InvestIng In WIsconsIn`s future uW-eAu cLAIre

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InvestIng In WIsconsIn`s future uW-eAu cLAIre
Investing in
Wisconsin’s future
UW-EAU CLAIRE
A growth agenda accountability report, 2011-12
Status At-A-Glance
Core Strategy 1: Prepare Students
Core Strategy 5: Resources
High impact practices (study abroad, faculty-student
collaborative research, and service learning) are a hallmark
of the UW-Eau Claire advantage and engage seniors at
participation rates well above national averages.
The UW-Eau Claire Foundation continued its fundraising
success ending FY11 with more than $4.3 million in gifts
from nearly 14,000 donors. This is the sixth year in a row
Foundation gifts have exceeded $4 million.
Core Strategy 2: More Graduates
Core Strategy 6:
Operational Excellence
Ninety-two percent of UW-Eau Claire new freshmen graduated
or were still enrolled in higher education within four years of
their first enrollment.
Core Strategy 3:
Well-Paying Jobs
UW-Eau Claire conferred nearly 600 degrees in STEM and
health fields during the 2010-11 academic year, helping to
meet the regional demand for workers in leading-edge fields.
Core Strategy 4:
Stronger Communities
UW-Eau Claire’s Human Development Center offers
affordable clinical services to individuals and families from
western Wisconsin, and provides community outreach to
area agencies involved in working with children and families.
2
The Student Office of Sustainability allocates funds that
promote sustainable modes of transportation, increases
in energy efficiency, reductions in the amount of waste
created by UW-Eau Claire and improvements in the
natural habitat of Wisconsin’s Most Beautiful Campus.
Core Strategy 7: Collaborations
UW-Eau Claire partnered with three other UW campuses
in working with OrgSync staff to offer students an
enhanced E-Portfolio tool, funded by the 2010-11 Growth
Agenda Grant Program.
C ore Strategy 1
Prepare Students
Ensure that students are prepared with the integrative learning skills, multicultural
competencies, and practical knowledge needed to succeed in and contribute to a rapidly
changing, increasingly global society.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
Additional UW-Eau claire Indicators
UW-Eau Claire prepares students for a global society through
a variety of experiences, both as part of the curriculum and
outside of the classroom. Among these experiences are the
high impact practices in the table below. Student participation
in these activities has been shown to contribute to gains
in critical thinking, one of the fundamental outcomes of
learning, as well as to gains in practical skills and in personal
and social development.
UW-Eau Claire National
High Impact Practices: First-Year Students
9%
19%*
Learning communities
27%
38%*
Service learning
High Impact Practices: Seniors
Research with faculty
25%
19%*
69%
Service learning
46%*
54%
48%*
Internship
39%
Senior experience
29%*
Critical Thinking: Seniors
91%
Thinking critically
86%*
Application of theories
86%
81%*
89%
86%*
Analyzing ideas
Master’s
Faculty/Student Collaborative Research. Distinguished by
more than two decades of leadership in supporting student
research with faculty, UW-Eau Claire’s Center of Excellence for
Faculty and Undergraduate Student Research Collaboration
continues to increase the number of students and faculty
engaged in “hands on” research and presentations to
campus and at regional, national, and international meetings
of professional organizations.
Student Participants
Faculty-led Research Projects
16%*
38%*
16%*
49%*
46%*
29%*
86%*
81%*
86%*
*Significant differences from the UW-Eau Claire percentage at the 0.05 level.
Note: All participating national and master’s-level public colleges and universities.
Source: 2011 National Survey of Student Engagement.
• Study abroad and exchange programs help students gain a
basic understanding of, respect for, and appreciation of cultural
differences. Of UW-Eau Claire graduates in 2010-11, 19.6% studied
abroad, an increase from 17.3% in 2005-06. According to the 2011
report of the Institute for International Education, UW-Eau Claire is
ranked among the top 10 institutions with students who participate
in mid-length study abroad experiences.
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
1,078
1,120
1,244
682
781
806
Students and faculty engaged in more than one project are counted in each project.
Immersion Experiences. In addition to being a national leader in
the number of students who study abroad, UW-Eau Claire also
continues to expand the number of “immersion” experiences
that provide students with opportunities to study and serve
in multi-cultural communities throughout the United States.
During the 2010-11 academic year, 180 students participated
in 10 different immersion experiences that included a student
group that worked with Hmong organizations in Fresno,
California, and then applied what they learned to work with
local Hmong organizations.
Integrated Learning. Learning outcomes to enhance student
global and multicultural competencies were drafted and are
being piloted by 29 faculty and staff through courses, Blugold
Bundles, intercultural immersion experiences, and living and
learning communities. More than 170 students are enrolled
in more than two linked courses with more than 500 students
participating in the global pilot. Preliminary assessment
indicates these efforts positively impact retention, and student
and instructor engagement.
3
Core Strategy 2
More Graduates
Increase the number of Wisconsin graduates and expand educational opportunities
through improving access and increasing retention and graduation rates.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
Additional UW-EAU CLAIRE Indicators
Increase in URM New Freshmen. As shown in the table below,
the percentage of underrepresented minority students in UWProviding access for new students and increasing their rates of success
Eau Claire’s new freshmen class has almost tripled compared
are key to producing more degree holders. The More Graduates
to five years ago.
initiative includes specific enrollment plans for UW-Eau Claire.
UW-Eau Claire Total Headcount Enrollment
Fall Semester 2006
2010
#
%
#
%
Students Enrolled
African American
48
0%
72
1%
American Indian
71
1%
55
0%
Southeast Asian
148
1%
237
2%
Other Asian American
129
1%
106
1%
Hawaiian/Pacific Is.*
3
0%
Hispanic/Latino(a)
107
1%
174
2%
Two or More Races*
94
1%
White
9,999 93% 10,284 90%
Unknown
136
1%
164
1%
International
128
1%
224
2%
374
3%
609
5%
URM1
Transfer Students
503
653
Total Headcount
10,766
11,413
More Graduates Plan
11,413
2011
#
%
78
1%
47
0%
259
2%
94
1%
5
0%
188
2%
124
1%
10,084 90%
93
1%
262
2%
662
6%
592
11,234
11,291
Fall Semester
2005
2009
2011
% URM New Freshmen
3.2%
5.5%
8.1%
Honors Program. The UW-Eau Claire Honors Program
continues to grow. The holistic admissions process for the
Honors program has played a key role in increasing the
program’s enrollment to more than 500 students. In addition,
participation in integrative learning experiences, like the
Bridgman Residence Hall Living-Learning community, are a
new area of focus for the Honors Program.
Bachelor of Professional Studies. In the fall of 2011, UW-Eau
Claire launched the UW System’s first bachelor of professional
studies degree and UW-Eau Claire’s first fully online bachelor’s
degree program. This degree in organizational leadership and
• Success and progress rates in the chart below show the percent
communication is a 60-credit degree completion program
of students who graduate with a bachelor’s degree, or are still
designed for adults who have completed an associate of
enrolled, within four and six years of entering UW-Eau Claire.
arts and sciences degree at a UW System two-year campus,
those who have completed a comparable associate degree, or
Success and Progress Rate
individuals with sufficient transferable credits to pursue their
for UW-Eau Claire, Fall 2005 cohort
educational goals.
First Time Full-Time Students
Underrepresented minority (URM) students include all who indicate African American,
American Indian, Hispanic/Latino(a), or Southeast Asian alone or in combination with other
races/ethnicities. *New race/ethnicity categories were implemented in 2008.
1
92%
4 Years Later
88%
6 Years Later
Graduated at
Another Institution
Still Enrolled at
UW-Eau Claire
Full-Time Transfer Students
80%
4 Years Later
Still Enrolled at
Another Institution
77%
6 Years Later
Graduated from
UW-Eau Claire
Source: Voluntary System of Accountability, College Portrait (www.collegeportraits.org)
0
20
40
60
80
100
• Degrees conferred at UW-Eau Claire totaled 2,198 in 2010-11
while five years earlier 1,991 degrees were conferred. UWEau Claire conferred 2,027 undergraduate degrees in 2010-11,
exceeding the More Graduates plan.
4
Veteran Students. Recruiting and retaining military veterans
and their dependents is a priority at UW-Eau Claire. In 2011,
a Military Benefits Coordinator was hired to advise and assist
the more than 350 veterans on campus. In addition, UW-Eau
Claire offers a Veterans Center, Veterans Club, and an advisory
committee that reports to campus administration.
C ore Strategy 2
More Graduates
Closing the Achievement Gap
Reduce the Achievement Gap by half by 2015 among underrepresented minorities, lower
income students, and for all races/ethnicities.
Retention and Graduation Rates
Status of the Achievement Gap
Each UW institution has the goal of raising retention and graduation The UW System has the goal of reducing the Achievement
rates for all students, and closing the achievement gap among
Gap by half compared to the baseline cohorts (1998 to 2000
underrepresented minorities (URM) and lower income students.
combined) among underrepresented minorities (URM) and
Improving the success rate of all student groups is important to the
lower income students, and for all races/ethnicities by 2015.
plans of the More Graduates initiative.
UW-Eau Claire New Freshmen Entering Full Time
2nd Year Retention Rate at Institution Where Started
2000 Fall Cohort 2010 Fall Cohort
#
%
#
%
African American
6
*
13
92%
American Indian
10
60%
8
*
Southeast Asian
27
81%
55
91%
Other Asian American
20
80%
12
100%
Hawaiian/Pacific Is.1
Hispanic/Latino(a)
13
69%
51
73%
Two or More Races 1
35
80%
White
1,980
80%
1,867
84%
Unknown
4
*
5
*
International
19
89%
12
75%
2
URM
56
71%
153
80%
Pell Recipients
291
78%
518
83%
Total New Freshmen
2,079
80%
2,058
84%
More Graduates Plan
86%
New race/ethnicity categories were implemented in 2008.
Underrepresented minority (URM) students include all who indicate African American, American
Indian, Hispanic/Latino(a), or Southeast Asian alone or in combination with other races/ethnicities.
*
Five or fewer students were retained or graduated.
Closing the Achievement Gap in
Retention Rates at UW-Eau Claire
Baseline
Gap: 5%
2015 Goal: 2%
Fall 2010
Gap: 4%
Status: In Progress
Baseline
Gap: 3%
2015 Goal: 1%
Fall 2010
Gap: 1%
Status: In Progress
0
20
40
20%
1
URM
60
40%
Non-URM
60%
Pell
80
80%
100
100%
Non-Pell
2
Accomplishing the More Graduates initiative means increasing
graduation rates for students of all races/ethnicities.
UW-Eau Claire New Freshmen Entering Full Time
6 Year Graduation Rate at Institution Where Started
2000 Fall Cohort 2005 Fall Cohort
#
%
#
%
African American
6
*
10
*
American Indian
10
*
11
82%
Southeast Asian
27
44%
29
41%
Other Asian American
20
55%
30
47%
Hispanic/Latino(a)
13
46%
15
80%
White
1,980
60%
1,934
66%
Unknown
4
*
22
68%
International
19
37%
12
58%
URM1
56
45%
65
57%
Pell Recipients
291
53%
277
57%
Total New Freshmen
2,079
59%
2,063
65%
More Graduates Plan
65%
Closing the Achievement Gap in
Graduation Rates at UW-Eau Claire
Baseline
Gap: 12%
2015 Goal: 6%
Fall 2005
Gap: 8%
Status: In Progress
Baseline
Gap: 9%
2015 Goal: 4%
Fall 2005
Gap: 9%
Status: In Progress
0
20%
URM
Non-URM
40%
Pell
60%
80%
Non-Pell
1
Underrepresented minority (URM) students include all who indicate African American, American
Indian, Hispanic/Latino(a), or Southeast Asian alone or in combination with other races/ethnicities.
*Five or fewer students were retained or graduated.
5
Core Strategy 3
Well-Paying Jobs
Increase the creation of well-paying jobs by expanding the university research enterprise
while linking academic programs to entrepreneurship and business development.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
Additional UW-Eau Claire Indicators
International Business Major. UW-Eau Claire is the first college
or university in northwestern Wisconsin to offer an international
Part of UW-Eau Claire’s mission is to create new knowledge and
business degree. The bachelor of business administration
prepare students to use that knowledge in the workforce.
degree in international business, approved in June 2011, will
• Research leads to the development of new industries and
help keep UW-Eau Claire at the forefront of global education
creates well-paying jobs in Wisconsin. Federal and privately
in northwestern Wisconsin. The new degree was developed
funded research expenditures at UW-Eau Claire were $938,000
using a grant from the U.S. Department of Education.
in fiscal year 2011 (FY11), down from $1.4 million in FY10.
STEM & Health Fields Enrollment. Enrollment in STEM and
• Degrees in high-need and leading-edge fields are important
health fields programs has increased by 26% since 2005.
to meet the demand for workers in fast-growing occupations,
This increase reflects UW-Eau Claire’s commitment to
such as in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
offering programs in high-need and leading-edge fields.
(STEM) and health fields. In 2010-11, UW-Eau Claire conferred
Current enrollment trends suggest that the number of
245 STEM degrees and 331 degrees in health fields, compared to
degrees granted by UW-Eau Claire in STEM and health fields
225 STEM degrees and 230 in health fields five years ago.
will continue to increase.
• UW-Eau Claire’s graduates contribute to Wisconsin’s economy
Frac Sand Industry. UW-Eau Claire graduates are benefiting
through higher levels of discretionary spending and by paying
from the burgeoning frac sand industry in Wisconsin. An
higher taxes. The differences in earnings between college
increasing number of geology graduates have found welland high school graduates is $21,000 on average. Overall, 58%
paying positions with several sand mining companies in
of UW-Eau Claire graduates remained in the state, with 23%
the area. One of these companies, EOG Resources, prides
living in the West Central region. Of Wisconsin residents who
itself on hiring locally, and has been recognized by Fortune
graduated from UW-Eau Claire, 73% remained in the state.
magazine as one of the best places to work in the U.S. for
several years in a row.
Applied Data Consultants, Inc. (ADC). Applied Data
Consultants, in Chippewa Falls, employs many UW-Eau
Claire graduates. These students come from a broad array
of programs, including computer science, geology and
geography. ADC uses revolutionary web technologies and
employs modern geographic information systems (GIS) to
deliver real-time, dynamic, geospatial web solutions for
clients throughout the nation.
6
C ore Strategy 4
Stronger Communities
In partnership with communities, address Wisconsin’s greatest challenges and priorities
through intensified engagement, research, and learning.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
UW-Eau Claire has a positive impact on communities both by
cultivating civic participation in students and through a variety of
engagement efforts developed in partnership with communities.
central, and western Wisconsin, in addition to parts of
Minnesota. Additionally, through the use of distance education
delivery methods, UW-Eau Claire is helping to meet the needs of
communities in this region, as many nursing students are placebound nontraditional students unable to relocate due to family
and financial/work obligations.
• Encouraging students’ civic participation yields immediate
Human Development Center. The Human Development
benefits to communities while students are enrolled and builds a
Center (HDC) is an interdisciplinary program that offers
foundation for lifelong civic involvement of graduates.
affordable clinical services (e.g., assessment, consultation
Participation UW-
and intervention) to individuals and families from western
National
Master’s
by Seniors, 2011
Eau Claire
Wisconsin. Under direct faculty supervision, student clinicians
from multiple disciplines (e.g., communication sciences and
Community service
79%
58%*
55%*
or volunteer work
disorders, education, nursing, psychology and social work)
Community-based
work with individuals experiencing problems associated
course project or
69%
46%*
49%*
with behavior, learning and social/emotional functioning.
service learning project
Approximately 75 clients receive services each year. The HDC
Voting in local, state, or
47%
33%*
34%*
national elections
also provides community outreach through the sponsorship
of consultation and professional training to area agencies
*Significant differences from the UW-Eau Claire percentage at the 0.05 level.
Note: All participating national and master’s-level public colleges and universities.
involved in working with children and families, including Eau
Source: 2011 National Survey of Student Engagement.
Claire Area Public Schools and the Department of Family
Medicine at UW-Madison.
•One of many ways UW-Eau Claire is active in community
outreach and engagement is by offering non-credit courses for Tax Assistance Program. UW-Eau Claire Accounting students
professional development and personal enrichment. In fiscal
provide free income tax assistance to taxpayers who cannot
year 2011, the total of non-credit continuing education course
afford to pay for professional help through the Volunteer
enrollments for UW-Eau Claire was 5,760.
Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. All accounting majors
participate in the VITA program. In addition, accounting and
finance students gain financial advising experience while
Additional UW-Eau Claire Indicators
giving back to the Eau Claire community by participating in the
Meeting Regional Healthcare Needs. UW-Eau Claire is the
Financial Literacy Improvement Program (FLIP). FLIP volunteers
only college offering baccalaureate and higher degree nursing
teach clients basic budgeting techniques and help them
programs in the northern, north central, and northwestern
establish a financial plan for their lives.
regions of the state and thus has the potential to impact the
health of the people in this predominantly rural area of the
state. A number of UW-Eau Claire graduates are working in
critical access hospitals, rural health clinics, public health
departments, community health centers, and/or with rural
or underserved populations, thereby improving health care
access and reducing health disparities in northern, north
7
Core Strategy 5
Resources
Balance, diversify, and grow the university’s financial resources and facilities while
developing its human talent.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
Additional UW-Eau Claire Indicators
The resources of people, money, and facilities are what
enable UW-Eau Claire to fulfill its mission to students and the
people of Wisconsin.
Blugold Commitment: Differential Tuition. In the second year
of the 4-year implementation schedule, the increase in studentapproved differential tuition should result in $9 million (FY12)
total funding designated for enhancing academic quality,
supporting more high impact practices and providing financial
assistance to students. More than 60 programs and initiatives
have been funded, including the equivalent of 30 faculty and
staff positions.
• Diversity of faculty and staff is an indicator of UW-Eau Claire’s
efforts to develop its human resources. Faculty and staff
diversity provides richer exchanges of ideas in the classroom,
broader lines of inquiry in research, and a more welcoming
climate for students from underrepresented groups. In fall 2011, Foundation. The UW-Eau Claire Foundation continued its
8.1% of UW-Eau Claire faculty and staff were people of color, or
fundraising success ending FY11 with $4,329,940 in gifts from
104 out of 1,285.
nearly 14,000 donors. This is the sixth year in a row Foundation
gifts have exceeded $4 million. In addition, Foundation board
UW-Eau Claire Faculty and Staff of Color
members personally gave $125,000 over three years to support
By Employment Category, Fall 2011
international study and immersion scholarships.
16.0%
15
12
9
8.1%
7.4%
6.3%
6
3.2%
3
0
3.2%
2.3%
New Student Center. The new W. R. Davies Student Center
is scheduled to open in time for the fall 2012 semester. The
$48.8 million project is funded through segregated fees paid
by students. No tax dollars are involved in the development,
construction, or operation of the building. In keeping with UWEau Claire’s strategic values of stewardship and sustainability,
the new student center will incorporate eco-friendly elements
including a green roof and sustainability standards designed to
consume 30% less energy than current codes require.
The Priory. In October 2011, a subsidiary of the University of
Wisconsin-Eau Claire Foundation, Inc., purchased the Priory,
African American
Asian American
Hawaiian/Pacific Is.
formerly St. Bede Monastery, located three miles south
American Indian
Hispanic/Latino(a)
Two or More Races
of the UW-Eau Claire campus. The property includes 112
IAS=Instructional Academic Staff
mostly wooded acres and three building complexes totaling
approximately 80,000 square feet. The first intended use of the
•UW-Eau Claire relies on revenue from a variety of sources to
Priory by the university will be as the relocation site for the
fulfill its mission. Revenue from all sources increased from $130
current Children’s Center.
million in fiscal year 2006 (FY06) to $175 million in FY11. Revenue
from gifts, grants, and contracts increased from 9% of total
revenue in FY06 to 12% in FY11.
8
Faculty
IAS
Non-IAS
Admin.
Classified Grad Asst
Total
C ore Strategy 6
Operational Excellence
Advance operational excellence by becoming more flexible, responsive, and cost efficient.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
Additional UW-Eau Claire Indicators
UW-Eau Claire makes efficient use of its human, financial, and
physical resources in a variety of ways.
Regional Data Center. With server space on campus near
capacity, UW-Eau Claire Learning and Technology Services
staff partnered with Chippewa Valley Technical College (CVTC),
which has similar data center needs. CVTC’s administration
repurposed its Manufacturing Education Center as an
Advanced Technology Center that will also house a regional
data center. UW-Eau Claire and WISCNET will be partners in
the venture with CVTC, with other regional partners joining
later. Occupancy will occur in summer 2012.
•By encouraging progress toward degree completion, UWEau Claire helps ensure efficient use of students’ personal
and financial resources and provides space for new students.
Credits taken prior to graduation, an indicator of educational
resources used by UW-Eau Claire students, are currently
below the levels in 1993-94, when the goal to reduce credits to
the bachelor’s degree was adopted.
Process Improvement. Process improvement efforts continued
in the areas of Accounts Payable and Purchasing, during
Average Credits Taken by UW-Eau CLaire
FY11. Several electronic forms (e forms) were implemented,
Bachelor’s Degree Recipients
dramatically increasing the accuracy, quality, and timeliness of
the transmitted information, all while reducing the amount of
150 150
paper being printed and transferred from desk to desk. A team
146
of UW-Eau Claire marketing students conducted data gathering
145
145
142
from various purchasing processes and conducted interviews
141
140
with internal customers. The findings from these efforts led to
140
138
137
proposals for streamlining parts of the purchasing process, and
136
136
135 provided excellent feedback on how to improve training for
135
faculty and staff.
130 130
125
93/94
01/02
03/04
05/06
07/08
09/10
10/11
• Keeping administrative spending low allows UW-Eau Claire
to concentrate resources on instruction and other studentrelated activities. Administrative spending at UW-Eau Claire
was 34% of the national average in FY09, the most recent year
of available national data. This means UW-Eau Claire spent
$19 million less on institutional support than it would have if
spending at the national average.
Student Office of Sustainability (SOS). The SOS serves as an
autonomous subunit of the Student Senate with the goal of
spearheading the student-led sustainability efforts on campus.
The SOS is responsible for allocating the approximately $220,000
green fund, supported entirely by student fees. Funds allocated
by the SOS support projects that promote sustainable modes of
transportation, increase energy efficiency, reduce the amount
of waste created by UW-Eau Claire, and improve the natural
habitat of Wisconsin’s “most beautiful campus.”
• Reducing energy usage is a goal for UW-Eau Claire and all
state agencies. At UW-Eau Claire, energy usage in fiscal year
2010 (FY10) was 19.4% below the amount in FY05, the baseline
year for state agencies.
9
Core Strategy 7
Collaborations
Further leverage UW System’s strengths and impact through collaborations among the
campuses and with other Wisconsin partners.
UW-Eau Claire’s Progress on UW System Indicators
UW-Eau Claire’s collaborations and partnerships with other UW
institutions, other education sectors, businesses, community
organizations, and governmental agencies allow it to have greater
impact than by acting alone.
with work or family commitments can complete their degrees
more easily. This collaboration serves to increase the number of
bachelor’s degree-level nurses with ties to Central Wisconsin.
Enrollment in the Marshfield nursing program, currently at 98,
has increased sevenfold since the fall 2005 semester.
•UW-Eau Claire increases student access through collaborative Additional UW-Eau Claire Indicators
degree programs, which are offered at multiple locations, integrate Student Practicum Work. During the 2010-11 academic year,
courses from different institutions, or both. UW-Eau Claire is a
many students from UW-Eau Claire completed their practicum
partner in ten of these formal arrangements, listed below.
coursework in ways that benefited communities in the Eau
Claire region. One example of this is the partnership between
Collaborative Degree Program
Partner Institutions
the university and local school districts. More than 1,000 UWDual Degree - BS in Physics,
LAC, MSN, OSH, RVF,
Eau
Claire students did practicum work across nearly 150
BS in Engineering
WTW
schools in the region during the 2010-11 year. In addition, nearly
BS in Nursing (Collaborative Program)
GBY, MSN, MIL, OSH
400 students in UW-Eau Claire’s nursing program completed
Dual Certification in Special Education
RVF
clinical work at more than 100 regional medical facilities.
Master of Business Administration (MBA
LAC, OSH, PKS
Consortium)
Doctorate of Nursing (DNP)
OSH
B of Professional Studies in Organizational
EXT*
Leadership and Communication
Dual Degree - BS in Physics,
BS in Engineering
University of Minnesota
(Minneapolis, MN)
Dual Degree - BS in Geology,
BS in Engineering
University of Minnesota
(Minneapolis, MN)
Associate of Science
RVF, STO, Chippewa
Valley Technical College
Dual Degree
AASCU’s 1-2-1
program in China
OrgSync E-Portfolio Tool. UW-Eau Claire, UW-Oshkosh, UW-River
Falls and UW–Stout worked collaboratively with the OrgSync staff to
offer each respective campus an enhanced E-Portfolio for students,
funded by the 2010-11 Growth Agenda Grant Program. The project
allowed the creation of a tool that included a portfolio component
and an enhancement to an Events Module, which offered new
opportunities for assessing student learning. Students are able to
use the tool to create an online portfolio of classes taken, reflections
on their learning, employment history and references as well as
involvement in campus activities and organizations.
Facilities Partnerships. UW-Eau Claire continues to grow its
partnerships to enhance campus facilities. A funding partnership
composed of the UW-Eau Claire Foundation, Student Senate, and
the university, supplemented with state and university facilities
•UW-Eau Claire has a variety of other partnerships in academic
improvement funds, enabled a year-long, $1 million renovation
and non-academic areas.
of historic Schofield auditorium, was completed in early 2012.
A continuing collaboration involving the university and city of
UW-Eau Claire nursing programs partner with St. Joseph’s Hospital
Eau Claire also saw improvements to Bollinger Fields, home
in Marshfield. These partnerships enable students from Central
to women’s soccer, athletics practice facilities, and intramural
Wisconsin to earn a UW-Eau Claire nursing degree without traveling
athletics, and City of Eau Claire recreation programs.
to the Eau Claire campus to attend classes, which means students
EXT* - UW-Extension provides administrative, financial, and other support to a number of UW
System Collaborative Degree Programs.
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UW-Eau Claire’s mission to provide a truly transformative liberal education and our
vision to be a premier learning community support the UW System’s goals to prepare
more graduates for Wisconsin who are ready to meet the challenges of a global
economy and able to take their place as active and engaged citizens. The University’s
Centennial Plan outlines the intention to transform learning by preparing and graduating
students who benefit from an intensive focus on purposeful, rigorous learning;
opportunities for real-world experience that include collaborative undergraduate
research, service learning, and internships; and leadership efforts in providing
international and multicultural immersion experiences.
This report illustrates UW-Eau Claire’s contributions to the UW System’s Growth Agenda for Wisconsin. Progress is reported within the seven
core strategies of the UW System’s Strategic Framework (above). Each core strategy includes one or more indicators of progress that are
common among UW institutions, supplemented with additional information reflecting activities and outcomes of particular relevance to
UW-Eau Claire. For similar information on the UW System as a whole, as well as links to additional resources and technical notes, see the
systemwide Investing in Wisconsin’s Future report: http://www.wisconsin.edu/opar/accountability/
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UW-EAU CLAIRE
The Accountability Report can be found at http://www.uwsa.edu/opar/accountability/

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