Page 1 THE BELGIAN SHEEPDOG - I .. - -".`~~*. -

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Page 1 THE BELGIAN SHEEPDOG - I .. - -".`~~*. -
THE BELGIAN SHEEPDOG
-
I
- -".' ~~*.
The Belgian Sheepdog
--
Club of America, Inc.
..
1959
This booklet is dedicated to the memory of
three members of the Belgian Sheep:iogClub
of America whose devotion and loyalty to the
breed caused their fellow members
of its
Board of Directors to wish to honor them for
their service inpromoting the breed by this
dedication:
Virginia Dykema
Helen Quilhot
William B. Vestal
The picture on the cover II of the ~Belgianl
on the Skyline- (Thor C.D.X., Bonita del Rio
Carmello, Ch. HadJe de Flanderl, U.D.T.)
who were owned by Mr. and Mrs. Vestal
some years ago.
Mr. Vestal was Informed, shortly before his
death, that this lovely picture, a favorite of
the entire fancy for years, had been selected
to be the only picture included in this booklet.
.
THE STORY
OF THE BELGIAN
SHEEPDOG
- andTHE OFFICIAL
Belgian
Member
Sheepdog
Club
OFFICERS
STANDARD
Club
of America,
of the American
OF THE BSCA
Kennel
Inc.
Club
1959-60
C. W. Bliss
President
1st V. President
2nd. V. President
Secretary-Treasurer..
Mary K. Killa'WaY
.Robert D. Krohn
Dorothea M. Kelley
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
C. W. Bliss
29025 Gates MUls Blvd., Cleveland 24, Ohio
Mary K. Dilla\\l3.Y
Old Plymouth Road, Sagamore, R F D I,
Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts
Robert D. Krohn
2454 45th St., Los Alamos, New Mexico
Dorothea M. Kelley
81 Edgewood
Drive, Avon Lake, Ohio
Myron E. Rowland
1310 HoytAvenue, Muncie, indiana
C. Gene Summers
513 Price St., Charleston 2, West Virginia
William F. Burt
Morningside,
R. D. I, Concord,Mass.
Prepared
by
Dr. Frank E. Dykema,
Belgian Sheepdog Club of America
THE BELGIANSHEEPDQG
INTRODUCTION
The aim of this short description
1s to
give the reader a word pIcture of the Belgian
Sheepdog and to present the find qualities and
desirahle
characteristics
of the breed, one
of the dogs of the Working Group. Therefore,
our first step will be to introduce the reader
to the origins and background ofthe Belgian
Sheepdog.
HISTORY
The Belgian Sheepdog has an ancestry
which seems to be common to many of the
herding dogs used throughout the modern
world.
The lineage can be traced back to
Central Europe, particularly
to the Mooreland dog.
Since Europe then was thinly populated as
compared
to modern times, domesticated
animals
required
herding and protection
from attackers such as wolves. Not only was
there danger from wild life; but, also, the
rigorous
climate demanded animals that
could withstand all kinds of weather:
heat,
cold, rain, snow, any combination. As people
did not move about too much in the past, a
dog could be developed over the years that
would meet the needs of and conditions
present
in isolated areas.
The Beigian
Sheepdog came into being as a result of the
rugged climate and requirements
of the
shepherd for a bright, strong, and agile dog.
Eventually the breed, truly the dog of the
Belgian Shepherd which included several
varieties of color and coat became so promInent as to be considered the national dog of
Belgium.
The breed inspiredOuida's
D()gof
Flanders and the more famous poet, phTIOsO:
pller, and dramatist
Maeterlinck's
Our
Friend the~:
both indicating the wiQe:'
spreaa ana exceptioDaI interest aftha Europeans. Belgian royalty even sponsored one
type of the Belgian Sheepdog.
The first organization for the purpose of
breeding specific types of Belgian Sheepdogs
was initiated by Professor
Reul v.rl.ln 1891
under the name of the Club du Chien d~
Berger BeIge. A few years later, in 1897,
the hIstory of the Groenendael (long haired,
black) Belgian Sheepdog began. About this
time, a resident of Veda, Mr. Beernaerte,
had found 1n Feluy-Arquermes
a Belgian
shepherd dog with long black hair working as
a herd dog. Impressed by Us beauty, speed,
and gentle sureness in herding the flock, he
acquired It and called It "Piccardd'Uccle."
Meanwhile, N. Rose, proprietor
of the
Restaurant du Chateau de Groenendael,
had
already bred several sheepdogs with long
black hair and owned a bitch named" Petite."
"Piccard d'Uccle" was bred to .Petite"and
produced "Due de Groenendael", a sheepdog
with long black hair, beautiful little ears and
good tall carriage,
but with an enormous
white "cravat" on Its chest. From the same
Utter came "Pitt", "Barotllle",
"Margot",
and "Berger",
all named .of Groenendael",
and It Is thus that the kennel name became
the name of one of the types of Belgian
Sheepdogs.
All our good Groenendaels descend from these ancestors,
and you have
only to trace their pedigrees back far enough
to find at the origin "Piccard d'Uccle" and
"Petite."
The longhaired, blackGroenendael,after
makiag Its show debut In 1898, grew rapdily
in popularity in its native land and throughout the continent.
Shortly after the turn of
the century, Belgian Sheepdogs were imported into the United States, some being
used for pollee work in New Jersey and New
York.
Some authorities
credit the breed
with being the first to be used for police and
war work.
The Groenendael
became the
popular type breed and shown in the United
States; and, although other types were imported from time to time, the Groenendael
color and physical characteristics
had become identified almost exclusively with the
breed name In the popular mind. On July 1,
1959, the American Kennel Club separated
the three types in the United States into
separate
breeds, naming the Groenendael
the Belgian SheePdog. The other types (now
breeds) were named Belgian Tenuren
and
Belgian Malinois.
The Belgian Sheepdog
Club of America, Inc. founded in the early
part of the 20th Century Is a breed club
member
of the American
Kennel Club.
Membership is open to any person favorable
to its objectives of promoting the breed and
who Is In good standIng with the American
Kennel Club.
CHARACTER
AND PERSONALITY
TRAITS
No resume would be complete without
reference to the outstanding character ofthe
breed.
Through great good fortune, the
European and American
breeders
of the
Belgian Sheepdog have adhered to sound
breeding patterns, unhampered by the desire
for quick profit.
Intelligence
and sound
temperament
have beenmaintalnedasphys_
leal type has been improved.
The Belgian Sheepdog, noted for its intelligence
and alertness,
has been widely
used for police and war work abroad and in
this country.
The rapidity with wltich the
Belgian learns and its responsiveness
to its
master's
every wish make it a joy to train,
for whatever
purpose,
be it as working
herder
of stock, as show dog, or as the
obedient house pet, companion to children
(for whom it shows great affection) and
guardian of property.
The natural herding instinct of these dogs
pius their superior speed and agility makes
them tireless
workers.
The Belgian is
wonderful companion, especially
sensitive
to its master's
moods. Orie must Hve with
these dogs to understand their deep loyalty
and affection for the immediate family. With
friends they are curious and reserved; with
strangers,
alert. In personality, the Belgian
is happy and gay in spirit, Inquisitive of
mind, with a delightful humor that wUl bring
no dull moments, and an originality that will
leave the new owner amazed at the dog's
ingenuity.
APPEARANCE
The Belgian Sheepdog starts out in life as
a wonderfully soft, fuzzy, black "bear cub" in
appearance.
Soon this profile will be replaced by the aristocratic
beauty and elegance of the mature animal. Stunning in his
abundant coat, the Belgian Sheepdog makes
one of the most attractive
silhouettes
In
dogdom. A distinctive characteristic
ofthe
Beigian is its proud bearing.
In show pose
the dog stands naturally, squarely on all four
legs.
The topHne is straight from back of
the withers to hips, with no slope as Is char-
acteristic
of some shepherd breeds.
It is a
compact dog, giving a square appearance
when viewed from the side. His movement Is
quick and agile.
He Is never heavy-footed
and makes unbelievably
fast turns. In accordance with his heritage as herder, he is
built for maneuverability
as weli as endurance. He has a deep chest, small, compact
feet, moderate bone, and high set triangular
ears, held erect when at attention.
ThetaH
is heavily plumed, of medium length, and
carried rather gaily as he moves but dropped
as he stands.
Feathering
on forelegs and
underside
of body, ruff framing expressive
face and eyes, culotte add to the beauty...
this beauty being left "as is" for the show
ring.
SPECIAL
FEATURES
The Belgian Sheepdog has a very desirable quality in that he has no objectionable
"doggy odor". He makes an excellent companion io the home as weli as In the field.
He changes coat usually once a year. Even
in this period. the householder
finds the
shedding of the soft undercoat far less a
problem than the shedding of some of the
smooth coated dogs whose hairs stick with
tenacity to upholstery and rugs. Some Belgian owners save combings for yarn and
have cashmere-like
sweaters
made of U.
Another feature of practical Interest is
simplicity of grooming. The Belgian Sheepdog's long coat responds
with delightful
sheen by first combing and follow-up with
brisk burshing.
An occasional trimming of
toenails and cutting of the hair between the
toes to keep the feet small and tight. cleaning the ears and seeing that teeth are kept
free of tartar...and
there you have It...even
if you plan to show the Belgian... maximum
of usefulness with minimum of care.
OBEDIENCE
Basic to all training is OBEDIENCE;
whether it be for household, herding, war,
police, guide, guard, or any other type of
work for which Belgian Sheepdogs are used.
Their superior intellect lends itself to this
training; and one needs only to turn to the
record made at obedience trials to find the
degree to which Belgians have excelled.
Even though the total number of Belgian
Sheepdogs reg i s t ere d places the breed
among the less common dogs, the number
holding obedience titles (Companion Dog,
Companion Dog Excellent,
Utility Dog,
Tracking Dog) is much greater than breeds
that have a much larger portion of the dog
population.
Not only do they earn their
degrees,
but they are also top ranking at
trials
where they appear In competition.
They are notable in the trials as happy and
fast workers.
They are always eager to
please and contrite when they have made a
mistake.
Their happiness at pleasing their
handlers In trials Is shown by their quick
response
to commands,
attentiveness
and
gaily wagging tails.
Persons new to training Belgian Sheepdogs are often astonished by their following
the quietly spoken command. Sometrainers
of these dogs have, therefore,
been accused
of using mental telepathy because of the
sharp contrast to the loudly bawled command too often heard at the trials.
SUMMARY
Now we come to the final word in this
brief description
of the Belgian Sheepdog.
This black beauty is companion, protector,
and friend.
His intelligence,
loyalty and
stamina can be relied upon at all times.
If you are looking for an enthusiastic
-
supporter
ASK
THE
MAN WHO OWNS
APPROVED
A BELGIAN!
STANDARD,
FOR BELGIAN SHEEPDOGS,
BY A.K.C.
ON JUNE 9, 1959
EFFECTIVE
JULY 1, 1959
PERSONALITY
The Belgian Sheepdog should reflect the
qualities of intelligence, courage, alertness,
and devotion to master,
To his inherent
aptitude as guardian of flocks should be
added protectiveness
of the person and
property of his master. He should be watchful, attentive, and always in motion when not
under command.
In his relationship with humans he should
be observant and vigilant with strangers but
not apprehensive.
He should not show fear or
shyness.
He should notshowviciousnessby
unwarranted
or unprovoked attack.
With
those he knows well, he is most affectionate
and friendly, zealous of their attention, and
very possesive.
OVER-ALL
APPEARANCE
The first
impression
of the Belgian
Sheepdog is that of a well-balanced
square
dog, elegant in appearance,
with an exceedingly proud carriage of the head alld neck. He
is a strong, agIle, well-muscled
animal,
alert and full of life. His whole conformation gives the impression
of depth and solidity without bulkiness.
The male dog is
usually
somewhat
more impressive
and
grand than his female counterpart.
The
bitch should have a distinctly feminine look.
Males should be 24-26
Size and Substance
inches in height and females 22-24 inches,
measured at the withers.
-
The length, measured
from point of
breast bone to point of rump, should equal
the height. Bitches may be slightly longer.
Bone structure
heavy in proportion
is well balanced
spindly or leggy or
should be moderately
to his height so that he
throughout
and neither
cumbersome
and bulky.
Stance _ The Belgain Sheepdog should stand
squarely on all fours.
Side view: the top
line, front legs, and back legs should closely
approximate a square.
-
Indicates alertness, attention,
Expression
readiness
for activity.
Gaze should be intelligent and questioning.
Coat - The guard hairs of the coat must be
long, well-fitting,
straight, and abundant.
They should not be silky or wiry. The texture should be a medium harslmess.
The
undercoat should be extremely dense, commensurate,
however, with climatic condl-
tlons. The Belgian Sheepdog is particularly
adaptable to extremes
of temperature
or
climate.
The hair is shorter on the head, outside
of the ears, and lower part ofthelegs.
The
opening of the ear Is protected hy tufts of
hair.
Ornamentation;
especially
long and
abundant hair, like a collarette,
around the
neck, fringe of long hair down the back of
the forearm;
especially
long and ahundant
hair
trimming
the hindquarters,
the
breeches; long, heavy, and abundant hair on
the tail.
Color - Black. May be completely black or
may be black with white, limited as follows;
Small
forechest.
to moderate
patch
or
strip
on
Between pads of feet.
On tips of hind toes.
On chin and muzzle
or gray).
(frost-maybe
On tips of front toes
fault.
-
allowable
white
but a
HEAD
Cleancut and strong, overall
be in proportion to the body.
size should
Skull _ Top flattened rather than rounded.
The width approximately
the same, but not
wider, than the length.
Stop
-
Muzzle,
Moderate.
Jaws,
Lips
- Muzzle
moderately
pointed, avoiding any tendency tosnipinesl'l,
and approximately
equal in length to that of
the top skull. The jaws should be strong and
powerful.
The lips should he tight and
black, with no pink showing on the outside.
Ears - Triangular in shape, stiff, erect, and
in proportion
to the head in size. Base of
the ear should not come below the center of
the eye.
Eyes - Brown, preferably
dark brown.
Medium size, slightly almond shaped, not
protruding.
-
Nose
areas.
Black,
without
spots or discolored
-
Teeth
A full compiement of strong, white
teeth, evenly set. Should not be overshot or
undershot.
Should have either an even bite
or a scissors bit.
TORSO
-
Neck
Round and rather outstretched,
tapered from head to body, well muscled,
with tight skin.
-
TopHne
The withers are slightly higher
and slope into the back which must be level,
straIght,
and firm from withers to hip
Joints.
The loin section, viewed from
above, Is relatively short, broad and strong,
but blending smoothly into the back. The
croup is medium long, sloping gradually.
-
Strong at the base, bone to reach hock.
Tail
At rest the dog holds it low, the tip bent back
level with the hock. When in action he raises
It and gIves it a curl, which Is strongest
toward the tip, withoutformlngahook.
Chest - Not broad, but deep.
The lowest
point sbould reach the elbow, fonning a
smooth asceDdant curve to the abdomen.
Abdomen
tucked-up
- Moderate
development.
nor paunchy.
Neither
FOREQUARTERS
Shoulder - Long and oblique, laid flat against
the body, forming a sharp angle (approximately 900) with the upper ann.
-
Legs
Straight, strong. and parallel to each
other.
Bone oval rather than round. Development (length and substance) should be
well proportioned
to the size of the dog.
Pastern:
medium length. strong, and very
slightly sloped.
-
Feet
Round (cat footed), toes curved close
together,
well padded.
Nalls strong 8.D.d
black except that they may be white to match
white toe tips.
HINDQUARTERS
-
Broad and heavily muscled.
The
Thighs
upper and lower thigh bones approximately
parallel the shoulder blade and upper arm
respectively,
forming a relatively
sharp
angle at stifle Joint.
Legs - Length aDd substance well proportioned to the size of the dog. Bone oval
rather than round. Legs are parallel to each
other.
The angle at the hock is relatively
sharp, although the Belgian Sheepdog does
not have extreme angulation.
Metatarsus
medium length. stroDg, and slightly sloped.
Dew Claws, If 8.D.y,should be removed.
Toes curved
Feet - Slightly elongated.
close together, well padded. Nails strong
and black except that they may be white to
match white toe tips.
GAIT
Motion should be smooth, free and easy,
seemIngly never tiring, exhlbitingfacHityof
movement rather than aharddrivingaction.
He tends to single track on a fast gait; the
legs, both front and rear, converging toward
the center Une of gravity of the dog. The
backline should remain firm and level, parallel to the line of motion with no crabbing.
He shows a marked tendency to move in a
circle rather than a striaght line.
FAULTS
Any deviation from these specif1catlons
is a fault. In determining whether a fault Is
minor, serious, or major, these two factors
should be used as a guide:
1. The extent to which it deviates from the
Standard.
2. The extent to which suchdeviationwould
actually affect the working ability of the
dog.
DISQUALIFICATiONS
1. VIciousness.
any color other than black, except for white In specified areas.
3. Ears - hanging (as on a hound).
4. Tall - cropped or stump.
5. Males under 22-1/2 or over 27-1/2
inches in height.
Females under 20-1/2 or over 25-1/2
Inches in height.
2. Color
-