South East Economic Development Strategy

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South East Economic Development Strategy
Tithe an Oireachtais
Houses of the Oireachtas
An Comhchoiste um Poist, Fiontair agus Nuálaíocht
Joint Committee on Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation
Straitéis Forbartha Eacnamaíochta an Oirdheiscirt
2013 -2023
South East Economic Development Strategy (SEEDS)
2013 -2023
Cuir síos na síolta – Cuir fás faoin Eacnamaíocht
Plant the SEEDS – Grow the Economy
JEI ****
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South East Economic Development Strategy
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments ...........................................................................................................................5
Chairman’s Foreword ......................................................................................................................7
Rapporteur’s Introduction (Senator David Cullinane) ....................................................................9
1
Executive Summary ...........................................................................................................11
1.1
Introduction and rationale for the report ......................................................... 11
1.2
Key Facts....................................................................................................... 13
1.3
A vision for the Southeast .............................................................................. 14
1.4
Key Actions and Interventions ........................................................................ 16
1.5
Structure and Implementation ........................................................................ 25
2. Profile of the Southeast – Strengths and Weaknesses .............................................................. 27
3
4
Key Areas ..........................................................................................................................33
3.1
Education, Training and Development ........................................................... 33
3.2
Infrastructural development............................................................................ 46
3.3
Fostering FDI growth and developing an enterprise environment ................... 64
3.4
Supporting the SME Sector............................................................................ 70
Key Growth Sector ............................................................................................................74
4.1
Agri-Business, Fishing, Food Production and Technology ............................. 74
4.2
Tourism, Arts and Culture .............................................................................. 80
4.3
Health, Life Sciences and Medical Devices .................................................... 83
4.4
Financial and International Trading Services.................................................. 85
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5.
4.5
Bio Technology and the Green Economy ....................................................... 87
4.6
Creative Industries and the ICT sector ........................................................... 90
4.7
Social Economy and Economic Self Reliance ................................................ 95
Appendices...................................................................................................................... 101
5.1
Membership of the Joint Committee ............................................................. 101
5.2
List of consultation meetings and submissions ............................................. 102
5.3
Profile of companies in the Southeast .......................................................... 108
5.4
Profile of the construction sector in the Southeast........................................ 129
5.5
Glossary of terms ......................................................................................... 132
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Acknowledgments
The Report acknowledges the research undertaken by Martin Spain and the significant
contribution he made to the report. It further acknowledges the research undertaken by the
Oireachtas Library and Research service. The material and research carried out by the author was
based on the oral consultations and written submissions of all of the groups, organisations and
individuals who contributed to the consultation process. The report also acknowledges the
contributions of Ciaran Quinn, Mary Roche and Joanne Spain.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Chairman’s Foreword
Damien English
Committee Chairman
(FG)
From its establishment in June 2011, the former Joint Committee on Jobs, Social Protection and
Education identified unemployment in general, long term unemployment and youth
unemployment as key priority issues that were fundamentally important in national efforts to
achieve economic recovery.
In September 2012, on foot of a proposal from Senator David Cullinane, the Joint Committee on
Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation agreed to appoint Senator Cullinane as a rapporteur for the
Committee in the preparation of a report on the development of a strategy for the economic
development of the South East. The Joint Committee agreed that Senator Cullinane would
examine the issue in detail by seeking the views of the relevant organisations and individuals in
the region with a view to identifying realistic policy recommendations which could contribute
towards reducing the jobs crisis in the South East which has suffered disproportionately from
unemployment over the years. The strategy set out in this report is intended to complement the
Southeast Region Employment Action Plan published by Forfás.
In the course of the preparation of this report, Senator Cullinane, over a number of months, met
with a wide range of key organisations and individuals throughout the region to elicit their views.
In addition, the Joint Committee held a day of hearings on the topic to which identified groups and
individuals were invited to make oral presentations. All written submissions, opening statements
and presentations received and the transcript of the public meeting of the Joint Committee on 18
June this year at which the various organisations and individuals gave evidence can be
electronically accessed on the Committees website at
http://www.oireachtas.ie/parliament/oireachtasbusiness/committees_list/jobsenterpriseandi
nnovation/reports/
Senator Cullinane brought a draft report to the Joint Committee on 2 July and it was agreed that a
Steering Group of its Members would consider the report. Following consideration by the
Steering Group a revised version of the draft report was submitted for the consideration of the full
Joint Committee. The draft report was finally agreed by the Committee at its meeting of 23 July
2013 and adopted as a Committee report.
On behalf of the Joint Committee, I would like to express my deepest gratitude to Senator
Cullinane for all the detailed work done in producing the draft report, to the Steering Group for its
input, to the Oireachtas Library and Research Service and the staff of the Committee Secretariat
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for the excellent research, analytical and administrative support throughout and to the
organisations and individuals who came before the Joint Committee to give evidence as well as
the organisations and individuals who submitted written submissions. The Joint Committee
gained valuable insights from all those who had an input into the preparation of the report.
The Joint Committee for its part, is fully committed in close consultation with the relevant
Ministers, Departments, State Agencies and stakeholders to monitoring the progress being made
on the on-going implementation of the recommendations contained in this report as well as other
policy initiatives.
__________________
Damien English, T.D.,
Chairman,
Joint Committee on Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation,
September 2013.
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Rapporteur’s Introduction (Senator David Cullinane)
I would like to acknowledge and thank the members of the Joint Committee on Jobs, Enterprise
and Innovation for their support and input into the preparation of this report. Examining the
factors at play in the Southeast, the particular circumstances, the appropriate responses to it, and
the lessons learned will provide a useful blueprint for tackling unemployment throughout the rest
of the country.
I sincerely thank the many groups, organisations and individuals who engaged with the
consultation process. Their advice, input and proposals were invaluable and are reflected in the
substance of the report. The conclusions of the report draw on the consultations held in
Waterford, Kilkenny, Carlow, South Tipperary and Wexford. It is hoped that this strategy will build
on the work of the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, the Southeast Action Plan
published by Forfás and the Regional Forum established under the direction of the Minister.
I am hugely optimistic about the social and economic future of the Southeast. The region faces
many challenges including high unemployment, low educational attainment levels and social
disadvantage. However, the region has many strengths including an improved road infrastructure,
water and waste water treatment plants, the Rosslare and Waterford Ports and the Institutes of
Technology. The region is well placed in the areas of Health, Life Sciences & Medical Devices,
Financial & Internationally Traded Services, Tourism, Culture & the Arts, Agri-Business, Food
Production & Technology, Engineering, Mobile Technologies, Software Development & Digital
Media and Bio-technology & the Green Economy.
We need a joining up of local and national policy. National decision-making must reflect the reality
and the needs of the Southeast. The priority for the region and for Government must be to exploit
the strengths and address the weaknesses. In my view this is best achieved through the
implementation of this ten-year Economic Development Strategy.
This should be driven by a Southeast Economic Development Forum that improves the
effectiveness of the existing Southeast Forum and that brings together representatives of the key
stakeholders, with clear lines of work through sub-committee structures and with a main body to
oversee and monitor implementation of a regional strategy.
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With the right policies, a coherent regional approach and a focus on the key strengths of the
region I have no doubt that the Southeast can and will develop socially and economically and
create the necessary jobs. We must foster a spirit of doing it for ourselves, support creativity,
innovation and entrepreneurship and allow the region to flourish and grow.
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1
Executive Summary
1.1
Introduction and rationale for the report
This Action Plan arises from the Joint Committee on Jobs Enterprise and Innovation, whose
members agreed in October 2012 that the unemployment crisis in the Southeast Region merits
particular attention. The Southeast region consists of Wexford, Waterford City and County,
Carlow, South Tipperary and Kilkenny.
The objective of the report is to identify the economic needs of the Southeast. While geographic
inequalities in the economy are recognised by the State; there is a continued prioritisation of the
urban centres. It is critical that Government policy recognises regional disparities, addresses
geographical inequalities and drives balanced regional development.
The Committee appointed Special Rapporteur, Senator David Cullinane, who originally raised the
issue of the region’s disproportionately high level of unemployment, with the task of drafting a
document to consider what steps can be taken to improve the employment situation, examining
the region’s particular circumstances and making specific proposals to create jobs and grow the
regional economy.
Stakeholder consultation meetings were held in each of the five counties. The Joint Committee
invited key witnesses from the region to a special sitting of the committee to discuss specific
solutions and interventions necessary to help grow the regional economy.
The report is divided into five chapters, an executive summary, a profile of the Southeast, key
development areas, key sectors identified as growth areas in the region and an appendix.
This report notes the excellent research undertaken previously by Forfás, which produced the
Southeast Region Employment Action Plan. It is also intended to complement the work of Minister
Richard Bruton’s Southeast Forum.
The work undertaken by Forfás is unnecessary to replicate. This report placed a particular
emphasis on adding to the sum of research that already exists by consulting directly with the
widest possible range of stakeholders in the region.
Meetings were held with concerned organisations and individuals across the region and numerous
written submissions were received. This input has been invaluable in providing a clear picture of
the challenges and opportunities that exist in the Southeast and inform the short, medium, and
long-term proposals that form the basis of this Economic Development Strategy.
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The findings of the consultations have led to a number of recommendations. A list of key
recommendations is given in the Executive Summary and expanded upon in the document. These
involve policy support at local, regional and national level and varying levels of State investment in
both the short and long term. The report urges action on all fronts and a cohesive regional
response.
The main recommendation is to support and implement this ten-year Economic Development
Strategy for the Southeast Region, which includes a menu of clear recommendations on what
actions and resources are necessary to create employment in the Southeast, and to outline the
sectors in which jobs can be created in the region as a whole and in specific counties.
The role of Central, Regional and Local Government is a vital cog in the economic development of
the Southeast region. To best position the region to take advantage of its strengths and address its
weaknesses, a suite of inter-agency interventions is necessary in both the short, medium and long
term.
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1.2
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Key Facts
The Southeast region comprises of Waterford City and County, Wexford, Carlow, Kilkenny and
South Tipperary.
The population of the region is over 497,300 or 13.5% of the State.
Between 2006-2011 the population of the Southeast grew by 7.9%1.
The population of the principal urban centres in the region are 51,203 for Waterford City &
Environs, 23,561 for Kilkenny City & Environs, 22,328 for Carlow Town & Environs, 19,918 for
Wexford Town & Environs, 17,564 for Clonmel & Environs and 9,427 for Dungarvan &
Environs2.
The recent figures for unemployment in the Southeast (Q1 2013) published by the CSO in the
Quarterly National Household Survey highlight that while at national level the unemployment
figure was 13.7%, the figure for the Southeast was 18.4%3.
The unemployment figures for the region’s Gateway City of Waterford from Census 2011 are
25.08%.
The most recently available report on the Gateway Development Index 4 (GDI) published in
May 2013 shows that the overall GDI score for Waterford Gateway was 4.7 out of 9
(Compared to 4.5 in 2009), one of the lowest of the established cities.
The most recent ‘indices of GVA per person’5 available from the CSO for 2009 show that each
of the regions that are prospering have a strong urban Gateway e.g. South West 122.7, MidWest 84.7 and the West 72.9. In contrast the Indices of GVA per person for the Southeast is
68.3.
Younger age cohorts have been affected by employment declines to a higher extent in the
Southeast6.
In Q1 2011, those with below third level educational attainment accounted for 85% of
unemployment in the Southeast compared to 78% in the State7.
Those aged under 35 account for 51% of total unemployment while representing only 38% of
the Labour Force in the region.
1
CSO, Census of Population 2011
CSO, Census of Population 2011
3
CSO (2013) Quarterly National Household Survey Q3 2013
4
Gateways | Hubs Development Index 2012 A Review of Socio-Economic Performance
5
CSO (2012) County Incomes and Regional GDP 2009
6
Forfás South East Region Employment Action Plan
7
Forfás South East Region Employment Action Plan
2
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1.3
A vision for the Southeast
For the Southeast to succeed in generating economic growth and creating employment, a sense of
shared purpose to create real regional cohesion is a prerequisite. This will involve inter-county and
inter-agency collaboration to eliminate needless layers of bureaucracy and deliver effective
change.
The proposed ten-year Economic Development Strategy allows time for new structures to bed in
and facilitates long-term planning in terms of R&D, allocation of resources and industry
development that is necessary to achieve sustainable economic expansion.
The Southeast needs to focus on its key strengths in tourism, agri-business and food production,
developing a critical mass of expertise through improved educational attainment, delivery of a
Technological University and strong research and development.
The region must maximise the potential of existing key assets such as the two ports of national
significance (Rosslare and Waterford), the regional airport and improvements to the road and rail
network.
10 Key priorities for the Southeast:
 Implementation of a long term Economic Development Strategy for the Southeast that
supports a new model for the region based on sustainability, meeting the needs of
enterprise, an alignment of national, regional and county objectives underpinned by the
needs of the community.
 The establishment of a southeast regional office and a southeast regional director of the
IDA based in Waterford City.
 To ensure that the Southeast has at least the same IDA Investment Aid as the BMW region
as part of the Regional Aid Guidelines for 2014 – 2020.
 The establishment of a Technological University in the region and the building of
competitive advantage through a strong research and development hub and support for
innovation and creativity.
 A strategy to improve educational attainment and skills provision in the region.
 The development of a regional Transport Hub that aligns road, rail and port infrastructure,
maximises use of both ports (Rosslare and Waterford), ensures completion of the
Enniscorthy and New Ross Bypass and improvements to the N24 to greatly improve the
Limerick to Waterford road corridor.
 Investment in the roll-out of Dark Fibre Network (Broadband) in the region.
 Investment in the regional Airport to allow for expansion of the runway and the opening of
opportunities to access new markets and supporting growth in tourism.
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 Supporting tourism as a key driver of economic growth through a coordinated and
integrated regional strategy and the development of a strategic tourism vision.
 The Development of the Southeast as a world leader in Food including production,
processing, ingredients and technology. This should involve maximising the potential of
Harvest 2020 and the abolition of the milk quota in 2015.
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1.4
Key Actions and Interventions
Education, Training and Development:
Key Proposals:
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Designation of Waterford and Carlow Institutes as a Technological University of the Southeast.
Ensure a Technological University is embedded in the social, cultural and economic needs of
the Southeast.
Incorporate Higher Education Institutions into a regional strategy to ensure a matching of
education provision with industry needs, allowing policy to guide and support regional
development and to ensure actions taken at national, regional and HEI level support each
other.
A Technological University must deliver new engagement models bringing together education
at all levels, technology, research, business and entrepreneurship producing industry-ready
graduates and new innovation models that drive the economic development of the region.
A holistic and integrated regional strategy to improve educational attainment through
increased focus in lifelong learning, up-skilling and greater flexibility in course delivery.
The development of a specific Labour Market Activation Programme for those with literacy
and numeracy needs.
The integration of literacy and numeracy into all publically funded education and training
programmes.
Create greater connections and collaboration across all training and education programmes
and providers.
Create greater awareness of skills development and learning opportunities in the region
through local information campaigns, open days and exhibitions.
Create greater opportunities for engagement with employers in the important areas of
training, re-skilling and up-skilling.
Local and other actions:
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The development of a pilot strategy in the region to ensure a greater emphasis on Creativity,
Innovation and Entrepreneurship in secondary schools through competitions and enterprise
modules.
Establish models of best practice in activation measures on providing career advice and
‘progression pathways’ for the unemployed and on up-skilling with accredited qualifications
and by documenting and sharing best practice.
Identify gaps in further education course provision across the region to serve the needs of
local employers.
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Change the rules and regulations surrounding Further Education and Training Awards Council
(FETAC) courses which prevent participants taking courses with a lower or equal rating than
the last one they completed, which inhibits people from changing career paths and reskilling.
The establishment of Waterford City as a National Centre of Excellence for Crystal Production
with the development of a Crystal Making Apprenticeship Scheme through a partnership
between the House of Waterford Crystal and Waterford Institute of Technology.
Support greater linkages between second and third level education drawing on the success of
the Calmast Programme at Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT).
The development of a second level schools programme focused on developing social
enterprise projects and link to the existing School Enterprise Programme.
Infrastructural development
Key Proposals:
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The development of a regional Transport Hub that aligns road, rail and port infrastructure,
maximises use of both ports (Rosslare and Waterford), ensures completion of the Enniscorthy
and New Ross Bypass and improvements to the N24 to greatly improve the Limerick to
Waterford road corridor.
The development of key strategic sites such as Belview in South Kilkenny and Knockhouse in
Waterford.
Invest in the roll-out of Dark Fibre Network (broadband) in the region and the introduction of a
pilot scheme that provides State financial support in key towns in each of the counties in the
region.
The creation of an Independent Port Authority for Rosslare Europort with a mandate to
develop the range and business activity at the Port.
Funding to be provided to Waterford Regional Airport for necessary development works and
expansion and extension of the runway.
The carrying out of a cost benefit analysis of all infrastructural spend including the methods
used to fund projects.
Local and other actions:
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A strategic review of rail access to Rosslare Europort to allow the port reach its full potential.
Deepen a berth at Rosslare Europort from 7 metres to 9 metres, where feasible, in accordance
with the Habitats Directive, to allow the port realise its potential as a strategic asset
supporting regional exports and tourism.
To explore the feasibility of the deepening of the Port of Waterford and exploit its commercial
potential as a load-on load-off Port.
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Support the extension of the Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN) to service Industrial
Development Authority (IDA) Belview lands, providing appropriate broadband requirements
allowing for enterprise development and expansion at the site.
The development of Dunmore East Harbour and Port, Kilmore Quay and Helvick Harbour to
support the fishing industry and expansion of the tourist industry including the need to
provide the necessary funding to dredge the harbour at Dunmore East.
The retention of the Limerick/Waterford Rail Line and the carrying out of a re-evaluation of
the Waterford to Rosslare line.
Ensure provision of accessible and affordable childcare in the region to support employment.
Fostering FDI growth
Key Proposals:
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Regional targets to be set for the IDA in attracting Industry and creating jobs in the region.
The establishment of a Southeast Regional Office and a Southeast Regional Director of the IDA
based in Waterford City.
The IDA to secure provision of new Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and high value jobs to the
region through increased site visits, marketing, branding and enabling clustering of industries.
The IDA, in partnership with local authorities, to bring forward plans to develop suitable sites
and property solutions to support the development of key sectors such as Agri-business, ICT,
Life-sciences and Internationally traded services.
The development of High Level CEO Groups across all key sectors in the region.
To ensure that the Southeast has at least the same IDA Investment Aid as the BMW region as
part of the Regional Aid Guidelines for 2014 – 2020.
Developing an Enterprise Environment
Key Proposals
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The development of a Marketing Programme for Waterford and Rosslare Ports.
The assistance of National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) to facilitate the development of
town and city centres in the region where possible, such as the Michael Street area in
Waterford City and the carrying out of an audit of NAMA stock with a view to maximising
potential of NAMA assets in the region.
To evaluate the South Tipperary County Hub Data and consider its rolling out throughout the
region.
Supporting expanding the role of Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs) to include businesses with
more than 10 employees and to take in tourism and food enterprises in line with regional
enterprise strategies.
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Development of a regional strategy aimed at getting more women into business, particularly
helping them through the early stages of start-up.
Supporting the Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) Sector
Key Proposals:
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A government initiative to prioritise job retention through a job retention fund.
A region-specific target for bank lending to SMEs.
An urgent review of commercial rates to rebalance the burden between large multinationals
and small and medium sized businesses.
Provision of greater soft supports for new micro start-ups including the introduction of startup vouchers on a pilot basis in the region.
Open up State procurement to small companies by breaking down contracts.
Examine the use of tax credits for multinational corporations which source locally produced
materials as opposed to importing to increase spin out opportunities in the SME sector in the
region, subject to European state aid conditions.
The continued support of the Import X initiative of the Enterprise Boards of the Southeast
which help substitute domestic goods or services for imported ones.
Local and other actions:
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Prioritise the review of the prompt payments legislation as called for by Irish Small and
Medium Enterprises (ISME).
Develop a regional strategy to support retention of local retailers including the enhancement
of local retail infrastructure, to prevent the drainage of local small and medium retail business
to big superstores in city and town centres.
The introduction of a PLATO type programme for the region to foster greater networking
between larger parent companies and the SME sector.
Agri-Business, Fishing, Food Production and Technology
Key Proposals:
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The development of a strategy to position the Southeast to take advantage of targets
envisaged in Harvest 2020 with an emphasis on milk expansion, beef expansion, Food SME
expansion and increased direct labour opportunities.
The development of a regional High Level CEO group in the food Sector working collaboratively
with the new Socio Economic Committees in the region and providing cutting edge advice on
future development and clustering.
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The development of a plan to position the Southeast as a world leader in food production,
technology and research through strong academic Research and Development and Industry
support.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should develop a comprehensive Sustainable
and Eco-friendly Fishing Strategy for the Southeast.
Local and other actions:
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The development of a Science Group (Department of Agriculture, Department of the
Environment, Local Authorities, Teagasc, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Water
catchment region, Irish Water and Waterford and Carlow Institutes) to ensure full compliance
with the Water Framework Directive and to ensure good water quality in groundwater, surface
water or in estuaries to facilitate expansion of herds.
Ensure the maintenance of the Nitrates Directive derogation to facilitate meeting Harvest
2020 targets.
The development of the agri-food sector, including the establishment of a forum of all
supermarket suppliers and members of each producer organisation to negotiate a fair trading
regime of suppliers and with a view to increasing the use of local produce.
Support for artisan and local food producers through designated traders, markets and festivals
and linkages with tourism and promoting the region as a Food Travel destination.
Tourism, Culture and the Arts
Key Proposals
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The development of a strategic tourism vision, an holistic package and marketing brand for the
region with continued support for the Viking Triangle in Waterford, the medieval mile in
Kilkenny, and the significant heritage sites in Wexford, South Tipperary and Carlow.
To develop a coordinated approach to supporting the cultural and tourist sector in the region
with an emphasis on heritage, eco-tourism and festivals.
To consider the development of Southeast Tourism based on the Kilkenny Tourism model
and/or Destination Waterford which ensures maximum collaboration between tourist and
service providers with an emphasis on customer service. This must also involve recognising
and measuring the economic value of festivals and tourism generally.
To develop Eco-tourism in the region and specifically the opening and operation of the world
class Mount Congreve gardens as a major tourist attraction.
The establishment of a Pilot ‘Streetscape fund’ to assist in the regeneration of towns and cities
in the region.
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Local and other actions:
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Develop a regional strategy to ensure a business dividend for the hotels, restaurants, shops
and public houses from the tourist industry with a key emphasis on improving the streetscape
and public realm in town and city centres.
The development of an online marketing strategy to promote the Southeast through
innovative uses of new technologies such as web-based video material, social media and using
local champions and ambassadors to sell the message.
Local authorities to provide adequate bus parking at key attraction points in the region.
Continued support for festivals in the region such as SPRAOI, Food Festivals, Cat Laughs,
Wexford Opera, Winterval and others.
Local authorities, tourist providers and venue operators to look at increasing the amount of
‘gigs’ and concerts in the region.
Health, Life Sciences and Medical Devices
Key Proposals
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The establishment of a regional high level CEO Medical Devices group working collaboratively
with the local Socio Economic Committees, to develop mutual supportive policies and actions
and greater clustering in this area and a use of the FUSE initiative to encourage greater
collaboration in the sector.
A strategy to assist companies in the life sciences sector in dealing with such challenges as
expiry of patents, the costs of Research and Development, global over-capacity in some areas
and greater competition from Asia and the Far East.
Local authorities in the region through the SECs to provide supports to companies in the sector
in areas such as good manufacturing practice (GMP), lean manufacturing and green initiatives.
Local and other actions:
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Support companies engaged in pipelining new products and new drug formulations.
Support stronger linkages between third level institutes and enterprises in this sector such as
the Pharmaceutical and Molecular Biotechnology Research Centre (PMBRC), Carlow Institute
of Technologies Industrial Design and Product Development Innovation Centre, Southeastern
Applied Materials Research Centre (SEAM) and the Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre
(Shannon ABC).
A future Technological University of the Southeast to have a clear focus on training, up-skilling
and meeting the graduate needs of the sector.
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Financial and Internationally Traded Services
Key Proposals:
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Development of a Regional High Level CEO Group in the sector, led by the financial services
sector and supported by the IDA and local authorities through the Socio Economic
Committees.
The High Level Group to identify the segments of the financial services sector, including newly
emerging sectors, which the region can best target.
The continued roll-out of next generation broadband to ensure that suitably identified sites
have access to advanced, high quality and competitively priced broadband infrastructure as
identified in the Forfás Report.
The region to build on its sizeable portfolio of international financial services companies as a
basis for further growth.
Local and other actions:
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The local authorities in the region to build and maintain a skills register and develop a
database of available and suitable property solutions (land, buildings and office premises) in
the region.
Strengthen relationships and linkages between industry and enterprises in this sector and the
existing third level institutes to ensure suitable course development and a steady supply of
appropriately skilled graduates.
The carrying out of a regional skills deficit audit in this sector to identify skills shortages such as
languages and multi-lingual activity and the development of appropriate responses through
collaborative initiatives between industry and the education sector.
Bio Technology and the Green Economy
Key Proposals:
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Develop a green economic strategy for the Southeast region, to explore enterprise
opportunities in green services, renewable energy and clean-tech industries.
Support the development of a regional renewable energy cluster policy to make
recommendations on the requirements of third and fourth level institutes, research and
development agencies and infrastructural requirements.
Develop a regional branding and strategy and market the Southeast as a Green Economy
region with support from Government Departments and relevant agencies.
An inter-agency approach in identifying and developing key green and clean-tech reference
sites in the region.
Support the revival of the sugar beet industry and the construction a new bio-refinery plant in
the Southeast which has the potential to create 5,000 jobs.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Local and other actions:
 Programmes should be put in place through local authorities to train advise individuals and
groups in starting up sustainable energy companies.
 An investment in wind power industry and wave energy to take advantage of the regions
geographical strengths.
 Further development of the strategic water resources in the region recognising that an
abundant supply of water and waste water treatment is hugely important into the future.
 Escalate regeneration projects in the region with a focus on retrofitting of local authority
stock.
Creative Industries and the ICT sector
Key Proposals




A strategy for the creative and cultural sector which would complement the broader plans for
developing R&D activity, new business start-ups and entrepreneurship arising out of the third
level sector.
The development of a creative industries plan supported by Enterprise Ireland, the Business
and Innovation Centre, County and City Enterprise Boards and the third level sector in the
region.
Such a plan would include specific targets for growing employment in key sectors such as
digital media, gaming, mobile technologies and ICT in health care, agri-business and ecoinnovation well as goals for new business start-ups, expansion of existing business and aid to
early stage entrepreneurs.
A regional plan aimed at getting businesses online by matching local businesses with local web
designers to develop sophisticated online business presences that move beyond a static
website to ones that are interactive with potential customers, allowing feedback and
promotion using social media and other online marketing tools.
Local and other actions




Targets set to bring more creative clusters to the Southeast allowing entrepreneurs to share
the costs of office space as well as creating a communal creative environment.
An audit of the wider creative and cultural sector in the Southeast to quantify current activity,
the net contribution to the region, employment levels, as well as the potential of the various
elements of this sector to expand.
A regional focus on the Enterprise Ireland (EI) Competitive Start Fund, targeting new local
enterprises to apply for this funding and business aid.
A bridging of potential skills gaps in the creative sector at both undergraduate and post
graduate levels.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Social Economy and Economic Self Reliance
Key Proposals:






The development of a pilot ‘Programme for Economic Self Reliance’ in the region whose aim
would be to create ten jobs in every community and a regional network of micro-economies.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should establish a sub group tasked with
mobilising and co-ordinating the resources available, pilot a variety of enterprise projects
across the five counties for replication across the region, remove barriers to progress,
establish a culture of shared learning and of best practice and foster linkages with third level
institutes and the sector.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should actively support the development of the
co-operative sector in the region by publishing a five-step simple plan to establishing a co-op,
running information campaigns on co-ops and monitoring current State employment and jobs
agencies to encourage the co-op model; as well as assisting in the establishment of co-ops
through advice and networking.
Local Authorities in the region should work to make vacant IDA, Údarás na Gaeltachta and
other public facilities available for co-op use and also consider assigning vacant NAMA
properties where suitable, to save co-ops rental and purchasing costs.
The holding of information sessions in each county in the region to build awareness of the
social economy and social enterprises.
The development of a pilot Social Enterprise Business Training Programme for community
groups in the region.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
1.5
Structure and Implementation
This document clearly sets out a vision for the region and its short, medium and long-term
priorities. To drive this plan, strategic leadership is required, and that direction can be provided by
improving and streamlining the work of the existing Southeast Forum. The existing structure
should be renamed to become the Southeast Economic Development Forum.
This forum would seek to improve the effectiveness of the current Southeast Forum and be led by
the Departments of Education and Skills; Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation; Environment,
Community and Local Government; and Social Protection in partnership with local government. It
would drive and implement an integrated regional strategy, although all government departments
would input the forum’s work as required.
The Forum should be chaired, on a rotational basis, by Assistant Secretaries from the Departments
of Education and Skills; Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation; Environment, Community and Local
Government and a senior regional Seirbhísí Oideachais Leanunaigh agus Scileanna (SOLAS)
representative through the Department of Social Protection.
The proposed forum would take in senior representatives from the IDA and Enterprise Ireland, the
Institutes of Technology, and City and County Managers and local government more generally.
In order to prevent the forum from becoming unwieldy, which is an identified problem with the
existing Southeast Forum, sub-groups with specific areas of responsibility would report to and
engage with the forum through their senior representatives.
The setting of targets, implementation of an overall economic development strategy and the
assigning of lead authorities to implement clear actions and goals should be the primary
responsibility of the proposed Southeast Economic Development Forum.
Proposals on structure and implementation of SEEDS:




The implementation of a ten year Economic Development Strategy for the Southeast.
Improving the effectiveness of the existing Southeast Forum through a more focused and
streamlined Southeast Economic Development Forum that brings together representatives of
key departments and agencies as required.
The main purpose of the Forum should be to monitor implementation of the 10 year regional
strategy and its chairing could be rotated by senior officials in each department and other
agencies on an annual basis.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum to become a structured body, with sub-groups
with clear work streams and responsibility beneath the main body.
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South East Economic Development Strategy



Align the services, policies and plans of all agencies and service-providers to such a strategy
and a joining of national, regional and local policy.
Regional and sub-regional job creation targets to be set for Enterprise Ireland, the IDA and
other Enterprise Support Agencies.
Build on the strengths of the region and support economic development in key target areas
such as:o Agri-business, Food Production and Technology;
o Tourism, Arts and Culture;
o Health, Life Sciences and Medical Devices;
o Financial and Internationally Traded Services;
o Mobile Technologies, Software Development and Digital Media;
o Bio Technology and the Green Economy.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
2. Profile of the Southeast – Strengths and Weaknesses
The Southeast Regional area comprises the following units of primary local government:
Waterford City Council, Waterford County Council, Wexford County Council, Kilkenny County
Council, South Tipperary County Council and Carlow County Council - equating to the five counties
of Carlow, Kilkenny, South Tipperary, Waterford and Wexford and the city of Waterford.
The region covers an area of some 9,406 sq. kms, or about 13.5% of the area of the State. The
‘Putting People First’ Document on local government reform envisages local authority
amalgamations in Waterford and South Tipperary.
The strengths, weaknesses and potential of the Southeast have been analysed by State agencies
and by consultants in these reports:
Some of the recommendations in this report are similar to recommendations contained in the
following reports:
Forfás. Southeast Region Employment Action Plan: Spotlight on the Southeast, December 2011.8
Forfás. Regional Competitiveness Agenda: Volume I : Baseline Data and Analysis : South-East
Region,n.d.. An overview of the region based on an analysis of quantitative and qualitative
indicators across a range of competitiveness factors.
Forfás. Regional Competitive Agenda. Volume 2-Realising Potential. Southeast.9
Final report: Regional Competitiveness Agendas: Overview, Findings and Actions, January 2010.10
This report also highlights findings arising from analysis of all regions, differentiating factors for
the regions, and priorities for regional enterprise development.
DKM Economic Consultants. An Economic Profile of Carlow, February 2009. Unpublished report
commissioned by Co. Carlow local authority.
O'Neill,Julie/Wexford County Council. Positioning Wexford for the Upturn: Towards Sustainable
Growth and Development, 2010. 11
A summary comparing Southeast key data with the State average is featured in Regional
Competitiveness Agendas: Overview, Findings and Actions, 2010:
8
Accessed at: http://www.forfas.ie/media/021211-South_East_Action_Plan_Publication.pdf
Accessed at: http://www.sera.ie/media/forfas-Regional-Competitiveness-Agendas-Southeast%20vol%20II.pdf
10
Accessed at: http://www.forfas.ie/media/forfas100121-Regional-Competitiveness-Agendas-Overview.pdf and
http://www.sera.ie/publications/index.html
11
http://www.wexford.ie/wex/Departments/CommunityEnterprise/Downloads/Thefile,15300,en.pdf
9
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South East Economic Development Strategy
The Southeast region:
The designated regional gateway, Waterford City (51,203), is about double the size in population
of the region’s second largest urban center, Kilkenny City (23,561), and just under three times the
size of Wexford Town (19,918).
The most recent Forfás study into the region found that Waterford City has underperformed as a
Gateway with the city exerting a limited influence within the region in terms of its relative scale,
physical extent and labour force catchment.
Overall population in the region has grown over the period 2002 to 2011 by 17.4%.
Regional Profile
Area of Region
9,406sq.kms.
Area as % of State
13.5%
Population
2006
2011
State
4,239,848
4,581,269
South-East Region
460,838
497,578
As a % of State Population
10.9%
13.5%
Proportion Urban Population
44.2%
45.4%
Proportion Rural Population
55.8%
54.6%
Population Density
49p/p/sq.Km.
53p/p/sq.km.
Population Change 2006-2011
+36,467
% Increase in Population 2006-2011
+8%
Labour Force and Employment (Southeast region)– Q1/2013
In Labour Force
In Employment
Unemployed
Unemployment Rate (State 13.7%)
Participation Rate (State 59.5%)
228,600
186,500
42,000
18.4%
58.3%
GVA Per Capita (State = 100)
68.3%
GVA Produced by:12
Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing
Manufacturing, Building & Construction
Market & Non-Market Services
3.4%
34.8%
61.8%
Disposable Income Per Capita (State=100)
92.9%
12
Q3, 2012 National Household Quarterly Survey
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Tourism (2009)
Total no. of Tourists
Domestic Tourists
Overseas Tourists
Total Tourism Revenue
Revenue from Overseas Tourism
Revenue from Domestic Tourism
1,778,000
1,100,000
678,000
€402m
€226m
€176m
The Southeast has a heavy dependence on Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing, and Industry.
However during the most recent economic downturn the region has seen a significant drop in
construction and manufacturing. The region is performing well in areas such as Life Sciences,
Medical Devices, Finance and Internationally Traded Services and Engineering.
Waterford City and the five counties of the Southeast have a lower level of educational
attainment than the national average. The unemployment rate in the Southeast region in the
second quarter of 2012 stood at 18.7% of the labour force, compared to the State-wide average of
14.7%.
Table 1. Summary of key data-2008/2009
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Source: Regional Competitiveness Agendas: Overview, Findings and Actions, 2010.
The table above indicates that unemployment in the Southeast is higher than the State average,
that Gross Value Added (productivity) per worker and per person are lower than the State
average, that educational attainment at third level is lower than the State average, that Higher
Education Research and Development (HERD) and Business Expenditure R&D (BERD) comprise a
small fraction of the State total.
Table 2. Gross Value Added by sector and region, 2010
Table 2 indicates that the Southeast is the region with the second-highest GVA in agriculture and
the third-lowest in industry.
Table 3. Employment by broad economic sector and region, 2012
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Table 3 indicates that Agriculture and manufacturing in the Southeast comprise a higher
proportion of employment than the State average, but is the region with the lowest employment
in the Services sector.
The Southeast (22.7%) had the second-highest highest percentage of persons employed in
Industry while Dublin (11%) had the lowest.
Nationally just 4.7% were employed in Agriculture whereas the regions with the joint-highest
proportions were the Border (9.4%) and Southeast (9.4%).
In 2012, while over three-quarters (77.2%) of persons in the State were employed in services, the
Southeast had the lowest proportion (67.9%) employed in this sector.
Industrial strengths of the Southeast Region
Agency-supported sectors that experienced the most significant growth in the region over
the last decade included:
•
•
•
Pharmachem
Medical technologies
ICT services industries
These growth sectors are dominated by foreign-owned firms.13
At Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT), the Telecommunications, Software and Systems
Group is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for ICT research & innovation which
engages with over 340 organisations globally.
Also at WIT, the Pharmaceutical and Molecular Biotechnology Research Centre is an applied
research centre aiming to support growth of the pharmaceutical and healthcare industry in the
region. Its State-of-the-art facility allows companies embed R&D into their activities. It has links
with national and international partners in industry, academia and medical care.
Also at WIT, the Southeast Applied Materials (SEAM) Research Centre is an industry focused
applied research centre providing innovative materials engineering solutions for companies from a
wide range of sectors, including bio-medical devices, pharmaceuticals, micro-electronics, precision
engineering and industrial technologies.
As referenced in the Regional Competitiveness Agenda report of January 2010:
13
Source::Regional Competitiveness Agendas: Overview, Findings and Actions,2010.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
“The small portion of the total R&D spend in the higher education sector (HERD)
underlines the importance of establishing linkages and networks, including with relevant
HEIs and research institutes beyond the region (nationally and internationally). Significant
developments such as the awarding of an SFI Strategic Research Cluster to
WIT/Telecommunications Software and Systems Group (TSSG) (the first of the ITs to
establish such a cluster) represent a key step in enhancing one aspect of research and
innovative capacity within the region.”14
Current employment situation in the Southeast
Recent statistics indicate that the Southeast region has the highest regional unemployment rate.
The main unemployment statistics are from the Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS).
By Q1 of 2013, the Southeast region had the highest regional unemployment rate—18.4%. This
compares to a rate of 13.7% in the State as a whole.
Table 4. Labour Force and Employment in the Southeast- Q1/2013
In Labour Force
In Employment
Unemployed
228,600
186,500
42,000
Unemployment Rate (State 13.7%)
Participation Rate (State 59.5%)
18.4%
58.3%
Source:http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/releasespublications/documents/labourmarket/2012/
qnhs_q42012.pdf.
In 2007, before the financial crisis, the Southeast was the region with the third-highest
employment rate. By 2012 the highest unemployment rate (19%) was in the Southeast region
compared to the State average of 15%. The highest unemployment rate for
men was 22.6% in the Southeast region.
The 2011 Forfás report notes that in terms of overall economic performance, the region is
underperforming. The Southeast contributes 8.2% to GVA overall compared with it’s almost 11%
of the population. This underpins the need for a national and regional focus on economic
development and enterprise support.
14
Regional Competitiveness Agendas: Overview, Findings and Actions,.January 2010
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South East Economic Development Strategy
3
Key Areas
3.1
Education, Training and Development
A recurring theme across the consultation meetings that inform this document is the vital role of
education in building the economy and creating employment opportunities.
The Southeast has a significantly lower percentage of students reaching third level than other
regions. In Q1 2011, those with below third level educational attainment accounted for 85% of
unemployment in the Southeast compared to 78% in the State.
It is vital that a suite of interventions by all educational sectors, national and local Government
and relevant stage agencies is put in place to improve educational attainment levels in the region.
This must be a key priority for the region.
Skills Availability—Third-Level Students in the Southeast
There are three third level colleges in the Southeast region with a student population of over
15,000 and over 4,000 graduates annually. The academic institutes supply graduates from
Diploma to PhD level and work closely with industry in the region. 15
Of importance will be the role of third level educational providers in the region in producing
graduates with enterprise focused skills, oriented towards sectors which are growing or have
strong potential to grow within the region.
“The small portion of the total R&D spend in the higher education sector (HERD)
underlines the importance of establishing linkages and networks, including with relevant
HEIs and research institutes beyond the region (nationally and internationally). Significant
developments such as the awarding of an SFI Strategic Research Cluster to WIT/TSSG (the
first of the ITs to establish such a cluster) represent a key step in enhancing one aspect of
research and innovative capacity within the region.”16
Waterford Institute of Technology
Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) is a third-level institution in the Southeast with almost
10,000 students and 1000 staff. It is recognised as one of the top performing institutes in the
State.
15
http://www.idaireland.com/connect-and-invest/waterford/#/connect-and-invest/waterford/business-in-waterford/homegrownbusinesses/
16
Regional Competitiveness Agendas: Overview, Findings and Actions,.January 2010
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South East Economic Development Strategy
In the academic year 2010/11 10,061 students were registered at Waterford Institute of
Technology. Of these 7,581 were full time and the other 2,480 were part time.
Table 5. Full and Part Time Student Enrolments for Academic Year 2010/11
Type
Full Time Part Time Total
Undergraduate
6,308
1,170
7,478
Postgraduate
409
357
766
Exchange / Visiting students
226
-
226
Other students (Apprentices / Professional development, etc.)
638
953
1,591
7,581
2,480
10,061
Total
Source: WIT. At http://www.wit.ie/about_wit/at_a_glance/about_wit2
By 2012/13 these numbers had fallen slightly.
Table 6.Waterford Institute of Technology Profile 2012/13
Type
Undergraduate
Diploma/Cert
Ordinary Degree (L7)
Honours Degree (L8)
Occasional
Postgraduate
Diploma/Cert
Masters Taught (L9)
Masters Research (L9)
PhD (L10)
Other Enrolments
Foundation
FETAC Adv Cert
Exchange/Visiting students
Occasional
Total Enrolments
Full Time
6467
400
2032
3900
135
483
113
254
63
53
253
65
56
132
0
7203
Part Time
929
299
208
112
310
477
82
356
22
17
862
0
133
0
729
2268
Total
7396
699
2240
4012
445
960
195
610
85
70
1115
65
189
132
729
9471
Source: WIT Student count based on Snapshot taken
1st March 2013.
Institute of Technology Carlow (ITC)
ITC has a current student population of 5,649. ITC has a diverse portfolio of over 60 taught
programmes to Level 9 (Masters) on the National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ), a growing
research portfolio to Doctoral level (Level 10 NFQ) in Sciences and Technology, and an emerging
research platform in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
It has acted as a catalyst for the generation of over 25,000 graduates to date. On average over
80% of ITC graduates find their first employment in the counties of South Leinster
(Carlow,Kilkenny, Wexford,Wicklow, Kildare, Laois) and Dublin.17
More than 70% of students studying for major awards are enrolled on Level 7 and Level 8 Bachelor
Degree programmes.
Table 7. IT Carlow Undergraduate & Postgraduate Statistics
School
2009/10
School of Business &Humanities
1360
School of Engineering
727
School of Science
696
Wexford campus
469
Postgraduate (Research)
38
Apprentices
312
Lifelong Learning
1193
Total
4795
2012/13
1791
526
974
505
24
148
1682
5649
Source:ITC Institutional Review 2005 – 2010/Personal communication Carlow ITC.
LIT Tipperary (formerly Tipperary Institute)
Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) Tipperary is a college of higher education, development
agency and research centre in County Tipperary, which is one of the five constituent schools of
Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT). Tipperary Institute opened campuses in Thurles and
Clonmel in 1999 and was merged with LIT in 2011.
It has two departments (Department, Business, Education & Social Science and Department,
Technology, Media & Science), and four Schools (Art & Design,
Built Environment, Business & Humanities, Science, Engineering, & IT).
University of the Southeast
The creation of a Technological University of the Southeast is a key requirement for the economic
development and enhancement of the human capital capacity of the Southeast. A Technological
University must conduct its activities as part of the global community supporting the flow of
people, ideas and business into the Region. WIT and IT Carlow have formally affirmed their
intention to apply jointly as a Technological University in accordance with the process set out by
the Higher Education Authority and the Minister for Education and Skills. 18
On the 30th May 2013 the Minister for Education and Skills Deputy Ruairi Quinn announced the
formation of regional clusters between universities and institutes of technologies and that WIT
17
Strategic Plan for IT Carlow, 2009 -2013
The Need for an Open Innovation Model to drive economic development in the Southeast June 2013 presented by
Willie Donnelly WIT to the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation
18
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South East Economic Development Strategy
and IT Carlow are to progress towards technological university status subject to meeting criteria as
laid down by the Department.
The Southeast Region has a lower than average participation rate in higher education. Only 23% of
the population have a higher education qualification against 36% in Dublin and 29% nationally. It
also has a higher rate of unemployment (19%) than the national average (15%) and a higher rate
of underemployment amongst under 25s than the national average. 19
If more students are to have access to third level in the future, it is vital that the third-level
institutions in the region are performing to their potential.
Several delegations in the consultation meetings highlighted the necessity to the region’s
economic development of re-designating Waterford and Carlow Institutes of Technology as a
multi-campus Technological University of the Southeast.
The Forfás report highlighted Waterford IT’s relative strength among ITs nationally in terms of
enterprise-relevant skills development, research and linkages.
The re-designation of these ITs as a technological university will greatly enhance the attractiveness
of the region for inward investment and the ability of the region to retain graduates.
Over 10,000 students attend WIT and a further 5,000 attend IT Carlow, which are actively involved
in research and development (R&D) and have strong industry links.
Some 1,000 students attend the Wexford campus of IT Carlow. Wexford County Council pointed
out that the region’s ability to retain graduates or attract them back is poor and needs to be
improved. Big companies are struggling at higher graduate level to attract staff. Government
investment in science and technology mostly goes to universities and the resultant high-potential
start-ups stay near the universities.
Waterford City and County Councils point out that numerous reports published regarding the redesignation of WIT as a university have highlighted that this deficit in infrastructure impacts
negatively on the region’s economy. This has affected the region’s ability to attract third level
students and to retain them in the local economy and also the ability of WIT to attract R&D
funding.
This technological university would have greater scope than exists at present under IT designation
to deliver courses and R&D capacity that would attract targeted industries (eg. Bio pharm or ICT)
and encourage graduates to remain in the region. The objective is to help develop clusters of
similar type businesses across the region, assisted by linked-in university courses and R&D.
The Telecommunications Software & Systems Development Group (TSSG) at WIT is an
internationally recognised centre of excellence for ICT research and innovation. Its head, Dr. Willie
Donnelly, also established the ArcLabs Research & Innovation Centre in Carriganore to provide
entrepreneurs and early-stage ventures with the support needed to achieve success in national
and international markets.
19
ibid
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Dr. Donnelly, Dr. John Wells, Head of School of Health Sciences, Dr. Mícheál Ó hEagartaigh, School
of Science, Computing Mathematics and Physics, and Declan Doyle, Head of Development at
Carlow IT, all advocated the multi-campus university status solution.
Dr. Donnelly, for example, said that in order to attract Multinational Companies (MNCs) it is
necessary to have a critical mass of relevant research available in proximity. MNCs usually arrive
as manufacturing companies. What is vital is an increase of research capacity locally to encourage
them to remain and potentially expand due to the intellectual value in the region.
Despite their success, however, ITs, unlike universities, have no baseline research funding and
have to completely self-finance their research work, which makes it very difficult to plan long
term.
A technological university needs to be focused and grounded in enterprise and embedded in the
needs of the community. It would have the autonomy and the research funding to be able to plan
to build partnerships and to make the necessary targeted investment to support a ten-year
regional economic development plan.
A technological university must build on the strengths of the region and support economic
development in key target areas such as Health, Life Sciences and Medical Devices, Financial and
International Trading Services, Tourism, Arts and Culture, Agri-Business, Food Production and
Technology, Engineering, Mobile Technologies, Software Development and Digital Media, and Bio
Technology and the Green Economy.
Improving Educational Attainment
In the consultations, WIT’s Dr. Ó hEagartaigh spoke to changing the culture of the region and
promoting innovation by building an industrial strategy that links business and third-level. He felt
that this strategy should begin in the schools, raising the horizon of second-level students by
encouraging young people to be ambitious and consider starting their own businesses.
To this end, a programme is needed in the region to encourage greater linking between second
and third level, akin to the Calmast programme at WIT, which promotes science and engineering
in schools and is working to develop the Southeast as a Science Region.
Calmast was established in 2003 at Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) allowing Sheila
Donegan and Eoin Gill to continue and develop the work they had been doing since the mid 1990s
in promoting science and engineering. In that time they have reached hundreds of thousands of
people with science supplements and publications and over 100,000 at events and activities. It is a
model that can be expanded on in other areas.
If third-level development is vital, pre-development work for young, vulnerable, and
disadvantaged people with low levels of educational attainment is equally significant. WIT has a
strong track record in the support of vocational and labour-market oriented education at all levels.
Addressing the needs of the unemployed is a critical requirement for the economic development
and social renewal of the region.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
The Southeast region has more people without a Leaving Certificate level qualification than almost
any other region in the country (with the exception of the Border), and one of the lowest levels of
third level educational attainment in the country.
The high incidence of early school leaving in the region should be addressed through specific
measures and strategies. Family learning can play a key role here, where parents who are
targeted to learn themselves will be more likely to encourage their children to stay and complete
their education. National Adult Literacy Association (NALA) has developed work in this area and
has produced a number of resources to support parents to help their children learn.
The Southeast region must recognise the key role of the Further Education and Training (FET)
Sector in economic development. A strong, sustainable FET sector has the potential to offer
vocational and practical skills opportunities – to develop practical accreditation in an area, to
reskill, and to offer alternative pathways to higher education. In an environment where
educational attainment is low, the Further Education sector can provide an ideal stepping stone to
a learner, with the potential of supporting them from a low skills level right up through the
qualifications system.
VECs have already developed expertise in supporting adult learners and this will inform the
delivery of Further Education and Training through the new Educational and Training Boards
(ETBs). The establishment of ETBs provides a platform for a strengthened, more co-ordinated
Further Education sector at local level and the potential for greater engagement, both with
employers and the higher education sector as well as a better learning experience for adults in the
area.
The State’s 33 Vocational Educational Committees (VECs) are due to be replaced this year by 16
Education and Training Boards.
Three new ETBs in Tipperary (formerly North and South), Co. Kilkenny/Carlow and
Waterford/Wexford (including Waterford City and County) has the potential to improve education
attainment and educational choice in the region.
Carlow College , run by the VEC, is the region’s biggest provider of further eduction courses
outside Waterford, with over 800 students. This VEC was of the view that a revision of structures
and of funding mechanisms would help drive its jobs agenda. At the moment there are significant
bureaucratic barriers to effective delivery, including eligibility problems for people seeking to
upskill or reskill.
Tipperary VEC said the organisation or its successor needs greater flexibility to respond to the
needs of employers, unhindered by caps on post-Leaving Cert numbers, as is the case at present.
The body could then present a rapid response to the needs of local industry.
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There is also a need to identify gaps in course provision across the region to serve the needs of
employers in the region. For example, Carlow College is now offering a food science course aimed
at food manufacturing to fill an identified gap in the labour market.
Ultimately, labour activation measures,whether the department of Social Protection’s Tús scheme
or the courses offered by Foras Áiseanna Saothair (FÁS), have to have real, long-term value and
provide actual pathways towards employment.
The Institutes of Technology and a future Technological University need to work more
collaboratively with the vocational sector and labour-market orientation education. Such
collaboration can lead to joint initiatives in up-skilling and re-skilling unemployed people as
happened in the case of former Waterford Crystal and Talk Talk workers.
Core Proposals for the Further Education Sector:
Create greater connections and collaboration across programmes and providers:
Currently there are a number of programmes designed to assist people who are unemployed to
gain access to the labour market through developing their skills. These include schemes from the
Momentum programme, through to Springboard, JobsBridge, Community Employment and Tús.
Some offer accreditation and knowledge, others more practical, experiential learning. There
needs to be greater levels of synergy amongst these programmes at local level, to allow people to
progress from one programme to another and gain both the knowledge and the experience.
Learning opportunities should, where possible, include practical, work experience opportunities.
Collaboration between providers will likewise result in better outcomes for learners. The PA
Consulting report on the first round of Labour Market Activation Measures found that the most
successful projects were those with a high level of collaboration. Activities which build and
encourage collaborative practices across a range of providers and agencies should be encouraged
to work towards this objective.
Similarly, there should be a strong connection built at local level between education and training
providers across the statutory, community and private sector, to avoid duplication and to
ultimately focus on better outcomes for learners.
Challenges and obstacles experienced by learners across the region should be documented and
fed into a national picture through SOLAS. This is particularly important in rural areas, where lack
of access to transport, childcare, or reduced level of course choices inhibit learner access and
progression.
Create greater awareness of skills development and learning opportunities in the area:
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This is particularly important when the services are in a State of flux with FÁS training services and
former VEC activities now moving under the remit of new ETBs. There may be a low level of public
awareness about the role and functions of ETBs in the early stages.
Likewise, there may be low levels of awareness about the role and function of the new Intreo
services. An information campaign locally could highlight the range of further education and
training opportunities in the area and who to contact. This could be supported by activities such
as exhibitions or open days.
For example, the EURES expo two years ago was a highly successful event organised by the
Department of Social Protection where different local providers provided information to members
of the public about information on education and employment options. People in receipt of live
register payments were alerted in advance by text message and encouraged to attend, resulting in
a high level of attendance on the day.
Past consultations with learners and feedback through AONTAS Information Referral Service
highlights the need for greater levels of awareness about training and education opportunities for
adults.
Create greater opportunities for engagement with employers:
Under the new legislation, each ETB will have an employer’s representative. According to the
legislation, the Minister will name nominating bodies (e.g. IBEC) who will provide ETBs with
possible representatives. This provides one way in which the employers sector can assist in the
delivery of education and training at local level. However, the role of employers must go beyond
this and a number of mechanisms should be established whereby they can feed into the
development of education and training initiatives. ETB structures should allow for engagement
with employers at a number of levels.
Employers must also be encouraged to see that they have a role to play in the re-skilling and upskilling agenda. Awareness-raising activities and information campaigns which highlight the
benefits of supporting staff to engage in training and education could form part of an overall
Educational Attainment Strategy.
An example of best practice in achieving this dialogue is in the Netherlands, where opportunities
are established for employers locally to engage with all education stakeholders (from primary
right through to FET and third level).
Documenting and sharing best practice:
This document proposes to create a generic, short-term labour market activation initiative which
builds on examples of best practice in the area. The success of these initiatives is often due to the
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fact that they are highly tailored towards the needs of particular learners and target groups who
may have experienced educational disadvantage.
While there are elements of programmes that can be adapted and applied across a range of
programmes, programmes should ideally be built around the needs of the learners themselves.
Responding to the diverse needs of learners is a challenge in terms of building a ‘one size fits all’
approach.
Better data will be available from both ETBs and SOLAS in terms of initiatives which work best for
which learners and this should be used to inform provision for key target groups. Sharing and
promoting of best practice examples should be facilitated.
Table 8. Age at which full-time education ceased by region, 2011
Nationally, 21.9% of persons finished their full-time education at 15-17 years of
age.
The South-East (25.6%) region had the highest proportion of persons in
this category.
Table 9. Highest level of education completed by region, 2011
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Table 9 indicates that the Southeast has the second- lowest proportion of persons with third level
education (23.1%).
The impact of this skills deficit has been softened in recent years by the abundance of jobs in
sectors which did not (in the main) require high levels of education, such as construction and the
retail trade, and in agriculture and low-skilled manufacturing in earlier decades. With the collapse
of the construction boom and the associated decline in the retail trade the limitations of the
Southeast’s skills profile may be more severely felt.
In the immediate term, those who have left education without completing the Leaving Certificate
or a primary third level qualification need to be skilled to a minimum standard which will enable
them to improve their employment prospects. Those still in education should be strongly
encouraged to obtain minimum level qualifications before entering the labour force.
It is vital that the educational providers in the region put an increased focus on the importance of
lifelong learning and up-skilling. This should result in the delivery of more flexible part-time
courses including new models of course delivery using on-line learning tools.
In their submission AONTAS strongly recommended that a range of educational strategies should
be available to learners as appropriate to their needs, and that this is best facilitated through a
balanced system of provision from the State, community and private sectors.
In their consultation, Carlow VEC made the point that at the pre-employment level, many young
people lack the confidence and social skills to access employment and may require years of
development education to build participants’ information acquisition skills and prepare them to
enter the jobs market.
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St Catherine’s Community Services Centre in Carlow highlighted the importance of this work for
vulnerable and disadvantaged people. Their successful Moving On scheme is a 40-week
programme that focuses on single mothers in the 22-24 age bracket, early school leavers with low
incomes and no work experience – facing long-term dependency on social welfare.
With child care on site, the course features a lot of one-to-one work, addressing social, child care
and legal issues, tackling low self esteem and confidence. Of 18 participants in 2012, 15
graduated, 4 are in work, all in the retail sector, and 11 are in full-time education/training.
In Kilkenny, the LEADER Partnership has pioneered Kick Start, a six-week work placement
programme for unemployed people. The organisation stressed that for such a programme to be
effective, work has to go into effectively matching and supporting both interns and employers so
that both can benefit.
The PLUTO preparation for work programme in Waterford City, run by St. Brigids Family Resource
Centre and the Sacred Heart Family Resource Centre, is a ten-week course supported by the
Waterford Area Partnership and the Department of Social Protection to help unemployed people
reframe their past work experience to enhance their chances of finding employment or accessing
educational opportunities.
It would make sense to develop a single best practise pre-development and short-term labour
activation course in the region drawing on the experiences and success of such projects. Short
course provision is critical initially to build confidence and re-familiarise oneself with routine and
challenge.
Labour activation measures need to address adult literacy, numeracy and basic skills
development. Developing basic skills among the labour force has a significant economic benefit
and impacts directly on employment and employability. In their submission NALA argued that
targeted and appropriate activation measures to address the unacceptable low literacy levels in
Irish society is cost-effective to the individual, their family, society and the economy.
Unfortunately, people with literacy and numeracy difficulties are less likely to participate in
education and training programmes.20 The development of an activation programme with more
long-term objectives aimed at those furthest from the jobs market should be developed. The
design of such an intervention could be a pilot in nature but draw on the experience of the
successful NALA programme under the Labour Market Activation Fund.
It is vital that better opportunities for adults to develop literacy and/or numeracy in a meaningful
and appropriate context are provided. Therefore the development and delivery of integrated
literacy and numeracy must be factored into all further education and training programmes.
The demise of Waterford Crystal was a disaster for Waterford City. The House of Waterford
Crystal has revived the city’s proud glass heritage, but with no apprenticeship scheme in the glass
industry, the skills base for an industry integrally associated with the city is vanishing.
20
Bailey and Coleman, 1998, ESRI - 2012
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A Crystal Making Apprenticeship Scheme through a partnership between the House of Waterford
Crystal and Waterford Institute of Technology would take advantage of the exceptional artisan
glass blowing and cutting skills that still exist in the city and preserve them for the future
development of the industry.
Key Proposals:










Designation of Waterford and Carlow Institutes as a Technological University of the Southeast.
Ensure a Technological University is embedded in the social, cultural and economic needs of
the Southeast.
Incorporate Higher Education Institutions into a regional strategy to ensure a matching of
education provision with industry needs, allowing policy to guide and support regional
development and to ensure actions taken at national, regional and HEI level support each
other.
A Technological University must deliver new engagement models bringing together education
at all levels, technology, research, business and entrepreneurship producing industry-ready
graduates and new innovation models that drive the economic development of the region.
An holistic and integrated regional strategy to improve educational attainment through
increased focus in lifelong learning, up-skilling and greater flexibility in course delivery.
The development of a specific Labour Market Activation Programme for those with literacy
and numeracy needs.
The integration of literacy and numeracy into all publicly-funded education and training
programmes.
Create greater connections and collaboration across all training and education programmes
and providers.
Create greater awareness of skills development and learning opportunities in the region
through local information campaigns, open days and exhibitions.
Create greater opportunities for engagement with employers in the important areas of
training, re-skilling and up-skilling.
Local and other actions:



The development of a pilot strategy in the region to ensure a greater emphasis on Creativity,
Innovation and Entrepreneurship in secondary schools through competitions and enterprise
modules.
Establish models of best practice in activation measures on providing career advice and
‘progression pathways’ for the unemployed and on up-skilling with accredited qualifications
and by documenting and sharing best practice.
Identify gaps in further education course provision across the region to serve the needs of
local employers.
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



Change the rules and regulations surrounding FETAC courses which prevent participants taking
courses with a lower or equal rating than the last one they completed, which inhibits people
from changing career paths and reskilling.
The establishment of Waterford City as a National Centre of Excellence for Crystal Production
with the development of a Crystal Making Apprenticeship Scheme through a partnership
between the House of Waterford Crystal and Waterford Institute of Technology.
Support greater linkages between second and third level education drawing on the success of
the Calmast Programme at WIT.
The development of a second level schools programme focused on developing social
enterprise projects and link to the existing School Enterprise Programme.
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3.2
Infrastructural development
In order to be able to compete with other regions and develop to its potential, the available
infrastructure must be equal to the Southeast’s ambitions for economic expansion and job
creation.
The critical areas identified in this strategy are:





The need for an integrated Transport Hub aligning road, rail and sea.
The importance of Rosslare Europort and the Port of Waterford to regional economic
development.
The need to support and develop Waterford Regional Airport.
The need to enhance and improve broadband availability and connectivity in the region.
Development of Key Strategic Sites.
In terms of road infrastructure, the completed M9 Waterford to Dublin motorway through
counties Kilkenny and Carlow has been a major step forward for the region, but the completion of
the N11/M11 upgrade, specifically Gorey to Enniscorthy and New Ross bypass, is an urgent
priority and needs to be signed off on by government.
Likewise, South Tipperary County Council has highlighted the importance of fast-tracking
improvements to the N24 to greatly improve the Limerick to Waterford road corridor via South
Tipperary. It is important that a full cost benefit analysis of all infrastructural investment is carried
out.
This report is clearly setting out the need for strategic investment in key infrastructural projects
that are a regional priority. It should be noted that this is a ten year Economic Development
Strategy and Government must target investment where it is needed most.
The region and Waterford are fully accessible with the necessary infrastructure in place, including
road, rail, air, port, water, wastewater and the Metropolitan Area Network for broadband
provision. While Waterford has a number of property solutions including strategic investment
sites suitable for a range of industries, there are still some deficits, which will in part be addressed
by the planned expansion by IDA Ireland of their Business & Technology Park.
The availability of suitable property solutions for attracting FDI is patchy, however, across the
region. Wexford County Council, in particular, pointed up significant underinvestment in industrial
buildings and land, and the lack of any IDA land bank in the county.
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Enterprise agencies in partnership with local authorities need to ensure provision of property
solutions suitable and available for Foreign Direct Investment. The IDA and Enterprise Ireland
should then be mandated to bring forward plans to develop suitable sites and properties.
The region must also make greater use of existing resources such as Waterford and Rosslare Ports
and Waterford Regional Airport.
Developing an integrated Regional Transport Hub:
It is important that the region develops an integrated regional transport hub that aligns road, rail
and port infrastructure. Such a strategy must also maximise the use of Rosslare Europort and the
Port of Waterford and ensure the completion of the Enniscorthy and Newross Bypass and the
necessary improvements to the N24 to greatly improve the Limerick to Waterford road corridor.
Regional Ports:
There is a clear need, as Wexford County Council outlined in its report, “Positioning Wexford for
the Upturn - Towards Sustainable Growth and Development, 2010”, to develop a clear and agreed
strategy for how best to exploit Rosslare Europort and its hinterland to the benefit of the county
and the region, and the scope for enterprise development in the vicinity of the port in that
context.
Rosslare is the largest Roll-on Roll-off (RoRo) and passenger port in Ireland. In respect of Rosslare
Europort and the Port of Waterford Company, National Ports Policy categorises the two ports as
Ports of National Significance.
The Minister for Transport through the National Ports Policy 2013 21 has identified that these are
ports that Are responsible for at least 2.5% of overall tonnage through Irish ports;
 Have the clear, demonstrable potential to handle higher volumes of utilised traffic, and
 Have the existing transport links to serve a wider, national marketplace beyond their
immediate region.
Two ports meet these requirements: the Port of Waterford Company and Rosslare Europort.
In addition to meeting the above criteria, the Port of Waterford and Rosslare Europort also meet
the European Commission’s criteria for inclusion in the comprehensive network under the Trans
European Network-Transport (TEN-T) proposal. These are ports that, while not enjoying the same
degree of connectivity as the core network, are still an integral part of the pan-European
transportation network.
21
National Ports Policy 2013. Accessed at: http://www.dttas.ie/upload/general/13776NATIONAL_PORTS_POLICY_2013-1.PDF
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The revised TEN-T programme will open up possibilities for TEN-T ports to avail of the funding
facilities to be put in place through the Connecting Europe Facility, including the proposed Project
Bonds.
The European Commission made its proposals in October 2011. The proposals are still at a
relatively early stage in the European legislative process and it will be 2013, at the earliest, before
the final package is adopted.
For inclusion in the core network, ports must enjoy significant volumes of freight and/or
passenger traffic, have a high level of international connectivity and by 2030, be connected to the
core European rail and road network.
Between them, these two ports handled 8% of total tonnage through Irish ports in 2011, and they
enjoy good road and rail connectivity. Both ports offer services in the higher-value unitised sectors
LoLo (Lift on/Lift off ) in Waterford and RoRo (Roll on/Roll off) in Rosslare22 that support
competitive conditions within those sectors by providing an alternative to the two larger unitised
ports of Dublin and Cork.
Table 10. Ports, ownership structure, vessel arrivals, 2011.
Port
Structure
Rosslare
Iarnród Éireann
Waterford
Port Company
Source: National Ports Policy 2013.
Vessel Arrivals(number)
1791
426
The Government intend in 2013 to publish a pathway for these two ports of Ports of National
Significance (Tier 2) to achieve their full potential.
However in the case of the Port of Waterford it has witnessed a significant fall-off in trade over
the past decade. This is especially severe in the case of its share of the Lift On/Lift Off market,
which has fallen from almost 20% to 5% in 2012. The Port Company carried out and external
review and is currently implementing the reports’ recommendations.
Rosslare Europort:
Rosslare Europort is the only Port in the country run by a semi-State body with a different primary
function, namely Iarnród Éireann.
22
Ro-ro or roll-on/roll-off ships are designed to transport trucks carrying containers, while lo-lo or lift-on/lift-off ships use cranes to
load and unload unaccompanied containers.
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In our consultations, Wexford County Council was supportive of handing it over to a new port
authority, which could make it an economic driver for the Southeast region.
The port is the subject of a review at present by the Department of Transport, whose advisors are
examining its current commercial and operational efficiency and advocating an appropriate
ownership structure.
This could include local authority involvement or some form of privatisation. It is understood the
Government would prefer to retain Rosslare in State ownership, given its importance to tourism
and trade.
Rosslare is unique among the State commercial ports as it operates outside of the Harbours Acts
1996–2009.
The port forms part of the Fishguard and Rosslare Railways and Harbour Company which owes its
origins to the Fishguard Bay Railway and Pier Act 1893. The constituent ports (Rosslare and
Fishguard) of the company are nowadays the operational and financial responsibility of Iarnród
Éireann and Stena Line Ports Ltd respectively.
On account of this historic arrangement, Rosslare Europort is operated as a division of Iarnród
Éireann. As it is not a separate corporate entity, it cannot be accurately compared in terms of
turnover, overheads and employees to the other port companies. This limits the ability to
adequately benchmark its performance.
A number of studies (including the High Level Review of the State Commercial Ports, 2003, and the
Joint Oireachtas Committee on Transport’s “Report on the Ports’ Sector”, (2010) have highlighted
the potentially inhibiting factor of the port’s unusual legislative and operational status, when
compared to the other State-owned ports, and recommended its integration within the State
commercial port governance framework.
The Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation announced in June 2012 that he had requested
the Competition Authority to carry out a study of the ports sector in Ireland. The Competition
Authority is expected to publish the results of this market study in 2013.
Its outcome will inform future Government policy on competition in the ports sector.
A number of contributors to the consultation process pointed to an unacceptable incompatibility
between the port and the railway. Timetables are awkward, the train station has been moved
further from the port, and the rail line to Waterford has been closed. The Port has no Load-on
Load-off (LoLo) facility.
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There is also a strong case for deepening one of the berths at the port from 7 metres to 9 metres
to allow larger freight vessels to use Rosslare and increase the already high levels of traffic coming
through.
To further assist this, a rail cargo depot could be built at the harbour, which would facilitate the
logistics business and help divert heavy traffic from the public road network. It could in turn lead
to the reopening of the Rosslare to Waterford Rail line.
There is an under appreciation of the added value of the port, with unutilised zoned land banks in
the vicinity. It should be a catalyst for development in the region. Outside of Dublin, it has the
most potential for expansion. Rosslare acts as an overflow port for Dublin when capacity is
constrained there.
Table 11. Rosslare Europort Traffic Volumes 2002-2011.
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Source: Rosslare Europort. Accessed at
http://rosslareeuroport.irishrail.ie/about_us/RosslareEuroport_TrafficVolumes_2002_2011.pdf
Freight and passenger numbers through the Port have fallen since 2007, as shown by Table 11.
These developments are also discussed in O'Neill, Julie/Wexford County Council. “Positioning
Wexford for the Upturn”: as follows:23
In total RoRo freight fell by nearly 5% on an all-Ireland basis in 2008 and by a further 11% in 2009,
a total of 15% over the two years reflecting the sharp downturn in the economy over that period.
RoRo freight movements by 2010 were back to 2005 levels while LoLo freight was back to 2003
levels on an all-Ireland basis.
In the case of Rosslare Europort RoRo freight declined by nearly 7% in 2008 and by a further 15%
in 2009. The total fall over the two years was almost 21%.
The Rosslare-UK market showed an even sharper decline – a 9% drop in 2008 and a further,
massive 24% decline in 2009 down to 102,539 freight movements. Rosslare Europort has lost
market share and Rosslare-UK had just 11% of the Republic of Ireland (ROI) RoRo market at the
end of 2009 as compared with 14% of the total in 2007.
When capacity is constrained at Dublin Port, Rosslare RoRo traffic tends to grow faster than the
average for Republic of Ireland. There was stronger than average growth in Rosslare RoRo
volumes in the years prior to 2007. Once the constraint at Dublin ceased, as happened in 2007
when freight volumes fell there due to the recession, freight loads are consolidated to maximise
efficiency and Rosslare Europort is likely to contract faster than the average.
Dublin Port has not generated overcapacity business for Rosslare in recent times and indeed, has
been sucking business back to Dublin.
Much of this loss of volume is likely to persist for the foreseeable future as freight associated for
instance with the construction trade, such as white goods and furniture, will not return to 2007
levels.
On the other hand, freight volumes on the Rosslare-Continental market grew over the two year
period, albeit from a smaller base of 20,089 freight movements in 2007 to 30,980 in 2009, an
increase of 10% in 2008 and a further 40% in 2009. As a result Rosslare-Continental market share
of Republic of Ireland RoRo traffic grew from 2% in 2007 to 3% in 2009. The sharp increase in 2008
23
Accessed at:
http://www.wexford.ie/wex/Departments/CommunityEnterprise/Downloads/Thefile,15300,en.pdf
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reflects, in part, the temporary entry into the Rosslare-Continental market of Cobelfret which
provided a hybrid RoRo service through the Port. This carrier has since been lost to Dublin Port.
Any business model for Rosslare Europort and its business stakeholders needs to track emerging
trends and respond to them appropriately so as to ensure timely investments are made.
Passenger movements through the Port have also been impacted by the global and Irish recession
and the associated downturn in tourism. Total Republic of Ireland ferry passenger movements
declined by 11.7% between 2007 and 2009.
Total passenger movements through Rosslare reduced by a slightly higher 12.7% over the two
years. However this masks an underlying trend where Rosslare-UK passengers fell between 2007
and 2009 by 14.7% to 745,965 while Rosslare-Continental fell by 4.4% overall to 200,656.
In fact Rosslare-Continental passenger numbers actually grew by 4.2% in 2009 after a fall of 8.2%
in 2008. There is evidence of a market response to trends in passenger numbers, with car and foot
fares dropping substantially in recent years to meet the requirements of the markets and to
compete with low air fares.
Potential for County Wexford and the Southeast generated by the Europort
The report “Positioning Wexford for the Upturn”, 2010 also discusses the potential of the Europort
for the county, from which this section is drawn.
Co.Wexford has a number of logistics companies built around the key strategic infrastructure of
Rosslare Europort.
Wexford has the opportunity to market its potential business, tourism and logistics opportunities
through this key transport infrastructure located in the county.
Tourism - Rosslare is the first point of entry for car passengers who pass through Wexford on their
way to their holiday destination. The key is to create awareness to visitors of all that Wexford has
to offer and persuade visitors that Wexford is a destination in its own right.
The second issue is to attract visitors into the county and to maximise new business opportunities
that may emerge from recent increased airport security and baggage restrictions. Ferry trips can
be marketed as taking the hassle out of travelling particularly for families or those travelling with
dogs.
Existing logistics companies - There are a number of logistics companies operating in Rosslare
Harbour, and throughout the county. Nolan Transport is one of the leading transport operators in
Europe and one of the largest employers in Wexford.
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The skills base and level of expertise in the logistics industry can be built upon to create further
business opportunities and exploit emerging trends. There are a number of operators who have
developed skills and a reputation in the logistics industry that can be built upon.
International Food Processing Companies – Companies in the food sector in Wexford benefit
from the existence of Rosslare Europort and the network of logistics operators which facilitates
them in minimizing the time it takes to get their produce to market.
Reduction in freight and passenger volumes through the port and loss of market share – If this
trend were to continue unabated it would ultimately threaten the viability of the Port itself and
put at risk the competitive advantage of the logistics, food and other sectors that depend on the
port.
The dominance of Dublin Port – the sheer size of Dublin Port makes it a formidable competitor,
particularly in a declining market. Rosslare Europort will need to be very cost-competitive to
counter this threat while simultaneously investing in shore-side infrastructure to be in a position
to grasp emerging business opportunities.
Changes in the Shipping and Logistics Markets – Changes in the market place outlined above will
require a shift in the business model for Rosslare Port. It will also require further investment at the
port such as the deepening of the Port to cater for larger ships travelling longer distances.
Reduction in freight volumes, and the associated loss of revenue to the Port, may put this
necessary investment at risk.
Ownership structure of the Port – Concern was expressed that this is inhibiting the Port in fully
developing its commercial mandate.
Absence of a clear development plan for the hinterland of the Port – There is a strong view that
the development potential of the area surrounding the Port is not being fully exploited and that
there is no clear vision or strategy for the role of the Port hinterland for business or tourism
purposes.
The area and the county appear to derive relatively little added value from having the Port in the
catchment area and the value added in the immediate hinterland of the Port is virtually zero.
Unresolved tensions between tourism, other business interests and the Port Authority about how
best to develop the port area have contributed to inaction to date on this agenda.
Passenger user experience at the Port – There is concern that Rosslare has become one of the
shoddiest and least attractive entry/exit points on this island. While passengers rarely spend any
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time in the Port, the hard reality remains that first and last impression of a destination often
decide a tourist’s view and their appetite for a return visit.
Image/Marketing - The county needs to develop a brand and marketing image to create
awareness of what Wexford has to offer in terms of tourism and business opportunities. Rosslare
Europort, the ferry companies and the access route to the Port could play a part in marketing the
message.
In developing the potential of Rosslare Europort and the logistics industry a number of actions
were identified:
Upgrading Facilities – Developing Rosslare Europort to compete with other ports and keep ahead
of trends in the market place requires a long term investment plan and the finance to underpin it.
However, in the short term, to ensure that the visitor has a good experience, some small scale
works could be undertaken at the terminal building to improve visitor facilities for tourism and
freight users. The aim of these cosmetic works would be to provide good, basic customer services
and signage and improve the overall image at the port.
New Business Model – A shared vision and action plan is needed across all key stakeholders on
the appropriate business model for the Port and the priority capital investments to underpin it.
Strategy for Port Hinterland – A clear and agreed strategy is needed for how best to exploit the
port hinterland to the benefit of County Wexford and the South-East region and the scope for
enterprise and tourism development in that context. This strategy should include the
improvement of the road network to the Port.
Ownership of the Port – The creation of an independent port authority for
Rosslare Europort.
Tourism – There needs to be a co-ordinated approach to the development of a cultural and
tourism plan for the county. This will require a strategic vision, to bring together the various
stakeholders to share information; resources and develop an holistic package and marketing
brand for the county. There are opportunities for the ferry companies to maximise visitor
numbers with the increasing perceived hassle of airports from recent baggage and security
measures. Ferry companies could further review their pricing structure and marketing to take
account of this.
Marketing - Wexford needs to develop a clear message about what it has to offer and brand this
concept. The county needs to develop a much stronger web presence and to exploit the new
technologies for online marketing.
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Small actions already undertaken at local level include the development of gateway visuals in the
county on access routes to and from the Port as well as the provision of video and other
information about Wexford on ferry services.
Port of Waterford Company:
The port of Waterford is the fourth largest of the State commercial port companies in terms of
total tonnage handled, and the fifth largest if Rosslare Europort is included. The port offers both
LoLo (Lift on/Lift off) and bulk services.
In terms of LoLo traffic, the port is the smallest of the three LoLo ports, handling approx. 8% of
total LoLo traffic in 2011 (IMDO, 2012a). It enjoys excellent connectivity to both the national road
and rail networks.
Table 12. Port of Waterford Company overview
2000*
2010
2011
Tonnage (’000)
1,943
1,451
1,383
Turnover (€’000)
3,998
6,966
6,463
Operating Profit (€’000)
963
-247
-236
Profit after Interest and Tax (€’000)
-975
-574
-440
Employees
15
38**
35**
* 2000 was the first full financial year as a commercial port company
** 2010 and 2011 employee figures include those employed in Waterford Container Terminal Ltd.
a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company since 2001.
Source: National Ports Policy 2013.
There has been a significant fall-off in trade in the Port of Waterford over
the past decade. This is particularly severe in the case of Waterford’s share of the LoLo market,
which has fallen from almost 20% in 2001 to 8% in 2011. In real terms, the drop in total tonnage
handled in the Port of Waterford across all modes and by Lo-Lo is even starker, falling by 30% and
29% respectively between 2001 and 2011.
A number of factors have contributed to this decline. While the declines in recent years have been
exacerbated by the economic conditions, the port has also suffered due to the impact of the
underlying trends in maritime transport, which has resulted in a consolidation of routes and
services, particularly in the LoLo sector.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
The long term international trend in ports and shipping is to consolidate resources in order to
achieve optimum efficiencies of scale. This has knock-on effects in terms of vessel size, the depth
of water required at ports and the type and scale of port hinterland transport connections.
These trends are not new and have over the years led to gradual consolidation among Irish
commercial ports.
The economic downturn has accelerated this process. Port traffic has increasingly gravitated
towards the larger ports in recent years to avail of capacity and economies of scale, in particular
ship size. These trends present obvious opportunities for development at some ports and
challenges for others.
Waterford Chamber said that the decline of the port, despite its excellent facilities and railway
access to the quay itself, has meant the city’s manufacturing potential hasn’t been exploited.
They say the port’s development has been held back by historical financial issues but the recent
introduction of a rail freight route to Ballina is a positive. The Chamber felt that lack of commercial
incentive for carriers is an issue but that there is huge potential for rail freight into the future.
In light of the underlying trends in maritime transport, with their effects in terms of vessel size,
the depth of water required at ports and the type and scale of port hinterland transport
connections, examining the feasibility of the deepening of the Port of Waterford and ensuring its
greater use as a load on load off port should be part of any economic regeneration plan for the
region.
In responding to all of these issues, the Port of Waterford engaged consultants to conduct a
strategic review of operations and make recommendations as to its future operation and
development. The outcome of this review and on-going work within Government will inform
future policy developments in relation to the Port of Waterford.
Kilkenny County Council in their submission pointed to the strategic importance and potential of
Waterford Port at Belview. It is the nearest deep water Irish port to mainland Europe. Two-thirds
of the Irish domestic market lies within a 160 km radius of Belview, with direct access to the
national rail network. The surrounding industrial area boasts substantial warehousing.
Kilkenny County Council and Waterford City and County Councils pointed to the continued
existence and development of the port as a key regional priority.
Similarly, there is a need to develop Dunmore East Harbour and Port in East Waterford, Kilmore
Quay in Wexford and Helvick in West Waterford to support the fishing industry and expansion of
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South East Economic Development Strategy
the tourist industry. The provision of the necessary funding to dredge the harbour at Dunmore
East must be a priority.
Rail Transport:
According to Forfás, rail services in the region are under-developed due to a combination of interrelated factors including time-tabling issues, lack of demand and limitations due to existing track
infrastructure.24 While improvements have been achieved – for example enhanced commuter
services to Dublin (from Carlow and Wexford especially) and the introduction of an early morning
service on the Waterford-Dublin inter-city line, services overall remain infrequent and journey
times too long.
Key enhancements are required in the following areas:



A reduction in travel time (to two hours) on Dublin-Waterford services
An increased level of service on the Limerick-Waterford route
Development of freight services in the region, serving port facilities at Waterford and
Rosslare.
Waterford Regional Airport:
The development of Waterford Airport has been hampered by the lack of any funded Public
Service Obligation route and of capital funding for a runway extension.
Waterford Airport operates without a PSO (Public Service Obligation) supported service to Dublin
and has concentrated on developing services to the UK and to Europe. The airport also carries out
activities including: a major Coastguard base, private and business aviation, cabin crew training,
and light aircraft maintenance.
Albeit from a low base, the airport achieved a fourfold increase in passenger numbers between
2003 and 2008.
Summer sun flights were offered to European destinations including Bordeaux, Faro and Malaga
during 2007-’08 which were very successful and the airport reached over 140,000 passengers.
But passenger numbers have declined since 2008 from a high of 143,645 to 111,965 in 2009,
104,488 in 2010, 81,877 in 2011 and 78,690 in 2012.
The airport was badly hit when Aer Arann withdrew its services from Waterford to London
Southend, London Luton and Manchester at the start of this year. At the time of the closure,
24
Forfás. Regional Competitive Agenda. Volume 2-Realising Potential. South East. Accessed at:
http://www.sera.ie/media/forfas-Regional-Competitiveness-Agendas-Southeast%20vol%20II.pdf
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President of Waterford Chamber Orm Kenny pointed out that “London in particular is a key
destination for over 500,000 citizens of the Southeast and some of Ireland’s largest blue-chip
multi-national companies as well as indigenous businesses in the region seeking to do business in
the UK”.
Direct flights from Waterford Airport are currently available to Birmingham and Manchester with
Flybe. The airline also offers connecting flights to Paris, Dusseldorf, Edinburgh and Glasgow from
Waterford via Birmingham and to Aberdeen, Exeter, Nice, Norwich and Southampton through
Manchester.
According to Forfás,
“Waterford Airport can play an important role in offering alternative and convenient services to
business travellers into the UK and other European hubs, and in strengthening the tourism
proposition for the region.
Future expansion of services will require implementation of critically important infrastructure
developments including a runway extension to accommodate larger jet aircraft (c.€20m
government funding is currently on hold).
Further development of tourism-related opportunities will require a specific focus - in conjunction
with Fáilte Ireland and other relevant stakeholders.”
Colin Buchanan Consultants published results of a survey of businesses in their Waterford Airport
Economic Impact Assessment in February 2010.
“Within the first week of issuing our survey we received an unprecedented response of
approximately 200 businesses, out of an eventual total of 450. Approximately 85% of these firms
view direct air access to the Southeast as important to their operations and around 9 out of 10 for
the region as a whole. Around one third of airport users are business travellers, which is
considerably above that of other regional airports and is underlined by the high frequency of trips
made by around 50% of all airport users.”
Dan Hoey, General Manager, Merck Sharp & Dohme / President of American Chamber of
Commerce, Southeast Region, told Colin Buchanan:
“Re-introducing flights to Amsterdam would be a big advantage as it connects with a wide range
of destinations – this would allow us to do business there with other regional offices based in
Europe”.
Colin Buchanan observes that the airport plays a vital role in supporting the region’s tourist
industry and specific assets such as Kilkenny which is Ireland’s third most popular overseas tourist
destination. Visitor numbers from Great Britain, prior to the recession were on a strong upward
trend with the majority of these arriving by air. Inbound passengers, primarily from the UK,
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account for 40% of the airport’s passengers and this is a key source of overseas income to the
region.
Passenger services activity is on a strong upward trend in line with UK tourist visits to the
Southeast – further route development is a critical factor in continued growth of tourism to the
Southeast from abroad. The airport accounts for approximately 560 jobs, both directly, indirectly
and through spending impacts.
Colin Buchanan is of the view that Waterford Airport is key to the economy of the Southeast
region and is set to play a more vital role in promoting business, tourism and the region’s
economic development in the future.
The extension and widening of the airport’s runway and the upgrading of Waterford Airport to
accommodate larger jet airplanes would expand opportunities in the aviation market to increase
services to British and continental European destinations. The expansion of the airport would
help generate jobs in tourism and airport support services and would also enhance the region’s
attractiveness from an FDI perspective.
Provision of Broadband in the region:
While the roll-out of next generation access broadband is an issue across the State, policymakers
must push forward the continued upgrading of broadband access in the Southeast, including dark
fibre network, to address what is a fundamental priority across all sizes and types of business in
the region.
This requires investment in the roll-out of dark fibre broadband network across the region and the
introduction of a pilot scheme that provides State financial support in key towns in each of the
counties in the region in which broadband infrastructure enables it.
PC ownership in the Southeast (70.0%) is below the national average (of 72.7%), especially in
South Tipperary (65.7%). Other Internet Access (10.2%) is above the national average (8.1%),
especially in Wexford (11.2%), Kilkenny (11.1%) and Carlow ((10.9).25
Broadband connectivity of households in the Southeast is lower than the national broadband
connectivity rate in all areas except Waterford city.
Table 13. Broadband connectivity of households in the Southeast-Census 2011
Carlow
Kilkenny
25
Households with Broadband
connectivity %
57.6 %
59.0%
Source: CSO Census of Population
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National broadband
connectivity rate %
63.8%
63.8%
60
South East Economic Development Strategy
Tipperary South 52.8%
Waterford
60.1%
Waterford City
66.4%
Wexford
56.5%
Source: Census 2011 Area Profiles
63.8%
63.8%
63.8%
63.8%
The Next Generation Broadband Taskforce notes ComReg statistics suggesting that 35% of
households in Ireland do not subscribe to a broadband service; that around 20,000 Irish
enterprises do not have internet access and that some 21% of Irish adults have never used the
Internet. Overcoming this lack of engagement, particularly in relation to the SME/enterprise
sector is considered by them to be a serious challenge.26
Table 12 above suggests that the challenge is more severe in the Southeast as the proportion of
households without broadband (42.1%) is higher than the national average.
The Metropolitan Area Network (MANs) have broken the single supplier monopoly that previously existed
and facilitate a range of telecoms products and services in these areas in the Southeast.27+Networks
/Metropolitan+Area+Networks.htmea+Networks.htmtan+Area+Networks.htm
Handover to E-net has been completed for all of these towns.
Table 14. Phase I MANs:Towns in the Southeast
Town
Start Date
Handover
KM
No. towns
Carlow
Nov-03
20/04/2005
15.4km
1
Clonmel
Nov-03
15/12/2005
21.8km
1
Dungarvan
Nov-03
15/12/2005
9.3km
1
Feb-03
27/09/2004
62.1km
1
Kilkenny
Nov-03
20/04/2005
17.2km
1
Waterford
Nov-03
28/02/2005
23.1km
1
Wexford
Nov-03
14/06/2005
39.1km
1
Total
6
Source: Department of Communication, Energy and Natural
Resources.http://www.dcenr.gov.ie/Communications/Communications+Development/Metropolit
an+Area+Networks/MANs+Phase+I.htm
Table 15. Phase II MANs:Towns in Southeast
26
27
http://www.dcenr.gov.ie/NR/rdonlyres/1AE24C27-40AD-4A73-879F-4536250C87BC/0/FullReport.pdf
Personal communication
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Town
Phase
Grant Agreement
Region
EU Funds
Grouping
County
No.
Towns
Cahir
2
SERA
S&E
Tipperary 1
Carrick-on-Suir
2
SERA
S&E
Tipperary 1
Cashel
2
SERA
S&E
Tipperary 1
Thomastown
2
SERA
S&E
Kilkenny
1
Tipperary
2
SERA
S&E
Tipperary 1
Total Number of Phase 2
5
Towns in Southeast
Source:
DCENR.http://www.dcenr.gov.ie/Communications/Communications+Development/Metropolitan+
Area+Networks/Phase+II+Towns.htm.
According to Forfás, an extension of the MAN in Waterford City to encompass developing areas in
the city such as Belview Port is required. 28
Key strategic development sites:
The IDA Ireland has two key strategic investment sites available servicing the Southeast which are
located at Knockhouse in Waterford and Belview in South Kilkenny.
Belview:
Belview is situated just four miles from Waterford City and 37 miles from Kilkenny City and
incorporates 265 hectares of zoned land, including the IDA land bank, the Marine Point Business
Park and Belview Port.
Glanbia is about to start building a milk processing plant on site. The water supply infrastructure is
matched by a wastewater treatment plant provided at a cost of €37 million by Waterford City,
with capacity of 190,000 population equivalent.
In their submission Kilkenny County Council pointed to the abundant water supply, and the
treatment and disposal of wastewater to standard, as the drivers behind Cork’s pharmaceutical
success. Waterford estuary has all these capabilities, including availability of land, roads, a deepwater port and, uniquely, a railhead on the dockside.
28
http://www.sera.ie/media/forfas-Regional-Competitiveness-Agendas-Southeast%20vol%20II.pdf
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South East Economic Development Strategy
The economic opportunity for agriculture and agribusiness in the region with the ending of the EU
milk quota in 2015 will bring enormous opportunities. Kilkenny County Council estimates that the
economic impact of milk will rise from €300 million to €1.559 billion by 2017 in Kilkenny alone.
The Belview site is a strategic asset that must be used to position the Southeast as a world leader
in Food Production and Technology.
The Government must support the extension of the Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN) to service
IDA Belview lands, providing appropriate broadband requirements and allowing for enterprise
development and expansion at the site.
Knockhouse:
This important IDA Ireland site is 45 acres of land adjacent to Genzyme at Knockhouse on the Old
Kilmeaden Road in Waterford. It is fully serviced and ready for development. Located off the
recently upgraded Old Kilmeaden Road, the site is in close proximity to Waterford City with
excellent infrastructure access including the M9/N9 Motorway/Dual Carriageway to Dublin,
Waterford Airport and the Port of Waterford.
This site is also strategically in close proximity to the existing IDA Business & Technology Park and
Waterford Institute of Technology’s West Campus at Carriganore. This valuable site provides
excellent opportunities for the IDA to attract FDI investment to the region.
Childcare Infrastructure
Another important element of infrastructural development in the region rests in implementing
measures that enable people to access the jobs market.
To that end, on a national level it would be helpful if the government devised a State childcare
strategy to reduce the cost of childcare and enable parents to join the work force. This strategy
should not just rely on State intervention, but on the role employers can play in providing on-site
childcare where feasible.
Key Proposals:


The development of a regional Transport Hub that aligns road, rail and port infrastructure,
maximises use of both ports (Rosslare and Waterford) ensures completion of the Enniscorthy
and New Ross Bypass and improvements to the N24 to greatly improve the Limerick to
Waterford road corridor.
The development of key strategic sites such as Belview in South Kilkenny and Knockhouse in
Waterford City.
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South East Economic Development Strategy





Invest in the roll-out of Dark Fibre Network (broadband) in the region and the introduction of a
pilot scheme that provides State.
Financial support in key towns in each of the counties in the region.
The creation of an Independent Port Authority for Rosslare Europort with a mandate to
develop the range and business activity at the Port.
Funding to be provided to Waterford Regional Airport for necessary development works and
expansion and extension of the runway.
The carrying out of a cost benefit analysis of all infrastructural spend including the methods
used to fund projects.
Local and other actions:







A strategic review of rail access to Rosslare Europort to allow the port reach its full potential.
Deepen a berth at Rosslare Europort from 7 metres to 9 metres, where feasible, in accordance
with the Habitats Directive, to allow the port realise its potential as a strategic asset
supporting regional exports and tourism.
To explore the feasibility of the deepening of the Port of Waterford and exploit its commercial
potential as a load on load off Port.
Support the extension of the MAN to service IDA Belview lands, providing appropriate
broadband requirements allowing for enterprise development and expansion at the site.
The development of Dunmore East Harbour and Port, Kilmore Quay and Helvick Harbour to
support the fishing industry and expansion of the tourist industry including the need to
provide the necessary funding to dredge the harbour at Dunmore East.
The retention of the Limerick/Waterford Rail Line and the carrying out of a re-evaluation of
the Waterford to Rosslare line.
Ensure provision of accessible and affordable childcare in the region to support employment.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
3.3
Fostering FDI growth and developing an enterprise environment
Fostering FDI Growth
A recurring theme in the consultations for this report, from local authorities to enterprise agencies
to politicians and business people, is frustration at the lack of an Industrial Development Authority
base in the Southeast.
The overwhelming viewpoint is that having the Southeast run from an IDA office in Cork has
worked against the region in terms of securing FDI jobs, with some counties faring worse than
others. Wexford, for example, has not had an IDA job announcement in over a decade, and the
council reports that there is no IDA land bank in the county even if a company was to show an
interest.
In 2012, there was 1 IDA visit by a potential investor to a site in Wexford, 12 in Waterford, 2 in
Tipperary, 3 in Kilkenny, and 2 in Carlow, a total of 20 for the entire region. This compares to 137
in Dublin and 31 in Cork.
In terms of the distribution of net jobs created by IDA and Enterprise Ireland client companies in
2012, 76% were in Dublin and Cork, 10% in Galway, 6% in Louth, 5% in Limerick, and 3% in the rest
of the State including the Southeast Region (unemployment rate 18.8%), and Midlands
(unemployment 16.9%). These areas consist of approximately 50% of the population of the State.
In order to tackle this perception of a region receiving less than its due, the establishment of a
Southeast Regional Office and a Southeast Regional Director of the IDA based in Waterford City
would be a positive indication of intent and a gesture of faith in the region.
The IDA should increase its efforts to secure provision of new FDI and high value jobs to the region
through greater numbers of site visits, strong marketing and branding of the Southeast,
encouraging clustering of similar type industries and ensuring the availability of quality property
solutions across the region.
This should be allied with the setting of regional and sub-regional job creation targets for the IDA,
Enterprise Ireland, and other Enterprise Support Agencies.
The establishment of high level CEO Groups in key sectors such as Agri-Business, Food Production,
Medical Devices, Engineering and Internationally traded services offers opportunities to ensure
maximum regional collaboration, the development of mutual supportive policies and actions and
greater clustering.
Regional Aid for the Southeast
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Regional Aid, also known as investment aid, is paid in the form of grants by the industrial
development agencies to businesses in order to support new investment and new employment in
productive projects in Europe's most disadvantaged regions.
Such aid must be in accordance with the Regional Aid Map 2007-13. This Map was drawn up by
the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation in accordance with the European Commission’s
Regional Aid Guidelines 2007-2013.
The eligible regions and applicable aid rates in Ireland for the 7 year period as set out in the Irish
Map are contained in the tabular Statement below.
The Regional Aid Guidelines for 2014-2020 were adopted by the European Commission on 19 June
2013. The guidelines will enter into force on 1 July 2014. Consequently, the current guidelines,
which were due to expire at the end of this year, are to be extended for six month transition
period.
The Regional Aid Guidelines 2014-2020 were adopted after extensive consultations by the
Commission with many stakeholders and with the European Parliament, the Committee of
Regions and the European Economic and Social Committee.
In the light of these guidelines, a revised Irish Regional Aid Map will be submitted to, and
approved by, the Commission before the end of June 2014. In drawing up this Map, economic
data such as unemployment and Gross Domestic Product for all counties will be analysed afresh
when deciding which counties will be designated for Regional Aid. It is vital that the current high
levels of unemployment in the Southeast are reflected, acknowledged and acted upon and that
the Southeast is at least on par with the Border, Midlands and Western (BMW) region as regards
IDA Investment aid.
Regional Aid Map 2007-2013 – IRELAND (as reviewed by Commission Decision
N130/2010 – Official Journal c 226/5 21.8.2010) 29
Table 16. BORDER, MIDLANDS and WEST REGION
LARGE FIRMS
MEDIUM FIRMS
SMALL FIRMS
Period
2007-2010
2011-2013
2007-2010
2011-‘13
2007- ‘10
2011-‘13
Aid Rate (Gross
Grant Equivalent)
30%
15%
40%
25%
50%
35%
29
PQ response Tuesday, 25 June 2013 (Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation)
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Table 17. SOUTHERN & EASTERN REGION
Designated
Areas
Southeast sub-Region
(Carlow, Kilkenny,
Wexford, Waterford,
South Tipperary) and
designated islands
LARGE FIRMS
MEDIUM FIRMS
SMALL FIRMS
2007 - 2013
2007 - 2013
2007 - 2013
10%
20%
30%
2007 - 2013
2007 - 2013
20%
30%
0%
20%
30%
0%
20072008
20092013
2007- 20092008 2013
20%
0%
30%
2007-2008
Mid West
2009-2013
10%
(Clare, Limerick, North
Tipperary2), Kerry,
Cork Urban
Regeneration Area
Cork (apart from
Urban Regeneration
Area)
10%
10%
0%
Lower aid rates apply to Large Investment Projects (i. e. > €50 million
Developing an enterprise environment
The National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) was established in December 2009 by the
Government to address the serious problems which arose in the banking sector as the result of
excessive property lending.
The Agency has acquired loans (land and development and associated loans) with a nominal value
of €74 billion from participating financial institutions. Its objective is to obtain the best achievable
financial return for the State on this portfolio over an expected lifetime of up to 10 years.
NAMA has published a listing of properties which have been subject to enforcement in the
Republic of Ireland and the UK. 30 From this list, the following list of properties in the Southeast has
been extracted.
30
http://www.nama.ie/about-our-work/properties-enforced/
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Table 18. Properties Subject to Enforcement Action, NAMA Listing as at 28 February 201331
Locations
NAMA properties
Wexford
12 properties
Waterford
30 properties
Carlow
5 properties
Kilkenny
9 properties
South Tipperary
18 properties(so far)
Source: NAMA :http://www.nama.ie/about-our-work/properties-enforced/properties-subject-toenforcement-action/?property_type=All&country.
A targeted intervention by NAMA could be beneficial to the work of the IDA and EI in the region in
terms of enhancing the urban landscape. NAMA has advanced €980 million to developers to finish
projects, with €568.2 million being forwarded to developers outside the island of Ireland. Over
two-thirds of NAMA properties are on the island of Ireland, yet only 41% of its cash advances are
spent here.
NAMA is funding development projects in Britain and Europe while Ireland is dotted with ghost
estates and empty hotels. Under the original NAMA Act, the body can borrow up to €5 billion in
total to loan to developers to finish projects.
NAMA could, therefore, help facilitate the development of town and city centres in the region
where possible, such as the Michael Street area in Waterford City.
The City and County Enterprise Boards across the Southeast are co-funded by the Irish
Government and EU Structural Funds. They concentrate on micro-enterprises, those businesses
employing 10 people or fewer. They are uniquely positioned to understand local needs and know
the background and track record of those applying for support and assistance.
The Waterford City and County Enterprise Board representatives welcomed the introduction of a
new network of Local Enterprise Offices. Announced by the Minister in February, the LEOs are due
to replace the CEBs and give local government an enhanced role in economic development and
enterprise support.
Although others questioned the capability of local authorities to engage in this kind of work, the
Waterford representatives believe the LEOs will offer a more cohesive way of measuring progress.
They also emphasised that in general there needs to be greater integration and collaboration
between the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation and the Department of Education.
31
L&RS calculations
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Another proposal that emerged from the consultations in this area of enterprise development is
that the remit for LEOs needs to be expanded to include businesses with more than 10 employees
and to take in tourism and food enterprises.
Carlow County Council expressed the view that linking the various enterprise centres across the
region should be a priority as part of an alignment of enterprise offerings, as all agencies spending
public money should be collaborating and sharing to avoid duplication.
Indeed, the expertise held by large exporting companies across the region should be leveraged by
presuming on their goodwill and developing high-level CEO groups across all key sectors in the
region to offer strategic advice and assist small companies to develop their businesses and access
the export market.
Waterford Port is not operating to anything like its full potential, given its location and the
facilities available. A marketing plan is needed to promote the port and attract new business,
allowing it to fulfil its potential, particularly in terms of load on load off business.
One of the key themes that emerged when compiling this report is the need for greater
collaboration and co-operation between all agencies to aid efficiency, cut down on red tape, and
prevent duplication of services. An interesting initiative in this regard is South Tipperary County
Council’s County Data Hub (southtipperaryinfo.ie), an inter-agency initiative started in 2009 to
collect and analyse county data and statistics to assist decision making and service delivery.
Its aim is to provide a central portal for information, data, maps and statistics, relevant to South
Tipperary and designed in an easy to use format.
The agencies subscribing to the initiative recognise the benefits of sharing data and making it
more accessible and in delivering information that is relevant to the services they provide
throughout the county.
An evaluation of the site’s operation should be undertaken with consideration given to expanding
its scope as a one-stop-shop and rolling out this initiative across the region.
Increasing the number of female entrepreneurs is a target of Enterprise Ireland. Enhancing the
role and potential of women in business should be part of the job creation strategy. EI’s already
mentioned Competitive Start Fund has begun to offer specific opportunities for female
entrepreneurs. Getting women into business, particularly helping them through the early stages of
start-up, should be a key pillar of the job creation strategy.
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Fostering FDI growth
Key Proposals:






Regional targets to be set for the IDA in attracting Industry and creating jobs in the region.
The establishment of a Southeast Regional Office and a Southeast Regional Director of the IDA
based in Waterford City.
The IDA to secure provision of new FDI and high value jobs to the region though increased site
visits, marketing, branding and enabling clustering of industries.
The IDA in partnership with local authorities to bring forward plans to develop suitable sites
and property solutions to support the development of key sectors such as Agri-business, ICT,
Life-sciences and Internationally traded services.
The development of High Level CEO Groups across all key sectors in the region.
To ensure that the Southeast sub region has at least the same IDA Investment Aid as the BMW
region as part of the Regional Aid Guidelines for 2014 – 2020 .
Developing an Enterprise Environment
Key Proposals





The development of a Marketing Programme for Waterford and Rosslare Ports.
The assistance of NAMA to facilitate the development of town and city centres in the region
where possible such as the Michael Street area in Waterford City and the carrying out of an
audit of NAMA stock with a view to maximising potential of NAMA assets in the region.
To evaluate the South Tipperary County Hub Data and consider its rolling out throughout the
region.
Supporting expanding the role of Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs) to include businesses with
more than 10 employees and to take in tourism and food enterprises in line with regional
enterprise strategies.
Development of a Regional strategy aimed at getting more women into business, particularly
helping them through the early stages of start-up.
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South East Economic Development Strategy
3.4
Supporting the SME Sector
Small and Medium Enterprises make up over 99% of businesses in the enterprise economy in
Ireland and account for almost 78% of people employed.
In our consultations Clonmel Chamber of Commerce pointed out that while the Government’s job
creation strategy is very much centred on attracting FDI, there are 200,000 SMEs in the State and
if each created just one job the unemployment rate would be nearly halved.
These figures show just how vital SMEs are to Irish economic life and to the fabric of our society.
SMEs, however, have been particularly badly affected as a result of the crisis of recent years.
Since 2008, Ireland has seen a marked decline in its business environment, reflected in the
number of layoffs and the collapse in private sector investment in the economy. Businesses cite
factors outside their control (such as rising energy costs, cash flow, upward only rents, rates,
consumer confidence and a reduction in demand) as the key business issues facing them.
A number of steps can be taken to effectively assist businesses and manufacturers to develop and
create jobs to alleviate the unemployment crisis and ensure our manufacturers retain a
competitive advantage in the future.
A key component of any job creation plan in such an environment has to be the prioritising of job
retention policies. Struggling small and medium enterprises in particular could benefit from an
initiative in this regard.
There are 55,914 people currently unemployed in the Southeast region, according to CSO figures,
and each of these individuals costs the State an estimated €20,000 in lost taxation and Social
Welfare payments. Rather than allowing people lose their jobs, the Government should examine
the use of a job retention fund, administered by the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and
Innovation and the Department of Social Protection, which would see people kept in employment
in viable businesses.
Such a scheme would cost a fraction to the State of what it would cost if those people became
unemployed. It would also be cost beneficial in the long term as it would help struggling viable
businesses, which might otherwise fold, to get back on their feet.
In a similar vein, the South Tipperary Development Company proposed a programme directed at
businesses under pressure to enable them to realign rather then fold, perhaps via a business
health check facility, backed up with a programme of support.
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In our consultations, a consistent theme expressed by those trying to assist small businesses and
start-ups has been access to credit, which businesses need to operate.
They have expressed frustration with the banks, whose refusal to lend to SMEs is stifling business
across the Southeast. AIB and Bank of Ireland have set goals to meet lending targets to SMEs, but
ISME has provided sufficient research to show that neither institution is meeting their targets and
that SMEs are suffering as a result.
The Government needs to set region-specific targets for bank lending to SMEs and the banks
should be compelled to report quarterly on whether those targets have been met without being
allowed to include rollover funding (the lending must be new funding).
For smaller enterprises in particular, commercial rates are a real obstacle. Businesses should pay
rates for the services provided by the State, but those rates should be reflective of the size and
scale of a business, and should be affordable. Time after time in our consultations, business
people lamented the outdated rates system that penalises businesses even for investing in their
premises. A rates review would be an enormous exercise across the State but a necessary one to
give smaller businesses a break and breathe life back into town centres.
ISME has called for a review of the prompt payments' legislation to ensure the ‘15- day rule' is
adhered to by State agencies. Delay in payments amongst Irish businesses is a significant hurdle
for operating a successful business. In 2011 ISME found that small businesses were waiting over
71 days for invoices to be paid.
Most consumers want to buy Irish but there is not a level playing field for Irish businesses. For
example, importers can avail of the same sell-by date as domestic producers; despite the fact their
products actually have a longer shelf life after including the import process. A review of this unfair
procedure would benefit the Southeast’s agriculture and the agri-food industry.
Other useful initiatives for this sector would be a campaign urging the food catering industry to
use domestic suppliers and increased monitoring of misleading 'Irish goods' labelling to con
consumers into thinking they are buying Irish.
There should also be an examination of the use of tax credits for multinational companies that
source Irish-produced materials as opposed to importing. The National Linkage Programme 1985
was established to develop a supply base in Ireland that would maximise local purchases of Irish
materials, components and services by foreign-owned organisations located in Ireland. Reports
show the programme was successful for a short period, but the inability of Irish companies to
enlarge their scale deterred MNCs. In straitened times, the attractiveness of targeted tax credits,
subject to European State aid rules approval, could kickstart this initiative back to life.
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This ties in with the Import X initiative already under way in the Southeast, progressed by the City
and County Enterprise Boards, to encourage companies in the region to explore sourcing goods or
services from local companies as an alternative to importing from abroad.
Waterford City and County Enterprise Boards also had an interesting proposal that local
companies trading into FDI companies should be considered exporters and receive commensurate
supports.
The Government spends between €14 billion and €16 billion on public procurement annually, but
many of these contracts are lost to Irish companies as under EU law the tenders have to be open
to competition from all EU States. These tenders are usually lost because domestic companies
cannot compete in terms of scale.
There should be a comprehensive review of State and local authority procurement projects with
the aim of breaking them down and allowing smaller businesses to compete for tenders.
Similarly, the provision of greater soft supports would greatly improve prospects for new micro
start-ups. This should include the introduction of a pilot scheme in the region of start-up vouchers
to be spent on R&D, training, business supports, etc.
Wexford Local Development Company in their submission highlighted the government’s
microfinance scheme, arguing that the level of red tape, central control and relatively high
interest rate is deterring take up.
The delegation also posited the idea of a mentoring scheme for start-ups using the tremendous
expertise and experience of such companies as Glanbia or Slaney Meats and their exporting knowhow.
The Waterford Gives A Shirt group felt that innovation vouchers (€5,000), currently available via
Enterprise Ireland only to limited companies, should be made more widely available and offer
better value for money, especially for young graduates who can get value from it.
Dr. Mícheál Ó hÉigeartaigh of Technology Cluster Southeast says that creating and sustaining a
vibrant SME cluster is the key to regional economic prosperity.
His primary interest is in creating a vibrant high technology SME sector, but his point is valid for all
categories of SMEs across the region.
Another area where SMEs could receive support is via a PLATO-type programme for the region,
whereby senior representatives of large “parent” companies offer specialist expertise and advice,
networking opportunities and business development training to SMEs. Such programmes have
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already operated successfully elsewhere in the State and offer great potential for supporting SME
survival and expansion.
Key Proposals:







A government initiative to prioritise job retention through a job retention fund.
A Region-specific target for bank lending to SMEs.
An urgent review of commercial rates to rebalance the burden between large multinationals
and small and medium sized businesses.
Provision of greater soft supports for new micro start-ups including the introduction of startup vouchers on a pilot basis in the region.
Open up State procurement to small companies by breaking down contracts.
Examine the use of tax credits for multinational corporations which source locally produced
materials as opposed to importing to increase spin out opportunities in the SME sector in the
region, subject to European State aid conditions.
The continued support of the Import X initiative of the Enterprise Boards of the Southeast
which help substitute domestic goods or services for imported ones.
Local and other actions:



Prioritise the review of the prompt payments legislation as called for by ISME.
Develop a regional strategy to support retention of local retailers including the enhancement
of local retail infrastructure, to prevent the drainage of local small and medium retail business
to big superstores in city and town centres.
The introduction of a PLATO type programme for the region to foster greater networking
between larger parent companies and the SME sector.
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4
Key Growth Sector
4.1
Agri-Business, Fishing, Food Production and Technology
The Southeast is the region with the third greatest number of farm holdings, which is 20.8% of the
total in 2007(see figure (iv). 32
The Southeast region had the largest average farm size of 42.7 hectares in 2007.
The Teagasc National Farm Survey 2011 found that Family Farm Income ranged from €14,040
(lowest) in the Border region to €40,664 (highest) in the Southeast region.
The largest number of viable farms is in the Southeast region.
32
CSO. Farm Structure Survey 2007, December 2008. Accessed at:
http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/releasespublications/documents/agriculture/2007/farmstructure_2007.pdf
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The agri-food industry is the largest indigenous manufacturing sector in the country and has
tremendous potential for growth and job creation, across the State but particularly in the
Southeast region.
This is underlined by the fact that less than 17% of raw material inputs are imported, compared to
over 60% for the manufacturing sector overall. That means that agri-food is in a stronger position
to recover if the proper focus is placed on exploiting Ireland’s comparative advantage as a food
producer, processor and exporter.
In the consultations, Kilkenny County Council outlined the economic opportunity for agriculture
and agri-business in the Southeast that the ending of the EU milk quota in 2015 will bring. The
local authority estimates that the economic impact of milk will rise from €300 million to €1.559
billion by 2017 in Kilkenny alone.
The importance of delivering success in this sector in the current economic climate cannot be
underestimated, hence the crucial part that overall strategy will have to play if that potential is to
be realised.
This sector has proved to be resilient in the face of the downturn in comparison to other
industries, but negative factors currently affecting agri-food businesses include the Sterling
exchange rate, the regulatory structure, the power of the major retailers, costs, and the difficulties
businesses encounter in accessing credit.
Among the challenges that need to be addressed are the up-skilling of those currently within the
sector but there also needs to be a focus, in collaboration with training agencies and further
education colleges, on retraining people for work within the food sector.
Entrepreneurship is also obviously an important factor, including community initiatives and others
as well as the traditional understanding of the entrepreneur as an individual. Training, credit,
research and development and the role of State enterprise development bodies are all key factors
here.
There should be a shift in emphasis in enterprise development to agencies that will focus on local
indigenous enterprises and assist in developing the optimum potential that lies in local and
regional production, processing, branding and marketing.
As with other areas of enterprise, great potential lies in clustering and networking, where small
local enterprises combine their activities in areas such as research and development, local and
regional branding, and marketing in order to maximise their potential.
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One of the major problems facing the Irish agri-food sector is the role that the EU’s regulatory
system has played. While there have obviously been huge trade advantages, as illustrated by the
fact that this country is among the leading exporters within the EU across a range of food
products, European restrictions, particularly in the areas of State aid and the promotion of Irish
produced food, are identified as negative factors.
Ireland must be allowed to intervene positively to help develop the optimum potential of agrifood, and there also needs to be a clarification and tightening of the regulations governing country
of origin labelling.
One major advance in the agri-food sector in the Southeast is the work on-going by industry giant
Glanbia to build a milk processing plant at Belview, which is situated just four miles from
Waterford City and 37 miles from Kilkenny City and incorporates 265 hectares of zoned land,
including the IDA land bank, the Marine Point Business Park and Belview Port. This ambitious plant
will be ideally placed to take advantage of the ending of the milk quota in 2015.
It is estimated that with current population trends, global food production will have to be
increased by up to 70% in the coming decades. Ireland has the potential to produce food for up to
36 million people.
The Government’s Food Harvest 2020 plan sets out a vision for smart, green and sustainable
growth for the Irish agri-food and fisheries sectors. The strategy, developed by an industry-led
committee, includes ambitious targets to increase food exports by 42 per cent by 2020.
There are, undoubtedly, obstacles to be overcome in the production, processing and marketing of
Irish food, but the future for this sector looks bright and the Southeast, with its abundance of top
quality agricultural land, can be at the very forefront of this expansion.
It is vital, therefore, that a collaborative strategy across the region is developed to position the
Southeast to take advantage of the targets envisaged in Harvest 2020, with an emphasis on milk
expansion, beef expansion, food SME expansion and increased direct labour opportunities.
A key element of such a strategy will involve positioning the Southeast as a world leader in food
production, technology and research through strong academic research and development and
industrial cohesion.
In their submissions Kilkenny County County and Waterford City Council highlighted the
importance of water in terms of infrastructural development. The €23 million Belview Strategic
Water Supply Scheme, which will facilitate industrial development and job creation in Kilkenny
and the Southeast, is an example of the region’s forward-looking policies.
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The water supply infrastructure is matched by a wastewater treatment plant provided at a cost of
€37m by Waterford City, with capacity of 190,000 population equivalent. It is this scheme that will
facilitate Glanbia’s new milk production plant.
A key priority for the region must be to overcome the constraints put in place by the EU Water
Framework Directive, which focuses on river basin management. All possible steps and measures
must be taken to ensure compliance with the directive.
The Southeast is looking at a major increase in herd numbers when the milk quota goes in 2015.
The environmental impact of this is manageable subject to a collaborative approach with farmers,
supported by producers.
The region should produce a best practice agricultural and environmental management model in
the Southeast that can be rolled out across the country. Milk and beef production are vital cogs in
the Southeast economy and the region has the potential to be a world leader in all aspects of the
industry, from milking machines to veterinarian practice to feed systems and environmental
management.
In their submission Kilkenny County Council outlined one major initiative involving LEADER
programmes and county enterprise boards whereby six CEOs of prominent food companies in
Kilkenny have been consulted to strategise around milk production and the development of small
food companies into successful exporters, potential winners that are targeting mid-sized British
supermarkets.
The idea is to develop new marketing and sales mechanisms for these companies, which typically
are good at producing but not at selling, by using the expertise developed by such industry giants
as Glanbia.
Such a high-level CEO Group could be of use across the region, working collaboratively with the
new Socio Economic Committees in the region and providing cutting edge advice on future
development and clustering.
To help develop this best practice model, a Science Group, involving the Department of
Agriculture, the Department of the Environment, Local Authorities, Teagasc, the EPA, Water
catchment region, Irish Water and Waterford and Carlow Institutes, should be convened to ensure
full compliance with the Water Framework Directive and to ensure good water quality in
groundwater, surface water or in estuaries to facilitate this herd expansion.
Under the EU Nitrates Directive, herd owners are legally required to limit the amount of nitrogen
from livestock manure that is applied (including that which is deposited directly by the animals
themselves) on individual farms to no more than 170 kgs Nitrogen/hectare/year.
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In 2007, the EU Commission approved a derogation for Ireland which allows individual farms
(upon application to the Department) to operate above this statutory livestock manure limit, up to
a maximum limit of 250 kgs Nitrogen/hectare/year, subject to strict conditions.
That derogation is due to expire at the end of this year but it should be extended to facilitate
meeting Harvest 2020 targets.
As part of the development of the agri-food sector, a forum of all supermarket suppliers and
members of each producer organisation should be convened to negotiate a fair trading regime for
suppliers and to encourage increased use of local produce.
As part of any expansion of agribusiness, a policy of supports is needed for artisan and local food
producers through designated traders, farmers’ markets and festivals. This emphasis on local and
green has obvious attractions for the tourist market and the Southeast should take advantage of
the range and quality of produce from artisan producers to promote itself as a Food Travel
destination.
Fishing:
Fishing remains a locally important sector for Southeast coastal communities. A vision for a
sustainable and financially viable fishing sector, resilient to fluctuations in catches/landings and
markets, working towards an upturn in sector activity and an increase in employment is necessary.
Restrictions on fishing for certain species such as salmon, bass and eel has impacted on the more
traditional fishing sectors in the region.
A revised Common Fisheries Policy could ensure both an increased share of the quota for the Irish
fleet and an overall reduction in the catch. There is considerable resentment in the Irish fishing
community at the latitude being given to foreign boats in Irish waters. For example while Irish
Fishermen have no bass quota for 2013, other national fleets have bass quota in our waters. The
restoration of bass quota to the Southeast fleet would provide much needed opportunities to the
fishermen in the region.
There is potential to expand both employment and value through increasing the catch and by
increasing the volume of fish processed locally for sale domestically and for export. Exports
nationally are currently valued at around €400 million annually. Given its obvious natural
advantages and the fact that the global demand for seafood is forecast to increase greatly over
the coming decades, there is huge potential for the Southeast to expand its market share if the
right strategies are put in place, and in the context of the required reform of the Common
Fisheries Policy (CFP).
In 2007 the European Union adopted the eel regulation, which led to the development of eel
management plans by 2009. The number of eels was in serious decline and it was decided to
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impose a ban on eel fishing in 2009. Following a review in June 2012 it was determined by the
Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources that eel fishing would not be
reopened for the foreseeable future. Therefore, the livelihood for eel fishermen has been
removed.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should develop a comprehensive Sustainable and
Eco-friendly Fishing Strategy for the Southeast. It must ensure full consultation and engagement
with local coastal communities and fishermen, seek to develop a sustainable and financially viable
fishing sector, an increase in upturn in the sector and properly compensate fishermen who have
suffered financially due to the banning of certain fish practices.
Key Proposals:




The development of a strategy to position the Southeast to take advantage of targets
envisaged in Harvest 2020 with an emphasis on milk expansion, beef expansion, Food SME
expansion and increased direct labour opportunities.
The development of a regional High Level CEO group in the Food Sector working
collaboratively with the new Socio Economic Committees in the region and providing cutting
edge advice on future development and clustering.
The development of a plan to position the Southeast as a world leader in food production,
technology and research through strong academic Research and Development and Industry
support.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should develop a comprehensive Sustainable
and Eco-friendly Fishing Strategy for the Southeast.
Local and other actions:




The development of a Science Group (Department of Agriculture, Department of the
Environment, Local Authorities, Teagasc, EPA, Water catchment region, Irish Water and
Waterford and Carlow Institutes) to ensure full compliance with the Water Framework
Directive and to ensure good water quality in groundwater, surface water or in estuaries to
facilitate expansion of herds.
Ensure the maintenance of the Nitrates Directive derogation to facilitate meeting Harvest
2020 targets.
The development of the agri-food sector, including the establishment of a forum of all
supermarket suppliers and members of each producer organisation to negotiate a fair trading
regime of suppliers and with a view to increasing the use of local produce.
Support for artisan and local food producers through designated traders, markets and festivals
and linkages with tourism and promoting the region as a Food Travel destination.
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4.2
Tourism, Arts and Culture
The Southeast, or “the Sunny Southeast”, as generations of Irish people know it, is blessed with a
great tourist product.
In our consultations, many contributors pointed to the quality of life in the region that can be
leveraged to attract newcomers. Tourists, workers, or new businesses cannot fail to be struck by
the Southeast’s air quality, relative lack of traffic, and easily accessible scenic beauty, from
verdant hills and valleys to unspoiled sandy beaches.
It is a region whose landmarks are steeped in the nation’s history and culture, so it is little wonder
that tourism plays such an important role in the economy of the Southeast.
Despite the traditional strength of tourism in the region, however, because of its dependence on
the domestic and British market, the Southeast has been particularly hard hit by the economic
downturn, with sharp falls in visitor numbers.
The region certainly has the capability to regain those numbers, and indeed, much has been done
already, augmenting its natural and built attractions with, for example, the Medieval Mile in
Kilkenny City, the Viking Triangle in Waterford City, the significant heritage sites in Wexford and
Carlow and initiatives such as the Butler Trail in South Tipperary.
There are also a wealth of festivals and events, such as the Tall Ships and Winterval in Waterford,
the Wexford Opera Festival, and Carlow’s enhanced gallery and museum offerings.
Barry Monaghan, organiser of the Winterval festival in Waterford, spoke of the important role
played by such events in opening people’s eyes to the Southeast, which people don’t realise, is
such a fantastic place. At a time when good roads have made it so much easier to head west from
Dublin, the Southeast needs such positives to showcase itself.
The key to regaining lost ground and maximising the region’s tourism potential lies in a coordinated strategic approach, involving Tourism Ireland to deliver a united message that the
Southeast is a family-friendly, value destination, with a range of attractions to suit all tastes,
whether outdoor or indoor, artistic or adventurous.
Waterford City Council in their submission emphasised the importance of branding in such an
endeavour. If the region is perceived as a place to visit then it will be seen as a place to do
business. There is a greater value to tourism than just direct economic return.
Such a strategy will require a level of combined effort among stakeholders across the region and
recognition that a rising tide lifts all boats.
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Consideration should be given to the development of this strategic vision for Southeast Tourism
along the lines of the Kilkenny Tourism model and/or Destination Waterford, which ensure
maximum collaboration between tourist and service providers, with an emphasis on customer
service.
Tourism is a key economic driver for Kilkenny City as evidenced by a €5.5 million plan to upgrade
the public realm in the city centre to encourage visitors beyond Kilkenny Castle into the city and to
St. Canice’s Cathedral, creating a dividend for local businesses.
This model involves a collaborative approach, involving, for example, local businesses realising
that although they may be in competition with one another, the development of a successful
branding and marketing strategy for their locality and the region in general will bring economic
benefits to all.
This strategy must also involve recognising and measuring the economic value of festivals and
tourism generally, in terms of economic activity generated and jobs created.
This strategy will entail convincing Tourism Ireland of the benefit of marketing the Southeast to
overseas markets as a distinct brand.
Contributors had countless ideas for tourist projects across the region, from a hotel in proximity to
the Rock of Cashel to encourage more bed nights in South Tipperary, to the notion of a heavily
marketed Ten Wonders of the Southeast visitor attraction, to a National Maritime Museum on
Waterford’s north quay, to an ambitious idea to build an interpretive centre at the burial place of
St. Nicholas in Thomastown, County Kilkenny.
There is also tremendous potential to promote and develop eco-tourism in the region, including
developing further walking or cycling trails, better promoting such attractions as New Ross’s John
F. Kennedy Arboretum, or developing to its potential the magnificent Mount Congreve Gardens in
Waterford, and promoting in general the sheer unspoilt beauty of Tipperary’s Golden Vale or
Wexford’s sandy beaches.
A key part of this regional strategy has to be to ensure a business dividend for the region’s hotels,
restaurants, shops and public houses from the tourist industry with a key emphasis on improving
the streetscape and public realm in town and city centres.
For example, a pilot ‘Streetscape fund’ could assist in the regeneration of towns and cities in the
region and provide employment opportunities for those carrying out the work and for those
businesses benefitting from their urban area becoming a more pleasant visitor experience.
As part of a Southeast Tourism strategy, an online marketing campaign should be developed to
promote the Southeast through innovative uses of new technologies such as web-based video
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material, exploiting the connections offered by social media and using local champions and
ambassadors to promote the attractions of their area and sell the message that the Sunny
Southeast has more to offer visitors than ever.
Key Proposals





The development of a strategic tourism vision, an holistic package and marketing brand for the
region with continued support for the Viking Triangle in Waterford, medieval mile in Kilkenny,
and the significant heritage sites in Wexford, South Tipperary and Carlow.
To develop a coordinated approach to supporting the cultural and tourist sector in the region
with an emphasis on heritage, eco-tourism and festivals.
To consider the development of Southeast Tourism based on the Kilkenny Tourism model
and/or Destination Waterford which ensures maximum collaboration between tourist and
service providers with an emphasis on customer service. This must also involve recognising
and measuring the economic value of festivals and tourism generally.
To develop Eco-tourism in the region and specifically the opening and operation of the world
class Mount Congreve gardens as a major tourist attraction.
The establishment of a Pilot ‘Streetscape fund’ to assist in the regeneration of towns and cities
in the region.
Local and other actions:





Develop a regional strategy to ensure a business dividend for the hotels, restaurants, shops
and public houses from the tourist industry with a key emphasis on improving the streetscape
and public realm in town and city centres.
The development of an online marketing strategy to promote the Southeast through
innovative uses of new technologies such as web based video material, social media and using
local champions and ambassadors to sell the message.
Local authorities to provide adequate bus parking at key attraction points in the region
Continued support for festivals in the region such as SPRAOI, Food Festivals, Cat Laughs,
Wexford Opera, Winterval and others.
Local authorities, tourist providers and venue operators to look at increasing the amount of
‘gigs’ and concerts in the region.
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4.3
Health, Life Sciences and Medical Devices
The Southeast has an increasing number of companies involved in various Life Sciences-related
business, mainly, although not exclusively, in manufacturing. Some 25 operations cumulatively
employ around 8,000 people.
Existing major players in the Southeast include Merck Sharp & Dohme in Carlow and South
Tipperary, Abbot Vascular, Boston Scientific, Clonmel Healthcare, and the Alza Cordis Corporation
in South Tipperary, Glaxo SmithKline in Dungarvan, Lake Region and Waters Technologies in
Wexford, Bausch & Lomb and Genzyme in Waterford and WIT’s Pharmachem research centre.
Outstanding indigenous and ‘native origin’ references include Eirgen Pharma, the Schivo Group,
Lancaster Laboratories, and CR Bard. The current IDA strategy is to attract pre-commercialisation
companies from abroad.
Even before the recent announcement that NiPro is to locate in Waterford, this sector had
received a boost with the announcement in February that global healthcare giant Sanofi will invest
€44 million to expand on the manufacture of its insulin products at the Genzyme biotech plant in
Waterford, where some 500 people are employed.
There is a cluster of bio-pharma companies in South Tipperary, where companies have taken a
strategic decision to locate in close proximity.
The strength of these industries offer opportunity for expansion into innovative enterprises, such
as Pharma Assist, an Irish company based in Clonmel that provides clinical trials for the main
pharmaceutical industry, and Pharma Foods in Carrickbeg, which offers crossover links between
the pharmaceutical and food industries.
Both WIT and Carlow IT have developed significant competence in Life Sciences in terms of
research and education and have forged relationships with companies involved in Life Sciences.
Manufacturing faces a threat from what has become known as the ‘patent cliff’. Cheaper overseas
competition will increasingly threaten this sector in Ireland as many drugs are imminently due to
fall out of patent.
A strategy is required to assist companies in the Life Sciences sector in dealing with this challenge,
as well as the costs of Research and Development, global overcapacity in some areas and greater
competition from Asia and the Far East.
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The key to future success in this area lies in creating a research and development capability within
the Institutes, in collaboration with the industry, to develop new products and capabilities, train
personnel and devise relevant curricula to deliver top graduates in this field.
Indeed, referring to the site at Belview, where Glanbia is to build a major dairy processing plant,
Kilkenny County Manager Joe Crockett made the point that abundant water supply and the
treatment and disposal of waste water to standard were the drivers behind Cork’s pharmaceutical
success. Waterford estuary, he said, has all these capabilities, including availability of land, roads,
a deep-water port and, uniquely, a railhead on the dockside.
To ensure success, a regional high level CEO Medical Devices group should be established to
develop mutual supportive policies and actions and encourage greater clustering in this area. The
Friends of the University of the Southeast (FUSE) initiative, a project by entrepreneurs to ignite
and promote business growth in the region, should also be harnessed to encourage greater
collaboration in the sector.
Moreover, local authorities should provide supports to companies in the sector in areas such as
good manufacturing practice, lean manufacturing and green initiatives.
Key Proposals



The establishment of a regional high level CEO Medical Devices group working collaboratively
with the local Socio Economic Committees, to develop mutual supportive policies and actions
and greater clustering in this area and a use of the FUSE initiative to encourage greater
collaboration in the sector.
A strategy to assist companies in the life sciences sector in dealing with such challenges as
expiry of patents, the costs of Research and Development, global over-capacity in some areas
and greater competition from Asia and the Far East.
Local authorities in the region through the SECs to provide supports to companies in the sector
in areas such as good manufacturing practice (GMP), lean manufacturing and green initiatives.
Local and other actions:



Support companies engaged in pipelining new products and new drug formulations.
Support stronger linkages between third level institutes and enterprises in this sector such as
the Pharmaceutical and Molecular Biotechnology Research Centre (PMBRC), Carlow Institute
of Technologies Industrial Design and Product Development Innovation Centre, Southeastern
Applied Materials Research Centre (SEAM) and the Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre
(Shannon ABC).
A future Technological University of the Southeast to have a clear focus on training, up-skilling
and meeting the graduate needs of the sector.
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4.4
Financial and International Trading Services
The improved road infrastructure, broadband and the research and graduate output in the
Southeast has the potential for job creation in such areas as Cloud computing, e-games,
international and financial services, e-commerce and other content businesses.
Kilkenny City in particular has attracted significant investment from leading financial services
companies such as State Street International, Bank of Ireland and Taxback.com.
State Street International is a leading global provider of fund administration services who first
established in Kilkenny in 2001 and now employ over 400 people at two locations in the city.
Taxback.com, a multinational corporation providing specialist tax return services to private and
corporate clients across 100 countries first located their global headquarters in Kilkenny in 2003
and now have 27 offices worldwide.
As with other industries, what would greatly assist the development of a strategy to create jobs
and grow this sector is a regional high level CEO Group, led by the financial services sector and
supported by the IDA and local authorities. This group would identify the segments of the financial
services market, including newly emerging sectors, which the region can best target.
In order to ensure success, next generation broadband must be available throughout the region,
and suitably identified sites should have access to advanced, high quality and competitively priced
broadband infrastructure as identified in the Forfás Report.
There is a need for increased collaboration between higher education providers and this sector to
ensure that relevant courses are available to students and that a steady supply of suitable
graduates is available to help sustain this sector’s expansion.
To this end, a regional skills deficit survey would be useful in identifying skills shortages such as
languages and multi-lingual activity and to help the development of appropriate responses
through collaborative initiatives between industry and the education sector.
Key Proposals:


Development of a Regional High Level CEO Group in the sector, led by the financial services
sector and supported by the IDA and local authorities through the Socio Economic
Committees.
The High Level Group to identify the segments of the financial services sector, including newly
emerging sectors, which the region can best target.
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

The continued rollout of next generation broadband to ensure that suitably identified sites
have access to advanced, high quality and competitively priced broadband infrastructure as
identified in the Forfás Report.
The region to build on its sizeable portfolio of international financial services companies as a
basis for further growth.
Local and other actions:
 The local authorities in the region to build and maintain a skills register and develop a
database of available and suitable property solutions (land, buildings and office premises) in
the region.
 Strengthen relationships and linkages between industry and enterprises in this sector and the
existing third level institutes to ensure suitable course development and a steady supply of
appropriately skilled graduates.
 The carrying out of a regional skills deficit in this sector to identify skills shortages such as
languages and multi-lingual activity and the development of appropriate responses through
collaborative initiatives between industry and the education sector.
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4.5
Bio Technology and the Green Economy
Any economic development plan for Southeast must trade on the green and clean credentials of
the region, with its good weather, fertile landscape, low density of population, lack of traffic, and
countless natural attractions.
Clean technology includes recycling, renewable energy (wind power, solar power, biomass,
hydropower, and biofuels), information technology, green transportation, electric motors, green
chemistry, lighting, Greywater, and many other appliances that are now more energy efficient. It
is a means to create electricity and fuels, with a smaller environmental footprint and minimise
pollution.
There has been significant investment in the water supply and waste water treatment systems in
the region, providing significant capacity for environmentally responsible industrial expansion.
Indeed, the region has a tremendous opportunity to position itself as the best practice agricultural
and environmental management model in the country by leveraging this forward-thinking focus
on the treatment and disposal of waste water to standard to facilitate the needs of industry and
agriculture.
A green economic strategy for the Southeast would explore enterprise opportunities in green
services, renewable energy and clean-tech industries.
Carlow County Council in particular is focusing efforts in its forward planning on new
opportunities in the area of renewable energy and the cleantech sector. The Institute of
Technology is a recognised centre of excellence in biotechnology research and Teagasc is also
headquartered in Carlow, specifically its plant biotechnology unit research centre, which,
combined with Carlow College’s offering, make the area attractive also for Life Sciences
companies and the agri-business industry.
The case has also been made to Government by two separate groups for the reclaiming of
Ireland’s sugar beet industry, with the possible location in the Southeast region of a plant to
produce sugar and/or bio-fuel.
One consortium estimates that between 400 and 500 jobs could be created in the construction
phase, with around 200 subsequently directly employed to operate the facility. They also estimate
that there would be significant indirect employment, amounting to around 5,000 jobs, among
farmers, agricultural contractors, hauliers, and input suppliers.
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Such a plant would also make a significant contribution to meeting the State’s requirements under
the Renewable Energy Directive, under which all member States have to achieve 10% substitution
of their transport energy needs from renewable sources by 2020.
There is potential, as the Forfás report outlined, to leverage regional assets such as Waterford
Port, road and rail links to exploit opportunities in renewable energy supply chains, such as
assembling wind turbines and foundations for proposed wind farms in the Midlands.
Indeed, there should also be investment in the wind power industry and wave energy to take
advantage of the Southeast’s geographical strengths.
There also other opportunities in this sector for former construction workers, particularly in terms
of retro-fitting homes and businesses to make them more energy efficient.
The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) estimates that every €15 million invested by
Government in energy efficient grant programmes supports the creation and retention of 1,000
jobs. The Government has promised an Energy Efficient Fund this year to step up Ireland’s energy
efficient performance, supporting up to 20 demonstrator projects that will become examples for
the expansion of this sector.
A new financing model for domestic retrofitting is due to be introduced next year to replace the
Better Energy grants scheme, but we believe there is every reason to fast track this proposal to
create jobs and reduce energy costs for businesses.
Indeed, there is still a huge amount of work to be done across the State in terms of retro-fitting
homes and businesses to make them more energy efficient.
It is estimated that most businesses that have not yet tackled energy efficiency can achieve a 20%
reduction in energy costs for minimal outlay, giving a significant boost to their competitiveness.
In our consultations, Brian Kehoe of Wexford Local Development, citing how Wexford had been
particularly hit with the collapse in construction, advocated expanding the SEAI better-energy
homes scheme and retraining Tús workers to insulate homes and businesses, including local
authority houses, where funding is currently very limited.
He also said there is also scope for a scheme to retro-fit heritage houses, both publicly and
privately owned.
Programmes should be put in place through local authorities to train, advise individuals and
groups in starting up sustainable energy companies.
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Key Proposals:





Develop a green economic strategy for the Southeast region, to explore enterprise
opportunities in green services, renewable energy and Clean-tech industries.
Support the development of a regional renewable energy cluster policy to make
recommendations on the requirements of third and fourth level institutes, research and
development agencies and infrastructural requirements.
Develop a regional branding and strategy and market the Southeast as a Green Economy
region with support from Government Departments and relevant agencies.
An inter-agency approach in identifying and developing key green and cleantech reference
sites in the region.
Support the revival of the sugar beet industry and the construction a new bio-refinery plant in
the Southeast which has the potential to create 5,000 jobs.
Local and other actions:




Programmes should be put in place through local authorities to train, advise individuals and
groups in starting up sustainable energy companies.
An investment in wind power industry and wave energy to take advantage of the regions
geographical strengths.
Further development of the strategic water resources in the region recognising that an
abundant supply of water and waste water treatment is hugely important into the future.
Escalate regeneration projects in the region with a focus on retrofitting of local authority
stock.
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4.6
Creative Industries and the ICT sector
A strategy for the creative and cultural sector would complement the broader plans for
developing R&D activity, new business start-ups and entrepreneurship arising out of the third
level sector. The potential of the creative and cultural industries in the Southeast is an important
element of the development strategy for the region.
Waterford Institute of Technology plays a pivotal role as a catalyst for regional, cultural and
economic development through the innovation of its research and the creation of an effective
knowledge transfer framework. Over the last decade, the Institute has secured through
competitive bidding on a national and European level in excess of €112 million in external
research funding. The IT has prioritised its research activity in target areas such as ICT, mobile
networks and services and pharmaceutical science.
In particular WIT through the Telecommunications, Software and Systems Group and the ArcLabs
Innovation Centre embodies the institutes stated research philosophy of driving regional
economic development through their global reputation for research and innovation excellence
through the creation of an integrated environment where entrepreneurs, business start-ups,
researchers and students are co-located.
Equally IT Carlow has developed a strong network of support for industry and entrepreneurs
through the on-going development of their five core areas of research, EnviroCORE, DesignCORE,
GeoCORE, GameCORE and SecturityCORE.
Further strengthening and investment in the research and innovation infrastructure capacity
within the Southeast region is critical. A critical mass of expertise in key target sectors such as
Digital Technology, Games, Mobile Technology and ICT for agriculture, Eco-innovation and ICT for
Health Care Services will help attract industry to the region and enable clustering.
The general creative sector offers employment and business opportunities not found in other
economic sectors as in many cases the opportunities suit small scale start-ups, where investment
is in technology and people rather than building industrial units.
Specifically, there are opportunities in creative industries such as: music, through performance
and production; drama; comedy; games development; fashion; design both in interior, furniture,
crafts and general design; a vast array of digital and social media products; web design; app
creation; computer software products and services.
Also in this sector are the traditional media stalwarts such as photography, print covering
newspapers and magazines, radio, TV and book publishing and retail, not forgetting fine arts,
particularly in terms of painting and sculpture.
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Taken together, the creative and cultural sector is a vital element of any regional economy. One
example is the case of music, art and drama festivals.
The Kilkenny Arts Festival, the Wexford Fringe Festival, Clonmel Junction Festival and the
Waterford Imagine Arts Festival are just some of the annual events organised in the Southeast.
These not only grow and support the creative sector, but there are also positive spinoffs for the
local tourists and services sectors.
Other examples of creative and cultural projects would include the €5 million Kilmacthomas
Workhouse project, driven a by a combination of the Waterford County Enterprise Board and the
owners of the site and which will double the number of artists units to 25, with the potential to
create long term 60 jobs.
Core proposals:
A Creative Industries Strategy
(1) The development of a Creative Industries Strategy to assess the wider creative and cultural
sector in the Southeast, to quantify current activity, the net contribution to the region,
employment levels, as well as the potential of the various elements of this sector to expand.
Such a strategy would also include an assessment of capacity for the sector, taking in broadband
access and speeds, the readiness of the region for the rollout of 4G services, and other capacity
issues such as the amount and quality of performance venues for music drama and other
disciplines, to the number of graduates ready to enter digital, media and web-based enterprises.
In particular, Enterprise Ireland, the Business and Innovation Centre, County Enterprise and
Development Boards and the third level sector in the region should be tasked with developing a
creative industries strategy.
The strategy should also include specific targets for growing employment in key sectors such as
digital media, gaming, mobile technologies and ICT in health care, agri-business and ecoinnovation, as well as goals for new business start-ups, expansion of existing business and aid to
early stage entrepreneurs.
Links to other sectors
(2) The food industry has been profiled through the Harvest 2020 policy as a key growth area. We
believe that the role new digital technologies can play from the farmyard to developing new
brands and products are not being fully exploited. Issues of traceability of produce, measuring
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yields and output, and individual farmers branding produce and creating a web presence for
themselves are natural partners for the creative sector.
Linking farmers and the food sector to the creative skills of web designers, digital marketing and
branding will be a key factor in adding value for both individual farmers and the small quality
producers that will be the bedrock of the agri-sector in the coming years.
Getting businesses online
(3) In 2011, the Government launched a strategy to get Irish businesses online. In the Southeast
this process could be enhanced by matching local businesses with local web designers and
internet companies who could deliver the necessary services for business to develop sophisticated
online business presences that move beyond a static website to ones that are interactive with
potential customers, allowing feedback and promotion using social media and other online
marketing tools.
A digital hub
(4) Cluster-based approaches are a key element of the creative sector. Dublin’s Digital Hub and
Fumbally Exchange both offer low cost models of cluster-based hubs that should be considered
for the Southeast for entrepreneurs who can share the costs of office space as well as creating a
communal creative environment.
This hub approach could be developed not just for digital technologies but also for fashion,
furniture and other crafts. The Kilkenny Design Centre was a unique flagship in this sector but its
potential was exploited fully and rolled out across the region and into other sectors.
The already mentioned Kilmacthomas Workhouse project is one example of this approach. Targets
should be set to bring more creative clusters to the Southeast.
Funding targets
(5) There is within the enterprise agencies a series of successful funding and investment strategies
for business development in Ireland, including Enterprise Ireland’s High Potential Start Up (HPSU)
fund. Tom Cusack, EI’s HPSU manager, estimated last year that there would be between 2,500 and
3,000 start-up proposals made to the agency in 2012 and that half of these would come from
outside Dublin. We believe that this strategy should set specific targets for the creative sector in
the Southeast.
Specifically, we believe the region should focus on the EI Competitive Start Fund and target new
local enterprises to apply for this funding and business aid.
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Alongside this there is the work of the county enterprise boards in helping people start new
business ventures. There are numerous start up models that could be rolled out across the region
such as the Start Up Boot Camp, which is an international venture capital-driven programme that
has been used in Dublin but which could be replicated in the Southeast.
Cork Business Innovation Centre ran in 2012 a mentoring weekend. We would support Southeast
Business Innovation Centre (BIC) replicating this programme.
Training and Education
(6) There is a need to bridge potential skills gaps in the creative sector at both undergraduate and
post graduate levels.
Carlow IT is offering a Visual Communication and Design degree through its Wexford campus,
while in Carlow there are degrees in Computer Games Development, Software Development,
Computer Systems Management and Communications, Media & Public Relations. Waterford IT
has degrees in Music Marketing with Advertising and Online Media, Visual Art and Entertainment
systems.
At Postgraduate level Waterford IT has masters’ programmes in Arts and Heritage Management,
Business Entrepreneurship, a range of computing options as well as in Innovative Technologies.
This is a wide spread of qualifications and creates an environment where the colleges could assess
the potential to develop further offerings in the creative sector.
Key Proposals
•
•
•
•
A strategy for the creative and cultural sector which would complement the broader plans
for developing R&D activity, new business start-ups and entrepreneurship arising out of
the third level sector.
The development of a creative industries Strategy supported by Enterprise Ireland, the
Business and Innovation Centre, County and City Enterprise Boards and the third level
sector in the region.
Such a plan would include specific targets for growing employment in key sectors such as
digital media, gaming, mobile technologies and ICT in health care, agri-business and ecoinnovation as goals for new business start-ups, expansion of existing business and aid to
early stage entrepreneurs.
A regional plan aimed at getting businesses online by matching local businesses with local
web designers to develop sophisticated online business presences that move beyond a
static website to ones that are interactive with potential customers, allowing feedback and
promotion using social media and other online marketing tools.
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Local and other actions
•
•
•
•
Targets set to bring more creative clusters to the Southeast allowing entrepreneurs to
share the costs of office space as well as creating a communal creative environment.
An audit of the wider creative and cultural sector in the Southeast to quantify current
activity, the net contribution to the region, employment levels, as well as the potential of
the various elements of this sector to expand.
A regional focus on the EI Competitive Start Fund, targeting new local enterprises to apply
for this funding and business aid.
A bridging of potential skills gaps in the creative sector at both undergraduate and post
graduate levels.
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4.7
Social Economy and Economic Self Reliance
Community Enterprise
Community Enterprise is an important sector which needs to be supported by local and national
Government. It has the potential to create new and sustainable jobs and a new culture of
entrepreneurship throughout the Southeast region.
Community Enterprise is a collaborative concept involving State agencies, community enterprise
groups with the capacity to leverage and create new job opportunities at local level.
Community Enterprise empowers local business people, professionals, farmers, craftspeople and
others to identify and create new job opportunities at local level.
Communities Creating Jobs (CCJ), a unique initiative to create jobs in communities across the
country, currently taking place independent of State agencies addressed the Joint Committee
hearing.
CCJ is a movement of ordinary people across the country determined to do something positive
about the twin evils of unemployment and youth emigration.
To that end, it has pledged to create at least ten jobs in every participating community and 20,000
countrywide by the end of 2016. Their mission is to develop a voluntary community enterprise
resource organisation with capacity to collaborate with public, private and community sectors in
helping community enterprise groups and individuals create jobs (social and private) at local level.
They operate by sharing ideas, experiences, solutions, funding sources, replicable projects, site
visits, enabling tools and other relevant information free of charge.
CCJ is cellular, focusing on communities coming together to create jobs in their localities and using
the experience gained to assist other communities to do likewise.
CCJ’s sister organisation, Turning Point, based in Kilkenny at the moment but designed to be
replicated across the country, is intended as an implementer between State agencies and the
people.
It is aimed at people with no formal qualifications and unemployed graduates alike, helping them
to set up businesses and brainstorming to give people ideas for businesses. Turning Point takes
equity stakes and sources funding for investment in these start-ups.
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CCJ is currently organising new groups across the length and breadth of the country. Such groups
show the need and value of a strategy for economic self-reliance in the region, fostering a spirit of
‘doing it for ourselves’ and expanding opportunities in the social economy and social enterprise
sectors.
Such a strategy is laudable and can be formally supported by local and national Government in the
region through the development of a pilot ‘Programme for Economic Self Reliance’ in the region
whose aim would be to create ten jobs in every community and a regional network of microeconomies.
The proposed Southeast Economic Development Forum should establish a sub-group tasked with
mobilising and co-ordinating the resources available, pilot a variety of enterprise projects across
the five counties for replication across the region, remove barriers to progress, establish a culture
of shared learning and of best practice and to foster linkages with third level institutes and the
sector.
Developing the Co-operative Sector
Co-operatives already exist in Ireland, though not in large numbers. Credit Unions are well known
co-ops, but the most famous and most successful Irish co-op developments to date have been in
the agriculture sector, such as Glanbia.
The Southeast has a proud tradition of co-operatives, and in this recessionary climate, it is timely
to look at the co-op model once more.
In Argentina, a country that suffered a huge financial crisis in 2001 with devaluation of the
currency and widespread unemployment, there are currently 12,670 co-operative societies with
over 9.3 million members (around 23% of the population).
Since the Argentine crisis, over 200 failing businesses have been rescued by their workers and reopened as worker co-operatives; none of these have gone out of business and they employ over
15,000 people.
Co-operatives are generally established if a shared need exists among a group of people or firms
that is not being met by capital companies or the State. They also serve as protection against
exploitation in the market or where alliances are needed to form critical mass, such as reaching
economy of scale and making a business more viable.
Because co-operatives are owned and democratically controlled by their members, the decisions
taken by co-operatives balance the need for profitability with the needs of their members and the
wider interests of the community.
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The benefits of co-operatives are many and are an obvious alternative route to job creation in
troubled times.
Co-operatives
•
are rooted in their communities.
•
offer jobs to local people.
•
are more stable employers, as their members are in the community where they are
located.
•
are less likely to relocate to lower wage areas but find innovative ways to retain jobs and
remain competitive.
•
create wealth within the community and local ownership keeps it there.
•
provide stability and services in areas that are not profitable for private enterprise.
The beauty of co-operatives is that they can be applied to most business and community activity.
Co-operatives listed by the Irish Co-operative Organisation Society collectively have over 150,000
individual members, employ 12,000 people in Ireland (a further 24,000 abroad) and have
combined turnover of €10 billion.
However, Ireland is the:
•
5th lowest in EU27 in terms of co-operative members.
•
6th lowest in EU27 in terms of number of co-operative enterprises.
•
10th lowest in EU27 in terms of co-operative employees.
At a time when a significant number of industries and multinational corporations are moving to
other countries in order to take advantage of low labour costs; or staying at home, but
‘rationalising’ staff numbers, the consequence has been growing unemployment. This has hit rural
areas in the region in particular.
Co-operatives provide direct employment, as well as seasonal and casual work. They are also
often the only provider of services in rural communities given that traditional companies often
find it too costly to invest in these areas or anticipate unacceptable levels of economic return.
Co-operatives provide an alternative to the classic programmes of Government designed to
combat unemployment, which are producing poor results as unemployment keeps rising.
Typically co-operatives place more emphasis on job security for employee members; they pay
competitive wages, promote additional income through profit-sharing, distribution of dividends
and other benefits, and support community facilities such as health clinics and schools, than
traditional businesses. The International Labour Organisation point out that not only do cooperatives provide jobs, they provide decent jobs.
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The owners of a co-operative are not external shareholders for whom there is a profit motivation;
they are the people who use the services on a day-to-day basis. For example, a dairy co-op is
owned by the farmers who produce the milk; a credit union is owned by its customers; a child care
co-op is owned by the parents of the children and/or by the care workers providing the service; a
fishery co-op is owned by the people who catch the fish.
Community Employment schemes often deliver co-op type services, such as meals on wheels,
housing maintenance for elderly people and after school care. The problem with the projects
being community employment is that they tend to be limited in their funding and ambition – they
do not teach the people that are trained to deliver a scheme how to continue delivering the
scheme, and make it sustainable, when the CE funding dries up.
Basically, where groups of people put their heads together, they can form a not-for-profit cooperative to deliver something that they collectively need and want to save money on.
The growing dependence on large foreign organisations for employment in the 26 Counties has
been negative for indigenous growth. These organisations have at times brought huge
employment and great affluence to communities, but the lack of local tradition and the lack of
employee ownership has seen many of these companies pull out when it suits – and more and
more have done so as the crisis deepened.
In addition, many home-grown companies have been allowed to go to the wall and their workers
becoming unemployed, as no agency had the imagination to step in and save the company or use
the workers expertise.
If the Government and State agencies had acted quickly, the workers left behind by these
industries could have been supported to form co-ops to take over where the company had left off.
This was something both Waterford Crystal and SR Technics workers had requested from the
Government at the time of their redundancies.
Ireland still lacks legislation prescribing specifically for the co-operative model.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should actively support the development of the cooperative sector in the region. This can be done by:
 Publishing a five-step simple plan to establishing a co-op. This simple procedural lay-out
expands on the following five steps:
o
1. Is there an economic need?
o
2. Can a co-operative offer a solution?
o
3. Is there interest from potential members?
o
4. Is the plan for a co-operative feasible?
o
5. Will members commit capital and business volume and are resources available?
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The biggest impediment to establishing a co-op is people’s lack of knowledge and fear of the steps
involved. We should seek to make it as easily understandable as possible.
The Forum should also be tasked with running an information campaign on co-ops and monitoring
current State employment and jobs agencies to encourage the co-op model; as well as assisting in
the establishment of co-ops through advice and networking.
The Forum should also ensure an understanding of the nature of co-operatives amongst relevant
Government officials and roll-out training programmes for local and regional bodies and agencies.
Local Authorities in the region should work to make vacant IDA, Údarás na Gaeltachta and other
public facilities available for co-op use and also consider assigning vacant NAMA properties where
suitable, to save co-ops rental and purchasing costs.
Developing the Social Economy
The social economy is also an important and often misunderstood sector. It offers the potential to
create sustainable jobs and enterprise in the region. However, it needs to be properly supported
through national and local government intervention.
The Ballybeg Community Project in Waterford offers an example of innovation in terms of social
enterprise via their successful horticultural project, which has benefited both participants and the
wider community. They have been prevented from building on this work, however, as cutbacks
have stymied progress on developing a community café.
They believe there is little evidence in Government of recognition of the value of social enterprise,
of its positive impact on communities in terms of social mobility and health. Training, small-scale
self-employment and employment schemes all need to be promoted, they say, as part of a major
expansion of social enterprise culture.
To this end, we recommend the holding of information sessions in each county in the region to
build awareness of the social economy and social enterprise and the development of a pilot Social
Enterprise Business Training Programme for community groups in the region.
Social Economy and Economic Self Reliance
Key Proposals:


The development of a pilot ‘Programme for Economic Self Reliance’ in the region whose aim
would be to create ten jobs in every community and a regional network of micro-economies.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should establish a sub group tasked with
mobilising and co-ordinating the resources available, pilot a variety of enterprise projects
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



across the five counties for replication across the region, remove barriers to progress,
establish a culture of shared learning and of best practice and foster linkages with third level
institutes and the sector.
The Southeast Economic Development Forum should actively support the development of the
co-operative sector in the region by publishing a five-step simple plan to establishing a co-op,
running information campaigns on co-ops and monitoring current State employment and jobs
agencies to encourage the co-op model; as well as assisting in the establishment of co-ops
through advice and networking.
Local Authorities in the region should work to make vacant IDA, Údaras and other public
facilities available for co-op use and also consider assigning vacant NAMA properties where
suitable, to save co-ops rental and purchasing costs.
The holding of information sessions in each county in the region to build awareness of the
social economy and social enterprises.
The development of a pilot Social Enterprise Business Training Programme for community
groups in the region.
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5.
Appendices
5.1
Membership of the Joint Committee
JOINT COMMITTEE ON JOBS, ENTERPRISE AND
INNOVATION 31st DAIL.
Chairman: Damien English (FG)
Deputies:
Dara Calleary (FF)33
Áine Collins (FG)34
Michael Conaghan (LAB)
Damien English (FG)
Tom Fleming (IND) 35
Seán Kyne (FG)
Anthony Lawlor (FG)
John Lyons (LAB) (Vice-Chairman)
Peadar Tóibín (SF)
Senators:
Deirdre Clune (FG)
David Cullinane (SF)
John Kelly (LAB)
Michael Mullins (FG)
Feargal Quinn (Ind)
Mary White (FF)
Notes:
1. Deputies appointed to the Committee by order of the Dáil on 12 June 2012
2. Senators appointed to the Committee by order of the Seanad on 14 June 2012
3. Deputy Damien English was appointed as Chairman on 19 June 2012
4. Deputy John Lyons was appointed as Vice Chairman on 19 June 2012
33
Deputy Dara Calleary replaced Deputy Willie O’Dea on 19 July 2012
Deputy Áine Collins replaced Deputy Deputy Brendan Griffin on 20 September 2012
35
Deputy Tom Fleming replaced Deputy John Halligan on 9 May 2013
34
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5.2
List of consultation meetings and submissions
Economic Deveopment Plan Consultation Meetings
Waterford 15 February 2013
Waterford City and County Enterprise Boards
Ciarán Cullen, CEO, Waterford City Enterprise Board
Anike Tyrrell, CEO, Waterford County Enterprise Board
Waterford City and County Councils
Michael Walsh, Waterford City Manager
Denis McCarthy, Waterford County Manager
Lar Power, Waterford City Council Director of Service, Housing, Community Services and
Enterprise
Waterford City Chamber of Commerce
Orm Kenny, Chamber President
Graham Doyle, Chamber Vice President, CEO, Waterford Airport
Derek O'Byrne, Chamber Director, Waterford Institute of Technology
Waterford City Family Resource Centre
Anne Goodwin, St. Brigid’s Family Resource Centre, Waterford
Heather Kiely, Sacred Heart Family Resource Centre, Waterford
Waterford Gives A Shirt Campaign
Cian Foley
Kieran O’Sullivan
Paul Dower
Liz Murphy
Southeast Business & Innovation Centre Ltd.
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Michael Maddock, CEO
Aidan Shine, Assistant CEO
Springboard Innovation Academy Business Hub Campaign
Louis Bell
Talk Talk Employees’ Representative Group
Seán Morton
Colm Dunphy
Thomas Phelan
Waterford Institute of Technology
Dr. Willie Donnelly, Head of Research and Director of Telecommunications Software &
Systems Development Group (TSSG)
Dr. John Wells, Head of School of Health Sciences
Waterford City Community Forum
George Power
Joe Kelly
Marie Keating
John Hawkes
Waterford Institute of Technology
Dr. Mícheál Ó hEagartaigh, School of Science, Computing Mathematics and Physics
Dunhill Eco-Business Centre / Communities Creating Jobs
Senan Cooke
Adrian O’Keeffe
ARC Mediation
Roisin O’Shea
Shane Dempsey
Kilkenny 22 February 2013
Page | 103
104
South East Economic Development Strategy
Kilkenny County Council
Joe Crockett, County Manager
Kilkenny Borough Council
Brian Tyrrell, Town Clerk/Senior Executive Officer
Communities Creating Jobs / Turning Point
Adrian O’Keeffe
Senan Cooke
David Barry
Rory Williams
Frank Walsh
Supported Employment Services (Kilkenny/Carlow)
Paula Murphy
Anthony Ryan
Kilkenny Chamber of Commerce &
Kilkenny Industrial Development Company, Ltd. (KIDCo)
Martin Costello, Vice President
Owen Sweeney, Secretary
Tom O’Connor, Board member
Kilkenny LEADER Partnership
Declan Rice, CEO
Martin Rafter, Assistant CEO & Social Inclusion Programme manager
Carlow 11 March 2013
Carlow Institute of Technology
Declan Doyle
Carlow County Council
Page | 104
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Bernie O’Brien (Director of Services)
Kieran Comerford (Carlow Enterprise Board CEO)
Carlow VEC
Marian Duffy (Adult Education Officer, Carlow VEC))
Shane Rooney (Guidance Counsellor, Carlow Adult Educational Guidance and Information
Service)
Markita Mulvey (Principal, Carlow VEC)
David Ford (Carlow Institute of Further Education)
Pauline Egan (Principal, Coláiste Eoin, Hacketstown)
Bernie Eales (Adult Education Office)
St Catherine’s Community Services Centre
Niall Morris
Wexford 15 March 2013
Wexford Local Development
Brian Kehoe
Wexford County Enterprise Board
Tom Banville
Wexford County Council
Tony Larkin (Deputy County Manager)
Padraig O’Gorman (County Economic Development Officer)
Cllr. John Hegarty (Chair, Strategic Economic Committee)
Cllr. Robbie Ireton
South Tipperary 22 March 2013
Clonmel Chamber of Commerce
Brian Cleary (CEO)
South Tipperary VEC
Page | 105
106
South East Economic Development Strategy
Eileen Condon (Adult Education Officer)
South Tipperary County Council
Kathleen Prendergast (Economic Development Officer)
Anthony Fitzgerald (Business Development Executive)
South Tipperary Development Company
Phil Shanahan (Social Inclusion Programme Manager)
Isabel Cambie (Rural Development Programme Manager)
Tipperary South Riding County Enterprise Board
Ita Horan (CEO)
Waterford 25 March 2013
Waterford Women’s Centre
Breda Murphy
Miriam Holt (National Coordinator, National Collective of Community Based Women’s
Networks)
Enterprise Ireland
Enda McDonald
Brian Fives
Waterford City Council
Michael Walsh (City Manager)
Tourism Projects
James Doherty
Property Developer/Waterford Winterval
Barry Monaghan
SIPTU
Michael Wall
Manor St. John/Children’s Group Link
Page | 106
107
South East Economic Development Strategy
Brendan Halligan
Maria Lindell (Waterford Area Partnership)
Joelle Keoghan
Paddy Walsh
Ballybeg Community Development Project
Liz Richies
Leona Basquill
Written Submissions
SIPTU
Marie Butler, Sector Organiser
David Lane, Industrial Organiser, Construction Sector
Waterford City Community Forum
South Tipperary VEC
Eileen Condon, Adult Education Officer
Trevor Ryan, Student
Waterford City and County Managers and Director of Services
Talk Talk Waterford Redundant Workers’ Association
Communities Creating Jobs
Údarás na Gaeltachta
Paul Dower
AONTAS
NALA
Page | 107
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South East Economic Development Strategy
5.3
Profile of companies in the Southeast
Overseas investment /Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)
The Southeast has 63 multinational companies across several business sectors: Biopharma,
Diversified Engineering & Clean Tech, Content Ind, Consumer and Business Services, Financial
Services, ICT and Medical Technology.
These 63 companies employ 10,713 people.
Among these companies are Genzyme, Bausch and Lomb, GSK, Coca Cola, Citi, State Street,
Abbott, Boston Scientific, Lake Region, Sun Life Financial, Honeywell, BNY Mellon, Mycroft,
Eurofins Lancaster Laboratories and Nypro Medical Devices.36
Some FDI business sectors are not represented in the Southeast.
Table 19. Categories of 52 overseas companies in the Southeast currently listed on
IDA website
Sector
Number of companies in the
Southeast on IDA website
Business Services
Chemicals
Cleantech
Cloud Computing
Construction
Consumer Goods
Emerging Business
Entertainment and Media
Financial Services
Ind. Automation and Control
Industrial Products and Services
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) --- Hardware
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) --- Software
Medical Technologies
Pharmaceuticals
Transportation
TOTAL
36
1
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
5
0
16
4
0
7
10
0
52
Source: IDA
http://www.idaireland.com/connect-and-invest/waterford/#/connect-and-invest/waterford/businessin-waterford/homegrown-businesses/
Page | 108
109
South East Economic Development Strategy
Source: http://www.idaireland.com/search-companies.xml
Table 20. Breakdown by sector and employment numbers (permanent) of IDA client
companies in the Southeast Region
SECTORAL BREAKDOWN ON employment SOUTHEAST REGION
Permanent
Employment
& Sector
Biopharma
Wexford
No
of
Co
Kilkenny
No
of
Co
Tipp
Sth.
No
of
Co
6
71
1
0
0
912
931
12
499
5
6
1
459
7
79
1
97
Financial
Services
351
2
240
1
ICT
10
1
114
Technology
1091
2
Total
4526
30
Diversified
Engineering
& Clean
Tech
Content Ind,
Consumer
and Business
Services
Waterford
No
of
Co
1684
Carlow
No
of
co
Southeast
No
of
Co
5
185
1
2852
13
40
1
255
5
1731
24
3
0
0
0
0
635
11
476
1
0
0
66
1
1133
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
124
2
1184
4
0
0
1963
2
0
0
4238
8
2187
13
579
5
2915
8
506
7
10713
63
Medical
Source: IDA (personal communication), April 2013
Figure 6. Sectoral employment breakdown by county
FDI SECTORAL EMPLOYMENT BREAKDOWN FOR WATERFORD
Biopharma
1091
1684
Diversified Engineering & Clean
Tech
Content Ind, Consumer and
Business Services
10
351
Financial Services
459
ICT
931
Medical Technology
Page | 109
110
South East Economic Development Strategy
FDI SECTORAL EMPLOYMENT BREAKDOWN FOR KILKENNY
0
0
0
6
Biopharma
97
Diversified Engineering & Clean
Tech
Content Ind, Consumer and
Business Services
Financial Services
ICT
476
Medical Technology
FDI SECTORAL EMPLOYMENT BREAKDOWN FOR TIPP. SOUTH
Biopharma
912
Diversified Engineering & Clean
Tech
Content Ind, Consumer and
Business Services
40
1963
0
Financial Services
0
0
ICT
Medical Technology
FDI SECTORAL EMPLOYMENT BREAKDOWN FOR CARLOW
00
66
0
Biopharma
185
Diversified Engineering & Clean
Tech
Content Ind, Consumer and
Business Services
Financial Services
255
ICT
Medical Technology
Page | 110
111
South East Economic Development Strategy
FDI SECTORAL EMPLOYMENT BREAKDOWN FOR WEXFORD
71
Biopharma
499
Diversified Engineering & Clean
Tech
Content Ind, Consumer and
Business Services
1184
79
Financial Services
240
ICT
114
Medical Technology
FDI SECTORAL EMPLOYMENT BREAKDOWN FOR SOUTH EAST
Biopharma
2852
Diversified Engineering & Clean
Tech
4238
Content Ind, Consumer and
Business Services
Financial Services
1731
ICT
124
1133
635
Medical Technology
Source: IDA (personal communication), April 2013
Page | 111
112
South East Economic Development Strategy
FDI Companies in the Southeast:
Table 21. FDI Companies in the Southeast listed on IDA website
This list is indicative, not exhaustive.
Business Services
1 company
Company
Sector(s)
Ubiqus Ireland Ltd
Ph: +35351852510
Fax: +35351852425
Website:
Nationality
Transcription
Business
including summaries
Services
& abstracts of
http://www.ubiqus.ie
Chemicals
No companies listed in Southeast
Cleantech
No companies listed in Southeast
Cloud computing
No companies listed in Southeast
Construction
No companies listed in Southeast
Page | 112
Product
conferences
Address
Top Floor
France
12 Broadstreet
Waterford
113
South East Economic Development Strategy
Consumer goods
9 companies
Company
Sector(s)
Product
Nationality Address
Consumer
Electronics
accessory
products.
Allsop Europe Ltd
Ph: +35351355091
Fax: +35351377717
Custom Injection
Consumer Moulding,
United
Goods
States
Medical and
Automotive full
Unit 503,
IDA Industrial Park
Cork Road
Waterford
service, design,
development and
Quality Precision
moulding.
Hasbro Ireland Limited
Ph: +35351331100
Fax: +35351331133
Website:
Consumer
Goods
Toys & Games
United
States
Ballynaneashagh
Cork Road
Waterford
http://www.hasbro.com
ITW Gorey
Ph: +353539422990
Fax: +353539422994
Website:
IDA Industrial
Consumer
Goods
Plastic Film
United
States
http://www.ipeurope.ie
Estate
Courtown Road
Gorey
Co Wexford
ITW Mima
Ph: +35351851551
Consumer Stretch Plastic
United
Belview Port
Fax: +35351851630
Goods
States
Waterford
Website:
Page | 113
film and sheet
114
South East Economic Development Strategy
http://www.mimalite.com
Procter & Gamble
Industrial Estate
(Manufacturing) Irl Ltd
Consumer Skin Care
United
Gortlandroe
Ph: +3536750100
Goods
States
Nenagh
Products
Fax: +3536732740
Tipperary
Rexam Beverage Can
Ireland Ltd
Ph: +35351359100
Website:
Waterford Industrial
Consumer
Goods
Can Ends
United
Estate
Kingdom Cork Road
Waterford
http://www.rexam.com
SRAM Corporation
Office 8a,
Europe
The Atrium
Ph: +35351310900
Consumer Bicycle
United
Maritana Gate,
Fax: +35351641688
Goods
States
Canada Street
Components
Website:
Waterford
http://www.sram.com
Waterford
Transbach Limited
Ph: +353567763722
Fax: +353567761776
Website:
Consumer
Goods
46 Hebron
Rucksacks
Switzerland Industrial Estate
Kilkenny
http://www.bachpacks.com/
Waterford Carpets Ltd
Ph: +35351375941
Fax: +35351379607
Website:
Waterford Industrial
Consumer Non-Woven
Goods
http://www.tretford.com
Emerging Business
No companies listed in Southeast
Page | 114
Carpets
Netherlands
Estate
Cork Road
Waterford
115
South East Economic Development Strategy
Entertainment and Media
No companies listed in Southeast
Financial services
5 companies
BNY Mellon
Ph: +353539149500
Financial
Fax: +353539149700
Services
Website: http://www.pfpc.com
Citi Hedge Fund Services
(Ireland), Limited
Ph: 622 2000
Website:
Funds Services and
back office
administration
IDA Business
United Park
States Drinagh
Co Wexford
Waterford
Offers hedge fund
Financial administration
United
Services services to the
States
European market
http://www.citiservices.com
Technology Park
Butlerstown,
Cork Road
Waterford
State Street International
(Ireland) Ltd
Ph: +35318538300
(018538970KK)
Fax: +35318538491
Kilkenny
Financial Funds services and United
Services administration
States
Website:
Business &
Technology Park
Ring Road
Kilkenny
http://www.Statestreet.com
Sun Life Information Services
Irl. Ltd.
Ph: +35351333300
Fax: +353 51 333310
Financial
Services
Software
development and
customer support
Unit 42, IDA
United Industrial Park
States Cork Road
Waterford
Website: http://www.sunlife.ie
Unit 11,
Unum Ireland Limited
Ph: +353599178100
Fax: +353599179707
Financial
Services
Software
Development
Operation
United
States
Merchant House
Shamrock Plaza,
Tullow Street
Carlow
Page | 115
116
South East Economic Development Strategy
Ind. Automation and Control
No companies listed in Southeast
Industrial Products and Services
16 companies in the Southeast
CIL Precision Limited
Ph: +3535854205
Fax: +3535854197
Website: http://www.cilprecision.ie
Industrial
Industrial
Products and
Services
Engineered
United
Fabrications
States
Industrial
Fax: +353599146860
Products and Control
Website:
Services
Process
Shamrock
Sweden
Systems
Fax: +35351334715
Carlow
Industrial
Products and
Services
Waterford
Design
Cutting Tools,
Wire Drawing
Industrial
Germany
Waterford
Unit 24-26
Ph: +35351372151
Industrial
Fax: +35351376180
Products and Control
Website:
Services
Page | 116
Park
Cork Road
Tools
Honeywell Process Solutions
http://www.honeywell.com
Business
Park
http://www.delaval.com
Ph: +35351334713
Co.
Unit 6
Ph: +353599146859
GmbH
Cappoquin
Waterford
De Laval Limited
G-ELIT Prazisionswerkzeuge
Estate
Process
Equipment
Waterford
United
Industrial
States
Estate
Cork Road
Waterford
117
South East Economic Development Strategy
Honeywell International
Industrial
Ph: +35351376411
Products and & Turbine
Fax: +35351355352
Services
Website:
Compressor
United
Unit 411
States
Waterford
wheels for
Industrial
turbo charges
Estate
http://www.honeywell.com
Cork Road
Waterford
Waterford
Hydro Tech Engineering
Industrial
Ph: +353526124611
Products and Tail Lifts
Fax: +353526124276
Services
Belgium
Road
Clonmel
Co. Tipperary
Hydro-Hoist Limited
Ph: +353599142529
Industrial
Fax: +353599141254
Products and
Website:
Services
Hydraulic
United
O'Brien Road
equipment
Kingdom
Carlow
http://www.edbro.co.uk
IMOFA Ltd
Ph: +353599141332
Fax: +353599141360
Website: http://www.imofa.com
Strawhall
Industrial
Products and
Services
Motors &
Fans
Industrial
Netherlands Estate
Strawhall
Carlow
Irish Driver-Harris Company
Limited
Industrial
Ph: +35351421405
Products and
Fax: +35351422983
Services
Electrical
United
Cables
States
Millbanks
Rosbercon
New Ross
Website: http://www.idh.ie
Parker Snap-Tite
Ph: +353539141566
Industrial
Fax: +353539141582
Products and
Website: http://www.snap-
Services
tite.com
Page | 117
Precision
Whitemills
Couplings,
United
Industrial
Valves &
States
Estate
Hose
Wexford
118
South East Economic Development Strategy
Readymix Cine
Industrial
Ph: +353567761177
Products and Products
Fax: +353567761182
Services
Concrete
Mexico
Dunmore
Co. Kilkenny
Website:
http://www.readymix.ie
Unit 5
Reflexite
Cleaboy
Ph: +35351358132
Industrial
Fax: +35351358047
Products and
Website: http://www.reflexite-
Services
Reflective
United
Film
States
europe.com
Business
Park, Old
Kilmeaden
Road
Waterford
Reynaer's Manufacturing
Limited
Ph: +353539235600
Fax: +353539235812
Website:
Industrial
Products and
Services
Aluminium
Accessories
Fairfield
Netherlands Enniscorthy
Co Wexford
http://www.reynaers.com
Sulzer Pump Solutions Ireland
Ltd.
Ph: +353 53 916 3200
Fax: +353539142335
Website:
Industrial
Submersible
Products and Pumps and
Services
Switzerland
Components
Clonard Road
Wexford
http://www.abspumps.com
Taylor Made Glass and
Systems Limited
Ph: +35350431986
Fax: 050431986
Website:
http://www.taylormarine.com
Page | 118
Curved
Industrial
tempered
Products and safety glass,
Services
sidebody &
rooflights
United
States
Railway Road
Templemore
Co Tipperary
119
South East Economic Development Strategy
Thermo-Air Environmental
Industrial
Technology Ltd
Products and Cabins,
Athy Road
Ph: +353599140327
Services
Carlow
Paint Spray
Netherlands Strawhall
Industrial
Fax: +353599142174
Heating and
Website:
Ventilation
http://www.thermoair.com
Equipment,
Hydraulic
Systems
Informations and Communications Technology (ICT)
4 companies
Carten Controls Limited
Ph: +35351355436
Fax: +35351378054
Website:
http://www.cartencontrols.com
Convertec Limited
Ph: +3535370100
Fax: +3535370101
Website:
http://www.convertec.de
Information and
High Purity
Communications
Valves
Technology (ICT)
DL/DL
--- Hardware
Converters
Wexford
Measuring &
Railway Road
Control
Whitemill
Germany
Industrial
Estate
Sweden Templemore
Devices
Co Tipperary
Information and
Voltage
Whitemill
Communications
Testers &
Technology (ICT)
Power
--- Hardware
Supplies
Website: http://www.eltex.se Technology (ICT)
Page | 119
Waterford
Devices &
Communications
http://www.benning.de
Estate
Communications
Fax: 050431002
Website:
Industrial
Power
Information and
Fax: +353539141841
Japan
Information and
Ph: +35350431002
Ph: +353539143155
Waterford
Technology (ICT)
Eltex Manufacturing Limited --- Hardware
Theo Benning Irl.
Unit 609
--- Hardware
Germany
Industrial
Estate
Wexford
120
South East Economic Development Strategy
Medical Technologies
7 companies in the Southeast. The Southeast’s number of overseas-based pharmaceutical and life
sciences companies account for a significant amount of export income to the economy.
Abbott Ireland Vascular Division
Clonmel
Ph: +353526173000
Fax: +3535288948
Cashel
Medical
Vascular
Technologies Products (VI)
United
States
Website: http://www.abbott.com
Road
Clonmel
Co.
Tipperary
Unit
424/425
Bausch+Lomb Ireland
Ph: +35351355001
Medical
Fax: +35351355639
Technologies
Website: http://www.bausch.com
Contact Lenses
and
Pharmaceutical
United
States
Waterford
Industrial
Park
Cork Road
Waterford
Cashel
Boston Scientific Clonmel Limited
Ph: +353526181000
Medical
Fax: +353526181002
Technologies CRM
Pacemakers
United
States
Website: http://www.bsci.com
Fax: +353539141671
Website:
Medical
Ophthalmic
Technologies plastic lenses
Germany
Industrial
Estate
Wexford
Lake Region Medical Limited
Guide Wires for
Butlersland
Diagnostic and United
New Ross
Ph: +35351440500
Medical
Fax: +35351440503
Technologies Interventional
Page | 120
Co
Whitemill
http://www.vision.zeiss.com/
Website:
Clonmel
Tipperary
Carl Zeiss Vision Ireland Limited
Ph: +353539163700
Road
Procedures
States
Co
Wexford
121
South East Economic Development Strategy
http://www.lakeregionmedical.com
Microbrush International Ltd.
Ph: +3535845966
Medical
Fax: +3535845969
Technologies
Website:
Clogherane
Disposable
Dental
Applications
United
Dungarvan
States
Co.
Waterford
http://www.microbrush.com
Wexford
World's largest
Waters Technologies Ireland Ltd.
Ph: +353539160400
Medical
Fax: +353539121681
Technologies
Website: http://www.waters.com
Business
manufacturer of
high
performance
United
States
liquid chro
Park
Drinagh
Wexford
Co
Wexford
Transportation
No overseas companies listed in Southeast
Pharmaceuticals
10 companies, The overseas-based pharmaceutical and life sciences
Companies based in the Southeast account for a significant amount of export income to the Irish economy.
Genzyme Ireland Limited
IDA Industrial
Ph: +35351594100
Fax: +35351594105
Biochemicals,
Pharmaceuticals pharmaceuticals and
Website:
Park
France
medicines
Road
http://www.genzyme.com
Waterford
GlaxoSmithKline Dungarvan
Ltd
Ph: +3535820200
Fax: +3535822555/43130
Page | 121
Old Kilmeaden
Pharmaceuticals
Finished
United
Pharmaceuticals
Kingdom
Knockbrack
Dungarvan
Co. Waterford
122
South East Economic Development Strategy
Website: http://www.gsk.com
GlaxoSmithKline Oral Care
Ph: +3535820200
Fax: +3535820299
Pharmaceuticals Oral Care products
United
Kingdom
Website: http://www.gsk.com
Dungarvan
Co Waterford
Unit 507
Laboratoires Arkopharma SA
Western
Ph: +35351351776
Fax: +35351351782
Youghal Road
Pharmaceuticals
Website:
Finished
Pharmaceuticals
France
Industrial
Estate
Waterford City
http://www.arkopharma.com
Waterford
Merck Sharp & Dohme
(Ireland)
Ph: +35351601000
Fax: +35351601241
Ballydine
Pharmaceuticals Bulk Pharmaceuticals
United
Kilsheelan
States
Clonmel
Website:
Co Tipperary
http://www.msdireland.ie
Biologicals;
MSD International GmbH
(MSD Ireland Carlow)
Ph: +353599172600
disinfection equipment
Pharmaceuticals and supplies;
pharmaceuticals,
Fax: +353594232592
United
States
Carlow
Business Park
Carlow
drugs and medicines
Ard Gaoithe
Commercial
Niche Generics Limited
Ph: +353 52 6126960
Fax: +353 52 6126961
Centre
Regulatory Affairs
Pharmaceuticals Department for Niche India
Website:
Generics
Ard Gaoithe
Business Park,
Cashel Rd,
http://www.nichegenerics.com
Clonmel
Co Tipperary
Ranbaxy Ireland Limited
Ph: +3536261206
Fax: +3536261575
Page | 122
Pharmaceuticals
Finished
Pharmaceuticals
Spafield, Cork
India
Road
Cashel
123
South East Economic Development Strategy
Website:
Co. Tipperary
http://www.ranbaxy.com
Suir Pharma Ireland
Ph: +353 52 6179999
Website:
Waterford
Pharmaceuticals
Generic
Germany
pharmaceuticals
http://www.suirpharma.com
Fax: +35351331398
Clonmel
Co. Tipperary
Units 27 - 35
TEVA
Ph: +35351331331
Road
Pharmaceuticals
IDA Industrial
Generic
Israel
Pharmaceuticals
Estate
Waterford
Website: http://www.teva.ie
Co Waterford
Source: http://www.idaireland.com/search-companies.xml
Table 22. Selected major IDA projects in the South-East region
Company
Sector/Activity
Estimated Job Numbers
GlaxoSmithKline
Pharma
50
Merck Carlow
Pharma
170
Servier
Pharma
155
Merck Clonmel
Pharma
120
Genzyme
Bio Tech
170
Lancaster Laboratories
Medical Technologies
100
Cordis
Medical Technologies
450
Waters Technologies
Medical Technologies
125
Teva
Pharma
165
Equifax
!CT Services
180
Citi
Financial Services
250
Unum
Software
200
Coca Cola
Beverages
100
(Microchem)
Page | 123
124
South East Economic Development Strategy
5.2 Indigenous Businesses in the Southeast
The Southeast has a cluster of notable companies including Glanbia, Ireland’s largest dairy
processor employing 4,500 people globally across 19 countries; Cartoon Saloon animation studio
which was nominated for an academy award and Eirgen Pharma, which manufacturers niche
cancer drugs, adding to the list of 595 indigenous companies in the Southeast.37
Table 23. Number of Enterprises in the Southeast,2010
Business Demography NACE Rev 2 by County, Employment Size, Statistical
Indicator and Year
2010
Carlow
All persons engaged size classes
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Under 10
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
10 - 19
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
20 - 49
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
50 - 249
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
250 and over
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
37
2,276
11,422
10,007
2,059
4,280
2,909
..
..
..
73
2,148
2,139
31
2,820
2,819
..
..
..
Source: IDA. Accessed at:
http://www.idaireland.com/connect-and-invest/waterford/#/connect-and-invest/waterford/business-in-waterford/homegrownbusinesses/
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Kilkenny
All persons engaged size classes
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Under 10
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
10 - 19
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
20 - 49
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
50 - 249
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
250 and over
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Waterford
All persons engaged size classes
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Under 10
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
10 - 19
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
20 - 49
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
50 - 249
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
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3,491
16,580
14,272
3,199
6,343
4,101
..
..
..
87
2,615
2,606
32
2,700
2,700
..
..
4,317
27,417
24,610
3,904
8,213
5,507
246
3,257
3,183
104
3,046
3,023
47
4,531
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Employees (Number)
250 and over
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Wexford
All persons engaged size classes
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Under 10
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
10 - 19
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
20 - 49
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
50 - 249
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
250 and over
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Tipperary
All persons engaged size classes
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
Under 10
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
10 - 19
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
20 - 49
Active Enterprises (Number)
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4,527
16
8,370
8,370
6,035
27,355
23,451
5,518
11,177
7,395
313
4,134
4,038
143
4,186
4,163
55
5,271
5,268
6
2,587
2,587
6,254
29,480
25,113
5,714
12,044
7,851
338
4,409
4,259
131
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South East Economic Development Strategy
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
50 - 249
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
250 and over
Active Enterprises (Number)
Persons Engaged (Number)
Employees (Number)
3,816
3,795
60
5,249
5,248
11
3,962
3,960
Source: CSO Business Demography .
http://www.cso.ie/px/pxeirestat/Statire/SelectVarVal/saveselections.asp
Note: North/South Tipperary not available separately
Note: The geographical breakdown given is an approximation. The county breakdown is based on
the address at which an enterprise is registered for Revenue purposes, rather than where the
business actually operates from, because no comprehensive administrative source is currently
available for business locations. In particular, where an enterprise has local units in several
counties, but one head office where all employment is registered, all its employees will be counted
against the county where the head office is located. Enterprises with Unknown supplied generally
have Revenue registered addresses outside of the Republic of Ireland. However, the employees
registered with these addresses are working in the Republic of Ireland.
For example, County Waterford has employers in a range of indigenous and FDI companies.
These include:
 Pharmaceutical / Science: GSK, Pinewood Laboratories (Wockhardt), Microbrush
International Limited, Lancaster Laboratories Europe (Microchem).

International Business Services: Citi Hedge Fund Services, Glanbia Shared Services.

Engineering: Radley Engineering, Shanley Engineering, Powerflow.

Food: Cappoquin Poultry, Flahavans, Dawn Meats and Meadow Fresh Foods.

Creative Industries: Nemeton Television Production .
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Another example is Clonmel, the administrative capital of South Tipperary, where a number of
major pharmaceutical companies are located, including Guidant, Clonmel Healthcare and Merck,
Sharpe and Dohme. The Coolmore Stud is situated nearby.
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5.4
Profile of the construction sector in the Southeast.
Construction employment in the Southeast fell from 30,500 in 2007 to 16,200 in 2010 38.
Data on construction employment was obtained by DKM Economic Consultants for Q1 2010,
based on the total number employed at that time (130,600). Figure 2 reveals that all regions
nationwide, including the Southeast, have been gravely affected by the construction crisis.
Table 23: Regional breakdown of construction employment: Q1 2007 – Q1 2010
(Thousands)
Source: CSO quoted by DKM
According to the Chart:
Each region experienced severe contractions in construction employment. All
but two regions (Mid-East/South-East) had their workforce reduced by more than
50% in the three years to Q1 2010.
38
DKM Economic Consultants. Annual Construction Industry Review 2009 and Outlook 2010–2012,October 2010. Accessed at
http://www.dkm.ie/uploads/pdf/reports/2010%2010%20CIRO%20FINAL%20REPORT.pdf
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Construction employment in the Southeast fell from 30,500 in 2007 to 16,200 in 2010.
Although DKM ascertained job losses from looking at the employment numbers, it was not
possible for them to establish whether those who lost their jobs have remained in the Irish
workforce. 39
The QNHS only provides an aggregate measure of unemployment for the economy as a whole and
does not measure unemployment in each economic sector.
While some unemployed workers have left the labour force due to emigration or early
retirement, for example, DKM suggests it is likely that the majority are being counted as
unemployed.
There are no separate data published for unemployment in construction but with construction
accounting for 57% of all job losses, DKM suggests that the construction unemployment rate is
likely to be significantly higher than the national average of rate of 13.2%. In some regions of the
country, DKM suggest it is likely to be closer to 25%. Their analysis of the individual occupations in
the construction sector reveals a considerable drop right across the board.
The return of net outward migration over the past two years supports the anecdotal evidence that
construction professionals and other construction workers have opted to emigrate. While this
trend implies a loss of design and construction skills, other critical issues now for construction
comprise the lack of jobs for graduates and the reduced potential to attract school leavers into the
construction professions.
“The severe drop in construction output from 2007 was mirrored in the construction
employment numbers, which began to tumble as the volume of work declined at a rapid
pace.40
The situation now is that many skilled construction workers, professionals and trades persons
have to emigrate to secure employment. The most recent estimates for emigration suggest that
almost 142,000 persons left Ireland in the two years to April 2011, almost 50% of whom were of
Irish nationality. In the most recent twelve month period, for which data is available, almost 60%
of males who emigrated were Irish. The result is a substantial loss of the skills base and expertise
39
DKM Economic Consultants. Annual Construction Industry Review 2009 and Outlook 2010–2012,October 2010. Accessed
at:http://www.dkm.ie/uploads/pdf/reports/2010%2010%20CIRO%20FINAL%20REPORT.pdf
40
DKM Economic Consultants for the Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland. The Irish Construction
Industry in 2012. Accessed at:
http://www.dkm.ie/uploads/pdf/reports/Irish%20Construction%20Industry%20in%202012%20DKM%20SC
SI.pdf
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in the construction sector, especially in design and building, which are essential to delivering the
high quality infrastructure required to support a growing competitive economy focused on
attracting foreign direct investment and competing in international markets.
There are considerable policy implications arising for unemployed construction workers who will
require new skills to find employment in other sectors. Retraining and up-skilling programmes are
required for work in those sectors that are expected to expand in the next phase of Ireland’s
economic recovery. The sector is unlikely to see employment return to the levels recorded in the
run up to the peak.
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5.5
Glossary of terms
BERD
BIC
BMW
CCJ
CEO Groups
CFP
EI
EPA
ETB
FÁS
FDI
FET
FETAC
FUSE
GMP
GVA
HEIs
HERD
IDA
ISME
MAN
MNCs
NALA
NAMA
PMBRC
QNHS
SEAM
SFI
Shannon ABC
SME
SOLAS
TEN-T
TSSG
Údarás
VEC's
WIT
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Business Expenditure Research and Development
Business Innovation Centre
Border, Midlands and Western
Communities Creating Jobs
Chief Executive Officer Groups
Common Fisheries Policy
Enterprise Ireland
Environmental Protection Agency
Educational Training Board
Foras Áiseanna Saothair
Foreign Direct Investment
Further Education and Training
Further Education and Training Awards Council
Friends of the University of the Southeast
Good Manufacturing Practice
Gross Value Added
Higher Education Institutions
Higher Education Research and Development
Industrial Development Authority
Irish Small and Medium Enterprises
Metropolian Area Networks?
Multinational Companies
National Adult Literacy Association
National Asset Management Agency
Pharmaceutical and Molecular Biotechnology Research Centre
Quarterly National Household Survey
South East Applied Materials
Science Foundation Ireland
Shannon Applied Biotechnology Centre
Small and Medium Enterprises
Seirbhísí Oideachais Leanunaigh agus Scileanna
Trans European Network-Transport
Telecommunications, Software Systems Group
Údarás na Gaeltachta
Vocational Educational Committee's
Waterford Institute of Technology