2007 - Holmesglen

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2007 - Holmesglen
Moorabbin Campus
488 South Road
Moorabbin 3189
(PO Box 42 Holmesglen 3148)
Telephone (03) 9564 1555
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE 2007 Annual Report
Chadstone Campus
Batesford Road
Chadstone 3148
(PO Box 42 Holmesglen 3148)
Telephone (03) 9564 1555
2007
Annual Report
Waverley Campus
585 Waverley Road
Glen Waverley 3150
(PO Box 42 Holmesglen 3148)
Telephone (03) 9564 1555
www.holmesglen.vic.edu.au
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
2007 Annual Report
Our Mission
The delivery and development of vocational education programs and value added services
supported by high quality resources. Students receive every opportunity to achieve their
educational goals.
Our Value
Access: We offer appropriate vocational programs and services for all individuals through
a variety of teaching modes, enhanced by relationships with other educational institutions
and key industries. Excellence: We strive to achieve the best practice in all that we do.
Enterprise: We encourage business development strategies that are innovative, wellresourced, responsive and entrepreneurial. Integrity: We respect the individual and uphold
the highest ethical standards by acting in a fair and objective manner.
Contents
Mission and Values......................................01
President’s Report........................................02
Institute Board.............................................04
Senior Staff ..................................................06
Organisational Chart...................................07
Retrospective................................................08
Report of Operations..................................09
Access
- Teaching Centre Reports.................................12
- Centre for Applied Technology .......................14
- Building Industry Training Centre.....................14
- Business Services Centre..................................16
- Centre for Design, Arts and Science................17
- Centre for Health, Human and
Community Services........................................18
- Centre for Language Programs and
International Centre........................................20
- Centre for Hospitality, Cookery and Bakery......22
- Centre for Horticulture Tourism and
Recreation.......................................................23
- Facilities..........................................................26
- Environmental Performance............................27
Administrative Reports
- Technology Services Department.....................28
- Information Commons....................................28
- Marketing Unit................................................29
- Media Services Department.............................29
- Corporate Improvement Unit..........................30
- Registrar’s Department....................................30
- Student Services..............................................31
Enterprise
- Conference Centre and Corporate Suites........36
- Hemisphere Conference Centre and Hotel.......36
- Holmesglen Employment.................................36
- Holmesglen Safety..........................................37
- Flexible Learning.............................................37
- Holmesglen Training and Development...........38
- Community and Industry Short Courses..........38
Excellence
- Awards Festival...............................................42
- Student Contact Hours....................................43
- Fees and Charges............................................44
- Workforce Data..............................................44
Integrity
- Occupational Health & Safety..........................48
- Staff Health & Well-being................................48
- Statement on the Application of
Employment & Conduct Principles . ................49
- Freedom of Information Act............................50
- Whistleblowers Protection Act.........................50
Financial
- Financial Information.......................................54
- Financial Reporting Framework.......................90
- Disclosure Index..............................................91
2007 Annual Report: President’s Report
I am confident that this model will be
successful for years to come, will be an
important landmark in the fabric of Victorian
education and will contribute to more effective
educational and vocational opportunity for
young people. It is our intention to continue
to develop this model of upper secondary
education.
This year sees the beginning of a
new planning period 2007 – 2012.
It has commenced promisingly
with student contact hours
growing from 11.7 million in 2006
to 12.07 million hours in 2007.
At the same time, the Institute’s
revenue grew from $129.8 million
to $150.07 million. The Institute is
significantly larger than any TAFE
institution in Victoria as is the size
of its non government business.
My Board remains concerned
that the continued growth of
the Institute is dependant upon
its capacity to recruit highly
competent staff, especially at
the senior administrative and
management levels. We believe
that there is an urgent need to
consider the appropriateness
of existing remuneration
arrangements for TAFE institutions
that operate on a local, national
and international level. Stand
alone TAFE institutions are at a
disadvantage compared to their
multi sector peers.
In my last report, I commented on
the impending implementation of the
Vocational College at Moorabbin and
its significance to Victorian education.
My Board is delighted with the first
year of its operation which has been
characterised by low attrition rates,
enrolments exceeding expectations
and positive student outcomes.
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Of equal importance to my Board is to
continue to offer educational programs that
are accessible and relevant to students and to
Victoria’s sound and economic development.
One strategy we have adopted has been
to develop Health Industry programs at the
certificate, diploma and degree level in a wide
variety of areas. We are committed to investing
significantly in health care education over the
planning period and have been encouraged
by the support we have received from many
organisations in the health industry.
The past year as well as being highly significant
in terms of our upper secondary and higher
education offerings has also been important
in relation to our international activities. Our
international student numbers are at record
levels and the Institute is strengthening its
International Projects activity. As a result,
the Institute with the Victorian Ministry of
Education has been successful in obtaining
work in Bahrain – in the development and
implementation of a vocational college
curriculum and the development of an
apprenticeship framework. We believe
there are significant international project
opportunities in which Victoria is well placed
to participate. However, the issues mentioned
earlier in this report need to be addressed if
Institutes are to realise their potential.
As can be gathered from the foregoing, there
is continued and growing demand for the
Institute’s programs and services. I said in my
report in 2006 that my Board believes there
is a need for a major capital development
at the Chadstone Campus. Whilst we are
willing to continue to inject substantial funds
to assist in the process, we are concerned the
government’s capital allocation process is not
easily understood. We think that the continued
development of the Victorian TAFE system
would be assisted by greater consistency and a
more strategic focus.
We have continued to develop effective
alliances and have extended arrangements with
a range of organisations, especially, University
of Tasmania, Charles Sturt and
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Deakin University. The Trajal School of Tourism
and Hospitality (Japan) has this year transferred
its entire Victorian program to Holmesglen.
Trajal has been an outstanding organisation
with which to be associated and its students
are excellent ambassadors. We have achieved
and strengthened our partnerships with AMES,
Headmasters, The Australian Institute of
Building and The Department of Education and
Early Childhood Development. Partnerships,
we believe, are a critical element for effective
business development.
The Institute’s diverse contribution to its
community continues with students raising
money for charities, assisting disadvantaged
community groups in a variety of ways.
I am indebted to my Board, the management
and staff of the Institute for their interest and
involvement with the Institute and the loyalty
they so willingly provide. In July, Mr George
Dore OAM, a wise and colourful foundation
Board member and chair of the Building and
Planning Committee retired. He is a passionate
believer in vocational education, especially, in
the importance of formal education for the
building industry. He played a pivotal role
in the development of Holmesglen – for 26
years – an extraordinary selfless contribution
for which we have all benefited and for which
we are indebted. The medal of the Order
of Australia was awarded to George for his
contribution and service to the building industry
as an administrator and educator. Mr David
Duggan, Deputy Director (Operations) retired in
March culminating over 25 years of outstanding
service and loyalty. Mr Duggan made a great
contribution not only to the operations and
structures in Holmesglen, but was also an
excellent contributor to the softer social side of
the Institute.
Throughout 2007, the Board, management
and staff have continued to work together in
a positive and focussed manner and I am sure
that this spirit of co-operation will continue in
future years. My deep gratitude is extended to
them all and in particular to the Institute’s Chief
Executive Bruce Mackenzie for their unqualified
support and enthusiasm.
John Sharkey AM
President of Board
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
2007 Annual Report: Institute Board
The Institute Board is the governing body of the Institute and
operates with the assistance of several committees, as follows.
The Council of Holmesglen Institute of TAFE was originally
incorporated under the Post-Secondary Education Act 1978
by an Order in Council on 5 January 1982 and was made
responsible to the Minister for Employment, Post-Secondary
Education and Training.
On the recommendations of the Minister for Tertiary Education
and Training, a new constitution for the Institute was approved
by the Governor-in-Council on 31 January 1995, under
Section 24 of the Vocational Education and Training Act
1990. The new constitution came into effect on 1 April 1995.
This constitution does not affect the continuity of previous
directives.
The new constitution replaced the term council with the term
board and board members assumed the title directors in mid
July 2007.
There is no comprehensive legal Code of Conduct for Board
members. Their duties and liabilities arise under common law,
the Vocational Education and Training Act 1990 (as amended),
the Education and Training Reform Act (2006) and a wide
range of other statutes and regulations which affect TAFE
Institutes.
The primary legislation which affects TAFE Institutes is:
- Education and Training Reform Act (2006)
- Victorian Qualifications Authority Act 2000
- Vocational Education and Training Act 1990 (Vic)
(‘the VET Act’)
Other sources of legal obligations include:
Ministerial Directions and Orders Pursuant to the VET Act
- Directions about Fees and Charges
- Reporting
- Directions about the Employment of Staff
- TAFE Management Staff Positions Order 1995 (as amended).
The objectives and functions of the Institute Board are:
(a) within the context of national and state policy and
management frameworks, to establish goals for the
Institute
(b) to provide quality vocational education and training and
adult, community and further education programs and
services which:
i. promote the competitiveness of industry
ii. enhance the opportunities for individuals
iii. serve the needs of the general community
(c) to manage and control the Institute efficiently and
effectively to optimise the efficient use of resources
(d) to be the market leader in meeting the education and
training needs of the community, industry and workplace.
The purpose of the Holmesglen Institute Board is set out in
the Constitution (1995, Section 2.3) and in the Institute’s
Strategic Plan. The Strategic Plan expresses the mission of the
Institute, its underlying values and identifies enabling actions
(strategies) that taken collectively enable the mission of the
Institute to be realised. A new Strategic Plan came into being
in 2007, covering the years 2007 – 2012. The Strategic Plan
is reviewed each year to ensure that the strategies contained
within the plan are in accord with the external environment.
The Board meets at least six times per year and met eight
times during 2007 with the majority of board members in
attendance for between five - seven meetings. There are
established committees to assist in its effective operations.
These committees are: Building and Planning, Business
Development, Finance, Audit, Higher Education Academic,
Investment and Remuneration. Each committee has an
executive officer drawn from the management group. In
addition, a Board executive acts on behalf of the full Board
between meetings. Normally, Board members would relate to
subordinate staff through the Chief Executive (CE). However,
committee chairs and committee members will relate directly
to their executive officer. Executive officers and directorate
staff attend all Board meetings. The president and CE are exofficio members of all Board Committees.
In 2007 Board members attended a 2-day residential
conference, held in July.
The Institute has implemented procedures which require
relevant officers to complete statements of pecuniary interest.
Such statements have been duly completed.
The Board’s values are consistent with those in the Institute’s
Strategic Plan. These, including the duties and code of
conduct are detailed in the Board Members Handbook. In
general, the values reflect that members must avoid conflict of
interest and act in good faith in the interest of the Holmesglen
Institute of TAFE.
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2007 Annual Report: Institute Board
Board Members (directors) in 2007
- Mr John Sharkey AM (President and Chair of Institute Board)
- Mr David Murden AM (Deputy President of Board)
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM (Chief Executive and Ex-officio)
- Ms Anabel Shears Carter
- Mr George Dore OAM (retired from Board in July 2007)
- The Honourable Haddon Storey QC
- Mr Jonathan Forster (new appointee in 2007)
- Ms Louise Hill
- Mr Peter Picking
- Ms Linda Dewar
- Mr Bryan Waters
- Mr Kevin Davern OAM
- Ms Ili Pelletier
- Mr Gerard Hayes (Staff Representative)
- Ms Sassy Hallett (re-elected Student Representative)
Appointments to the Institute Board are made for a variety of
reasons, including political, industry representation, specialist
knowledge, community service and gender.
Board members were in attendance for eight Board meetings
held during 2007 and a Board Effectiveness Survey will be
undertaken in 2008. Attendance records and qualifications of
individual board members are available from the Institute on
request to the Board Secretary:
Board Secretary
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
P O Box 42
HOLMESGLEN VIC 3148
Building and Planning Committee
The Building and Planning Committee function is to
recommend to the Board facility and infrastructure plans for
Institute building works. It oversees the construction of these
projects as well as the overall maintenance of all Institute
buildings.
Membership
- Mr George Dore OAM, Board Member
(Chair of Committee - retired in July 2007)
- Mr Peter Picking, Board Member and new Chair from
August 2007
- Mr John Sharkey AM, Board President
- Mr David Murden AM, Board Deputy President
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM, Chief Executive,
Holmesglen Institute
- Mr Nicholas Moore, Co-opted Committee Member
- Mr Michael Dore, Co-opted Committee Member
- Mr Wayne Judson, Co-opted Committee Member
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
Finance Committee
The prime function of the Finance Committee is to ensure that
the Institute’s financial policies are executed in accordance with
the government’s Financial Reporting Framework.
Membership
- The Hon Haddon Storey QC, Board Member (Chair)
- Mr John Sharkey AM, Board President
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM, Chief Executive,
Holmesglen Institute
- Mr Bryan Waters, Board Member
- Mr Kevin Davern OAM, Board Member
- Ms Ili Pelletier, Board Member
- Mr Enzo Spangher, Corporate Services Manger (Executive
Officer)
- Mr Frank Virik, Deputy Director (Information Services)
- Ms Susan O’Brien, Finance Manager (Staff Member)
By Invitation (non-voting)
- Mr Gary McDermott, Invitee
- Mr Bruce Prescott, Deputy Director (Operations)
- Ms Mary Faraone, Deputy Director (Educational Development
and Design)
Audit Committee
The Audit Committee’s primary responsibility relates to the
adequacy of financial reporting, risk management and internal
control.
Committees of the Board
and Membership
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- Mr David Duggan, Deputy Director (Operations) and
Executive Officer of Committee but retired in February 2007
- Mr Bruce Prescott, Deputy Director (Operations) and Executive Officer of Committee from March 2007
- Mr Enzo Spangher, Manager, Corporate Services
- Mr Gerard Hayes, Board Member (Staff Representative)
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2007
Membership
- The Hon Haddon Storey QC, Board Member (Chair)
- Mr John Sharkey AM, Board President
- Mr Bryan Waters, Board Member
- Mr Kevin Davern OAM, Board Member
- Ms Ili Pelletier, Board Member
By Invitation (non-voting)
- Mr Gary McDermott, Invitee
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM, Chief Executive,
Holmesglen Institute
- Mr Enzo Spangher, Corporate Services Manager
(Executive Officer)
Investment Committee
The function of this Committee is to oversee and review the
Institute’s investments.
Membership
- The Hon Haddon Storey QC, Board Member (Chair)
- Mr John Sharkey AM, Board President
- Mr David Murden AM, Board Deputy President
- Ms Anabel Shears-Carter, Board Member
- Mr Bryan Waters, Board Member
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM, Chief Executive,
Holmesglen Institute
- Mr Enzo Spangher, Corporate Services Manager
- Mr Peter Ozelis, Systems Accountant
(Staff Member and Executive Officer)
By Invitation (non-voting)
- Mr Gary McDermott, Invitee
- Mr Bruce Prescott, Deputy Director (Operations)
- Ms Mary Faraone, Deputy Director (Educational Development
and Design)
- Ms Mary Faraone, Deputy Director (Educational Development
and Design)
- Mr Max Newton, Associate Director, Business Services Centre
(Staff Member)
- Mr Henry Pook, Associate Director, Building Industry Training Centre (Staff Member)
- Ms Erica Wright, Institute Registrar (Staff Member)
- Ms Maxine Courtier, Manager, Graduate and Business Programs (Staff Member)
- Ms Leone English, Associate Director, Health Human and
Community Services (Staff Member)
- Ms Marion King, Manager, Information Commons
Business Development Committee
The function of the Business Development Committee is to
consider potential business opportunities to be put forward to
the Institute Board.
External Committee Members
- Professor Gary O’Donovan, Faculty of Business,
University of Tasmania
- Mr Damon Anderson, Faculty of Education,
Monash University
Membership
- Ms Anabel Shears-Carter, Board Member (Chair)
- Mr David Murden OAM Board Deputy President
- Ms Louise Hill, Board Member
- Ms Linda Dewar, Board Member
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM, Chief Executive,
Holmesglen Institute
- Ms Avril Reagon, Business Development Manager
(Staff Member and Executive Officer)
- Mr Enzo Spangher, Corporate Services Manager
(Staff Member)
- Mr Andrew Adamson, Principal, Holmesglen
Vocational College (Staff Member)
- Mr David Endean, Director, International Programs
and Projects (Staff Member)
By Invitation (non-voting)
- Professor Swee Eng Chen, Invitee, Chair, Building Degree Programs, Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
Remuneration Committee
The function of this Committee is to ensure that there
is a consistent and rigorous approach for establishing,
implementing and maintaining executive remuneration in the
Institute. The Committee also reviews policies and practices
in relation to conditions of employment for all employees and
where appropriate, make recommendations to the Institute
Board.
Membership
- Mr John Sharkey AM, President, Institute Board (Chair)
- Mr David Murden OAM, Board Deputy President
- Ms Anabel Shears Carter, Board Member
- Mr Gary McDermott, Co-opted Member
Higher Education Academic Committee
The Higher Education Academic Committee is responsible
for oversight of all higher education programs conducted at
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE, i.e., undergraduate degrees and
graduate certificates (higher education).
Membership
- The Hon Haddon Storey QC, Board Member (Chair)
- Mr Bruce Mackenzie PSM, Chief Executive,
Holmesglen Institute
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2007 Annual Report: Senior Staff
The six senior staff of the Institute are Chief Executive, Deputy
Director (Educational Development and Design), Corporate Services
Manager, Deputy Director (Operations), Deputy Director (Information
Services), and Director, International Programs and Projects
Mr Bruce
Mackenzie PSM
Mr Frank Virik
Mr Enzo Spangher
Corporate Services
Manager
Responsibility for the
management of the
Institute’s corporate
services, financial
resources and the
development of
strategies to optimise
the provision and
use of funds in
accordance with
Institute objectives
and government
requirements.
6
Deputy Director
(Information
Services and
Campus Manager
Moorabbin)
Responsibility
for technology
infrastructure and
management
of the Moorabbin
campus.
Mr Bruce Prescott
Ms Mary Faraone
Chief Executive
Deputy Director
(Educational
Development and
Design)
Responsibility for
the management
of program
development and
delivery at the
Institute to ensure
the needs of
government, industry
and the wider
community are met.
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
Responsibility for
the effective
and efficient
management of
the Institute.
Mr David Endean
Director International
Programs and
Projects
Responsibility
for international
operations, projects
and the International
Centre.
Deputy Director
(Operations)
Responsibility
for the planning,
co-ordination and
development of
facilities, minor
works, property
services and security.
2007 Annual Report: Organisational Chart
Institute Board
Building and
Planning
Committee
Finance
Committee
Business
Development
Committee
Remuneration
Committee
Audit
Committee
Investment
Committee
Higher
Education
Academic
Committee
Bruce Mackenzie
Chief Executive
Mary Faraone
Deputy Director
Educational Development
and Design
• Academic Management
• Holmesglen Training and Development/Corporate Improvement Unit
• Flexible Learning Unit
• Teaching Centres
- Applied Technology (APT)
- Building Industry Training Centre (BITC)
- Business Services Centre (BSC)
- Centre for Language Programs (CLP)
- Design, Arts and Science (DAS)
- Health, Human and Community Services (HHCS)
- Hospitality, Cookery & Bakery
- Horticulture, Tourism and Recreation (HHTR)
• Vocational College
Enzo Spangher
Corporate Services
Manager
• Finance
• Personnel
• Purchasing
Bruce Prescott
Deputy Director
David Endean
Director
Frank Virik
Deputy Director
Operations
International
Centre
Information
Services and
Campus Manager
Moorabbin
• Facilities Planning
and Development
• Property Services
• Security
• Waverley Campus Manager
• Rural Learning Centre
• International Projects
• International Centre
for Students
• Technology Services
• Information Commons
• Media Services
• Registrar
• Educational Support
- Student Services
- Fitness Centre
Avril Reagon
Business Development
Manager
• Marketing
• Community and Industry
Short Courses
• Hemisphere Hotel
& Conference Centre
• Holmesglen Employment
Victoria & South Australia
• Conference Centre/
Corporate Suites
• Corporate Art
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2007 Annual Report: Retrospective 2007
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE was officially opened in February
1982 on the former site of Holmesglen Constructions in
Batesford Road, Chadstone. The site had been developed as
an armaments factory during World War II and was later used
by the Victorian Housing Commission for the production of
pre-fabricated concrete housing.
Ramlegh Park, the Institute’s rural property located five
kilometres from Eildon and purchased in 2003, will be
developed as a recreation and educational facility for students
and staff. Significant work has been undertaken at the site,
and work continues on the student and staff conference
facility.
An Institute Council comprising representatives from industry,
trade unions, Malvern City Council, staff and students was
established in 1982. Holmesglen was incorporated under
the Post-Secondary Act (1978) to provide a range of general
TAFE programs for the community and basic training for all
the trades associated with the building and construction
industry. The first class conducted at the Chadstone campus
was for Carpentry and Joinery apprentices in late January
1982. In 1987 the Council established an Overseas Education
Unit. Holmesglen is now the largest Victorian TAFE provider
for overseas students, and has undertaken project work
throughout South East Asia.
Following legislative change in 2003, which allowed TAFE
Institutes to develop and deliver higher education courses, the
Institute had four undergraduate degrees accredited in 2005.
The degrees in Vocational Education and Training, Business
(Executive Administration), Applied Science (Built Environment)
and Built Environment. Three new programs were accredited
in 2006, the Bachelor of Business (Accounting), the Associate
Degree in Business (Accounting), and the Associate Degree in
Social Science (Justice).
In the late 1980s Holmesglen Institute also occupied the
former Oakleigh Technical School site, however the Oakleigh
site had limited scope for expansion and offered little
opportunity for the Institute to broaden its profile in the
future. When the Institute took possession of the Waverley
site in 1992, formerly the Victorian State Schools Nursery, it
abandoned the Oakleigh site and its facilities were relocated
for use on the new Waverley Campus.
On 11 May 1994, Holmesglen became the first Australian
educational institution to be registered as having met ISO
9001/AS 3901/NZS 9001. As Australia’s first quality assured
educational institution, Holmesglen has established, both
locally and internationally, a reputation for excellence and
innovation in vocational education and training. Holmesglen’s
registration has been approved at all subsequent audits since
that time. On 1 January 2002 the Moorabbin campus of
Chisholm Institute of TAFE was transferred to Holmesglen,
along with approximately 200 staff and 15,000 students.
Major work was completed in 2005 on the Moorabbin campus
on the creation of two educational precincts, one at the
northern end of the campus (at the South Road frontage) and
one at the Southern end, to provide a total capacity of 30,000
students, both day and evening. The northern precinct now
houses a new teaching facility and the campus Information
Commons.
Major work was also completed in 2006 at the Waverley
campus, with the completion of two new educational facilities
at the southern and northern ends of the campus, together
with a new cafeteria.
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Significant work was undertaken during 2006 in planning
for the establishment of the Vocational College, an upper
secondary facility catering for 15 to 17 year old students. The
Vocational College opened in 2007 with an estimated 150
students.
The Institute has grown significantly since its beginnings in
1982, and is now the largest TAFE provider in Victoria. The
Institute continues to broaden its range of products and
services to ensure that it meets the expectations and needs
of its students, and is committed to providing excellent
teaching facilities for both its students and staff. The Minister
to whom the Institute was responsible in 2007 was the
Honourable Jacinta Allan MP, Minister for Skills and Workforce
Participation.
2007 Annual Report: Report of Operations
Major Changes
Following considerable planning and development the
Holmesglen Vocational College commenced operation to an
initial enrolment of 150 students. The students undertook the
Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning either at Intermediate
or Senior level offered across 13 industry streams: Carpentry,
Plumbing, Electrotechnology, Bricklaying, Tiling, Wall and
Ceiling Lining, Glass and Glazing, Painting and Decorating,
Hospitality, Sport and Recreation, Community Services,
Hairdressing and Beauty Therapy.
The Institute continued in 2007 with its successful
international project work and in partnership with the
Department of Education and Early Childhood Development
secured the tender to assist the Kingdom of Bahrain undertake
a major reform of its upper secondary vocational education.
The three year project commenced in June 2007, with the
mobilisation of the Holmesglen team consisting of seven long
term advisors. In August 2007 a group of 22 Bahraini teachers
attended a two week professional development program at
the Moorabbin Campus and in September 2007 a pilot with
100 students commenced in two Bahraini upper secondary
schools.
Operational objectives for 2007 were set out in the Institute’s
Performance Agreement with the Office of Training and
Tertiary Education (OTTE). The key reporting requirements
related to the following areas:
•Financial Statements and Reports
•Annual Student Statistical Report
•Staffing
•Verifiable Student Contact Hours and Invalid Enrolments
•Koori Participation and Completion Rates
•Youth Pathways and Managed Individual Pathways
•Capital / Infrastructure Program
•Environmental Sustainability
•Utilisation of Training Facilities
•Innovation Fund Reports
All reports were provided by the due date. In 2007 the
Institute achieved the objectives documented in the
performance agreement with the Victorian Learning and
Employment Skills Commission.
Key priorities for the Institute during 2007 included:
•meeting the Weighted Training Hour
•implementing the Innovation Fund – A New Way of Skilling
Victorians
•delivering an alternative upper secondary school model
focused on vocational training
Delivery of Weighted
Training Hours
The Institute met the Performance Agreement target of
delivering a minimum 6,129,184 WTH in 2007 in accordance
with the Council’s 2007 Training Plan and also met the
delivery of Industry Priority Targets as set in the Performance
Agreement. The Module Load Completion Rate for 2007 was
77%.
Innovation Fund – A New Way
of Skilling Victorians
Building on the 2006 initiative, the aim of the 2007 Innovation
Fund project was to provide practical strategies on how
training, particularly in the skill shortage industries, for
example, building and construction, could be more accessible
and attractive to mature age workers (35 and older) seeking
a career move, and unqualified workers in the industry. The
research undertaken during 2006 raised a number of issues
in relation to the low completion rate of apprentices and
in particular the attitude of employers, and the length of
indenture for apprentices. This project focussed on providing
practical guidance and clear trialling of new methods of
skilling Victorians.
The main outcomes and achievements of the project included:
• Industry stakeholders not supportive of a new curriculum
model for mature age entrants to the industry.
• Development and implementation of a skill recognition
process for existing workers without formal qualifications in
the bricklaying and carpentry sectors. The trial participants
commenced in late 2007 and will continue their skill gap
training in 2008.
• Skill recognition model for existing workers endorsed by
industry stakeholders.
• The 2007 project will continue in 2008 for existing
bricklaying and carpentry sectors and will be extended across
additional trade sectors.
Holmesglen Vocational College
Holmesglen Vocational College opened its doors in February
2007 to enrolled students from 58 postcode areas across
Melbourne. The Hon Jacinta Allan MP, Minister for Skills and
Workforce Participation showed her support for the College
on the first day of the program by attending a welcome
ceremony. By year’s end, 191 students had enrolled in what is
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2007 Annual Report: Report of Operations
now seen as a very successful new program with outstanding
facilities based at the Moorabbin Campus.
Vocational College provides a transition for young people
between middle secondary programs and vocational learning
programs and employment. The College aims to facilitate
the personal support framework of groups of friends, mentor
teachers and personal and career counselling to enable them
to grow into confident, capable and responsible young adults.
Effective communication between parents and Group Mentor
Teachers is seen as an important part of helping students in
making this transition.
For many students the program meant a very positive reengagement with education and an exposure for the first
time to applied vocational learning. One publicly recognised
success was that of Senior VCAL student, Ben Howden,
awarded an Australian Vocational Student Prize for 2007,
presented by Senator Kay Patterson.
By a number of measures, the Holmesglen Vocational
College has experienced a very strong start. In addition to
solid enrolments, the number of students ‘dropping out’
has been very low with almost all students continuing on to
pre-apprenticeships, apprenticeships or certificate courses.
Extensive surveying of students, parents and staff revealed a
very high level of satisfaction with the program.
Substantial preparation of curriculum and teaching resources
preceded the opening of the College providing students
access to a broad range of curriculum choice. The curriculum
diversity enables students to experience a number of
vocational learning areas to assist them make an effective
choice of vocational career pathway. Learning programs were
conducted through outstanding workshop facilities, except
for Hairdressing and Beauty Therapy which was delivered in
partnership with Headmasters Academy. The emphasis on
project-based learning resulted in students producing a wide
range of well-crafted small items such as coffee tables and also
taking part in service industry projects such as the operation of
the Retail Bakery in the Hospitality Department.
Students also participated in a Personal Development program
which included a substantial and very practical Life Skills
component and a Sports and Arts elective program. Broad
choice remained a central feature of the electives, largely
reflecting student preferences but also introducing to many
students new activities through which they could build skills,
leadership and self-confidence. Elective activities included: AFL
football (in partnership with the Oakleigh Chargers Football
Club), soccer, cricket, baseball, volleyball, art, art and music
multimedia, outdoor recreation and fashion design.
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One feature of the sports program was the opportunity
for students to compete against secondary schools in the
region in the Victorian Secondary Schools Sports Association
competition.
Another important component of the course has been the
introduction of students to the world of employment through
Occupational Health and Safety training, industry specific
training and, perhaps most importantly, programs of work
placement in Terms 2 and 4 - organised with the support of
local community organisation – Youth Connect.
With acute workforce skills shortages and a significant number
of young people unsure about future career choices and not
always able to participate in high quality vocational programs,
Holmesglen Vocational College has provided a new model for
upper secondary vocational programs.
Student Satisfaction Survey 2007
The 2007 Student Satisfaction Survey was conducted across
23 non-apprenticeship courses and eight apprenticeship/
trades courses across all campuses. In total, 717 students were
surveyed.
For the apprentice/trades course respondents 92.6 percent of
respondents reported they were ‘satisfied’ or ’very satisfied’
with their course overall. For the non-apprentice respondents
surveyed, overall satisfaction levels were even higher with 93.2
percent reporting that they were ’satisfied’ or ’very satisfied’
with their course overall.
Teaching and assessment was the most highly rated area
overall for both groups. Within this area, teachers’ knowledge
of subject content and teachers’ general reliability were the
two most highly rated aspects for both apprentice and nonapprentice respondents.
Non-apprentice respondents rated safety on campus and
the friendliness of staff most highly of all the non-teaching
aspects, while for apprentices, size of classrooms, tools and
equipment and friendliness of staff in general were the most
highly rated aspects besides teaching.
Information Requirement
In compliance with the requirements of the Ministerial
Directions of the Minister for Finance, details in respect of
the information items below are available to the relevant
Ministers, Members of Parliament and the public (subject to
the Freedom of Information Act, if applicable).
Consistent with the requirements of the Financial
Management Act 1994, Holmesglen Institute of TAFE has
prepared material on the following items, details of which are
available on request:
• Statement regarding declarations of pecuniary interest;
• Shares held beneficially by senior officers as nominees of a
statutory authority or subsidiary;
• Publications and where they are located;
• Changes in process, fees, charges ,rates and levies;
• Major external reviews
• Major research and development activities;
• Overseas visits undertaken;
• Major promotional, public relations and marketing
activities;
• Assessments and measures undertaken to improve the
occupational health and safety of employees;
• Industrial relations issues; and major committees sponsored
by Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
Enquiries regarding the information should
be directed in writing to:
Board Secretary
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
PO Box 42
HOLMESGLEN VIC 3148
Report of Operations for 2007
The Institute has had another successful year, revenue for 2007 has increased by 5.8% while expenditure increased by only
6.3%. The Institute continues to reduce its reliance on government funds.
2007
2006
2005
2004
$000
$000
$000
$000
Operating Revenue
150,002
141,342
124,972
112,436
Operating Expenses
(128,694)
(120,633)
(113,701)
(107,688)
Operating Result
21,308
20,709
11,721
4,748
The figures are shown in the format required by the Financial Management Act 1994. There were no consultancies during
2007 costing in excess of $100,000. There were 55 consultancies during 2007 costing less than $100,000. The total cost of
these engagements was $687,014.
Information prepared for the Report of Operations has been prepared and verified by
Mr Bruce Mackenzie, PSM,
Chief Executive
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- Teaching Centre Reports
- Facilities
- Administrative Department Reports
The Institute remains committed to a vigorous and robust
course profile which meets not only the needs of industry but
also the demands of students and the community to provide
excellence in vocational learning with qualifications suited to
an ever changing workforce. Courses are suitable for school
leavers as well as mature age students who undertake training
to enter, or re-enter, the workforce, advance in their profession
or change career direction.
Access: Teaching Centre Reports
Centre for Applied Technology
The Centre for Applied Technology comprises two departments
– Computing and Information Technology which run courses
at both Chadstone and Moorabbin and the Engineering and
Electrotechnology Department based at Moorabbin.
Computing and Information Technology offers IT courses
from Certificate II to degree studies. Engineering and
Electrotechnology offers training in electrical studies,
engineering, fabrication, electrotechnology and airconditioning.
Meeting the Needs of Students
In 2007, Youth Connect continued to be an important source
of students offering Certificate I courses in Automotive
Accessory Fitting, Boating, Engineering and Information
Technology. Many of these courses were aimed at year 10
students wishing to enter the industry. All courses run in 2007
were very successful and the students highly motivated.
Air-conditioning delivered at the pre-apprenticeship and
apprenticeship levels gained popularity. Within a skills
shortage area and the demand for air-conditioning courses
increased, it is predicted that another workshop will be needed
for future years. An alliance with the Air-Conditioning and
Mechanical Contractors Association continued to provide upto-date knowledge, skills and industry practices.
Electrical studies continued to grow, particularly in the preapprenticeship arena with 2007 workshops timetabled to
capacity.
A highly public and emerging area within electrotechnology
was renewable energy. The Centre will build a Renewable
Energy Centre in early 2008 to offer programs aimed at
solar energy installers. It is also planned to introduce this
component in to apprenticeship programs to give Holmesglen
electrical apprentices an “edge” over other apprentices.
Demand for training within the Engineering areas has
remained steady for 2007
The depressed Information Technology training situation
maintained a steady level of enrolment with the Certificate II
in Information Technology continuing to be a popular course.
Development started on a Holmesglen degree in Information
Technology based around the SAP platform. SAP Australia has
been keenly involved in the development of this degree; slated
for delivery in 2009.
Alliances and Partnerships
The Computing and Information Technology Alliance with
Global Online Learning, a graduate recruitment organisation
for employment at IBM, ATO and National Bank continued
with a unique program allowing students to be paid to
complete a degree during school holidays and work at other
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times with their employer. Holmesglen students have won
scholarships, which is a reflection of the high esteem in which
the department and its students are held.
The Computing and Information Technology department has
also entered into an Alliance with SAP Australia within their
University Alliance Program. Holmesglen is the first TAFE
to enter into such an agreement and many advantages for
Holmesglen and the degree students will be realised from this
alliance.
Engineering has a strategic alliance with ISCAR, a multinational
tooling company, and a technical partnership with Renishaw
providing equipment, training and support to Holmesglen
in return for the use of the facility to conduct seminars.
As a direct result of the new equipment, the Australian
Manufacturing Technology Institute Limited selected
Holmesglen to develop and deliver their Advanced HighSpeed CNC Machining course. The Fabrication Department
continued the sponsorship arrangement with Metabo,
providing power tools at a substantially reduced cost.
The Centre’s alliance with the AMCA continued to prove
very beneficial to air-conditioning courses. AMCA supported
Holmesglen from the planning stage of the themed VCAL
through to the design and development of the apprenticeship
course. AMCA’s insight with industry is invaluable to the
Centre, and provides prominence to Holmesglen’s airconditioning courses.
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
During 2007 Engineering continued the process of upgrading
equipment with the purchase of new equipment including
lathes and a new Mazak Integrex CNC machine. Building
works were started on a new “junior” workshop aimed at the
secondary school student and pre-apprenticeship levels. The
junior workshop will comprise smaller lathes, mills and welding
booths. Electrotechnology’s telecommunications workshop
was completed and PABX equipment was donated by NEC.
The Institute has invested heavily within the Engineering area
to provide leading edge technology to students. Holmesglen
has one of the best training facilities in Australia and its
ongoing alliances will ensure access to the latest technology.
Building Industry Training Centre
The Building Industry Training Centre (BITC) provides training
programs at the pre apprenticeship, apprenticeship and
diploma level across most sectors of the building industry. It
also offers a degree studies program in building: the Bachelor
of Applied Science (Built Environment). The Centre works
closely with companies and industry organisations in the
development of industry specific training programs and assists
community organisations through a range of building project
work. It comprises the following departments: Advanced
Building Technology; Carpentry, Glass and Glazing; Plumbing
and Construction Finishing; Trowel Trades; and Industrial Skills. It also operates training programs from both the Chadstone
and Moorabbin campuses and an off campus location in
Dingley.
Achieving Goals
2007 proved to be an excellent year for the BITC. Training
programs at all levels experienced high levels of demand and
student numbers remained strong. Fee for service activity,
incorporating a range of industry focused training programs,
maintained steady growth and the Centre’s contribution to a
range of community projects also continued.
Growth and Expansion
Diploma level programs in building, building design and
drafting, building surveying and the built environment were in
high demand reflecting the need for high level training within
a thriving building and construction sector.
Holmesglen’s Bachelor of Applied Science (Built Environment)
degree, incorporating an innovative problem based approach
to learning and assessment, experienced strong enrolments
and has been an undoubted success which is reflected
in student results, completion rates and levels of student
satisfaction. Further professional specialisation degrees in
construction management and economics, building surveying,
property valuation and facilities management have been
accredited in 2007 and are being prepared for possible delivery
in 2008.
The demand for apprenticeship training remained strong and
the BITC continued to attract large numbers of apprentices
across most trade areas, particularly in carpentry and
plumbing. It is also noteworthy that other trades, such as
wall and ceiling lining, wall and floor tiling, glazing, and
stonemasonry showed similarly strong levels of demand,
although demand for training places in floor finishing and
covering continued to decline. Places in pre apprenticeship
programs were highly sought after and a range of initiatives
from departments in the Centre resulted in an expansion
of the pathways program for secondary school students.
The VCAL trades program offered through the Vocational
College proved extremely popular with students, providing
them opportunities to later take up pre-apprenticeships or
apprenticeships in building.
Demand for Industrial Skills courses, in particular industrial
rope access and tower rescue increased, and a new training
program in fencing was introduced. Training in scaffolding/
forklift training remained strong throughout 2007, reflecting
the vibrant state of the construction sector. Industry based
fee for service work continued to expand with training being
provided to a range of companies and organizations. The BITC
also introduced or supported a range of specialised programs
in heritage training through the Specialist Centre for Heritage
Trades, including an introduction to the Burra Charter,
the Victorian Stucco Seminar and lime workshops held in
conjunction with International Specialised Skills Institute. In
terms of facilities, work has been completed on a plumbing
stack allowing for the delivery of mechanical skills and sanitary
training, whilst the new cutting room, portable power tool
and classroom complex for carpentry training now provides
apprentices and pre-apprentices with a modern, ‘state-of-theart’ facility.
Community Projects
‘Live work’ training, based on a range of community projects,
continued to provide non apprentice trade students with the
skills and work ready experience considered necessary by
today’s employers. Under the auspices of the Carpentry, Glass
and Glazing Department, pre apprentices from a broad range
of building training programs such as carpentry, painting and
decorating, floor finishing and covering, wall and floor tiling,
bricklaying and plastering worked on these projects.
Building projects undertaken included work for: Parks Victoria;
the Guide Dogs Association of Victoria; Fenwick Street
Kindergarten; Best Chance (formerly the Child and Family
Care Network); Care Force Church Mt Evelyn and the Alfred
Hospital.
Alliances and Partnerships
The Centre has been particularly successful in maintaining
and extending training and other partnerships with
industry, government authorities and the higher education
sector. These initiatives have included: preparation for
the implementation of First Rate Five Training Program in
conjunction with the Sustainability Victoria; the continued
delivery of project management training for Australian
Shop and Office Fitting Industry Association; the Security of
Payments course conducted in conjunction with the Building
Commission; a Continuing Professional Development Program
in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Building; and
the preparation of a training program for site supervisors
and project managers in Malaysia, in conjunction with IJM
Malaysia. The Plumbing Enterprise Unit experienced another
highly successful year in the delivery of industry training
programs across the State, including: backflow prevention;
confined space entry; split air conditioning installation; Class A
asbestos removal, Plastek accreditation, estimating and costing
for plumbers; trench shoring and safety and installation of
residential and domestic fire sprinkler systems.
Bricklaying staff continued to work closely with Australian
Brick and Blocklaying Training Foundation Ltd to identify
issues related to attracting more apprentices to the trade and
to ensure a higher level of completion for apprentices and to
host a number of the “Trial a Trades” programs. Wall and
floor tiling staff continued to work in close co operation with
the Master Builders Association of New South Wales to deliver
a training program and certificate in waterproofing to the
existing workforce.
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Other training and industry initiatives included: stilts training
for fibrous plasterers; CSR product training; insulation
installers course; a dry stonewalling program; Wattyl Paints
consultancy training program; sponsorship arrangements
with CSR (including a major sponsorship package of the
wall and ceiling lining apprenticeship training program
that was re-signed in 2006); and a proposed arrangement
with Skills Tasmania to provide apprenticeship training for
Tasmanian stonemasons. Donations and other support from
a range of industries included: a partnership with Volvo to
support earthmoving training programs; connections with
Graphisoft (provider of ArchiCAD software); Bluescope and
Spanset; AIRCO; Pilkington Australia; DMS Glass; Axess (lead
lighting donations); DeWalt and Stanley Tools; Selkirk and
Austral for brick donations; roof tiling suppliers such as CSR
Monier, Bristile, CSR Wonderlich and Boral; Dulux paints; La
Farge, Rondo, A.B.A Norcros Building Products, Architectural
Structural Adhesive, Davco Construction Materials, Granito
Australian Building Ceramics, and Beaumont and Johnson
Tiles.
Staff Excellence
Throughout the Centre staff participated in a range of
conferences and professional development activities as well
as extensive consultation with industry to identify issues
related to employment, industry retention, the need for staff
to undergo further training in current industry practices, and
an industry induction program. Other accolades for staff
included an International Specialised Skills Institute Fellowship
in lead lighting as well as attendance at heritage seminars
at Beechworth and in London. Staff conferences included
the annual Plumbing, Sheet metal, Coppersmith Instructors
Conference in Albury and the Building and Construction
Conference at Albury. Other programs were: Workplace
assessor training programs; Safety Map awareness training;
the Diploma in VET(as well as five staff completing their
degree studies in the Bachelor in VET); and Training Package
review and evaluation. Advanced Building Technology staff
participated in an extensive program designed to prepare all
diploma level programs for the implementation of training
package qualifications. Staff also attended a range of careers
nights and training expos in co-operation with industry
associations and cluster groups of schools.
Student Success
BITC students were again prominent as recipients of a range
of awards throughout 2007. Successful departmental
Awards Evenings were conducted across the Centre as part
of Holmesglen’s Awards Festival and were well supported by
industry. Building design and technology diploma student,
Graeme Parker, won the 2006 award for outstanding diploma
student. At the Master Plumbers and Mechanical Services
Association of Victoria’s 100th Annual Gold Medal and
Training Awards Holmesglen trained plumbing apprentices
won 10 awards and the Carpentry Department celebrated
the success of Christopher Lynch, who not only won the best
apprentice award for the department, but also the Master
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Builders Award at both the state and national level for the
best apprentice of the year. Further recognition of apprentice
achievements were seen with Shane Gray, a floor finishing
apprentice, awarded the flooring award at the furnishing
industry association awards. Holmesglen apprentices were
also successful at the State final of the WorldSkills competition
winning awards for painting, wall and ceiling lining, bricklaying
and tile-laying.
Business Services Centre
The Business Services Centre (BSC) remained the largest
teaching centre within Holmesglen, delivering a total of
2,067,574 student contact hours in 2007 - an increase of
over 5% on 2006. The departments for business studies and
administration and management studies are located at the
Chadstone campus with Moorabbin campus offering a wide
range of business and administration courses.
Graduate and Degree programs included new business degrees
and also conducted the Deakin University Transfer Program,
Charles Sturt University business and hotel management
degrees, and a range of graduate certificates. 2007 saw the
first cohort of students complete the Bachelor of Business
(Executive Administration) and Bachelor of VET. The Bachelor
of Business (Accounting) was delivered for the first time,
with the Australian Society of Certified Accountants (CPA)
granting accreditation thereby recognising the quality of the
program and enabling students to benefit from membership of
this highly regarded professional association. Holmesglen is the
first TAFE, and only the second non-university in Australia, to
be granted CPA accreditation.
The Offshore Department has continued to increase student
numbers and programs, co-ordinating the delivery of programs
at five campus locations in China. Approximately 20 BSC staff
travelled to China to assist with the delivery and assessment
of programs. Accounting and a new course in International
Business were introduced in 2007.
Growth and Expansion
Local demand for business courses remained strong but
the major growth area in 2007 was seen in the number of
international students enrolled in business courses which
reached record levels, with over 700 students enrolled by the
end of the year.
The largest course student numbers in BSC were Accounting,
Administration, Legal Practice and Management, Human
Resource Management, International Trade and Marketing.
Banking & Finance and Advertising were also popular courses.
Fee for service courses included the Certificate IV in Training
and Assessment, the Diploma in Financial Planning and the
National Custom Brokers’ Program, which all had good
numbers.
In addition, a range of graduate certificates were offered,
which have proved popular with mature age students for
many years.
Meeting the Needs of Students
As well as providing students with quality teaching, BSC also
provided additional activities to enhance learning. A good
number of BSC students continued to engage with industry in
undertaking real projects with many examples of outstanding
industry presentations delivered to the industry representatives.
Degree students were involved in industry placements with
good success. Legal Practice students participated in a range
of worthwhile field trips and Human Resource students
enjoyed the input of a number of guest speakers from
industry. Administration students organised and conducted a
conference on the environment, Going Green, which was well
supported by industry speakers.
In 2007 staff used the TAFE Virtual Campus as an additional
resource for students. This has proven to be beneficial and
staff skills in blended e-learning have also been enhanced.
Christine Contessotto, Senior Educator of Accounting, was
recognised for her outstanding contribution to accounting
education being awarded the Holmesglen Educational
Excellence Award.
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
Moorabbin teaching facilities provided an excellent learning
environment with modern well equipped facilities. Staff
at Chadstone had three offices refurbished with a major
renovation of the main teaching areas, including two
simulated offices planned.
Centre for Design, Arts & Science
The Centre is comprised of the Departments of Arts,
Communications and Science, Furniture and Joinery
Manufacturing and Interior Decoration, Design Multimedia &
Art, and the Holmesglen Safety Unit.
Growth and Expansion
The dual diploma in Marketing and Advertising continued
to be a successful model and, in 2007, several other dual
diplomas were introduced, providing students with the
opportunity to obtain a second qualification with only a
relatively small additional weekly workload.
In 2007, there was an increase in the number of pathway
programs offered. Delivery in the outer eastern suburbs was
increased with a number of pathways programs conducted
on-site in fully equipped workshops at Cranbourne and
Pakenham.
The Business Services Centre also delivered VET in VCE to
secondary schools in the financial services area.
Community Projects
Staff Excellence
Teaching staff within the Centre continue to provide excellent
course delivery to students. Many held memberships of
industry associations and used these as a means of staying
abreast of current trends. BSC sponsored a variety of
professional development activities for staff. With the
increasing degree level delivery, a number of staff continued to
be supported in obtaining Masters qualifications.
Administrative staff completed an excellent job of providing
high levels of service to students and staff.
Subject evaluation processes were revised in 2007 and
provided much improved feedback from students regarding
delivery. This included the ability to provide teachers with
an indication of their performance, most of whom scored
extremely well.
Very successful residential staff conferences were held in
September and December with good interaction between BSC
staff achieved and planning objectives for 2008 being set.
In 2007, the Furniture & Joinery Manufacturing Department
assisted the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation
by manufacturing kitchens for five Victorian state schools. In
total, five schools were supplied with twenty sets of open
kitchen cabinets which were constructed on a cost-only
recovery basis.
Meeting the Needs of Students
Students from the Design, Multimedia and Art department
where supported in promoting their work through exhibitions
both on-campus and at external venues including the
Australian Centre for the Moving Image.
Students continued to showcase their work at the ARC21
Gallery located at Moorabbin with a number of exhibitions
held throughout the year.
Two staff from the Furniture Manufacturing Department
travelled to Germany for training on the latest CNC
equipment. This training will enhance the quality and
effectiveness of CNC training in this department.
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Alliances and Partnerships
The Furniture and Joinery Manufacturing Department entered
into a partnership with the University of Melbourne to provide
ongoing assessment, training and advice to the Laos Furniture
Industry through an ACIAR Federal Aid Program.
Major Projects
The Furnishing Industry Design and Innovation Centre, or
FIDIC, was opened by the Honourable Jacinta Allan late in
the year. The Centre was launched with a number of new,
innovative furniture designs. It is planned that these, or similar
pieces, will be manufactured by industry for the retail market
in 2008.
Several leading furniture designers are currently working with
FIDIC to realise original designs for the domestic market.
Lynette Buckley, a Holmesglen VCE student, was recognized as
the state’s oldest VCE graduate and received newspaper and
TV coverage.
In Professional Writing & Editing, Margaret Campion’s history
“ 3AW is Melbourne - 75 years of Radio “ was published.
Glenn Ford’s autobiography “Rebel with a Cause” was also
published. This was a proud achievement for Glenn, keen to
write of his experiences after being crippled in a childhood car
accident.
In Live Theatre, two seasons of original Australian short plays
were staged.
In May, five Holmesglen Advanced Diploma of Screen students
were selected as finalists of the 15/15 Film Festival and had
their film screened internationally.
The Furniture and Joinery Manufacturing Department
continues to provide furniture for Holmesglen Departments
over three campuses.
Six students from the Graphic Art and Design Department
achieved success at the national Southern Cross Packaging
Awards for 2007 and the Australian Paper Saxton Scholars,
Awards.
Staff Successes
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
A number of teaching staff gained recognition in their areas of
expertise. Jason Boviard, a sessional teacher in the Certificate
IV Live Production Theatre and Events, won Lighting Design
awards in a number of competitions in Victoria and New
Zealand.
A new facility was opened for the Screen, Animation and
Multimedia areas at the Waverley campus. This refurbished
facility will allow delivery of a new Bachelor of Screen
Production degree to required industry standards.
Tony Woolrich, a teacher of Visual Arts at Moorabbin, received
first place in the 3D category for his sculpture “Malvern Star”,
at the Artz Blitz competition held at the Kingston Arts Centre
Gallery.
Sharon Billinge, a teacher of Visual Arts at Moorabbin, won
a competition to be part of Art Melbourne, which showcases
affordable art at the Royal Exhibition Building in Carlton.
Bridget Hillebrand, a teacher of Visual Arts at Moorabbin, won
the 2D award and prize money for her mixed media work at
the Williamstown Festival Tattersall’s Contemporary Art Prize at
the Substation Arts Centre in Newport.
Cerise Ward-Furmston, a teacher of Visual Arts at Moorabbin,
had her artist book selected for the Southern Cross University
Artists’ Book Award 2007.
Student Successes
Holmesglen Furnishing apprentice Daniel Bittner was
named the best Cabinet Maker and the Victorian Furnishing
Apprentice of the year at the Furnishing Industry Association
of Australia training awards held in May in 2007.
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The Graphic Art and Design department was relocated to new
purpose built facilities at Chadstone. The refurbished area was
designed to replicate a graphic design environment.
Major Changes
In 2007 a restructure resulted in biomedical science moving
to form part of a new Centre for Health and Human Services,
while the Diploma of Conservation and Land Management
was relocated to Waverley campus to be administered by the
Horticulture Department.
Centre for Health, Human &
Community Services
One of the largest centres at Holmesglen, Health, Human
and Community Services (HHCS), offers courses across three
campuses across a diverse range of areas. Early 2007 saw a
restructure within the Centre and the movement of biomedical
sciences from the Centre for Design, Arts and Science. This
led to the formation of a new department, Health Science
and Biotechnology, and the re-amalgamation of community
services courses within the Human and Community Services
Department across the Moorabbin and Waverley campuses.
Growth and Expansion
HHCS experienced significant growth over the year. In 2007
the Centre delivered 1,481,596 student contact hours, an
increase of 19% on 2006 figures (excluding the acquisition
of biomedical sciences). This large increase was due mainly
to the 196% growth in international student contact hours
related to increasing international student enrolments within
the Department of Human and Community Services at the
Waverley Campus.
Demand for many courses remained high. This was most
evident in the nursing area where approximately 1000 people
applied for 100 student places (an additional 100 student
places were filled easily by international students). There was
growth also in areas such as pathology, children’s services
and welfare with many graduates gaining employment prior
to course completion. The VET in Schools Certificate II in
Community Services also expanded from five groups to nine,
broadening distribution to the Peninsula VET Cluster.
Alliances and Partnerships
To ensure the integrity of courses the Centre continued to
work closely with industry partners in the development and
delivery of high quality education and training.
Visual arts projects provided opportunities for community
partnerships with Essex Heights Child Care Centre, Monash
Special Development School and the Department of Vocational
and Community Studies Work Education students. Lewis
Industries employees, MECWA and Winnacom clients have
continued to receive fee for service life skills training.
Holmesglen Gardening Service saw its eighth year of
traineeships in Certificate II in Horticulture and there was
service expansion to include five trainees in cleaning and two
in office administration. To ensure success of the initiative,
Holmesglen partnered with Eastworks Employment to provide
additional training, mentoring and support. Over seventy
young people with a disability have now had the opportunity
for employment while acquiring a valuable qualification. As
a result of this venture Eastworks Employment nominated the
service for the 2007 Prime Minister’s Employer of the Year
Awards and the national Diversity @ Work Awards.
Drawing on the many existing and long standing partnerships,
the Centre commenced the development of industry
reference groups representing five major fields of study children’s services, justice, community services, nursing and
biotechnology. These groups provide an excellent forum
for the ongoing review of curriculum and foster supportive
relationships with regard to the provision of student
placements.
There was a considerable focus on developing strategic
partnerships in the nursing area in 2007. As a result there
was significant improvement in the relationship between
Holmesglen and a number of key health care providers and
growing support for the delivery of a Bachelor of Nursing by
Holmesglen.
Students Achievements
The Centre successfully implemented another YAA company,
bringing the total to thirteen over the past seven years.
Work Education and VCAL Foundation students exhibited
five claymation animations in the Port Phillip “Armed and
Dangerous Film Festival”. Each film received standing ovations
and were further showcased at HHCS staff conferences.
Certificate of Transition Education students continued their
success in theatrical productions producing` The Land of
Torgor` with three public performances at Cromwell Road
Theatre, South Yarra.
The increasing pathways available to students saw a growing
number take up the option to study degree programs on
completion of their diploma courses. It is anticipated that in
future years with Holmesglen’s increasing higher education
capability, students will follow pathways into Holmesglen
degree programs. In order to facilitate this, the Centre is
customising courses to provide multiple outcomes.
Staff Achievements
Work Education staff at Chadstone and Moorabbin have
maintained Holmesglen Institute’s reputation as the largest,
most innovative TAFE in Victoria. Staff represented all
TAFE work education work programs at the inaugural Inner
Melbourne VET Cluster ‘Career Your Lifestyle Expo’ for
National Careers Development Week.
Twenty three staff from across the Centre attended auditor
training in 2007, bringing the Centre’s bank of trained auditors
to 32. Staff participated enthusiastically in a ‘Review Festival’
in which 101 procedures were audited across all departments.
To support the active development of e-learning within the
Centre the E-learning Group was established. This group is
led by the Centre’s ELF and comprises e-learning ‘champions’
from across each of the major course areas. Champions have
the opportunity to further develop their own skills and have
piloted several successful e-learning activities.
With the release of a new National Health Training Package in
July 2007 staff undertook major redevelopment of nursing and
pathology courses.
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Obtaining clinical placements for students proved challenging
in 2007 and additional staff were employed to address this
situation. Placement Officers and Coordinators provide a vital
link in maintaining optimal relationships with industry.
Student Exchange Program
In 2007 a successful exchange program was implemented with
ITE College East in Singapore. Student exchanges took place
in both the nursing and biotechnology areas in Singapore and
in Australia. Exchange placements varied from three to four
weeks and all comprised a workplace experience.
Projects
Certificate III in Aged Care staff, supported by Holmesglen
Training and Development, delivered an inclusive e-learning
project. The project ensured mature aged students were
familiarised with computers and introduced to using TAFE VC.
In 2007 the Department of Human and Community Services
partnered with City of Kingston to deliver the Certificate III in
Children’s Services. This project, which commenced in 2005,
targets specific client groups of migrant women providing
them with the skills, knowledge and confidence needed to
seek employment.
In late 2006, the Centre, in conjunction with Holmesglen
Training and Development, successfully tendered to deliver the
Diploma of Community Services (Case Management) to case
managers employed throughout Australia within Salvation
Army Employment Plus. The project has been successfully
implemented and students are scheduled to complete in early
2008.
2007 Community Services Traineeship projects included the
following large employers: Salvation Army Employment and
Kingston, Monash and Bayside City Councils. Three traineeship
groups met the requirements of long term unemployed
students with complex educational and personal needs to
successful graduation and employment in the aged care and
disability fields.
New programs
The Centre succeeded in gaining accreditation to deliver
associate degrees in two major fields of study: social science
justice and early childhood education. Both courses will
commence in 2008 and provide pathways into bachelor
degrees within partner universities.
Development of the Diploma of Dental Technology
commenced in 2007 and a ‘state-of-the-art’ dental laboratory
was established on the Chadstone campus to cater for
international and local students. The course will commence in
2008.
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The Diploma of Disability was offered for the first time at
Chadstone campus. The Diploma is offered through both
flexible and on-campus delivery.
In October 2007 a Bachelor of Nursing curriculum document
was submitted for accreditation following an extensive 18
month development process. This degree has resulted in much
public debate, however it is steadily gaining support within
the nursing profession. It is anticipated that the degree will be
offered for the first time in 2009.
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
Significant remodelling of the Work Education staffroom was
completed in 2007 greatly improving working conditions for
Work Education staff. A retail outlet was also created at the
Chadstone campus to enable Certificate in Work Education
students to develop their communication and numeracy skills.
Centre for Language Programs
and International Centre
The Centre for Language Programs has the International
Centre and the Language Centre under its umbrella. The
International Centre is responsible for the management
and administration of the Institute’s international students
program, as well as off-shore programs and projects. The
Language Centre provides a wide range of language and
literacy programs we well as teacher training courses and
support services for non-English speaking students enrolled
in courses throughout the Institute. In addition, the Centre
provides a small range of fraud prevention courses and
develops new programs for the Institute.
Language Centre
Language Centre courses continued to be in strong demand
in 2007 with enrolments totalling almost two million student
contact hours. There was growth in the Centre’s fee for
service programs.
These programs include:
•Adult Multicultural Education Programs (AMEP) for recently
arrived migrants
•Language, Literacy and Numeracy Programs (LLNP) for the
unemployed
•Workplace English Language and Literacy Programs (WELL)
for migrants in the workplace
•Teacher training programs for teachers of English as a
Second Language
ELICOS (English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas
Students) enrolments grew by 27% to over a million student
contact hours.
The language support tutorials provided to all students of
non-English speaking backgrounds continued to receive very
positive feedback from students, parents and counsellors,
and played a large role in the high pass rates of international
students. Flexible Learning Centres at both Moorabbin and
Chadstone campuses continued to provide a high value added
service to students intent on acquiring English language
proficiency rapidly. Teacher training programs continued to be
in strong demand.
International Centre
International Centre revenue grew by 35% to $32.8 million
from $24.3 million in 2006. International student enrolments
grew by 33% to almost 6,500 students. Enrolments from
China and the Indian sub-continent were particularly strong.
While the Institute’s key source countries continue to be in
Asia, there was strong growth in enrolments from Africa, Latin
America and Europe.
The bulk of international student enrolments continue to be in
ELICOS, business, hospitality and nursing. There has also been
a notable increase in enrolments in trade courses – especially
in the engineering trades.
Visa restrictions imposed on the VET sector by the Department
of Immigration and Citizenship have continued to make it
difficult to recruit international students for VET diploma and
certificate courses. The Institute has packaged VET courses
with higher education courses in order to overcome this
barrier. The Institute continued to play a key role in working
with TAFE Directors Australia to effect changes in the visa
regime.
The Centre conducted a very successful conference for its
agents and counsellors in Guilin in China, as well as hosting
visits to the Institute from agents and educational institutions
from around the world.
The Institute undertook a capacity building project for
the Eastern Technical Institute at Batticoloa in Sri Lanka,
funded by the Department of Premier & Cabinet, which
involved curriculum and resource development, teacher and
management training, facilities upgrade and the procurement
of equipment and tools for learning purposes.
An agreement was also signed with IJM to deliver building
supervision training at IJM building sites throughout Malaysia
to commence in February 2008.
Risk Management/Offshore Programs
The nature of identified strategic and operational risks and the
strategies established to manage such risks.
1. The principal areas of risk for the organisation in its
engagement in international activities are identified, and
detailed, in the Holmesglen Institute Risk Management
Plan’s Risk Register.
2. The principal areas of risk for the organisation in its
engagement in international activities, with particular
relevance to the overseas delivery of its programs, are
encompassed within the Risk Management Plan.
3. The Risk Categories relevant to the organisation’s activities,
including offshore programs, include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Commercial
Strategic Context
External Factors
Information Technology
Strategic Planning and Management
Liability
Human Resources
Safety and Security
4. Each Risk Category specifies:
The Centre also commenced a successful student exchange
program with ITE East in Singapore.
As a result of new legislation in China stopping any new
partnership agreements and placing some restrictions on
existing agreements, offshore enrolments stabilised in 2007.
The Centre again conducted extensive familiarisation and
teacher training for large groups of teachers working in
partner institutions in China and also delivered Certificate IV in
Training & Assessment to VET teachers in Chongqing.
The Centre undertook the project management for the
China-Australia Senior VET Administrators Training Project.
This government project is facilitated through TAFE Directors
Australia and is aimed at capacity building, sustainable
outcomes and relationship building at the senior management
level.
4.1Risk Definitions: eg under the Commercial category, a
broad definition such at Threat to International Market.
Under the broad Risk Definition are noted specific defined
risks relevant to the broad Risk Definition (eg under the
Risk Definition ‘Threat to International Market’ – the
specific defined risk of ‘deterioration of relations with
international partnership/s’.
4.2Consequences: the full range of consequences identified,
eg business interruption, damaged reputation, loss of
enterprise, morale, financial, human resources, loss of
students.
4.3Inherent Risk Ranking: ie Likely/Significant
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4.4Risk Management Strategy: strategies aimed at
addressing specific risks as defined, and in light of likely
identified consequences (such as strategies focusing on:
Student Satisfaction, Legislative Compliance, Retention
of Competitive Advantage, Monitoring, Protection of
International Partnerships, Monitoring Fees & Payments).
Centre for Hospitality, Cookery
and Bakery
• review viability of partnerships on an ongoing basis
• maintain a strong international agent’s network
• implement continual lobbying, advocacy, networking
processes
• allocate responsibilities with respect to safeguarding the
Institute’s international registration status
Substantial growth in Hospitality & Allied trade programs at
Holmesglen over the past ten years led to the establishment
of a Teaching Centre for Hospitality, Cookery and Bakery
Programs in February 2007. Teaching programs delivered
include:
• Hospitality Management
• Commercial Cookery
• Asian Cookery
• Patisserie
• Sommelier
• Food and Beverage Service
• Housekeeping
• Retail Bakery
In addition, new or revised/improved Risk Treatment Controls
are introduced as a matter of routine through review and
evaluation processes. Such new controls (as relevant to the
example noted immediately above) include:
The Centre also took responsibility for the operation of
the student training restaurants located on Waverley and
Moorabbin campuses, and retail bakery outlet at the
Moorabbin campus.
• allocate responsibilities with respect to the establishment
of, maintenance of, and review/evaluation of international
partnerships
• implement a regular partnership reciprocal visits program
• implementation of partnership staff training programs
Community Projects
4.5Risk Treatment Control: specific control measures to
address each identified Risk Management Strategy. eg
The Risk Management Strategy for Protecting International
Partnerships notes the Risk Treatment Control as:
The appalling service of Australian Government agencies in
relation to client service is difficult to minimise.
Staff Acheivements
Students and staff from the Centre for Hospitality, Cookery
and Bakery assisted both the Southmoor and East Burwood
Primary Schools in the establishment of Stephanie Alexander
Kitchen Garden Foundation programs. This support saw
Holmesglen trainers visiting the schools to demonstrate correct
handling and use of knives, supporting training of parents and
staff in food handling practices and assisting with fund raising
events.
Meeting the Needs of Students
Staff presentations were made at the AMEP National
Conference by:
Rita Chiu – ARED: Applications for Rapid e-Learning
Development
Elise Icten – In the Absence of Experience – Barriers to
Employment of Recent Migrant Professionals
Julia Lee – Stepping Out – Promoting Pathways to Further
Education & Training Among Recently Arrived Migrants
One of the key objectives of the Centre has been to provide
students with a wide range of practical training opportunities
both in the workplace and within the Institute. There has
been an expansion of the practical placement programs that
underpin courses which provided both new and existing
practical placement partners greater opportunity to provide
placement and subsequent employment opportunities.
Major Projects and Achievements
With the launch of the Holmesglen Vocational College,
the Centre for Hospitality, Cookery and Bakery started the
Breakfast Club which gave Vocational College students the
opportunity to operate Cilantro restaurant two mornings per
week and provide breakfast for Holmesglen students and staff.
This project not only provided students a great vocational
project, it also promoted the importance of a having a
good breakfast to students and staff prior to taking on the
challenges of the day.
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Cookery and Hospitality students played an important behind
the scenes role at the Good Food & Wine Show as they
assisted some of the top chefs from around the world to
prepare dishes for presentation at the Chef Celebrity Theatre,
others prepared the Wine Theatre for numerous sessions over
the duration of the show.
• The Hospitality Industry Showcase Dinner, with guest
speaker Stephanie Alexander
• Tastes of the East dinner
• Sommelier Dinner
Numerous other events throughout the year showcased the
excellent standards of students and staff.
The Centre also worked with Meat & Livestock Australia
throughout 2007 providing assistance in the presentation
of information days to assist chefs and butchers in the
preparation and presentation of meat cuts, recipe ideas and
background information on the process of getting product
from paddock to plate. The assistance provided by Meat &
Livestock Australia to the Holmesglen team, representing
greater Melbourne in the Tasting Australia Regional Food
Culinary Competition, was also greatly appreciated.
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
Student and Staff Successes
The success of staff and students who competed in a range of
bakery & culinary competitions in 2007 was outstanding, with
Holmesglen participants winning awards in all competitions.
• Scott Megee placed second runner-up in Le Coupe Down
Under, the Australian Artisan Bakery Cup. As a result of
this placing Scott will be a member of the team to represent
Australia at SIGEP Bread cup in 2008.
• Trainers Andrew Watt, Duncan White-Robertson, Dean
Flower and apprentice Cassandra Wills made up team
‘Greater Melbourne’ winning Best Entrée, Best Main and
placed second overall in the Tasting Australia Regional Food
Culinary Competition against 16 teams across Australia.
• Holmesglen team of Apprentices from the Waverley campus
won Gold and the perpetual trophy at the 2007 VIC TAFE
Cookery Challenge.
• The VIC TAFE individual cookery competition saw
Holmesglen full time and apprentice cookery students win
a number of Gold, Silver and Bronze medals, with Sutinee
Suntivatana winning the best overall cookery student of the
competition.
• Nine students, who completed VET/VCE Hospitality program
at Holmesglen in 2007, collected high achievement awards,
including Eve Wong who achieved a perfect score of 50 for
the VET/VCE Hospitality food & beverage stream.
Student and Staff Excellence
Throughout 2007 students and staff provided outstanding
dishes and service for a large number of special events:
• three nights of Academic Awards
• The Hospitality, Cookery & Bakery Outstanding Awards
Lunch
• catering for Lilydale Estate during the Grape Grazing
Festival
An additional unit kitchen was opened at the Waverley
campus, equipped to provide skills training in commercial
cookery and basic patisserie programs. A new bakery training
area was opened at the Moorabbin campus, to incorporate the
latest in computer controlled bakery and patisserie equipment.
Centre for Horticulture, Tourism
and Recreation
The Centre for Horticulture, Tourism and Recreation was
created in February 2007 with programs offered at two
campuses. Horticulture and floristry programs were delivered
in a purpose built facility on Waverley campus. Fitness, tourism
& events courses were delivered at the Waverley & Moorabbin
Campuses, with sport and outdoor recreation programs also
at Waverley campus. The Holmesglen Fitness Centre at
Moorabbin offered students, staff and community members
the opportunity improve their lifestyle.
Horticulture
The horticulture department delivered the expected numbers
of student contact hours for 2007. For the first time, the
Diploma in Conservation and Land Management was included
as a course offering. There were continued strong international
enrolments, with seven new groups commencing during 2007.
Industry and fee for service programs continued to maintain
their standing in contributing considerably to the horticulture
department profile.
At present, the horticulture industry is suffering from the
on-going drought conditions, with many sectors experiencing
considerable down turn. This is reflected in student enrolment
in some areas, however Holmesglen enrolments have been
strong.
Community projects
Community involvement and public contact remained an
ongoing part of training. Talks and short lectures maintained
popularity with groups, clubs and associations, delivered
during the year, at the Waverley campus and public venues.
Advice and assistance has been provided to school and local
organisations in regard to landscape design and garden
development.
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23
Diploma of Horticulture students designed and assisted in the
construction of a garden for the elderly at the Cumberland
View Retirement Village, while international students
constructed a kitchen garden at Burwood Heights Primary
School as part of an ongoing association with the Stephanie
Alexander Foundation. This will be an ongoing project.
A considerable number of plants, propagated by students from
all programs, were donated to organisations to plant as part of
redevelopment and for sale at fundraising events.
The horticulture department was again involved in the
International Flower and Garden Show, with a display
constructed by the floristry and international students, and
participation in the Achievable Gardens and Fleming’s design
competitions.
Meeting the Needs of students
The changing nature of the horticulture industry has required
the department to be responsive to the special needs of
students and industry in training requirements. This resulted in
the development of programs relating to plant selection, water
use, tree selection and basic tree climbing using climbing aids.
Changes in the legislation concerning chemical application,
has required retraining of staff to enable them to deliver
the AgVet program, to reflect the amended legislative
requirements and changing industry needs. Programs
containing the new material have been successfully delivered.
Alliances and Partnerships
Holmesglen horticulture continues to retain strong industry
relationships with employers and industry bodies. A new
partnership has been developed with the Horticulture Therapy
Association, and it is anticipated that new programs may
be developed as result. The inaugural Horticulture Therapy
Victoria Conference was held at the Waverley campus.
Holmesglen staff continue to act in an advisory capacity to the
Landscape Industries Association Victoria (LIAV) in the role of
education support and judging for the annual awards. The
Green Gardeners program, in partnership with Sustainable
Gardening Australia, once again attracted many participants.
The Annual Clay and Segmental Paviors Conference was held
at the Conference Centre at Chadstone campus. A disputes
resolution workshop, for the LIAV, was held as part of a new
landscape accreditation process. A partnership with Parks
Victoria provides a practical on ground experience for our
Conservation and Land Management students. Diploma of
Conservation and Land Management students promoted
Wattle Day at Wattle Park. The day provided a range of
environmentally related activities, with 23 participating stake
holders and 3000 visitors.
Staff and Student Success
Landscape apprentice, Rohan Blythe, competed at the World
Skills Championship in Japan, and received a “medallion for
excellence” for his outstanding landscape garden. Another
Holmesglen trained apprentice also received recognition as the
outstanding LIAV apprentice for 2007.
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Nick Van Diemen, a horticulture staff member, was granted
a Churchill Fellowship to study flexible and segmental paving
design and construction.
Diploma of Horticulture students received awards at the
Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show for the
design and construction of Achievable Gardens’ displays
Tourism and Events
Achieving Goals and Growth
All areas of the tourism and events programs saw continued
demand in 2007. Tourism and Events achieved a marked
increase in enrolments in their part time fee for service
programs and added significant appeal to a number of their
diploma programs by including qualifications from the business
training package.
Community Projects
Tourism and Events has always had a strong commitment
to involvement in community projects and 2007 was no
exception. Involvement with the Make a Wish Ball allowed
Holmesglen’s brand to be promoted with acknowledgement
for the teachers and students efforts in front of 1000
corporate members. Other events Tourism and Events with
which students were involved included, The Red Ball, The
Heart Foundation and The Breast Foundation. Students also
organised and developed their own events and raised money
for the following charities: The Sakyamuni Buddhist Vihara
Building Fund, Oz Child, Royal Children’s Hospital, Canteen,
Oakleigh Hostel, National Breast Cancer Foundation and
Ronald McDonald House.
Fitness and Recreation
Growth and Expansion
Enrolments in all fitness and recreation courses remained solid
throughout 2007 with enrolments in fitness programs doing
extremely well. A new course, Diploma of Remedial Massage,
was introduced with demand so high a mid year program was
also offered.
Community Projects
Sport and recreation continued ongoing programs with various
local schools and community organisations. A sports expo saw
hundreds of local primary school students enjoy a variety of
sporting activities and the Riverside Challenge Fun Run was
again a great success, raising $4000 for Camp Challenge.
Outdoor recreation students have been volunteer school camp
leaders for Year 9 students at Mount Waverley Secondary
College for almost a decade and the camps continued in 2007.
Meeting the Needs of Students
Students enjoy state of the art facilities at the picturesque
Waverley campus. They have access to two well equipped
gyms at Moorabbin and Waverley and all equipment is
upgraded regularly and well maintained. All classes have
audio visual equipment to enable teachers provide a variety of
learning experiences.
Alliances and Partnerships
The Department has built strong relationships with a number
of schools over many years including Mount Waverley
Secondary College, Mentone Girls Secondary College, Our
Lady of the Sacred Heart, Parkdale Secondary College and
Sandringham Secondary College. These relationships remain
responsible for the enrolment of many of each schools’
students.
The tourism and events area developed a relationship with the
International Special Events Society that sees students receiving
preferential treatment for employment emanating from their
website.
The outdoor recreation program has developed relationships
with Bindaree Outdoors, Aus camp, The Outdoor Education
Group and Outward Bound that sees all students completing
placements at these organisations with many having seven or
eight generations of Holmesglen students as their employees.
During 2007, the fitness and recreation department aligned
with Holmesglen Vocational College and offered these
students the opportunity to complete a Certificate II in
Community Recreation.
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25
Access: Facilities
All Government and Institute funded projects are monitored
through the Building and Planning sub-committee of the
Institute Board and meet monthly.
Major Government Grants in
2007 include the following:
1.
2.
Waverley Campus Upgrade ($9.96 million
This project was undertaken in 3 stages – new general
teaching facilities, a new cafeteria and finally a new
horticulture building. The project was essentially finished
in December 2006 with the exception of relocating
the horticulture glasshouse which was scheduled for
December 2007/January 2008. All 3 major facilities
were officially opened by the Commonwealth Minister
the Honourable Andrew Robb in October 2007.
Chadstone Plumbing and Carpentry Facilities
($732,950)
These projects funded a mezzanine level “Multi Stack
Mechanical Services” training facility in Plumbing – the
first facility of its type in Victoria. This was completed in
March 2007 at a cost of $335,000.
In Carpentry a new machine shop, power tools training
area, mezzanine construction space and five new
classrooms were completed in May 2007 at a cost of
$1.35 million.
$732,950 of this was funded from Government grants
and the shortfall of $952,000 was made up from
Institute funds.
3.
Vocational College at Moorabbin
(Additional $700,000)
The main part of the Vocational College was completed
in time for its commencement in February 2007 at a
cost of $2.3 million. The further $700,000 provided
by Government has been used to refurbish and create
additional trade facilities to accommodate the Vocational
College students. This included upgrades to electrical
workshops, engineering workshops, as well as providing
an additional machine shop. These additional funds will
be entirely expended by March 2008.
4.
Commonwealth Equipment Grant
($1.11 million)
This grant was expended on a range of general
equipment items for teaching and administration as well
as computer and technology upgrades.
5.
26
TAFE Teaching Equipment Grant ($952,907)
This grant, provided by the State Government, was
used to purchase high cost and up to date high-tech
equipment items for furniture manufacturing, industrial
skills, engineering, glass and glazing, biomedical sciences,
nursing and multimedia.
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Major Institute Board Projects
for 2007
1.
Rural Learning Centre
The Institute has committed a total of $7.2 million to
the construction of the Rural Learning Centre at its
Eildon property – Ramlegh Park. The project now
provides for accommodation of 48 students and 18
staff and conference facilities for up to 100. Civil works
commenced early in 2007 and construction commenced
in July with an anticipated completion date of August
2008.
2.
Hemisphere
The final phase of the upgrade of Hemisphere conference
and accommodation at Moorabbin was completed in July
2007.
3.
Metal Fabrication for Joinery
The Institute funded a new metal fabrication workshop
at Chadstone for the joinery department at a cost of
$340,000
4.
Teaching Kitchen Waverley
The Institute funded the creation of a new teaching
kitchen at Waverley in the space formerly used by the
cafeteria at a cost of $565,000.
5.
Multimedia, Animation and Screen
The Institute funded the conversion of the old nursery
building at Waverley into a multimedia, animation
and screen production facility. This was completed in
September 2007 and will be fully utilized in 2008.
6.
Graphic Design Bridge Links and Related Works
The Institute committed $3.4 million to upgrading the
former gymnasium area in building 2 at Chadstone into
a graphic design facility and a new mezzanine office area
for Holmesglen Training and Development. This project
included creating two bridges to link building 2 with
building 1 and building 8 as well as refurbishing the areas
vacated by Holmesglen Training and Development and
graphic arts. All phases of this project will be completed
by February 2008.
7.
Moorabbin Bakery
The Institute committed $930,000 to create a new
bakery facility at the rear of building 1 at Moorabbin.
This was completed in September 2007.
8.
Carpentry Upgrade
The Institute funded $952,000 of the carpentry facility
upgrade detailed above.
9.
Cyclic Maintenance and Minor works
In 2007 the Institute maintained its commitment of
$840,000 towards cyclic maintenance and minor works.
10. Rural Learning Centre – Manager’s Residence
The Institute committed $355,000 to build a house on
its Eildon property for the Rural Learning Centre centre
manager to be appointed in 2008. Construction will
commence in early 2008 and be completed by the time
the Ramlegh Park conference centre begins operations.
Building Act 1993
The Institute is required to conform to the building and
maintenance provisions of the Building Act 1993. A
surveyor has been engaged to conduct audits as and when
required under the Building Code. Any major issues that
arise through these audits are reported to the Building
& Planning Committee and attended to by the Property
Services Department. All documents related to the Institute
Compliance are available through the Manager, Property
Services.
Environmental Performance
1.
•
•
•
2.
Energy Efficient Buildings
The Institute has undertaken the following strategies in
line with the Government policy:
purchase of 10% green power for Holmesglen’s three
major campuses, through the supplier Ergon Energy.
This is approximately 30% more expensive than regular
power.
continuing the installation of separately metering
buildings on each campus to enable closer monitoring.
continuing the extension of the Building Automation
System (BAS) on all campuses, centrally monitored from
Chadstone (approx. 95% completed)
Environmentally Sustainable Design (ESD)
Principles in New Building Design
2.1. The new teaching buildings/cafeteria at
Waverley include the following ESD features:
• east-west orientation for the teaching buildings
to maximise light.
• solar hot water systems
• sun shading
• natural lighting configuration (clerestory ceilings)
• T5 light fittings
• connection to the Institute BAS system
• LCD computer screens
• waterless urinals installed in building 2 and horticulture.
2.2 The Vocational College included the following
ESD features:
• natural lighting through skylights
• T5 light fittings
• connection to the Institute BAS system
• LCD computer screens
• water efficient devices in all wet areas.
2.3 Other Institute funded works as detailed
above have all included ESD elements.
3. Environmental Sustainability Committee
The Institute initiated an Environmental Sustainability
Committee in August 2006 as a sub-committee of the
Building & Planning Committee. The Committee develops
policy and procedures for all campus operations.
The focus to date has been on the following areas:
• water management investigations have commenced
on rainwater harvesting for Chadstone and Waverley.
(Moorabbin has a 250,000 litre tank for one building.)
Two additional 100,000 litre tanks are to be installed
on the Waverley campus early in 2008
• urinals on all sites have been converted to waterless
during 2007
• agro forestry is planned for the rural campus, with the
potential for carbon credits.
• feasibility plans for using lidded waste bins and skips
show that significant savings can be achieved by
better waste streaming for paper, food, glass, cans
and trade waste from the apprenticeship areas (glass,
metal, plastic, masonry, timber).
• carefully monitoring the room timetable to ensure
facilities are not heated and air-conditioned when
facilities are unused. Significant reductions have been
achieved in this way during 2007.
Energy Consumption
The Institute has undertaken significant facility expansion
each year making it very difficult to quantify any reduction in
electricity and gas consumption. To date each building is not
separately metered. The year 1999 used by the Government
as the base measurement to measure consumption reduction
creates a problem as Holmesglen acquired the Moorabbin
campus in 2002. This acquisition added almost 33% to the
Institute’s annual energy consumption. Additionally all new
buildings are air-conditioned for student comfort. LPG or
heating oil is not used by the Institute.
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Technical Services Division
The Institute continued to show strong growth in 2007
which impacted strongly on the demand for services from the
Technology Services Division (TSD). Problems encountered
earlier in the year with data backup and storage were the
catalyst for a number of projects aimed at improving network
stability and data security. This was therefore, an extremely
busy and demanding year which saw the introduction of
new systems and approaches being implemented with wide
ranging effects. Technical Services Division staff faced many
challenges throughout 2007 and produced major effort to
achieve success in securing and enhancing the network. This
work will prepare and provide a strong foundation for future
growth and expansion in 2008.
Major Achievements and Projects
Network support staff completed a large number of projects
including:
• major overhaul of infrastructure with a number of aging
servers replaced and rebuilt using new and updated
software. This resulted in a far more consistent and stable
network which can be considered leading edge industry
standard
• the implementation of Virtual Clustering in mid 2007 using
VMWare
• completion of the major VOIP project was finalised and
despite some earlier problems, issues with end user
equipment were resolved
• major rollout of new desktop equipment
• a new ‘state of the art’ firewall was purchased
• a new email system was implemented – [email protected] – for
students.
The software development and MIS teams also rolled out a
number of innovative and highly effective applications such as:
• development and implementation of online pre enrolment
forms and a new scanning system
• a major upgrade of SARS online resulting system
• new and improved reporting for both vocational and
degree students
• new format staff cards
• Award Notification system. Piloted in 2007, with greatly
reduced work required in determining eligible graduates.
• Graduation ceremonies were automated through QLS for
the first time in 2007
• major upgrade of Celcat timetabling and Palm Attendance
applications
• a highly effective online enrolment project for the Short
Course Department was completed and should provide
strong return on investment in 2008 when it is deployed
into other areas of the Institute.
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
There was an upgrade of switching fabric in several locations
and several servers were rebuilt and replaced. A large number
of desktops were rolled out during the year and new highly
cost effective desktop models introduced in the latter part
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of the year. These tasks were highly problematic due to
the volume and complexity of the infrastructure and the
need for minimal disruption to end users. TSD staff worked
extremely hard throughout the year and are to be praised for
their devotion, effort and commitment to the Institute which
resulted in highly successful outcomes.
Information Commons
Achieving Goals
The Information Commons (IC) prides itself on professional
and customer-focused service. Results of the student
satisfaction survey indicated that students rated this service
very highly as they do all Information Commons core services.
This was an excellent result reflected across all four branches
of the Commons.
Meeting the Needs of Students and staff
The Information Commons’ new website was launched
in 2007, reflecting major improvements in terminology, a
stronger visual appeal and a more intuitive search component,
enabling fast access to key services and resources. The ability
for clients and the Information Commons to interact directly is
now a key component of the site, where blogs are well utilised
to comment on and suggest improvements to products and
services. A unique component in the planning process was
the opportunity for both staff and students to have direct
impact on the final product, via intranet surveys, focus groups
and competitions. This input from clients, has been a major
contributor to the success of the website.
Alliances and Partnerships
Annie Yee, Information Database Librarian, utilised her
professional placement opportunities at Swinburne and
Victoria University Libraries, facilitated through the TAFE
Industry Skills Scheme, to substantially improve and streamline
the collection development of electronic information resources
at the IC.
Zita Youens, was seconded to Monash University on a research
project jointly funded by the Victorian Association of TAFE
Librarians. Zita’s strong involvement in this three month
project, on the evolution of the Information Commons into
a Learning Commons, was very beneficial for the IC, for
changing the focus of the current Branches into more flexible
spaces, facilitating mobile wireless environments and multifunctional spaces.
Joyce Sendeckyj, was successful in her application for a three
month professional placement at the International Criminal
Court Library in the Hague, as a component of her Bachelor of
AppIied Science, Library and Information Management degree.
Upgrading Facilities and Equipment
A cashless alternative to paying for services was trialled in 2007,
in the form of a new machine, where students could withdraw
money directly from their debit or credit bank accounts. New
machines will be introduced to all branches in 2008.
A training room was established within the Waverley
Information Commons, housing 11 state-of-the-art computers
and overhead data projector. This new facility provided much
needed instruction to new students on online search and print
information.
Marketing Unit
The Marketing Unit experienced a challenging year in 2007.
The promotion of courses to prospective students as well as
initiation and participation with an ever increasing range of
public relations events required great team effort and support.
As with all marketing communication areas, staff movements
were vigorous and required Institute wide co-operation
to achieve successful servicing provision in the areas of
advertising, event management, prospective student
recruitment and publication production. The Institute
embarked on several new projects for which marketing input
was required, including the opening of new buildings at
Waverley campus, launch of the Furnishing Industry Design
and Innovation Centre at Chadstone, four new degrees and
promotion of the Vocational College.
Marketing Co-ordinator, Lisa Sweeting received professional
recognition through Holmesglen’s award for Outstanding
Administrative Staff.
Major Projects
A co-ordinated one day event for Open Day was held during
which all three campuses were open on the same day with
around 5,000 people attending. This coincided with the
WorldSkills Regional Championships being hosted on the
Chadstone campus.
Holmesglen’s annual Awards Festival was held in May to
once again celebrate the great achievements of its staff and
students. The Marketing Unit played a major role in the coordination of the Awards Festival, in particular organising the
Awards Presentation Dinner and a School’s Open Day, which
involved the hosting and site visit for over 500 secondary
school students.
A large mid year promotional campaign was undertaken in
order to achieve student enrolment targets. The campaign
consisted of print, radio and outdoor advertising, all directing
interested students to a dedicated space on Holmesglen’s
website.
A Change of Preference campaign and information session
aimed to assist VCE students was initiated and executed.
Community Projects
Marketing again assisted in the execution and promotion
of the Sensation Tasting dinners, which have become very
popular events and provide excellent profile to the hospitality
areas. Among sponsorship opportunities, Holmesglen
was able to support the Ashburton Women’s Soccer Club.
Representation was also made at educational expos and
community exhibitions. A community guide was distributed
via group mail around the Waverley and Moorabbin campuses.
Prospective Students
Campus tours were offered on all campuses, with over
27 schools and around 1000 students gaining first hand
knowledge of the Holmesglen and the TAFE system. Holmesglen
remained an active participant with the Tertiary Information
Service, participating in around 10 events. School presentations
were made to over 80 schools thoughout the year.
Publications
Constant advertising, predominantly press, saw an average
of around 10 appearances over 50 weeks with a reduced
advertising budget on 2006. The Marketing Unit continued
to produce a range of publications, distributed strategically to
reach a wide target audience.
The range of publications, in hard, soft or web based form
produced included:
• course information publications, such as the Handbook,
course brochures, course directory, study area booklets, fee
for service course publications, weekend courses handbook,
Holmesglen course offered through VTAC, Pathways and
School Leavers Without VCE. This included all necessary
web based material
• newsletters, including Holmesglen News for staff and the
school-orientated Hitline
• corporate publications, including the 2006 Annual Report
and Strategic Plan
• a range of specific promotional Centre and Department
publications
• promotional items, such as bookmarks, posters,
wallplanners, opens day and other giveaways
• over 600 brochures were reviewed and updated and
published.
Information about publications produced by Holmesglen or
details of major promotional, public relations and marketing
activities is available upon request in writing to:
The Marketing Manager
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
PO Box 42, Holmesglen VIC 3148
Media Services Department
Audio Visual Services – Educational Media
The Educational Media area experienced significant increases
in demand for its facilities, resources and services in 2007,
especially evident through the growth and adoption of
DVD technologies. The area also continued to expand its
entrepreneurial client base.
Production highlights included “Going for Gold” DVD showcasing Holmesglen’s ability to provide staff training for
major events such as the Melbourne Commonwealth Games
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and the Hospitality Cookery Bakery CD ROM/Video/DVD,
an extensive promotional program highlighting hospitality
courses and the Contractor Safety DVD - incorporating safety
procedures and requirements for contractors.
Corporate Improvement Unit
Ongoing entrepreneurial productions included the Trajal
Promotional DVD - promoting the broad range of educational
programs available in Australia to Japanese students the
Armstrong World Industries DVD – a flooring instructional/
installation DVD and the video component for ANZCA Online
Educational Resource developed for the Australian and New
Zealand College of Anaesthetists.
In 1994, Holmesglen was the first educational provider in
Australia to gain certification to an internationally recognised
quality management standard. The Holmesglen Management
system has served the Institute well, providing stability during
periods of remarkable growth. Like all dynamic systems, the
quality management system has evolved over the years, and
in 2006 a directorate working party looked at further ways to
improve by encouraging greater ownership of the system by all
levels of the organisation.
A strong demand for digital photography continued to be
evident, especially with the growth of new areas such as
the Vocational College, degree programs and the on going
expansion of the Waverley campus. An image data bank/
library containing over 1000 digital photographic images was
developed and with further enhancements planned.
The changes have included a new name for the Unit to
emphasise its role of providing support and facilitating
continuous improvement. The internal audit system has
been broken into two stages with some being conducted at
the local area as well as those organised by the Corporate
Improvement Unit (CIU).
There was a sustained increase of audio visual acquisitions
and installations. In particular, integrated data video projection
systems increased from 130 (2006) to 165 (2007).
The changes made were greatly supported by Holmesglen’s
external certification agency, SGS. A triennial audit was
undertaken in May that certified Holmesglen to AS/NZS
9001:2000 for a further three years. At this same time
Holmesglen converted its safety management system
certification from SafetyMAP (Initial Level) to AS/NZS
4801:2001.
Graphic Design Services
The graphic design area continued to develop its broad
range of services, including print based projects, multimedia
development, DVD and CD-ROM information delivery and
electronic based presentations. In 2007 support was also
provided to the development of numerous internet spaces
including; Vocational College, degrees programs and
Holmesglen Employment.
This area also assisted the Institute with its promotion/
marketing both locally and overseas, by producing diverse
and complex ranges of core and special event publications/
presentations as well as informational materials, proposals
and tender submissions. These services are forever expanding
and necessitate the latest upgrades to existing hardware and
software
Printroom Services
This area continues to improve with its ability to handle an
ever increasing demand for its services - 2007 produced well
over 22 million copies.
As a result of the printroom tender for upgrade to digital
production systems, significant equipment and software
acquisitions were made. Part of this tender process also
included an on line electronic job ticket and job management
software application scheduled for 2008 introduction.
Waverley campus facilities were relocated to a purpose built
area, ensuring services and production capacity in line with the
growth of delivered facilities and courses.
Due to the overall increase in production demands across
all MSD areas, the department once again upgraded its file
storage backup facilities/capabilities.
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To ensure effective implementation of these changes,
Corporate Improvement Unit staff spent much of 2006
formally training and working one-on-one with staff. With
the new system bedded down, in 2007 CIU was focussed on
further refining the changes made as well as turning attention
to operational process improvement.
Registrar’s Department
The Registrar’s Department remains responsible for the
effective provision of a range of services and supports across
the Institute, including:
• academic graduation ceremonies
• awards preparation and issue
• examination schedule and conduct
• mail registry
• reception duties and general course information
• student administration, enrolment and fees collection
• student records management
• switchboard operations
• timetabling of rooms
• weekend Institute operations
The Department also plays a major in the provision of
statistics and reports for internal and external bodies, and the
dissemination of Institute administrative policy information to
staff, current, prospective and past students, and the general
public.
Process Improvement
• scanning and electronic storage of student enrolment
documentation
• roll out of electronic resulting to teaching departments
across the Institute
• review of current enrolment and fees payment processes
• development of an electronic enrolment form
• development of a software system to support student
course completion
• graphic design of student and staff diaries undertaken by
student designers
A review of the capabilities of QLS was undertaken and the
process to look at a replacement Student Management System
for the future commenced.
Awards and Ceremonies
13,313 accredited qualifications were issued in 2007, an
increase of 50% from 2006. The large increase was due to
changed internal processes brought about by the new OTTE
requirement requiring ‘eligible’ completions be reported.
Software is being developed to support this process. In
semester 2, 2007, 4,320 Statements of Academic Completion
and 1,224 ineligible letters were generated.
Timetable
The completion of building projects across the Institute meant
the total number of rooms in the timetabling system increased
by 25 to 393. Staff timetabled an average of 1905 ‘events’
per day, up from 1865 in 2006. As part of an ongoing plan
to update to the latest technology in teaching classrooms, 27
data video projectors were installed in designated classrooms.
Enrolment and Student Fees
Ongoing enrolments and flexible payment options were
implemented to assist students enrol and pay fees. Reenrolling students were offered the option of Fees Quotations
in November, with payment due in mid January, allowing
them to better budget fee commitments. Payment plans were
implemented for students experiencing temporary financial
difficulties to allow payment of fees in instalments through
direct debits. 239 students successfully applied, resulting in a
reduction of bad debts.
Examinations
As well as scheduling and arranging supervision for the
Charles Sturt University exams and VCE exams, this year the
Bachelor of Business (Accounting) exams were included. The
VCE exams co-ordination and supervision successfully passed
external audit by VCAA.
Information Offices
Renovations were undertaken to increase space and improve
layout at Waverley, to accommodate increased enquiries and
enrolments.
Student Records Office
Approximately 170,000 student records were scanned and
stored electronically. All eligible departments moved to
electronic resulting which enabled statement of results to
be mailed to students prior to the Christmas break. Thirty
teaching departments were using electronic resulting and
three departments remain on assessment sheets.
VTAC
The number of Holmesglen courses offered through the
Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) system increased
to 79, including four degree programs and nine dual diplomas.
Weekend Institute Office
The Weekend Institute Office was open for 42 weekends and
continues to be the central administrative, information and
service area for weekend students, teachers and courses.
Student Services
The Student Services Department offers a diverse range of
support services and information to assist students achieve
their full academic and career potential and enjoy student life.
It also assists teaching and general staff with respect to dealing
with students and with other matters, to ensure the best
possible employment experience for staff.
Mail Registry and Switchboard
262,000 out going Australia Post mail articles were processed
by the Mail Registry. Over 150,000 incoming phone calls were
taken through the switchboard, an average of around 600
calls per day.
Counselling
In 2007, 3,358 clients attended 4,704 counselling sessions.
The international student counsellor co-ordinated targeted
support, including home-group activities, information sessions,
workshops and recreational activities to ensure the support
needs of international clients were met. Areas of client
concern were mainly personal counselling (28% of counselling
sessions), careers counselling (25%),disability support (20%),
educational counselling (14%) and student employment (6%).
Student Management System
The Electronic Resulting module of the SMS was upgraded
during 2007, to ensure smooth transition to electronic
resulting for teaching departments. A total of 34 system
enhancements were implemented. Training Sessions offered to
staff included: Get the Best Out of QLS; 25 teaching staff and
15 administration staff attended, QLS Enquiries/Applications;
12 administrative staff attended and Electronic Resulting.
Disability Support
Funding from OTTE for disability support provided to
Holmesglen Institute in 2007, together with Institute-provided
and other source funding, enabled students with disabilities
to receive enrolment assistance and orientation, note-taker
support, classroom participation assistance, tutorial assistance,
and Auslan interpreters. Students were also assisted with lift
keys, car parking, specialised equipment and furniture.
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Vocational College and the Youth Pathways
Program
One counsellor, part of the Vocational College team working
on a fulltime basis, provided personal, educational and career
counselling, workshops and welfare support. The counsellor
also plays a vital role in supporting teachers of young people
who have had difficulty in the past fitting into a formal
learning environment. Part of the role co-ordinates the Youth
Pathways Program, providing training pathways to 15 to 19
year olds enrolled at Holmesglen.
Recreation and Activities
In 2007, the Recreation Unit delivered a comprehensive
program for students. Activities included lunch time functions,
ski trips, day trips and extended tours, sporting activities and
special interest activities.
• Theme Weeks
Themes throughout the year included ‘O week’,
International Students’ week, Indulgence week, Australian
Music week, Mid Year Celebrations, Get Active week,
Multicultural week, and End of Year Celebrations. Student
participation levels for on campus activities were high,
attendance numbers being much higher than 2006. An
apprentice morning tea was held on all campuses with a
pleasing response from the trade students.
• TREV Initiatives
This year Holmesglen continued to be a part of the
exciting Inter TAFE and University calendar offered by TREV
(Tertiary Recreation and Entertainment Victoria). This year’s
initiatives included the National Campus Band Competition
and Future DJ Competition.
Holmesglen had 310 students participate in TREV Sporting
Competitions and other events throughout the year.
The year was less successful on the sporting arena than
previous years due to staff and managerial changes at a
number of different institutes. Once again strong support
from Holmesglen management resulted in high student
participation numbers in comparison with most other
Victorian TAFEs.
• Trips and Tours
There were thirteen trips and tours held; two interstate
tours and eleven day/weekend trips. The interstate tours,
a 12-day camping safari to Central Australia, had 73
students in attendance, and a nine-day trip to Sydney
and the Gold Coast had 40 students participating. The
short trips included sightseeing tours, which were popular
among the international students alongside the adventure
tours and snow trips. There was an increase in student
participation on the trips and tours from previous years,
which demonstrating the programs success.
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• Special Interest Activities
Special Interest Activities organised for 2007 included
night activities such as Dinner and IMAX, Pancake and
Movie Night and the VAC’s Ball. Some of the day activities
included Go Kart Racing, Swim with Dolphins, Luna
Park, Latin Dance classes and the Moorabbin Basketball
Tournament.
• Publicity
For the fifth year in a row a competition was held within
the ‘Graphic Pre-Press’ course to design the cover of the
2008 Recreation & Activities Guide. The competition was
extremely popular with the whole class submitting pieces
as an assignment. The project was a huge success thanks
to the commitment and support of the course teacher.
• Hit Hot Press
Five editions of Hit Hot Press were produced throughout
the year including a special Careers edition in August. Each
publication in cluded up to date information on upcoming
trips, tours, theme months and also reminders of services
available to students such as counseling, disability support,
employment, careers advice and more.
• Orientations
The Recreation and Activities Unit attended 65 orientation
sessions throughout 2007. These sessions addressed new
and re-enrolling Holmesglen students.
13,313 accredited qualifications were issued in
2007, an increase of 50% from 2006.
Enterprise
- Conference Centre and Corporate Suites
- Hemisphere Conference Centre and Hotel
- Holmesglen Employment
- Holmesglen Safety
- Flexible Learning Unit
- Community and Industry Short Courses
- Holmesglen Training and Development
Holmesglen Institute has become renowned in the vocational
education sector for leading the field in the breadth and success
of its entrepreneurial activities. In 2007, the Institute continued
to achieve outstanding results, with commercial and fee-forservice activities generating in excess of 40% of the operating
revenue of the organisation.
Holmesglen is characterised by an embedded entrepreneurial
culture. All teaching centres conduct fee-for-service activities as
well as a number of individual business units which focus purely
on entrepreneurial activities.
Enterprise
Conference Centre and
Corporate Suites
its operation. A total of 2,000 student contact hours was
delivered through work placement at Hemisphere in 2007.
Sustained effort by a small team of staff enabled Holmesglen
Conference Centre to continue its provision of fully serviced
conference facilities, for both external and internal clients.
Feedback forms received from external clients consistently
rated staff service as excellent, closely followed by other
attributes including the standard of the rooms and equipment.
The main Conference Centre building, at Chadstone, served
13,462 delegates, in attendance of some 430 conferences or
events. 79% of these events were held by external corporate
clients, with 90% repeat patronage.
In contrast, a high demand by internal groups prevailed in the
Corporate Suites, with 79% of bookings being for internal
clients, from the Institute. 1226 meetings were held in the
Corporate Suites.The Corporate Suites are used by internal
groups for wide ranging purposes, including department
meetings, staff training programs, senior management
meetings, appointments with industry visitors and international
delegations, as well as launch functions to acknowledge
significant Institute events.
Hemisphere Conference
Centre and Hotel
Hemisphere Conference Centre and Hotel experienced an
excellent result in 2007 due to a concerted effort on the part
of the committed staff team.
Hemisphere exceeded its revenue and profit budgets in 2007,
while maintaining a balance of 80% of repeat clients and 20%
new business. Hemisphere catered for in excess of 37,949
delegates who attended various meetings, conferences,
functions and other events.
Hemisphere continued to increase its marketing campaign.
The business development executive focused on promoting
the accommodation facilities as a separate entity to
conferences. As a result Hemisphere Hotel’s occupancy
increased by 6.1%, with an additional 1087 room nights
achieved. The number of guests booking accommodation
directly through websites increased by 19%. Travel agents
booking via the global distribution system increased by
50.3% over 2006.
Hemisphere has gained a reputation as a quality four star
hotel, attracting a mix of local businesses, corporate clients
and the leisure market.
Hemisphere continues to work with the School of Hospitality,
Cookery & Bakery to integrate student work placement into
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The Centre underwent the final stage of its three stage
refurbishment. The completed facility was launched to external
clients and staff at a cocktail function in July 2007 with both
groups providing positive feedback about the upgraded
facilities. Results achieved by the business have certainly
justified the Institute’s investment in this attractive asset.
Holmesglen Employment
2007 was a year of record low unemployment in Australia,
making the employment sector a particularly tight environment
in which to successfully operate. Despite the challenges
caused by the labour market, Holmesglen Employment had
a successful year consolidating gains made previously, and
improving Department of Education, Employment, and
Workplace Relations’ “star ratings” at all operating outlets.
Emphasis on the professional development of Holmesglen
Employment staff was maintained, with Victorian staff
continuing training in Certificate IV in Business (Employment
Services) through Holmesglen Training & Development, and
extensive ongoing training provided to South Australian staff.
In an effort to diversify its income base, Holmesglen
Employment explored various ‘fee for service’ opportunities
within the sector throughout the year. The first of these
projects to be delivered was the ‘WorkAware’ program. This
program was designed to assist job seekers into sustainable
employment and was sold to Commonwealth Rehabilitation
Services (CRS) in September. Holmesglen Employment
facilitated the program from CRS’ city office, with the
partnership continuing into 2008.
The Norwood office, South Australia, of Holmesglen
Employment relocated to new premises. The site now provides
job seekers with a comfortable, modern environment to
conduct job searching activity with access to ‘state-of-the-art’
IT. New HIT supplier, ACER Computers, generously matched
Holmesglen Employment dollar-for-dollar to enable the
replacement of all personal computers at its SA sites. Sincere
thanks go out to HIT Technology Services Department for
brokering this deal. The new site was officially opened by
the Member for Norwood Vinie Ciccarello, with Holmesglen
represented by Chief Executive, Bruce Mackenzie and Deputy
Director, Mary Faraone.
2007 was an eventful year for the Small Business Training
Unit with the appointment of a new unit manager and an
ensuing raft of changes to the NEIS. These changes simplified
the application process for assistance to establish a small
business, and showed increased numbers of new businesses
being assisted by the NEIS program. The NEIS program also
managed to increase its DEEWR star rating during the year.
Other innovative projects undertaken by the unit during the
course of the year were the restructure of mentoring services
to provide a higher quality of feedback, and the creation of a
framework for an online forum for NEIS participants, past and
present.
The year finished on a high note with Holmesglen NEIS
graduate Melanie Michaels, owner of a business in children’s
entertainment, being invited to the White House, USA, to
perform at President George W. Bush’s ‘Easter Egg Roll’.
Holmesglen Safety
Holmesglen Safety is located at the Waverley Campus
providing services to industry for safety, environmental and
quality training and consultancy.
Goals and objectives achieved:
• planning for the 2008 accredited programs in occupational
health and safety
• unit continued to be profitable
• new customers gained in 2007
• exhibition at the Safety In Action Trade Show 2007
Growth and Expansion
The Tullamarine venue experienced growth and was seen as
attractive by north west Melbourne industry. Consultancy
income has become more significant – certification auditing
for certification bodies, noise assessments, traffic management
plans for forklift/pedestrian separation. The Red Card
construction industry training was very popular.
Meeting the needs of students
Flexible Learning Unit
The Flexible Learning Unit located at the Moorabbin and
Chadstone campuses, has been operating since 1995 and
provides training nationally. It comprises two departments
– Industry Programs and Off Campus, which deliver courses
at all campuses. It also specialises in fee for service activities
for industry, which include: consulting, developing and
implementing training systems, skills audits, recognition of
prior learning (RPL), workplace training and assessment,
training needs analysis and resource development.
Industry Programs work in partnership with many
organisations and offer traineeships in Retail, Rural
Merchandising, Business, Asset Maintenance (Cleaning
Operations), Transport & Distribution (Road Transport)/
(Warehousing & Storage), Wholesale Operations, Customer
Contact, Hospitality Operations, Correctional Practice
(Custodial)/(Community).
Off Campus offers students a number of different study
options when undertaking, or completing a course. Students
can predominantly study at home, at their own pace, also
Fast Track training on campus is available for some courses.
Courses and units offered include Course in Property (Agents’
Representatives), MYOB, Cert IV in Training and Assessment,
Certificate II to Advanced Diploma in Business, Financial
Services and Human Resources. Off Campus also runs an
Assessment Centre.
Alliances and Partnerships
Partnership with South West Institute of TAFE and Bendigo
Regional Institute of TAFE for the WorkSafe approved training
programs
The Flexible Learning Unit continued to attract major external
industry clients and work with them to implement a training
system which guaranteed a system for continuous learning
opportunities. These partnerships enabled the Flexible
Learning Unit to deliver training nationally by accessing
Government funded User Choice. National recognition has
been the winning ingredient when working with enterprises,
with ensured consistency in the delivery of training. Over
440,000 student contact hours of assessment were delivered
in 2007.
Major Achievements and Projects
Growth and Expansion
• conducted safety certification audits for seven national
foods sites
• selected as a consultant auditor for Fulton Hogan
• passed the WorkSafe Victoria approval audit
• selected as the certification auditor for WorkSafe Victoria
The Off Campus Assessment Centre expanded its access
operations offered to the trades areas. Industry Programs have
been identified growth, areas in process manufacturing and
food processing and work with industry will continue to offer
traineeships in these courses.
Student/Staff Success/Excellence
A partnership with the Master Builders Association was formed
and a trade accreditation service commenced providing access
to qualifications for experienced trades persons. Partnerships
continued with non profit organisations, the Salvation Army,
Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Gateway Family Church,
to create learning opportunities for the community and retrain casual staff.
Following an audit by WorkSafe Victoria in March, an annual
requirement for providers of WorkSafe approved training
programs, Holmesglen Safety continued to be a provider.
Alliances and Partnerships
One staff member continued further education in
management and a further staff member continued to
represent Holmesglen on the Education Alliance at WorkSafe
Victoria.
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Enterprise
Community and Industry
Short Courses
Australia for an online development product built in 2006 ARED2. This product has become very popular with teachers
and online resource developers.
The Short Course Department experienced excellent results
in 2007 due to increased efforts in marketing and promotion
especially to industry. Increased enrolments were noted
particularly in specialised courses such as real estate and the
builders registration program. The department exceeded all
projected budget targets and attained the highest revenue its
history.
Revenue from industry clients increased by 57% as a direct
result of efforts in target marketing and this push will continue
in 2008.
A new pilot course titled ‘Home Sustainability Assessment’
was developed and conducted with funding by Sustainability
Victoria. Pilot participants included those either currently
involved in this work and wanting an accredited course
qualification or who had interest in being involved in this type
of work. Energy and water retailers as well as local councils
and other government organisations expressed a strong
interest in the course for 2008.
In 2007 in excess of 100 new courses were offered across all
areas including: makeup, lawn bowls, bathroom renovations,
bullying, operating a home business, chairing meetings and
curtain and window coverings. The department continued
to focus on offering a diverse and proactive approach to
programming.
Training commenced in 2006 for The Salvation Army
Employment Plus was completed with over 300 employment
consultants successfully completing three competencies
from the Certificate IV in Business (Employment Services).
Holmesglen Employment staff also continued their training
in this course completing three competencies in 2006 and a
further two competencies in 2007. The Employment Services
Toolbox, developed in 2006, has been used by Holmesglen
Employment for these competencies with very successful
outcomes.
Automation of systems continued throughout 2007 with
a new automated enrolment process allowing students to
enrol, pay online by credit card; receive emailed confirmation
of enrolment and print a receipt in real time – all in a matter
of minutes. Email can also used to advise clients of course
confirmation. Cancellation and refunds can be made directly
to the payees’ credit card.
Holmesglen Training and Development was again successful
in gaining another round of Toolbox funding. The Toolbox
for 2007 was for the BCG40106 Certificate IV in Building
and Construction (Building). Three major core competencies
were completed and this online product is to be used in the
Advanced Building Technology department at Holmesglen and
by other training institutes in 2008.
Automation of the enrolment processes enabled staff to
be deployed into positions such as marketing assistant and
webmaster, to maintain the currency of the website.
The CMM function for building and construction, water and
furnishing continued to operate successfully and provide
advice and guidance to the TAFE sector in Victoria. In 2007
funding from OTTE enabled the pre-apprenticeship status
for the Certificate II in Building & Construction (Bricklaying,
Carpentry, Painting and Decorating) to be reaccredited for the
State. Wall and ceiling lining, wall and floor tiling and solid
plastering were added as additional streams to the course by
way of modification. Additionally, RPL and skill recognition
kits were developed for wall and ceiling lining, roof tiling
and bricklaying for the BCG03 General Construction Training
Package. Training and delivery strategies were developed for
the Certificate IV and Diploma in Building (Building) and as
with all products developed through the CMM function, reside
on the TAFEVC3.
All staff participated in professional development programs
including positioning and branding workshops relevant to the
department. Several staff commenced studies in diploma and
degree programs in business administration and marketing and
senior staff attended Institute organised programs in copyright
and leadership.
Holmesglen Training and
Development
Again a successful year for Holmesglen Training and
Development, with the completion of a large number of
online learning resources delivered for national and state
governments. A two year contract was secured with the
Learning Federation for online resources and a further two
year contract for training and resource development for BP Pty
Ltd. In addition, an innovations project was completed, funded
by OTTE. This project involved the development of an RPL/
skill recognition kit for Certificate III Carpentry and Bricklaying
qualifications. The kits assisted mature age workers in applying
for either courses and receiving recognition for existing
knowledge and skills. Workshops were also conducted across
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Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
Revenue from industry clients increased by
57% as a direct result of target marketing.
Excellence
- Awards Festival
- Student Services
- Fees and Charges
- Workforce Data
Holmesglen has a history of achievement and success. Since 1998 the
Institute has held an annual Awards Festival which acknowledges the
achievements of students and staff. After graduation, a number of
Holmesglen’s students have gone on to achieve significantly in their field.
Holmesglen has created a staff environment that promotes excellent
staff performance and commitment. It aims to provide a challenging and
stimulating workplace for staff, encouraging confidence, motivation and
pride in their work. As a demonstration of this, staff development is a focus,
with the Institute Board making a significant annual contribution to staff
development.
Excellence: Awards Festival
Awards Festival
Holmesglen’s Awards Festival celebrates the achievements of all
students and the contribution of staff and industry to the success
of the Institute. Held 14 - 27 May 2007, the Festival included
13 individual ceremonies across the Institute and three major
graduation ceremonies. A Schools Open Day attracted over 500
secondary school students on campus to get a ‘taste’ of TAFE
life and a Charity Golf Day was held for the seventh time, raising
funds for Holmesglen Charitable Foundation which provides
support to students via scholarships, offshore exchange programs
and hardship relief. The Foundation also provides support to
community groups and projects.
The 2007 Awards Festival winners were announced to over 400
guests at an Institute awards evening held at the Park Hyatt.
Outstanding Student of the Year Award Winners
Mr Kris Kaplun
2006 Apprentice of the Year
Mr Kris Kaplun
Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication Trade).
2006 Certificate Student of the Year
Ms Emily French
Certificate IV in Health (Nursing).
Ms Emily French
2006 Diploma Student of the Year
Mr Graeme Parker
Diploma of Building Design & Technology
Holmesglen Staff Award Winners
2006 Outstanding Administrative Staff Member
Ms Lisa Sweeting
Marketing Co-ordinator - Waverley
Mr Graeme Parker
2006 Teaching and Educational Excellence Award
Ms Christine Contessotto
Senior Educator, Business Services Centre
Encouragement Awards
Ms Lisa Sweeting
Two people were awarded an Encouragement Award, in
recognition of their outstanding student achievement within a
non-academic activity during 2006.
Ms Heidi Axton, Diploma of Professional Writing and Ms Jenny
McDowell Cambridge Certificate in English Language Teaching to
Adults (CELTA).
Industry / Employer Certificates of Appreciation
Glen Eira Council (Business Development Unit), YouthWorx Bargain
Store and Viewtech Glass Pty Ltd were formally recognised for the
enormous contribution they made to the success of Holmesglen in
2006.
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Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
Ms Christine
Contessotto
Excellence
2007 Student Course Enrolments
Student Contact Hours
VET Qualifications 11,449,191
Short Courses
630,547
Total
12,079,738
Qualification Level
Degrees and Graduate Certificates
794
Diplomas
8,507
Certificates
25,493
Year 12
590
Short Courses and other
17,547
Total Enrolments
52,931
Study Mode
Full time
6,499
Part time
46,432
Age
15 to 24 year olds
25 years and over
23,240
29,691
Gender
Female
Male
43%
57%
Module Load
Completion Rate
Government Funded
77%
Funding Source
Government
Domestic Fee Paying
Overseas Fee Paying
20,118
21,709
11,104
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43
Excellence: Fees and Charges
2007 Fees and Charges
Workforce Data
Details of Institute changes in fees and charges may be
obtained by writing to:
The Registrar
Holmesglen Institute
PO Box 42
Holmesglen Victoria 3148
Staffing details as at 31 December 2007
• 2006 Statistics are shown in brackets
• Totals are rounded to the nearest whole number
• Statistics do not include casual staff
Actual
Statement regarding compulsory fees,
subscriptions and charges
The State Government fees policy applied to all courses funded
by the Government. The student tuition contribution payable
was $1.34 per nominal enrolled hour. The maximum tuition
contribution per calendar year was $860 and the minimum
tuition contribution was $53.
Male
Female
Total
Teaching Staff
311 (311)
274 (268)
585 (579)
Non Teaching Staff
164 (166)
339 (426)
503 (482)
Total
475 (477)
613 (584) 1088 (1061)
A fee concession calculation was applied to any student who
demonstrated proof of eligibility.
A general services fee, which was 15% of the tuition
contribution applied to all students, with the maximum
general services fee being $129.
A fee applied in some courses to recover the actual cost of
providing materials to be retained by a student as his or her
personal property.
The State Government Twelve Month Fee Rule was applied to
all students where relevant.
The Holmesglen 2007 State Government Fees and Charges
booklet was provided to each student at enrolment.
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Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
Effective Full
Time
Male
Female
Total
Teaching Staff
286 (291)
227 (219)
513 (510)
Non Teaching Staff
158 (162)
309 (288)
467 (450)
Total
444 (453)
536 (507)
980 (960)
A charity golf day held for the seventh time raised
funds for Holmesglen Charitable Foundation.
Integrity
-Competitive Neutrality
-OH & S
-Staff Health and Well–being Program
-Statement of the Application of Employment
and Conduct Principles
-Freedom of Information Act
-Whistleblowers Protection Act
The Institute has a proud history of providing opportunity for the individual
and fostering a culture of fairness. The Institute has strong Equal Employment
Opportunity policy and dedicates many resources to OH&S principles to
ensure a safe environment for staff, students and visitors of the Institute. It
adheres to international quality certification to ensure it is delivering quality in
all its practices.
Integrity
Competitive Neutrality
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE continues to comply with the
National Competition Policy and the Victorian Government
Competitive Neutrality Policy. It has implemented measures
to ensure that the policy is applicable to commercial activity
and to pricing of bids for government funded education and
training that is advertised for competitive tender.
The Institute fulfils its obligations and also meets its wider
responsibilities to the community by requiring competitive
neutrality be applied where it is in the public interest to do so.
Occupational Health and Safety
In 2007 the Institute continued with its ongoing commitment
and dedication to improving Occupational Health and
Safety. The new OHS Regulations 2007 came into effect
on 1 July 2007 and are a consolidation of the 13 existing
occupational health and safety regulations, streamlined into
a single document. A review process of the Holmesglen
Safety Management System was initiated as a result of the
introduction of the regulations.
A summary of the occupational health and safety activities and
initiatives for 2007 follows:
Health Surveillance
Audiometric testing of staff that may be exposed to noise in
the workplace was conducted in July and August of 2007.
Lung function testing was conducted in November 2007 for
staff in the bricklaying, stonemasonry and landscaping areas.
Staff in the above-mentioned departments were assessed as
they may be exposed to silica.
Emergency Services
With the many changes occurring across all campuses, it is
necessary to continuously conduct First Aid risk assessments to
ensure that there are trained first aiders and first aid facilities
available to staff. First aid risk assessments were undertaken
and completed at Waverley, Moorabbin and Chadstone
campuses in 2007.
Health and Safety Representative Refresher
Training
Health and Safety representatives attended a one day refresher
training session. The course was conducted by the Holmesglen
Safety Unit and is a very important training session as it
informs the Health and Safety representatives of the latest
changes to legislation and reinforces the importance of their
role in the Institute.
Traffic Management
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The Institute has reviewed the recommendations made in
the Traffic Management report conducted in 2005, and
has progressively introduced a number of traffic control
mechanisms to ensure the safety of pedestrian and vehicular
traffic.
Designated Work Groups and Health and Safety
Representatives
The moving of departments to different areas within the
Chadstone campus as well as the resignation of a number
of Health and Safety Representatives has resulted in new
representatives being elected and undertaking their five day
OH&S training.
WorkSafe TAFE Intervention Project
WorkSafe has been visiting and conducting inspections of
departments across all campuses during the past 18 months.
The WorkSafe Field Inspector assigned to the Institute, in his
final entry report for the program, complimented the Institute
on having a comprehensive health and safety management
system that was well supported by all management and staff.
By undertaking the above activities the Institute has ensured
it has complied and met its Occupational Health and Safety
commitments and obligations.
Staff Health & Well-being Program
Wealth Management Seminars were conducted in March
2007 at Chadstone, Waverley and Moorabbin campuses by a
qualified practitioner.
Skin cancer checks were offered to all staff during the period
March to June 2007.
VicSuper superannuation seminars were offered to all staff
in May 2007. Staff were also offered individual information
sessions with a superannuation adviser.
Gardisil Vaccine for cervical cancer prevention for 18 to 26 year
old female staff was offered in July 207 as a specific women’s
health initiative.
Ergonomic workstation training at Holmesglen Employment
was provided in August 2007 by a qualified ergonomist.
In excess of 300 staff attended one or more of the above
activities.
Statement on the application
of Employment and Conduct
Principles
In 2007, the Institute:
Complied with The Victorian Public Sector Employment
Principles (refer below), as outlined in the Public Administration
Act 2004, as follows:
Merit in Employment
Action taken to meet this principle was broad-based and
included:
• advertising vacancies to facilitate, as far as practicable,
open competition, thereby maximising the opportunity for
attracting competitive fields of applicants
• ensuring key selection criteria for each position are
documented and were relevant to the work to be
performed. Applicants were encouraged to access the
criteria before submitting applications
• assessing all candidates in line with the relevant selection
criteria and selecting candidates on merit.
Fair and Reasonable Treatment of Staff
This principle was adhered to through continued application of
the Institute’s:
• Appointment Procedures
• Equal Employment Opportunity, Equal Opportunity and
Sexual Harassment policies
• Code of Conduct,
all of which encourage and facilitate the fair and reasonable
treatment of staff.
Also, equal opportunity, harassment and bullying awareness
workshops were conducted in conjunction with representatives
from the Victorian Employers’ Chamber of Commerce and
Industry. Workshop participants were provided with practical
examples of what constitutes harassment, bullying and unfair
treatment and the resolution processes to be followed should
an issue arise.
Equal Employment Opportunity
This principle was also adhered to through application of the
procedures and policies, referred to above. In particular:
• the Institute’s Equal Employment Opportunity policy
continued to be promulgated throughout the Institute in
both electronic and hard copy form
• all employment related policies and procedures, based on
applicable equal opportunity laws, continued to be applied
within the Institute.
Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities
The Institute commenced a process of clarifying its obligations
under the provisions of the Charter. The process included
committing to the four principles of the Charter, training of
staff and identifying areas for introduction of new procedures/
policies. The Institute will be undertaking further work in this
regard during 2008.
Reasonable Avenue of Redress
This principle was adhered to by the continued application of
the Institute’s:
• Appointment procedures, which promote procedural
fairness and allow for the resolution of issues fairly and
promptly
• Grievance resolution procedures, which are included in the
Institute’s equal opportunity and sexual harassment policies.
Also in line with the Public Administration Act 2004, during
2007, the Institute:
• Ensured its Strategic Plan maintained a commitment to
integrity and access and upholding the highest ethical
standards
• Continued its comprehensive induction program which
provides for induction sessions for new staff including
information on the application of the employment principles
as detailed above.
A selection skills workshop was also conducted with a
specific goal of ensuring members of selection committees
were provided with appropriate training to ensure fair and
reasonable treatment was accorded to job applicants.
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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49
Integrity
Freedom of Information Act
Superannuation
Two requests for information were received in 2007. Requests
for access to records should be directed to:
Mr Rex Buckeridge
Freedom of Information Manager
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE
PO Box 42
Holmesglen, Victoria, 3148
1. Revised Scheme
2. New Scheme
Applicants are required by the Act to submit applications
requesting access to documents in writing. No form of
application is specified. A letter which clearly describes the
documents(s) sought is sufficient.
The letter should specify that the application is a request made
under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 and should not
form part of a letter on another subject. The applicant should
provide the following information:
• Name
• Address
• Telephone Number
(where applicant can be contacted during business hours)
• Details of documents(s) requested
• The form of access required, i.e. copies of documents,
inspection of files or specify any other format.
Whistleblowers Protection Act
The Institute has an established policy and associated
procedures to ensure application of the requirements of the
Whistleblowers Protection Act 2001. The Institute’s policy
includes the appointment of the Chief Executive of the
Institute as the Protected Disclosure Co-ordinator whose role is
to receive all correspondence, telephone calls and emails from
whistleblowers. The policy also facilitates the appointment of
two Protected Disclosure Officers whose role includes being
a contact point for general advice about the operation of the
Act.
The policy also advises individuals that should a person wishing
to lodge a disclosure about improper conduct or detrimental
action by the Institute not wish to submit a disclosure to
the Institute, that person may lodge the disclosure with the
Victorian Ombudsman.
There were no disclosures considered by the Institute in 2007.
Industrial Relations
• No industrial disputation was experienced in 2007
• 42 claims were received in 2007 under the provisions of the
Accident Compensation Act 1985. Time lost in relation to
the accepted claims totalled 342 days.
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Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
The Institute has in its staffing profile a number of employees
who are members of the Government Superannuation Office
administered schemes referred to as:
|
2007
Additionally, the Institute has nominated VicSuper Pty Ltd as
its default superannuation scheme in accordance with the
requirements of Federal legislation. Eligible employees are
advised of their right to choose which superannuation fund
will receive their superannuation guarantee contributions and
a broad range of schemes are now receiving payment from the
Institute.
Fair and reasonable treatment of staff continues
through appointment procedures, equal
opportunity and sexual harassment policies.
Financials
- Financial Information
- Financial Index
- Compliance Index
Financial : Activity Tables
ACTIVITY TABLE
Note A1 - STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
2007
Total Operating Expenses
Delivery provision and support activity
2006
Note
$000
$000
A2
72,535
67,842
Administration and general services activity
A3
22,119
19,391
Property plant and equip. services activity
A4
15,794
17,883
Student and other services activity
A5
18,246
15,517
128,694
120,633
Total Operating Expenses
Note A2 - STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
Delivery Provision and Support Activity
Salaries, wages, overtime & allowances
54,547
51,981
Superannuation
4,551
4,387
Payroll tax
2,858
2,677
626
538
3,158
3,365
180
160
Other salary related costs
Consumables
Travel and motor vehicle expenses
Other direct delivery expenses
6,615
4,734
72,535
67,842
10,529
9,589
Superannuation
813
819
Payroll tax
516
513
Other salary related costs
195
137
Consumables
745
560
Note A3 - STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
Administration and General Services Activity
Salaries, wages, overtime & allowances
Communication expenses
Fees and charges
Travel and motor vehicle expenses
Other expenses
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Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
318
275
4,441
2,878
470
554
4,092
4,066
22,119
19,391
Financial : Activity Tables
ACTIVITY TABLE
2007
2006
$000
$000
925
824
Superannuation
79
72
Payroll tax
48
43
Note A4 -STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
Note
Property, Plant and Equipment Services Activity
Salaries, wages, overtime & allowances
Other salary related costs
10
8
266
230
Depreciation
6,528
7,912
Equipment
1,084
803
Energy costs
1,445
1,410
Contract services
3,122
2,929
Consumables
Rent/leasing charges
Repairs and maintenance
Other expenses
46
30
1,526
1,790
715
1,832
15,794
17,883
Note A5 - STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
Student and Other Services Activity
Salaries, wages, overtime & allowances
8,504
8,246
Superannuation
746
345
Payroll tax
460
213
Other salary related costs
209
242
Ancillary trading
462
407
Consumables
433
663
Other expenses
7,432
5,401
18,246
15,517
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55
Financial : Auditor’s Report
56
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Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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57
Financial
58
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OPERATING STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR
ENDED DECEMBER 2007
Consolidated
Income
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Note
Revenue from continuing operations
Operating activities
- Government contributions - operating
2.1
72,214
69,880
72,214
69,880
- Fee for service
2.3
51,587
39,389
51,587
39,389
- Student fees and charges
5,370
5,272
5,370
5,272
- Sale of goods
6,711
6,484
6,711
6,484
10,359
8,590
10,359
8,590
146,241
129,615
146,241
129,615
Non operating activities
-Other income
2.4
Expenses from continuing operations
Employee benefits
3.1
85,629
81,243
85,629
81,243
Other
3.2
35,681
30,406
35,681
30,406
Impairment of assets
11
423
167
423
167
121,733
111,816
121,733
111,816
24,508
17,799
24,508
17,799
3,761
11,727
3,761
11,727
(6,105)
(7,912)
(6,105)
(7,912)
(856)
(905)
(856)
(905)
Net result from continuing operations
21,308
20,709
21,308
20,709
Net result for the period
21,308
20,709
21,308
20,709
Net operating result from continuing operations
before capital and specific items
Government contributions - capital
2.2
Depreciation and amortisation
9
Expenditure using Government contributions - capital
3.3
The above operating statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
59
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2007
Consolidated
Assets
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Note
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
4, 23
30,647
23,424
29,647
22,424
Receivables
5, 23
2,863
3,466
3,863
4,466
Inventories
Other financial assets
Other assets
6
125
100
125
100
7, 23
752
753
752
753
8
189
412
189
412
34,576
28,155
34,576
28,155
7, 23
55,103
43,379
55,103
43,379
Total Current Assets
Non-Current Assets
Other financial assets
Property, plant and equipment
9
236,717
225,071
236,717
225,071
Intangible assets
11
678
1,101
678
1,101
Investment properties
10
9,330
8,310
9,330
8,310
Total Non-Current Assets
301,828
277,861
301,828
277,861
Total Assets
336,404
306,016
336,404
306,016
23,994
20,162
23,994
20,162
Current Liabilities
Payables
12, 23
Interest bearing liabilities
13, 23
0
0
0
0
14
9,949
9,671
9,949
9,671
33,943
29,833
33,943
29,833
1,664
1,697
1,664
1,697
1,664
1,697
1,664
1,697
TOTAL LIABILITIES
35,607
31,530
35,607
31,530
NET ASSETS
300,797
274,486
300,797
274,486
Employee benefits
Total Current Liabilities
Non-Current Liabilities
Employee benefits
14
Total Non-Current Liabilities
EQUITY
Contributed capital
15
122,807
122,807
122,807
122,807
Reserves
15
115,136
104,166
115,136
104,166
Accumulated surplus/(deficit)
15
62,854
47,513
62,854
47,513
300,797
274,486
300,797
274,486
TOTAL EQUITY
The above balance sheet should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
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STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2007
Consolidated
Note
Total equity at the beginning of the year
15
Change in Accounting policy
1.28
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
274,486
253,777
274,486
253,777
(-5,967)
0
(-5,967)
0
268,519
253,777
268,519
253,777
10,970
0
10,970
0
10,970
0
10,970
0
Net operating result for the year
21,308
20,709
21,308
20,709
Total recognised income and expense for the year
21,308
20,709
21,308
20,709
300,797
274,486
300,797
274,486
Gain on revaluation of land and buildings
15
Net income recognised directly in equity
Total equity at the end of the year
15
The above statement of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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61
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED
31 DECEMBER 2007
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
61,674
49,115
61,674
49,115
Interest received
4,636
3,238
4,636
3,238
Dividends received
3,103
2,910
3,103
2,910
Goods and Services Tax recovered
4,992
4,353
4,992
4,353
Other receipts
1,703
1,482
1,703
1,482
(-85,384)
(-80,727)
(-85,384)
(-80,727)
(-2,395)
(-2,247)
(-2,395)
(-2,247)
(-30,793)
(-23,902)
(-30,793)
(-23,902)
Note
Cash Flows from operating activities
Receipts
User fees and charges
Payments
Employee benefits
Goods and Services Tax paid
Suppliers
Cash flows from government
Government contributions - operating
2.1
72,214
69,880
72,214
69,880
Government contributions - capital
2.2
3,761
11,727
3,761
11,727
Net cash provided by/(used in) operating
activities
16
33,511
35,829
33,511
35,829
(-15,453)
(-18,242)
(-15,453)
(-18,242)
889
942
889
942
(-12,227)
(-24,115)
(-12,227)
(-24,115)
503
1,328
503
1,328
Cash Flows from Investing Activities
Purchases of property, plant & equipment
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment
9
Purchases of investments
Proceeds from investments
Loan to related party
Net Cash provided by/(used in) Investing
Activities
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash
equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial
year
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the
financial year
4
0
0
0
(-1,000)
(-26,288)
(-40,087)
(-26,288)
(-41,087)
7,223
(-4,258)
7,223
(-5,258)
23,424
27,682
22,424
27,682
30,647
23,424
29,647
22,424
The above cash flow statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
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Note 1 - STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING
POLICIES
Statement of compliance
The accounting policies set out below have been applied in preparing
the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007
and the comparative information presented for the year ended 31
December 2006.
The financial report is a general purpose financial report which has
been prepared on an accrual basis in accordance with the Financial
Management Act 1994, applicable Australian Accounting standards
and Interpretations and other mandatory professional requirements.
Accounting Standards include Australian equivalents to International
Financial Reporting Standards (‘A-IFRS’).
1.2 REPORTING ENTITY AND PRINCIPLES OF
CONSOLIDATION
The financial statements were authorised for issue by Mr. Enzo
Spangher, Chief Finance and Accounting Officer on 4 March 2008.
The Institute and its controlled entities together are referred to in this
report as the consolidated entity. The effect of all transactions between
controlled entities within the consolidated entity are eliminated in full.
The controlled entities did not trade during the reporting period, the
operations were not material.
The financial report consists of the financial statements of the Institute
and the consolidated accounts of the economic entity comprising
the Institute as parent entity and the entities it controlled at the end
of, or during, the financial year. The accounting policies adopted in
preparing the financial report have been consistently applied, unless
otherwise stated.
1.1 BASIS OF PREPARATION
The following is a summary of the material accounting policies
adopted by the Institute in the preparation of the financial report.
The accounting policies have been consistently applied unless
otherwise stated.
1.1.1 Reporting basis and conventions
The financial report has been prepared on a historical cost basis,
except for the revaluation of certain non-current assets and financial
instruments. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration
given in exchange for assets.
1.1.2 Critical accounting estimates and judgments
In the application of A-IFRS, management is required to make
judgments, estimates and assumptions about carrying values of
assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.
The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical
experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable
under the circumstance, the results of which form the basis of making
the judgments. Actual results may differ from these estimates.
1.1.3 Estimates
The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an
ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in
the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only
that period, or in the period of the revision and future periods if the
revision affects both current and future periods.
1.1.4 Judgements
Judgements made by management in the application of A-IFRS that
have significant effects on the financial statements and estimates with
a significant risk of material adjustments in the next year are disclosed
throughout the notes in the financial statements.
The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets and
liabilities of all entities controlled by the Institute as at the reporting
date and the results of all controlled entities for the reporting period.
The name of the controlled entity is: Holmesglen International Training
Services Pty. Ltd.
1.3 CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and cash at
bank, deposits at call and highly liquid investments which are readily
convertible to known amounts of cash and are subject to insignificant
risk of change in value. For the purpose of cash flow statement, cash
and cash equivalents consist of cash and cash equivalents as defined
above, net of bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are included in interest
bearing liabilities in current liabilities in the balance sheet.
1.4 RECEIVABLES
Investment income and GST input tax recoverable. Receivables
are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently measured at
amortised cost using the effective rate of interest method, less any
accumulated impairment. A provision for doubtful debts is made
when there is objective evidence that the debts will not be collected.
Bad debts are written off when identified.
1.5 INVENTORIES
Supplies and consumables, work in progress (WIP) and finished
goods are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Costs,
including an appropriate portion of fixed and variable overhead
expenses and other costs incurred in bringing inventories to their
present location and condition are assigned to inventory on hand by
the method most appropriate to each particular class of inventory,
with the majority being valued on a first in first out basis. Net
realisable value represents the estimated selling price less all estimated
costs of completion and costs to be incurred in marketing, selling and
distribution.
Inventories held for distribution which includes materials or supplies to
be consumed in the production process or in the rendering of services
at no or nominal consideration are measured at the lower of cost and
current replacement cost.
Inventories acquired at no cost, or nominal consideration are measured
at current replacement cost as at the date of acquisition.
Accounting policies are selected and applied in a manner which
ensures that the resulting financial information satisfies the concepts
of relevance and reliability, thereby ensuring that the substance of the
underlying transactions or other events is reported.
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63
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
1.6 FINANCIAL ASSETS
1.7.2 Exchange differences
1.6.1 Recognition
Exchange differences arising on the translation of monetary items
are recognised in the operating statement, except where deferred in
equity as a qualifying cash flow or net investment hedges.
Investments are recognised and derecognised on trade date where
purchase or sale of an investment is under a contract whose terms
require delivery of the investment within the timeframe established by
the market concerned, and are initially measured at fair value, net of
transaction costs.
The Institute classifies its other investments in the following
categories: financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, loans
and receivables, held-to-maturity investments, and available-forsale financial assets. The classification depends on the purpose for
which the investments were acquired. Management determines the
classification of its investments at initial recognition.
1.6.2 Financial assets at fair value through profit and loss
Investments held for trading purposes are classified as current assets
and are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised
in profit or loss.
Exchange differences arising on the translation of non-monetary items
are recognised directly in equity to the extent that the gain or loss on
the non-monetary item is directly recognised in equity, otherwise the
exchange difference is recognised in the operating statement.
1.8 NON-CURRENT ASSETS CLASSIFIED AS HELD FOR SALE
Non-current assets (and disposal groups) are classified as held for
sale and measured at the lower of their carrying amount and fair
value less costs to sell if their carrying amount will be recovered
principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing
use. The condition is regarded as met only when the sale is highly
probable and is expected to be completed within one year from the
date of classification and the asset (or disposal group) is available for
immediate sale in its present condition.
Non current assets classified as held for sale are not subject to
depreciation.
1.6.3 Loans and receivables
Trade receivables, loans and other receivables are recorded at
amortised cost, using the effective interest method, less impairment.
The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised
cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the
relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly
discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of
the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.
1.6.4 Held-to-maturity investments
Where the Institute has the positive intent and ability to hold
investments to maturity, they are stated at amortised cost less
impairment losses.
1.6.5 Available-for-sale financial assets
Other investments held by the Institute are classified as being
available-for-sale and are stated at fair value. Gains and losses arising
from changes in fair value are recognised directly in equity until the
investment is disposed of or is determined to be impaired, at which
time the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in equity is
included in profit or loss for the period.
1.9 NON-CURRENT PHYSICAL ASSETS
1.9.1 Non-current assets constructed by the Institute
The cost of non-current assets constructed by the Institute includes the
cost of all materials used in construction, direct labour on the project,
and an appropriate proportion of variable and fixed overheads.
1.9.2 Property, plant and equipment
Land and buildings are measured initially at cost, then subsequently
at fair value. Plant, equipment and vehicles are measured at cost less
accumulated depreciation and impairment.
Crown land is measured at fair value with regard to the property’s
highest and best use after due consideration is made for any legal or
constructive restrictions imposed on the land, public announcements
or commitments made in relation to the intended use of the land.
Theoretical opportunities that may be available in relation to the
asset are not taken into account until it is virtually certain that the
restrictions will no longer apply.
1.9.3 Library collections
1.7 FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTION
Library collections are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation.
All foreign currency transactions during the financial year are brought
to account using the exchange rate in effect at the date of the
transaction. Foreign monetary items at reporting date are translated
at the exchange rate existing at reporting date. Non-monetary assets
and liabilities carried at fair value that are denominated in foreign
currencies are translated at the rates prevailing at the date when the
fair value was determined.
1.9.3 Subsequent costs
1.7.1 Functional and presentation currency
The functional currency of the Institute is the Australian dollar, which
has also been identified as the presentation currency of the Institute.
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Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or
recognised as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable
that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to
the group and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All other
repairs and maintenance are charged to the operating statement
during the financial period in which they are incurred.
1.10 REVALUATIONS OF NON-CURRENT PHYSICAL ASSETS
1.12 INTANGIBLE ASSETS
1.10.1 Non-current physical assets measured at fair value are revalued
in accordance with FRD 103B.
Intangible assets represent identifiable non-monetary assets without
physical substance. Intangible assets are recognised at cost.
Subsequently, intangible assets with finite useful lives are carried at
cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment
losses. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised
when it is expected that additional future economic benefits will flow
to the Institute.
This revaluation process normally occurs every five years. Land and
buildings were valued by C.B. Cunningham, AAPi AREi at fair value
as of 31 December 2007. This resulted in an increment in land of
$3,553,000 and buildings of $7,417,000. Revaluation increments or
decrements arise from differences between an asset’s carrying value.
Revaluation increments are credited directly to equity in the revaluation
reserve, except that, to the extent that an increment reverses a
revaluation decrement in respect of that class of asset previously
recognised as an expense in the net result, the increment is recognised
as revenue in determining the net result.
Revaluation decrements are recognised immediately as expenses in
the net result, except to the extent that a credit balance exists in the
revaluation reserve in respect of the same class of assets, they are
debited to the revaluation reserve.
Revaluation increases and revaluation decreases relating to individual
assets within a class of property, plant and equipment are offset
against one another within that class but are not offset in respect of
assets in different classes. Revaluation reserves are not transferred to
accumulated funds on derecognition of the relevant asset.
1.11 IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS
1.12.1 Research and Development
Expenditure on research activities is recognised as an expense in
the period in which it is incurred. Where no internally generated
intangible asset can be recognised, development expenditure is
recognised as an expense in the period as incurred.
An internally-generated intangible asset arising from development (or
from the development phase of an internal project) is recognised if,
and only if, all of the following are demonstrated:
(a) the technical feasibility of completing the intangible asset so that it
will be available for use or sale;
(b) the intention to complete the intangible asset and use or sell it;
(c) the ability to use or sell the asset;
(d) how the intangible asset will generate probable future economic
benefits;
Goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives and
intangible assets not yet available for use are tested annually for
impairment (i.e. as to whether their carrying value exceeds their
recoverable amount). All other assets are assessed annually for
indications of impairment, except for:
(e) the availability of adequate technical, financial and other resources
to complete the development and to use or sell the intangible
asset; and
Inventories;
Financial assets;
Investment property that is measured at fair value;
Non current assets held for sale.
(f) the ability to measure reliably the expenditure attributable to the
intangible asset during its development.
Intangible assets are measured at cost less accumulated amortisation
and impairment, and are amortised on a straight-line basis over their
useful lives as follows:
If there is an indication of impairment, the assets concerned are tested
as to whether their carrying value exceeds their recoverable amount.
Where an asset’s carrying value exceeds its recoverable amount, the
difference is written off by a charge to the operating statement, except
to the extent that the write down value can be debited to an asset
revaluation reserve amount applicable to that class of asset.
The recoverable amount for most assets is measured at the higher
of depreciated replacement cost and fair value less costs to sell.
Recoverable amount for assets held primarily to generate net cash
flows is measured at the higher of the present value of future cash
flows expected to be obtained from the asset and fair value less costs
to sell. It is deemed that, in the event of the loss of an asset, the future
economic benefits arising from the use of the asset will be replaced
unless a specific decision to the contrary has been made.
The recoverable amount of the Holmesglen Employment (Adelaide)
unit has been determined based on a value in use calculation. To
calculate this, cash flow projections are based on financial budgets
approved by senior management covering a one-year period.
The discount rate applied to cash flow projections is 9% with an
expected growth rate of 1.3%.
Capitalised software development cost 3-5 years.
1.12.2 Goodwill
Goodwill and goodwill on acquisition is initially recorded at the
amount by which the purchase price for a business or for an
ownership interest in a controlled entity exceeds the fair value
attributed to its net assets at date of acquisition. Goodwill on
acquisition of subsidiaries is included in intangible assets. Goodwill
on acquisition of associates is included in investments in associates.
Goodwill is tested annually for impairment and carried at cost less
accumulated impairment losses. Gains and losses on the disposal of
an entity include the carrying amount of goodwill relating to the entity
sold.
1.13 PAYABLES
Payables consist predominantly of creditors and other sundry liabilities.
Payables are carried at amortised cost and represent liabilities for
goods and services provided to the Institute prior to the end of the
financial year that are unpaid, and arise when the Institute becomes
obliged to make future payments in respect of the purchase of these
goods and services.
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65
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
1.14 INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
1.15.4 Employee benefits on-costs
1.14.1 Interest bearing liabilities are recorded initially at
fair value, net of transaction costs
Subsequent to initial recognition, interest bearing liabilities are
measured at amortised cost with any difference between the initial
recognised amount and the redemption value being recognised in
profit and loss over the period of the interest bearing liability using the
effective interest rate method.
1.14.2 Finance costs
Finance costs are recognised as expenses in the period in which they
are incurred. Finance costs include interest on bank overdrafts and
short term and long term borrowings, amortisation of discounts
or premiums relating to borrowings, amortisation of ancillary costs
incurred in connection with the arrangement of borrowings and
finance lease charges.
1.15 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
The calculation of employee benefits includes all relevant on-costs and
are calculated as follows at reporting date.
1.15.1 Wages and Salaries, Annual Leave and Long Service
Leave
Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits and
annual leave expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting
date are recognised in the provision for employee benefits in respect
of employee services up to the reporting date, classified as current
liabilities and measured at their nominal values.
Employee benefits on-costs (payroll tax, workers compensation,
superannuation, annual leave and long service leave accrued while on
LSL taken in service) are recognised and included with LSL employee
benefits.
1.15.5 Performance Payments
Performance payments for TAFE Executive Officers are based on a
percentage of the annual salary package provided under the contract
of employment.
1.15.6 Superannuation
Defined contribution plan;
Contributions to defined contribution plans are expensed when
incurred.
Defined benefit plans;
The amount charged to the operating statement in respect of
superannuation represents the contributions made by the Institute
to the superannuation plan in respect of current services of current
Institute staff. Superannuation contributions are made to the plans
based on the relevant rules of each plan.
The Institute does not recognise any deferred liability in respect of the
plan(s) because the Institute has no legal or constructive obligation
to pay future benefits relating to its employees; its only obligation is
to pay superannuation contributions as and when they fall due. The
Department of Treasury and Finance recognises and discloses the
State’s defined benefit liabilities in its finance report.
Liabilities that are not expected to be settled within 12 months of the
reporting date are recognised in the provision for employee benefits as
current liabilities, measured at present value of the amounts expected
to be paid when the liabilities are settled during the remuneration rate
expected to apply at the time of settlement.
1.16 PROVISIONS
1.15.2 Long Services Leave
The amount recognised as a provision is the best estimate of the
consideration required to settle the present obligation at reporting
date, taking into account the risks and uncertainties surrounding
the obligation. Where a provision is measured using the cashflows
estimated to settle the present obligation, its carrying amount is the
present value of those cashflows.
Liability for long service leave (LSL) representing 10 years service is
disclosed as a current liability even when the Institute does not expect
to settle the liability within 12 months because it will not have the
unconditional right to defer settlement of the entitlement should an
employee take leave within 12 months.
The components of this current liability are measured at:
- present value - component that is not expected to be settled within
12 months
- nominal value - component that is expected to be settled within 12
months
Non Current Liability - conditional LSL representing less than 10 years
service is disclosed as a non-current liability. There is an unconditional
right to defer settlement of the entitlement until the employee has
completed the requisite years of service. The non- current LSL liability is
measured at present value.
1.15.3 Employee Benefits Expense
Employee benefits expense includes all costs related to employment,
including wages and salaries, leave entitlements, redundancy payments
and superannuation contributions. These are recognised when
incurred, except for contributions in respect of defined benefits plans.
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Provisions are recognised when the Institute has a present obligation,
the future sacrifice of economic benefits is probable, and the amount
of the provision can be measured reliably.
When some or all of the economic benefits required to settle a
provision are expected to be recognised from a third party, the
receivable is recognised as an asset if it is virtually certain that recovery
will be received and the amount of the receivable can be measured
reliably.
1.17 LEASED ASSETS
Leases are classified as finance leases whenever the terms of the lease
transfer substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership to the
lessees. All other leases are classified as operating leases.
1.17.1 Institute as lessor
Amounts due from lessees under finance leases are recorded as
receivables. Finance lease receivables are initially recorded at amounts
equal to the present value of the minimum lease payments receivable
plus the present value of any unguaranteed residual value expected
to accrue at the end of the lease term. Finance lease payments
are allocated between interest revenue and reduction of the lease
receivable over the term of the lease in order to reflect a constant
periodic rate of return on the net investment outstanding in respect of
the lease.
Rental income from operating leases is recognised on a straight-line
basis over the term of the relevant lease.
1.17.2 Institute as lessee
Finance leases are recognised as assets and liabilities at amounts equal
to the fair value or, if lower, at the present value of the minimum lease
payments, each determined at the inception of the lease. The lease
asset is depreciated over the shorter of the estimated useful life of the
asset or the term of the lease. Minimum lease payments are allocated
between the principal component of the lease liability and the interest
expenses calculated using the interest rate implicit in the lease, and
charged directly to the operating statement. Contingent rentals
associated with finance leases are recognised as an expense in the
period in which they are incurred. The corresponding liability to the
lessor is included in the balance sheet as a finance lease obligation.
Operating lease payments including any contingent rentals, are
recognised as an expense in the operating statement on a straight-line
basis over the lease term, except where another systematic basis is
more representative of the time pattern of the benefits derived from
the use of the leased asset.
1.18 DEPRECIATION AND AMORTISATION
Depreciation
Depreciation is provided on property, plant and equipment, including
freehold buildings but excluding land. Depreciation is generally
calculated on a straight-line basis so as to write off the net cost or
other revalued amount of each asset over its expected useful life to
its estimated residual value. Leasehold improvements are depreciated
over the period of the lease or estimated useful life, whichever is the
shorter, using the straight-line method. The estimated useful lives,
residual values and depreciation method are reviewed at the end of
each annual reporting period.
All library acquisitions are brought to account and depreciated over a
7 year period.
Depreciation methods and rates used for each class of depreciable
assets are
Class of asset
Buildings
Computers
Plant & Equipment
Motor Vehicles
Library Collections
MethodRate/Rates
Straight Line1.41% - 20.0%
“14.29% - 50.0%
“1.0% - 50.0%
“8.0% - 20.0%
“14.28%
The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed and adjusted
if appropriate on an annual basis. There has been no change in the
methodology and rates for 2007.
1.19 INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
Investment properties represent properties held to earn rentals or for
capital appreciation or both. Investment properties exclude properties
held to meet service delivery objectives of the State of Victoria.
Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred
subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it is probable
that future economic benefits in excess of the originally assessed
performance of the asset will flow to the Institute.
Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment properties are
re-valued to fair value with changes in the fair value recognised as
income or expenses in the period in which they arise. The properties
are not depreciated.
Rental income from the leasing of investment properties is recognised
in the operating statement on a straight-line basis.
1.20 GOODS AND SERVICES TAX (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except
where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the
taxation authority, in which case it is recognised as part of the cost of
acquisition of an asset or part of an item of expense. Receivables and
payables (Debtors and Creditors) are stated inclusive of the amount of
GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from,
or payable to, the taxation authority is included with other receivables
or payables in the balance sheet.
Cash flows are included in the cash flow statement on a gross basis.
The GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing
activities which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation
authority is classified as operating cash flows.
1.21 REVENUE RECOGNITION
1.21.1 Government contributions
Government contributions are recognised as revenue in the period
when the Institute gains control of the contributions. Control is
recognised upon receipt or notification by relevant authorities of the
right to receive a contribution for the current period.
1.21.2 Fee for service
Fee for service revenue is recognised by reference to the percentage
completion of each contract, i.e. in the reporting period in which the
services are rendered. Where fee for service revenue of a reciprocal
nature has been clearly received in respect of programs or services
to be delivered in the following year, such amounts are disclosed as
Revenue in Advance.
1.21.3 Student fees and charges
Student fees and charges revenue is recognised by reference to the
percentage of services provided. Where student fees and charges
revenue has been clearly received in respect of courses or programs to
be delivered in the following year, any non-refundable portion of the
fees is treated as revenue in the year of receipt and the balance as
Revenue in Advance.
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67
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
1.21.4 Revenue from sale of goods
1.23 MATERIALITY
Revenue from sale of goods is recognised by the Institute when:
(a) the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods have
transferred to the buyer; (b) the Institute retains neither continuing managerial involvement to
the degree usually associated with ownership nor effective control
over the goods sold;
(c) the amount of revenue can be reliably measured;
(d) it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the
transaction will flow to the Institute and;
(e) the costs incurred or to be incurred in respect of the transaction
can be measured reliably.
In accordance with Accounting Standard AASB1031 ‘Materiality’,
accounting policies need only be identified in the summary of
accounting policies where they are considered ‘material’. Accounting
policies will be considered material if their omission, misstatement or
non-disclosure has the potential, individually or collectively, to:
1.21.5 Investment income
1.25 COMPARATIVE INFORMATION
Investment income from cash, short-term deposits and investments is
brought to account on a time proportional basis taking into account
interest rates applicable to the financial assets and any dividend
revenue is brought to account when the Institute’s right to receive a
dividend is established.
When required by Accounting Standards, comparative figures have
been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation for the current
financial year.
1.21.6 Assets received free of charge
Commitments include those operating, capital and other outsourcing
commitments arising from non-cancellable contractual or statutory
sources and are disclosed at their nominal value.
Assets received free of charge are recognised as revenue when the
Institute gains control of them. The benefits derived from these assets
are recorded at their fair value in the financial statements.
1.21.7 Gain/loss on disposal of property, plant and
equipment
Any gain or loss on disposal is recognised at the date control of the
asset is passed to the buyer and is determined after deducting from
the proceeds the carrying value of the asset at the time.
1.21.8 Rental income
Rental income is recognised on a time proportional basis and is
brought to account when the Institute’s right to receive the rental is
established.
1.22 CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL
Funding that are in the nature of contributions by the State
Government are treated as contributed capital when designated in
accordance with UIG Interpretation 1038 Contribution by Owners
Made to Wholly-Owned Public Sector Entities. Commonwealth capital
funds are not affected and are treated as income.
(a) influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the
financial report; and (b) affect the discharge of accountability by the management or
governing body of the entity.
1.24 ROUNDING OF AMOUNTS
All amounts shown in the Financial Report have been rounded to the
nearest thousand dollars, or in other cases to the nearest dollar.
1.26 COMMITMENTS
1.27 CONTINGENT ASSETS and CONTINGENT LIABILITIES
Contingent assets and liabilities are not recognised in the balance
sheet, but are disclosed by way of a not (refer note 19) and, if
quantifiable, are measured at nominal value.
1.28 CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING POLICY
The TAFE sector has increased the capitalisation threshold from
$1,000 to $5,000, effective from 1 January 2007. The Institute
has implemented this change and a summary of these changes are
detailed below:
Accumulated surplus as at 1/1/07
Less assets at cost under $5,000 at 31/12/06
Adjusted Accumulated Surplus 1/1/07
Due to the number of assets involved it was deemed impracticable to
apply this adjustment retrospectively.
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$000
47,513
(-5,967)
41,546
1.29 AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ISSUED BUT NOT YET EFFECTIVE
Where new or revised accounting standards and interpretations have been issued that are not mandatory for the current reporting period
the Institute has assessed the impact of these standards and interpretations and has not, and does not intend to, adopt these standards
early. The table below sets out the details and expected impacts on future financial reports.
Standard / Interpretation
Summary of Changes
Operative Date
Impact on the Institute’s
Financial Report
AASB 107 - Cash Flow Statements
Inserting the option to use the indirect
method for presenting cash flow
statements
Year commencing
1 July 2007
No impact expected, only gives
the option for the presentation
of the cash flow statement using
the indirect method.
AASB 116 - Property, Plant and
Equipment
Minor editorial amendments. AASB
120 allows an item of PPE to be
reduced by government grants.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
No impact as AASB 120 only
applies to for-profit entities.
AASB 117 - Leases
Removal of term “UIG”.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 118 - Revenue
Removal of term “UIG”.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 119 - Employee Benefits
Term “Business segment” has been
changed to “Operating Segment”
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 121 - Effects of Changes in
Foreign Exchange Rates
Removal of term “UIG”.
Year comm encing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 127 - Consolidated and
Separate Financial Statements
Various editorial amendments.
Requirement to prepare separate
financial statements for investments in
subsidiaries, joint ventures and jointly
controlled entities.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 131 - Interests in Joint
Ventures
Removal of term “UIG”.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 132 - Financial Instruments
Presentation
Various editorial amendments.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
AASB 136 - Impairment of Assets
“AASB 114 Segment Reporting”
amended to “AASB 8 Operating
Segments”.
Year commencing
1 July 2007
Disclosures only.
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
69
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Note 2 - REVENUE FROM CONTINUING ACTIVITIES
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
68,709
66,603
68,709
66,603
3,505
3,277
3,505
3,277
72,214
69,880
72,214
69,880
Commonwealth capital
1,494
7,129
1,494
7,129
State capital
2,267
4,598
2,267
4,598
3,761
11,727
3,761
11,727
Note
Note 2.1 - GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS
– OPERATING
State/ Commonwealth current specific funded programs
Other contributions
Note 2.2 - GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS
– CAPITAL
Note 2.3 - FEE FOR SERVICE
Fee for service - Government
Fee for service - International operations
Fee for service - other
8,274
6,251
8,274
6,251
32,580
23,523
32,580
23,523
10,733
9,615
10,733
9,615
51,587
39,389
51,587
39,389
231
57
231
57
Investment income
4,636
3,238
4,636
3,238
Dividends
3,103
2,910
3,103
2,910
Rent
1,689
1,620
1,689
1,620
700
765
700
765
10,359
8,590
10,359
8,590
NOTE 2.4 - OTHER INCOME
Donations & contributions
Other
70
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Note 3 - EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
74,467
70,171
74,467
70,171
Superannuation
6,189
6,007
6,189
6,007
Payroll tax
3,882
3,679
3,882
3,679
Note
Note 3.1 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
Salaries, wages, overtime and allowances
Movement in provision for long service leave
Movement in provision for annual leave
Other salary related costs
79
335
79
335
(-39)
121
(-39)
121
1,051
930
1,051
930
85,629
81,243
85,629
81,243
Note 3.2 - OTHER EXPENSES
Auditors’ remuneration
21
89
92
89
92
Bad and doubtful debts
5
15
5
15
5
Communication expenses
1,263
1,205
1,263
1,205
Consumables
4,602
4,818
4,602
4,818
Contract and other services
7,854
5,888
7,854
5,888
462
407
462
407
Equipment (below capitalisation threshold non Government
Contributions)
1,970
976
1,970
976
Fees & charges
6,031
4,014
6,031
4,014
198
152
198
152
Promotional expenses
1,613
1,798
1,613
1,798
Rent/leasing charges
1,018
1,175
1,018
1,175
Building repairs and maintenance
1,888
1,763
1,888
1,763
Staff development
1,146
922
1,146
922
Travel and motor vehicle expenses
1,642
1,376
1,642
1,376
Utilities
1,549
1,502
1,549
1,502
Cost of sale of goods including ancillary trading
Grants & subsidies
Loss on disposal of non current assets
Other expenses
9
825
1,303
825
1,303
3,516
3,010
3,516
3,010
35,681
30,406
35,681
30,406
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2007
71
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Plant & Equipment
694
610
694
610
Other
162
295
162
295
Total Expenses using Government Contributions
- capital
856
905
856
905
2,647
2,824
1,647
1,824
Note
Note 3.3 - GOVERNMENT CONTRIBUTIONS
EXPENDITURE
Note 4 – CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
Cash at bank and on hand
Deposits at call
Total cash and cash equivalent assets
28,000
20,600
28,000
20,600
30,647
23,424
29,647
22,424
(a) The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows as follows:
Balances as above
30,647
23,424
29,647
22,424
0
0
0
0
30,647
23,424
29,647
22,424
1,453
1,725
1,453
1,725
842
1,091
842
1,091
0
0
1,000
1,000
Less Bank overdraft
Balance as per cashflow statement
(b) Cash at bank and on hand- These are non interest bearing.
(c) The effective interest rate on short term deposits at call was 6.50% (2006 5.92%)
These deposits have an average maturity of 41 days.
Note 5 - RECEIVABLES
Current
Trade receivables
Revenue receivable
Loan to related party
Other debtors
46
29
46
29
GST receivable
522
621
522
621
2,863
3,466
3,863
4,466
Bad and doubtful debts of $15,00 have been expensed during the year. A provision for bad and doubtful debts has not been provided
for in 2007.
72
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2007
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Consumable materials at cost
68
70
68
70
Live Stock held for sale at cost
57
30
57
30
125
100
125
100
55,855
44,132
55,855
44,132
Note
Note 6 - INVENTORIES
Current
Note 7 – OTHER FINANCIAL ASSETS
Available for sale
Held to maturity
Less non current portion
0
0
0
0
55,855
44,132
55,855
44,132
55,103
43,379
55,103
43,379
752
753
752
753
Current portion
Current
Available at fair value through profit and loss
Fixed interest bearing
752
753
752
753
Total available for sale assets
752
753
752
753
752
753
Available for sale financial assets comprise investments in the ordinary share capital of various entities.
There are no fixed returns or fixed maturity dates attached to these investments.
Total current financial assets
752
753
Non Current
Available for sale
Fixed interest bearing bills
Total available for sale assets
32,500
30,500
32,500
30,500
32,500
30,500
32,500
30,500
Available at fair value through profit and loss
Various Shares
Total non current financial assets
22,603
12,879
22,603
12,879
22,603
12,879
22,603
12,879
55,103
43,379
55,103
43,379
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2007
73
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Consolidated
Note
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
189
412
189
412
189
412
189
412
Note 8 - OTHER ASSETS
Current
Prepayments
Note 9 - PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
Land
At cost
At fair value
0
882
0
882
44,960
41,245
44,960
41,245
44,960
42,127
44,960
42,127
Buildings
At cost
At fair value
Accumulated depreciation
0
1,361
0
1,361
176,916
166,109
176,916
166,109
0
-3,324
0
-3,324
176,916
164,146
176,916
164,146
3,141
2,287
3,141
2,287
Work in Progress
At cost
Plant & Equipment (includes Computers)
At cost
Accumulated depreciation
20,573
32,937
20,573
32,937
(-11,372)
(-19,067)
(-11,372)
(-19,067)
9,201
13,870
9,201
13,870
2,509
2,455
2,509
2,455
Motor Vehicles
At cost
Accumulated depreciation
(-646)
(-479)
(-646)
(-479)
1,863
1,976
1,863
1,976
Library Collections
At cost
Accumulated depreciation
Total Property, Plant and Equipment
74
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2007
3,432
3,666
3,432
3,666
(-2,796)
(-3,001)
(-2,796)
(-3,001)
636
665
636
665
236,717
225,071
236,717
225,071
Note 9 - PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT (Cont)
Reconciliations
Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of each class of land, buildings, plant and equipment, motor vehicles and other classes of assets at the
beginning and end of the current year are set out below.
Land
Buildings
WIP
Plant &
Equipment
Motor
Vehicles
Library
Computer
Equipment
Total
2007
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
42,127
164,146
2,287
7,557
1,976
665
6,313
225,071
Assets less than
$5,000
0
(-10)
0
(-1,456)
0
0
(-4,501)
(-5,967)
Additions
0
10,142
3,141
2,561
957
209
757
17,767
2007
Carrying
amount at
1 January
Disposals
0
(-842)
0
(-187)
(-682)
0
(-3)
(-1,714)
Net additions
through
restructuring
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Revaluation
increments
(decrements)
2,833
7,118
0
0
0
0
0
9,951
Transfers
0
0
(-2,287)
0
0
0
0
(-2,287)
Depreciation
/ amortisation
expense
0
(-3,638)
0
(-1,194)
(-388)
(-237)
(-647)
(-6,104)
44,960
176,916
3,141
7,281
1,863
636
1,920
236,717
Cost or fair value
42,127
167,470
2,287
15,541
2,455
3,666
17,396
250,942
Accumulated
depreciation and
impairment
0
(-3,324)
0
(-7,984)
(-479)
(-3,001)
(-11,083)
(-25,871)
42,127
164,146
2,287
7,557
1,976
665
6,313
225,071
Cost or fair value
44,960
176,916
3,141
13,167
2,509
3,432
7,406
251,531
Accumulated
depreciation and
impairment
0
0
0
(-5,886)
(-646)
(-2,796)
(-5,486)
(-14,814)
44,960
176,916
3,141
7,281
1,863
636
1,920
236,717
Carrying
amount at
31 December
At 1 January 2006
Net carrying
amount
At 31 December
2007
Net carrying
amount
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
75
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Note 9 - PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT (Cont)
Land
Buildings
WIP
Plant &
Equipment
Motor
Vehicles
Library
Computer
Equipment
Total
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
41,245
158,273
3,752
6,963
1,936
700
5,366
218,235
2006
2006
Carrying
amount at
1 January
Additions
882
6,585
2,287
2,299
1,244
202
3,493
16,992
Disposals
0
(-1,111)
0
(-211)
(-888)
0
(-34)
(-2,244)
Net additions
through restructuring
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Revaluation
increments
(decrements)
Transfers
0
3,752
(-3,752)
0
0
0
0
0
Depreciation
/ amortisation
expense
0
(-3,353)
0
(-1,494)
(-316)
(-237)
(-2,512)
(-7,912)
42,127
164,146
2,287
7,557
1,976
665
6,313
225,071
Cost or fair value
41,245
158,273
3,752
13,872
2,430
3,930
14,828
238,330
Accumulated
depreciation and
impairment
0
0
0
(-6,909)
(-494)
(-3,230)
(-9,462)
(-20,095)
41,245
158,273
3,752
6,963
1,936
700
5,366
218,235
Cost or fair value
42,127
167,470
2,287
15,541
2,455
3,666
17,396
250,942
Accumulated
depreciation and
impairment
0
(-3,324)
0
(-7,984)
(-479)
(-3,001)
(-11,083)
(-25,871)
42,127
164,146
2,287
7,557
1,976
665
6,313
225,071
Carrying
amount at
31 December
At 1 January 2005
Net carrying
amount
At 31 December
2006
Net carrying
amount
76
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|
2007
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Buildings
3,638
3,353
3,638
3,353
Plant & equipment
1,841
4,006
1,841
4,006
Motor Vehicles
388
316
388
316
Library collections
238
237
238
237
Note
Depreciation and amortisation
Depreciation
Investment Properties
0
0
0
0
6,105
7,912
6,105
7,912
889
942
889
942
-1,714
-2,245
-1,714
-2,245
-825
-1,303
-825
-1,303
Profit and/or Loss on Sale of Non Current Assets
Proceeds on sale of property, plant & equipment
Less written down value
Net profit/(loss) on disposal
2.4
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2007
77
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Consolidated
Note
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
9,330
8,310
9,330
8,310
Note 10 - INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
At fair value
Accumulated Depreciation
0
0
0
0
9,330
8,310
9,330
8,310
8,310
8,310
8,310
8,310
0
0
0
0
1,020
0
1,020
0
0
0
0
0
9,330
8,310
9,330
8,310
Goodwill at cost
1,268
1,268
1,268
1,268
Less impairment expense
(-590)
(-167)
(-590)
(-167)
678
1,101
678
1,101
1,101
0
1,101
0
0
1,268
0
1,268
Total Investment Properties
Reconciliations of the carrying
amounts of each class of investment
properties at the beginning and end of
the current year are set out below.
Carrying amount at start of year
Additions
Revaluation increments (decrements)
Depreciation / amortisation expense
Carrying amount at end of year
Note 11 - INTANGIBLE ASSETS
Non-current
Total Intangible Assets
Reconciliations of the carrying
amounts of each class of intangible
asset at the beginning and end of
the current year are set out below.
Carrying amount at start of year
Additions
Revaluation increments (decrements)
Impairment expense
1.11
Carrying amount at end of year
78
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2007
0
0
0
0
(-423)
(-167)
(-423)
(-167)
678
1,101
678
1,101
Consolidated
Note
Note 12 - PAYABLES
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
9,064
7,129
9,064
7,129
Current
Creditors and accruals
Revenue in advance
14,930
13,033
14,930
13,033
23,994
20,162
23,994
20,162
Note 13 - INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
Current
Bank overdraft
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Note 14 - EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
Current
Employee benefits:
. Long service leave (expected leave next 12 months)
Long service leave (service over 10 years)
. Annual leave
Workcover provision
559
758
559
758
7,100
6,789
7,100
6,789
2,085
2,124
2,085
2,124
205
0
205
0
9,949
9,671
9,949
9,671
Non-current
Employee benefits:
. Long service leave
Total employee benefits
1,664
1,697
1,664
1,697
1,664
1,697
1,664
1,697
11,613
11,368
11,613
11,368
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2007
79
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Land
32,044
28,491
32,044
28,491
Buildings
83,092
75,675
83,092
75,675
115,136
104,166
115,136
104,166
28,491
28,491
28,491
28,491
3,553
0
3,553
0
32,044
28,491
32,044
28,491
75,675
75,675
75,675
75,675
NOTE 15 - EQUITY AND MOVEMENTS IN EQUITY
Note
Composition of Reserves
Asset revaluation reserve
Asset Revaluation Reserve - Land
Balance at 1 January
Revaluation increment on non-current assets
Balance at 31 December
Asset Revaluation Reserve - Buildings
Balance at 1 January
Revaluation increment on non-current assets
Balance at 31 December
7,417
0
7,417
0
83,092
75,675
83,092
75,675
122,807
122,807
122,807
122,807
122,807
122,807
122,807
122,807
47,513
26,804
47,513
26,804
Contributed Capital
Balance at 1 January
Balance at 31 December
Accumulated surplus / (deficit)
Balance at 1 January
Change in accounting policy
1.28
Net operating result for the year
Balance at 31 December
Total equity
80
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2007
-5,967
0
-5,967
0
21,308
20,709
21,308
20,709
62,854
47,513
62,854
47,513
300,797
274,486
300,797
274,486
Consolidated
Note 16 - CASH FLOW INFORMATION
Note
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
Reconciliation of operating result to net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities
Net operating result for the year
21,308
20,709
21,308
20,709
6,528
8,079
6,528
8,079
(-28)
(-20)
(-28)
(-20)
825
1,303
825
1,303
Decrease (increase) in receivables
603
76
603
76
Decrease (increase) in inventories
(-25)
68
(-25)
68
Decrease (increase) in other assets
223
49
223
49
3,832
5,048
3,832
5,048
245
517
245
517
33,511
35,829
33,511
35,829
498
661
498
661
Depreciation and amortisation
Donations of Fixed Assets - Library
Net profit/(loss) on disposal of non-current assets
Change in operating assets and liabilities
Increase (decrease) in payables
Increase (decrease) in employee benefits
Net cash provided by / (used in) operating
activities
Note 17 - LEASES
Operating lease commitments
Payments due
one year or less
one to five years
553
399
553
399
1,061
1,060
1,061
1,060
Institute owned properties
9,330
8,310
9,330
8,310
Gross amount of leased assets
9,330
8,310
9,330
8,310
LEASED ASSETS
As at the reporting date the Institute leased out
the following assets:
Operating Lease Receivables
Payments due
one year or less
one to five years
over five years
587
536
587
536
1,353
1,602
1,353
1,602
0
0
0
0
1,940
2,138
1,940
2,138
The Institute leases out certain land, buildings and equipment, which are excess to current requirements, at current market rates.
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
81
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Consolidated
Note 18 – COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURE
Note
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
4,391
5,200
4,391
5,200
Capital Commitments
As at the reporting date the Institute had the following
outstanding Capital Commitments:
New Buildings
Building Modifications
2,615
6,185
2,615
6,185
7,006
11,385
7,006
11,385
one year or less
5,806
8,540
5,806
8,540
one to five years
1,200
2,845
1,200
2,845
7,006
11,385
7,006
11,385
4
6
4
6
1,495
1,558
1,495
1,558
4,167
4,044
4,167
4,044
499
227
499
227
6,165
5,835
6,165
5,835
Outstanding Capital Commitments are payable as follows:
Payments due
Note 19 - CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND ASSETS
There were no contingent liabilities at 31 December 2007. (Nil 2006)
Note 20 - SUPERANNUATION (refer 1.15.6)
The Institute made contributions for employees who contribute to the funds, as follows:
State Superannuation Fund of Victoria
Emergency Services & State Super 12.5%
Revised Scheme and New Scheme
of Victoria 8% to 15%
Victorian Superannuation Fund
Vic Super Scheme 9%
Other Superannuation Schemes
Other Superannuation Schemes
Total Contributions to all Funds
As at the reporting date there were no outstanding contributions payable to the above funds.
As at the reporting date there were no loans to the Institute from any fund.
Note 21 - AUDITORS’ REMUNERATION
Auditor General
. Auditing the financial report
37
37
37
37
Audit firm (WHK Manning + Perry)
52
55
52
55
89
92
89
92
82
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2007
Note 22 - RESPONSIBLE PERSONS RELATED DISCLOSURES
The names of persons who were Responsible Persons at anytime during the financial year, were:
The Hon. Jacinta Allan, Minister for Skills and Workforce Participation from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2007
J. Sharkey (President)
L. Hill
S. Hallett (Student Representative)
D. Murden (Vice President)
L. Dewar
G. Hayes (Staff Representative)
B. Mackenzie (CE)
W. Forster
G. Dore
A. Shears-Carter
N. Moore
K. Davern
The Hon. H Storey QC
B. Waters
P. Picking
I. Pelletier
Remuneration of Responsible Persons
Amounts relating to Ministers are reported in the financial statements of the Department of Premier and Cabinet.
Other relevant interests are declared in the Register of Members’ Interests which each member of the Parliament completes.
Remuneration received, or due and receivable from the Institute in connection with the management of the Institute, includes
termination payments and bonuses paid at end of contracts.
Consolidated
Note
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
305
278
305
278
305
278
305
278
The number of Responsible Persons whose remuneration from the Institute was within the specified bands are as follows:
2007
2006
2007
2006
Income Range
No
No
No
No
0 - 10,000
13
13
13
13
40,000 - 50,000
0
0
0
0
50,001 - 60,000
0
1
0
1
60,001 - 70,000
1
0
1
0
200,001 - 210,000
0
0
0
0
210,001 - 220,000
0
0
0
0
220,001 - 230,000
1
1
1
1
15
15
15
15
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83
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
Retirement Benefits of Responsible Persons
There were no retirement benefits paid by the Institute in connection with the retirement of Responsible Persons of the Institute.
Executive Officers’ Remuneration
The number of executive officers, other than Responsible Persons, included under “Remuneration of Responsible Persons” above
whose total remuneration exceeded $100,000 during the financial year are shown in their relevant income bands. The base remuneration is exclusive of bonus payments, long service leave payments, redundancy payments and retirement benefits.
Total remuneration
Base remuneration
2007
2006
2007
2006
No.
No.
No.
No.
100,001 - 110,000
0
0
2
2
110,001 - 120,000
3
0
1
3
120,001 - 130,000
1
1
8
5
130,001 - 140,000
7
6
0
2
140,001 - 150,000
0
3
2
2
150,001 - 160,000
2
2
0
1
160,001 - 170,000
0
2
3
0
170,001 - 180,000
3
1
0
0
180,001 - 190,000
0
0
0
0
16
15
16
15
Total remuneration for the reporting period of executive officers included above amounted to:
Consolidated
Institute
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
2,242
2,180
2,242
2,180
2,242
2,180
2,242
2,180
Superannuation
There were no amounts paid to a superannuation plan or other entity by the Institute in connection with the retirement of Responsible
Persons during the financial year.
Loans
There were no loans in existence at reporting date that have been made, guaranteed or secured by the Institute or any related party to
Responsible Persons of the Institute or Responsible Persons-related party of those Responsible Persons.
Shares
At reporting date there were no interests in the Shares of related entities held by Responsible Persons of the Institute.
Other Transactions
There were no transactions between the Institute and Responsible persons and their related parties during the financial year.
84
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Note 23 - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
23.1 TERMS, CONDITIONS AND ACCOUNTING POLICIES
The Institute’s accounting policies, including the terms and conditions of each class of financial asset, financial liability and equity instrument, both
recognised and unrecognised at reporting date, are as follows:
Recognised Financial
Instruments
Notes
Accounting Policies
Terms and Conditions
FINANCIAL ASSETS
• Cash and cash equivalents
- cash at bank and on hand
4
Cash at bank is carried at the nominal amount.
Cash is invested as funds permit at varying interest
rates between 5.67% and 7.30%
• Cash and cash equivalents
- deposits at call
4
Deposits at call are carried at their nominal
amounts. Interest revenue is recognised in the
operating statement when it is earned
Deposits at call have an average maturity of
41days and effective interest rates of 5.67% to
7.30%. (2006 - 5.56% to 6.37%)
• Receivables
- Debtors
5
Trade debtors are carried at nominal amounts
due less any allowance for doubtful debts. An
allowance for doubtful debts is maintained to
recognise that collection of the full nominal
amount is no longer probable.
Credit sales are on 7 day terms.
• Receivables
- Other debtors
5
Other debtors are carried at the nominal amounts
Credit is allowed for a 30 day term.
• Other Financial Assets - Long Term Deposits
7
Long term deposits are stated at their amortised
cost or fair value depending on their classification
on initial recognition. Interest revenue is
recognised in the operating statement when it is
earned.
Long term deposits are invested for a period up to
5 years. Interest is based on the 90 day bank bill
plus a premium of between .03% and 1.9%.
• Other Financial Assets - Assets available for sale
7
Available for sale financial assets are reflected at
fair value.
Other financial assets are purchased with the
approval of the Institute Investment Committee.
• Payables
- Creditors and Accruals
11
Liabilities are recognised for amounts to be paid
in the future for goods and services received,
whether or not invoiced to the Institute
Trade liabilities are settled as required
• Interest Bearing Liabilities - Bank Overdraft
12
Bank overdrafts are carried at the principal
amount. Bank interest is charged as an expense as
it accrues. Details of credit standby arrangements
are: Nil
Interest is charged at the bank’s ruling overdraft
rate. Floating rates of 9.95% to 10.20% were
charged during the year. (2006 - 9.10% to 9.35%)
The amount of unused credit is Nil.
FINANCIAL LIABILITIES
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85
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
23.2 INTEREST RATE RISK
Interest rate risk arises from the potential for a change in interest rates to change the expected net interest earnings in the current reporting
period and in future years. Similarly, interest rate risk also arises from the potential for a change in interest rates to cause a fluctuation in the fair
value of the financial instruments.
The objective is to manage the rate risk to achieve stable and sustainable net interest earnings in the long term. This is managed predominately
through a mixture of short term and longer term investments.
The Institute’s exposure to interest rate risks and the effective interest rates of financial assets and financial liabilities, both recognised and
unrecognised at balance date are as follows:
FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
FLOATING
INTEREST RATE
FIXED INTEREST RATE MATURED IN:
One year or
less
One to five
years
Over five
years
Non Interest
Bearing
Total Carrying
Amount per
Statement
of Financial
Position
2007
2006
2007
2006
2007
2006
2007
2006
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
$000
FINANCIAL ASSETS
• Cash assets-Cash at Bank
• Cash assets-Deposits at Call
1,647
1,823
1,647
1,823
28,000
20,600
28,000
20,600
• Receivables-Debtors
1,453
1,725
1,453
1,725
• Receivables-Other Debtors
1,410
1,741
1,410
1,741
Various Shares
22,603
12,879
22,603
12,879
Term Deposits
33,252
31,253
33,252
31,253
85,502
66,555
Total Financial Assets
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,863
3,466
88,365
70,021
9,064
7,129
9,064
7,129
9,064
7,129
9,064
7,129
FINANCIAL LIABILITIES
• Payables:
Creditors & Accruals
Total Financial Liabilities
86
0
0
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
0
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2007
0
0
0
0
0
23.3 NET FAIR VALUES
The aggregate net fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities, both recognised and unrecognised, at balance
date, are as follows:
Total carrying amount as
per the Balance Sheet
Aggregate net fair value
2007
2006
2007
2006
$000
$000
$000
$000
• Cash and cash equivalents
- Cash at Bank
1,647
1,823
1,647
1,823
• Cash and cash equivalents
- Deposits at Call
28,000
20,600
28,000
20,600
• Receivables - Debtors
1,453
1,725
1,453
1,725
• Receivables - Other Debtors
1,410
1,741
1,410
1,741
FINANCIAL ASSETS
• Other Financial Assets
- Short Term Deposits
752
753
752
753
- Long Term Deposits
32,500
30,500
32,500
30,500
22,603
12,879
22,603
12,879
88,365
70,021
88,365
70,021
9,064
6,129
9,064
6,129
0
0
0
0
9,064
6,129
9,064
6,129
• Other Financial Assets
- Various Shares
Total Financial Assets
FINANCIAL LIABILITIES
• Payables
- Creditors & Accruals
• Interest Bearing Liabilities
- Bank Overdraft
Total Financial Liabilities
The following methods and assumptions are used to determine the net fair values of financial assets and liabilities:
Recognised Financial Instruments
Cash at Bank, Deposits at call, Receivables,
Creditors & Accruals, Other Loans and Short Term
Borrowings.
These financial instruments have a short term to maturity.
Accordingly,
it is considered that their carrying amounts reflect fair values.
Long Term Deposits and Long Term
Borrowings
The net fair values of these monetary financial assets and
financial liabilities are estimated using discounted cash flow
analysis, based on current interest rates for similar assets and
liabilities with similar risk profiles. These financial instruments
are carried at an amount in excess of their net fair value
but have not been written down as they will be repaid in
accordance with the agreed terms on maturity.
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87
Notes to and forming part of the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2007
23.4 FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT
23.4.5 CONCENTRATIONS OF CREDIT RISK
The Institute’s financial instruments consist mainly of deposits with
banks, local money market instruments, short term investments,
accounts receivables and payables and leases.
The main risks the Institute is exposed to through its financial
instruments are market risk, foreign currency risk, price risk, funding
risk, interest risk, credit risk and liquidity risk.
The Institute minimises concentrations of credit risk in relation to trade
accounts receivable by undertaking transactions with a large number
of customers. The majority of customers are concentrated in Australia.
The major customers relate to the provision of Vocational Education
and Training services to industry and the community. The Institute
continues to provide ongoing training, consultancy and other services
for these customers who adhere to industry trade terms.
23.4.1 MARKET RISK
Credit risk in trade receivables is managed in the following ways:
The Institute in its daily operations is exposed to a number of market
risks. Market risks relate to the risk that market rates and prices will
change and that this will have an adverse affect on the operating
result and /or net worth of the Institute. e.g. an adverse movement in
interest rates or foreign currency exchange rates.
- payment terms are 7 days from date of invoice.
- debtors with arrears are sent a reminder notice indicating a further
7 days to make payment before reference of their debt to a debt
collection agency.
The Board ensures that all market risk exposure is consistent with
the Institute’s business strategy and within the risk tolerance of the
Institute. Regular risk reports are presented to the Board.
There has been no significant change in the Institute’s exposure, or
its objectives, policies and processes for managing market risk or the
methods used to measure this risk from the previous reporting period.
- debtors which represent government departments or agencies
are not referred to a debt collection agency, but managed by the
Institute directly with department or agency contacts.
The Institute minimises concentrations of credit risk in relation to
student loans receivable in the following ways:
23.4.2 FOREIGN CURRENCY RISK
There has been no significant change in the Institute’s exposure, or its
objectives, policies and processes for managing foreign currency risk
or the methods used to measure this risk from the previous reporting
period.
- funds are drawn directly from the students bank account or credit
card account on the due date. If payments fail their enrolment is
suspended.
There has been no significant change in the Institute’s exposure, or
its objectives, policies and processes for managing funding risk or the
methods used to measure this risk from the previous reporting period.
23.4.3 PRICE RISK
The Institute is exposed to price risk in respect of fee for service and
contract services which are subject to open market competition.
23.4.6 INTEREST RATE RISK AND OTHER PRICE RISK
23.4.4 FUNDING RISK
The following is a summarised sensitivity analysis of the Institute’s
financial assets:
Funding risk is the risk of over reliance on a funding source to the
extent that a change in that funding source could impact on the
operating result for the current year and future years.
(1) +/-1% movement in interest rates and
(2) +/- 10% movement in the Australian listed equity price index:-
The Institute manages funding risk by continuing to diversify and
increase funding from Commercial activities, both domestically and off
shore.
(See table below)
Carrying
amount
($’000)
Intrest rate risk
Current rate
23.4.6 INTEREST RATE
RISK AND OTHER PRICE
RISK
- debtors with accounts in excess of 30 days are sent a statement of
account, indicating terms of 7 days to make payment.
Profit
($’000)
Cash and cash equivalents (1)
6.50%
1,647
(16)
(16)
16
16
Cash assets - Deposits at call (1)
6.50%
28,000
(280)
(280)
280
280
(333)
(333)
333
333
(629)
(629)
629
629
-1%
Other price risk
1%
Equity
($’000)
Profit
($’000)
Equity
($’000)
-10%
10%
Profit
($’000)
Equity
($’000)
Profit
($’000)
Equity
($’000)
(2,260)
(2,260)
2,260
2,260
(2,260)
(2,260)
2,260
2,260
Financial Assets
Various shares (2)
Term deposits (1)
22,603
7.51%
33,251
Total Increase (Decrease)
88
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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2007
Note 23 - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (cont)
23.5 CREDIT RISK
23.5.1 FINANCIAL ASSETS PAST DUE (but not impaired)
`000
Institute
`000
Consolidated
`000
Institute
`000
`000
> Three months
to six months
Consolidated
`000
Institute
> One to
three months
Consolidated
Institute
Consolidated
Institute
Consolidated
2007
No later than
one month
> Six months
to one year
> One year to
five years
`000
`000
`000
`000
FINANCIAL ASSETS
• Receivables
- Debtors
1,294
- Other Debtors
1,376
118
26
15
23
11
- Loans to related parties
`000
`000
> Six months to
one year
`000
`000
-
1,011
Institute
`000
38
Consolidated
`000
> Three
months to six
months
-
Institute
`000
26
Consolidated
`000
> One to three
months
-
Institute
2006
118
Consolidated
Institute
No later than
one month
-
Institute
2,670
Consolidated
-
Consolidated
Total Credit Risk
- Financial assets
1,000
> one year to
five years
`000
`000
FINANCIAL ASSETS
• Receivables
- Debtors
700
- Other Debtors
712
148
165
1,714
19
7
- Loans to related parties
Total Credit Risk
- Financial assets
1,000
-
2,414
-
712
-
148
-
184
-
1,007
Note 24 - SUBSEQUENT EVENTS
No material events occurred after reporting date.
Note 25 - EX-GRATIA PAYMENTS
There were no ex-gratia payments made during 2007. (Nil for 2006).
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
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89
Financial Reporting Framework
TABLE OF CONTENTS - PART ONE PAGE NO
KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS............................................................................................................................ 54
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND ACCOMPANYING NOTES......................................................................................... 56
DECLARATION BY PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
AND CHIEF FINANCE & ACCOUNTING OFFICER....................................................................................................... 60
OPERATING STATEMENT.......................................................................................................................................... 61
BALANCE SHEET...................................................................................................................................................... 62
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY...................................................................................................................... 63
CASH FLOW STATEMENT......................................................................................................................................... 64
NOTE 1 STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
1.1
BASIS OF PREPARATION........................................................................................................................................... 65
1.2
REPORTING ENTITY AND PRINCIPLES OF CONSOLIDATION....................................................................................... 65
1.3
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS.............................................................................................................................. 65
1.4
RECEIVABLES........................................................................................................................................................... 65
1.5
INVENTORIES........................................................................................................................................................... 65
1.6
FINANCIAL ASSETS.................................................................................................................................................. 66
1.7
FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSACTION....................................................................................................................... 66
1.8
NON-CURRENT PHYSICAL ASSETS CLASSIFIED AS HELD FOR SALE........................................................................... 66
1.9
NON-CURRENT PHYSICAL ASSETS........................................................................................................................... 66
1.10
REVALUATIONS OF NON-CURRENT PHYSICAL ASSETS............................................................................................. 67
1.11
IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS.......................................................................................................................................... 67
1.12
INTANGIBLE ASSETS................................................................................................................................................. 67
1.13
PAYABLES................................................................................................................................................................ 67
1.14
INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES................................................................................................................................. 68
1.15
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS................................................................................................................................................ 68
1.16
PROVISIONS............................................................................................................................................................ 68
1.17
LEASED ASSETS....................................................................................................................................................... 68
1.18
DEPRECIATION AND AMORTISATION....................................................................................................................... 69
1.19
INVESTMENT PROPERTIES........................................................................................................................................ 69
1.20
GOODS AND SERVICES TAX (GST)........................................................................................................................... 69
1.21
REVENUE RECOGNITION.......................................................................................................................................... 69
1.22
CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL........................................................................................................................................... 70
1.23
MATERIALITY........................................................................................................................................................... 70
1.24
ROUNDING OF AMOUNTS....................................................................................................................................... 70
1.25
COMPARATIVE INFORMATION................................................................................................................................. 70
1.26
COMMITMENTS...................................................................................................................................................... 70
1.27
CONTINGENT ASSETS AND CONTINGENT LIABILITIES............................................................................................... 70
1.28
CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING POLICY........................................................................................................................ 70
1.29
AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ISSUED BUT NOT YET EFFECTIVE............................................................. 71
NOTE 2 REVENUE FROM CONTINUING ACTIVITIES............................................................................................................... 72
NOTE 3 EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS........................................................................................................... 73
NOTE 4 CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS.............................................................................................................................. 74
NOTE 5 RECEIVABLES........................................................................................................................................................... 74
NOTE 6 INVENTORIES........................................................................................................................................................... 75
NOTE 7 OTHER FINANCIAL ASSETS....................................................................................................................................... 75
NOTE 8 OTHER ASSETS........................................................................................................................................................ 76
NOTE 9 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT........................................................................................................................ 77
NOTE 10 INVESTMENT PROPERTIES........................................................................................................................................ 80
NOTE 11 INTANGIBLE ASSETS................................................................................................................................................. 80
NOTE 12 PAYABLES................................................................................................................................................................ 81
NOTE 13 INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES................................................................................................................................. 81
NOTE 14 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS................................................................................................................................................ 81
NOTE 15 EQUITY AND MOVEMENTS IN EQUITY..................................................................................................................... 81
NOTE 16 CASH FLOW INFORMATION..................................................................................................................................... 82
NOTE 17 LEASES.................................................................................................................................................................... 83
NOTE 18 COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURE......................................................................................................................... 83
NOTE 19 CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND ASSETS..................................................................................................................... 84
NOTE 20 SUPERANNUATION.................................................................................................................................................. 84
NOTE 21 AUDITOR’S REMUNERATION.................................................................................................................................... 84
NOTE 22 RESPONSIBLE PERSONS RELATED DISCLOSURES....................................................................................................... 85
NOTE 23 FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS....................................................................................................................................... 87
NOTE 24 EVENTS OCCURRING AFTER REPORTING DATE........................................................................................................ 91
ACTIVITY TABLE - PART TWO
NOTE A1 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES.................................................................................................................................. 55
NOTE A2 DELIVERY PROVISION AND SUPPORT ACTIVITY........................................................................................................ 55
NOTE A3 ADMINISTRATION AND GENERAL SERVICES ACTIVITY............................................................................................. 55
NOTE A4 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT SERVICES ACTIVITY......................................................................................... 56
NOTE A5 STUDENT AND OTHER SERVICES ACTIVITY.............................................................................................................. 56
90
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Disclosure Index
Clause
Reporting Requirement
Page
1
SD 4.2(g)
2
SD 4.2(h)
3
SD 4.2 (j)
Report of Operations
Qualitative and Quantitative Information
Prepared in Accordance with Financial Reporting Directions
Signature of Responsible Person
9
9, 56
58
4
FRD 22
5
FRD 22
6
FRD 22
7
FRD 22
General information
Manner of Establishment and Responsible Minister
Institute’s objectives, functions, powers, summary of activities, programs, achievements
Nature and range of service provision
Organisational Chart/s
8
3-11
3-5
7
8
Recomm. 4.5.1.1
TAFE Gov Review
9
Recomm. 4.5.1.1
TAFE Gov Review
10
Recomm. 4.5.1.1
TAFE Gov Review
11
Recomm. 4.5.1.1
TAFE Gov Review
12
FRD 22 13
FRD 22 14
FRD 22 15
FRD 22 Governance
Structure of Board including committees
Statement of Workforce Data
Statement on application of employment and conduct principles
Statement on occupational, health and safety
Statement on industrial relations
16
FRD 10
17
FRD 10
18
FRD 10
Disclosure Index
Victorian legislation with statutory disclosure requirements
Description of relevant requirement
Relevant page
19
FRD 11
Disclosures
Disclosure of ex gratia payments
Ex gratia payments
20
FRD 21(1)(a) 21
FRD 21(1)(b) 22 FRD 21(1)(c) 23
FRD 21(1)(d) 24 FRD 21(2)(a) 25 FRD 21(2)(b) 26 FRD 21 (2)(c) Disclosures of responsible persons
Names of responsible persons
Disclosures of remuneration of Executive Officers
Total remuneration of responsible persons
Analysis of remuneration in bands of $10,000
Table disclosing aggregate amount of related party transactions
Total remuneration of all executive officers
Base remuneration disclosed separately
Accrual principles in determining remuneration levels
01
FRD 27
FRD 27
02
03
FRD 27
04
FRD 27
05
FRD 27
06
FRD 27
07
FRD 27
08
FRD 27
09
FRD 27
10
FRD 27
11
FRD 27
12
FRD 27
Key Performance Indicators
Module Load Completion Rage
Participation of 15 - 24 year olds
Participation of 25 - 64 year olds
Total Cost per Student Contact Hour (SCH)
Working Capital Ratio
Net Operating Margin
Revenue per EFT Staff
Energy Consumption
Student Contact Hours (SCH)
Participation of 15 - 19 year olds
Disability numbers
Indigenous numbers
27
FRD 22 28
FRD 22
29
FRD 22
30
FRD 22
31
FRD 22
32
FRD 22
33
FRD 22
34
FRD 22
35
FRD 22
36
FRD 22
37
FRD 22
38
FRD 22
39
FRD 22
40
FRD 22
41
FRD 22
42
FRD 22
Financial Information
Summary of financial results with comparative information for preceding four years
Summary of significant changes in financial position
Summary of operational and budgetary objectives
Events subsequent to Balance Date
Consultancy in excess of $100,000
Total consultancies individually valued at less than $100,000
Total expenditure of consultancy arrangements
Financial information consistent with financial statements
Report of Operations
Report of Operations
3-5
Summary of meetings attended by Board members
3
Summary of training by Board members
4
Board values and code of conduct
3
44
48
48
50
3, 91
91
91
89
83
83-84
83
82
84
84
84
43
43
43
27
43
43
11
11
9-11
89
11
11
11
11
9-11
9-11
Other Relevant Information
Freedom of Information Act
Building Act Whistleblowers Protection Act
National Competition Policy
Summary of environmental performance
Information available
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
48
25
48
46
25
11
|
2007
91
Disclosure Index
43
FRD 22
44
FRD 22
45
FRD 22
46
FRD 22
47
FRD 22
48
FRD 22
49
FRD 22
50
FRD 22
51
FRD 22
52
FRD 22
53
FRD 23
54
FRD 23
55
FRD 23
56
FRD 23
57
PAEC Dec 97 Overseas Operations of Victorian TAFE Institutes
Institute’s international operations
21
58
-
Auditor General Recommendation in relation to overseas operations
Risks, performance measures
21
59
FMA 1994 49(a) 60
FMA 1994 49(b) 61
FMA 1994 49 (c) 62
FMA 1994 49(d) 63
FMA 1994 49(e) b) Financial Statements
Part 7 of Financial Management Act
Information as required by Minister
Prepared in manner and form approved by Minister
Present fairly financial transactions
Present fairly financial position Certified by accountable officer
54-58
54-58
54-58
54-58
54-58
64
SD 4.2(a)
65
SD 4.2(a)
66
SD 4.2(a)
Financial Statements Prepared in Accordance with:
Australian Accounting Standards
Financial Reporting Directions
Business Rules
54-58
54-58
54-58
67
SD 4.2(b)
68
SD 4.2(b)
69
SD 4.2(b)
70
SD 4.2(b)
71
SD 4.2(c)
72
SD 4.2(c)
73
SD 4.2(c)
74
SD 4.2(d)
75
SD 4.2(d)
76
SD 4.2(d)
Financial Statements to Comprise the Following:
Statement of Financial Performance
Statement of Financial Position
Statement of Cash Flows
Notes to financial statements
54-58
54-58
62
63-89
Financial Statements signed and dated by Accountable Officer
Financial statements present fairly financial transactions
Financial statements prepared in accordance with directions
Comply with Australian Accounting Standards
56-58
56-58
56-58
Financial Statements expressed in nearest dollar
$10,000,000 may be expressed to nearest $1000
$1,000,000,000 may be expressed to nearest $100,000
Reviewed and recommended by Audit Committee
68
68
54-89
77
AASB1018
78
AASB1018
79
AASB1018
80
AASB1018
81
AASB1018
82
AASB1018
83
AASB1018
84
AASB1018
85
AASB1018
86 AAS36
87
AAS36
88
AAS36
89
AAS36
90
AAS36
91
AAS36
92
AAS36
93
AAS36
94
AAS36
95
AAS36
96
AAS36
Statement of Financial Performance
Revenues from ordinary activities
Expenses from ordinary activities
Borrow cost expense
Result from ordinary activities
Extraordinary items
Result for year
Increase (decrease) on adoption Accounting Standard
Net increase (decrease) in asset revaluation reserve
Total revenues, expenses, valuation adjustments
Current Assets
Non-current Assets
Classes of assets
Total assets
Current liabilities
Non current liabilities
Classes of liabilities
Total liabilities
Reserves
Contributed capital
Total equity
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
54-89
97-100 AAS28
Statement of Cash Flows
Statement of Cash Flows
54-89
101-161 AAS Notes to and forming part of Financial Statements
Notes 1-26
54-89
92
Pecuniary interests
Details of shares
Publications
Major promotional, public relations, marketing activities
Changes in prices, fees, charges
Compulsory non-academic fees, subscriptions, charges
Major external reviews
Major research and development activities
Details of overseas visits
Major committees sponsored by Institute
Superannuation Liabilities and Disclosures
Name and type of superannuation scheme
Basis for calculating superannuation
Loan to Institute from scheme
Superannuation liabilities
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE Annual Report
|
2007
11
11
29
29
44
44
11
11
11
11
50
50
50, 82
50, 82
Moorabbin Campus
488 South Road
Moorabbin 3189
(PO Box 42 Holmesglen 3148)
Telephone (03) 9564 1555
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE 2007 Annual Report
Chadstone Campus
Batesford Road
Chadstone 3148
(PO Box 42 Holmesglen 3148)
Telephone (03) 9564 1555
2007
Annual Report
Waverley Campus
585 Waverley Road
Glen Waverley 3150
(PO Box 42 Holmesglen 3148)
Telephone (03) 9564 1555
www.holmesglen.vic.edu.au
Holmesglen Institute of TAFE

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