Summer 2009 Edition Topics

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Summer 2009 Edition Topics
News and advancements in oncology from
The Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute at GBMC
Summer 2009
In this issue:
n Physicians Rocking the Oncology World
n Genetic Counseling: Information is Power
n Thoracic Oncology Center Streamlines Care
A GBMC Publication • Summer 2009
From the Director
Cancer Committee 2009
Looking back on the past allows us to better
prepare for the future…
Over the past decade, the oncology
professionals at GBMC have made significant contributions to the field, playing
leading roles in groundbreaking, national
clinical trials that have led to new, targeted
therapies for a variety of cancers. Through
their diligent work and collaborative
partnerships with national and local cancer
organizations, our clinical staff and support
professionals have greatly impacted public policy and have made it a
mission to address quality of life and patient rights issues.
It has also been one year since we dedicated the Cancer Institute in
recognition of philanthropists Sandra and Malcolm Berman, individuals
who have been instrumental in setting the course of growth and development for the many oncology services and support programs at GBMC.
Supporters at all levels continue to provide us with the opportunity to
pursue advancements in technology, outpatient facility enhancements and
new services for our patients, as well as support the significant research
component of our program.
As you will read further on page 3 of this issue, GBMC’s oncology services
are poised for significant growth, both physically and programmatically.
I continue to look back on what we have achieved over the years and realize
all that we have to look forward to as we plan for the future of cancer care
at GBMC.
Thank you for reading the latest issue of Greater Oncology Today.
Warm regards,
Gary I. Cohen, MD
Medical Director
The Sandra & Malcolm Berman
Cancer Institute at GBMC
n
Baltimore, Maryland 21204
Chairman
Gary I. Cohen, MD
American College of Surgery Liaison
Frank Rotolo, MD
Administration
Executive Director, Oncology Services
Brian E. McCagh, FACHE
Department of Medicine
Hematology: John A. Nesbitt, III, MD
Medical Oncology: Paul Celano, MD
Marshall Levine, MD
Palliative Care: Anthony Riley, MD
Internal Medicine/Rehabilitation: Alan L. Kimmel, MD
Department of Surgery
General Surgery: Lauren A. Schnaper, MD
Gynecology: Francis Grumbine, MD
Thoracic Surgery: Neri Cohen, MD
Urology: David S. Goldstein, MD
Pathology
Nathan A. Dunsmore, MD
Pharmacy
Dolores Dixon, PharmD, MBA, RPh
Radiation Oncology
Robert Brookland, MD
Eva Zinreich, MD
Radiology
Lee Goodman, MD
Oncology Service Line
Medical Oncology/Cancer Center: Connie R. Herbold, CPC-I
Cancer Registry: Sharon McIntire, MA, CTR
Clinical Trials: Garnitha Ferguson, RN
Human Genetics Institute: Jessica Adcock, MS
Inpatient Oncology (Unit 45): Barbara Shaw, RN
Oncology Support Services: Donna Lewis, RN, MS, CPC
Community Outreach: Laura Chase, BS
ACS Patient Navigator: Mindy Shifflett, BS
Infusion Center: Dawn Stefanik, AA, MLT, RN, BSN, OCN
Quality Assurance: Susan Fowble, RN, MS
Radiation Oncology: Craig Randall, RTT
Spiritual Support: Joseph Hart, M.Div.
The Milton J. Dance, Jr. Center/Head and Neck Associates
Barbara Messing, MA, CC-SLP, BRS-S
Karen Ulmer, RN, CORLN
~
Greater Oncology Today is published semi-annually by the
P.S. Greater Oncology Today is now a nationally recognized, award-winning
magazine, receiving runner-up awards for “Most Improved Publication”
and “Best Nonprofit Magazine” in the 2009 Ragan Recognition awards.
6701 North Charles Street
Members shall be no less than seven in number and shall include
a representative from the Departments of Surgery, Gynecology,
Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Internal Medicine,
Diagnostic Radiology, Radiation Oncology, Pathology and such
other members of the Medical Staff as deemed necessary to the
effective function of the committee.
n
443.849.2000
n
www.gbmc.org
GBMC includes Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Gilchrist Hospice Care and GBMC Foundation.
Marketing and Communications Department of The Greater
Baltimore Medical Center, a private, non-profit healthcare provider.
Questions and comments regarding Greater Oncology Today
articles should be submitted to [email protected]
Director of Marketing: Michael P. Hartnett
Publications Supervisor/Editor: Lisa J. Schwartz
Contributing Editor: Gary I. Cohen, MD
Contributing Writers: Judy Grillo,
Jessica Schoeffield, Susan Walker
Design & Layout: Dave Pugh Design
Photography: Mimi Azrael, Tracey Brown
Printing: Schmitz Press
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
4
O N C O L O GY N U R S I N G
Nurses Bring Expertise and Passion
to Patients
20
2
VISION
6
IN FOCUS
8
O N C O L O GY
CASE REVIEW
10
GENETICS
11
OF NOTE...
14
DA N C E C E N T E R
15
GIVING
16
AREA HIGHLIGHT
18
P H YS I C I A N
SPOTLIGHT
12
AREA SPOTLIGHT
H E A D & N E CK C A N C E R
Women’s Surgical Center Caters to
an Exceptional Clientele
Physicians and Faculty Expand
Treatment Options for Patients
On the Cover: Sara Pai,
MD, PhD, is spearheading
groundbreaking research to
help head and neck cancer
patients (page 12).
21
NEWS
22
P RO F I L E S I N
O N C O L O GY
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
1
VISION
Investing inof Cancer
theCareFuture
at GBMC
F
OR GBMC’S SANDRA & MALCOLM BERMAN CANCER INSTITUTE, THE FUTURE IS ALL ABOUT
program growth and development. Brian McCagh, Executive Director of the Cancer
Institute, sees the blueprint for the future as “making a major investment not only in
outpatient space and sophisticated technology, but also in the people, resources, programs and
service excellence that make us stand out as the top community hospital-based cancer program
in the state.”
“Our focus is on the next 5 to 10 years,” explains Gary Cohen, MD, Medical Director of the
Cancer Institute. “From a clinical standpoint, we realize the importance of investing in top
oncology talent and leadership now so that we’ll continue to meet the ever-growing cancer care
needs of the community well into the future.”
In addition to recruiting top talent in the field, investing in expanded and renovated outpatient
facilities and new technology, as well as programmatic development like tumor-site specific
centers and enhanced survivorship and support programs, is a top priority. And, states Mr.
McCagh, a continued emphasis on service excellence and providing patients with all of the
resources needed throughout their cancer journey will certainly keep GBMC’s Cancer Institute
well-positioned in the Baltimore region.
The blueprint for growth in all areas of
oncology includes:
2
~
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
n
Recruiting new, renowned medical
oncologists, specialists and surgeons
who will lead the program into the
next decade and beyond
n
Expanding and renovating facilities for
outpatient programs and services
throughout Physicians Pavilion West
n
Adding six more chairs in the Infusion
Center to treat an increasing number of patients
n
Relocating the pharmacy, which will be dedicated to chemotherapy, adjacent to the
Infusion Center
n
Adding two new physician offices and up to eight new exam rooms in the Medical
Oncology Center to accommodate and sustain the burgeoning medical oncology practice
n
Enhancing Radiation Oncology with the renovation of a third vault, as well as a new
$3.7 million Rapid Arc linear accelerator that would make GBMC one of the first in the
Baltimore market with such advanced technology
~
Summer 2009
The Future is Now
If the expansion of the Milton J. Dance Jr., Head and Neck Center and Johns Hopkins Head
and Neck Surgery at GBMC is any indication of what the future holds for oncology services,
things are sure looking good. Completed in October 2008, the Dance Center increased in size
from 3,000 square feet to 10,000 square feet in Physicians Pavilion West and features new,
state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment in a healing environment.
Additionally, Oncology Support
Services’ new, modern space in
the West Pavilion has enabled
the team to expand support
programs for adults as well as
adolescents, including the
development of a survivorship
program.
GBMC’s President and
CEO Says Vision for Gro
The vision for
GBMC’s Cance
r Institute — to
in the region —
be the preferred
aligns with the
community can
overall vision fo
This is just the beginning,
very best medic
cer program
r the hospital. B
al oncologists, sp
y
retaining and re
ecialists and surg
concludes Mr. McCagh.
sophisticated pr
cruiting the
eons, and throug
ograms and on
h ongoing inve
cology services,
“What it all comes down to
the best cancer
st
ment in
th
e Cancer Instit
care available cl
ute will continue
ose to home an
is this — being forward
for example, in
to deliver
d throughout th
cludes the curren
e region. This in
t $10 million re
thinking and doing the
Oncology Cente
ve
st
ment,
novation of the
r, which features
Sheila K. Riggs
right things right while
new, state-of-the
expanded patien
Radiation
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t support areas.
new infrastructu
And, as we mov
turning dreams
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re and
e forward, plan
ancer Institute
s to incorporate
in the West Pavi
into reality.” n
ad
ditional
lion will also ta
Also important
ke shape.
to the growth of
oncology servic
opportunities of
es is the establis
f-campus. The
hment of relati
de
velopment of st
areas will allow
onships and
rategic partnersh
GBMC to lend
ips in our secon
expertise and vi
programs that m
dary service
able resources to
ay be in need. A
those hospitals
nd, our relation
at Johns Hopki
an
d cancer
ship with the le
ns provides our
ading university
patients with th
oncology servic
program
e best of both ac
es.
ademic and un
iversity-level
GBMC has a lo
ng history of de
livering high-lev
care in oncology
el
, recognized for
years as one of
top cancer cente
th
e
rs in the nation
by US News &
World Report. T
he need for this
caliber of care in
the community
is clearly eviden
t.
We have set the
course for conti
nued growth so
that the choice
coming to the ve
for
ry best commun
ity hospital-bas
cancer program
ed
will be clear wel
l into the future
.
Laurence M. M
erlis
GBMC Presiden
t and CEO
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
wth is Clear
Summer 2009
~
3
ONCOLOGY NURSING
Barbara Shaw, RN, BSN, OCN, shares a
smile with her patient on the inpatient
oncology unit as she tends to his IV
and checks to see how he is
tolerating his treatment.
4
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GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
T
HE FIELD OF CANCER DIAGNOSIS AND
treatment is evolving at an increasingly
rapid rate. That can make it difficult for
patients to gain access to the information
they need to understand their treatment
options and better manage the side effects
they face. At GBMC, patients have an
important resource they can rely on to
provide that information and support —
oncology certified nurses.
Currently, 14 oncology nurses at GBMC
have earned the certification, and several
more are in the process of working toward
this designation. To become certified, nurses
must not only pass a rigorous test that
covers all aspects of cancer care, they are
also required to recertify every four years.
Recertification requires that they earn at
least 100 hours of continuing education
or participate in equivalent professional
development activities such as teaching or
publishing or that they pass the test again.
“Oncology nursing is a very specialized
field,” explains Dawn Stefanik, AA, MLT,
BSN, RN, OCN, who has been an oncology
certified nurse since 1998 and is the nurse
manager in GBMC’s Lois Harvey Miller
Infusion Therapy Center. Ms. Stefanik
is also a trainer for the national ONS
Chemotherapy and Biotherapy course and
is currently serving as the team leader for
the national revision of the renewal course,
which is required every two years to remain
up-to-date in this area of practice. “There
is a great deal to learn. Treatments are
constantly changing and new ones are
being developed. As oncology certified
nurses, we have a wealth of knowledge we
share with patients that can help improve
their quality of life while undergoing
treatment,” she adds.
Barbara Shaw, RN, BSN, OCN, an
oncology certified nurse in GBMC’s
Joseph F. Keelty Inpatient Oncology Care
unit, agrees. “We act as liaisons and advocates for our patients and can offer options
such as medications to ease the nausea
associated with some treatments. We bring
the latest knowledge in the field of oncology
to the table for patients and they look to us
for in-depth information and support.”
A Dual Perspective
Kathy Robinson, RN, BSN,
ONC and Dawn Stefanik,
AA, MLT, BSN, RN,
OCN, talk to patient
Susan Grimmel about her
treatment for breast cancer
during one of her visits to
the Infusion Center.
Adele Hammerman sees the benefits of
oncology certified nursing from both sides.
The retired high school teacher received
cancer treatment at GBMC and is also
a public member of the board of the
Oncology Nursing Certification
Corporation (ONCC), the organization
that oversees the certification process. In
her role with the ONCC, she represents
the views of the people who use the services
oncology nurses provide.
“Knowing your nurse has achieved oncology
certification gives patients more confidence,”
she believes. “You’re working with a specialist who is committed to providing the best
and most up-to-date cancer care.”
Having oncology certified nurses on staff
also offers benefits to physicians. “Nurses
are able to provide a higher level of support
because they have extensive, detailed knowledge about the complete range of treatment
options,” says Kathy Robinson, RN, BSN,
OCN, GBMC’s department of outpatient
oncology. “That helps our oncology team
provide the best care to patients.” n
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
5
IN FOCUS
GBMC’s New Thoracic Oncology Center:
Streamlined Care for Lung and Esophageal
G
BMC’S NEW THORACIC ONCOLOGY CENTER PROVIDES
patients with streamlined access to the complete
spectrum of diagnostic and treatment options for
lung and esophageal cancers. The center also offers the
services of a navigator to guide patients and families
through their journey.
“Our goal is to bring together the best aspects of a multidisciplinary approach,” explains Neri Cohen, MD, PhD,
Chief of GBMC’s Division of Thoracic Surgery. “The
center serves as a single point of contact for patients and
referring physicians. It also allows for the rapid transfer of
information between members of the care team so we can
develop an individualized, comprehensive diagnostic and
treatment plan and put it into motion rapidly.”
Services offered include:
6
n
Rapid scheduling of appropriate appointments with
cancer specialists
n
Full range of noninvasive and minimally invasive
diagnostic testing
n
Surgery, focusing on minimally invasive approaches
which speed recovery
n
Radiation, including conventional, 3D conformal,
intensity modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic
radiosurgery
n
Chemotherapy, including biologically targeted agents
n
Access to the entire range of clinical trials
n
Patient- and family-centered cancer care
n
Pulmonary and physical therapy rehabilitation
~
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
n
Low-dose ultra-fast screening CT scans for patients
with an increased risk of developing lung cancer
n
Consult reports faxed to referring physicians in one
day or less
The Patient Perspective
Daniel Cronin, a 65-year-old man referred to the
Thoracic Oncology Center by his otolaryngologist,
experienced the benefits of the center’s approach. Within
two weeks, he moved rapidly through diagnosis; he had
a PET/CT scan and saw Dr. Neri Cohen who arranged
for him to undergo a biopsy of the tumor in his left lung.
One day after the biopsy, Mr. Cronin met with medical
oncologist Marshall Levine, MD, and with the
Radiation Oncology team (led by Eva Zinreich, MD)
the following day. Thereafter, he began concurrent
chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which he tolerated
well and completed in January 2009.
“The process moved so smoothly, there was very little I
had to do,” says Mr. Cronin. “My daughter, an oncology
nurse who works elsewhere, told me no one gets in to
see the treatment team as quickly as I did. My level of
anxiety would have been much higher without the
guidance I received from the team at the Thoracic
Oncology Center.” n
For more information or a patient referral,
contact the Thoracic Oncology Center
at 443-849-3470.
Cancer Patients
Dr. Neri Cohen reviews
a patient's images.
He states that one of the
many advantages of the
new Thoracic Oncology
Center is the ability to
develop an individualized
treatment plan and set it
into motion rapidly.
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
7
ONCOLOGY CASE REVIEW
GBMC’s Multidisciplinary Approach to
Primary CNS Lymphoma
“The hardest thing
I had to do was go
in for brain surgery
because I could see the
fear in the faces of my
family and friends who
were there for me.”
R
“At the Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer
Institute, we see one or two patients per
hospital” came at age 51. Following
year with this particular condition,” says
a year of flu-like symptoms that proDr. Donegan. “It is very aggressive and, if
gressed to blurred vision and limb weakness,
left untreated, most individuals will live
he experienced two seizures in late 2005.
less than six months. Age and the person’s
This would be the beginning of more than
physical condition
a year of both supportive
Robert B. Donegan, MD
at the time of diagand definitive therapies.
nosis are the two
A brain MRI revealed
most important
a 3 cm mass in Mr.
prognostic factors.
McDonald’s right
Both of these were
temporal lobe of the
in Mr. McDonald’s
brain, suspicious for a
favor.”
primary brain tumor. He
The standard
underwent a craniotomy
treatment for
and resection of the
PCNSL is
brain mass and, rather
chemotherapy,
than a primary brain
specifically hightumor, it proved to be a
dose methotrexate
diffuse large B-cell non(HD-MTX),
Hodgkin lymphoma.
which may be
Additional testing
combined with
revealed no evidence of
other chemotherapy agents. Radiation
residual lymphoma within the brain or
therapy to the brain is generally avoided as
lymphoma outside of the brain, although
initial therapy due to its potential toxicity
an asymptomatic mass was incidentally
but may be beneficial later, particularly in
noted within his right kidney, suspicious
those who recur following chemotherapy.
for primary kidney cancer.
OBERT MCDONALD’S “FIRST TASTE OF A
A Rare Find and Swift Action
He was referred to GBMC medical
oncologist Robert B. Donegan, MD,
who established the diagnosis of Primary
Central Nervous System Lymphoma
(PCNSL). PCNSL arises within, and is
confined to, the central nervous system.
PCNSL is quite rare, accounting for only
five percent of all brain tumors and an even
lower percentage of all lymphomas.
8
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GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
Following the craniotomy, Mr. McDonald
began high-dose methotrexate. This initially
required hospitalization for four-to-five
days several times a month, but after three
months the chemotherapy was temporarily
halted. Ronald F. Tutrone, MD, GBMC’s
Division Head of Urology, then performed
a nephrectomy and removed a Stage I
carcinoma of the kidney that was unrelated
to the lymphoma.
Not Out of the Woods Yet
In May 2006, the high-dose methotrexate resumed once per month, and
Mr. McDonald went on to complete a full
year of chemotherapy. However, halfway
through this treatment, he was having
difficulty seeing out of his left eye and it
was found that the lymphoma had recurred
within the eye. C.P. “Pat” Wilkinson, MD,
Chairman of GBMC’s Department of
Ophthalmology, performed a vitrectomy,
a surgical procedure that removes some
or all of the eye’s vitreous humor. In
Mr. McDonald’s case, lymphoma cells were
found in the vitreous humor. This was
followed by 12 doses of radiation therapy
to the left eye under the direction of Eva
Zinreich, MD, Radiation Oncologist. These
treatments resulted in a complete response
and an eventual return of normal vision.
“It was nerve-racking seeing all these
different doctors for different treatments
week after week, but Dr. Donegan was
always upbeat, and we would talk about
sports and rock and roll music,” recalls
Mr. McDonald. “He is a great person
besides being a great doctor, and he kept
me grounded.”
Mr. McDonald’s chemotherapy treatments
ended in February 2007 and, to date, he
shows no signs of recurrence of either
cancer. Since completion of his treatment,
he undergoes a complete physical exam, an
eye exam, an MRI of the brain, and a CT
scan of the kidney every four-to-six months.
“Now that two years have passed, we are
quite optimistic about Mr. McDonald’s
prognosis, and while we sure like seeing his
smiling face, we will eventually be able to
reduce the frequency of his follow-up,”
says Dr. Donegan.
Moving on with Life as Usual
“The hardest thing I had to do was go in
for brain surgery because I could see the fear
in the faces of my family and friends who
were there for me,” says Mr. McDonald.
“But, as time went on, it was so important
that the GBMC doctors, nurses and staff
are more than skilled professionally, they
are incredible people who will do anything
to make your situation a little easier.”
Robert McDonald is working and back
to his life. “I just love getting up in the
morning, letting the dog out and happily
getting on with my day,” he says. n
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
9
GENETICS
Genetic counselor Jessica
Adcock encourages patients
to find out as much as they
can about their family
health history, saying,
“Information is power.”
Genetic
Counseling
Helps Patients
Build a Strategy
to Combat
Breast Cancer
W
HILE INHERITED FORMS OF BREAST CANCER PLAY A ROLE IN ONLY ABOUT
5 TO 10
percent of women diagnosed with the disease, the presence or absence of the BRCA-1
or 2 gene mutations can form the foundation of a tailored treatment and surveillance
strategy. Women with the mutation are at a higher risk for breast cancer, a second breast
cancer, as well as for ovarian cancer, so more vigilant screening and prophylactic surgical
options can become key components of their cancer-combating strategy.
“If a woman is diagnosed with breast and/or ovarian cancer younger than age 50, has a family
history of breast and/or ovarian cancer or has a personal history of more than one primary type
of cancer, she may be a good candidate for genetic counseling,” says Jessica Adcock, Genetic
Counselor at GBMC’s Harvey Institute for Human Genetics. “Those are characteristics that
can suggest a genetic component to the occurrence of the cancer.”
The genetic counselors at the Harvey Institute perform an in-depth risk assessment which
includes the patient’s family and individual history to determine if there might be a genetic
predisposition to breast cancer. If a genetic element appears to be involved, they offer the
patient the option of pursuing genetic testing.
Anna Marie Bavett, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at 43, underwent the counseling
and testing because she wanted to know if she had an increased risk for ovarian cancer.
“I had the testing for my peace of mind and my family’s,” she says. “I wanted to seek proactive
treatment if my tests showed I did have the genetic mutation. I was both surprised and relieved
to learn I didn’t.”
“For many of the patients we see, information is power,” says Ms. Adcock. “They use it to
make medical decisions and learn if their children and siblings might be at risk for cancer so
they can encourage them to be more proactive with screenings and cancer risk reduction.”
Adds Ms. Bavett, “The counseling and testing was a very positive experience. It provided
information that helped me make decisions on how I would continue my fight against breast
cancer. For me, it was the last piece of the puzzle.” n
To learn about the genetic counseling and testing services available at the
Harvey Institute or to refer a patient for counseling, call 443-849-3131.
10 ~ G R E A T E R O N C O L O G Y T O D A Y
~
Summer 2009
OF NOTE...
McCagh Appointed To
State Cancer Council
Gary Cohen, MD, Honored
for Medical Excellence
Lymphedema Center
Gets Facelift, New Space
Brian McCagh,
FACHE,
GBMC’s
Executive
Director of
Oncology
Services, was
appointed by
Governor Martin
O’Malley to serve on the Maryland
State Council on Cancer Control. The
council’s purposes include advising
government officials and the general
public on state policies and programs,
coordinating and promoting programs
that address the cancer needs of
Marylanders and reviewing existing
and planned cancer programs. He
has provided oversight of GBMC’s
oncology service line since May 2007
and works closely with Gary Cohen,
MD, Medical Director of the Sandra
& Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute
at GBMC.
Gary Cohen,
MD, Director
of the Sandra &
Malcolm Berman
Cancer Institute
at GBMC,
was the 2008
honoree of the
Dorothy
Friedman Caplan Guild, a nonprofit
fundraising organization for cancer
and leukemia research. Dr. Cohen was
recognized for being an outstanding
medical oncologist and clinical
researcher in the community.
The new and expanded Greater
Baltimore Lymphedema Center and
new Oncology Rehabilitation Center
offer comprehensive services for recovering cancer and lymphedema patients.
The facility features private exam and
treatment rooms, physician and therapist
offices, an education area as well as a
rehabilitation gym.
A special reception was held at
Harbor Court on November 29. The
Foundation made a generous donation
of $25,000 for patient enhancements
in the Lois Harvey Miller Infusion
Therapy Center, including specialized
comfort recliners for chemotherapy
patients and flat screen TVs for 19
patient bays.
Lymphedema occasionally occurs in
recovering cancer patients who have
undergone lymph node surgery or
radiation, but frequently goes undiagnosed because its symptoms can be
mistaken for other conditions. Working
in conjunction with GBMC’s Sandra
& Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute,
lymphedema therapists are available
to monitor and coordinate patients’
exercise regimens with the types of
chemotherapy they received, ensuring
safety and success. n
VVVVV
VVVVVV
VVVVV
VVVVVV
TheBoutique V
Sometimes it’s the small things that can
make a woman undergoing cancer treatment
feel better…a great-fitting wig, a touch
of blush on the cheeks and a little extra
pampering.
That’s just what they’ll find at GBMC’s
Boutique, where the primary focus is on
the special needs of women with cancer,
alopecia and specialized skin care conditions
resulting from scars, burns or laser treatments. The Boutique offers wigs and wig
fittings, scarves and hats for hair loss, breast
fittings (bras and prosthetics), products for
skin care and overall image consultation.
Helping women look good and feel great about themselves…
The Boutique’s cosmetologist,
Linda Kurgan, puts great
emphasis on helping patients
look good and feel well. Other
services provided include
shampoos, haircuts, styling,
manicures and waxing services.
Next time your patient needs
that little extra pampering,
send her to The Boutique.
Hours of Operation: Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Gift certificates
are available. All services are by appointment only. Call 443-849-8700 or e-mail
Lynne Caddick, Boutique Manager, at [email protected]
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
11
HEAD & NECK CANCER
GBMC Physicians and Johns
Hopkins Faculty Expand Treatment
Options for Head and Neck
Cancer Patients
M
EMBERS OF JOHNS HOPKINS HEAD AND
Neck Surgery at GBMC are involved
in a range of studies and clinical trials
that have the potential to open doors to
new treatment options for head and neck
cancer. From therapeutic vaccines to genetic
explorations, the studies help to strengthen
the understanding of head and neck cancer
and to pioneer new treatments.
“Engaging in a variety
of research creates
the potential to make
great strides in the
treatment of head
and neck cancers.”
Joseph Califano, MD, FACS, Professor,
Department of Otolaryngology–Head
and Neck Surgery at The Johns Hopkins
University and surgeon at Johns Hopkins
Head and Neck Surgery at GBMC and the
Milton J. Dance Jr., Head and Neck Center,
is enrolling patients in a Phase II clinical
trial of the erectile dysfunction drug tadalafil
to reverse immune suppression in the
environment around head and neck tumors.
The drug increases nitric oxide blood levels,
which in turn combats the suppression of
tumor-killing cells. A previous study with
sildenafil, another drug from the same
class, found that the treatment resulted in
significant tumor regression.
Another study by Patrick K. Ha, MD,
FACS, surgeon at Johns Hopkins Head
and Neck Surgery at GBMC and Assistant
Professor of Otolaryngology–Head and
Neck Surgery at Johns Hopkins, is focusing
on the genetic process of methylation in a
rare form of head and neck cancer, adenoid
cystic carcinoma. The study, which is in a
very early stage, has identified several gene
12 ~ G R E A T E R O N C O L O G Y T O D A Y
~
Summer 2009
targets for the disease that have not been
described before. Because there is no
effective chemotherapy for adenoid cystic
carcinoma and the progression of the disease
can be highly unpredictable, gaining an
understanding of the mechanism of the
cancer is key to developing new treatments.
Patients at the Dance Center have the
option of including a recently FDAapproved monoclonal antibody therapy in
their treatment regimen. GBMC medical
oncologist Marshall Levine, MD, FACP,
notes that cetuximab is being used to treat
squamous cell head and neck carcinomas
in two settings — as part of a combined
regimen with chemotherapy for metastatic
and recurrent head and neck cancer and as
primary management of locally advanced
cancer being treated with radiation. For
some patients, cetuximab, which is less toxic
than chemotherapy, may improve quality
and quantity of life. Clinical trials showed
that patients with oropharangeal squamous
carcinoma gained a significant advantage
with the addition of cetuximab over treatment with radiation alone. In addition,
a study is available through the Eastern
Cooperative Oncology Group to patients
with recurrent or metastatic head and neck
cancer. It involves randomization between
chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy
and the anti-angiogenic drug bevacizumab.
The goal is to determine if interrupting the
blood supply to cancer cells makes standard
chemotherapy more effective.
Sara Pai, MD, PhD, Assistant
Professor, Johns Hopkins
Department of Otolaryngology
— Head and Neck Surgery, is in
the final stages of launching a
clinical trial with a therapeutic
DNA vaccine which targets head
and neck cancers caused by the
human papillomavirus (HPV).
The vaccine works by boosting
the immune system to recognize
and kill HPV-infected cancer
cells, which may have been
missed by traditional treatments
such as chemotherapy, radiation,
or surgery. The potential of
the DNA vaccine in treating
microscopic locoregional and/
or micrometastatic disease is
demonstrated in preclinical
animal models in which
complete regression of established
tumors was achieved after DNA
vaccination.
In addition, Dr. Pai is leading a
study that monitors the immune
status of head and neck cancer
patients after they complete
chemoradiation therapy. The
study is aimed to determine
if chemoradiation treatment suppresses the immune system. The
information will allow Dr. Pai
and her colleagues to determine
the optimal timing to administer
the DNA vaccine after patients
complete chemoradiation therapy
and, thus, ensure that patients
will be able to respond to and,
possibly, benefit from the
immune boosting vaccine.
“Engaging in a variety of
research creates the potential
to make great strides in the
treatment of head and neck
cancers,” says Dr. Ha. n
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
13
DANCE CENTER
Dysphagia in Cancer Patients
By Barbara Messing, MA, CCC-SLP, BRS-S; Melissa Walker, MS, CCC-SLP;
Jaclyn Trachta, MS, CCC-SLP; and Keri Culton-Ryniak, RD, LDN, CNSD
D
YSPHAGIA IS A TERM DESCRIBING A
swallowing difficulty or disorder.
Although many individuals may experience dysphagia, 25 percent of patients with
cancer experience treatment-related side effects
that affect swallow function. This number
increases dramatically in patients undergoing
treatment for head and neck cancer.
Trends in cancer treatment include organ
preservation treatment protocols often
involving chemotherapy and radiation;
common side effects of these treatments
include mild to severe mucositis (ulcerations,
sores in the mouth, throat, esophagus), pain
with swallowing, dry mouth and changes
in saliva viscosity, trismus (restricted jaw
opening), diminished or altered sense of taste,
disuse muscle atrophy and complications such
as esophageal stricture or narrowing. Surgery
to remove a tumor from the patient’s mouth,
throat or esophagus may result in significant
anatomical changes that alter the patient’s
swallow function.
Barbara Messing, Clinical
Director of the Dance Center,
performs a videoflouroscopy
Modified Barium Swallow
(MBS) study, which monitors
the flow of liquid barium
through the oral cavity,
pharynx and the esophagus
of her patient.
Dietary Concerns Surround Dysphagia Patients
A patient with cancer may exhibit an inability to eat or demonstrate a reduced ability to take
food or liquids because of related problems, such as nausea, tumor pain, diminished appetite,
depression and other medical conditions. Comprehensive dysphagia assessment is necessary
to determine the least restrictive diet that the patient will safely tolerate to maintain adequate
nutrition and hydration needs. Early and late effects of treatment place patients at risk for
swallowing problems during and well after their cancer treatments have ended. Monitoring
of swallowing function and nutritional status is critical.
Common complications that occur as a result of a swallowing disorder include malnutrition
and dehydration, aspiration pneumonia and other potential pulmonary complications, airway
compromise, poor quality of life, and even death. Malnutrition and dehydration may impact
a patient’s ability to successfully navigate treatment in that patients may experience increased
toxic side effects that may interrupt treatment, require hospitalization or discontinuation
of treatment. Patients who are malnourished do not recover as well from treatment-related
side effects.
14
~
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
GIVING
A Gift of Technology
Provides Many with the
Tools for Early Detection
F
OR ARLENE HADDOCK, HELPING OTHERS GET THE BEST SCREENING FOR
Lateral view of a Modified Barium
Swallow Study (MBS). MBS is
fluoroscopic imaging of swallow structures
and function that provides important
information on patterns of impairment
of the swallowing mechanism.
Diagnosis and Treatment
of Swallowing Disorders
Swallowing disorders are diagnosed
and treated by a speech pathologist.
Common assessment methods include
clinical evaluations, x-ray guided
swallowing studies (modified barium
swallow studies) and endoscopic
examination of swallowing (fiberoptic
endoscopic evaluation of swallow).
The treatment of swallowing disorders
typically involves a combination of
modalities, such as diet modification,
safe swallowing strategies, rehabilitative
exercises, medication and possibly
surgery. Patients undergoing cancer
treatments are at risk for malnutrition
and often benefit from consultation
with a registered dietitian as well as a
speech pathologist. The registered
dietitian assesses current nutritional
status and provides recommendations
for maximizing dietary intake. n
For more information about
swallowing disorders or
to schedule a nutritional
consultation during or following
cancer treatments, contact the
Milton J. Dance, Jr., Head and
Neck Center at 443-849-2087.
breast cancer was paramount in her efforts to provide GBMC’s Sandra
and Malcolm Berman Comprehensive Breast Care Center with the
funds needed to purchase sophisticated digital mammography equipment.
Ms. Haddock, who was treated for breast cancer at GBMC, bravely battled
the disease for six years before she passed away in April 2008.
Ken Haddock explains that his wife realized that the center had a need for
digital mammography. Because this was so close to her personally, she felt
it was important to help make this happen.
And indeed, she did. Through Ms. Haddock’s philanthropic foundation,
The Louis Berkowitz Family Foundation, a $25,000 grant was given
to GBMC for the purchase of digital mammography equipment. The
Foundation has also generously provided funding for other GBMC
initiatives such as the Lung Cancer Early Diagnosis Program, which
provides at-risk individuals with low-cost lung cancer screening.
Ms. Haddock’s journey with breast cancer spanned six years, including
hormone therapy, a lumpectomy and later a mastectomy, as well as four to
five courses of chemotherapy. While the disease would eventually overcome
the heroic efforts of her oncology team, Mr. Haddock recalls her strength
through it all. In the end, he says, “Arlene wanted to help other women
with breast cancer as much as she could.” n
Arlene and Ken Haddock
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
15
AREA HIGHLIGHT
Fighting Breast Cancer is a
amilyAffair
F
J
J
ULIE NIEHAUS REMEMBERS THE SHOCK AND FEAR SHE FELT WHEN SHE RECEIVED “THE NEWS.”
At age 42, a surgical biopsy confirmed what her mammogram had detected — ductal
carcinoma of the left breast. “The hardest thing was telling my daughters because I didn’t
want them to worry,” she says.
For her sister Kelly, a mother of three, the news was a wake-up call that she was months
behind schedule for her annual mammogram. She quickly made an appointment and, just days
before Thanksgiving 2006, she too was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma at age 45, just six
weeks following Julie’s diagnosis.
While Julie and Kelly were prescribed different treatment plans, both required surgery and
chose to schedule their initial surgical procedures on the same day with Frank Rotolo, MD,
FACS, breast oncologist at GBMC. Kelly recalls being surrounded by supportive family
members that morning but says that throughout this difficult time there were questions and
concerns that only Julie could truly understand.
The range of breast cancer treatment choices includes surgery and may be followed by
combinations of radiation, chemotherapy and hormone therapy to reduce estrogen production.
Julie underwent a bilateral mastectomy in January 2007 and within six months completed
reconstructive plastic surgery with Brent C. Birely, MD. She is currently taking Tamoxifen, an
adjuvant therapy to help prevent the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Following
three lumpectomies, Dr. Rotolo performed a simple mastectomy on Kelly to ensure complete
removal, which was followed by reconstructive plastic surgery with Sheri Slezak, MD. Both
women return to GBMC at six-month intervals for follow-up exams.
“While I always felt like I was in good hands at GBMC, it was really a blessing that my sister
Kelly and I had each other to talk to throughout the entire experience,” adds Julie. “I would
have felt much more alone without her.”
Making aChoice
Making a Choice
Following treatment, Julie and Kelly chose to take their journey with cancer one step further
“for all the women in our family.” In the spring of 2008, they underwent genetic testing to
determine if they had inherited certain gene alterations that increase risk for breast and/or
ovarian cancer. Both sisters tested negative and do not have the altered gene.
“We know that genes are not the only factor that affects cancer risk, but we were pleased
to head home and give our families this positive news,” says Kelly. n
16
~
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
StayPositive
Words to Live By: “Stay Positive”
Julie’s daughter Allie, then 17, found her own means
of support for what she describes as an overwhelming
situation. “When my mom told me about her cancer
diagnosis, she said that the key thing to remember was
to stay positive,” says Allie Niehaus.
Later that year, in her college entrance essay, Allie
explained how she chose to live by this advice. As her
mother faced a bilateral mastectomy and reconstructive
surgeries, Allie spent a great deal of time with her sister,
brothers and close friends while concentrating on school
to avoid thinking about everything that could potentially
go wrong.
Allie admits that she benefited in many ways by keeping
herself focused during this harrowing time. In her essay,
she expressed how she ultimately discovered just how
important family and good friends are during difficult
times “to give you advice, and encouragement, and to
listen to you cry when it’s too much.”
Now an English major at Towson University, Allie plans to
teach high school but aspires to be a college professor one
day. “Attitude does change a situation, and by continuing
to follow my mom’s advice to stay positive, I will be able
to achieve the level of success I want in college, as well as
in life,” says this wise young woman.
Julianne Niehaus’s
positive attitude
helped her family,
including daughter
Allie (right),
cope during her
battle with
breast cancer.
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
17
PHYSICIAN SPOTLIGHT
Robert K. Brookland, MD
Chairman, GBMC Department
of Radiation Oncology
A volunteer for the American
Cancer Society (ACS) since
1984, Dr. Brookland has
served as Chairman of the
Maryland Division of the
ACS, which grew to become
the Mid-Atlantic Division
then the South Atlantic
Division under his tenure.
He is currently on the
Society’s South Atlantic
Division Board of Directors.
“The American Cancer Society is a community-based
organization that helps people at a grassroots level through
education, advocacy and services, but also funds research
that has led to findings such as the Pap test and Tamoxifen,”
says Dr. Brookland. “I’m proud to volunteer for an organization that does so much in the fight against cancer.”
I
NSIDE THE WALLS OF THE SANDRA & MALCOLM BERMAN
Cancer Institute, many patients begin their journey with
cancer and later celebrate survivorship thanks to the
oncology professionals who make a difference each and
every day. Outside of these walls, these same professionals
are playing vital roles in affecting positive change in the field
of oncology, volunteering their professional and personal
talents outside the spectrum of their day-to-day patient care
responsibilities. Drs. Robert Brookland, Paul Celano and
Frank Rotolo’s leadership with organizations at national and
regional levels impacts cancer policy and initiatives that serve
the best interests of their patients.
18 ~ G R E A T E R O N C O L O G Y T O D A Y
~
Summer 2009
Among the many ACS initiatives that Dr. Brookland has
played a role in is the Patient Navigator Program. Launched
approximately two years ago in the South Atlantic Division,
it is now approaching 30 sites across the region. “Navigators
are full-time Society employees who go through rigorous
training with the ACS and the hospital partner to assist
cancer patients through the complex maze of information
and resources,” he says. Here at GBMC, ACS patient
navigator, Mindy Schifflet, is dedicated to helping cancer
patients and their families connect with the resources and
information they need, from support services to catastrophic
health planning.
Dr. Brookland is a past winner of the Society's highest
honor, the St. George National Award, in recognition for
his outstanding service and dedication.
Paul Celano, MD, GBMC Division
Head, Medical Oncology
Frank Rotolo, MD, FACS, Surgeon
and Cancer Liaison Physician
Paul Celano, MD, joined
GBMC in 1993 following
nearly a decade at Johns
Hopkins. Committed to
delivering compassionate and
quality care to his patients,
he also looks for innovative
and effective ways to bring
preventive measures and
delivery of care in medical
oncology even further
through his work with the
Maryland and District of
Columbia Society of Clinical Oncology (MDCSCO).
Fellowship in the American
College of Surgeons (ACOS)
has led Dr. Frank Rotolo to
more than 15 years of service
as a Cancer Liaison Physician
(CLP) with the Commission
on Cancer (CoC). As a CLP,
Dr. Rotolo manages clinically
related cancer activities,
supports GBMC’s compliance
efforts with CoC standards,
facilitates patient and
community activities and
coordinates with the American Cancer Society (ACS).
Recently elected President, Dr. Celano has been a member
of MDCSCO since its inception in 1993. During this time,
he served on the Executive Board and as Representative for
MedChi, the Maryland State Medical Society.
He has also served as the Maryland State Chair of Cancer
Liaison Physicians for the past seven years. As State Chair,
he is the key contact in Maryland for programs and activities
of the CoC, serves on the local ACOS Chapter Council and
hosts an annual statewide CLP meeting.
“The organization adds a different dimension to my work,”
says Dr. Celano. “We represent and support physicians who
treat people with cancer, but of equal importance is our goal to
educate the public, government bodies, insurance carriers, and
other healthcare providers about appropriate cancer prevention
measures and appropriate standards of care in oncology.”
These goals are met through a number of continual, diverse
initiatives such as meetings with state legislators to advise on
upcoming legislation that directly impacts patients, and an
annual Cancer Forum with a number of hospitals to offer
an educational series to patients and family members.
During the past year, Dr. Celano was also instrumental in
obtaining a grant from the American Society of Clinical
Oncology to develop a web-based resource for Maryland and
District of Columbia oncology professionals. This effort will
provide a web site offering a collective calendar for posting
oncology-related events, as well as a means for sharing information on clinical trials, research findings and reimbursement issues. “I think of it as Facebook for oncologists and
look forward to building an active community across oncology disciplines throughout the region,” says Dr. Celano.
“I’m very pleased that Maryland has one of the highest
representations on the Commission on Cancer with 34 of
35 hospitals participating in collaborative efforts at a variety
of different levels,” says Dr. Rotolo. “One of our major
efforts is to utilize the National Cancer Database (NCDB),
a joint program of the CoC and the ACS. It represents more
than 20 million records and helps us to illustrate the quality
of cancer care in the state as well as identify areas for
improvement.”
According to Dr. Rotolo, every GBMC patient with cancer
is registered in the NCDB, and 80 percent of NCDB
registrants are treated at 25 percent of the hospitals enrolled
in the Commission. During the past year, Dr. Rotolo has
also served on a subcommittee determining physician staging
requirement changes for cancer patients. n
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
19
AREA SPOTLIGHT
Women’s Surgical Center Caters
to an Exceptional Clientele
F
OR PATIENTS WITH BREAST OR GYNECOLOGIC CONDITIONS, GBMC’S WOMEN’S SURGICAL
Center (WSC) provides a wide range of diagnostic and treatment options in a compassionate environment. From admission and preoperative preparation to post anesthesia recovery,
the staff of 42 supports each of the more than 20 patients it serves daily. WSC employees work
in concert with personnel from other GBMC departments such as radiology, anesthesiology,
laboratory/pathology and oncology, for every procedure.
Approximately 10 percent of WSC’s surgical volume is comprised of breast cancer surgeries,
most of which are performed by surgeon Lauren Schnaper, MD, FACS, in addition to
Scott Maizel, MD, FACS, and Frank Rotolo, MD, FACS, in one of the six operating rooms,
specially equipped for female-centric procedures. According to Laura Perdue, RN, MS,
CNOR, Clinical Director of the Women’s Surgical Center, the single-gender setting is ideal
for patients facing the types of procedures performed there, which can include hysterectomy
and mastectomy. “The sensitive and sometimes emotional nature of these surgeries makes it
even more important for us as caregivers to help comfort our patients and afford them as much
attention as possible,” she says.
Dr. Schnaper, for example, utilizes the skills of a dedicated surgical team — including an
operating room nurse, anesthesiologist and surgical technician — to assist her when she
performs breast cancer surgery at WSC. The members’ familiarity with one another allows
them to anticipate each other’s needs, which helps the team function more accurately and
efficiently. “Patients appreciate the fact that our team works together every day,” Dr. Schnaper
explains. “They sense how well we know each other and how much we respect each other.”
The Women’s Surgical
Center Breast Surgery
Team includes (left to
right): Dr. Shelly
Hairston-Jones, anesthesiologist; Dr. Lauren
Schnaper, surgeon; Liz
Germeroth, RN; and
Patricia Brock-Johnson,
surgical technician.
20
~
The benefits of privacy, dedicated support and teamwork are not exclusive to breast cancer
patients, however. The sole focus on women’s surgeries allows caregivers throughout WSC
to develop a greater
understanding of
their patients’ needs.
Whether preparing for
a loop electrosurgical
excision procedure
(LEEP) to remove
cervical cancer or
recovering from a
lumpectomy, Ms.
Perdue notes, “Women
can take comfort in
the fact that they will
not only receive expert
care here, but highly
personalized service
as well.” n
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
NEWS
Surviving Cancer in the 21st Century
O
N SATURDAY, FEBRUARY
21, 2009, RENOWNED
A
U
B
U
C
U
D
U
E
U
F
U
G
U
H
U
oncology specialists at GBMC came together for
the first annual cancer conference, “Surviving
Cancer in the 21st Century,” exchanging a wealth of
information and scientific knowledge with fellow
oncology and healthcare professionals and clinicians
from around the region.
The comprehensive conference covered topics such as
diagnosis, screening and treatment options for a wide
variety of cancers including breast, prostate and colon.
Featured speakers focused on a wide range of important
topics in cancer care including appropriate methods of
screening and early detection; new, targeted systemic
therapies; the role of genetics in cancer; and long-term
survivorship issues.
Speakers included:
A Jessica Adcock, MS, genetic counselor with
the Harvey Institute for Human Genetics;
Topic: Genetics of Cancer
B Paul Celano, MD, Chief, Division of Medical
Oncology; Topic: Breast Cancer Survivorship:
Bridging the Gap between Primary Care and Oncology
C Gary Cohen, MD, Medical Director, Berman
Cancer Institute; Topic: Cancer Therapy: New Targets,
New Arrows
D Judy Destouet, MD, Diagnostic Radiology/
Advanced Radiology; Topic: Tomosynthesis
Mammogram Tomography
E Donna Lewis, RN, MS, CPC, Manager,
Oncology Support Services; Topic: Survivorship
F Loralie Ma, MD, Diagnostic Radiology/Advanced
Radiology; Topic: MRI of the Breast
G Harold Tucker, MD, Vice Chief of Staff,
Gastroenterologist; Topic: Colon Cancer Screening –
Current Guidelines, Future Possibilities
H Ronald Tutrone, MD, Division Head, Urology;
Topic: Updates in Prostate Cancer Screening,
Treatment and Research n
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
21
PROFILES IN ONCOLOGY
MEET
THE
ONCOLOGY
SPECIALISTS
at GBMC’s Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute
THORACIC ONCO
LO
O
C
N
O
L
A
C
I
D
E
M
GY
FACP
hen, MD,
o
C
I.
y
r
a
G
& Malcolm
tor, Sandra
c
e
ir
D
l
a
ic
Med
te
y
Hematolog
ncer Institu
&
y
g
lo
o
c
n
Berman Ca
ical O
ied in Med
Board-certif
o, MD
Paul Celan
gy
ical Oncolo
d
e
M
f
o
d
a
e
ology
Division H
edical Onc
M
in
d
ie
if
rt
Board-ce
D
tology
audhry, M
y & Hema
g
lo
o
c
n
O
Madhu Ch
l
ica
ied in Med
Board-certif
negan, MD
Robert Do
y
Hematolog
&
y
g
lo
o
c
n
ical O
ied in Med
Board-certif
D, FACP
Levine, M
.
A
ll
a
h
rs
ncology
Ma
Medical O
in
d
ie
if
rt
e
Board-c
rmation:
ontact info
C
l
a
r
e
t
n
e
G
harles Stree
6569 N. C
MD 21204
Baltimore,
051
443-849-3
22 ~ G R E A T E R O N C O L O G Y T O D A Y
~
Summer 2009
LOGY
Neri Cohe
n, MD, Ph
D
Division H
ead of Tho
ra
cic
Surgery
Board-certif
ied in Tho
racic
Surgery
Steven Mil
ma
Board-certif n, MD
ied in Tho
racic
Surgery
General C
ontact Info
rm
6569 N. C
harles Stree ation:
t
Baltimore,
MD 21204
443-849-3
470
RADIATION ONCOLOGY
Robert Brookland, MD
Radiation
Chairman, Department of
Oncology
n Oncology
Board-certified in Radiatio
Albert Blumberg, MD
n Oncology
Board-certified in Radiatio
& Therapeutic Radiology
Eva Zinreich, MD
utic Radiology
Board-certified in Therape
tion:
General Contact Informa
6701 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21204
443-849-2540
d.
, Dr. Zinreich, Dr. Brooklan
Left to right: Dr. Blumberg
BREAST CENTER
Lauren Schnap
er, MD, FACS
Director, Sandr
a and Malcolm
Berman Compr
Board-certified
ehensive Breast
in General Surg
Care Center
ery
Scott Maizel, M
Director, Breas
D, FACS
t Cancer Risk A
ssessment Prog
ram
Board-certified
in General Surg
ery
H. Alexander M
unitz, MD
Director, Pavilio
n Imaging Cen
ter and Directo
of the Sandra an
r, Imag
d Malcolm Ber
man Comprehen ing Division
Board-certified
in Diagnostic R
sive Breast Care
adiology
Center
Judy Destouet
Chief of Mamm
, MD
ography for Adv
anced Radiology
Board-certified
in Radiology
General Conta
ct Information
:
6701 N. Charl
es Street, Baltim
ore, MD 21204 n
443-849-2600
GREATER ONCOLOGY TODAY
~
Summer 2009
~
23
PROFILES IN ONCOLOGY
(continued)
JOHNS HOPKINS HEAD & NECK SURG
John R. Saunders, Jr., M
D, FACS
Medical Director, Milton
J. Dance, Jr.,
Head and Neck Center
Board-certified in Surgery
Ray Gervacio F. Blanco
, MD
Board-certified in Surgery
Joseph A. Califano, III,
MD, FACS
Board-certified in Otolaryn
gology
Patrick K. Ha, MD, FA
CS
Board-certified in Otolaryn
gology
General Contact Informa
tion:
6569 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21204
443-849-8940
ERY AT GBMC
Left to right: Dr. Ha, Dr.
Blanco, Dr. Saunders, Dr.
Califano.
URO ONCOLOGY
GYN ONCOLOG
Y
AMERICAN COLLE
OF SURGEONS (A GE
COS) LIAISON
D
umbine, M
Francis Gr partment
De
Chairman,
gy
c
e
s
of Gyn olo
in Obstetric
d
ie
if
rt
e
-c
rd
a
Bo
ology and
and Gynec
y
ic Oncolog
Gynecolog
tion:
ct Informa
ta
n
o
C
l
a
r
Gene
t
harles Stree
6569 N. C
MD 21204
Baltimore,
765
443-849-2
24 ~ G R E A T E R O N C O L O G Y T O D A Y
~
Ronald Tutrone, MD
Division Head of Urology
Board-certified in Urology
tion:
General Contact Informa
6535 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21204
410-825-5454
Summer 2009
Frank Roto
lo, MD, FA
CS
Board-certif
ied in Surg
ery
General C
ontact Info
rmation:
1205 York
Road
Lutherville
, MD 2109
3
410-821-6
260
Oncology Support Groups and Classes*
“Us Too” Prostate Cancer Support Group
Assembling the first Monday of every month, 20 to 30 participants meet from 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.,
discussing educational topics and personal experiences. Facilitator: Michele Better, LCSW-C.
For more information call 443-849-2961. Registration required.
Look Good, Feel Better¨
Sponsored by the American Cancer Society, this program helps women undergoing cancer
treatments cope with the appearance-related side effects of rehabilitation therapies, such as hair
loss and changes in complexion. Meetings are held the first and third Monday of every month
from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Facilitated by Laura Chase, Community Outreach Specialist. For more
information call 443-849-2037. Registration required.
Patient/Family Head and Neck Cancer Support Group
This support group is composed of newly diagnosed and long-time survivors of head and neck
cancer. Meeting the third Tuesday of every month from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m., participants share
feelings associated with their diagnosis. Facilitators: Dorothy Gold, LCSW-C; Karen Ulmer,
RN, MS, CORLN. For more information call 443-849-2087.
Laryngectomee Interest Group
This group provides news and information relevant to people who have had a laryngectomy.
Participants also have the opportunity to share their experiences and practice voicing. Meetings
are on the first Tuesday of every month from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Facilitators: Barbara Messing,
MA, CCC-SLP, BRS-S and Melissa Walker, MS, CCC-SLP. For more information call
443-849-2087.
* There is no charge for any of the above listed support groups and classes.
Non-Profit Org
U.S. Postage
6701 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21204
PAID
Permit No. 4406
Baltimore, MD