File - Andy Bellomo

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File - Andy Bellomo
FORECAST
Tomorrow
48º
29º
Sports
ALL-DISTRICT SOCCER RELEASED
Indian Lake’s Shoffstall named coach of the year
PRECIPITATION:
None; Month 0.91”;
Year 34.72”
Also Inside: Tri-County to honor Maxine Wingo
BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Vol. 121 • No. 284
50 CENTS
ALSO AVAILABLE ONLINE @ www.examiner.org
CITY COUNCIL
City may have a balanced budget for 2013
BY JOEL E. MAST
EXAMINER STAFF WRITER
[email protected]
Bellefontaine could start the
new year with a general fund
spending plan that equals it revenues, a significant change from
recent years in which the city had
to use reserves to maintain its
workforce and services to residents.
“It looks like we could have a
balanced budget,” said Council
Finance Committee Chairman
Mark Fissel, “but not necessarily a
sustainable budget.”
The proposed $7.5 million
general fund appropriation does
not provide for additional personnel outside of one firefighter,
“It looks like we could have a balanced budget,
but not necessarily a sustainable budget.”
Mark Fissel
Finance Committee chairman
pay raises nor new equipment
purchases, he said.
Service-Safety Director James
Holycross said the firefighter hire
is in lieu of two open positions.
Also, the department moved
one firefighter’s salary from the
Ambulance Fund, which is an
enterprise fund supported by
user fees, to the general fund
which is primarily supported by
local income tax revenues.
City Auditor Jack Reser said
revenues have improved this
year, but it is still too early to tell if
it is a continuing trend.
Income tax receipts are up
$260,000 and the city should end
the year with a $2 million reserve.
In the past several years,
Bellefontaine has used $300,000
or more in reserves each year to
meet expenditures.
Along the way, the number of
city workers has dropped as the
administration declined to hire
replacements for retirees.
A police officer was hired this
year, breaking the trend.
Council members approved a
first reading of the $23.8 million
temporary budget which includes
the general fund, special revenue
funds and enterprise funds.
Mr. Fissel and Finance
Committee member Deb Baker
met in executive session with the
administration, Police Chief
Brandon Standley and Law
Director Howard Traul II to discuss negotiations with the police
officers union.
To help ease the city’s financial stress and maintain staffing,
police officers and firefighters
Quincy suspect
arrested in federal case
Faces charges relating to
producing child porn
BY THE BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER STAFF
A Quincy area resident who is a registered
sex offender was arrested late Thursday on
federal charges relating to the production
and distribution of child pornography.
Mickell E. Close, 31, of 2491 County Road
255, Cottage 4, is currently in federal custody
and is awaiting a court date with the U.S.
Southern District of Ohio.
His arrest follows the execution of a search
CLOSE
See ARREST on Page 4
See BUDGET on Page 4
Youth ideas to fuel
a second mural
Chicago area artist to
participate in BCAC project
BY MANDY LOEHR
EXAMINER STAFF WRITER
[email protected]
PHOTO | ANDYBARTWORKS.COM
Chicago-based artist Andy Bellomo, who stands in front of a mural that she helped to create with the Chicago Public Art Group at
Osterman Beach, will visit the city this spring to collaborate on a Bellefontaine Cultural Arts Commission project with local youths.
Local youths were the driving
force behind a community
mural that was installed in the
city earlier this year. In a similar
effort, another colorful creation
soon will grace the downtown
Bellefontaine area as a result of
a second grant received by the
Bellefontaine Cultural Arts
Commission.
The organization recently
was awarded a $9,000 Mary
Eleanor Morris Fund educational grant for the new project, following the receipt of an $8,000
grant last year for a mural that is
displayed on one side of the
Allstate Insurance building, 207
S. Main St.
“Receiving this second grant
is really exciting, as it proves
that we had a successful project
in the eyes of the foundation,”
BCAC director Chloe Manor
said. “We’re pleased that they
wanted to work with us again.
“We’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback from the first
mural. We also saw the positive
impact that it had on our youth,
which was more than enough
for us to feel like it was a worthwhile project.”
With the first mural project,
students in the Ohio Hi-Point
Career Center’s printing and
graphic arts class created a
design centered around the
Shawnee Indian war chief Blue
Jacket.
For the upcoming piece, the
location of the mural has not yet
been determined, but work will
begin in April with Andy
Bellomo, an artist and educator
from the Chicago area.
A former art center director
in Boston, Ms. Bellomo’s mural
work has been featured in cities
in Michigan, Illinois,
Massachusetts and Wisconsin.
The artist also has more than
10 years of experience working
with at-risk youths, which will
See MURAL on Page 4
Speeding complaint One pleads,
prompts Huntsville to another sentenced
look at liability issue Escaped fugitive gets
nine months in prison
The Huntsville Village Council is looking into what its
BY THE BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER STAFF
liabilities are when it comes to the driving habits of its volunteer servants.
Mayor William Jenkins reported receiving a complaint
about a volunteer firefighter’s use of excessive speed in
“very foggy conditions,” adding that the complainant was
nearly struck by the driver. Fire Chief Tim Jenkins was
asked to speak with the volunteers about the matter.
Further, council members raised concerns about what
the village’s liability is if such an accident occurs. Officials
will contact the village’s insurance representative for clarification on the matter.
Council approved the addition of Andrew Newman and
Joseph Brenner to its volunteer fire department ranks.
A letter requesting to upgrade several road signs within
the village has been forwarded to the Logan County
Engineer’s Office. Officials noted the new signs are required
to meet the new federal guidelines by Dec. 1, 2012.
In other business, council accepted a new service contract from the Logan County Sheriff’s Office for 2013, noting
a cost increase of 50 cents an hour to $26.50 per hour of
patrol service.
The Huntsville Neighborhood Watch meeting for Nov.
20 is canceled for the Thanksgiving holiday.
The next meeting is at 7 p.m. Nov. 27.
BY NATE SMITH
EXAMINER STAFF WRITER
[email protected]
A defendant confessed to theft of an elderly man’s wallet
and another was sentenced for stealing several thousand
dollars from his girlfriend’s father in an abbreviated docket
Tuesday in Logan County Common Pleas Court.
Jennifer Kindle, 38, of 332 West St., pleaded guilty to a
fifth-degree felony count of theft from the elderly.
In exchange for the plea, prosecutors dismissed a charge
of identity fraud.
She admitted to taking a wallet that had been misplaced
by Kent Tenant, 68, at the former Rich gas station, 721 N.
Main St., on May 3. Law enforcement used video taken from
store security cameras to identify the suspect.
Charges had been made to the victim’s card in Logan,
Union and Franklin counties, assistant prosecutor Dan
LaRoche said.
The plea agreement submitted to the court recommends
a 90-day jail sentence and a restitution order in the amount
of $1,325.46.
See COURT on Page 4
Annual ‘smokeout’ is Thursday
BY THE BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER STAFF
As the official sponsor of birthdays,
the American Cancer Society marks
the 37th Great American Smokeout on
EXAMINER PHOTO | REUBEN MEES
Thursday by encouraging smokers to
use the date to make a plan to quit.
An estimated one billion people
Janie Haddix, top, and Karla Gingerich light approximately 180 candles in memory of worldwide will die during the 21st century because of tobacco use, according
local residents who have died within the past year as a list of their names are read
to The Tobacco Atlas, published by the
during the annual Community Memorial Service sponsored by Universal Home
American Cancer Society and World
Health and Hospice Care and Eichholtz, Jennings-Farley, Mannasmith, RexerRiggin-Madden and Shoffstall funeral homes. The event took place Tuesday evening Lung Foundation. The American
Cancer Society provides tips and tools
at the First Presbyterian Church in Bellefontaine.
Remembering
online to help smokers quit tobacco
for good.
“Tobacco use remains the single
largest preventable cause of disease
and premature death in the United
States,” spokesperson Wendy
Weichenthal Simpkins said in a news
release. “Quitting smoking is the most
important thing you can do for your
health and the Great American
Smokeout is a great way to start.”
Tobacco use accounts for at least
30 percent of all cancer deaths and 80
percent of lung cancer deaths. In the
See SMOKEOUT on Page 4
2 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • Wednesday, November 14, 2012
SocialSpotlight
n
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
YOUR GUIDE TO AREA HAPPENINGS
Today
Our Daily Bread free meal program, 4:30 to 6 p.m., 223 Oakland Sq.
Pinochle, 5:30 p.m., Friendly Senior Center, 934 S. Main, 593-1511.
Outdoor Heritage, Inc., 7 p.m., Indian Lake State Park.
Bingo, 7 p.m., Indian Lake Elks Lodge 2792.
Aluminum can collection, 7 to 9 p.m., West Mansfield squad house.
Logan County Fair Board, 7:30 p.m.
Bokescreek Township Trustees, 7:30 p.m.
East Liberty Legion, 7:30 p.m.
Huntsville Women’s Literary Club, 7:30 p.m.
LaCultura Literary Club, 7:30 p.m.
Lakeview AMVETS 39, 7:30 p.m.
Humane Society Serving Logan County, 7:30 p.m., shelter.
AA, open discussion, 8 p.m., First United Presbyterian Church, 117 N. Main St., rear.
Thursday, Nov. 15
Transportation for Logan County, public transit, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., 593-0039.
Historical Society office hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Logan County Board of Elections, 8:30 a.m.
ABLE classes, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Hi-Point Career Center.
Immunization clinic, 9 to 11 a.m., Health Department.
Young-At-Heart Center, Lakeview, open, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
County Commissioners, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
ILCC Thrift store open, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 124 Burkhart, Russells Point.
Home school program, 10 a.m., Knowlton Library.
St. Vincent DePaul Store open, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Russells Point.
Quilting, 10 a.m., Friendly Senior Center, 934 S. Main, 593-1511.
Senior nutrition lunch, 11:30 a.m., West Mansfield Firehouse.
Kiwanis, noon, BPOElks 132.
United Christian Services food pantry, noon to 3 p.m., Salvation Army, Lakeview.
Euchre, 2 p.m., Lakeview AMVETS.
Tri-County CAC board, 2 p.m.
Vaccination Clinic, 3 to 5 p.m., Chippewa Outreach Center, 13976 Ironwood Ave., Lakeview.
Potluck dinner, 4 p.m., Young-at-Heart Center.
ABLE classes, 4 to 7 p.m., Galilee Lutheran Church.
Our Daily Bread free meal, 4:30 to 6 p.m., Eagles Annex, Lakeview.
ABLE classes, 5 to 8 p.m., Hi-Point Career Center.
Logan County DD Board, 5:30 p.m.
Narcotics Anonymous, 6 p.m., Indian Lake Community Church Outreach Center.
Bellefontaine Al-Anon, 7 p.m., First United Presbyterian Church (rear entrance).
Duplicate bridge, 7 p.m., Friendly Senior Center, 934 S. Main, 593-1511.
Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services, 7 p.m.
Promise Keepers Task Force, 7 p.m., Christian Fellowship Church.
Russells Point Pride Committee, 7 p.m., fire house, rear.
Humane Society Bingo, 6:30 p.m., Belle Center American Legion.
Rushsylvania Lions, 7:30 p.m.
West Liberty American Legion, 7:30 p.m.
Hi-Point Eagles Auxiliary, 7:30 p.m.
Pomona Grange, 7:30 p.m.
Roundhead VFW 8832 Auxiliary, 8 p.m.
AA, 12&12, 8:30 p.m., First United Presbyterian Church, rear.
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— 27th Annual —
Country Collection
Christmas Boutique
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2012
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Allen County Fairgrounds - Lima, Ohio
(Merchants, Youth Exhibits, Agriculture Bldgs. & Youth Activity Bldgs.)
- OVER 250 BOOTHS ADMISSION $3.00
A fine collection of tole, folk art, floral
arrangements, candles, wearables, glass, dolls, bears
and Much More!
KUNTREE FRIENDS & KRAFTS
419-648-3747
Dear Annie: Recently, my husband mentioned that he wanted
to get together with some friends
for a project. I encouraged him to
invite the guys to our home to
work on it. I thought it would be a
few hours, but it ended up taking
well over 12. They arrived early in
the morning and stayed until late
that night, taking over our living
room.
I suggested in private to my
husband that he should have
wrapped things up by late afternoon. The project is for fun. It’s
not like they had a deadline for
work. It is also designed to continue on a weekly basis for the next
six months, so committing to only
a portion of the day would not
have made much difference.
My husband, however, is a
people pleaser and didn’t feel he
could ask his friends to leave
before they wanted to. Would it
be wise to discuss a lax but scheduled time of arrival and departure
with them in the future, or am I
being unfair to suggest that the
party should move elsewhere after
10 hours? I want my husband and
his friends to feel comfortable in
our home, but I also don’t want
my house invaded for such a long
period of time. — East Coast
Dear East Coast: It is always
wise to discuss time constraints in
n
advance, particularly
when overstaying
annoys you
so much.
Some wives
would have
no objection
to a 12-hour
marathon.
ANNIE’S
They would
MAILBOX
occupy
themselves
elsewhere, and this is one option
for you. But please discuss reasonable limits with your husband,
allowing yourself to be the “bad
guy” in order for him to ask his
friends to leave when you’ve had
enough. There is no point creating
ill will with one’s spouse if it could
easily be avoided.
Dear Annie: My husband has
been put on the lung transplant
list, and we are praying and waiting. Please remind your readers
about donating their organs. They
only need to mark the back of
their driver’s licenses. Many people are desperate for a lung, and
my husband’s time is getting
shorter. — Vermont
Dear Vermont: People are also
desperately waiting for kidneys,
livers, hearts and corneas. We
urge all of our readers to consider
LOCAL NOTES
Fashion on the runway at DKG meeting
A fashion show featuring clothing from JCPenney was one of the
highlights of the recent Delta Kappa Gamma meeting at the West
Liberty Church of God.
The fashion show featured members Cindy Plank, Karen King,
Joyce Zilles, Ginger Huhn, Paula Stickley and Mary Ann Knecht and
also employees of the Bellefontaine JCPenney store. The show was
organized by store employee Carol Stape, and Delta Kappa Gamma
member Peggy Wirick served as the narrator.
During the business meeting that followed, Karen King volunteered to attend the state executive meeting in Columbus.
Ginger Huhn reported another successful sale of tickets for the
group’s fundraiser at the Rock ’N Robin on Oct. 31. The profits will
benefit the organization’s scholarship fund for next spring.
Melissa Sizemore reported that the school supplies that were
donated to Ohio Hi-Point Career Center were distributed to students and teachers.
Surena Neer, president, reported the group still needs an historian and second vice president. Linda Benedict volunteered to be
recording secretary for this year.
Melissa Sizemore and Joyce Zilles each won a door prize of a
necklace donated by Cindy Plank.
The next meeting is 6 p.m. Nov. 26 at the West Liberty Church of
God, when a group photo will be taken for the state conference in
the spring. Other topics of discussion will include membership and
updating the chapter scrapbook.
Beta Theta is the local chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Society
International. It consists of active and retired educators for Logan
and Champaign counties. Delta Kappa Gamma promotes professional and personal growth of women educators and excellence in
education.
Are you interested in
becoming a certified
Master Gardener Volunteer?
The Logan County Master Gardeners are now recruiting for the
2013 training and volunteering season. Requirements for
certifications are 50 hours of horticultural training and 50 hours
of service to the community.
For more information, contact the OSU
Extension Office at 937-599-4227 or visit
logan.osu.edu or stop into our office at
1100 S. Detroit Street, Bellefontaine.
Applications should be completed and
submitted to the Extension Office by
November 30, 2012.
64th Annual
Turkey Festival
Saturday, Nov. 17th
Serving Dinner at 5 p.m.
GROCERYLLC
WEEKLY
SPECIALS
Served by the Lions Ladies
Sandwiches • Baked Beans • Potato Salad
Pie • Coffee • Cider • Pop Etc.
TURKEY RAFFLE 7 p.m.
100 Turkeys to be Given Away
Dressed, Ready to Cook
Sponsored by The West Mansfield Lions Club
Smoked Swiss ................$3.49/lb. Dutch Loaf ......................$2.30/lb.
Farmer’s Cheese..............$2.70/lb. Sm. Turkey Breast ..........$2.59/lb.
Colby Cheese ..................$2.35/lb. Cream Cheese ...........99¢/8oz. pk.
THANKSGIVING
G HAMSS & TURKEYS
Come to a Christmas shopping event hosted by Fusion Student
Ministries where you can shop for Christmas gifts from vendors
who are donating a portion of their proceeds to missions.
Smoked Ham Portions ....$1.74/lb. Smoked Turkey ..............$2.71/lb.
Christmas Shopping
For a Cause
Spiral Smoked Ham ........$2.44/lb. Ambrosia Chocolate........$2.05/lb.
Double Smoke Ham ........$2.36/lb. Peter’s Caramel ..............$3.72/lb.
BULK
K FOODS
G SUPPLIES
BAKING
DISCOUNT
T GROCERIES
LOCAL
L HONEY
5570 Co. Rd. 49, Huntsville
937-464-2148 • MON–SAT 8AM–5:30PM
ONLINE @ www.examiner.org
Time for husband to develop backbone
Conservation Building - West Mansfield
Cherokee
Lane
eMail: [email protected]
Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012
5:00 – 8:00 p.m.
BELLEFONTAINE FIRST CHURCH OF GOD • 1000 E. BROWN AVE.
Buy amazing gifts! Give money to missions! Both at the same time!
For more info & vendor list, call 441-2299
the gift of being an organ donor.
Dear Annie: I’d like to add
another take to “Not a Fan of the
Big Gulp.” I agree that a Big Gulp
is probably a little over the top.
However, I always bring my own
canned soda to my family’s parties.
You see, I am a recovering
alcoholic with 24 years of sobriety.
Sadly, my family members cannot
be trusted not to add liquor to
whatever is served. My sponsor
suggested that I bring my own
drink and keep it with me at all
times. One can then be certain
that alcohol-free drinks are neither tampered with nor inadvertently mixed with alcoholic drinks.
At a bridal shower for my
nephew’s fiancee, I brought my
own soda. As I was leaving, my
sister took me aside and told me
that our niece had spiked the
lemonade with vodka so people
would “loosen up.” I was shocked
and angry that this 37-year-old
niece would pull such a juvenile
and dangerous trick. Aside from
my sobriety, she never considered
that some guests may have been
taking medication that could be
lethal in combination with alcohol. — Recovering Drunk
Dear Recovering: We are certain that etiquette would give you
a pass. We also heard from someone whose well water was tainted.
But in most instances, it is rude to
bring your own beverage to occasions where there is a variety
served. And it is never appropriate
to bring a Big Gulp.
Dear Annie: I am a teenager. In
our society, the central message is
that you need to look perfect and
have tons of money. It’s drilled
into our heads every day, and I
feel the pressure.
n
Clothing companies tell me I
need to wear their labels to be
popular, cosmetic companies
convince me with airbrushed
models that their makeup will
make me look flawless, and
weight programs promise to give
me the perfect body. People
undergo surgery to make their
faces and bodies more appealing
because they have been brainwashed into believing the body
they were given isn’t good
enough.
While all this goes on, there are
simultaneous advertisements for
suicide hotlines, medication for
depression, and help with bulimia
and anorexia. I am sick of it. I
don’t want to feel like I must look
like every Photoshopped model in
the magazines to be accepted. I
am beginning to question the
society I live in. Is there anything
to do? — Teen Lacking Self-Esteem
Dear Teen: You sound like a
pretty smart cookie to us. You
already understand that the reason behind such advertisements
is to sell product, and that the
pressure to be “flawless” is manufactured by companies that benefit from your purchases. This pressure is internalized and can breed
insecurity in those who don’t feel
they measure up.
We know it’s difficult, but
remember that those who are
interested primarily in superficial
appearances aren’t particularly
appealing in the long run. Please
don’t feel obligated to attract such
people. There are plenty who still
value integrity, intelligence, confidence and a good personality. If
you cultivate those traits, your
self-esteem will develop right
alongside them.
© 2012 Creators.com
VETERANS NOTES
• Logan County Veteran Appreciation Day — 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 17, American Legion Harold Kerr Post 173, 120
Colton Ave.; all veterans (not just those who served during
war/conflicts, including those currently serving) and their families
are invited; lunch provided, commemorative coins presented.
Remembering Lisa
More than 100 friends and family members of the late Lisa
Hirschfeld Rubin recently participated in the annual “Step-Up for
Stefanie” Walk/Run event in Columbus. Mrs. Rubin, a daughter of
Dale and Sue Hirschfeld of DeGraff, passed away Oct. 4, 2011.
The “Friends of Lisa” team included her husband, Dan, and her
children, Lauren and Jack, along with her brother, Eric Hirschfeld
and his family of New Bremen, along with friends and family from
the Logan County area and from Dublin. The event benefits the
Stefanie Spielman Fund for breast cancer research at the James
Cancer Hospital. The group also participated last year.
n
HISTORY TODAY
Today is Wednesday, Nov. 14, the
319th day of 2012. There are 47 days left in
the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Nov. 14, 1862, during the Civil War,
President Abraham Lincoln gave the goahead for Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside's
plan to capture the Confederate capital of
Richmond; the resulting Battle of
Fredericksburg proved a disaster for the
Union.
On this date:
In 1851, Herman Melville's novel
"Moby-Dick; Or, The Whale" was first published in the United States.
In 1881, Charles J. Guiteau went on
trial for assassinating President James A.
Garfield. (Guiteau was convicted and
hanged the following year.)
In 1889, inspired by Jules Verne, New
York World reporter Nellie Bly (Elizabeth
Cochrane) set out to travel around the
world in less than 80 days. (She made the
trip in 72 days.) Jawarharlal Nehru (juhwah-hahr-LAHL' NAY'-roo), the first
prime minister of independent India, was
born.
In 1910, Eugene B. Ely became the first
aviator to take off from a ship as his Curtiss
pusher rolled off a sloping platform on the
deck of the scout cruiser USS Birmingham
off Hampton Roads, Va.
In 1922, the British Broadcasting Co.
began its domestic radio service.
In 1940, during World War II, German
planes destroyed most of the English town
of Coventry.
In 1944, Tommy Dorsey and his
orchestra recorded "Opus No. 1" for RCA
Victor.
In 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off for the
moon.
In 1970, a chartered Southern Airways
DC-9 crashed while trying to land in
Huntington, W.Va., killing all 75 people on
board, including the Marshall University
football team and its coaching staff.
In 1972, the Dow Jones Industrial
Average closed above the 1,000 level for
the first time, ending the day at 1,003.16.
In 1986, the Securities and Exchange
Commission imposed a $100 million
penalty against inside-trader Ivan F.
Boesky and barred him from working
again in the securities industry.
In 1997, a jury in Fairfax, Va., decided
that Pakistani national Aimal Khan Kasi
(eye-MAHL' kahn KAH'-see) should get
the death penalty for gunning down two
CIA employees outside agency headquarters.
Ten years ago: Aimal Khan Kasi (eyeMAHL' kahn KAH'-see) was executed by
injection at a prison in Jarratt, Va., for the
slayings of two CIA employees in 1993.
Pope John Paul II made a historic speech
to Italy's parliament, urging Italians to
work for world peace, uphold their
Christian values and have more babies.
Actor-comedian Eddie Bracken died in
Montclair, N.J., at age 87.
Five years ago: Michael Mukasey took
a ceremonial oath as the new U.S. Attorney
General, five days after he was privately
sworn in. A justice of the peace ordered
O.J. Simpson to stand trial on kidnapping
and armed robbery charges stemming
from a confrontation with memorabilia
dealers in a Las Vegas casino hotel room.
(Simpson and a co-defendant were convicted in Oct. 2008.) The prime ministers of
North and South Korea launched their first
talks in 15 years.
One year ago: Former Penn State football assistant coach Jerry Sandusky, in an
interview with NBC News' "Rock Center,"
denied allegations he'd sexually abused
eight boys and said any activities in a campus shower with a boy were just horseplay.
A Russian spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Dan Burbank and two Russians blasted off from the snow-covered Kazakh
steppes, headed for the International
Space Station.
Today's Birthdays: Former U.N.
Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali
is 90. Actress Kathleen Hughes is 84.
Former MLB All-Star Jimmy Piersall is 83.
Former NASA astronaut Fred Haise is 79.
Jazz musician Ellis Marsalis is 78.
Composer Wendy Carlos is 73. Writer P.J.
O'Rourke is 65. Zydeco singer-musician
Buckwheat Zydeco is 65. Britain's Prince
Charles is 64. Rock singer-musician James
Young (Styx) is 63. Singer Stephen Bishop
is 61. Blues musician Anson Funderburgh
is 58. Pianist Yanni is 58. Former Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice is 58.
Presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett is 56.
Actress Laura San Giacomo (JEE'-ah-kohmoh) is 51. Actor D.B. Sweeney is 51.
Rapper Reverend Run (Run-DMC) is 48.
Actor Patrick Warburton is 48. Rock musician Nic Dalton is 48. Country singer
Rockie Lynne is 48. Pop singer Jeanette
Jurado (Expose) is 47. Retired MLB All-Star
pitcher Curt Schilling is 46. Rock musician
Brian Yale is 44. Rock singer Butch Walker
is 43. Actor Josh Duhamel (du-MEHL') is
40. Rock musician Travis Barker is 37.
Contemporary Christian musician Robby
Shaffer is 37. Actor Brian Dietzen (TV:
"NCIS") is 35. Rapper Shyheim is 35. Rock
musician Tobin Esperance (Papa Roach) is
33. Actress Olga Kurylenko is 33. Actor
Graham Patrick Martin is 21.
Thought for Today: "I never gave away
anything without wishing I had kept it; nor
kept anything without wishing I had given
it away." — Louise Brooks, American
actress (born this date in 1906, died 1985).
© 2012 The Associated Press
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • 3
Local & State
eMail: [email protected]
ONLINE @ www.examiner.org
Kids’ mom in murder-suicide wanted them back
BY JOHN SEEWER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOLEDO — For the past three years,
Mandy Hayes had counted on her
mother to care night and day for three
of her children after another son at
home had become too much to handle.
When she decided it was safe to bring
all of them back home in recent weeks,
her mother snapped, killing her three
young grandchildren and herself with
the help of her 32-year-old son who also
died, police said.
Letters left behind indicate 54-yearold Sandy Ford and her son Andy son
carefully planned the murder-suicide
by barricading the garage in their
Toledo home, nailing plywood over the
windows and then running two hoses
from the exhaust of his pickup truck
into the rear window of a car where all
five were found dead, police said.
Police are waiting for autopsy results.
n
The family disagreement over where
the children should live erupted within
just the past week, with police and children services workers being asked to
intervene. But both said there was
never any indication that the dispute
would end in tragedy.
Firefighters using a sledgehammer
broke down the garage door to find the
bodies of 5-year-old Madalyn Hayes,
her 6-year-old brother Logan and 10year-old sister Paige slumped inside a
car, along with their grandmother and
uncle. Two hoses attached to the
exhaust of a pickup truck pumped gas
fumes through the car’s rear window.
Police said letters inside the house
indicated the woman and her son plotted the murder-suicide, beginning by
picking up the children from school
Monday morning after their mother
had dropped them off earlier.
Toledo police Sgt. Joe Heffernan
wouldn’t say what was in the letters,
AREA BRIEFS
Suspect charged in alleged marijuana growing operation
ST. PARIS – Anthony A. Rench, 21, was charged with trafficking
in drugs and corrupting a juvenile with drugs for his alleged
involvement in a marijuana growing operation in St. Paris.
Around 10:30 a.m. Friday, village police responded to 209 Lawn
Ave. in response to complaints from neighbors about a high
amount of traffic in and out of the residence. After getting a search
warrant, authorities found objects and evidence consistent with a
marijuana growing operation in addition to drug paraphernalia and
marijuana inside the residence.
Rench and three other individuals were arrested and taken to the
Tri-County Regional Jail on a 48-hour hold. While Rench is still in
the jail, the other three suspects were released. Officials said the
release of the three individuals does not mean they will not be
charged, but they believe Rench is the main suspect in the case and
may face additional charges.
The search also resulted in the discovery of a grenade outside the
residence. Wright-Patterson Air Force Base officers reported to the
scene to detonate the grenade.
Anyone with additional information about the case or any suspicious activity should contact the St. Paris Police Department at
(937) 663-4468.
Children’s Hospital expanding to Marysville
MARYSVILLE — Nationwide Children’s Hospital has confirmed
its intent to construct a Children’s Close to Home facility on north
Coleman’s Crossing Blvd. in Marysville’s City Gate development at
U.S. Route 33 and State Route 36.
Hospital officials said the center would include pediatric urgent
care, child labs and child radiology services, at a minimum. The
facility would be very similar to other close-to-home centers and
offer services not currently available in Marysville.
Children’s officials reported having talks with Memorial Hospital
of Union County, but could not reach an agreement to work together, although Children’s remains open to future collaborations.
There are not yet estimates on the cost to construct the facility,
but construction is expected to begin in the spring.
Ada program a finalist for most notable in country
ADA — The Ada Police Department’s S.A.F.E.R. Program has
been named a finalist for the 2012 Government Security News’ Most
Notable Municipal/County Programs, Projects or Initiatives Award,
according to area reports.
The Seeking Aid From Every Resident Program was a finalist
along with programs from Seattle, Tampa and St. Petersburg, Fla.,
police departments.
S.A.F.E.R. was created in Ada in 2001 following the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks. Ada Police Chief Michael Harnishfeger said the program has been instrumental in numerous criminal investigations
and quality of life issues, making Ada a safer community overall.
The annual contest acknowledges successful public-private collaborations for the country’s homeland security measures to recognize achievements in strategies and initiatives. The winning program will be announced in Washington on Nov. 29.
n
LOCAL NOTES
‘Examiner’ schedule altered
The Nov. 21 edition of the Bellefontaine Examiner will be a
morning paper and the business office of the newspaper will be
open from 8 to 11 a.m. that day because of the Thanksgiving holiday.
The newspaper is not published Thanksgiving.
Religion page deadline changed
Because of the Thanksgiving holiday, the deadline for items for
the Religion page has been changed to noon Tuesday.
Illness hinders delivery service
A substitute carrier has been delivering Examiner motor route
driver Mike Radulovich’s route. Mr. Radulovich, who has been off
since Friday because of illness, anticipates resuming his delivery
duties early next week.
The route covers portions of western Logan County and includes
subscribers in DeGraff, Lewistown and Quincy.
but it appeared some were written by
the children.
“We’re trying to figure out all the
why’s in this,” he said.
Authorities were called to the home
by the children’s frantic grandfather
after he discovered the letters and was
unable to force open the garage door.
Despite the grisly scene, investigators
found no signs the children were forced
into the car and believe all five died of
carbon monoxide poisoning.
Until last week, the children had
spent the last three years living with
their grandparents, Sandy and Randy
Ford, and their uncle at a house in a
residential neighborhood close to the
Michigan state line.
Mandy Hayes had asked her mom for
help caring for the three children
because a fourth child was becoming disruptive, said children’s services representatives and a family friend.
“She was just being protective,” said
BY THOMAS J. SHEERAN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLEVELAND — A
Cleveland woman puffed on a
cigarette, wore headphones,
and ignored passers-by and
crowds of reporters as she
stood for an hour Tuesday
under a judge’s order holding
a sign that said, “Only an idiot
would drive on the sidewalk to
avoid a school bus.”
A Municipal Court judge
had ordered 32-year-old
Shena Hardin to serve the
highly public sentence
Tuesday and Wednesday for
the Sept. 11 citation after she
was caught on camera driving
on a sidewalk to pass a
Cleveland school bus that was
unloading children.
She arrived bundled up
against the 34-degree cold at
the intersection near downtown Cleveland as passing
vehicles honked. Satellite TV
trucks streamed the event live.
Hardin refused to comment, as did her mother, who
watched from a parked car. A
message seeking comment
was left for Hardin’s attorneys.
Hardin’s license was suspended for 30 days and she
was ordered to pay $250 in
court costs.
Lisa Kelley, whose 9-yearold daughter boards the bus
that Hardin had been passing
on the sidewalk, said the sen-
BY THE BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER STAFF
Tri-County Community
Action Commission Champaign,
Logan and Shelby Counties of
Ohio honors the dedication of
Maxine Wingo with a lunch buffet and award ceremony at 11:30
a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, at
Liberty Gathering Place, 111 N.
Detroit St., West Liberty.
Mrs. Wingo, who turns 95 on
Nov. 23, is employed through
Tri-County’s Experience Works,
a job-skill training program for
senior citizens.
Officials said Maxine makes
friendly telephone calls to check
on the well-being of homebound seniors and reminds
them to take their medications.
She also provides assistance to
our Senior Nutrition Program by
POLICE & FIRE
Imagination Academy is Saturday
Teen faces charges
Feel comfortable using a computer and the Internet,
Be eligible for special Internet and computer offers
Classes are FREE and forming
NOW at community
organizations in your area.
Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226)
for local class information
tence fit the crime.
“She’s an idiot, just like her
sign says,” Kelley said as she
watched Hardin lean against a
fence, her head down and her
eyes hidden by dark glasses.
“She did this almost every
day last year,” Kelley said.
“She won’t stop laughing.
She’s not remorseful, she
laughed at every court appearance. She’s still laughing, so
serving meals to area seniors.
“Maxine is an exemplary
employee who demonstrates
compassion, dedication and
extraordinary work ethics in
performing her job duties.”
The luncheon menu includes
baked chicken, mashed sweet
potatoes, peas, fruit, dinner roll,
beverage and pumpkin pie with
whipped topping. The cost for
those preregistered with the
CAC TIII program is a suggested
$2 donation; for those under 60,
a $5 donation is requested.
Talk with Maxine at 593-0034
from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Nov. 19 and
20; or mail a letter to Tri-County
CAC, 125 E. Patterson Ave.,
Bellefontaine 43311. Taxexempt monetary donations to
Senior Nutrition Services in her
honor are also accepted.
she needs to be humiliated
like this.”
Kelley said she was only
sorry the woman was standing
in the cold and not the rain or
snow.
Bill Lipold, 37, who works
nearby in the blue-collar
neighborhood of older homes
and factories, yelled to Hardin:
“Why do you hate kids?” He
hopes the punishment works.
“How else are you going to
stop her from doing it again?”
he said. “She really didn’t
show remorse for her action
after being caught, so you’ve
got to try something.”
With two schools located
within two blocks of the location and busy commuter traffic, the area can be risky for
youngsters walking to class,
Lipold said.
Girl says she was locked
basement, punished
HAMILTON (AP) — A 12year-old girl who authorities
say was locked in a basement for weeks testified
Tuesday that she was held
under cold showers,
slapped, spanked and fed
peanut butter sandwiches
for punishment.
The girl, her older sister
and a social worker were
among those who testified
on the first day of the trial
for Shawn and Joanna
Blackston, the 12-year-old’s
father and stepmother. The
trial was scheduled to continue today in a Butler
County court.
Shawn Blackston, 40,
and Joanna Blackston, 37,
of Middletown, have pleaded not guilty to a misde-
meanor count of child
endangering for allegedly
locking the girl in the basement as punishment. The
couple could get up to six
months in jail if the judge
finds them guilty, a court
official said.
The girl clutched a teddy
bear and rocked in a chair
as she spoke in court, The
Hamilton JournalNews
reported.
She told the court that
she had to ask to use an
upstairs bathroom, and her
parents would give her two
or three pieces of toilet
paper. She acknowledged
that she sneaked out of the
house, found food in a
neighbor’s trash can and
returned to the basement.
BELLEFONTAINE BEAT
n
FREE
AP PHOTO | TONY DEJAK
Shena Hardin holds up a sign to serve a highly public sentence today in Cleveland for driving on
a sidewalk to avoid a Cleveland school bus that was unloading children. Cleveland municipal
judge Pinkey S. Carr ordered 32-year-old Hardin to serve the highly public sentence for one hour
Tuesday and today.
Tri-County Community
Action hosts open
house for Maxine Wingo
The Huntsville Neighborhood Watch group’s meeting for Nov. 20
has been canceled for the Thanksgiving holiday.
basic computer training for adults
both sides of the family, most recently
on Saturday, said Dean Sparks, executive director of Lucas County Children
Services.
“We only know that there were a lot
of allegations back and forth,” he said,
adding that Sandy Ford was worried
about placing her grandchildren back in
the home with their 9-year-old brother,
who had been disruptive in the past.
Mandy Hayes and her husband also
have a baby who was born just less
than a year ago.
But the agency had no authority to
decide who should keep the children,
Sparks said, and the parents had every
right to bring them back into their home.
Turner said she never saw any indication of a strained relationship
between Hayes and her mother, and
they never went to court over the issue
of custody.
Family members declined to comment.
Woman who drove on sidewalk holds ‘idiot’ sign
Huntsville watch group cancels meeting
Paper and all of its unique uses is the subject of Imagination
Academy, which begins at 10 a.m. Saturday in the AcuSport
Community Room at the Knowlton Library, 220 N. Main St.
The event is free for children in grades K-6. Participants will fly
paper airplanes and learn how to make their own paper they can
use and write on.
Contact the library, 599-4189 for more information.
the friend, Cammie Turner.
While the children were living with
their grandparents, their parents saw
them almost every day and went on outings to parks and the zoo, Turner said.
“Their kids mean everything to
them,” she said.
But recently Hayes had decided they
should all return home, and the children moved back in with their parents
last week, upsetting Hayes’ mother,
Turner said.
“Mandy wasn’t taking the kids away
from her entirely,” she said. “She wanted them home. It wasn’t like she was
taking them and grandma could never
see them again.”
Turner said Hayes had confided that
her mother was controlling, but she
never seemed alarmed by it.
“It doesn’t make sense,” she said. “I
can’t imagine. To have your mom....”
Police were at the house last week
and children services workers met with
He was released to his parents.
A 13-year-old boy was spotted walking near his Woodview
Drive residence around 3:15 a.m. today and now faces delinquency charges of violating curfew and possession of tobacco.
He told officers of the Bellefontaine Police Department he left the
residence to pursue someone messing with his family’s vehicles.
Officers found multiple pocket knives and flashlights in his
possession, along with a can of chewing tobacco.
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FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITY
Firefighters of the Bellefontaine Fire and EMS Department
report the following activity:
Tuesday — 9:22 a.m., squad run; 11:32 a.m., squad run; 2:32
p.m., squad run; 4:54 p.m., squad run; and
Today — 5:07 a.m., squad run.
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SUN, TUE, WED, THU 4–9PM • FRIDAY 11AM–10PM • SATURDAY 4–10PM
2527 SOUTH US 68 • BELLEFONTAINE • ACROSS FROM STEVE AUSTINS
4 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • Wednesday, November 14, 2012
eMail: [email protected]
ALSO AVAILABLE ONLINE @ www.examiner.org
3 pilots flying to safety meet die in Miss. crash
BY EMILY WAGSTER PETTUS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSON, Miss. — Three
pilots flying together to a federal
safety conference died when
their single-engine plane faltered in midair and crashed into
a house that went up in flames.
The three men had just taken
off from Hawkins Field Airport
in Jackson on Tuesday when a
witness said the Piper PA-32
began “spitting and sputtering.”
The witness, a Jackson police
officer, saw the plane sputtering
like it was out of fuel, he would
later tell the plane’s owner — a
budding pilot whose own life
was spared when he decided to
go deer hunting instead of flying. The men on board were
headed to a Federal Aviation
Administration safety conference less than 30 miles away.
One of the aviators asked for
permission to return to the airport, but just minutes later the
plane went down. It crashed
through trees before slamming
into a house that quickly caught
fire, sending long flames and
black smoke through the neighborhood of modest single-family homes surrounded by magnolia and oak trees.
A deputy fire chief told
WJTV-TV that one person
escaped the burning home with
minor injuries, but it was not
immediately clear if anyone else
was inside. One patient from
the scene was in good condition
at University of Mississippi
Medical Center, spokesman
Jack Mazurak said late Tuesday.
He wouldn’t give the person’s
name or gender or the extent of
the injuries, citing privacy laws.
The plane was owned by
Roger and Michele Latham,
from Superior Pallet Company
in Flowood, Miss., both of
whom showed up at the crash
site, along with their grown
daughter, Emily Latham.
Emily Latham noted that her
father was supposed to have
been on board but changed his
plans.
“He went hunting,” she said.
“Thank God.”
Michele Latham said all
three men on board were pilots.
Roger Latham, who is 15 hours
short of getting his pilot’s
license, identified one of the
victims as John Edward Tilton
Jr., his flight instructor.
“He was one of the finest
Christian men I knew,” Latham
said. “We had three great men
who lost their lives,” he added.
“I just want to wake up in a
while and say, ‘This didn’t happen.”’
Hinds County Coroner
Sharon Grisham-Stewart confirmed three people died in the
crash. She said dental records or
DNA would be needed to confirm their identities.
The plane took off at 5:10
p.m. and shortly after, the pilot
asked for permission to return
to the airport, according to a
news release issued by the
Jackson Municipal Airport
Authority. It never made it.
The plane had departed
Hawkins Field Airport headed
for Raymond, Miss., for an FAA
safety conference. Latham said
his plane had been parked in a
hangar for a month and they
wanted to take it out for a short
flight before he flew it to Gulf
Shores, Ala., for Thanksgiving.
Latham said he had owned the
plane for 2 1/2 years and
described it as being in mint
condition.
Latham said a Jackson police
officer who was about a block
away when the plane was coming down told him “it was spitting and sputtering and ... starving for fuel.”
It hit trees on the way down,
Latham said, adding, “I’m sure
John was doing everything he
possibly could to save the lives
on board.”
Vivian Payne, who lives
about six blocks from the crash
site, said she heard a loud bang
that sounded different from an
electrical transformer blowing.
“It shook the walls of my
house,” Payne said.
Mural_________________________
Continued from Page 1
be a major asset for this
upcoming endeavor, as the
project will involve girls who are
a part of the Logan County
juvenile probation system.
“We were hoping to find an
artist who had a background in
education and also in working
with at-risk teens,” Ms. Manor
said. “So when we found Andy,
we were just thrilled and couldn’t wait to get started working
with her.”
More specifically, participants who will work on the
mural are involved in the Logan
County Family Court’s intervention group called “Girl Talk” for
ages 14-18.
Girl Talk members meet
twice a month for a meal, discussion and other activities to
deal with a variety of issues,
from peer and parental relationships to decision making, goal
setting, money management,
job-seeking skills, dating violence, bullying, body image and
health education.
Community service credit is
given to the girls as a reward for
their participation.
Ms. Manor said she has
observed several Girl Talk ses-
sions, and wrote the grant
specifically to target the teens in
the group.
“Through the BCAC, we’re
looking at how we can serve the
youth of our community, and
we felt that we wanted to reach
out to at-risk girls who are in
this group.”
One of Ms. Bellomo’s previous efforts included working
with a group of homeless teens
who were parenting or pregnant. That group created a large
project called “Real Eyes
Moms,” in which each young
woman created a life-size mosaic of herself and then recorded
her life story onto an mp3 player that was attached to the
mosaic.
“We had an exhibit and over
300 people showed up to hear
the stories and see their art,” the
Chicago resident said in an email.
Through her many experiences, Ms. Bellomo, who holds
a master of education degree in
art and education from Lesley
University, has observed the
profound impact that art can
have on children and
teenagers.
“I do think these projects
effect youth immensely, espe-
Court __________
Continued from Page 1
She will be sentenced Jan. 7.
Bill Ray Garland, 57, of 1629
S. Township Road 46, was sentenced to 30 days in the Logan
County Jail, five years’ community control, and was ordered to
pay court costs and attorney fees
for theft, a fourth-degree felony.
Mr. Garland was convicted of
stealing a debit card that
belonged to his girlfriend’s
father and charging to it
$14,283.20.
The defendant said the crime
occurred as a result of an addiction to crack cocaine, a habit he
has since kicked, “cold turkey.”
Reading from a presentence
investigation, Judge Mark S.
O’Connor noted the defendant
hasn’t had a full-time job in nine
years.
Mr. Garland said he has
worked a series of odd jobs over
that time, and that he is the pri-
n
mary caregiver for his girlfriend,
who is prone to daily seizures.
He says he is now seeking
employment and anticipates
being able to pay between $50
and $100 each month toward
the restitution.
In a case resolved last week, a
convicted sex offender was sentenced for skipping town while
on furlough ahead of his original
sentence.
Shawn Kerns, 33, was sentenced to nine months in prison
to be served consecutively with
the five-and-a-half years he’s
currently doing for two counts of
gross sexual imposition.
The defendant fled Ohio in
April after he pleaded to the GSI
charges. He was located in June
in the Oglala community of the
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in
South Dakota, where he had
been living in a tent.
Court was pushed back a day
in observance of Veterans’ Day.
PALLBEARERS
Pallbearers for the funeral of Ruth Hesser were Shawn Hesser,
Chuck Hesser, Tim Newland, Zach Newland, Grant Mizek, John
Baughman and Justin Van Buskirk.
Active pallbearers for the funeral of Eunice White were Clay
Swainhart, Eric Swainhart, Sean Williams, Chad Williams, Andy
White and Travis Ropp, with honorary pallbearer Matt Auflick.
n
FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS
JOHNSON, Betty B. — Visitation, two hours prior to funeral, 2
p.m. Thursday, Kauffman-Eichholtz Funeral Home, West Liberty.
RAYMOND, Elinor Jane — Memorial service, 11 a.m. Friday,
Kauffman-Eichholtz Funeral Home, West Liberty.
cially teens that may be struggling emotionally, or not have a
strong support system,” she said
via e-mail. “It gives young people a sense of ownership over
something and the understanding of what it’s like to work
together for a larger cause.
“Youth typically just want to
feel proud of something they
have accomplished and they
want others to be proud of
them, too. As a society, I’m sure
we could do a better job guiding
our youth through their accomplishments and giving them
more opportunities to create
something together and succeed in a common goal.”
While the theme and subject
matter of the upcoming work
will be determined by the Girl
Talk members, the mural itself
will be a mosaic piece, where
each individual has a hand in
creating a larger image, the
artist noted.
“The cool thing about
mosaics is that literally every
piece is touched by someone on
the project, so it couldn’t get
done without the personal hard
work and touch of each and
every teen working on the
piece.”
After completing mostly
urban projects, Ms. Bellomo
said she’s looking forward to her
time in Bellefontaine this
spring.
“Over the years, I’ve worked
with people from all ages, styles,
backgrounds, and communities,
and I’ve learned something
from each project I have worked
on.
“I especially love working
with young people, because of
the sense of inspiration we tend
to get from each other. It keeps
me going and wanting to create
more.”
For additional examples of
Ms. Bellomo’s public murals,
visit her Web site at www.andybartworks.com.
Budget_________
Continued from Page 1
have voluntarily gone without
pay increases for the last three
years with the understanding the
unions could reopen wage talks if
there is an improvement in city
revenues.
No action was taken, nor was
there any indication if the police
union was seeking a pay raise for
2013.
The council is planning to
n
drop the second scheduled meeting in December as it would fall
on Christmas Day.
Council members will meet at
7 p.m. Dec. 17 in a special session
to consider a tax incremental
finance district measure. The
measure, which sets aside property tax revenues earned on new
valuations, must be passed before
the end of the year.
The next regular meeting of
the council is at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 27
A look back into the headlines…
50 Years Ago
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 1962
MR. AND MRS. STANLEY SHAFER, Superior avenue,
attended the Ruth Lyons 50-50 Club television show in
Cincinnati Tuesday, where Mrs. Shafer won a camera and
appeared on television during the presentation.
RICHARD SLOAN, Bellefontaine, is the new president of the Logan
County Association of Independent Insurance Agents. He succeeds Than
Moffitt, Belle Center.
WALTER RICHEY, chairman of the Industrial Division of the Logan
County United Fund drive, reported today the completion of the Industrial
Division campaign with total giving of $14,854.73, an increase of 12.4 percent
over the 1961 figure.
25 Years Ago
Saturday, Nov. 14, 1987
SATURDAY FEATURE: Bellefontaine Police Patrolman Brian R. Kennedy
has been the official police photographer since 1986. The third-shift patrolman is on call 24 hours a day and is responsible for photographing all evidence and crime and accident scenes for use during investigations and in
court.
ROBERT G. HARRISON of West Liberty has been named to the Urbana
University Board of Trustees. Harrison is the owner of the Appliance and
Home Center in Bellefontaine.
GOLDEN TEACHER AWARD: The Logan County Board of Education has
recognized Leah Moore, who teaches multi-handicap students at Huntsville
Elementary School.
PVT. BRIAN E. SULLIVAN, U.S. Army, son of Mr. and Mrs. John L.
Sullivan, 117 Summit Dr., and a 1987 graduate of Bellefontaine High School,
has successfully completed basic armor training as a member of the Honor
Platoon of B Co., 2nd Battalion, 13th Armor at Ft. Knox, Ky.
FIVE Bellefontaine High School football players were honored with selections to the all-Central Buckeye Conference Team, announced today. They
are Keith Brewster, Chris Karibo, Steve Burton, Danny Springs and Terry
Jackson.
Arrest _________
Continued from Page 1
warrant at his residence
Thursday by special agents
with the Homeland Security
Investigation office out of
Columbus.
Spokesman Khaalid Walls
with the U.S. Immigration and
Customs Enforcement office
reported today that the defendant was arrested without incident.
The criminal complaint
against Mr. Close alleges that
the illegal activity had
occurred since June.
Also in the criminal complaint document, the offense
description states the defendant allegedly “used, persuaded, induced, enticed or
coerced three or more minor
children to engage in sexually
explicit conduct for the purpose of producing a visual
depiction of such conduct, and
such visual depiction was produced using materials that
traveled in interstate or foreign
commerce ... that is by computer and/or the Internet.”
The spokesman said he
could not release information
about what materials might
have been uncovered during
the execution of the search
warrant.
Thursday, deputies of the
Logan County Sheriff’s Office
provided back-up support to
federal agents at the scene in
Quincy.
Mr. Close was convicted in
2000 of gross sexual imposition involving a 3-year-old
female victim in Logan
County. He is labeled as a sexual predator, according to
Logan County Sheriff’s Office
Detective Phil Bailey.
Mr. Walls said the investigation continues into the federal
case.
Smokeout ______
Continued from Page 1
U.S., tobacco use is responsible
for nearly 1 in 5 deaths, or
about 443,000 premature
deaths each year.
Smokers who quit, regardless of age, live longer than people who continue to smoke. In
just 20 minutes after quitting
smoking, heart rate and blood
pressure drop and in about one
to nine months after quitting,
coughing and shortness of
breath decrease.
The American Cancer
Society created the trademarked concept for its first
Great American Smokeout in
1976 as a way to inspire and
encourage smokers to quit for a
day.
One million people quit
smoking for a day at the 1976
event in California. The Great
American Smokeout encourages smokers to commit to
making a long-term plan to quit
smoking for good. Find tips and
tools online at
www.cancer.org/smokeout for
help to quit smoking for good.
LOGAN COUNTY BEAT
SHERIFF & HIGHWAY PATROL
Drivers cited in crashes
John W. Baker Jr., 22, of Bellefontaine, was cited for failure to
control and for driving with an expired registration following a
crash about 1:50 a.m. Saturday.
Deputies of the Logan County Sheriff’s Office report he was
operating a westbound pickup on U.S. Route 33 when he drove
onto the exit ramp for U.S. Route 68 and then drove off the right
side of the roadway, and his vehicle overturned onto its side.
No injuries were reported and damage was light to his vehicle.
• Derek A. Stephens, 18, of Belle Center, was cited for failure
to control and speed relating to a previously reported crash that
occurred Friday morning on Charles Street in Belle Center.
He reportedly was operating a southbound car when he
drove off the left side of the road and struck a tree.
His passenger, Joe L. Blanton, 18, of Belle Center, was transported by MedFlight helicopter to Grant Medical Center in
Columbus for incapacitating injuries. The driver was transported by BMRT squad to Lima Memorial Health System for possible injuries.
• Lucas S. Sons, 22, of Kenton, was cited for failure to control
following a crash about 4:05 p.m. Monday on State Route 292
between county roads 50 and 48.
A photo of the crash appeared in Tuesday’s Examiner.
The driver reportedly was operating a southbound pickup
when he drove off the right side of the road and struck a tree.
Burglary reported
Levi Oglesbee, 190 W. Lake St., Lakeview, reported Monday
evening that he returned home from work to find damage to an
entry door to his home.
Upon entering his house, he discovered that his residence
had been ransacked.
He reported that a pair of earrings were missing. Deputies
report the resident is working to compile a list of any additional
missing items.
OHIO STATE HIGHWAY PATROL
Hit/skip crash sends 2 to hospital
Troopers of the Marysville Post of the Ohio State Highway
Patrol seek information about the identity of the driver of a semi
tractor-trailer who fled the scene of a crash about 5:45 a.m.
Tuesday.
Troopers report that the southbound semi was driving on
U.S. 68 just south of Township Road 219 when it went left of
center into the path of a northbound sport utility vehicle operated by Anthony Richardson, 46, of Sidney.
Mr. Richardson took evasive action to avoid the oncoming semi and drove off the right side of the road. His SUV
then went back on the road, and went left of center and
struck a southbound car operated by Michael Joseph, 57, of
Marion.
The semi reportedly left the scene and continued southbound on U.S. 68.
Mr. Joseph and Mr. Richardson each was transported by
Bellefontaine squad to Mary Rutan Hospital for incapacitating
injuries.
Troopers note that Mr. Richardson was not wearing a seat
belt at the time of the crash.
Anyone with information about the semi driver should call
the Marysville Post at 644-8348.
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Wednesday, November 14, 2012 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • 5
Opinion & Editorial
eMail: [email protected]
www.examiner.org
SPEAKING OUT
What they learned and didn’t learn
he headline was inevitable: “What
following President Obama’s re-election
went wrong?”
have been a salted slugfest. Amid the
Seriously?
writhing, I rest my case.
Republicans plan to commence focus
Some Republicans stubbornly insist,
groups and voter-based polls to discover
of course, that the problem was that
the mystery behind their
Romney wasn’t conservaloss. Having sat staring
tive enough. Really? In his
into space the past
heart, this may be true. I
couple of days, they now
never believed Romney
want to get to the bottom
was passionate about
of it.
social issues. He
The bubble in which
embraced them because
most politicians and their
he had to, but had no
staffs live is not just a
intention of pursuing a
KATHLEEN PARKER
metaphor, apparently.
socially conservative
The answer has been so
agenda.
obvious for so long and in so many ways,
But the real problem is the
one has to wonder what these people
Republican Party, which would not be
read in their spare time? Old issues of
recognizable to its patron saint, Ronald
Boys’ Life?
Reagan. The party doesn’t need a poll or
If nothing else, one only had to look at
a focus group. It needs a mirror.
the two political conventions. One was colThe truth is, Romney was better than
orful, vibrant, excited and happy. The other
the GOP deserved. Party nitwits underwas pale, moribund, staid and restrained. If
mined him and the self-righteous tried to
the latter sounds like something in the final
bring him down. The nitwits are wellstages of life, you’re not far off.
enough known at this point — those farA couple of weeks before the election,
thest-right social conservatives who
I spoke to an audience of about 450 in
couldn’t find it in their hearts to keep
Florida, the demographics of which were
their traps shut. No abortion for rape or
about 80 percent male, 90 percent
incest? Sit down. Legitimate rape? Put on
Republican and, oh, about 99.9 percent
your clown suit and go play in the street.
white.
Equally damaging were the primary
What could be more fun than that!
leeches who embarrassed the party and
Alas, the bulk of my talk was criticism
wouldn’t leave the stage. Nine-nine-nine,
of the Republican Party. If Mitt Romney
we’re talking about you, Herman Cain.
loses, I told them, it will be largely the
And Gov. Oops? You, too. And then there
fault of the party. As I spelled out the
were Rick Santorum and Michele
details, nary a creature was stirring. It
Bachmann, who never had a real shot at
was painfully quiet. Even my best jokes
the nomination and certainly could never
fell flat. Hey, guys, that was funny!
win a national election, yet they refused
It was hard to tell whether they
to surrender to the certain nominee.
resented the messenger or whether they
Did they have a right to persist in their
were trying to digest the unpalatable
own fantasies? Sure. But not if they were
truth. Truth is often painful and the days
serious about getting a Republican in the
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White House. Thus, for months and
months, Romney had to spend his energy and, importantly, his money to prevail
in the primaries against opponents who
had no chance and who ultimately hurt
him. During that same precious time,
Obama’s campaign was busy pinpointing
specific voters, practically learning the
names of their dogs, and buying ads in
niche markets.
More to the point, the GOP seems
willfully clueless. There’s a reason there
are so few minorities in the party. There’s
a reason women scrambled to the other
side. There’s a reason Hispanics, including even Cuban-Americans this time,
went for Obama.
The way forward is about love, not
war, baby. Women’s reproductive rights
need to come off the table. As Haley
Barbour suggested long ago, agree to disagree. Compassionate immigration
reform, including a path to citizenship,
should be the centerpiece of a conservative party’s agenda.
Marginalize or banish those who in
any way make African-Americans, gays,
single women or any other human being
feel unwelcome in a party that cherishes
the values of limited government, low
taxes and freedom. A large swath of conservative-minded Americans are
Democrats and independents by default.
Mitt Romney would have been a fine
president and might have won the day but
for the party he had to please.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
[email protected]
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THE FORUM
Keep church and state separate in the U.S.
week before the November election, the great
New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd
wrote “Republicans are geniuses at getting
people to vote against their own self interest.”
To conservatives and the right wing, the left-leaning
Times is a “Commie Newspaper.”
But Dowd is right on.
The mechanism used by Republicans to accomplish
their goals is religion.
In the months leading to their action, you could read
the editorial pages of any paper and be exposed to a
conservative sermon about how awful President Barack
Obama and his administration were.
The implications being that anyone with a liberal
point of view is an atheist, a communist or a socialist.
Maybe all three.
I keep reminding myself, though, that it was the right
wing segregationists in the South all those years who
claimed slavery was in their Bible.
Most irksome to me in the recent editorials were the
A
repeated references to religious themes and our Constitution.
I’m always asking questions. I think that’s a very
good thing to do. This requires two big ones.
If religion was so central to our founders’ vision of
America, why is even God not mentioned in the Constitution?
And why did the chief architect of the Constitution,
James Madison, say that where religion had been part of
civil government in past times, it had always resulted in
“tyranny” and was “needed not.”
So, how do the Republicans exploit religion and faith?
It’s as simple as human nature.
I’ve long believed that we make more important
decisions in our lives based on emotions than we do on
facts, logic or common sense.
What is love if not pure emotion?
Religion is a very emotional thing, especially on
issues like abortion and same sex marriage.
What are we missing by all this though?
For instance, how many of those in the anti-abortion
movement who care so much about protecting us while
we’re on the way, are opponents of universal healthcare? They have to be saying that once we’re here, only
those with enough cash on hand deserve it.
That’s hypocrisy 101.
We hear a great deal in America about “Islamic
Terrorism.” Islam being a religion of course.
After all the hateful missives I’ve read this fall from other
religious zealots, many of them sound like terrorists to me.
A threat to anyone — atheists, liberals, gays, etc. —
that dares to be or is different.
I’m convinced James Madison and our other
founders were mindful of such concerns when separating church and state in or civil government.
And despite all the noise from the religious right,
that alleged socialism/Marxist in the White House,
Barack Obama, was re-elected president of the United
States on Nov. 6.
I think our founders would have approved.
Jerry Turner
Quincy
Why I struggle with sleepless nights
ear Friends and Citizens of Logan County,
As I set here in the early morning after the
election, I want to express some of my concerns
and thoughts that are keeping me from a good night’s
sleep.
I am looking at these thoughts not as a Republican,
Democrat or Independent, but as a son of a WWII Vet, a
Vietnam Vet, husband, father and grandfather and most
of all a proud American.
I have been blessed to have been born in this great
and exceptional country of the United States of
America. This is a country of freedoms and opportunities equaled by none. A country where I was taught by
loving parents about religion, work ethic and the fact
that I could succeed by working hard and making intelligent decisions. I was also taught early on that making
bad decisions had consequences. I was also taught love
and responsibility for our country. These are lessons
taught by most all parents regardless of political association. We all want our country to be the best it can be,
not only for us but for future generations. We all hope
and pray that the freedoms and blessings that our forefathers provided for us will provide a safe, happy and
successful life for our kids and grandkids. Yet we do not
seem to be able to elect representatives to government
that secure those hopes. Why? We only seem to elect
those who care more for themselves than for us and
more for their careers than for serving their country.
Why? I can only look at the last four years and wonder
how we were led to $16 trillion in debt, how we have
D
had freedoms taken from us by our representatives
enacting laws and regulations and by judge decisions
that disregard our Constitution, the same Constitution
that was designed to protect us from the government. I
see a Christian nation founded on Christian principles
being oppressed more and more in schools, at work, by
government and in our daily lives for political correctness. I see schools and teachers being required to act as
parents and used for social and political teaching rather
than teach the skills needed to be successful in the
future. I see our great country that was once the hope
and leader of the world being laughed at by dictators
and enemies when once we were respected for our
goodness and feared for our power. I see our country
never being energy independent because of laws and
regulations that do no let us use the resources God has
given us but requires us to buy from countries that hate
us. I see a country of hardworking God-fearing
Americans with no jobs, on unemployment, food
stamps and other kinds of government support, not
because they want to be but because our government
has put them there by their policies. I don’t believe that
any American wants to see this but yet we cannot elect
people that agree with us? I truly believe that when over
50 percent of our working population must depend on
government for food, housing, health care and many
other programs to survive, that our country as we know
it will be gone.
No doubt you can see that I am very fearful for the
future of our country. We are told that everything will
be OK and that we can solve our problems if we only
pay a little more taxes. That is not the answer. Look at
Europe where taxes are being raised higher and higher
and it cannot fix their problems. Is this the kind of freedom we want? The kind that requires us to work for the
government and not for ourself and family? That is
where we are headed. We can no longer vote out of
office officials that lie, cheat and buy votes using their
policies and our tax money? This is not the future I want
to see. Going down this path will lead to a USA that has
far less freedoms, is weak financially and militarily with
a much lower standard of living for future generations.
Is this what any of us want? Who do we have to blame?
Only ourselves. This is why I cannot sleep tonight and I
wonder how many of you are having the same
thoughts?
I pray that once again we become a Christian USA
and are proud of it. I believe that is the only hope and
change that will make a difference.
Dale King
PRAYER FOR TODAY
Lord God of the nations, whose sovereign rule brings
justice and peace, have mercy on our broken and
divided world. Pour out your peace into the hearts of
all, that all races and peoples may learn to live as
members of one family in obedience to your law,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
“Nothing is stronger than public
opinion; given the facts,
nothing is wiser.”
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The Forum
Bellefontaine Examiner
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Bellefontaine, Ohio 43311
ABE MARTIN
“Constable Newt Plum
accidentally locked his
whiskers up in a cash
register last night an’ it wuz
3 a.m. before his cries fer
help wuz heard.”
Written prior, 1931, by Kin Hubbard, a
world-famous newspaper humorist and
father of late T.E. Hubbard, former
Examiner owner/publisher
6 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Florida socialite at center of general’s sex scandal
BY TAMARA LUSH
AND MATT SEDENSKY
tangled sex scandal involving Petraeus
lead back to Kelley, whose complaint
about anonymous, threatening emails
triggered the FBI investigation that led
to the general’s downfall as director of
the CIA. And now Kelley is in the middle of an investigation of the top U.S.
commander in Afghanistan over
alleged “inappropriate communications” between the two.
Kelley’s friendship with Petraeus
and his wife began when the general
arrived in Tampa about 2008. Kelley
and her husband, Scott, a cancer surgeon, had moved to the area a few
years earlier and threw a welcome
party at their home, a short distance
from Central Command headquarters,
introducing the new Central Command
chief and his wife Holly to Tampa’s
elite, according to staffers who served
with Petraeus.
Such friendships among senior military commanders and prominent local
community leaders are common at any
base, a symbiotic relationship where
the officers invite top locals to exclusive military events and functions, and
the invitees respond by providing private funding to support troops with
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA, Fla. — When news vans
camped outside her stately home, a
Florida socialite tied to the Gen. David
Petraeus sex scandal fell back on her
informal credentials as a social ambassador for Tampa society and top military brass: She asked police for diplomatic protection.
In the phone call to authorities, Jill
Kelley, a party hostess and unofficial
social liaison for leaders of the U.S. military’s Central Command in Tampa,
cited her status as an honorary consul
general while complaining about news
vans that had descended on her twostory brick home overlooking Tampa
Bay.
“You know, I don’t know if by any
chance, because I’m an honorary consul general, so I have inviolability, so
they should not be able to cross my
property. I don’t know if you want to
get diplomatic protection involved as
well,” she told the 911 dispatcher
Monday.
Nearly all lines in the increasingly
everything from morale-boosting
“Welcome Home” parades to assistance for injured troops.
She also met Gen. John Allen while
he was at Central Command, and now
investigators are looking at 20,000-plus
pages of documents and emails
between Kelley and Allen, some of
which have been described as “flirtatious.” The general has denied any
wrongdoing.
For her part, Kelley has taken a low
profile since Petraeus’ affair with his
biographer, Paula Broadwell, became
public. The Kelleys have retained highpowered Washington lawyer Abbe
Lowell, who did not immediately
return a call.
On Tuesday, Kelley could be seen
through the large windows of her South
Tampa home. In the driveway was a silver Mercedes with a license plate
marked “Honorary Consul.” Kelley’s
identical twin sister, Natalie Khawam,
also lives there.
South Tampa is a conservative
Southern community of big houses, big
bank accounts, garden clubs and wives
who pride themselves on volunteer
work. A lot of the brass from MacDill
Air Force Base, where Central
Command is headquartered, live or
socializes in South Tampa, and helping
members of the military is a major volunteer activity.
Former Mayor Pam Iorio said she
went to several parties to benefit the
military at the Kelleys’ home, and they
drew MacDill’s top brass, including
Petraeus. But they were by far not the
only parties held around the city for
MacDill’s officers.
“Our community’s relationship with
MacDill is just multi-faceted,” said
Iorio, who later invited the Petraeuses
over to her own home for dinner. “It’s
something that is generational. People
sincerely care about the military.”
Petraeus aides said Kelley took it to
another level, winning the title of “honorary ambassador” for her extensive
entertaining. Petraeus even honored
Kelley and her husband with an award
in a special ceremony at the Pentagon.
The Kelleys invited then-Florida
Gov. Charlie Crist to their home, but he
never accepted. Instead, he had dinner
with the Kelleys at a steakhouse in
Tampa with Petraeus.
“Lovely people. I remember I had a
nice dinner with she and her husband
and the general and his wife,” Crist
said.
Ken Walters, a neighbor, said he
went to a party the couple had to celebrate their first son’s baptism. The
Kelleys have two other children.
“Natalie and her sister, they’re certainly not shrinking violets,” Walters
said. He recalled that when the sisters
first entered the South Tampa social
scene, they “rubbed people the wrong
way. I think they probably stepped on a
couple of toes.”
Petraeus’ affair with Broadwell was
discovered after Kelley told an FBI
agent friend she had received email
warning her to stay away from
Petraeus. The email turned out to be
from Broadwell, who apparently
regarded Kelley as a rival for Petraeus’
affections. Kelley’s family and Petraeus
aides have said Petraeus and Kelley
were just friends.
In another strange footnote to the
scandal, long before the case involving
Petraeus got under way, the FBI agent
sent Kelley shirtless photos of himself,
according to a federal law enforcement
official.
Survivors of Indianapolis
blast waiting for answers
BY CHARLES WILSON
AND RICK CALLAHAN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cutting landlines will
silence our seniors.
Senate Bill 271 has the potential
to greatly harm senior Ohioans in
rural areas who rely on landlines.
Withholding affordable phone
service from seniors will cut
them off from family, friends and
emergency medical services.
Keep our seniors safe. Say no to SB 271.
Paid for by AARP.
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INDIANAPOLIS — Survivors
of a deadly explosion that devastated an Indianapolis neighborhood are trying to rebuild
their lives even as they await
answers about what caused the
massive blast.
Investigators are focusing on
natural gas-fueled appliances as
they search for the cause of
Saturday’s explosion, which
killed two people, leveled two
homes and left dozens more
uninhabitable.
Indianapolis Homeland
Security Director Gary Coons
said Tuesday that his “investigators believe natural gas is
involved” and were “recovering the appliances from
destroyed homes to help
determine the cause.” He
made the announcement after
the National Transportation
Safety Board said investigators
had found no leaks in the gas
main or pipes leading into the
n
house that exploded.
“Based on the NTSB statement, our focus is on the houses
and appliances,” Coons said in a
statement.
Some residents expressed
frustration at the pace of the
investigation Tuesday night
during a meeting of about 150
residents of the Richmond Hill
subdivision held at a church
near the damaged neighborhood. But 51-year-old Helen
Upton, who attended the meeting, said she and most of her
neighbors are willing to wait
while officials sort through the
evidence to pinpoint the cause
and source of the suspected gas
explosion.
“It’s only been three days
and there’s a lot of debris and
rubble where that house blew
up, so I’m not surprised they’re
still being tight-lipped,” she
said. “But I think some of the
neighbors are obviously getting
anxious. There’s just a lot of
questions and a lot of ‘we don’t
know yets.”’
Upton said she was at home
sleeping while her ex-husband
was visiting with their two children when a house about 50 to
60 yards away exploded. The
blast nearly tossed her off her
bed, she said, and shattered her
home’s front windows, blew off
its front door and buckled her
garage door.
Three days after the blast,
Upton said, her household is
“fully functioning” again and
she’s thankful none of her family were injured. But she said her
home still has some boarded up
windows and other needed
repairs and her kids’ nerves are
frazzled.
“My kids are having trouble
sleeping. They’re afraid there
could be another explosion
since we don’t know what it
was,” said Upton, who works at
Indiana Farm Bureau.
An owner of the house
believed to be at the center of
the explosion has said the
home’s furnace had been having problems, but his estranged
wife, Monserrate Shirley, said
the furnace was fine.
COURTHOUSE NEWS
Marriage licenses
The following couples recently
applied for marriage licenses in Logan
County Family Court:
Oct. 15, 2012: Matthew A. Kerns and
Martha J. Corley
Oct. 16, 2012: David D. Myers and Lori
M. Meade
Oct. 16, 2012: Jeffery W. Maben and
Lori L. Jenkins
Oct. 16, 2012: Neil T. Moser and Mary
A. Ropp
Oct. 19, 2012: William R. Howard Sr.
and Nikki L. Sidders
Oct. 22, 2012: Daryl W. Abraham and
April M. Donnelly
Oct. 23, 2012: Robert C. Gloeckner and
Betina A. Tucker
Oct. 23, 2012: Daniel J. Gingerich and
Etta F. Miller
Oct. 23, 2012: Aaron D. Kelsey and
Victoria A. Pence
.&%*$"-*/'03."5*0/
5&$)/0-0(:
Oct. 24, 2012: Joshua A. McGill and
Jeananna D. McWade
Oct. 26, 2012: Jason M. Dye and Tonya
K. Woodbridge
Oct. 29, 2012: Eric S. Dahlke and
Donna J. Herford
Nov. 6, 2012: Christopher M. Westhoff
and Chloe A. Manor
Nov. 8, 2012: Gerardo Ramos III and
Alexis G. Deweese
Divorces and dissolutions
The following couples recently had
divorces or dissolutions of marriage
finalized in Logan County Family Court:
Oct. 9, 2012: Trista D. Elkins and
Harold J. Elkins IV
Oct. 9, 2012: Wendy Woodruff and
Chad H. Woodruff
Oct. 12, 2012: Amanda B. Thomas and
Rickie L. Thomas
Oct. 15, 2012: Teresa Ann O’Brien and
Rock Edward O’Brien
Oct. 22, 2012: Phyllis Jane Isbestor and
Gary Alan Isbestor
Oct. 25, 2012: Barbara S. Richardson
and Edwin C. Richardson
Oct. 25, 2012: Barbarlee Ullman and
Wesley Ullman
Oct. 25, 2012: Patricia Evans and Josh
Larson
Oct. 26, 2012: Rosa L. Yeazell and
Ronald K. Yeazell
Oct. 26, 2012: Anne D. Justice and Joe
M. Justice
Oct. 30, 2012: Amy Z. Rathor and Ram
R. Rathor
Oct. 30, 2012: Heidi R. Penhorwood
and Mark A. Penhorwood
Oct. 30, 2012: Tracy Stone and Jacob
Stone
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Inside Sports:
EXAMINER
CHAMPS GO DOWN
Kentucky knocked off by Duke
in big early hoops matchup
eMail: [email protected] • Phone: (937) 592-3060 *122 or *115
Sports
MORE ONLINE @ www.examiner.org/sports
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Lakers’ Shoffstall named district coach of year
Three local soccer players
earn first-team honors;
Others honored on
all-Miami Valley squad
BY MATT HAMMOND
EXAMINER SPORTS EDITOR
[email protected]
Indian Lake’s boys soccer
program enjoyed its most successful season in school history
this fall. That was not overlooked when it came to selecting the all-district teams.
Lakers’ head coach Jon
Shoffstall was named the
Division II all-district coach of
the year by the Miami Valley
Scholastic Soccer Coaches
Association.
Shoffstall guided the Lakers
to a program-high nine wins
this fall.
Indian Lake freshman
Connor Davis was selected to
the Division II all-district team
along with Bellefontaine’s Zach
Gingerich.
Davis scored 22 goals, a
school record, in his rookie season for the Lakers. He also
added three assists.
Gingerich turned in another
strong campaign in goal for the
Chiefs. The senior helped
Bellefontaine to
10 shutouts this
season, which is
a new school
record.
JON
On the girls
SHOFFSTALL
side,
Bellefontaine senior standout
Regan Price was named to the
Division II first team. She
returned from a knee injury she
suffered during her junior season to lead the Chiefs in goals
this fall.
Only 12 players in each division from the entire Miami
Valley received all-district honors.
Miami Valley all-area teams
The area’s soccer teams were
well represented on the Miami
Valley Scholastic Soccer
Coaches Association all-area
squads.
CONNOR
DAVIS
ZACH
GINGERICH
For the boys, Indian Lake’s
Shoffstall was named the North
coach of the year and Benjamin
Logan’s Rob Painter was selected the assistant coach of the
year. Shoffstall also was selected
to coach in the Miami Valley allstar game.
Earning first-team all-North
honors in Division II were
Indian Lake’s Davis,
Bellefontaine’s Gingerich and
Ben Logan’s Timon Mannings.
Second-team awards for
Division II went to
Bellefontaine’s Dhaile
Ballesteros and Indian Lake’s
Tony Carpenter, while third-
REGAN
PRICE
TIMON
MANNINGS
team selections included
Bellefontaine’s Brett Wisner,
Josh Neighoff and Ethan Tullis,
Ben Logan’s Dan Kuhmer and
Indian Lake’s Zach Allison and
Dustin Roby.
For the Division III all-Miami
Valley East boys squad, West
Liberty-Salem’s Corey Lianez
received a first-team honor.
The Tigers’ Grant Burden
was named to the second team
and the Tigers’ Jakob Nelson
landed on the third team.
Bellefontaine’s Price headlined the Division II all-North
girls team by being selected the
player of the year.
COREY
LIANEZ
SHONDA
GIESEKE
The Chiefs’ Julia Hunt
received second-team honors,
as did Ben Logan’s Mary Evans.
Named to the Division II
third team were Bellefontaine’s
Elise Brunner and Morgan
Ferguson and Ben Logan’s Dana
Van Buskirk, Hannah Boysel
and Kaci Oswalt.
West Liberty-Salem’s
Shonda Gieseke received a spot
on the Division III all-North
first team. The Tigers’ Alandra
Cox was selected to the second
team and the Tigers’ Melany
Ward, April Kelley and Addy
Hartsel were named to the
third team.
Hilliker
swimmers
compete
in Stingray
Pentathlon
BY THE BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER STAFF
The Bellefontaine Hilliker
Heat swim team had a successful trip to the Stingray
Pentathlon at the Shelby County
YMCA last weekend.
Numerous swimmers
dropped time during the meet.
In the girls 8-and-under division, Morgan Henry was second in
the 25 backstroke, third in the 100
individual medley, third in the 25
freestyle, fourth in the 25 breaststroke and sixth in the 25 butterfly,
Mia Stallard finished eighth in the
25 freestyle, ninth in the 25 butterfly and 15th in the 25 backstroke,
Junette Ly took ninth in the 25
freestyle, 11th in the 25 breaststroke, 12th in the 25 butterfly and
16th in the 25 backstroke and
Sarah Fulmer took 11th in the 25
backstroke, 11th in the 25 butterfly
and 16th in the 25 freestyle.
For the 9-10 girls age group,
Sarah Starkey was fourth in the
100 individual medley, fifth in
the 50 breaststroke, fifth in the
50 backstroke, sixth in the 50
freestyle and ninth in the 50
butterfly, Torrance Cline was
12th in the 100 individual medley, 12th in the 50 butterfly, 14th
in the 50 freestyle and 17th in
the 50 backstroke, Samantha
Starkey placed 11th in the 50
backstroke, 16th in the 50 butterfly and 18th in the 50
freestyle and Mullaney Yoder
was 10th in the 50 breaststroke
and 18th in the 50 backstroke.
In the 11-12 age group, Amy
Fulmer finished fifth in the 50
backstroke, seventh in the 100
individual medley and 10th in
the 50 freestyle, Shelby Starkey
took fifth in the 50 butterfly, seventh in the 50 backstroke, 12th
in the 50 freestyle and 14th in
the 100 individual medley and
Lauran Barthauer was 19th in
the 50 butterfly.
For the girls 13-14 division,
Emily Fulmer finished sixth in
the 200 individual medley, sixth
in the 100 freestyle, seventh in
the 100 backstroke, eighth in the
100 butterfly and 13th in the 100
breaststroke, Shelbi Moore was
11th in the 100 backstroke, 11th
in the 200 individual medley and
13th in the 100 freestyle, Molly
Schulz was sixth in the 100 backstroke, 12th in the 200 individual
medley, 12th in the 100 freestyle,
13th in the 100 butterfly and 16th
in the 100 breaststroke, Megan
Barthauer was 10th in the 100
breaststroke, 14th in the 200
individual medley, 15th in the
100 backstroke, 15th in the 100
butterfly and 16th in the 100
freestyle and Regan Hormann
placed 11th in the 100 breaststroke, 19th in the 100 freestyle,
19th in the 100 backstroke.
In the girls 15-and-over division, Emma Smith was eighth in
the 100 breaststroke, Jessica Miller
placed ninth in the 100 breaststroke, 10th in the 200 individual
medley, 11th in the 100 backstroke,
12th in the 100 freestyle and 16th
in the 100 butterfly and Shelby
Phillips took 18th in the 100
freestyle, 20th in the 100 butterfly.
See SWIMMERS on Page 8
AP PHOTO | DARRON CUMMINGS
Wisconsin’s Montee Ball, left, and James White celebrate after Ball ran 49 yards for a touchdown during the second half of Saturday’s game against Indiana in Bloomington, Ind.
Buckeyes have a
growing dislike
for Wisconsin
BY RUSTY MILLER
AP SPORTS WRITER
COLUMBUS — It used to be that Ohio
State players despised their longtime enemies to the North, Michigan, and abided
everyone else on their schedule.
No more.
Now the Buckeyes also have a special
level of dislike for the Wisconsin Badgers.
“I don’t want to go on record saying that I
hate Wisconsin more than Michigan,”
Buckeyes wide receiver Corey Brown said,
“but I hate Wisconsin just as much as
Michigan.”
A lot of that enmity will likely bubble to
the surface when the sixth-ranked and
unbeaten Buckeyes travel to play the
Badgers at Camp Randall Stadium on
Saturday.
Blame the antagonism on chippy, close,
contentious games the past few years. Each
side says the other’s fans are obnoxious.
Both have accused each other of grandstanding after victories, such as dancing on
the opposing team’s logo at midfield after a
rare road win.
Along the way, they’ve worked up a heated little rivalry where once there was none.
This year’s edition began during the middle of the winter. Wisconsin coach Bret
Bielema alleged that Ohio State’s Urban
Meyer was swooping in and stealing verbal
commitments. Both coaches downplay it
now. At the time it seemed like a natural
extension of the battles that have been taking place on the field.
“We do a lot of recruiting in Ohio. So the
kids know each other,” Bielema said of the
rivalry this week. “That builds up a little bit
of animosity and some feelings out there
more than anything. I’ve learned early on in
my coaching career you lose more friends in
recruiting in the coaching world than you do
on game days.”
The Badgers have three starters from the
Buckeye state, including star linebacker
Chris Borland (second in tackles and first in
sacks and fumbles recovered), along with
tight end Brian Wozniak and defensive lineman Pat Muldoon. Chase Hammond is a
backup wide receiver and Darius Hilary is a
second-teamer at cornerback as a freshman.
Once just a blip on the schedule, now the
game’s recent history raises the rancor on
both sides.
The Buckeyes won every meeting
between 1960 and 1980, and have a 54-17-5
lead in the series. That mark does not count
one of the most painful losses ever to the
Badgers. Two years ago, the last time the
Buckeyes visited America’s Dairyland, Ohio
State was 6-0 and ranked No. 1 in the nation
but David Gilreath returned the opening
kickoff for a touchdown and the Buckeyes
fell behind 21-3 at the half on the way to a
31-18 loss to the No. 18 Badgers. (Ohio State
had to vacate the 2010 season as part of
NCAA sanctions for violations committed
under deposed coach Jim Tressel.)
“I continually think about when we were
ranked No. 1 a couple of years ago going into
their house,” Ohio State cornerback Travis
Howard said. “They took that away. A lot of
guys on the team, especially the seniors, are
continually thinking about that moment and
don’t want it to happen again — especially
with the perfect season we’re having.”
Meyer is in his first year at Ohio State as
head coach, but has a sense of the emotional
tug of war between the teams.
“I’m learning about it. I think they stole a
season,” he said, referring to the 2010 upset.
“(The Ohio State players) were telling me
that story a little bit. It’s interesting hearing
our players talk about it. This is a rivalry
game because you have to understand who
you’re playing and what they’ve done the
last few years.”
If you’re looking for omens, the week
before that Ohio State team’s perfect season
was ended, undefeated Alabama was No. 1
and was upset — just as it was a week ago by
Texas A&M.
See BUCKEYES on Page 8
AP PHOTO | FRANK FRANKLIN II
The Brooklyn Nets’ C.J. Watson, left, and Brook Lopez, right,
defend the Cleveland Cavaliers’ Kyrie Irving during the second half
Tuesday in New York. The Nets won 114-101.
Williams, Johnson
lead Nets over
Cavaliers 114-101
NEW YORK (AP) —
Brooklyn’s Backcourt broke out.
Deron Williams had 26
points and 10 assists, Joe
Johnson scored 25 points, and
the Nets beat the road-weary
Cleveland Cavaliers 114-101 on
Tuesday night for their third
straight victory.
Expected to be one of the
league’s best guard tandems,
Williams and Johnson are still
trying to find their way together
in a new home on a rebuilt
team. They know games such as
this one are expected, and both
said they can be delivered regularly.
“It’s probably the best
game that we’ve had together,” Johnson said. “It’s still
early in the season, but yeah,
I’m sure that’s the vision
everybody had, that’s the
vision I had and I’m sure this
won’t be the last (big) game.
Like I say man, we’re just figuring things out.”
Brook Lopez added 23
points for the Nets, who
opened a 20-point lead at
home for the third straight
game, but this time barely let
up and beat the Cavaliers for
the sixth time in eight meetings
after losing nine in a row,
mostly during the LeBron
James era.
Anderson Varejao scored a
career-high 35 points and
grabbed 18 rebounds for the
Cavaliers, who were wrapping
up a six-game, coast-to-coast
trip and played much of the
game with the urgency of a
team that wanted to be home.
They haven’t played there
since Nov. 2, their second game
of the season, and dropped the
final four games of the trip to
finish 1-5.
Williams and Johnson,
perennial All-Stars who have
been nicknamed “Brooklyn’s
Backcourt,” put things together
for the first time since the Nets
acquired Johnson from Atlanta
over the summer. Neither had a
20-point game before Tuesday,
and Johnson had been shooting
only 36.2 percent.
Williams shot 10 of 20, and
Johnson was 9 of 16 while
adding six assists and five
rebounds.
“It definitely felt like we
played better together today
and like I said, we both got
going today which was good, so
hopefully we can continue to
make improvements,” Williams
said. “Me and him have been
talking a lot the last couple of
days trying to get each other
going and find out where, you
know, our spots are on the
court.”
The Nets held Orlando below
20 points in a franchise-record
seven straight quarters during a
home-and-home sweep and
were allowing 90.4 points per
game, fourth-best in the NBA.
But the offense had been spotty,
particularly once they got
ahead. They blew a 22-point
lead last week in a loss to
Minnesota and most of a 20point advantage Sunday against
the Magic.
This time, there was no
letup, in part because they just
ran by a Cleveland team that
didn’t have its legs. Brooklyn
finished with a 23-8 advantage
in fast-break points.
8 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Sports
n
THE WHIRL
NEWSMAKERS IN BRIEF
Vermillion helps Ashland
football reach playoffs
Former Bellefontaine football standout Zach Vermillion
has helped Ashland University
record one of its best seasons in
school history.
The Eagles are 11-0, ranked fifth
in the nation in NCAA Division II
and are headed to the playoffs for
the first time since 2008.
Ashland won the Great Lakes
Intercollegiate Athletic
Conference this fall and will play
at home on Nov. 24, at 11 a.m.
against the winner of the firstround game between Chadron
State and West Texas A&M.
Vermillion starts at left tackle
for the Eagles.
Triad honors fall athletes
Triad High School recently
honored its fall athletes during
an awards presentation.
In volleyball, Dayna Ober
earned the Offensive Fighting
Cardinal Award, Anna McKenzie
took home the Defensive
Fighting Cardinal Award,
Maddie Ehrenborg was most
improved and Emily Thompson
was given the coach’s award.
Jacob Watkins headlined the
football accolades by earning
the Clarence Hunter Award. Tre
McIntyre was named Offensive
Fighting Cardinal and Austin
Sanford was the Defensive
Fighting Cardinal. Jacob
McCreary was named most
improved and Seth Collier took
home the coach’s award.
In cross country, Tanner
Stengel was selected as the Boys
Fighting Cardinal and Miranda
Linscott was the Girls Fighting
Cardinal. Zach Moore earned most
improved and Alyssa Ferguson
received the coach’s award.
Seth Donohoe led the golf
team with the lowest average
and Summer Detrick was
named most improved.
Dakota Thompson was named
the Offensive Fighting Cardinal in
girls soccer, while Haley Vincent
was named the Defensive
Fighting Cardinal. Hannah
Kilbride took home the coach’s
award and Julie Boes received the
most improved award.
In boys soccer, Devin Byrd
earned the Offensive Fighting
Cardinal Award and Damian
Boldman was honored with the
Defensive Fighting Cardinal
Award. The coach’s award went
to Luke Donohoe and Brent
Benedum was most improved.
The cheerleading squad named
Hannah Long most spirited,
Mekayla Campbell was most
improved and Miranda Hammons
received the coach’s award.
eMail: [email protected]
ALSO AVAILABLE ONLINE @ www.examiner.org/sports
Duke holds off Kentucky 75-68
BY PAUL NEWBERRY
of an issue this time — Duke
finished with a 31-30 edge —
but the more experienced Blue
Devils showed a bit more poise
down the stretch. Especially
Curry, a senior guard.
After Duke let Kentucky back
in the game by continuing to
put up errant 3-pointers, Curry
finally changed things up. He
pumped faked and took off for
the hoop, drawing a foul on
Goodwin with just over 2 minutes remaining. He knocked
down both ends of the one-andone, pushing Duke to a 66-61
lead with 2:04 remaining.
Poythress gave the Wildcats a
semblance of hope, putting
back a missed shot, but Curry
blew by Goodwin for a layin that
made it 68-63 with 1:13 left and
essentially sealed it. Calipari
called a timeout and screamed
at Goodwin as the freshman
walked toward the bench.
In the final minute, Curry
added two more free throws to
finish off the Wildcats.
Plumlee fouled out near the
end, but not before scoring 18
points in 29 minutes. Ryan Kelly
and Sulaimon had 10 points
apiece. Both Curry and
Sulaimon hit three shots beyond
the arc, as the Blue Devils finished 8 of 18 from 3-point
range.
AP SPORTS WRITER
ATLANTA — Seth Curry
scored 23 points and No. 9 Duke
held off a furious comeback by
No. 3 Kentucky, beating the
defending national champions
75-68 Tuesday night in the first
matchup between the storied
programs since 2001.
Duke (2-0) appeared to be in
control, even with Mason
Plumlee on the bench in foul
trouble. The Blue Devils ripped
off a 13-3 run, capped by
Rasheed Sulaimon’s 3-pointer
that made it 58-44 with 9 1/2
minutes remaining.
But Kentucky (1-1) wasn’t
done, rallying like the defending
champ even though this is
essentially a whole new team in
coach John Calipari’s one-anddone system. The Wildcats
outscored Duke 17-6 over the
next six minutes and actually
had a chance to tie it.
Julius Mays missed a 3pointer with the Blue Devils
clinging to a 64-61 lead.
Curry made sure youthful
Kentucky didn’t get any closer.
He schooled freshman guard
Archie Goodwin on a drive —
using a pump fake to get past
the Wildcat — that essentially
clinched the win.
AP PHOTO | DAVE MARTIN
Duke guard Seth Curry shoots in front of Kentucky's Julius Mays during the second half Tuesday at
the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. Duke beat Kentucky 75-68.
Alex Poythress led Kentucky
with 20 points, while Nerlens
Noel and Goodwin added 16
apiece. All are freshmen, showing this team has plenty of room
to grow before tournament
time.
Even though Kentucky
opened the season with a victory over Maryland, Calipari wasn’t happy with his team’s effort
— especially on the boards.
They were outrebounded 54-38
by the Terrapins, including 28 at
the offensive end.
That was simply unacceptable given Kentucky’s vaunted
frontcourt featuring the 6-foot10 Noel and 7-footer Willie
Cauley-Stein.
Rebounding wasn’t as much
Steelers’ Roethlisberger has sprained shoulder
BY WILL GRAVES
AP SPORTS WRITER
PITTSBURGH — Ben
Roethlisberger left Heinz Field
on Monday night with his
sprained right shoulder in a
sling. When he walks back in
ready to play is anybody’s guess.
Tomlin called Pittsburgh’s
franchise quarterback “questionable” but otherwise offered little
detail Tuesday, less than 24 hours
after Roethlisberger was pounded into the ground by Kansas
City Chiefs linebackers Tamba
Hali and Justin Houston in the
third quarter of Pittsburgh’s 1613 overtime victory.
“He is being evaluated,”
Tomlin said. “Obviously this
injury puts his participation in
the questionable category for
this week.”
Roethlisberger left the game
and went to the hospital to for
Buckeyes
Continued from Page 7
Just last year, the Buckeyes
broke the Badgers’ hearts.
Quarterback Braxton Miller
danced around to avoid a rush
and heaved a 40-yard touchdown pass to Devin Smith
with 20 seconds remaining to
upset No. 15 Wisconsin, 3329, in Ohio Stadium.
“It comes up a lot in the
players’ minds,” said
Wisconsin’s record-setting running back, Montee Ball. “That
was a game we felt we could
MINNICH FAMILY
TRUST AUCTION
have won and we didn’t. We just
tell everybody that same thing
can happen if we don’t go out
and execute the way we want to.
And way we plan to.”
Ohio State has won six of the
last 11 meetings and holds a
narrow 239-231 edge in points
over that span.
Don’t expect either side to
exchange air-kisses before or
after the game.
“I really don’t like them, to
tell you the truth,” Buckeyes
defensive lineman Johnathan
Hankins said. “I’m sure they
probably hate us too, but I really
don’t care what they think.”
an MRI-exam. He underwent
more tests on Tuesday to determine the severity of the sprain
to the sternoclavicular (SC) joint
in his throwing shoulder.
The SC joint connects the collarbone to the sternum.
Treatment can range from a few
days of rest and ice to as much as
4-6 weeks according to Dr. Victor
Khabie, chief of sports medicine
at Northern Westchester
Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y.
“You could tape it, you could
do that stuff but the reality is
those ligaments just have to
heal,” Khabie said. “If you go
throwing, you slow down the
healing process.”
Roethlisberger was scrambling in the pocket to buy time
on Pittsburgh’s first possession
of the second half when Houston
wrapped up Roethlisberger’s legs
and Hali slammed into him,
driving the quarterback’s right
side into the damp Heinz Field
turf. Roethlisberger didn’t
appear to be hurt walking off the
field but quickly made his way to
Swimmers
Continued from Page 7
For the boys 8-and-under
age division, Kelvin Ong was
fifth in the 25 breaststroke,
eighth in the 25 butterfly, 11th
in the 25 freestyle and 12th in
the 25 backstroke and Jacob
Salyer finished 11th in the 13th
in the 25 backstroke and 14th in
the 25 freestyle.
In the 9-10 division, Jared
Salyer placed fifth in the 50
breaststroke, eighth in the 50
butterfly, 11th in the 50 backstroke, 11th in the 100 individ-
ual medley and 12th in the 50
freestyle, Ryan Braig finished
10th in the 50 butterfly and 18th
in the 100 individual medley
and Dylan Jordan was 15th in
the 50 backstroke.
For the boys 11-12 age group,
Collin Jordan finished 19th in
the 50 freestyle.
In the 13-14 age division,
Kohl Moore was 14th in the 100
freestyle and 16th in the 100
backstroke.
Josh Haisley was fifth in the
100 backstroke for the 15-andover division.
<RX/RVWD&KXQNRI&KDQJH/DVW
<HDU%LOOLRQVLQ)DFW
Logan County Fairgrounds, 301 E. Lake Ave., Bellefontaine, OH 43311
Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012 • 11:30 a.m.
ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, FURNITURE, HOUSEHOLD & TOOLS:
Evinrude Elto outboard motor; South Bend fishing reels to include 900 smooth
cast &777 free cast; Shakespeare wonder reels, 1920s; Pfluger #1893 reel;
Shakespeare/Rapella/Heddon fishing lures; metal minnow buckets; fish creel
basket; bamboo for fishing poles; mouse and other lures (some w/boxes); CocaCola cooler; pewter toy soldiers; mini cast iron beer wagon w/8 horses & wooden beer kegs; cast iron ash tray w/man; cast iron motorcycle w/rubber tires; several miniature pieces; cast iron toys; Wyandotte toy semi trucks (2); Tonka 24 hr.
service semi truck; toy car hauler; Hopalong Cassidy toys including chaps & dart
board; Howdy Doody & Clarabelle dolls; Lone Ranger holster; Goofy & Donald
Duck windup toy; coloring books; Cub Scout uniform w/badges & books; Jim
Prentice elec. football game; Indian Lake photo books (70s); Indian Lake 1964
Boat Show book & 1953 Festival book; Indian Lake Jr. High letterman jacket letters; Stokes Township letterman jacket letters; Indian Lake signs; WWI post
cards; old post cards (some as early as 1919); old newspaper (early as 1931);
hunting & trapping licenses 1957-1964; lots of traps & skinner cages; old scrapbooks; old children’s books; old lunchbox; tin pictures; paperweight; old
Christmas decorations; Columbus Blue Valley milk can; Columbus washboard;
decorative miniature glass & Depression glass; Fenton glass; whiskey decanter
music box; salt & pepper shakers; souvenir spoons (some as early as 1901);
1940s & 50s Spiegel catalogs; All-American R&R engine w/3 cars; L&N R&R
lantern; NY Central R&R lantern; Ohio Dept. Highway blue lantern; Coleman
lanterns; old outdoor porch lights; magnet oil lamp; Martin box birdhouse; cork
duck decoys; UW pulleys; old metal fans; shoe hook w/Bellefontaine adv.; 45
record player (Phonola); cast iron skillets (1 Wagner); butter churn & crocks;
folk art pieces; marbles (some clay); 2 sets ice skates; mounted fish; deer head
mount; pheasant & duck mounts; Elgin pocket watch; various costume jewelry;
Seth Thomas mantel clock; John Maxwell of Cooksville, TN; Mountain
Dulcimer; old Singer sewing machine in table; oak dresser; wardrobe; oak bookcase; table w/4 chairs & bench; wrought iron coffee table w/glass top; (2) glass
top end tables; (2) wrought iron lamps; oak corner elec. fireplace; Kitchen Aide
mixer; Champion juicer; Bailey wood planer; Groove planer; #7 Stanley/Bailey
jack planer; miter box; Milwaukee drill & Sawzall; DeWalt palm sander & cordless drill; Black & Decker circular saw; Homelite chainsaw; 10 gal. shop vac.
GUNS: Remington 22 pump; Remington #31 16 ga. pump; Western Field 550
12 ga.; Western Field bolt action 22; Smith & Wesson 12 ga. pump; Liberty single 22 revolver; Danish 8/57 rifle; Traditions 50 cal. w/Traditions scope & synthetic stalk; Sovereign scope.
See Auctionzip.com ID #5619 for pictures & updates.
Terms: Cash or check w/proper ID. Credit cards accepted with 4%
clerking fee.
Auctioneer’s Note: This sale is almost exclusively antiques & collectibles. The Minnich family has lived on the lake for years & have
collected for just as long.
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the locker room before leaving
the stadium with the game still
in progress.
“It didn’t seem like a tough
hit ... but he came to the sideline and next thing you know he
was gone,” Pittsburgh left tackle
Max Starks said. “I’m hoping it
was nothing serious. Honestly it
didn’t seem like it.”
If Roethlisberger can’t play, the
Steelers (6-3) will turn veteran
backup Byron Leftwich, who completed 7 of 14 passes for 73 yards in
relief as Pittsburgh won its fourth
straight game thanks to Shaun
Suisham’s 23-yard field goal 51
seconds into the extra period.
The 32-year-old Leftwich
hasn’t started a game since
2009, when he went 0-3 for the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers. His last
victory came on Oct. 8, 2006
when the Jacksonville Jaguars
beat the New York Jets 41-0.
The former first round pick
has spent most of the last six
years as a backup while dealing
with a series of significant
injuries. He missed all of last season after breaking his arm in a
preseason game and threw seven
regular season passes in 2010
after hurting his knee at the end
of training camp.
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W W W. K E N N E DY D E N TA L O N L I N E . C O M
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • 9
SPORTS SCOREBOARD
FOOTBALL
OHSAA STATE PLAYOFF PAIRINGS
REGIONAL FINALS
DIVISION I
Games scheduled for
7 p.m. (unless noted) on Saturday, Nov. 17
Region 1
4 Mentor (11-1) vs. 2 Cleveland St. Ignatius (11-1) at
Parma Byers Field
Region 2
1 Massillon Washington (11-1) vs. 2 Toledo Whitmer
(12-0) at Mansfield Arlin Field
Region 3
4 Pickerington North (11-1) vs. 7 Hilliard Davidson (102) at Ohio Wesleyan University Selby Stadium
Region 4
1 Cincinnati Colerain (12-0) vs. 3 Cincinnati
Archbishop Moeller (9-3) at University of Cincinnati
Nippert Stadium, 7:30 p.m.
DIVISION II
Games scheduled for
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16
Region 5
4 Chardon (10-2) vs. 3 Aurora (11-1) at Twinsburg Tiger
Stadium
Region 6
4 Avon (11-1) vs. 2 Toledo Central Catholic (11-1) at
Clyde Robert Bishop Jr. Stadium
Region 7
4 New Albany (10-2) vs. 3 Columbus Marion-Franklin
(11-1) at Gahanna Lincoln Stadium
Region 8
1 Cincinnati Turpin (12-0) vs. 6 Trotwood-Madison (102) at Kings Stadium
DIVISION III
Games scheduled for
7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17
Region 9
1 Chagrin Falls (11-1) vs. 6 Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary
(10-2) at Solon Stewart Field
Region 10
1 Napoleon (11-0-1) vs. 2 Bellevue (11-1) at Findlay
Donnell Stadium
Region 11
4 Dover (10-2) vs. 2 Millersburg West Holmes (11-1) at
Canton Fawcett Stadium
Region 12
1 Dayton Thurgood Marshall (11-1) vs. 3 The Plains
Athens (11-1) at Reynoldsburg Raider Stadium
DIVISION IV
Games scheduled for
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16
Region 13
1 Brookfield (12-0) vs. 2 Creston Norwayne (12-0) at
Stow Ron Marhofer Auto Family Field
Region 14
1 Columbus Bishop Hartley (12-0) vs. 2 OttawaGlandorf (12-0) at Piqua Alexander Stadium-Purk Field
Region 15
1 St. Clairsville (12-0) vs. 3 Johnstown-Monroe (10-2)
at Zanesville Sulsberger Stadium
Region 16
1 Clarksville Clinton-Massie (12-0) vs. 7 West Milton
Milton-Union (10-2) at Centerville Stadium
DIVISION V
Games scheduled for
7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17
Region 17
1 Kirtland (12-0) vs. 7 Youngstown Ursuline (8-4) at
Aurora Veterans Stadium
Region 18
4 Findlay Liberty-Benton (11-1) vs. 7 Hamler Patrick
Henry (10-2) at Lima Stadium
Region 19
1 Lucasville Valley (12-0) vs. 6 Baltimore Liberty Union
(10-2) at Nelsonville Boston Field
Region 20
1 Coldwater (12-0) vs. 3 Covington (12-0) at Dayton
Welcome Stadium
DIVISION VI
Games scheduled for
7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16
Region 21
1 Mogadore (12-0) vs. 6 Youngstown Christian (9-2) at
Ravenna Gilcrest Field
Region 22
1 McComb (12-0) vs. 6 Delphos St. John’s (8-4) at
Findlay Donnell Stadium
Region 23
1 Danville (11-1) vs. 2 Newark Catholic (10-2) at
Westerville Central Warhawk Field
Region 24
4 St. Henry (9-3) vs. 3 Maria Stein Marion Local (10-2)
at Wapakoneta Harmon Field
NCAA AP TOP 25
Record Pts
Pv
1. Oregon (45)
10-0 1,485
2
2. Kansas St. (14)
10-0 1,451
3
3. Notre Dame (1)
10-0 1,382
4
4. Alabama
9-1 1,259
1
5. Georgia
9-1 1,223
5
6. Ohio St.
10-0 1,212
5
7. Florida
9-1 1,089
7
8. LSU
8-2 1,046
9
9. Texas A&M
8-2 1,031 15
10. Florida St.
9-1 1,024
8
11. Clemson
9-1
907
10
12. South Carolina
8-2
848
12
13. Oklahoma
7-2
798
14
14. Stanford
8-2
766
16
15. Oregon St.
7-2
556
13
16. Nebraska
8-2
549
18
17. UCLA
8-2
541
17
18. Texas
8-2
496
19
19. Louisiana Tech
9-1
374
19
20. Louisville
9-1
322
11
21. Southern Cal
7-3
297
21
22. Rutgers
8-1
179
24
23. Michigan
7-3
135
NR
23. Texas Tech
7-3
135
25
25. Kent St.
9-1
93
NR
Others receiving votes: Oklahoma St. 79, N. Illinois 77,
Mississippi St. 48, Wisconsin 26, UCF 16, Boise St.
14, Arizona 6, Cincinnati 6, Fresno St. 6, TCU 5, San
Jose St. 4, Tulsa 4, Utah St. 4, San Diego St. 3,
Northwestern 2, Toledo 1, Washington 1.
NCAA AP TOP 25 SCHEDULES
Saturday
No. 1 Oregon vs. No. 14 Stanford, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Kansas State at Baylor, 8 p.m.
No. 3 Notre Dame vs. Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Alabama vs. Western Carolina, 12:21 p.m.
No. 5 Georgia vs. Georgia Southern, 1:30 p.m.
No. 6 Ohio State at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Florida vs. Jacksonville State, 1 p.m.
No. 8 LSU vs. Mississippi, 3:30 p.m.
No. 9 Texas A&M vs. Sam Houston State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Florida State at Maryland, Noon
No. 11 Clemson vs. NC State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 South Carolina vs. Wofford, 1 p.m.
No. 13 Oklahoma at West Virginia, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Oregon State vs. California, 10:30 p.m.
No. 16 Nebraska vs. Minnesota, 3:30 p.m.
No. 17 UCLA vs. No. 21 Southern Cal, 3 p.m.
No. 19 Louisiana Tech vs. Utah State, 4 p.m.
No. 22 Rutgers at Cincinnati, Noon
No. 23 Michigan vs. Iowa, Noon
No. 23 Texas Tech at Oklahoma State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Kent State at Bowling Green, Noon
MAJOR COLLEGE SCHEDULES
Wednesday, Nov. 14
MIDWEST
Ohio at Ball St., 8 p.m.
Toledo at N. Illinois, 9 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 15
SOUTH
SE Louisiana at Nicholls St., 7 p.m.
North Carolina at Virginia, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 16
SOUTH
FIU at FAU, 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Hawaii at Air Force, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 17
EAST
Temple at Army, Noon
Yale at Harvard, Noon
Towson at New Hampshire, Noon
Indiana at Penn St., Noon
Maine at Rhode Island, Noon
Monmouth (NJ) at Robert Morris, Noon
Sacred Heart at St. Francis (Pa.), Noon
Duquesne at Wagner, Noon
Virginia Tech at Boston College, 12:30 p.m.
Columbia at Brown, 12:30 p.m.
Penn at Cornell, 12:30 p.m.
CCSU at Albany (NY), 1 p.m.
BASKETBALL
Bryant at Bucknell, 1 p.m.
Colgate at Fordham, 1 p.m.
Holy Cross at Georgetown, 1 p.m.
Lehigh at Lafayette, 1 p.m.
Dartmouth at Princeton, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at UMass, 3 p.m.
Villanova at Delaware, 3:30 p.m.
Texas St. at Navy, 3:30 p.m.
Oklahoma at West Virginia, 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Tennessee Tech at Austin Peay, Noon
Houston at Marshall, Noon
Florida St. at Maryland, Noon
W. Carolina at Alabama, 12:21 p.m.
Arkansas at Mississippi St., 12:21 p.m.
Marist at Campbell, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Davidson, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville St. at Florida, 1 p.m.
Delaware St. at Howard, 1 p.m.
Drake at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Valparaiso at Morehead St., 1 p.m.
Hampton at Morgan St., 1 p.m.
Wofford at South Carolina, 1 p.m.
The Citadel at Furman, 1:30 p.m.
Presbyterian at Gardner-Webb, 1:30 p.m.
Georgia Southern at Georgia, 1:30 p.m.
Savannah St. at SC State, 1:30 p.m.
Liberty at VMI, 1:30 p.m.
Richmond at William & Mary, 1:30 p.m.
Jackson St. at Alcorn St., 2 p.m.
Alabama A&M at Auburn, 2 p.m.
Florida A&M at Bethune-Cookman, 2 p.m.
Elon at Chattanooga, 2 p.m.
SE Missouri at Murray St., 2 p.m.
NC A&T at NC Central, 2 p.m.
Memphis at UAB, 2 p.m.
South Florida at Miami, 3 p.m.
Tennessee St. at UT-Martin, 3 p.m.
NC State at Clemson, 3:30 p.m.
Charleston Southern at Coastal Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
Duke at Georgia Tech, 3:30 p.m.
Mississippi at LSU, 3:30 p.m.
Middle Tennessee at South Alabama, 3:30 p.m.
Arkansas St. at Troy, 3:30 p.m.
East Carolina at Tulane, 3:30 p.m.
Utah St. at Louisiana Tech, 4 p.m.
North Texas at Louisiana-Monroe, 4 p.m.
Old Dominion at James Madison, 7 p.m.
W. Kentucky at Louisiana-Lafayette, 7 p.m.
Tennessee at Vanderbilt, 7 p.m.
Samford at Kentucky, 7:30 p.m.
Lamar at McNeese St., 8 p.m.
UTEP at Southern Miss., 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Kent St. at Bowling Green, Noon
Rutgers at Cincinnati, Noon
Iowa at Michigan, Noon
Northwestern at Michigan St., Noon
Miami (Ohio) at Cent. Michigan, 1 p.m.
N. Dakota St. at Illinois St., 1 p.m.
E. Michigan at W. Michigan, 2 p.m.
Indiana St. at Youngstown St., 2 p.m.
South Dakota at S. Dakota St., 3 p.m.
W. Illinois at S. Illinois, 3 p.m.
Purdue at Illinois, 3:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Nebraska, 3:30 p.m.
Wake Forest at Notre Dame, 3:30 p.m.
Ohio St. at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m.
Missouri St. at N. Iowa, 5 p.m.
Iowa St. at Kansas, 7 p.m.
Syracuse at Missouri, 7 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
UCF at Tulsa, Noon
MVSU at Texas Southern, 2 p.m.
Prairie View at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 3:30 p.m.
Texas Tech at Oklahoma St., 3:30 p.m.
SMU at Rice, 3:30 p.m.
Sam Houston St. at Texas A&M, 3:30 p.m.
E. Illinois at Cent. Arkansas, 6 p.m.
Northwestern St. at Stephen F. Austin, 7 p.m.
Kansas St. at Baylor, 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Washington at Colorado, 1:30 p.m.
North Dakota at N. Colorado, 2:05 p.m.
Washington St. at Arizona St., 3 p.m.
Southern Cal at UCLA, 3:05 p.m.
Colorado St. at Boise St., 3:30 p.m.
Montana St. at Montana, 3:30 p.m.
Nevada at New Mexico, 3:30 p.m.
Wyoming at UNLV, 4 p.m.
E. Washington at Portland St., 4:05 p.m.
UTSA at Idaho, 5 p.m.
Weber St. at Idaho St., 6 p.m.
Sacramento St. at UC Davis, 6 p.m.
Cal Poly at N. Arizona, 6:05 p.m.
Stanford at Oregon, 8 p.m.
Arizona at Utah, 10 p.m.
California at Oregon St., 10:30 p.m.
BYU at San Jose St., 10:30 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
New England
6 3 0 .667
Miami
4 5 0 .444
N.Y. Jets
3 6 0 .333
Buffalo
3 6 0 .333
South
W L T Pct
Houston
8 1 0 .889
Indianapolis
6 3 0 .667
Tennessee
4 6 0 .400
Jacksonville
1 8 0 .111
North
W L T Pct
Baltimore
7 2 0 .778
Pittsburgh
6 3 0 .667
Cincinnati
4 5 0 .444
Cleveland
2 7 0 .222
West
W L T Pct
Denver
6 3 0 .667
San Diego
4 5 0 .444
Oakland
3 6 0 .333
Kansas City
1 8 0 .111
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
N.Y. Giants
6 4 0 .600
Dallas
4 5 0 .444
Philadelphia
3 6 0 .333
Washington
3 6 0 .333
South
W L T Pct
Atlanta
8 1 0 .889
Tampa Bay
5 4 0 .556
New Orleans
4 5 0 .444
Carolina
2 7 0 .222
North
W L T Pct
Chicago
7 2 0 .778
Green Bay
6 3 0 .667
Minnesota
6 4 0 .600
Detroit
4 5 0 .444
West
W L T Pct
San Francisco
6 2 1 .722
Seattle
6 4 0 .600
Arizona
4 5 0 .444
St. Louis
3 5 1 .389
PF
299
173
175
211
PA
201
186
228
285
PF
250
186
219
127
PA
143
201
311
246
PF
254
207
220
169
PA
196
177
231
211
PF
271
209
191
146
PA
189
191
284
256
PF
267
188
156
226
PA
216
204
221
248
PF
247
260
249
163
PA
174
209
256
216
PF
242
239
238
216
PA
133
187
221
222
PF
213
198
144
161
PA
127
161
173
210
SCHEDULES
Thursday, Nov. 15
Miami at Buffalo, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 18
Cleveland at Dallas, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, N.Y. Giants, Seattle, Tennessee
Monday, Nov. 19
Chicago at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
BCS STANDINGS
1. Kansas St.
2. Oregon
3. Notre Dame
4. Alabama
5. Georgia
6. Florida
7. LSU
8. Texas A&M
9. South Carolina
10. Florida St.
11. Clemson
12. Oklahoma
13. Stanford
14. Nebraska
15. Texas
16. Oregon St.
17. UCLA
18. Southern Cal
19. Louisville
20. Louisiana Tech
21. Michigan
22. Rutgers
23. Texas Tech
24. Oklahoma St.
25. Washington
Rk
2
1
3
4
5
7
8
10
11
6
9
12
13
14
15
16
19
18
17
20
24
21
22
26
40
Harris
Pts
2774
2844
2634
2494
2398
2113
2082
1842
1732
2175
1972
1631
1621
1239
1095
1081
870
886
943
728
264
571
325
118
1
Pct
.9649
.9892
.9162
.8675
.8341
.7350
.7242
.6407
.6024
.7565
.6859
.5673
.5638
.4310
.3809
.3760
.3026
.3082
.3280
.2532
.0918
.1986
.1130
.0410
.0003
Nov. 11, 2012
USA Today
Rk Pts
Pct
2 1427 .9675
1 1460 .9898
3 1346 .9125
5 1243 .8427
4 1260 .8542
7 1079 .7315
8 1040 .7051
10 967
.6556
11 903
.6122
6 1143 .7749
9 1033 .7003
12 799
.5417
13 793
.5376
14 653
.4427
15 615
.4169
17 490
.3322
16 494
.3349
21 343
.2325
18 442
.2997
19 413
.2800
23 144
.0976
20 354
.2400
25 106
.0719
24 111
.0753
36
7
.0047
Rk
2
4
1
5
6
3
7
8
8
17
15
10
11
13
14
12
20
17
27
25
16
27
20
22
19
Computer
Pct
Avg
.9700 .9674
.9700 .9497
.9900 .9396
.8500 .8534
.8100 .8328
.9200 .7955
.7700 .7331
.6900 .6621
.6900 .6349
.2900 .6071
.3900 .5921
.6300 .5797
.6100 .5705
.5300 .4679
.4800 .4259
.5400 .4161
.2400 .2925
.2900 .2769
.0200 .2159
.0400 .1911
.3100 .1665
.0200 .1529
.2400 .1416
.2100 .1088
.2500 .0850
BCS
Pv
2
3
4
1
5
6
7
15
8
10
13
12
14
16
17
11
18
19
9
20
NR
23
22
NR
NR
MEN’S NCAA AP TOP 25
Record Pts
Prv
1. Indiana (46)
1-0 1,598
1
2. Louisville (18)
1-0 1,572
2
3. Kentucky (1)
1-0 1,438
3
4. Ohio St.
1-0 1,339
4
5. Michigan
1-0 1,327
5
6. NC State
1-0 1,278
6
7. Kansas
1-0 1,222
7
8. Syracuse
1-0 1,163
9
9. Duke
1-0 1,109
8
10. Florida
1-0 1,007 10
11. North Carolina
2-0
944
11
12. Arizona
1-0
882
12
13. UCLA
1-0
746
13
14. Missouri
1-0
716
15
15. Creighton
1-0
678
16
16. Baylor
2-0
578
19
17. Memphis
0-0
570
17
18. UNLV
0-0
538
18
19. Gonzaga
1-0
437
21
20. Notre Dame
1-0
343
22
21. Michigan St.
0-1
325
14
22. Wisconsin
1-0
324
23
23. UConn
1-0
262
—
24. Cincinnati
1-0
152
24
25. San Diego St.
0-1
128
20
Others receiving votes: VCU 75, Murray St. 64,
Minnesota 58, Pittsburgh 36, Saint Louis 32, Saint
Joseph’s 30, Butler 22, Texas 20, Marquette 18,
Tennessee 18, Kansas St. 12, Miami 9, Saint Mary’s
(Cal) 8, Florida St. 7, New Mexico 7, West Virginia 7,
Ohio 6, Alabama 5, Davidson 4, N. Iowa 4, Stanford 4,
Bucknell 1, Georgetown 1, Maryland 1.
MAJOR COLLEGE SCORES
Tuesday’s Results
EAST
Bucknell 61, George Mason 56
Mount St. Mary’s 70, Hartford 63
New Hampshire 72, Dartmouth 58
Niagara 86, St. Francis (Pa.) 69
Northeastern 67, Princeton 66
St. John’s 77, Detroit 74
Stony Brook 54, Rider 46
UConn 67, Vermont 49
UMass 67, Harvard 64
SOUTH
Belmont 88, Maryville (Mo.) 49
Charlotte 66, Georgia Southern 53
Duke 75, Kentucky 68
East Carolina 87, Methodist 51
Elon 95, Bridgewater (Va.) 51
Florida Gulf Coast 63, Miami 51
Furman 90, Southern Wesleyan 71
High Point 86, Appalachian St. 64
Jacksonville 78, Trinity Baptist 48
LSU 73, McNeese St. 48
Michigan St. 67, Kansas 64
Middle Tennessee 58, Savannah St. 55
Mississippi 90, Coastal Carolina 72
Mississippi St. 78, FAU 58
Richmond 101, UNC Wilmington 58
Stetson 88, Florida A&M 66
Tulane 65, Bethune-Cookman 55
UCF 85, Alabama St. 56
VMI 116, Cent. Pennsylvania 81
W. Kentucky 74, Austin Peay 54
Wichita St. 53, VCU 51
MIDWEST
Chicago St. 81, Concordia (Ill.) 65
Cincinnati 102, MVSU 60
IPFW 73, Rochester (Mich.) 56
Indiana St. 66, Winthrop 55
Marquette 64, SE Louisiana 53
Miami (Ohio) 80, Grambling St. 54
Missouri 91, Alcorn St. 54
Northwestern 79, Texas Southern 49
S. Dakota St. 78, Tennessee St. 71
Temple 80, Kent St. 66
UMKC 99, Lincoln (Mo.) 64
Valparaiso 69, N. Illinois 46
W. Michigan 85, Marygrove 40
Wright St. 56, E. Illinois 44
Xavier 62, Butler 47
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 76, Ark.-Monticello 47
Cent. Arkansas 108, Hendrix 65
Prairie View 91, Arlington Baptist 38
Sam Houston St. 82, Hardin-Simmons 31
Texas St. 86, Texas-Tyler 66
FAR WEST
Albany (NY) 63, Washington 62
BYU 80, Georgia St. 62
Boise St. 88, Oakland 80
California 79, Pepperdine 62
Gonzaga 84, West Virginia 50
Hawaii 73, Houston Baptist 60
Houston 77, San Jose St. 75
New Mexico 86, Davidson 81
San Diego St. 91, San Diego Christian 57
San Francisco 73, Cal St.-Hayward 58
Southern Cal 62, Long Beach St. 44
UCLA 80, UC Irvine 79, OT
TOURNAMENT
NIT Season Tipoff-East
Championship
Pittsburgh 78, Lehigh 53
Third Place
Robert Morris 74, Fordham 58
NIT Season Tipoff-Midwest
Championship
Kansas St. 87, Ala.-Huntsville 26
Third Place
North Texas 74, Lamar 59
NIT Season Tipoff-North
Championship
Michigan 77, Cleveland St. 47
Third Place
IUPUI 80, Bowling Green 66
NIT Season Tipoff-South
Championship
Delaware 59, Virginia 53
Third Place
Fairfield 62, Penn 53
No. 9 DUKE 75
No. 3 KENTUCKY 68
DUKE (2-0)
Mas. Plumlee 7-8 4-4 18, Kelly 4-11 1-4 10, Thornton
0-1 2-2 2, Sulaimon 3-14 1-2 10, Curry 7-14 6-6 23,
Cook 3-5 0-2 7, Murphy 0-0 0-0 0, Hairston 2-3 1-2 5,
Jefferson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 26-57 15-22 75.
KENTUCKY (1-1)
Noel 5-11 6-8 16, Poythress 9-12 1-2 20, Wiltjer 2-5 00 5, Goodwin 5-12 5-8 16, Mays 2-8 2-2 7, Hood 0-0
0-0 0, Polson 0-0 0-0 0, Cauley-Stein 2-3 0-1 4. Totals
25-51 14-21 68.
Halftime—Duke 33-31. 3-Point Goals—Duke 8-18
(Curry 3-5, Sulaimon 3-7, Cook 1-2, Kelly 1-3,
Thornton 0-1), Kentucky 4-10 (Wiltjer 1-2, Poythress 12, Goodwin 1-2, Mays 1-4). Fouled Out—Hairston,
Mas. Plumlee. Rebounds—Duke 31 (Sulaimon 6),
Kentucky 30 (Noel, Poythress 8). Assists—Duke 16
(Sulaimon 5), Kentucky 13 (Goodwin, Wiltjer 4). Total
Fouls—Duke 17, Kentucky 20. A—22,847.
WOMEN’S NCAA AP TOP 25
Record Pts
Prv
1. Baylor (39)
1-0
975
1
2. UConn
1-0
931
2
3. Duke
0-0
883
3
4. Stanford
2-0
838
4
5. Maryland
2-0
812
5
6. Kentucky
1-0
766
6
7. Notre Dame
1-0
743
7
8. Louisville
2-0
677
9
9. Penn St.
1-0
665
8
10. Georgia
1-0
615
10
11. Oklahoma
1-0
548
12
12. California
1-0
518
13
13. Vanderbilt
1-0
426
16
14. West Virginia
1-0
407
17
15. Nebraska
2-0
375
18
16. Texas A&M
0-1
331
15
17. Delaware
1-1
285
11
18. Purdue
1-0
271
21
19. Texas
2-0
224
—
20. Ohio St.
0-1
198
19
20. St. John’s
1-1
198
14
22. Oklahoma St.
1-0
164
23
23. Miami
1-0
139
24
24. Tennessee
1-1
125
20
25. Georgetown
2-0
112
—
Others receiving votes: Kansas 103, Middle Tennessee
82, Iowa St. 52, Georgia Tech 42, UCLA 26, Green Bay
22, DePaul 17, Virginia 16, North Carolina 14, San
Diego St. 13, Florida St. 12, Chattanooga 10, Rutgers
10, Dayton 9, LSU 8, Michigan St. 4, Princeton 4,
Gonzaga 3, South Carolina 2.
WOMEN’S MAJOR
COLLEGE SCORES
Tuesday’s Results
EAST
Albany (NY) 67, LIU Brooklyn 50
BYU 58, Dartmouth 57
Boston College 71, Holy Cross 52
CCSU 78, UMass 69
Fairfield 49, Brown 34
Hartford 64, Marist 53
Pittsburgh 75, Siena 50
Rhode Island 65, Bryant 50
Syracuse 68, Maine 44
Towson 61, Morgan St. 57
Youngstown St. 60, Buffalo 50
SOUTH
Akron 78, Tennessee Tech 67
Furman 64, High Point 62
George Mason 64, Md.-Eastern Shore 38
Georgia Tech 80, Kennesaw St. 51
Nicholls St. 80, New Orleans 66
Old Dominion 77, SC-Upstate 46
Radford 76, UNC-Greensboro 64
SE Louisiana 83, Mobile 53
South Florida 75, Clemson 73, OT
MIDWEST
Butler 70, Ball St. 62
Cent. Arkansas 59, S. Illinois 46
Detroit 65, Canisius 54
IPFW 68, Grace 52
Ohio 63, Cleveland St. 56
Oklahoma St. 74, Missouri St. 71
W. Illinois 85, Clarke 35
SOUTHWEST
Alabama 83, Houston 74
Baylor 85, Kentucky 51
Stephen F. Austin 62, Prairie View 55
Texas-Pan American 77, Texas A&M-CC 65
RACING
FAR WEST
Arizona 83, UNLV 82
Boise St. 80, N. Dakota St. 61
Colorado St. 56, N. Colorado 43
Montana 75, Montana St.-Northern 45
Montana St. 73, Denver 55
Utah 79, S. Utah 61
NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
New York
5
0
1.000
Brooklyn
4
2
.667
Philadelphia
4
3
.571
Boston
4
3
.571
Toronto
2
6
.250
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
Miami
6
2
.750
Charlotte
3
3
.500
Atlanta
3
3
.500
Orlando
2
5
.286
Washington
0
6
.000
Central Division
W
L
Pct
Milwaukee
4
2
.667
Chicago
4
3
.571
Indiana
3
5
.375
Cleveland
2
6
.250
Detroit
0
8
.000
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
San Antonio
7
1
.875
Memphis
5
1
.833
New Orleans
3
2
.600
Dallas
4
4
.500
Houston
3
4
.429
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
Oklahoma City
6
2
.750
Minnesota
5
2
.714
Denver
4
4
.500
Utah
4
4
.500
Portland
3
5
.375
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
L.A. Clippers
5
2
.714
Phoenix
4
4
.500
Golden State
3
4
.429
L.A. Lakers
3
5
.375
Sacramento
2
6
.250
GB
—
11⁄2
2
2
41⁄2
GB
—
2
2
31⁄2
5
GB
—
1
⁄2
2
3
5
NOTES
NASCAR SPRINT CUP LEADERS
AWARD NIGHTS
Through Nov. 11
Points
1, Brad Keselowski, 2,371. 2, Jimmie Johnson, 2,351.
3, Kasey Kahne, 2,321. 4, Clint Bowyer, 2,319. 5,
Denny Hamlin, 2,309. 6, Matt Kenseth, 2,297. 7, Greg
Biffle, 2,293. 8, Kevin Harvick, 2,285. 9, Tony Stewart,
2,284. 10, Jeff Gordon, 2,281.
11, Martin Truex Jr., 2,260. 12, Dale Earnhardt Jr.,
2,211. 13, Kyle Busch, 1,091. 14, Ryan Newman,
1,009. 15, Carl Edwards, 998. 16, Paul Menard, 973.
17, Joey Logano, 935. 18, Marcos Ambrose, 918. 19,
Jeff Burton, 858. 20, Jamie McMurray, 844.
Money
1, Jimmie Johnson, $8,016,243. 2, Matt Kenseth,
$7,409,161. 3, Denny Hamlin, $6,808,160. 4, Tony
Stewart, $6,472,650. 5, Kyle Busch, $6,361,073. 6,
Brad Keselowski, $6,118,870. 7, Jeff Gordon,
$5,778,968. 8, Kevin Harvick, $5,653,795. 9, Greg
Biffle, $5,540,938. 10, Clint Bowyer, $5,282,333.
11, Carl Edwards, $5,224,999. 12, Ryan Newman,
$5,203,183. 13, Martin Truex Jr., $5,160,427. 14, Dale
Earnhardt Jr., $5,078,170. 15, Jeff Burton, $5,050,905.
16, Marcos Ambrose, $4,664,605. 17, Aric Almirola,
$4,652,585. 18, Kasey Kahne, $4,640,836. 19, Jamie
McMurray, $4,461,800. 20, Juan Pablo Montoya,
$4,392,923.
FOR WL-SALEM
West Liberty-Salem will have its fall awards nights on
the following dates and times. For cross country, the
banquet is Nov. 19, at 6 p.m. in the cafetorium. There
will be a potluck dinner. Take a dish to share. Drinks
and table service will be provided.
NASCAR SPRINT CUP SCHEDULE
Feb. 18 — x-Budweiser Shootout (Kyle Busch)
Feb. 23 — x-Gatorade Duel 1 (Tony Stewart)
Feb. 23 — x-Gatorade Duel 2 (Matt Kenseth)
Feb. 27 — Daytona 500 (Matt Kenseth)
March 4 — Subway Fresh Fit 500 (Denny Hamlin)
March 11 — Kobalt Tools 400 (Tony Stewart)
March 18 — Food City 500 (Brad Keselowski)
March 25 — Auto Club 400 (Tony Stewart)
April 1 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500 (Ryan Newman)
April 14 — Samsung Mobile 500 (Greg Biffle)
April 22 — STP 400 (Denny Hamlin)
April 28 — Capital City 400 presented by Virginia is for
Lovers (Kyle Busch)
May 6 — Aaron’s 499 (Brad Keselowski)
May 12 — Bojangles’ Southern 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
May 19 — x-Sprint Showdown (Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
May 19 — x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race (Jimmie
Johnson)
May 27 — Coca-Cola 600 (Kasey Kahne)
June 3 — FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks
(Jimmie Johnson)
June 10 — Pocono 400 (Joey Logano)
June 17 — Quicken Loans 400 (Dale Earnhardt Jr.)
June 24 — Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Clint Bowyer)
June 30 — Quaker State 400 (Brad Keselowski)
July 7 — Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-Cola (Tony Stewart)
July 15 — Lenox Industrial Tools 301 (Kasey Kahne)
July 29 — Crown Royal Presents The Curtiss Shaver
400 at The Brickyard (Jimmie Johnson)
Aug. 5 — Pennsylvania 400 (Jeff Gordon)
Aug. 12 — Finger Lakes 355 at The Glen (Marcos Ambrose)
Aug. 19 — Pure Michigan 400 (Greg Biffle)
Aug. 25 — Irwin Tools Night Race (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 2 — AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 8 — Federated Auto Parts 400 (Clint Bowyer)
Sept. 16 — GEICO 400 (Brad Keselowski)
Sept. 23 — Sylvania 300 (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 30 — AAA 400 (Brad Keselowski)
Oct. 7 — Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500 (Matt Kenseth)
Oct. 13 — Bank of America 500 (Clint Bowyer)
Oct. 21 — Hollywood Casino 400 (Matt Kenseth)
Oct. 28 — TUMS Fast Relief 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
Nov. 4 — AAA Texas 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
Nov. 11 — AdvoCare 500 (Kevin Harvick)
Nov. 18 — Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race
GB
—
1
21⁄2
3
31⁄2
GB
—
1
⁄2
2
2
3
GB
—
11⁄2
2
21⁄2
31⁄2
RESULTS, SCHEDULES
Tuesday’s Games
Charlotte 92, Washington 76
Toronto 74, Indiana 72
New York 99, Orlando 89
Brooklyn 114, Cleveland 101
Portland 103, Sacramento 86
San Antonio 84, L.A. Lakers 82
Wednesday’s Games
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Utah at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Atlanta at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Boston at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
New York at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Miami at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
ALUMNI BASKETBALL GAME
FOR BEN LOGAN GIRLS
The Benjamin Logan girls basketball program is hosting its annual girls alumni basketball game Nov. 21 at
5:30 p.m. at the high school. Any alumni from the girls
basketball program interested in playing should call
Abby Bednarki at (937) 339-4766.
SIGNUPS/TRYOUTS
BELLEFONTAINE VIPERS BASEBALL
The Bellefontaine Vipers 11-and-under baseball team
will have tryouts for its 2013 travel season Nov. 10 and
Nov. 17 at 2 p.m. each day. For more details, call Henry
Fox at (937) 441-4497.
FOR BELLEFONTAINE YOUTH BASKETBALL
The Bellefontaine Joint Recreation District is now taking
registrations for youth basketball. Boys and girls in grades
3-6 are eligible to play. For more information, go to
www.ci.bellefontaine.oh.us or call the parks department.
RUNNING EVENTS
HILLIKER YMCA RUNNING CLUB HALF
MARATHON
The Hilliker YMCA Running Club and Hi-Point
Harriers are now registering for the Third Annual Liberty
Half Marathon on Jan. 1, 2013, at 9 a.m. in West
Liberty. Pre-registration is required through the Hilliker
YMCA by Dec. 23, 2012. Register before Oct.15 for an
early bird rate of $20. The race fee from Oct. 16-Nov.
30 is $25 and from Dec. 1-Dec. 23 is $40.00. The registration from is available at the Hilliker Y and at
www.hillikerymca.org. Finishers Mugs will be given to
runners registered by Nov. 30. Awards for top three and
first place in age categories will also be given.
GOLF EVENTS
HURRICANE JUNIOR GOLF TOUR
OHIO STOPS IN 2013
The Hurricane Junior Golf Tour, which is based in
Jacksonville, Fla., is expanding to Ohio for the 2013
season. There will be four events in the state: April 6-7
at Delaware Golf Club in Delaware; April 20-21 at
Stonewater Golf Course in Cleveland; May 4-5 at
Phoenix Golf Links in Columbus; May 18-19 at Miami
Whitewater in Cincinnati. The tour has produced over
2,500 collegiate golfers who have signed letters of
intent at over 200 universities. There are four age divisions: boys 15-18; boys 11-14, girls 11-14; and girls 1518. For more information, go to www.HJGT.org, or call
(940) 379-2697.
TV SPORTS SCHEDULE
Wednesday, Nov. 14
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 — Toledo at N. Illinois
GOLF
8:30 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour Australasia, Australian Masters, first
round, at Melbourne, Australia
1:30 a.m.
TGC — Hong Kong Open, first round (delayed tape)
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — Wisconsin at Florida
NBCSN — St. Bonaventure at Cornell
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN — Memphis at Oklahoma City
10:30 p.m.
ESPN — Miami at L.A. Clippers
JF
JENNINGS FARLEY
F U N E R A L
H O M E
Caf é Reception Area
• Ample Parking
• Advanced Funeral Planning
• Serving Logan County
• Serving All Faiths & Cemeteries
WWW.JENNINGSFARLEY.COM
• Professional Compassionate Staff
Rick Farley
GM/FD
5591 US 68 • LOGAN COUNTY, OHIO • 937-599-2139
H I G H L A N D M E M O R I A L C E M E T E RY •
A Part of Logan County for 50 Years
Are you ready for Black Friday?
Liberty National Bank is!
Stop by Liberty National Bank on Friday, November 23rd between
the hours of 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and get some great Holiday deals!
•
•
•
No activation fees on Visa Gift Cards.*
Open up a new Personal Checking account and receive
$100.00.**
Apply for a Mortgage Loan and we will waive the loan
origination fee.***
Plus during those hours, sign up for a chance to win a
32” Vizio Flat-screen TV!!!
Expect the BestTM
www.LNBbank.com
Certain restrictions may apply. *Limit to 5 gift cards per customer and/or business. **To receive the $100.00 in your checking account, it must be a new
personal account with at least $25.00 in new money. The $100.00 will be automatically deposited in your new persoanl checking account after 60 days.
The account must remain open for a minimum of six months, or an early withdrawal penalty of $20.00 will apply. For tax purposes, you will receive a
Form 1099-INT from us for your cash bonus. ***Maximum amount waived for loan origination fee is $250. Eligibility for the prize does not require
a purchase nor being a customer of the Bank to win. One entry per person. This promotion and prize sign-up is only available on November 23, 2012
between the hours of 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Ada
118 S. Main
419-634-5015
Bellefontaine N.
1120 N. Main
937-592-5688
Bellefontaine S.
1454 S. Main
937-593-9694
Kenton
100 E. Franklin
419-673-1217
Marysville
160 Coleman’s Crossing
937-642-0467
10 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • Wednesday, November 14, 2012
COMICS
BLONDIE by Young and Drake
SHOE by Jeff MacNelly
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
TUNDRA by Chad Carpenter
PICKLES by Brian Crane
ZITS by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
SHERMAN’S LAGOON by Jim Toomey
MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM by Mike Peters
DENNIS THE MENACE by Hank Ketcham
MODERATELY CONFUSED by Jeff Stahler
RUBES by Leigh Rubin
WEDNESDAY EVENING
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
ABC
The Middle
& Enter& Access
&
6
WSYX
WKEF
NBC
^
$
C
WDTN
WCMH
WLIO
CBS
Level: 1
_
*
2 3 4
WHIO
WBNS
FOX
<
M
WTTE
WRGT
PBS
B
;
WOSU
WBGU
CW
:
U
WBDT
WWHO
K
WUAB
L
WTLW
NOVEMBER 14, 2012
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
Nashville “You’re Gonna
Change (Or I’m Gonna
Leave)” Rayna decides to
change her sound. (N)
& ABC 6
Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit “Vanity’s
Bonfire” A kidnapping
investigation reveals lies.
(N) (In Stereo) Å
Chicago Fire “Rear View
Mirror” Dawson is helped
by a girl she saved. (N) (In
Stereo) Å
^ NEWS at The Tonight
$ News
C Your
Show With
Jay Leno
(N) (In
Stereo) Å
Criminal Minds “The
Fallen” Burned bodies
show up on a pier. (N) (In
Stereo) Å (DVS)
CSI: Crime Scene Inves- _ News
tigation “Fallen Angels”
Center 7
A cleric is slain at a grave * News
site. (N) Å (DVS)
Late Show
With David
Letterman
(N) Å
< FOX 28 News at 10
Harris, Kendrick, Kelly.
M FOX 45 News at Ten
The Office
Andy drives
across the
country.
Seinfeld
Four pals
gets caught
in traffic.
NOVA “Ultimate Mars
Challenge” A rover named
Curiosity lands on Mars.
(N) Å (DVS)
Nova scienceNOW “What
Will the Future Be Like?”
Technological advancements. (N) Å (DVS)
B As Time
B Tavis
: Two and Arrow “Legacies” Bank
Met/Mother a Half Men robbers threaten the city.
U FamU Family
(N) (In Stereo) Å
Feud
Feud (N)
Supernatural “A Little
Slice of Kevin” Kevin and
Mrs. Tran build a demon
bomb. (N) Å
: NEWS
at 10
U Dish
Nat.
: Rules of : Fam Guy : Family
EngageU Engage- Guy Å
ment
U Excused
ment
U TMZ (N)
(N) Å
Two and a
Half Men
John Hagee
Today
NUMB3RS A secret will
change the FBI team.
James
Bob Coy
Robinson
News
Sports
Dish Nation
Extra
(N) Å
Newswatch Wretched/
Todd Friel
tainment
Hollywood
6 Family
’Night
6 FamFeud Feud
^ Inside
“Thanksgiving IV” (N)
Å
The Neighbors (N) (In
Stereo) Å
^C
Modern
Family “Mistery
Date” (N)
Suburgatory “The
Wishbone”
(N) Å
Fortune (N)
* Jeopardy! (N)
Whitney
Guys With
Jeopardy!
“Bawl and
Kids “First
(N) Å
Chain”
Birthday”
$ Inside
Whitney
Celebrating
Edition (N) and Alex
Ernie’s first
Å
celebrate.
birthday. (N)
(N)
_ Entertain- Survivor: Philippines (N)
ment ’Night (In Stereo) Å
* Wheel
Fortune
< Two and
< Big Bang The X Factor “Live Performance” The finalists
Edition (N)
$ Extra (N)
C Wheel of
Fortune (N)
_ Wheel of
Half Men
Theory
M Big Bang M Simp-
Theory
sons
B Nightly
B Are
Business
; News
perform live. (N) (In Stereo Live) Å
Nature “An Original
You Being
DUCKumentary” Wood
Served? Å ducks care for ducklings.
(N) Å (DVS)
: How I
Two and a
Half Men
Joyce
Meyer
NUMB3RS Thieves hijack
a truck with aid workers.
Andy Griffith The Flying
Show
Nun
Drive Thru
History
News
6 ABC 22
Nightline
(N) Å
News
11pm
News
Goes By
; Charlie
Rose (N)
Smiley Actress Keira
Knightley.
Extra (N)
Å
Joseph
Prince
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
AMC
APL
11/14/12
SOLUTION TO TUESDAY’S PUZZLE
Complete the grid
so each row,
column and
3-by-3 box
(in bold borders)
contains every
digit, 1 to 9.
For strategies on
how to solve
Sudoku, visit
www.sudoku.org.uk
© 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by
Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.
BET
BRAV
CMT
CNBC
CNN
COM
CSPAN
CSPN2
DISC
DISN
E!
ESPN
ESPN2
FAM
FOOD
FOXOH
GOLF
HALL
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
MTV
NICK
QVC
SPIKE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TVLD
USA
VH1
WGN-A
Storage
Storage
Storage
Storage
Storage
Storage
Duck DyDuck DyDuck DyDuck DyWars Å
Wars Å
Wars Å
Wars Å
Wars Texas Wars Texas nasty (N)
nasty (N)
nasty Å
nasty Å
CSI: Miami An enemy of ›››‡ The Truman Show (1998) Jim Carrey.
››› Shanghai Noon (2000) A robber and a
the CSIs turns up dead.
Cameras broadcast an unwitting man’s life. Å
Chinese Imperial Guardsman rescue a princess. Å
Swamp Wars Å
Finding Bigfoot: Further Rattlesnake Republic
Rattlesnake Republic
Finding Bigfoot: Further
Black Girls Rock 2012 Å
Rickey Smiley: Live From Atlanta
Don’t Sleep! The Game
Top Chef: Seattle
Life After Top Chef
Life After Top Chef (N)
Top Chef: Seattle (N)
LOLwork
Happens
Reba Å
Reba Å
Reba Å
Reba Å
Redneck Island
Rocky II (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone. Å
The Kudlow Report (N)
Marijuana: Pot Industry BMW: A Driving Obs.
American Greed
Mad Money
Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360
Erin Burnett OutFront
Colbert Rep Daily Show Chappelle’s Key
South Park South Park South Park Key
Daily Show Colbert Rep
(5:00) Public Affairs
Capitol Hill Hearings
U.S. Senate Coverage
Tonight From Washington
Capital News Today
American Guns Å
American Guns Å
Sons of Guns (N) Å
Moonshiners (N) Å
Sons of Guns Å
A.N.T. Farm Shake It
Ratatouille (2007, Comedy) Voices of Patton Oswalt. Gravity
Phineas
Shake It
Jessie
E! News (N)
A-List
A-List
Ice-Coco
Ice-Coco
The Soup
E! Special
Chelsea Lat E! News
SportCtr
NBA
NBA Basketball: Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder. (N) NBA Basketball: Heat at Clippers
College Basketball: Wisconsin at Florida. (N) (Live) College Football: Toledo at Northern Illinois. (N) (Live)
Harry Potter
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe.
The 700 Club Å
Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible
College Football: Oregon State at Stanford.
Cavaliers
Football
World Poker Tour
Golf
Range
PGA Tour Golf: Australian Masters, First Round. From Melbourne. (N) (Live)
Twice Upon a Christmas Love at the Thanksgiving Day Parade (2012) Å
The Night Before the Night Before Christmas (2010)
House Hunters Reno
Property Brothers Å
Buying and Selling Å
Hunters
Hunters Int’l Property Brothers Å
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn 1880’s
1880’s
My Life, Movie
Houstons
Houstons
Houstons
Houstons
My Life, Movie
My Life, Movie
Clueless
Pranked
Top 10
Ridiculous. The Challenge: Battle
The Challenge: Battle
Teen Mom 2 (In Stereo)
Drake/Josh Figure It
Full House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends
Friends
Accessories Gift List
In the Kitchen with David “PM Edition: Gifts”
Computer Shop
Bev. Cop
Coming to America (1988, Comedy) Eddie Murphy. Å
Eddie Murphy: One Night Only (N) (In Stereo)
Ghost Hunters Å
Ghost Hunters Å
Ghost Hunters (N) Å
Dark Side
Dark Side
Ghost Hunters Å
Seinfeld Å Seinfeld Å Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang
Big Bang
Conan Kristen Stewart;
Theory
Theory
Glenn Howerton. (N)
Å
Å
Å
Å
(6:15) Born to Kill (1947) ›››› The Maltese Falcon (1941) Detective Sam ›››‡ The Big Sleep (1946) Humphrey Bogart.
Lawrence Tierney. Å
Spade searches for a jewel-encrusted statue.
Philip Marlowe investigates blackmail and murder.
Breaking Amish Å
Breaking Amish Å
Breaking Amish “Finale” Breaking Amish: The
Breaking Amish “Finale”
The Mentalist “Red
Castle Assistant district
Castle Two women ID a
Castle An art dealer gets Perception Moretti tries
Scare” Haunted mansion. attorney’s murder. Å
body in a garbage chute. shot in his gallery. Å
to impress her boss.
M*A*S*H
Cosby
Cosby
Cosby
Raymond
Raymond
Cleveland
Divorced
King
King
NCIS A package contains NCIS A petty officer is
NCIS “Red Cell” The
NCIS “Twilight” Gibbs is
Covert Affairs “Quicktwo eyes. Å
found dead. Å
murder of a Marine.
targeted by terrorists.
sand” Å (DVS)
Behind the Music T.I.
Behind the Music “Pink” Couples Therapy
Couples Therapy (N)
Rehab With Dr. Drew
Funniest Home Videos
Rules
Rules
Rules
Rules
WGN News at Nine (N)
Funniest Home Videos
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO
MAX
Mr. Poppers Seth
Mitchell
Hunted Sam meets someone from her past. Å
››‡ Tower Heist (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. ‘PG- Boardwalk Empire “The Real Time With Bill
13’ (Adult language, adult situations) Å
Milkmaid’s Lot” Å
Maher (In Stereo) Å
Hunted Aidan uncovers
››› Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001, Fantasy)
Skin to the
some of Sam’s secrets.
Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ Å
Max
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • 11
EXAMINER
Classifieds
TO PLACE YOUR AD:
Mail: Box 40 • Bellefontaine, OH 43311
Phone: (937) 592-3060 *110 or *132
Fax: (937) 592-4463
Web: www.examiner.org/classifieds
ALSO AVAILABLE ONLINE @ www.examiner.org
LOST & FOUND
HELP WANTED
FOUND ORANGE female cat
with purple flea collar, near
Holland Theatre. Ph. 599-4839
or 937-441-5716. Thank You.
THREE YEAR OLD German
Shepherd lost Saturday Nov.
10. Wearing blue collar. Very
loving gentle family pet. Lost
SW Bellefontaine. Reward for
returning. 937-539-1664.
PERSONAL
CRISIS HOTLINE
Call and give operator first
name and brief comment
about service needed.
1-800-224-0422
FOR INFORMATION Concerning American Red Cross
Blood Services Program, call
650-5000.
POISON CONTROL
CENTER
*Jobs Available Now*
CAREGIVERS NEEDED
TO ASSIST PEOPLE WITH
DISABILITIES
Make a difference in
someone’s life!
2nd and 3rd shifts and
weekend help is needed
Paid training is provided
Requirements: a high school
diploma or GED, a valid
Ohio drivers license, proof of
car insurance, SS Card or
Birth Certificate,
and an acceptable criminal
background check.
Open Interviews will be
conducted on
Nov. 20, 2012
from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
1600 South Main Street
Bellefontaine
1-(800)222-1222
24 Hour Hotline
WORK WANTED
CARMAN BUILDERS
Vinyl siding, replacement windows, seamless spouting.
Free estimates. 585-6472 Or
1-800-354-2489.
MAC-O-CHEE VALLEY TREE
SERVICE. Free estimates,
fully insured. 593-0228.
NUISANCE WILDLIFE REMOVAL, coon, possum, skunk,
groundhog,
moles.
Call
599-1866, cell 935-7679.
Applications are available
online at www.crsi-oh.com
and will be available
prior to the interviews
LOCAL HOME Improvement
Company seeking experienced
garage door, replacement window and entry door installer.
Please reply with cover letter
and prior experience to Box M,
c/o Bellefontaine Examiner,
P.O. Box 40, Bellefontaine,
OH 43311.
Bringing buyer and seller together daily.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
SERVICES
ADEA RULINGS
The Bellefontaine Examiner
does not knowingly accept
help wanted advertisements in
violation of the Age Discrimination Employment Act.
The ADEA prohibits arbitrary
age discrimination of persons
age 40 or over and applies to
employers with 25 or more
employees, employment agencies and labor organizations.
Advertising containing such
terms as “young”, “boy”, or
“girl” or designating a certain
age such as “age 35 to 55” or
other similar specification indicates discrimination against
employment of older persons
and are considered in violation
of the act.
Information about the Act may
be obtained by calling or writing the U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division.
EMPLOYMENT AND
JOB TRAINING PROGRAM
Unemployed and under-employed individuals interested in
joining a Job Training Program
to gain skills working outdoors,
tree cutting, removing downed
trees from streams, working
with chain saws, skid loaders,
skid steers, a bucket truck,
and other equipment, including
safety training and for those
who qualify securing a CDL
driving license. You should apply now to determine whether
you qualify for this National
Emergency Grant program.
The Training Program provides full time employment
with benefits for six months
while work is being done
throughout Logan County.
This opportunity will be open
to the first fourteen persons
who are eligible for the program and who are accepted
into the program by the Training Staff. Salary begins at
$10.50 per hour with periodic
increases based on performance. All equipment and protective clothing is supplied by
the program. The training program is expected to begin by
mid-November.
The first step is to go to the
Logan County Job and Family
Services WorkPlus One-Stop
Office located at 221 E. Columbus Ave., Bellefontaine,
Ohio. The entrance to the
WorkPlus Office is on the east
side of the building. Ask to join
the NEG (National Emergency
Grant) Program. You must apply in person and do not need
to be a Logan County resident
to apply. Logan County is an
equal opportunity employer.
Experienced
Machine Operator Needed
Local company is looking
for an Experienced Brown
& Sharp Screw Machine
Operator. This person has to
have a valid driver’s license,
a high school diploma/GED,
and a clean criminal background. Anyone interested
can apply in person at the
Urbana iforce located at
803 Scioto St., Urbana.
937-653-9675.
LU’S ROCKIN’ WORKOUT
Cardio & Strength Training
Classes
Aries Center - Russells Point
CALL FOR CLASS TIMES
First Class is FREE!
937-407-4792 or 599-4876
Instructors: Lee Ann Smith &
Lori Newman
Customer Service/
Tax Professionals
Do you have customer service,
tax preparation or office management experience? We are
interviewing for multiple positions for the upcoming tax season. We offer competitive pay,
flexible hours and a great work
environment!
Don’t miss out - call today!
No tax experience?
Ask about our free classes!
Call 1-888-435-1040
We Bring You
Logan
County!
WOULD YOU like someone to
do your cleaning? 599-3847.
SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT:
www.examiner.org
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS FOR
FULL TIME DRIVERS.
DEDICATED ROUTES/
HOME DAILY.
FULL BENEFITS INCLUDING
401K, DENTAL & VISION.
PAID VACATIONS &
HOLIDAYS.
CDL CLASS A REQUIRED.
2 YRS. EXPERIENCE.
GOOD MVR.
CALL 419-733-0642 OR
EMAIL [email protected]
STEEL FABRICATOR seeks
Welders and Painters. Send
resume to
[email protected] or Call
937-642-5971.
STEEL HAULER NEEDED
Class A CDL with
flatbed experience required.
Home weekends.
Call 567-674-3339
WE ARE looking for childcare
for a 9 year old. Someone who
can drop off and pick up to and
from school, two to four days a
week. Also need a sitter day
shift every other Saturday &
Sunday. Childcare experience
required. If you are available
or have an opening please call
937-593-0928. If no answer
please leave a message with
your number. Thank you.
AUTOMOBILES
Give the gift of
HEALTH THIS HOLIDAY!
PERSONAL TRAINING GIFT
CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!
My studio overlooking Indian
Lake or your choice of venue
Lee Ann Smith,
Certified Personal Trainer
For more information
937-407-4792
REACH 2 MILLION Newspaper Readers with one ad
placement. Only $295. Ohio’s
best community newspapers.
Call Bellefontaine Examiner,
592-3060. Check out website
at: www.adohio.net.
AUCTIONEERS
MICK LILE, AUCTIONEER
For all your auction needs
599-6131
RESTAURANTS
PIZZA PLANET
16” 1 Item Pizza, $7.99
592-5758
FOR SALE
12’-16’ BUILDING, dismantled,
sells at Lile’s Auction Wednesday 14th, 5 p.m. His auction.
HUSQVARNA (Viking) sewing
machine in wooden cabinet.
$300. 592-0757 or 539-6000.
AUTOMOBILES
We are the nation’s leading distributor of shooting sports products and currently have the
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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Corporate Sales Professional
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Technical Web Writer
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Desktop Support Technician
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QUALIFICATIONS & BENEFITS:
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AcuSport Corporation
One Hunter Place | Bellefontaine, OH 43311-3001 | 800.543.3150
Apply online at www.AcuSport or e-mail your resume to: [email protected]
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
2nd / 3rd Shift
Distribution Center Positions
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QUALIFICATIONS & BENEFITS:
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AcuSport Corporation
One Hunter Place | Bellefontaine, OH 43311-3001 | 800.543.3150
www.AcuSport.com
AcuSport is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
&RPSOHWHDQDSSOLFDWLRQDWRXURIÀFH0RQGD\)ULGD\
between 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m or visit our website to print
RIIDQDSSOLFDWLRQXQGHUWKH&DUHHU2SSRUWXQLWLHVWDE
n Crossword
THE DAILY COMMUTER PUZZLE | BY JACQUELIN E. MATHEWS
ACROSS
1 Traveler’s
lodge
4 “Remember the
__!”
9 Stir-fry pots
13 Frog’s cousin
15 High-powered
surgical beam
16 Actor Richard
17 Mix with a
wooden spoon
18 Bawled
19 “__ want for
Christmas is...”
20 Very detailed
22 Preserve
23 Gently curled,
as hair
24 Bread for a
Reuben
26 Like a salty
solution
29 Chemistry,
biology, etc.
34 Strong string
35 Reads quickly
36 Samuel’s
teacher
37 Sounded a
bell
38 Informal street
talk
39 Fishing worms,
for example
40 “Roses __ red,
violets...”
41 Ornamental
bird feather
42 Keep a cooking
turkey moist
43 Street vendors
45 India’s dollars
46 Needle hole
47 Chest
48 Long tale
51 Golfer’s top
56 Was in debt
57 Chris of tennis
58 __ up; absorb
60 Nary a one
61 Come apart
62 Create
63 Country singer
__ Campbell
64 Base stealer’s
move, often
65 Fellows
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RI VKRRWLQJ VSRUWV SURGXFWV LV FXUUHQWO\ KLULQJ QG UG 6KLIW
'LVWULEXWLRQ&HQWHUZRUNHUVWRKDQGOHSLFNLQJ SDFNLQJDQGVKLSSLQJ
UHFHLYLQJLQRXU%HOOHIRQWDLQH2+GLVWULEXWLRQFHQWHU
2005 TOYOTA
AVALON XLS
109K, Leather, Full Power,
XM Satellite Radio.
Fully Serviced. E.C.
$12,225
937-925-0583
2009 CHEVROLET
IMPALA LS
Gold Mist Metallic,
11,000 miles, E.C., auto.,
3.5L V6, power. $13,500.
937-844-7964
PETS
REGISTERED ENGLISH Bantam Bulldog Puppies. Born
Aug. 11th. $700. 539-2175 or
539-6019.
FOR RENT
12 YR. HOME for lease at
Russells Point. 3 Bedrms., 2
baths & double garage. $900
mo. No pets. 937-642-9227 by
appointment.
2 BEDROOM DUPLEX. $425
a month plus deposit. No pets.
935-0524.
2 BR, 1 FLOOR Double:
Washer/dryer hook-up, close
to
Southeastern
School.
$545/month + deposit. No
pets. 937-935-3650.
FRONTIER Cottage renting till
May. Nice furnished 2 BR.
$125 weekly. 937-622-0361.
NOTICE
Housing advertisements published in this newspaper are
subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which
makes it illegal to advertise
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, nationality, sex,
age (including children), handicap or familial status. This also
includes limitation to number
of persons desired. The Bellefontaine Examiner will not
knowingly accept advertising
which is in violation of the law.
VACATION RENTAL
Leesburg, Florida - 2 BR/2 BA
mobile home, furnished, includes utilities, 55+ park, $750
a mo., 3 mo. minimum. Fishing
Lake Yale. 352-702-0531.
Online
The Bellefontaine Examiner
seeks an organized, creative
professional with an effervescent personality to join our Advertising
team. Candidate must be comfortable making phone calls, dealing with the public, administrative functions, multiple deadlines
and working in a fun, fast-paced environment. Computer skills and a comfort level
with the internet is preferred. Training will
be provided to the candidate who shows the
willingness to learn and grow professionally.
Please mail your resume with cover letter to
the Bellefontaine Examiner Advertising, P.O.
Box 40, Bellefontaine, Ohio 43311 or by
email to [email protected]
$FX6SRUWLVDQ(TXDO2SSRUWXQLW\(PSOR\HU
n Horoscopes
JACQUELINE BIGAR’S STARS | FROM KING FEATURES SYNDICATE
Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the
degree of your sun at birth. The sign
name is simply a label astrologers put on
a set of degrees for convenience. For best
results, readers should refer to the dates
following each sign.
A baby born today has a Sun and Moon
in Scorpio if born before 2:52 a.m.
(PST). Afterward, the Moon will be in
Sagittarius.
Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
21
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
DOWN
“__ all Greek to
me”
Memo
Tack
Wall recess
Stooge’s name
Huge continent
Encounter
Telling a waiter
what you’d like
Lose courage
Make eyes at
Hardy cabbage
Make a tiny cut
Sketching
Cause of
misery
“__! We Have
No Bananas”
Thin piece of
leather
In the know
__ up; in a row
Phony deals
Walking stick
Discontinue
Upper crust
Locations
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday,
Nov. 14, 2012:
This year you express how unusually
savvy you can be with your finances,
though you might want to be more willing to take risks. You brainstorm easily
with others, and you always seem to
come up with more ideas as a result.
Express your concern for a child or loved
one. Allow your imagination to flow, and
you will express a more resourceful side.
You seem to drop words like “impossible” and “no” from your vocabulary,
which creates more possibilities than you
could have imagined. If you are single,
you might fuss a lot as you spruce up for
dates. Toss yourself into the excitement
of the moment. If you are attached, most
of your problems stem from misunderstandings. SAGITTARIUS always
encourages you to take risks.
The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll
Have:
5-Dynamic;
4-Positive;
3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult
(c) 2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
35 Speak
disparagingly of
38 Pullman cars
39 Christening
41 __ one’s trade;
work diligently
42 George W. __
44 Benumb
45 Steal cattle
47
48
49
50
52
53
54
55
59
Uninterested
Anthem, e.g.
Absent GI
Autry or Barry
Egg-shaped
Mr. Strauss
Wander
__ back; recant
Barbie’s beau
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
#### Communicate an unusual idea,
yet be willing to accept suggestions. A
brainstorming session could be fruitful.
The unexpected plays a large role in how
events unfurl. You will respond in what
might be considered a startling manner.
Tonight: Nearly anything is possible.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
##### You might keep pushing the
limit with a partner. A discussion about
ideas could be more important than you
realize. A friend confuses plans without
meaning to. Relax and work with the
changes, if you can. Note a sudden
insight. Tonight: Dinner for two.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
#### Others seek you out; try to
remain responsive. Your imagination
could take you in a new direction. Share
some of these thoughts with a close associate. You could be surprised by this person’s reaction. You can’t predict what he
or she will do. Tonight: Go with the program.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
### You might be unusually focused
on your daily life. Somehow, someone
shakes up the status quo, and you’ll realize how accustomed you have become to
a tried-and-true routine. Allow yourself
to be uncomfortable and let some new
elements into your life. Tonight: Get
some R and R.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
##### Let your mind expand to other
ways of thinking. You will notice the difference and be more positive as a result.
A partner could surprise you with an
idea, which might be hard to grasp. Your
fiery personality emerges when facing
the unexpected. Tonight: Let your hair
down.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
### Stay centered, and know what you
want. Take some time to get grounded
before heading into what could be an
unusually busy day. A partner continues
to be vague. This fugue state is authentic,
but there really isn’t a reason for it. Give
this person some space. Tonight: Order
in.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
#### Stay on top of your work, an
important situation or simply the day’s
events. A friend or associate inadvertently could confuse plans or a conversation.
You might decide to go off and do your
own research in order to confirm what
you are hearing. Tonight: Talk up a
storm.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
### Know that you could change your
budget and priorities if you so choose.
You might not be sure as to what your
expectations are with a creative option or
dynamic personality in your life. Think
less and enjoy more. Tonight: Treat yourself well.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
#### You are energized, and you
zoom right through any confusion. You’ll
come out on top, no matter what. Your
impulsiveness, mixed with your ingenuity, carries you easily through any hassles. A child or loved one could surprise
you. Tonight: Let the fun begin.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
### Your intuition tells you that more
information is coming. Remember to
assume a passive stance. Though this
trait is not innate to you, it could work.
Your resourceful mind cannot be turned
off, so note the ideas that inevitably
come forward. Remain positive. Tonight:
At home.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
#### Your immediate concern goes
from others’ evaluation of your work or
performance to simply letting go and
being yourself. You can’t push to the
extent that you have without integrating
some lighter and easier interactions.
Tonight: A friend makes life far more
appealing.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
#### Pull back and examine what is
happening. Be careful not to make judgments or become triggered. Your eyes
will open up to a new perspective, especially if you can accept responsibility for
your side of the issue. Tonight: In the
limelight.
BORN TODAY
Britain’s Prince Charles (1948), former
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza
Rice (1954), composer Yanni (1954)
***
Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet at
www.jacquelinebigar.com.
© 2012 by King Features Syndicate Inc.
12 • BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER • Wednesday, November 14, 2012
BELLEFONTAINE EXAMINER
n Weather
FORECAST
Tonight: Partly cloudy in the evening, then overcast. Low of 27.
Winds less than 5 mph. Thursday: Clear in the morning, then partly
cloudy. High of 46. Winds less than 5 mph. Thursday night: Partly
cloudy. Low of 30. Winds less than 5 mph. Friday: Partly cloudy.
High of 50. Winds from the NNE at 5 to 10 mph. Friday night: Partly
cloudy in the evening, then clear. Low of 30. Winds less than 5 mph.
Saturday: Clear. High of 50. Winds less than 5 mph. Saturday night:
Clear. Low of 30. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph.
THE HOLIDAYS ARE
FAST APPROACHING
Tonight/Thursday
$60
$75
(Bathroom painted, materials included)
$200 .............................................
$50 ....................................................
Youngstown
25° | 46°
$175
• ANYTIME FITNESS
$375
(12 Mo. Membership)
• ARTISTIC TREASURES
$10 cert. ...................................
$7.50
• BFN’S BEST CAR WASH
$13 ............................................
(“Best” Car Wash)
$30
• BELLEFONTAINE MOTOR SALES
$19.99
• BEST DOOR & WINDOW
$325
(Genie® 1/2hp Garage Door Opener)
$999 ............................................
$20 ....................................................
$15
• BLUE JACKET DAIRY
ICE CREAM SHOP
• HUMANE SOCIETY T
BINGO
OUber
D
L
O
S ecem
$20 ....................................................
D per evening)
(Limit 1 ’per
tilperson
• INDIAN LAKE OUTFITTERS
$4 ...............................................
$2.80
• BUCKEYE SPIRIT
$7.50
• CAPTAIN MIDNIGHT
MOBILE DJ/BACKYARD CINEMA
$75 ....................................................
$55
• THE CARPET GALLERY
$699 ............................................
D OUT $525
L
O
S
(12’x24’ rem. installed w/8# pad)
• CHATTAN LOCH “THE LOCH”
$900 ............................................
$750
(Facility Rental)
$100 ..................................................
$75
(On-or-Off Site Event)
KY.
$70
• CLANCY’S (SIDNEY)
$4
• COURT HOUSE SQUARE
$10 ..........................................................
$7
• CROSS FIRE ARCHERY
$70
(Good on any new compound bow)
$20 ....................................................
$14
• DEJA YOU RESALE BOUTIQUE
$10 ..........................................................
$5 ...............................................
AP PERSONAL FINANCE WRITER
$3.50
$6 ...............................................
BOSTON — Thanksgiving
could be an opportune time to
talk turkey about family
finances, rather than merely
eat the bird and prepare for the
next big holiday. A detailed discussion could prove to be
worthwhile, given the strong
likelihood that older parents
and their adult children have
conflicting expectations about
issues such as elder care,
retirement security and inheritance.
Survey results released
today by Fidelity Investments
found family members frequently disagree when asked
privately about these hard-todiscuss topics.
Key findings from the
Boston-based financial services company include:
• Twenty-four percent of the
adult children surveyed
expected they will have to help
their parents financially at
some point, yet 97 percent of
the parents don’t expect to
need help.
• Nearly all of the older parents and their grown children
— 97 percent — disagreed on
$4.50
(Fri & Sat 7–10:30 p.m.)
• KEGG’S GARAGE
SOLD
OUT
$50 ....................................................
$35
(5 per customer/per visit)
$20 ....................................................
$15
(Only 25 per month, 5 per customer)
$50 cert .............................................
$35
Good toward Stihl chain saw
$35
Good toward Stihl trimmer
• LIBERTY GATHERING PLACE
$10 .........................................................
$7
• MAD RIVER FARM MARKET
$10 ............................................
$7.50
• MAD RIVER KNIFE & SUPPLY
$7.50
$50 .................................................... $35
$199 ............................................. $149
$10 ............................................
7pc. Kershaw Cutlery Knife Block Set
$7.00
$5 ............................................... $3.50
$10 ............................................
• NATIONAL SALT DISTRIBUTORS
$100 ..................................................
$70
$30 ....................................................
(ONLY 20 CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE)
$39.99 ..............................................
$70 ....................................................
$79.99 ..............................................
$49
$7
$165 .............................................
$119
(One Month Family Gym & Martial Arts Membership)
• RAX ROAST BEEF
• EASTON WATER
$30 ....................................................
$18
(Only 20 Available)
$69 ....................................................
$55
(Good on any service call - 5 Available)
$180 .............................................
$145
(1-year water cooler rental
w/20gal. water a month - 5 Available)
$37.50
(Limit 1 per customer per job)
$600 ............................................
$3.50
$9 ............................................................ $6
$5 ...............................................
$25 .......................................
$18.75
(Two per purchase)
$500 ............................................
$375
(ONLY 4 AVAILABLE)
• SUNSATIONS TANNING & DAY SPA
$450
$20 ....................................................
(Good for Rhino® Pro Spray-in Bedliner)
• FAT BOY’S PIZZA
$5 ...............................................
$30 ....................................................
80s
90s 100s 110s
Flurries
Snow
Ice
W.VA.
Weather Underground • AP
whether a child will take care
of the parents if they become
ill. One reason for the nearly
universal disagreement is the
small number of families who
discuss their expectations in a
comprehensive way. Just 10
percent of the adult children
believed the conversations
they had were very detailed,
and 63 percent of the children
and parents disagreed on the
level of detail they had covered
to date.
• Adult children typically
underestimate the value of
their parents’ estate by more
than $100,000 on average, in
part because few families have
a detailed discussion about
how much might be passed
down through inheritance.
Older parents were more likely
to believe a conversation had
been detailed.
• Expectations differ as to
how financially well-off older
parents will be in retirement.
Thirty-eight percent of children thought their parents will
have a very comfortable
lifestyle, while just 20 percent
of the parents said that about
their retirements.
Kathleen Murphy, Fidelity’s
president of personal invest-
ing, said the need for families
to discuss these issues is likely
to grow as more baby boomers
reach retirement age, and as
life expectancies continue to
increase.
“Getting more comfortable
with these conversations is
going to be really important,”
Murphy said. “The burden only
gets bigger.”
The so-called “fiscal cliff”
that’s dominating the postelection national political dialogue could serve as a jumping-off point for many families
to shift holiday conversations
to their own finances, Murphy
says. The fiscal cliff denotes
the potential tax increases and
government spending cuts that
begin to take effect Jan. 1
unless Congress and President
Barack Obama can work out a
deficit-reduction compromise.
“It’s a more comfortable
way to start these conversations — a conversation about
the national economy can lead
into a conversation about your
personal economy,” she says.
Avoiding the conversation
means decisions are put off
until there’s a family crisis,
often resulting in sharp disagreements.
$18
CALL 592-3060 *125 TO FIND OUT HOW!
NOTE: Certificates can’t be combined with any other offer, coupon or gift certificate.
No cash back value and are a non-refundable purchase.
Apply today at www.adeccousa.com
Branch Automotive West (5890) or call 937.593.9400
APARTMENTS
APARTMENTS
ROOMS
REAL ESTATE
1 BR APARTMENT, newly
painted, carpeted, blinds. Electric, water, trash included.
$465 a month. NO PETS. Deposit required. 539-2300.
8121/2 S. MAIN. Large 1 BR
upstairs apartment. $325 a
month plus utilities. Fresh
paint, new carpet, stove and
fridge included. 593-9846 or
592-3807.
CLEAN, PRIVATE ROOMS,
all utilities at affordable prices.
Any income source, payment
plans accepted. Call or Text
Vicki 407-0516.
PUBLISHERS NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to
the Fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise
“any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or an intention to make
any such preference, limitation
or discrimination.” Familial
status includes children under
the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under
18.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in the newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain
of discrimination call HUD toll
free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll free telephone number for
the
hearing
impaired
is
1-800-927-9275.
Online
70s
Showers and thunderstorms are expected over Georgia, Florida
and the Carolinas as a trough passes through. Otherwise, tranquil
weather is expected for the rest of the U.S.
$3.50
INTERESTED IN JOINING THE PROGRAM?
2 BR TOWNHOUSE. Carpeted, all kitchen appliances
furnished,
W/D
hook-up,
blinds, ceiling fan, C/A. Nice
courtyard, private patio, offstreet parking. No pets. $520 a
month,
deposit
required.
539-2300.
2 BR TOWNHOUSE. Close to
hospital and downtown. Gas
heat, W/D hook-up. Deposit
required. No pets. $515 a
month. 539-2300.
2 BR, 1 FLOOR Double:
Washer/dryer hook-up, close
to
Southeastern
School.
$545/month + deposit. No
pets. 937-935-3650.
3 BR TOWNHOUSE, 11/2
bath, C/A, W/D hook-up, lg.
private patio, nice setting,
off-street parking. $620 a
month, deposit required. No
pets. 539-2300.
T-storms
• TRI COUNTY WATER
$380 ............................................
(20 Large 3 topping pizza’s)
$15
• SWISS HAUS
T $7
U
O
D
$269
SOL
$10 ..........................................................
Rain
Adecco currently has production opportunities
with Honda Transmission Manufacturing located
in Russells Point.
• High School Diploma/GED
• Must be able to stand, twist, bend 8+ hours per day & lift up to 30 lbs
As an Adecco associate, you will receive:
• 1st shift $10.00hr • 2nd/3rd shift $10.55/hr
• $100 monthly perfect attendance bonus
• Paid days off, shutdown pay
• SMITH JEWELERS
• SUN-LITE VINYL WINDOW CO.
• EXCEL AUTO BODY & PAINT
50s 60s
to a new career in
Russells Point
$59
(One Month Kids Martial Arts)
(3 Med-1 topping, PU/Carryout)
$10 ..........................................................
20s 30s 40s
Get your
motor
running
$28
(One Month Family Gym Membership)
$22
10s
• OHIO FITNESS & MARTIAL ARTS
• DONATOS PIZZA, SUBS, SALADS
$32.73 ..............................................
$18
(One Month Gym Membership)
$7
0s
© 2012 Wunderground.com
BY MARK JEWELL
Good toward equipment purchase only
$100 ..................................................
High
Survey: Families at odds over financial planning
$35
$20 .................................................... $15
• MICHAELS PIZZA (BFN)
$6 ...........................................................
Low
(1-Year Archery Range Membership)
$50 ....................................................
$10 ............................................
Pressure
Showers And Storms Develop In Southeast
Portsmouth
28° | 55°
$12
• LEVAN'S POWER EQUIPMENT
D O UT
$50 .......................................
Cincinnati
27° | 54°
$699
(Good for 12’x18’ concrete pad installed)
$100 ..................................................
-0s
Showers
• LEE’S COMFORT SHOES
• BIG ORANGE SHOE SHOP
SOL
$35
• HACKLEY CONCRETE
(Tue, 7–9:30 p.m. – Sat, 2–4:30 p.m.)
(Memorial Saddle)
$435 .............................................
Warm Stationary
Columbus
30° | 50°
Dayton
23° | 46°
• INDIAN LAKE ROLLARENA
• BELLEFONTAINE MEMORIALS
$27 (Oil Change Only).........
Cold
-10s
$50 ....................................................
$9.99
$40 ....................................................
Fronts
PA.
$35
• KEY LOCKSMITH CO.
$50 ....................................................
$125
(16x20 room painted, materials included)
$469 .............................................
Cloudy
Cleveland
34° | 46°
Toledo
30° | 48°
(Can be used one per piece of furniture)
(12x12 room painted, materials included)
$275 ............................................
Pt. Cloudy
• FRANCIS FURNITURE (SIDNEY)
(12x12 ceiling painted, materials included)
$125 .................................................
Sunny
MICH.
Mansfield
28° | 45°
$100 ..................................................
Forecast highs for Thursday, Nov. 15
City/Region
Low | High temps
Forecast for Thursday, Nov. 15
Don’t miss out on the gift that
no one will want to return!
• A-1 PAINTING & DRYWALL
National forecast
ONE BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment with detached garage space. Security deposit
and credit check required.
Apartment is located one mile
outside Bellefontaine. Call
419-236-4933 for appointment.
PENNY LANE Apartmentsoff Wright St. 2 Bdrm. garden
and TH apt. w/attached garage, AC, gas heat, kit. appl.,
hook-ups. $575 And $625 rent
and
deposit.
Call
937593-4309.
Whispering Pines
Apartments
Remodeled spacious 3 BR
townhome w/central air & heat.
$635.00 1st month’s rent,
$317.50 deposit.
For limited time only
lifestyle apt. 3 BR, 2 full bath,
W/D hook-up.
$675 1st month’s rent,
$337.50 deposit.
937-593-8511
STORAGE
540 & 33 SELF-STORAGE,
across from JVS. 10x15. First
month free. 593-0000.
ALL
AMERICAN
Storage.
Monthly rentals. Free locks.
Behind JC Penney. 592-9100.
STORAGE GARAGE
For Rent, 10x20. $55 a month.
Call 937-539-1202
REAL ESTATE
1200 SQ. FT. 3-4 BR Home
w/1 bath, 2 car + detached garage in Jackson Center.
937-596-6818 call anytime, or
937-596-6360 M-F 8 a.m.-6
p.m.
BEAUTIFUL NEW HOME: 128
E. Auburn. 3 BR, 2 baths, 2
car garage. No money down,
payments based on income.
740-572-1953.
BELLEFONTAINE
INVESTMENT -- 6 townhouse apts.,
large parking lot in prime
neighborhood. $42,000 gross.
937-592-2076.
REAL ESTATE
3 Bedrooms
2 Full Baths
Laundry Room, Garage,
Full Basement
412 E. Lake
937-599-3457
LOTS & LAND
JUST LISTED: 104.09 Ac.,
Miami Twp. 1382' on 235, 1
mi. N. of Quincy. $750000.
Courtesy Realty 937-497-1000
[email protected]
PICTURESQUE LAND FOR
SALE: 7.7 acres overlooking
Cherokee Hills Golf Course to
build your dream home. CALL
Nancy at 937-539-0503.
We Bring You
Logan
County!
Lack of communication was
a key theme in the survey findings. Sixty-eight percent of
older parents said they were
more comfortable talking about
these matters to a third-party
financial professional than they
were with family members.
That was the case for 60 percent of the adult children.
The lack of discussion contributed to differing views
about how often older parents
worry about their long-term
financial security. Forty-six
percent of adult children think
their parents worry at least
once a month, while just 32
percent of parents reported
they worry that often.
Adult children may be more
concerned about these issues
than their parents because
many are part of what’s known
as the “Sandwich Generation,”
middle-aged people trying to
care for their elderly parents
while also supporting their
own children.
Such parents “may be grappling with planning for their
own retirement, helping to fund
a child’s college education and
dealing with eldercare and
retirement challenges with their
parents as well,” Murphy says.
Wal-Mart
launches food
subscription
service
NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. today officially
launched a mail subscription
service, called Goodies, that lets
shoppers discover new foods from
the comfort of their homes.
For a monthly fee of $7 that
includes tax and shipping, customers get a box of five to eight
hand-picked, sample-size food
items, ranging from organic to
ethnic products that are not currently carried on Wal-Mart’s
shelves. The world’s largest retailer began testing the service three
months ago and so far has 3,000
subscribers. For November items
include pumpkin souffle mix,
white cheddar popcorn and dark
chocolate-infused Quinoa bars.
It works like this: users can
sign up for the service at
www.goodies.com. The monthly
price is almost half of the total
value of the items if they were
purchased separately, according
to Wal-Mart.
PUBLIC NOTICES
LEGALS
NOTICE
DISSOLUTION OF
CORPORATION
The Bellefontaine Examiner
does not knowingly accept
Help Wanted ads from employers covered by the Fair
Labor Standards Act if they offer less than the legal minimum wage or fail to pay at
least time and one-half for
overtime hours.
LEGALS
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Village of Rushsylvania is accepting letters
of interest from Village
residents to fill a vacant
seat on the Board of Public Affairs.
Letters should be submitted to:
Board of Public Affairs
P.O. Box 204
Rushsylvania, OH 43347
Letters should be submitted by December 1st.
Nov. 12, 2012-t3 consec.
SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT:
www.examiner.org
Notice is hereby given
that Medaris & Associates, Inc., an Ohio corporation, has elected to dissolve
and
completely
wind up its affairs, and
that a Certificate of Dissolution was filed in the office of the Ohio Secretary
of State on November 1,
2012. This notice is given
pursuant to and in accordance with §1701.87 of the
Ohio Revised Code.
Send inquiries to: Connor W. Kinsey, Thompson, Dunlap & Heydinger,
Ltd., 1111 Rush Avenue,
P.O. Box 68, Bellefontaine, Ohio 43311.
Nov. 14, 2012-t2
Classified Ads Pay!
Call 592-3060, ext. 110

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