gloriosa nobilis seed yucca

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gloriosa nobilis seed yucca
JOSSIE MEETS THE PLANTS
copyright REEP 2015
AGAVE
Agave americana 'Mediopicta Alba' (American Aloe) Asparagaceae
Description
'Mediopicta Alba' is an evergreen perennial forming striking rosettes of spiny-edged, greygreen leaves, each with a creamy-white central stripe. Flowers seldom seen. Can be used in
modernist, drought tolerant, and desert style cactus gardens.
Origin
Mexico
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South-facing or East-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Sand, Loam; Well-drained; Acid, Neutral
Hardiness: Down to about -4C in well-drained substrate. Cover with fleece. Needs to
be brought indoors in most areas
Grow under glass in a standard cactus compost, in bright, filtered light. When in growth
water moderately and feed every two or three weeks with a balanced liquid feed. Keep almost
dry in the winter. Propagate by offsets taken in spring or autumn
Can be replaced with
Yucca gloriosa 'Variegata' – requires a sheltered position
but is harder than A.americana. It creates a similar effect
when young but over the course of 10-20 years will mature
to develop woody and a height of 1.5-2.5m
Herbal and/or medicinal use
If the flower stem is cut without flowering, a sweet liquid called aguamiel ("honey water")
gathers in the heart of the plant. This may be fermented to produce the drink called pulque.
The high-alcohol product of agave distillation is called mezcal; Agave americana is one of
several agaves used for distillation.
ALOYSIA CITRODORA (Lemon Verbena)
Aloysia citrodora (Lemon Verbena) Verbenaceae
Description
A. citrodora is a deciduous sub-shrub to 2.5m in height, with narrowly lance-shaped, strongly
lemon-scented leaves and open panicles of tiny white or pale lilac flowers.
Origin
Argentina, Chile
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South-facing or West-facing or East-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Well-drained; Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Hardiness: Down to about -5C, Likely to be damaged or killed in cold winters.
Easy to grow in well-drained soil in full sun. May need winter protection in northern Britain.
Mulch in autumn to protect the roots. Under glass grow in a loam-based potting compost in
full light. Propagate by softwood cuttings
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Lemon verbena leaves are used to add a lemon flavour to fish and poultry dishes, vegetable
marinades, salad dressings, jams, puddings, Greek yogurt and beverages. It also is used to
make herbal teas, or added to standard tea in place of actual lemon (as is common with
Moroccan tea). It can also be used to make a sorbet.
It contains a strong lemon-scented essential oil that has calming and digestive qualities.
However it is to be used in moderation as it can cause irritation. The essential oil is used in
aromatherapy in the treatment of nervous and digestive problems and also for acne, boils and
cysts. An essential oil obtained from the leaves is extensively used in perfumery but there is
evidence to suggest that it can sensitise the skin to sunlight. In addition, it has anti-Candida
and antioxidant properties
ALLIUM
Allium hollandicum 'Purple Sensation' (Dutch garlic 'Purple Sensation') Alliaceae
Description
'Purple Sensation' is a perennial with small, vivid rosy-purple flowers in crowded spherical
umbels. They are popular in both architectural and formal planting with long-lasting flowers
which are ideal for cutting. They grow up to 90cm and have short basal leaves which die
before flowering. They are mainly from dry and mountainous areas in the Northern
Hemisphere but have adapted to live in almost every plant habitat on the planet, from ice cold
tundra to burning, arid deserts.
Origin Iran and Kyrgyzstan
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, North, West or East-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand, Clay; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Hardiness: Down to about -5C, likely to be damaged or killed in cold winters.
Easy to grow in fertile well-drained soil. Add grit when grown in clay soils to improve
drainage.Propagate by seed, sowing in containers in a cold frame when just ripe or in the
spring. Alternatively, remove offsets in autumn.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
A.hollandicum was prized for its supposed medical and aphrodisiac qualities as well as
flavour. The Romans are sometimes held responsible for their wide distribution by taking
them all over their empire.
ALCEA ROSEA (Hollyhock)
Alcea rosea single-flowered (Hollyhock) Malvaceae
Description
A. rosea is a robust biennial or short-lived perennial that grows to 2m or more, with shallowly
lobed, rounded leaves and long erect racemes of open funnel-shaped flowers to 10cm across,
which may be pink, purple, red, white or yellow. This is a classic English cottage garden
flower, often seen growing against the house or in groups supported with strong stakes near a
garden wall. Single-flowered strains are more elegant and typical of the race, than the heavy
double forms whose blooms tend to be spoiled by wind and rain.
Origin
Southwest China. Introduced to Europe in, or around, the 15th century.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Well-drained; Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Hardiness: Hardy to -20°C
Grow in well-drained, moderately fertile soil in full sun. Stake on exposed sites. Cut back
after flowering. Propagate by seed sown in gentle heat in mid-winter or in-situ in spring.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Hollyhock, is completely edible (root, leaves and blossoms). It is a direct relation to
Marshmallow and can be used interchangeably for that herb.
The flower is used to make a medicinal tea. People also use hollyhock for preventing and
treating breathing disorders and digestive tract problems. Some people apply it directly to
the skin for treating ulcers and inflammation.
ALOE
Aloe striatula (Hardy Aloe) Asphodelaceae
Description:
A.striatula is a tough, hardy climbing aloe with orange-yellow flowers. The species name,
striatula means 'little stripes' which refers to the distinctive dark green stripes on the plant's
stem. It naturally occurs on the summits of mountains along the south of the Karoo region
of South Africa and is very tolerant of drought, making it an ideal specimen for use in a
xerophytic (adapted for dry conditions) garden. It is also suitable for growing in containers.
Origin
S. Africa, Lesotho
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun to partial shade
Aspect: South or west-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Well-drained
Hardiness: It will tolerate much colder temperatures than most Aloes, including frost
and even some light snow
Needs a free-draining site in warm a sunny position, avoiding heavy or easily water-logged
soils as they encourage root rots. Dig in plenty of horticultural grit or sand if conditions need
improving. In extreme conditions consider growing A.striatula into a mound, a raised bed or
a large, terracotta pot. New plants will need to be watered well during their summer to help
them become established, but then ease off come the autumn. In the following years watering
will only be necessary in periods of extended drought or heat. Water too much and you risk
energy being directed into foliage growth only, preventing it flowering for that season.
Feeding should be infrequent using a water soluble fertilizer.
In colder climates it may be necessary to protect plants by covering straw or bracken.
It can be pruned to encourage a bushy habit and the prunings potted up for propagation of
new plants. Old plants may need to be staked to prevent drooping.
Propagate by cuttings and seed.
Can be replaced with
Yucca
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use: Aloe has a wide variety of use in health drinks, gels
and other forms. Search the internet for more ideas.
ANTIRRHINUM (Snapdragon)
Antirrhinum majus pale-yellow-flowered (common snapdragon) Plantaginaceae
Description
Antirrhinum majus is a herbaceous perennial that produces upright racemes of two-lipped
flowers with spreading, rounded lobes. It flowers profusely summer through autumn. Good
for use in beds, borders, rockeries and containers in a cottage garden setting.
Origin
Native to the Mediterranean region, from Morocco and Portugal north to
southern France, and east to Turkey and Syria.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun to partial shade
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Sand, Loam, Clay; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral
Hardiness: Hardy to -20°C
It is easily grown in moist, organically rich, well-drained soils in full sun or partial shade.
They require regular watering but overhead watering should be avoided. Deadhead to prolong
flowering. Propagate by seeds and cuttings.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
The leaves and flowers have been employed in poultices on tumours and ulcers. It is effective
in the treatment of all kinds of inflammation and is also used on haemorrhoids. The plant is
harvested in the summer when in flower and is dried for later use. All parts of snapdragon
are poisonous if ingested.
BOURGAINVILLEA
Bougainvillea
Description
Bougainvillea is a tropical climber with long, arching thorny branches, bearing heart-shaped
leaves and masses of vibrantly coloured, papery bracts from summer to autumn, perfect for
brightening warm greenhouses and conservatory borders. It is suitable for large containers
placed in the garden during summer but must be kept frost-free in winter. In warmer
climates, is grown along fence lines, on walls, in containers and hanging baskets, and as a
hedge or an accent plant.
Origin
South America from Brazil west to Peru and south to southern Argentina
Cultivation Information:
Sun: Full Sun (but protection from direct sun when under glass)
Aspect: Bright light with protection in mid-summer
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: rich, well-drained soil; slightly acidic
Hardiness: Half hardy minimum night temperature of 10°C
As large climbers they can be planted directly into a conservatory border or grown in large
containers. These can be placed in the garden in summer but must be kept frost free in winter.
Enrich border soil with well-rotted compost and a balanced granular fertiliser or controlledrelease fertiliser such as Osmocote. Use loam-based compost like John Innes 3 for containers.
Bougainvillea do well in a reasonably small pot and like to be allowed to dry out between
waterings, in the winter this means they rarely need watering. Feed the plant a fertilizer high
in phosphate every few months to keep the flowers blooming.
Bougainvilleas require a trellis or pillar for support and can be trained as a standard and spurpruned to restrict size. They flower on the current seasons growth so pruning in late winter or
early spring, just before growth begins. They are prolific growers and need good pruning to
force blooming and retain their desired shape.
Propagate by semi-hardwood cuttings taken with a heel, in summer or hardwood cuttings in
winter. Layering in late winter and early spring is usually more effective and new plants will
flower in 2-3 years.
Can be replaced with
Hardy Climbers that produce vivid splash of colour:
Clematis 'Daniel Deronda' (pale purple flowers)
Clematis 'Remembrance' (pink flowers)
Clematis 'Rasputin’ (purple flowers)
Clematis 'Success Magenta' (magenta flowers)
Less hardy climbers:
Clematis Alita and Clematis Rebecca (red flowers)
Shrubs that produce a splash of colour:
Rhododendron
Camellia
DIANTHUS
Dianthus 'Mrs. Sinkins' (English Garden Pink)
Description
An evergreen, hardy, ground-covering, perennial, which grows almost anywhere and will last
for many years. It can cope with some neglect, and is useful for difficult areas such as dry
slopes or rock gardens. Its produces fragrant blooms over a long summer period. ‘Mrs
Sinkins’ has one of the strongest scents of any Pink, and just one flower can fill a whole room
with fragrance. Height and Spread: 50cm. Flowers are June - September. Flowers lightly the
first year and then prolifically after that. Ideal for patios, cottage gardens, alpine and rockery
setting, scented gardens and cut flower gardens.
Origin
Of garden origin - 1868, Possibly by the master of Slough workhouse and
named for his wife.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Chalk; Well-drained; Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -15°C
Deadhead to prolong flowering. Make sure soil is well drained and avoid winter wet which
can be harmful to the plant. Propagate by seed.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Some parts of these flowers are edible.
CALENDULA
Calendula officinalis cv. (English Marigold, Marigold, Pot Marigold) asteraceae
Description
Single golden-orange blooms radiate their colour in beds and borders. These fast growing
hardy annuals can be sown in drifts for a spectacular display. The daisy-like flowers are
excellent for cutting and can also be added to salads as an edible flower. Quick and easy to
grow, Calendula copes in almost any garden situation, and even grows well in coastal areas.
Height: 45cm. Spread: 30cm.
Origin
Probably native to southern Europe, though its long history of cultivation
makes its precise origin unknown, and it may possibly be of garden origin.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Loam; Well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -20°C
Grow in a light, poor, free-draining soil in full sun or partial shade. Deadhead regularly to
prolong flowering and pinch out terminal shoots to encourage bushy growth. Deadheading
also prevents them from self seeding. Propagate by seed sown in situ in spring or autumn.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Calendula flowers are edible. The petals have been used as a substitute for saffron, and they
make a bright and zesty addition to salads. However, marigolds may be harmful in large
amounts. They should only be eaten occasionally and in moderation.
CONVULVULUS
Convolvulus sabatius (Blue Rock Bindweed) Convolvulaceae
Description:
C. sabatius is a trailing, woody-based perennial forming a mat to 20cm in height, with small,
oval leaves and widely funnel-shaped, purplish-blue flowers 2cm in width. It is often used in
hanging baskets and containers but can also be used in rock gardens, where the stems can
bake on the stones and root wherever they touch the soil.
Origin
Italy, North Africa
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Well-drained; Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Hardiness: Down to about -5C, Likely to be damaged or killed in cold winters.
Best grown in a gritty, well-drained soil in a sheltered, sunny position. Alternatively grow in
a container or raised bed. Propagate by seed or softwood cuttings.
Can be replaced with
Convolvulus althaeoides (Hardy)
Convolvulus minor ‘Blue Ensign’ (Hardy)
Convolvulus tricolour (Hardy)
Vinca (Hardy)
CORIANDER
Coriandrum sativum (Coriander) Apiaceae
Description
A fast-growing, aromatic herb with feathery, finely divided leaves that resemble those of
flat-leaved parsley, growing on stems from up to 90cm inches tall. Blossoms in spring and
summer are tiny white to pale pink flower clusters. It has an annual lifecycle, setting small
round, ribbed, beige-coloured seeds in late summer.
Origin
Native to regions spanning from southern Europe and North Africa to
southwest Asia.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam, Sand; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral; rich in organic matter
Hardiness: Frost-sensitive
Grows best in a sunny position but requires shade during the hottest part of the day. It has a
tendency to bolt if stressed, compromising the quality of the foliage. Plants are being to
produce seed should be placed in full us as stress from the heat will trigger flower production.
Young plants react poorly to transplanting (tending bolt) so is best grown from seed sewn
directing into the soil.
Time late plantings so that harvest comes before the first hard frost. Coriander will die back
in freezing weather. Leaves can be harvested within three to four weeks of sewing and seeds
within about forty-five days.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Coriander is strong-smelling with a fresh, citrus taste that makes it an invaluable garnish and
flavour enhancer. Both the fresh leaves and stalks are edible, as well as the berries, which are
dried and called coriander seeds. Although sometimes eaten alone, the seeds are often used as
a spice or an added ingredient in other foods. Coriander is used in curries, meat dishes, bread,
sweets, and alcoholic drinks. Major world producers include Morocco, India Pakistan,
Romania, and the former Soviet Union.
COSMOS
Cosmos bipinnatus 'Sonata Pink' (Sonata Series) Asteraceae
Description
Sonata Series are compact annuals that grow to 30cm, with finely dissected leaves and single,
daisy-like flower-heads 8cm across. Sonata Pink produces masses of large, soft pink flowers
all through the summer. They are perfect for use in a cottage garden and will attract birds,
bees and butterflies, including the Monarch butterfly.
Origin Cosmos bipinnatus, (garden cosmos or Mexican aster) is native to Mexico
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Hardiness: Down to about -5C, Likely to be damaged or killed in cold winters.
Grow in a moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil in full sun. Deadhead to prolong
flowering. Propagate by seed sown in-situ in late spring.
C. bipinnatus 'Sonata White' (Sonata Series)
Description:
Sonata Series are compact annuals that grow to 30cm, with finely dissected leaves and single,
daisy-like flower-heads 8cm across. The flowers attract birds, bees and butterflies including
the Monarch butterfly. 'Sonata White produces pure white daisy-like blooms which float
above the finest lacy foliage. This beautiful dwarf Cosmos is particularly useful for exposed
positions. It also performs well in sunny borders as well as being perfectly proportioned for
use in containers. Strong stems and a long vase life make it ideal for cutting for an elegant
bouquet.
ERIGERON
Erigeron karvinskianus (Mexican fleabane, Latin American fleabane) Asteraceae
Description
E. karvinskianus is a perennial forming wide mats to 15cm in height, with narrow, hairy
leaves and daisy-type flower-heads 15mm in width, opening white but soon turning pinkishpurple. It is frequently grown in crevices in walls or paving, where it rapidly spreads to
provide a carpet of flowers.
Origin
Mexico to Panama
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -10°C
Grow in fertile, well-drained soil that does not dry out in summer; best in full sun with some
midday shade. Ideal for wall or paving crevices but can self-seed and become invasive in
mild areas. Deadhead to encourage further flowering. Cut back to ground level in autumn.
Propagate by seed in pots in a cold frame in spring.
FENNEL
Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel) Apiaceae
Description
F. vulgare is a robust, upright, aromatic biennial or short-lived perennial, with 3- to 4-pinnate
leaves with hair-like segments, and flat umbels of small yellow flowers in summer; both
leaves and fruits are aniseed-scented.
Origin
Europe
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand, Clay; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness:
Grow in moist, fertile soil. Can be invasive if flowers are allowed to set seed. If grown with
the bronze form then they will readily hybridise, resulting in inferior plants. Propagate by
seed.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Widely cultivated, both in its native range and elsewhere, for its edible, strongly flavoured
leaves and fruits. The bulb, foliage, and seeds of the fennel plant are widely used in many of
the culinary traditions of the world.
Fennel is one of the plants which is said to be disliked by fleas, and powdered fennel has the
effect of driving away fleas from kennels and stables.
STRAWBERRY
Description An easy-care, hardy perennial that provides vigorous groundcover for almost
any setting. Characteristic trifoliate (clover-like) leaves, just like commercial strawberry
plants, spreading by runners. All are low growing groundcovers, with simple 5-petal white
flowers and diminutive, edible berries.Healthy plants will produce an abundance of berries
for three to four years, after which they should be replaced.
Origin
North America / Chile
Cultivation Information:
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect:
Exposure:
Soil: Fertile; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral,
Hardiness: Hardy
Strawberries can be grown in rows or mounds. Only a few runners should be allowed per
plant, with newcomers being cut off. The top roots and crown should be a quarter of an inch
above soil level, with a heavy mulch to conserve moisture and deter weeds (use grass
clippings, sawdust or even plastic sheeting. All require good drainage and will spread happily
by runners.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use:
Strawberries have a taste that varies by cultivar, and ranges from quite sweet to rather tart.
Strawberries are an important commercial fruit crop, widely grown in all temperate regions of
the world including Britain and Morocco.
LABLAB
Lablab purpureus (Hyacinth Bean) Fabaceae
Description
Lablab (Lablab purpureus, previously Dolichos purpureus) is a highly ornamental climber
with pink, sweet pea-like, flowers, followed by spectacular dark glossy purple, edible seed
pods.
Origin
Southeast Asia, Africa
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Sand, Clay; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Not frost hardy
Plants can be grown outside once the danger of frost has passed. Can also be grown in a 2025cm (8-10in) pot in a greenhouse or conservatory up tripods in large containers. Train plants
up bamboo canes, wires or similar supports as you would sweet peas or runner beans. Water
regularly during warm, dry periods. Feed every two weeks with high potash potassium
fertiliser. Mist the air around plants growing under glass to keep the atmosphere moderately
humid, or damp down the greenhouse path, ideally three times a day. Roots can be lifted at
the end of the growing season, before the first frosts, and overwintered in a warm greenhouse.
Or allow pods to mature at the end of the season, saving seeds for the following year.
Can be replaced with:
Lathyrus odoratus (Sweet pea) - hardy with similar flowers
Dwarf French Bean Purple Teepee – similar seed pods
Dwarf French Bean Purple Queen – similar seed pods
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
It is cultivated throughout the tropics and subtropics, as a food and fodder crop. Young pods
can be eaten like sugar snap peas and young leaves, steamed or lightly boiled like spinach.
Harvest pods regularly when small. Old, mature pods can become stringy. Do not eat raw
seeds
LAUREL (BAY)
Laurus nobilis (Bay Tree, Bay Laurel) Lauraceae
Description
L. nobilis is a large, erect evergreen shrub with aromatic, narrowly ovate, leathery leaves
useful in cooking. Flowers are small, pale greenish-yellow, in dense clusters; fruit oval,
glossy black when ripe. The bay tree is a popular evergreen shrub suitable for containers or
growing in the ground. Kept neatly clipped, the dark-green foliage can create stunning formal
shapes that make an entrance or look perfect on a patio.
Origin
S. Europe
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand, Clay; Well-drained; Acid, Alkaline, Neutral
Hardiness: Generally hardy to -5°C
Grows well in a container. Prefers a well-drained soil in sun or partial shade. Pruning and
training depends on whether the plant has been trained as a topiary feature or is simply
growing it as a shrub in the ground. Propagate by seed or semi-hardwood cuttings.
Layering is often successful, but slower than cuttings
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Bay leaves can be used fresh or dried and are used in cooking to give a fragrant flavour to
soups, stews and other dishes.
LILY
Lilium regale (King’s Lily, Regal Lily) Liliaceae
Description
L. regale is a vigorous bulbous perennial that grows to 2m in height, with narrow glossy
green leaves. It produces racemes of fragrant, trumpet-shaped white flowers 14cm in length,
yellow in the centre and flushed with purple on the outside, from June to July. This
spectacular, magnificently scented trumpet lily that has been a garden classic for centuries.
Origin
Native to western Sichuan in China
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Clay, Loam; Moist but well-drained; Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -20°C
Grow in well-drained soil, enriched with leaf mould or well-rotted organic matter. Likes a
cool root run. When planting envelope the bulbs in sharp sand or your will lose them
(particularly in heavy soils). Leave them where they are from one year to the next, or plant
them in a pot and sink them in the ground somewhere very prominent in the garden for lifting
out of the wet and cold until the following spring. Propagate by seed, sown, when ripe, in
containers in a cold frame or separate offsets after the foliage dies down.
LONICERA (Honeysuckle)
Lonicera x heckrottii (or L. heck. 'Gold Flame') honeysuckle
Description
Fabulously fragrant, pink-flushed, orange-yellow, tubular flowers from June to August,
followed by red berries in hot summers. This vigorous, shrubby honeysuckle is semievergreen in milder winters, and looks lovely in a small cottage-style or wildlife garden. It
can also be grown in a container.
Origin
Hybrid
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial shade
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Fertile, Humus-rich; Sand, Clay; Moist but well-drained; Neutral, Mildly Acidic
Hardiness: Fully Hardy, Frost Hardy
Since it doesn't have the twining branches found on other varieties, it will need to be tied with
garden twine to an upright support. Cut back established plants after flowering, removing a
third of the flowering shoots. Apply a generous 5-7cm mulch of well-rotted compost or
manure around the base of the plant in early spring. Water regularly but avoid overwatering.
Propagate from leaf cuttings or herbaceous stem cuttings.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Honeysuckle has been used as a remedy for influenza in traditional Chinese medicine.
MATTHIOLA INCANA
Matthiola incana purple-flowered (Garden Stock, Gillyflower) Brassicaceae
Description
A beautiful, rich velvet purple, highly scented, short-lived perennial stock. Woody-stemmed
with rosettes of soft grey leaves. Single, four-petalled, magenta flowers are carried in short
spikes of from June to September. It can be grown in a container or pot or act as a valuable
addition to any herbaceous border.
Origin
Mediterranean from Spain to Turkey and south to Egypt.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Clay, Loam; Moist
Hardiness: Not frost tender.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Flowers can be eaten as a vegetable or used as a garnish, especially with sweet deserts.
An infusion has been used in the treatment of cancer and when mixed with wine it has been
used as an antidote to poisonous bites.
Matthiola incana alba (hoary stock) Brassicaceae
Description:
A self-seeding native perennial, with highly scented single white flowers over narrow, greyblue leaves from May to July. Grows to approximately 80cm x 40cm. A beautiful addition in
a dry border, raised bed or large container.
Origin
Mediterranean from Spain to Turkey and south to Egypt
Cultivation Information:
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Clay, Loam; Well-drained; Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Not frost tender.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use:
Flowers can be eaten as a vegetable or used as a garnish
MINT (Spearmint)
Mentha spicata (Spearmint) Lamiaceae
Description
M. spicata is a vigorous rhizomatous perennial forming an extensive colony of erect stems
bearing spearmint-scented, lance-shaped leaves, and small light purple flowers in interrupted
terminal spikes.
Origin
Native to South and Central Europe and Asia
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Clay, Loam; Well-drained; Neutral, Alkaline, Acid
Spearmint grows well in nearly all temperate climates. Often grown it in pots or planters due
to its invasive, spreading rhizomes. The plant prefers partial shade, but can flourish in full sun
and full shade. Spearmint will grow in any soil but is best suited to loamy soils with abundant
organic material. Cut back after flowering. Propagate by seed or division in spring or autumn.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use:
Spearmint is often cultivated for its aromatic and carminative oil, referred to as oil of
spearmint. It is used as a flavouring for toothpaste and confectionery, and is sometimes added
to shampoos and soaps.
Spearmint is an ingredient in several mixed drinks, such as the mojito and mint julep.
As a medicinal plant, spearmint is steeped as tea for the treatment of stomach ache.
MINT (Moroccan Mint)
Mentha spicata var. crispa 'Moroccan' (Moroccan Mint) Lamiaceae
Description
A fully hardy, clump forming, deciduous perennial, herb with aromatic bright green crinkly
foliage. Pale lilac flowers borne on spikes of whorl like clusters. Recognised to be an
excellent attractant and nectar source for bees and other beneficial insects.
Origin
Native of Europe, but has been naturalised worldwide
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Clay, Loam; Moist but well-drained; Neutral, Alkaline, Acid
Mint will thrive anywhere, preferring moist partly shady areas, and are easy to grow from
cuttings or replanting of runners. To control spread, this herb should be planted in sunken
bottomless containers and kept well watered to ensure good leaf production.
Propagate by sowing seeds indoors or under glass, from spring to early summer. When all
risk of frost has passed, harden the plants off by gradually acclimatising them to outdoor
conditions, and plant them out.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Mentha spicata var. crispa 'Moroccan' leaves have a fantastic mint flavour that is a favourite
for tea and mint sauce. Also used to add a fresh, summery flavour to salads, sauces, summer
dishes and drinks. The Flowers are also flowers are edible.
Mint cultivated for its medicinal uses for thousands of years. Examples of its current use
include: relieving symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, inhibiting the growth of some
types of bacteria, freshening breath and gargling to relieve a sore throat. When crushed is
applied to the temples to ease a headache or put onto insect stings.
MYRTLE
Myrtus communis (common myrtle) Myrtaceae
Description
M. communis is a bushy medium-sized evergreen shrub with small, aromatic, ovate leaves
and profuse white flowers 2cm in width, followed by purplish-black berries.
Origin
Mediterranean
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Chalk, Sand, Clay, Loam; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -10°C
Grow outdoors in moist but well-drained soil, shelter from cold dry winds. Under glass grow
in a loam-based compost in filtered light with good ventilation. Requires a long hot summer
to produce flowers and fruits. Propagate by seed or semi-hardwood cuttings.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Used in the islands of Sardinia and Corsica to produce an aromatic liqueur called Mirto by
macerating it in alcohol. Mirto is one of the most typical drinks of Sardinia and comes in two
varieties: mirto rosso (red) produced by macerating the berries, and mirto bianco (white)
produced from the less common yellow berries and sometimes the leaves.
The berries, whole or ground, have been used as a pepper substitute.
In several countries, particularly in Europe and China, there has been a tradition for
prescribing this substance for sinus infections.
ORIGANO
Origanum vulgare (Oregano) Lamiaceae
Description
O. vulgare is a bushy, woody-based perennial with small, aromatic, ovate leaves and paniclelike clusters of small pink flowers in summer and early autumn.
Origin
Europe, N. Africa
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Chalk, Clay, Loam; Well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Not frost tender
Grow in a well-drained (preferably alkaline) soil, in full sun or partial shade. Cut back old,
flowered stems in early spring. Propagate by seed or by division in the autumn or spring.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use:
Widely used to give flavour to tomato or lamb dishes, it is an important herb in Greek and
Italian cuisine. It is also used in traditional medicine, potpourri and as an ornamental.
PARSLEY
Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum plain-leaved (flat-leaved parsley) Apiaceae
Description
A robust biennial with strongly aromatic, dark green, 1- to 3- pinnate, flat leaves, and small
yellow-green flowers in umbels in summer. It has flat bright green leaves with three lobes
that have toothed edges and will grow up to half a metre in height. Flat-leaved parsley is
considered relatively easy to cultivate being more tolerant to rain and sunshine the some other
parsley varieties.
Origin
Native to the central Mediterranean region (southern Italy, Algeria,
and Tunisia), naturalized elsewhere in Europe
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: will survive close to or on freezing temperatures
Grow in fertile, moist, but well-drained soil in full sun or partial shade. Normally grown as an
annual it can be overwintered although leaves become coarser in the second year. Cut back
after flowering. Propagate by seed sown in situ, in succession from late spring through
summer.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
It has aromatic edible leaves that are good for cooking with or for using as a garnish.
POMEGRANATE
Punica granatum (Pomegranate) Lythraceae
Description
P. granatum is a rounded shrub with glossy, narrowly oblong leaves, bronze in spring, and
funnel-shaped bright scarlet flowers 3-4cm across in summer, sometimes followed by
spherical, reddish-brown fruits up to 12cm across.
Origin:
Europe to Himalayas
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -7 but frost tender
Under glass grow in loam-based compost, in a large container or greenhouse bed, in full light
with shade from hot sun. During growth, water freely and apply a balanced liquid fertiliser
monthly. Water sparingly in winter. Can be grown outdoors in a well-drained, fertile soil in
full sun. Requires high autumn temperatures (13-16°C) for fruit to ripen. Propagate by seed
in spring or root semi-hardwood cuttings with bottom heat in summer.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
The entire seed can be consumed raw. The seeds are also used as a spice known as anardana,
most notably in Indian and Pakistani cuisine. The fruit is used for pomegranate juice and was
the original ingredient of grenadine syrup.
The pomegranate has been used extensively as a source of traditional remedies. The rind of
the fruit and the bark of the pomegranate tree are used as a traditional remedy against
diarrhea, dysentery, and intestinal parasites. The seeds and juice are considered a tonic for the
heart and throat.
ROSE
Rosa ‘Comte de Chambord’
Description
A vigorous, erect bush, bearing fragrant pinkish-lilac, full, flat flowers. It has an excellent
resistance to disease and will repeat-flower throughout the summer. Ideal for a smaller
garden, the front half of a flowerbed and tight spots where several plants are competing for
soil space. It will perform where soil quality is poor and can even be used for hedging.
“A most charming and beautiful rose that retains its true Old Rose character whilst repeat-flowering
well. Its warm clear pink, full-petalled flowers open flat and quartered. There is a strong and delicious
Damask fragrance. It forms a strong, upright shrub with prickly stems and ample foliage – the leaves
coming up to the flower in true Portland style. A very healthy, tough and reliable variety”. (MoreauRobert 1860).
Origin
Bred by Moreau-Robert 1860
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Fertile, humus-rich; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -5°C
The roses can be kept in their pots throughout the winter provided they are kept well fed and
watered, however ideally they should planted out as soon as possible. Water generously until
well established, and apply a specialist rose fertiliser (following the manufacturer’s
instructions) each spring. They will also benefit from a generous mulch of composted
farmyard manure in spring, but make sure this is kept away from the stems. Blooms form on
new wood so prune early to promote new growth. In late winter remove dead, damaged,
diseased or congested branches completely. Then cut back vigorous new shoots by up to a
third, and shorten strong side-shoots to within two or three buds of the main stems. If the
centre of the shrub is becoming congested, remove one or two of the older stems to their
base. After the first flush of flowers has faded, prompt dead-heading will encourage more
flowers to form. Propagate by cuttings, grafting, budding or layering.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use:
Rosewater, pot-pourri, crystallised leaves.
ROSEMARY
Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) Lamiaceae
Description
An aromatic shrub with evergreen leaves which are green above and white below with dense,
short, woolly hair. The plant flowers in spring and summer in temperate climates, but can be
in constant bloom in warm climates. Flowers are white, pink, purple or deep blue. Since it is
attractive and drought-tolerant, rosemary is used as an ornamental plant in gardens and
for xeriscape landscaping, especially in regions of Mediterranean climate. It is considered
easy to grow and pest-resistant. Rosemary can grow quite large and retain attractiveness for
many years, can be pruned into formal shapes and low hedges, and has been used for topiary.
It is easily grown in pots.
Origin
Native to the Mediterranean region
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam; Well-drained; Neural, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -1 but is frost tender
Can withstand droughts, surviving a severe lack of water for lengthy periods. It will not
withstand waterlogging and some varieties are susceptible to frost. It can be propagated from
an existing plant by clipping a shoot (from a soft new growth) 10–15 cm (4–6 in) long,
stripping a few leaves from the bottom, and planting it directly into soil.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use:
Rosemary is used as a decorative plant in gardens where it may have pest control effects. The
leaves are used as a flavouring in foods such as stuffings and roast lamb, pork, chicken and
turkey. Fresh or dried leaves are used in traditional Italian cuisine. Herbal tea can be made
from the leaves.
Rosemary oil is used for purposes of fragrant bodily perfumes or to emit an aroma into a
room. It is also burnt as incense, and used in shampoos and cleaning products. In traditional
medicine of India, extracts and essential oil from flowers and leaves are used to treat a variety
of disorders.
In the Middle Ages, rosemary was associated with wedding ceremonies. The bride would
wear a rosemary headpiece and the groom and wedding guests would all wear a sprig of
rosemary. From this association with weddings, rosemary was thought to be a love charm.
ROSEMARY (Weeping)
Rosmarinus officinalis Prostratus Group (Weeping Rosemary) Lamiaceae
Description:
A low-growing, spreading form of common rosemary that sends out upright spikes of purpleblue flowers from April to June, among narrow, aromatic, dark green, evergreen leaves that
has been a familiar sight in British gardens for hundreds of years. It is useful as an edging
plant for a sunny herb garden or mixed border and is suitable for xeriscaping. It can also be
used to great effect in hanging baskets and patio pots as the runners become loaded with
flowers.
Origin
Native to the Mediterranean region
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam; Well-drained; Neural, Alkaline
Hardiness: Frost hardy but needs winter protection in cold areas
It will grow in any poor, free-draining garden soil, preferably one that is neutral or slightly
alkaline. Avoid planting in heavy or clay soils, particularly those which will be prone to
waterlogging as excessive moisture around the roots will encourage fungal rots and in
extreme cases root death. Once established it is surprisingly drought tolerant.
Winter frosts may kill off some of the shoots but the plant should regenerate from the base. It
can remain outside in the very mildest regions of southern England but further north it will
require a protection of bracken or straw over the winter. If you are in any doubt lift it, pot it
on and move into a protected environment. Alternatively take cuttings in the autumn as a
safeguard for planting out the following spring. To keep plants in shape, trim after flowering.
Propagate by cuttings, stooling or layering.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
The young leaves are great for flavouring roasted vegetables, lamb and pork.
SAGE
Salvia officinalis (Common Sage) Lamiaceae
Description:
S. officinalis is a bushy, spreading evergreen sub-shrub that grows to 75cm tall, with very
aromatic, finely veined, grey-green leaves and short spikes of pale blue flowers in early
summer.
Origin
Mediterranean, Africa
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: North, South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Clay, Loam; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Grow in a light, moist, but well-drained soil in full sun in a sheltered position. Avoid
excessive winter wet. Propagate by softwood cuttings in spring or semi-hardwood in late
summer. Propagate by seed sown in spring
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Salvia has a long history of medicinal and culinary use. Salvia and "sage" are derived from
the Latin salvere (to save), referring to the healing properties long attributed to the
various Salvia species. In traditional Austrian medicine, S. officinalis herb has been used
internally (as tea or directly chewed) for treatment of disorders of the respiratory tract, mouth,
gastrointestinal tract, and skin. Investigations have taken place into using sage as a treatment
for Alzheimer's disease patients.
S. officinalis has a savoury, slightly peppery flavour and appears in many European cuisines,
notably Italian, Balkan and Middle Eastern cookery. It is also grown in parts of Europe for
distillation of an essential oil.
TOMATO
Solanum lycopersicum cv. Tomato Solanaceae
Description
The plants typically grow to 1–3 meters (3–10 ft) in height and have a weak stem that often
sprawls over the ground and vines over other plants. It is a perennial in its native habitat,
although often grown outdoors in temperate climates as an annual. Produces abundant
delicious fruits in a range of colours, shapes and sizes. Easily grown in gardens, greenhouses
or containers.
Origin
Originated in South America in the region of modern day Peru and
Ecuador. but now found all over the world.
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Nutrient rich; Moist but well-drained; Neutral, Slightly Acidic
Hardiness: Half hardy, to 0°C
Plant outside in early summer. In unheated greenhouses, planting can take place in midspring. Most soils can be improved with the addition of organic matter. Roots should be kept
moist but never waterlogged. Feeding isn’t essential for soil-grown plants.
Pots and grow-bags require frequent watering and feed to get the best fruit. Water little and
often for the best results. Feed your tomatoes with a general liquid feed until the first truss
has formed then alternate with a high potash feed. This will encourage more flowers and
fruit.
Tomato flowers self-pollinate readily. However, indoor plants benefit from being gently
shaken to dislodge the pollen. Misting flowers with water can help fruit set. Pick fruits as
required, with the stalk still attached. When cropping slows in early autumn, green fruits can
be gathered and kept in a warm, dark place to ripen. Propagate by seed or grafting.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
The use of tomato as food originated in Mexico, and spread throughout the world following
the Spanish colonization of the Americas. It now forms a fundamental part of cuisines across
the globe.
THYME
Thymus vulgaris (Common Thyme) Lamiaceae
Description
T. vulgaris is a bushy dwarf shrub with small, linear to ovate, aromatic, dark grey-green
leaves, and terminal spikes of small, whorled, white or pink flowers in early summer.
Origin
Western Mediterranean
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered or Exposed
Soil: Loam, Chalk, Sand; Well-drained; Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -1°C and frost tender
Easy to grow in most well-drained alkaline to neutral soils in full sun. Cut back in spring.
Propagate by seed, by division or plant rooted basal stem cuttings in spring.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
T. vulgaris is an herb long used in alternative medicine. It is thought to contain compounds
with antioxidant and antibacterial effects. A dietary supplement form is used in alternative
medicine for a wide range of health problems. One of the constituents of T. vulgaris is
thymol, a compound shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial
properties. In aromatherapy, T. vulgaris is touted as a natural treatment for the following
health conditions: arthritis, bronchitis, colic, colds, cough, diarrhea, ear infections, flatulence,
menstrual cramps, premenstrual syndrome, sore throat
NASTURTIUM
Tropaeolum majus (Garden Nasturtium, Indian Cress or Monks Cress) Tropaeolaceae
Description
Probably one of the most popular climbers in European as well as American gardens it
blooms brightly all through the summer. Most plants have yellow or orange flowers,
sometimes bright reddish orange. It can grow up to 2-3 metres long over the summer. Its leaf
stalks are attached in a very distinctive fashion in the middle of the blade. They have tissue
that is touch-sensitive, causing it to bend around the bract and the plant climbs up trees,
bushes or large stemmed plants whenever it gets the chance. It can tolerate shade at its base
but the shoots reach out towards the light. It also be grown on rocks, climbing up them or
sprawling along the ground. Nasturtiums are also considered widely useful companion plants.
They repel pests such as squash bugs, cucumber beetles, and several caterpillars. They also
serve as a trap crop against black fly aphids as well as attracting beneficial predatory insects.
Origin
Of cultivated, probably hybrid origin and, as such, does not exist in the wild
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Loam, Sand; Moist but well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Frost tender
Annual garden nasturtium is very sensitive to frost and collapses on the first cold night. If the
plant survives the spring frosts it can flower quite well, ripen its seeds, sow itself and provide
splash of colour year after year. It can grow in nutritionally poor soil.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
Widely cultivated, both as an ornamental and medicinal plant. Nasturtium has long been used
in Andean herbal medicine as a disinfectant and wound-healing herb and to relieve chest
conditions. All parts of the plant appear to be antibiotic and an infusion of the leaves can be
used to increase resistance to bacterial infections and to clear nasal and bronchial catarrh.
All its parts are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially
ornamental salad ingredient; it has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress, and is
also used in stir fry. The unripe seed pods can be harvested and dropped into spiced vinegar
to produce a condiment and garnish, sometimes used in place of capers.
VITUS (Grape)
Vitis 'Fragola' (Fox Grape, Red Grape) Vitaceae
Description
Prized for its delicious purple-red fruit, 'Fragola' is a selection or hybrid of Vitis labrusca, a
hardy, deciduous, woody vine native to eastern North America. An early-fruiting variety, it
produces firm, seeded, sweetly flavoured grapes that ripen in early fall. This vine has
attractive deeply lobed, rich green leaves that turn burnished shades of orange and gold in
autumn. Inconspicuous fragrant flowers precede the fruits in early summer.
Origin
Hybrid
Cultivation Information
Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade
Aspect: South, East or West-facing
Exposure: Sheltered
Soil: Clay, Loam, Sand; Well-drained; Acid, Neutral, Alkaline
Hardiness: Hardy to -12°C
Vigorous, tough, and hardy, 'Fragola' requires less summer heat and more winter cold than do
European grape varieties. It needs full sun for best fruiting and prefers fertile soil that is
amply drained. This vine grows fast enough to cover an arch, arbor or walkway in one
season. Plants must be pruned each year to maximize fruit production. Propagate through
seeds and cuttings.
Herbal, Medicinal or Culinary use
‘Fragola’ is used in jams, jellies and sorbets, and is the source for a delicious strawberryflavored table wine. ‘Fragola’ in Italian means ‘strawberry’.

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