annual report - Volunteer Wellington

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annual report - Volunteer Wellington
2015–2016
ANNUAL REPORT
Volunteer Wellington
Te Puna Tautoko
A catalyst for involvement in the community
Contents
Volunteer Wellington
Level 7
186 Willis St
PO Box 24130
Wellington
T: 04 499 4570
F: 04 499 3907
E: [email protected]
Our purpose, Our vision, Our values,
Our guiding principles, Our mission
statement, Aims and objectives,
What we do, Board of trustees
3
Key achievements
4
Chair’s report
5
Building the new
5
Volunteer Porirua
Level 4
Pember House
16 Hagley Street
Porirua
T: 04 237 5355
E: [email protected]
Action that supports and builds
7
Volunteering connections reaching out
8
Volunteer Hutt
Level 4
21–23 Andrews Avenue
Lower Hutt 5010
T: 04 566 6786
E: [email protected]
Many hands make light work – The era of
the ‘blitz’
13
The admin year
14
Auditor's Report
15
website
http://www.volunteerwellington.nz
Statement of Financial Performance
16
Statement of Financial Position
16
blog
www.volunteerwellington.wordpress.com
Statement of Movements in Equity
17
Statement of Cash Flows
17
Notes to the Performance Report
18
Thank you
22
Those who have used our services
23
A wide-angled picture
10
Talking in the lift
11
Renewed motivation along the career-path
journey12
Financials
THANKS TO VERTIA FOR THE RED AND MINIMUM GRAPHICS FOR THE DESIGN
Volunteer Wellington : Te Puna Tautoko
Volunteer Wellington
Level 7, 186 Willis Street, PO Box
24130, Wellington
t 04 499 4570
f 04 499 3907
[email protected]
wwww.volunteerwellington.nz
Volunteer Wellington
is registered as
"" an incorporated Charitable Trust
"" exempt from income tax
"" We are committed to developing
the capacity of the community
and voluntary sector in the
Wellington region through
professional development,
support and mentoring
The spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi
is a continuous source of inspiration
in all aspects of our work
Our mission statement
Donations to Volunteer Wellington
are tax deductible to the donor.
To create opportunities for
meaningful engagement in the
community through volunteering
Registered Charity CC26471
Aims and objectives
Our purpose
Volunteer Wellington, Te Puna
Tautoko, is the champion of
volunteering in Wellington
Our vision
A strong and connected community
and voluntary sector
Our values
"" Respect
"" Diversity
"" Flexibility
"" Integrity
"" Inclusiveness
Our guiding principles
"" We are committed to being
a catalyst for involvement in
the community – a continuous
source of support for the
community
"" We believe that volunteering is
“meaningful purposeful activity”
"" We are committed to developing
innovative ways of matching and
connecting people to voluntary
roles in the community
"" We believe that all motives for
volunteering are valid
"" We are committed to diversity in
all areas of our work
"" We are committed to being
a promoter of and advocate
for volunteering and the
management of volunteers
Volunteer Wellington is a
community organisation that
focusses on championing
volunteering and building the
capacity and capability of
communities in greater Wellington.
We work with more than 400
community based agencies
providing the essential volunteer
workforce needed to sustain
their services. We provide advice,
mentoring and professional
development in the management
of volunteers to enhance
the experience for both the
organisation and the volunteer.
What we do
"" Provide professional
development to managers/
leaders of volunteers which
will enhance the growth of
the profession of managers of
volunteers across Volunteer
Wellington’s geographic and
demographic outreach
"" Maintain a comprehensive
range of quality volunteering
opportunities from our network
of community organisations
"" Recruit and refer volunteers to
voluntary roles suited to their
interests and goals
"" Provide a professional
development training
programme designed for the
community and voluntary sector
"" Promote the benefits and value
of volunteering with emphasis on
diversity, inclusion and effective
management of volunteer
programmes
"" Produce two-monthly
newsletters with up-to-date
information about volunteering
and the management and
leadership of volunteers
"" Support networks of managers
of volunteers and voluntary
organisations in the Wellington
region
"" Facilitate peer mentoring and
work with peer support groups
for MoVs
"" Maintain and develop an
accessible resource library and
website
"" Publicise, manage and facilitate
Employee Volunteering (EV)
"" Work with corporates,
government agencies and
other businesses to encourage
volunteering and ongoing
relationships between the
community and business sector
Board of trustees
Ruth Collingham (chair), Lesley
Daly (deputy chair), Drew Hadwen,
Nathalie Harrington, Alvin Hu,
David Loveridge, Ryan O'Connell,
Christian Pilkington, Glenn Todd,
Ming-chun Wu
This strong and enthusiastic board
has been actively involved with
the many projects which have
developed this year, bringing skills,
strategic vision and creative energy
to our services.
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 3
Key achievements
By the numbers
Recruitment and referral
Capacity building in the
wider community
2681
21
formal volunteer seekers – includes
those interviewed face-to-face and
those referred online.
65%–70%
successful volunteering placements
within the community sector.
Volunteer diversity
and inclusion
324
registered with Work and Income
624
seeking paid work
446
full-time paid employment
286
part-time paid employment
111
retired
599
students
100
unpaid labour force
68
visitors
26
other
561
migrants
86
refugees
professional development
workshops/forums organised by our
three offices – Volunteer Wellington,
Volunteer Hutt, Volunteer Porirua.
620
record numbers of participants at
training events.
423
liaison/mentoring visits and calls
with greater Wellington community
network.
9
778
employees participating from 20
businesses.
40
diverse community organisations
joined our membership.
Promotion and advocacy
8
bi-monthly Volunteer Wellington
NEWS produced for community
membership; intermittent NEWS
FROM THE EDGE newsletter produced
for Business Friends membership
with both being distributed to all
stakeholders and supporters.
mentoring partnerships connecting
experienced community practitioners
with those new to the sector and/
or who are seeking support and
direction. Business Friends also
involved in this programme during
past year.
18
17
Volume 4: Stories about Volunteers
and Volunteering with 33 profiles
included, published and launched.
managers/leaders of volunteer
programmes involved with Peer
Support and Leadership groups in
Porirua and Wellington. Hutt group
re-established 2016–2017 timeframe.
101
employee Volunteering projects with
Business Friends connecting with
our community network resulting in
increased capacity, resources and
business/community relationships.
By the outcomes
profiles written about diverse
volunteers and creative managers of
volunteers.
4
8
celebratory and informative events
held in Hutt, Porirua and Wellington
to acknowledge all aspects of
volunteering and the management
of volunteers on International
Volunteer Managers Day, National
Volunteer Week, International
Volunteer Day. Several hundred
participants.
Numbers are interesting. They’re the outputs, the raw data which helps us
measure our performance. However the heart of the success from our three
active offices – Volunteer Wellington, Volunteer Hutt and Volunteer Porirua
– is how many lives we’ve been able to change through doing what we’re doing.
A connected community creates a strong society. Our strategic objectives
are focused on connections that will have an ongoing impact within
community life – and therefore New Zealand as a whole.
Tales from Volunteer Wellington’s Chair and permanent staff members –
their own and other stories to which they have contributed – describe a year
which has been dynamic, energetic and full of change; and the relationship of
outcomes to our Key Strategic Objectives.
4 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Chair’s report
Tena koutou
I am pleased
to present
this annual
report, my
first as chair
of Volunteer
Wellington since taking over from
Ruth Collingham at the start of
2016. We have enjoyed another
busy and successful year, but
one that has presented a few
challenges. The redevelopment
of Community House meant
that we needed to find new
accommodation midway through
2015. However, as is often the case,
what is initially seen as a disruptive
and challenging situation ends
up presenting opportunities and
benefits. The new Wellington office
is now domiciled in a light-filled
spacious office on Willis Street, a far
nicer place to work and visit.
This year the major internal focus
has been a review to benchmark
Volunteer Wellington against
international best business
practices, refining our strategic
plan and updating our policy
documents. For the most part
Volunteer Wellington fared well
in the business review, measuring
up to being a ‘remarkable
organisation’; those areas noted for
improvement have been targeted in
our three year strategic plan.
In closing I want to acknowledge
the continued support of our
community sector members,
funders and stakeholders and
to also thank my fellow Board
members, the staff (paid and
unpaid) who make Volunteer
Wellington an organisation that we
are proud to serve.
Ngā mihi nui
Glenn Todd
COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS • MEMBER DEVELOPMENT • MEMBER
ENGAGEMENT • COMMUNITY DIVERSITY • CAPABILITY PROMOTION
BUILDING THE NEW
"The secret of change is to focus all of
your energy not on fighting the old, but
on building the new" – Socrates
During a year of change and ‘building
the new’ our move to level 7, 186 Willis
Street was a big step; made painless
and straightforward by the work of
two volunteer project managers, Pete
Thomson and Chris Streatfield, and
also the architectural skills of John
Rogers from CCM Architects, one of
our premier supporters.
Two key staff members moved
on after nearly ten years; Lynne
Harding, manager of Volunteer
Porirua and Judy Kerr, coordinator
of the Employee Volunteering
programme. Julia Donovan, the
new manager in our Porirua office
and Lyne Pringle coordinator of our
Employee volunteering programme
(connecting businesses with our
community members) joined our team
in December bringing new skills and
fresh perspectives to our work.
Our role as a ‘pivotal connector’
within the community sector has been
a high point this year. We attracted
a further 40 diverse community
organisations to our membership of
400. 2681 individual volunteer seekers
from all walks of life made time to
connect with their communities
through our services. Almost 800
employee volunteers added value
to our community members by
completing 101 projects. Record
numbers of 620 people attended our
professional development programme
– 21 workshops and forums covering
a wide selection of hot topics and
including two international trainers
Rob Jackson from the UK and Andy
Fryar from Australia. ‘Something for
everyone’ we said at the beginning of
the year. That happened!
Distribution of volunteer
registration by oFfice
Online
(40%)
Wellington
(29%)
Porirua
(11%)
Lower Hutt
(20%)
Networking – those valuable
connections made – is the added
benefit to attending our training
programme and celebratory events.
Hearing the ‘buzz’ as people get to
know each other, share ideas and tips
and go on to develop peer support
relationships gives us a ‘real buzz’.
These connections can make the
difference between people surviving
or thriving in their role and work
environment.
Grassroots connections made
through our mentoring programme
and peer support groups have
resulted in some amazing coaching
relationships. Profiles written reveal
the impact experienced practitioners
sharing their skills and resources
have on the professional and personal
development of our community
“The training reinforced changes
we knew we needed to make to
ensure our service is inviting to
new opportunities.”
“Great workshop – I got tools
to implement in my work and
inspiration. Great to have time
out to reflect.”
“Renewed my enthusiasm.”
“Hugely beneficial – I have
a better understanding of
volunteering in a wider context.”
“This is by far the most
interesting training on
fundraising I have been to.”
“Very engaging. Really enjoyed
meeting other NFP governance
group members.”
“Very useful, engaging and
stimulating.”
“Very valuable – motivated me to
make a start on a plan.”
members. ‘Gave me the chance to take
a step back from my work, I think I’ve
grown professionally and personally with
my mentor’s support’ (mentee), ‘Being
a mentor has improved my passion for
my own work which, given its challenges
and workload, I have much appreciated’
(mentor). Advice from one mentee –
‘Do it! Learning from other people who
have real life experience is the best.’
Working with diversely rich
communities and witnessing the
positive impact our services have on
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 5
FROM APRIL/MAY/2015 NEWS
Diverse training line-up –
something for everyone!
Stepping through Transitions
workshop
Julie (left) at the annual Nikau Foundation
Corporate Challenge celebration
with Adrienne Bushell of Nikau, Chris
Streatfield and Sue Hobbs from Volunteer
Wellington. photo: carolina henriquez
organisations and peoples’ lives is
incredibly motivating and inspiring.
Our successes and achievements this
year are testament to the commitment,
skills and creativity of our team of
paid employees, board members
and volunteers. All made possible
through the valuable support of our
stakeholders. We can proudly say that
Volunteer Wellington is ‘A catalyst for
involvement in the community’.
Julie Thomson
Manager member services
volunteers by age
60 plus
There are still places left on this
workshop. Designed for small
community organisations it explores
their challenges of becoming more
productive as demand for their
services increases and looks at
the impact these changes have
on the organisations’ capacity
and capability. The workshop has
been organised in partnership
with Porirua City Council (PCC)
and CGO Transitions. It is most
effective if two or more people
from your organisation attend. PCC
has subsidised the fees for Porirua
groups and for two people from an
organisation.
What community organisations
need to know about New
Zealand’s changing Health and
Safety law
Individuals in governance and
management roles in the NFP sector
need to be aware of the implications
and impact the new bill will have on
managing health and safety in their
organisations and the risk of personal
liability.
For those who missed the Health
and Safety forum we ran last year
we have organised another session
on Monday 20 April from 12 to 2 pm
in the Hutt, led by Kate Scarlet of
Community Law Wellington and Hutt
Valley. The session will cover:
FROM AUG/SEPT/2015 NEWS
Inspiring workshop
Understanding volunteers and
volunteering today
We are very excited to advise that
Volunteer Wellington is hosting
Rob Jackson, UK based renowned
international leader in the Volunteer
Management field. Rob has
written, spoken and trained on
volunteer programme management
internationally for over twenty years.
Understanding volunteers and
volunteering today is the workshop
topic which will be held on 20
October in Wellington.
This full-day workshop will look
at some of the key ways in which
society is changing and how these
changes affect volunteering. We will
discuss what leaders of volunteers
can do to update their practices to
accommodate these changes, further
enhancing their engagement and
retention of 21st century volunteers.
You’ll have the chance to explore
what you believe about volunteering
– what it is, what it isn’t, why you
think that – and consider what
this might mean for your work as
a volunteer leader. The workshop
will be highly inter­active, a bit
provocative, and a lot of fun.
Make sure you grab this one-off
opportunity to spend a day with Rob
by registering for this workshop on
line www.volunteerwellington.org.nz
and click on training or complete the
enclosed registration form and send
with payment to our office.
"" A comparison between the current
law and new law
50–59
"" The new due diligence duty and
effect on the governance and
management roles
40–49
30–39
"" What a Person Conducting
Business or Undertaking (PCBU)
is and what this means for your
organisations
20–29
"" The role of Worksafe NZ
14–20
"" Changes to penalties
0
200
400
600
800 1000 1200
Number of volunteers
6 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
A key to a strong board is involvement
with an organisation’s special events. It
also helps with understanding different
stakeholders says Volunteer Wellington
board member Glenn Todd, photographed
at the 2015 AGM talking with guest speaker
Guy Ryan. photo: eva kaprinay
Charlie spent a morning discussing the management of volunteers and the importance
of volunteers in a democracy with five of the young leaders in Wellington for six months
as part of UnionAid’s Myanmar Young Leaders Programme. His words on a Facebook post
that day: ‘It was super inspiring – thanks for your energy and enthusiasm and keep up the
amazing work you are all doing in Myanmar!! Nga mihi nui!’
ACTION THAT SUPPORTS
AND BUILDS
Something that gives me a real buzz
in my work is meeting with a new
community organisation or a new
Manager of Volunteers in one of our
existing members and discussing all
of the ways that we can support them
in their work. One example that stands
out from the past year was a meeting
with the new Manager Volunteer
Strategy and Services at Mary Potter
Hospice, Lichelle Evans.
Lyne Pringle and I meet with
Lichelle in February 2016 and out
of that meeting, a host of action
and events took place … I connected
Lichelle with the CBD peer support
group for Managers of Volunteers as
well as with a local mentor. Meanwhile
Lyne worked with employee volunteers
from ACC to re-paint the volunteer
offices and to do some work in the
gardens at their Newtown base. And,
of course, we have been recruiting
volunteers for Mary Potter Hospice’s
day-to-day operations as well as for
their annual appeal which set a new
record for their organisation this year!
Supporting organisations and
individuals to reach their full potential
and achieve their mission through
engaging volunteers is not only
satisfying, but creates our vision for a
strong and connected community and
voluntary sector. And I think that’s
pretty darn cool!
Charlie Devenish
Member capability advisor/
Funding officer
“I am enjoying my work as a Volunteer
Activities Assistant at St John of God
Haoura Trust here in Karori. It has
certainly made me change my thinking
on what a disability actually is. I am
going to continue to do it as long as I
can. Kind regards,” Richard Anderson.
FROM APRIL/MAY/2016 NEWS
A mentoring partnership …
Willing to invest time
in thinking
Marcia Skinnon has a background in
community and social development.
Her focus is building resilient people
through their neighbourhoods and
family networks.
When she took on the leadership
of Dress for Success as executive
director she immediately recognised
her past work and life experiences
were valuable; but she also had to be
more singular about her role as the
‘face and voice’ of the organisation.
Mark Corbitt is general manager
of ICT with Contact Energy, a
company committed to contributing
to the community by encouraging
employees to volunteer. Highly
experienced, a good listener,
and with a ‘great career’ already
achieved, he was enthusiastic about
a ‘mentoring match’ with Marcia
during her first few weeks in the job.
‘I saw our potential partnership
as a very good fit as I do have an
interest in fashion.’ Among his varied
career experiences Mark worked in a
women’s clothing company for a year.
‘As we have come to know more
about one another I can see my
mentoring role providing ideas,
thoughts and possibilities – and also
challenges. In her role as the leader
of this organisation Marcia needs
the confidence to be in the public
view.’ Public speaking and how to be
relaxed about photo opportunities
has been a recent task ‘pushed’ by
Mark.
‘He has given me tips that he uses
himself as a result of comprehensive
public speaking and media training.
Find your good side, learn to
pose, practise with selfies, know
what colours you look best in …
sometimes I’ve found his challenges
difficult but there is always the room
for reflection and to think through
the different perspectives he offers.
Mark also gives me the space to offload. Say what I like.’
There is disciplined planning
around their mentoring meetings,
now a priority in their monthly
calendars with one hour monthly
being allocated throughout the year.
‘They can’t be ad hoc,’ says Mark.
A life-changing event
‘Find your good side, learn to pose,
practise with selfies …’ A selfie taken by
Marcia Skinnon with her mentor Mark
Corbitt.
He talks about their first meetings.
‘Straightaway I was struck by Marcia’s
passion. Elements of my work can be
abstract. Learning about people with
very real struggles and where life is
not so easy helps me to see my place
in community. Dress for Success can
for many, be a life-changing event.’
Acknowledging that their world
views are different Mark emphasises
that with a constructive men­tor­ing
relationship there must be openmindedness and empathy; plus the
willingness to invest time in thinking.
‘This development of ideas is what
makes the partnership exciting.
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 7
I will continue to challenge – but
what I offer is without prejudice or
mandate.’
Marcia enjoys the fact that Mark
‘is there in a completely neutral
space to hear and to share’; and she
now feels that her ambitions to truly
meet the needs of her client group
– disadvantaged women – and to
create more grassroots’ connections
and cultural awareness are
happening through her leadership.
She was even happy about taking
a selfie of herself with Mark Corbitt,
her mentor, for this Volunteer
Wellington NEWS story.
FROM DEC/15/JAN/16 NEWS
Revisiting your top tips
The top tips for new managers
of volunteers gathered from last
month’s International Managers of
Volunteers’ Day are worth revisiting
in light of superdiversity. Points
identified as the keys to a successful
volunteer programme by the 60
attendees at our IMVDay breakfast
forum were:
"" Take time to get to know the
volunteers working in your
organisation;
"" Know volunteers’ skills and
motivations and make sure you
match them with appropriate
roles;
"" Listen to volunteers suggestions
and take on-board their feedback;
"" Recognise, thank and respect
volunteers’ contribution
(repeatedly).
And we think these points are also
central to providing an organisational
culture that is welcoming and
inclusive of diversity.
Concentration, focus, ideas at Volunteer
Wellington’s 2015 IVMDay breakfast forum.
FROM JUNE/JULY/2016 NEWS
Other Wellington region National Volunteer Week events
Read all about it ... the guide that will support you
develop your volunteer programme
We are looking forward to launching, during
National Volunteer Week, our newly created
resource Developing your Volunteer Programme: A
guide for Managers of Volunteers.
We have produced this resource in partnership
with managers of volunteers in the city and
with support from volunteer centres around
the country. The resource includes tips,
tools and resources for each aspect of your
volunteer programme – from set-up to ongoing
management and exiting of volunteers.
There are a number of templates at the back of
the resource that you can adapt and use in your
volunteer programme. The guide will be freely available to
all our stakeholders and members.
If you’d like to find out more, or wish to receive a copy once it has
been officially launched, please contact Charlie on 499 4570 or [email protected]
volunteerwellington.nz
“This Guide is a culmination of my learning over the past three years. Much of the
content is information about what our community members have asked about – or
they’ve already come up with the answers. Putting it together has been incredibly
inspiring,” said Charlie Devenish when the Guide went public.
Hello Charlie
Just wanted to say this Guide is great. I am new Manager here 3 months
ago, haven’t managed Volunteers for 12 years so this is very helpful for 2016
environment. I will definitely use this for the future.
Regards, Donna Tunnicliffe, Operations Manager
Hutt Rape Counselling Network (HRCN)
VOLUNTEER SEEKERS • VOLUNTEER DIVERSITY • INCREASING
SUCCESSFUL PLACEMENTS IN COMMUNITY SECTOR • ENSURING
MOTIVES FOR VOLUNTEERING ARE MET
VOLUNTEERING CONNECTIONS REACHING OUT
Volunteering in the Hutt Valley is
like the river flowing through the
valley. One volunteer’s action flows
out, connecting with others to greater
effect, and volunteers never know
where their actions will reach.
The varied amounts of time that
individuals make for Kaibosh, a food
redistribution agency, flows on to
the fourteen or so organisations that
share the food with those in need.
Arohanui Strings, based at a decile 1
school, is able to sustain its hungry
young musicians as they rehearse for
concerts such as those at Parliament or
with the National Orchestra. In turn
some of those musicians played at a
celebratory event at Kaibosh – a lovely
completion of the circle.
Similarly Earthlink runs an agency
8 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
focused on sustainability, salvaging
appliances and furniture left at the
landfill, repairing and on-selling
where possible, turning old uniforms
into new clothes, keeping cold
houses warm with recycled curtains,
working with the aid of mental health
consumers and volunteers. The
effects continue to flow out into the
community as many of the clients
become work ready through their
involvement with Earthlink.
Hutt volunteers offer support that
has a profound and far-reaching effect
on their community in ways they
might never have expected.
Katie Terris
Manager Volunteer Hutt
“Thanks so much Julie and Katie: I am a massive fan of your organisation and want
to thank you both for your hard work. I really enjoyed the collaboration between
our organisations. You certainly made things a lot easier and stress free than what
it would’ve been if we went out by ourselves! I look forward to doing more things
together and look forward to the funding workshop next month.”
Amber Moffitt, Upper Hutt City Council
FROM JUNE/JULY/2015 NEWS
FROM DEC/15/JAN/16 NEWS
The Spring Ball at Woburn Home
For teenager Lola Hall a highlight of
the Spring Ball was ‘dancing with
90-year-old Peggy, she was such a
character and could kick her legs just
as high as me!’
While balls may normally be
associated with teenagers, residents
at the Woburn Presbyterian Home
had a chance to re-live their youth on
22 October with a Spring Ball at their
residence.
The ball was a result of the
combined efforts of volunteers.
Residents initially suggested the
ball to manager Stewart Clark, who
wanted ideas for projects the Hutt
Valley High School Service Council
could help with. Jessica Kemp, a
volunteer employee from Mercer,
then met with the students to help
them to organise the event.
The ball was a huge success,
involving residents and many of
their family members, from spouses
through to grandchildren. The event
included beautiful music, finger food
and demonstration dancing – the
latter demo of old-time dancing was
provided by Ursula Curtis-Jelbert
from Greytown and her dancing
partner, John Wales of Upper
Hutt. This encouraged many of the
residents to join in the dancing.
Residents weren’t the only people
to benefit from the event. Hutt Valley
Able sailing
Happiness is … the Spring ball.
High Service Council members Deah
Nocete, Lucy Burton and Lola Hall all
had positive experiences organising
the event and found it inspiring.
‘Not only did I get to see the elderly
residents have fun, but I also got to
see what we can accomplish just
by working together… It was not
only some people helping – it was
Volunteer Hutt, the staff, the Home,
the students, the residents and the
residents’ families;’ reflected Deah
Nocete.
For student Lola Hall it is ‘events
like this that motivate me to continue
bringing small moments of happiness
to others, and remind me what an
impact small groups of people can
have on the community.’ story and photographs: lola hall
Don Manning (pictured right above)
has been interested in people with
disabilities since he was a schoolboy.
Back then, he wanted to get a friend
with cerebral palsy into a yacht and
teach him to sail. This wish came
true 37 years later when he set up
Sailability Wellington 13 years ago.
Sailability enables and encourages
people with disabilities to sail on
Wellington Harbour from Evans Bay
Yacht Club.
Don works with keen teams of
volunteers to get 136 Wellingtonians
with different disabilities, onto the
water four days a week weather
permitting.
An extended version of this story
will appear in our forthcoming
publication of Volume 4. Stories about
volunteers and volunteering. Also
pictured are, from left, sailor and
sometime volunteer Darrell Smith
and Sunday bosun Anita Nicholls.
writer: suzanne carty
FROM AUG/SEPT/2015 NEWS
Inspiring displays at
Lower Hutt event
FROM JUNE/JULY/2015 NEWS
There is a place for you to volunteer – the theme for National Volunteer Week 2015
resonated for this happy group of new migrants who recently received Volunteer Connect
Awards for new migrants. The awards were presented by Mayor Celia Wade-Brown at a
celebration attended by around 70 people at the Southern Cross Hotel.
photo: eva kaprinay
The theme for National Volunteer
week 2015 was there’s a place for
you to volunteer. And at an event
organised by Volunteer Hutt that
week, The Dowse positively sparkled
with displays of photos and posters
from many local organisations that
find a place for volunteers.
More than 100 volunteers and
managers of volunteers from
throughout the Hutt Valley shared the
morning tea provided by the mayor,
networked and listened to inspiring
speakers – all with a passion for
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 9
volunteers and volunteering.
Mayor Ray Wallace, Annabel
White from Trade Aid and Don
Manning from Sailability energised
the audience with their enthusiasm,
helping volunteers value what they
themselves do. After the event the
display moved to War Memorial
Library stimulating more interest.
people to use the resources they
already have to achieve goals they
value and change the world a little.
Volunteer seekers through our
Pember House office in Porirua, are
examples of the diversity we continue
to promote. A high percentage are
registered with Work and Income,
often with complex needs, health
issues, criminal backgrounds. Being
part of their journey to find direction
and motivation is all part of a wideangled picture.
In my few months with Volunteer
Porirua I have observed placements
with our local community members
which have changed lives and
rewarded both the volunteer and the
organisation.
Julia Donovan
Manager Volunteer Porirua
Janice Henson of Te Omanga Hospice and
other community representatives enjoying
our Hutt NVW event.
A WIDE-ANGLED PICTURE
The first day I spent at the Porirua
office, learning my new job, I sat in
on an interview with an interesting
woman who mentioned in passing
that she didn’t feel justified accepting
the superannuation to which she
was entitled, as she didn’t need it. I
suggested that she could look at it
as an opportunity to control a small
portion of government spending, and
direct it towards purposes she thought
most appropriate.
Before I left the office that day, she
rang in to let me know she’d decided
to accept her superannuation and use
it to sponsor a group of children in
India. For me, this story is a perfect
illustration of what we do: supporting
A story about Joe Kahu, a past Porirua
Work and Income client whose
volunteering led to full-time employment,
catches Julia’s eye during her recent
introduction to Volunteer Porirua.
FROM JUNE/JULY/2015 NEWS
New and exciting volunteer
roles in Porirua community
We’ve had some great results from
a recent drive to connect with our
Porirua-based members.
These conversations have led
to the development of several new
and exciting volunteer roles in the
Porirua community. To date 80% of
our members in Porirua are actively
seeking volunteers and, at time of
writing, there were 494 roles on our
database at locations across the
Wellington region.
Visits
Member liaison visits are a great
way to develop your organisation’s
volunteer programme. They involve a
member of the Volunteer Wellington
team (including the Hutt and Porirua
offices) visiting you in your workplace
to talk about your volunteering
needs; and experience your work
environment.
Awareness of trends in the
volunteer workforce combined with
our knowledge of the community
sector, mean that we are well-placed
to support you to develop creative
and meaningful roles that are
beneficial to both your organisation
and the volunteers taking on the
work.
We can also provide advice on
recruitment, training and ongoing
effective management of volunteers.
10 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Value
Our recent work with the Perinatal
Mental Health NZ Trust (PMHNZ
Trust) shows the value of using our
services. As a newly established
organisation Volunteer Porirua
was able to provide them with
templates to set up their volunteer
programme including a policy on
volunteers, a volunteer agreement, a
code of practice and an example of a
volunteer role description.
We then worked with the Chair,
Rosie Smith, to identify the work
they needed done and developed the
large list of tasks into four distinct
volunteer roles. Once these roles
were signed off by the board we
began recruiting volunteers to fill the
roles: within eight weeks more than
20 volunteer referrals were made
and two of the four vacancies have
been filled.
Rosie Smith, Chair of PMHNZ Trust
says: ‘The Volunteer Porirua team
were so helpful in helping us to identify
the roles we needed and then advising
us about the recruitment process
with lots of templates which we could
adapt to our organisation. We have
two enthusiastic volunteers who want
to give us the benefit of their skills
and time. I highly recommend them
(Volunteer Porirua).’
FROM AUG/SEPT/2015 NEWS
Extraordinary diversity
The launch of the fourth volume of
Once upon a time … stories about
volunteers and volunteering was
another inspiring happening at
Volunteer Wellington’s recent AGM.
The 34 profiles included in the
book cover the people ‘we all are’,
with a colourful overview emerging
of extraordinary diversity and the
impact of volunteering on our lives.
Read more about it by contacting
Volunteer Wellington for a copy to
add inspiration
to your
recruitment
programme; or
to share ideas
with a creative
manager of
volunteers.
RELATIONSHIPS • INCREASING ABILITY TO GIVE VOICE TO OUR VALUES AND THE VALUE AND BENEFITS OF
VOLUNTEERING • INCREASING THE RECOGNITION AND VALUE OF MANAGERS OF VOLUNTEER PROGRAMMES
TALKING IN THE LIFT
‘Which floor are you going to?’ said the
man in the lift. I was arriving at work
at our new premises, 186 Willis Street,
soon after our October 2015 arrival.
‘Level 7,’ I said. ‘We’re Volunteer
Wellington – heard of us?’
‘No, what do you do?’ (Typical lift
conversation.)
‘We work with 400 community
organisations, offer training and
recruit volunteers from all over.’
‘Do you work with 20+-year-olds
who are unemployed and don’t know
what to do with themselves?’
‘All the time,’ I said talking as
quickly as possible – ‘lots of options – a
chat with one of our interviewers is
always interesting and leads to people
getting a feel of what’s out there in the
voluntary sector.’
‘Wonderful. I’ll tell my daughter
tonight.’
‘Here’s my card….’ I’d arrived at
my floor. And yes, she did come in
FROM DEC 15/JAN/16 NEWS
‘Take a bow’ Wellington
volunteers
Celebrating International Volunteer
Day 2015 was a fitting way to break
in the newly refurbished Volunteer
Corner at Dixon and Victoria Streets.
Volunteer Wellington was there
when the corner was first developed
in 2001 and we returned to help plant
‘volunteer’ camellias when the space
was officially reopened in spring
this year, following the upgrade of
Victoria Street.
It was fantastic to partner with
ZEAL to host the first public event in
the new space. And what a success it
was! More than 120 people, including
guest speaker Mayor Celia WadeBrown, came to enjoy the beautiful
Turn your organisation into a
volunteer magnet – 3 May
From left: Ann Hodson, deputy mayor
Justin Lester, Charlie Devenish and
Pauline Harper with newly planted
camellia Volunteer at the redeveloped
Volunteer Corner on Victoria and Dixon
Streets.
Pauline Harper
Manager programmes
FROM APRIL/MAY/2016 NEWS
Dynamic and engaging trainer
From left Ruth Collingham chair of
Volunteer Wellington, Mayor Celia WadeBrown, Jenna Harris, manager Zeal.
photo: eva kaprinay
the following week. The options
and choice had attracted this young
graduate, despondent because finding
employment was more difficult than
she had bargained for.
Around 600 students came through
our services last year. Volunteering
has a tremendous impact on their
lives. They gain that necessary work
experience and valuable insights into
the many organisations that help to
create a more equal, cohesive and
vibrant society.
summer’s day, to eat strawberries
and the delicious biscuits baked by
ZEAL volunteers and the chocolates
donated by Butler’s.
Hema Water kept us all hydrated
as we listened to the beautiful music
performed by ZEAL and heard stories
of the impact volunteering has in the
lives of everyday Wellingtonians; and
of course the impact that volunteers
make in the daily life of Wellington!
We’ve heard it before, but
where would we be, where would
our organisations be, and where
would Wellington be without our
volunteers? One and all, take a
bow. December 5 was our chance to
say thank you for the work you do
to make Wellington’s community
awesome!
It’s all happening on IVD 2015 at Volunteer
Corner. photo: eva kaprinay
We are thrilled to advise that
Volunteer Wellington is hosting
engaging and dynamic trainer,
speaker and writer on volunteer
management, Andy Fryar. Based
in Australia Andy has been
involved globally in the volunteer
management field for over 30
years and regularly presents at
international conferences and
seminars. Andy’s training sessions
are practical, thought provoking
and challenging and his quick wit,
humour and down-to-earth style
make his sessions an enjoyable
experience.
Andy will be delivering his
most popular workshop Turn your
organisation into a volunteer
magnet on Tuesday 3 May in
volunteers by Labour force
Other (4%)
Visitor (3%)
Not stated (1%)
Unpaid labour force (4%)
Student (22%)
Retired (4%)
Part-time paid employment (11%)
Registered with Work & Income (12%)
Seeking paid work (23%)
Full-time paid employment (17%)
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 11
RENEWED MOTIVATION
ALONG THE CAREERPATH JOURNEY
Andy Fryar
Wellington. This half-day workshop
caters for leaders/managers/
coordinators of volunteers at all
levels and is based on six key qualities
identified that all successful volunteer
programmes have in common.
Ethnicity of volunteers
Pakeha/NZ1,006
Maori175
Pacific Peoples
172
India344
China162
South East Asia
165
East Asia
82
South Asia
60
Middle East
43
Other Asian
0
Australia21
Western Europe
176
Eastern Europe
23
Russia/Baltic States
13
North America
47
South/Central America
70
Africa39
Other2
Not stated
81
I am reminded each day when I call
clients for follow up that the personal
stories they share with me and that the
clients I work with are so much more
than ‘letters of referral, statistics, job
placements, names on the database or
the many faceless unemployed’.
You see when I ring clients, I’m
sitting at my desk in front of my
computer at my job, but when I call
them, I ring in the middle of their
lives, and I never know what is going
to be happening on the end of that
phone. I have called to find people
on the way to Tangi, people who have
recently been touched by suicide,
people recovering from accidents and
illness and sometimes I just call in the
middle of life! – and life when you are
unemployed and on the poverty line
can be tough:
I called ‘D’ as a usual follow-up call
to see if he had managed to find a role
yet. He was so pleased to hear from
me. He happened to be in a car coming
back from Northland where he had
been stuck for a month because after
attending a deceased family member’s
unveiling, his car broke down. When
you’re poor and can’t pay for repairs
the garage keeps the car until you can
and during that time he had no money
to top up his phone. He was so pleased
we hadn’t given up on him and is keen
to finally be able to start volunteering.
Where does that positivity come
from?!
Then there’s ‘Al’, a 23-year-old
Samoan man who came to see me at
Work and Income. A stroke has given
him aphasia and a big knock back in
Amanda Hanan
12 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Distribution of volunteers by gender
Not stated
(1%)
Male
(32%)
Female
(67%)
how volunteers heard of
volunteer wellington
Not stated
(2%) Website
(31%)
Other (18%)
Your employer (1%)
Pamphlet (1%)
Speaker (4%)
Sandwich board (3%)
Work and Income (5%)
Newspaper/radio/TV (7%)
Word of mouth
(28%)
his amazing young working life. His
double degree and working experience
at Disneyland, his youth advocacy
work – all on hold as he learns to
process language all over again.
‘R’, a 20-year-old who, despite leaving
school two years ago with NCEA level
3, has never held a job. It turned out he
had volunteered some years ago with
St Johns as a youth mentor. When I
discovered these skills it was easy to
place him with a great volunteer role.
He now has renewed motivation to
find a sustainable career path.
I believe volunteering offers hope:
filling a gap on a resume, offering
a reason to get out of bed in the
morning, a chance to network, a
second chance, an opportunity to
get a reference, and a chance to feel
good about yourself – because you
connected and gave valuable support
today.
I tell all my clients to include their
volunteering role on their resumes
and add details of their new skills.
Lorraine had this to say when I said
this to her: ‘I know it is volunteering,
but really it’s work. What I do it’s a
job, I have no problem putting my
volunteering role and skills on my
resume – what I do it’s professional,
important and real’. Quite right!
Amanda Hanan
Engagement in the
community co-ordinator
Extract from report to
Work and Income:
n a man out of work for a long
time reacts with surprise at how
many roles he has the life skills
for, takes up a position with
Riding for the Disabled and is
now a highly valued member of
their team
n a woman who took on two
of the roles we suggested tells
us ‘As I want to create a career
in mental health, by doing peer
support and/or advocacy, both
of these roles are giving me great
experience’
n a Pacifika woman in her
50s laughs about learning to
make change while working at
the hospice shop. She has two
different roles there and her
value has been recognised by
the organisation – definitely new
directions, she says
n a young migrant man says
‘volunteering [in customer
service] has opened up a lot of
opportunities for me’
n an older woman who has had a
two year battle with depression
walks away with several
recommended roles, happy to
know we’d be following up – and
when we do, we find she’s taken
a role as a writer and her skills
are ‘all coming back’ to her
n a man who felt down because
a criminal record made it hard
to find a voluntary position is
so heartened by the one he gets
that he determines to keep it and
add another
n message from Peter and now
volunteering three days a week
with one of the Mary Potter
Hospice shops: ‘After finishing
up with same firm for 20 years
my confidence was at rock
bottom but it is now starting to
go up up up.’
The benefits of volunteering
for the organisations are
obvious to most people, but
the benefits for the volunteers
are at least as great, and often
involve providing motivation,
satisfaction and a sense of selfworth to people who need it the
most.
PROFILE
Interacting with so many different people
Samantha Pardo is young, qualified
(she has a BA and diploma in
journalism), persuasive, energetic –
but at the time of this interview had
had no paid employment.
After too many rejection letters
and too many applications she
followed up on a suggestion to get
into volunteering work. ‘I’d never
really done any real work, just school
and then university. So I realized my
CV was way too short!’
When her search began through
Volunteer Wellington she was
surprised at the calibre of the roles
available. So her journey began to
build more flexible skills base…and a
longer CV.
She began with the Red Cross
doing data entry and general
administration. ‘It was great to be
busier and to be with a work team of
people who would shake me out of
feeling down and depressed.’
Now Samantha had the bit
between her teeth she wanted to be
still busier. Her next role was as an
events manager with Plunket. This
was occasional and on-call but when
on, the learning curve was huge, she
said.
Reception work with Greenstone
doors, a counselling service for
women, followed. ‘I felt so happy
when I began working here. There
was a very good vibe – such positive
energy. Plus I was honing up my
customer service and reception
ability.’
When she began interviewing
volunteer seekers at Volunteer
Wellington there was some lack
‘It was great to be busier and to be with a
work team of people who would shake me
out of feeling down and depressed.’
of confidence, a feeling of being
intimidated. ‘Some of the people I
was talking with were much older and
more experienced than me; and then
there were others at the opposite end
of the scale. I trained with another
interviewer, Anna Maria, for several
weeks and now I am not afraid to
interview on my own. I am building
up my confidence all the time as I
learn about interacting with so many
different people.’
In the course of this interviewing
role Samantha gave a talk to a group
of new migrants from an English
learning ‘pathways to work’ class who
were visiting Volunteer Wellington.
She was telling them about the
benefits of volunteering and the way
it was definitely a stepping stone to
employment. ‘That’s my goal too,’
she said. ‘My CV is so long now – I
know a job is just around the corner.’
BUSINESS FRIENDS • EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING • SUPPORTING
EMPLOYERS TO ENABLE THEIR STAFF TO VOLUNTEER • INCREASING
SKILL VOLUNTEERING UPTAKE
MANY HANDS MAKE
LIGHT WORK – THE ERA
OF THE ‘BLITZ’
It is one of those ‘bluebird days’,
we have had a lot of them lately in
this extended Wellington summer.
Without a breath of wind, the camera
drone is able to hover over a freshly
dug bike track. The vista is breathtaking, as is the scale of the work
undertaken over the past few weeks.
Three hundred metres of new track
cleared by 10 teams, 80 people in total,
over a period of 3 weeks.
I am meeting Jo Boyle who is
on the committee of the Makara
Peak Supporters (responsible for
leading the multi-team project from
the community end) and Melissa
Middleton from ANZ (responsible for
the logistics in her workplace). They
have been a formidable team leading a
‘corporate blitz’.
Today they stand at the starting
point of the project and wave up at
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 13
FROM NEWS FROM THE EDGE/ISSUE TWENTY FIVE/DEC 2015
Christmas decorating for the elderly
Lyne becomes familiar with Volunteer
Wellington’s almost 400 community
organisation members during week one.
the drone that will map the scale of
the endeavour for a film presentation
at the KPMG function on 22 June.
This event will mark the end of the
Nikau Corporate Challenge period of
January to June. They exemplify the
immense possibilities for community
and corporate partnerships and
were recognised with our Corporate
Challenge Award this year.
When I speak to Jo Boyle, in charge
of trails at Makara Peak and Melissa
Middleton, from ANZ, they are all
slightly shocked by the scale of the
achievement.
Lyne Pringle
Employee Volunteering
co-ordinator
Other stand-our projects
of the year
Mary Potter Hospice and ACC
renovating the volunteer spaces at the
Hospice. This standout project took
place between Mary Potter Hospice and
ACC. Five teams over the course of a
week transformed the volunteer spaces
at the Hospice. Lichelle Evans their
manager of volunteers said: ‘It took quite
a bit of planning to be ready for this group
but it was entirely worth it. One of the
best collaborative projects I have been
involved with.’
n Chorus at the Wellington Women’s
Boarding House. A plucky team from
Chorus spruced up the premises in a
whirlwind of activity. ‘The day was a
roaring success and everyone who came
from Chorus was brilliant,’ said Margaret
Speirs the Manager of the House.
n A Mega crew from OMD prepared
Central Park for Planting. A large team
from OMD took to the lower reaches of
the stream in Central Park. This was a
collaboration with Upstream: Friends of
Central Park to clear invasive weeds and
make way for winter planting.
n Huntleigh Home volunteer manager,
Gwen Esler put a special request
in this year for the same employee
volunteering team as last year to put
up the Christmas decorations.
Team leader Andrew Thrift and
his group were only too happy to say
“yes” to the project, getting to know
the residents and enjoying every
minute of decorating the main rooms.
“We did this project last year and
it was fun. It brings a bit of Christmas
cheer to the residents and workers,
as well as ourselves,” says Andrew.
Gwen was so pleased with the
efforts of the team of eight, she wants
them back in 2016. “It was their
attitude, friendliness and willingness
to come in for a second year, and
the efficient way the decorating was
organised that impressed me,” says
Gwen.
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON • CREATING, MAINTAINING AND ENHANCING
PARTNERSHIPS TO ENSURE FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY FOR
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON • INCREASING CAPABILITY THROUGH THE
USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
THE ADMIN YEAR
Another busy year has passed us by.
My admin mainstays Paul
Headifen, Manisha Guria and Amy
Davis (who have all volunteered with
us for many years now) have been
joined by Bronwen Turner and Himani
who we are delighted to have on board.
Others have left for other pastures. It’s
always great to find how skills learnt
at the reception desk add so much to
people’s confidence – and next steps.
Thank you to the wonderful
team of interviewers, journalists,
photographers, mentors, liaison
assistants, researchers and follow-up
people who have added great value
and vibrancy to our organisation
during the past year.
Welcome to Jonathan Maharaj (our
new volunteer auditor). We greatly
appreciate all his hard work and
expertise during this year’s audit.
Sue Hobbs (graphic design) and
Chris Streatfield (IT) have assisted us
immensely over the year (as they have
Former Volunteer Wellington board
member Drew Hadwen with our most
recent premier supporter, Geoff Marsland
of Havana Coffee Works. photo: carolina
henriquez
14 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Detailed records and a warm welcome
come together at the registration desk of
so many of our celebrations throughout
the year with Debra at the helm.
photo eva kaprinay
for many years now) and we are always
grateful for their huge contribution.
It is only with the assistance
of such an energetic and creative
group of volunteers that we are
able to offer the service we do; and
a service which supports so many
people and organisations in the wider
community.
Debra Roche
Office Administrator
A new Volunteer
Induction Manual
was created this
year with support
from HR volunteer
assistant Annana
Pal. Diagrams
included have
proved useful
descriptions
of Volunteer
Wellington as
The Vital Link;
plus our internal
structure.
The Vital
Link
Volunteers
Students
Unemployed
People seeking
career changes
Cultural
to contribute
Volunteer Wellington
Special events
A CATALYST FOR
INVOLVEMENT
IN THE COMMUNITY
Retirees
People wanting
Welfare
Arts
Migrants & refugees
People wanting
Community organisa
tions
Health
Full-time employed
Sport & recreation
to develop skills
Youth developme
nt
Environmental
Information services
Training
in the
management
of volunteers
Volunteer
recruitment
and referral
Community
development
and capacitybuilding
organisational charts
VOLUNTEER WELLIN
BOARD OF TRUSTEGTON
ES
VOLUNTEER HUTT
BRANCH MANAGER
Volunteer
interviewing team
OFFICE
ADMINISTR ATOR
Working with:
– volunteer admin
staff
– accountant
– auditor
CO-MANAGERS
Programme Manager
/ Manager Member
Services
VOLUNTEER PORIRUA
BRANCH MANAGER
Volunteer
interviewing team
EMPLOYEE
VOLUNTEERING
COORDINATOR
Facilitates employee
volunteering with
community groups
VOLUNTEER
INTERVIEWING
TEAM
Interface between
volunteer seekers
and community
organisations
VOLUNTEER SPECIAL
ASSIGNMENTS
– graphic designers
– IT specialists
– writers
– photographers
– liaison supporters
– refugee
community group
mentors
Volunteer Wellington
A CATALYST FOR
INVOLVEMENT
IN THE COMMUNITY
4
MEMBER CAPABILITY
ADVISOR/FUNDING
OFFICER
Working with
community
members to develop
effective volunteer
programmes
ENGAGEMENT
IN
THE COMMUNIT
Y
COORDINATOR
Provides in-depth
follow-up support
with volunteers
Independent Auditor’s Report
To the Trustees
Report on the Performance Report
We have audited the accompanying performance report
of Wellington Volunteer Centre on pages 9 to 23 which
comprises the entity information, the statement of service
performance, the statement of financial performance,
the statement of movements in equity and the statement
of cash flows for the year ended 31 March 2016, the
statement of financial position as at 31 March 2016, and
the notes to the performance report.
The Responsibility of the Trustees for the
Performance Report
The Trustees are responsible on behalf of the entity for:
a) Identifying outcomes and outputs, and quantifying the
outputs to the extent practicable, that are relevant,
reliable, comparable and understandable, to report in
the statement of service performance;
b) The preparation and fair presentation of the
performance report which comprises:
— The entity information;
— The statement of service performance; and
— The statement of financial performance, the
statement of financial position, the statement of
movements in equity, the statement of cash flows,
and the notes to the performance report;
in accordance with Public Benefit Entity Simple Format
Reporting – Accrual (Not-For-Profit) issued in New
Zealand by the New Zealand Accounting Standards
Board; and
c) For such internal control as the Trustees determine
is necessary to enable the preparation of the
performance report that is free from material
misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.
Auditor’s Responsibility
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the
performance report based on our audit. We conducted
our audit of the statement of financial performance,
the statement of financial position, the statement of
movements in equity, the statement of cash flows, and
the notes to the performance report in accordance with
International Standards on Auditing (New Zealand)
(ISAs (NZ)), and the audit of the entity information and
statement of service performance in accordance with
the International Standard on Assurance Engagements
(New Zealand) ISAE (NZ) 3000 (Revised). Those standards
require that we comply with ethical requirements
and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable
assurance about whether the performance report is free
from material misstatement.
An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit
evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the
performance report, including performing procedures
to obtain evidence about and evaluating whether the
reported outcomes and outputs and quantification of the
outputs to the extent practicable, are relevant, reliable,
comparable and understandable.
The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s
judgement, including the assessment of the risks of
material misstatement of the performance report,
whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk
assessments, the auditor considers internal control
relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation
of the performance report in order to design audit
procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances,
but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the
effectiveness of the entity’s internal control.
An audit also includes, evaluating the appropriateness
of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of
accounting estimates made by management, as well as
evaluating the overall presentation of the performance
report.
We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is
sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit
opinion. Other than in our capacity as auditor we have
no relationship with, or interests in, Wellington Volunteer
Centre.
Opinion
In our opinion:
a) The reported outcomes and outputs, and
quantification of the outputs to the extent practicable,
in the statement of service performance are suitable;
b) The performance report (available on the websites of
Volunteer Wellington www.volunteerwellington.nz and
the Charities Services www.charities.govt.nz) gives a
true and fair view of:
— The entity information for the year then ended;
— The service performance for the year then ended;
and
— The financial position of Wellington Volunteer Centre
as at 31 March 2016, and its financial performance,
movements in equity, and cash flows for the year
then ended
in accordance with Public Benefit Entity Simple Format
Reporting – Accrual (Not-For-Profit).
Aurora Financials
Limited Qualified Statutory Auditors
Wellington
28 June 2016
Full Statement of Service Performance and Financial Performance available on the websites of
Volunteer Wellington www.volunteerwellington.nz and the Charities Services www.charities.govt.nz
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 15
Statement of Financial Performance
For the year ended 31 March 2016
REVENUE
Notes
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Donations, fundraising and other similar revenue
3
211,100
176,567
Fees, subscriptions and other revenue from members
3
67,533
41,570
Revenue from providing goods or services
3
92,012
94,773
Interest, dividends and other investment revenue
3
4,942
5,732
375,587
318,642
Total Revenue
EXPENSES
Volunteer and employee related costs
4
278,522
270,533
Costs related to providing goods or services
4
88,750
84,031
Other expenses
4
2,935
4,352
370,207
358,916
Total Expenses
Surplus / (Deficit) for the year
5,380
(40,274)
Statement of Financial Position
As at 31 March 2016
Notes
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other receivables
Non Current Assets
Property, plant and equipment
5
5
6
Total Assets
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
148,591
19,927
138,403
13,530
168,518
151,933
4,412
5,847
4,412
5,847
172,930
157,780
Current Liabilities
Trade and other payables
5
36,391
42,249
Income in advance
5
55,198
91,589
39,570
81,819
Total Liabilities
91,589
81,819
Net Assets
81,341
75,961
6,341
75,000
961
75,000
81,341
75,961
Equity
Accumulated surplus
Reserves
Total Equity
7
This performance report has been approved by the trustees.
For and on behalf of Wellington Volunteer Centre:
Dated: 28 June 2016
TrusteeTrustee
These statements must be read in conjunction with the notes to the performance report and the audit report.
16 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Statement of Movements in Equity
For the year ended 31 March 2016
Accumulated Surplus
Reserves
Total
116,235
—
116,235
At 1 April 2014
Deficit for the year
(40,274)
—
(40,274)
Transfer to reserves
(75,000)
75,000
—
75,000
75,961
At 31 March 2015
961
Surplus for the year
5,380
—
5,380
At 31 March 2016
6,341
75,000
81,341
Statement of Cash Flows
As at 31 March 2016
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Cash flows from operating activities
Donations, fundraising and other similar receipts
214,109
183,409
Receipts from providing goods or services
98,022
82,433
Fees, subscriptions and other receipts from members
71,652
61,371
4,931
5,608
Interest, dividends and other investment receipts
Payments to suppliers and employees
Net cash flows from operating activities
(377,919)
(356,352)
10,795
(23,531)
Cash flows from investing and financing activities
Receipts from the sale of property, plant and equipment
1,023
­—
Acquisition of property, plant and equipment
(1,630)
(1,167)
(607)
(1,167)
Net cash flows from investing and financing activities
Net increase / (decrease) in cash
10,188
(24,698)
Cash at the beginning of the year
138,403
163,101
Cash at the end of the year
148,591
138,403
148,591
138,403
This is represented by:
Cash and cash equivalents
These statements must be read in conjunction with the notes to the performance report and the audit report.
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 17
Notes to the Performance Report
For the year ended 31 March 2016
1.General
Wellington Volunteer Centre (the
“entity”) is a charitable trust that
is domiciled in New Zealand and is
registered with the New Zealand
Charities Commission.
The entity’s principal activity
is championing volunteering and
building the capacity and capability
of communities in Greater Wellington.
During the year ended 31 March 2016,
there was no material change in the
nature of the entity’s principal activity.
This performance report was
authorised for issue by the trustees on
28 June 2016.
2. Statement of Accounting
Policies
The principal accounting policies
adopted in the preparation of the
performance report are set out below.
These policies have been consistently
applied to all the years presented,
unless otherwise stated.
Basis of preparation
The performance report has been
prepared under the historical cost
convention.
The entity has elected to apply
PBE SFR-A (NFP) Public Benefit Entity
Simple Format Reporting – Accrual
(Not-For-Profit) on the basis that it
does not have public accountability
and has total annual expenses of less
than $2,000,000. All transactions in the
performance report are reported using
the accrual basis of accounting.
The performance report is prepared
under the assumption that the
entity will continue to operate in the
foreseeable future.
The trustees believe that the basis
of preparation of the performance
report is appropriate and the entity
will be able to continue in operation
for at least 12 months from the date
of this statement. Accordingly, the
trustees believe that the classification
and carrying amounts of the assets and
liabilities as stated in the performance
report are appropriate.
Tier 2 PBE Accounting Standards
Applied
The entity has not adopted any Tier
2 PBE Accounting Standards in the
preparation of the performance report.
Changes in Accounting Policies
There have been no changes in the
entity’s accounting policies since the
prior financial year.
Comparative figures
Where necessary, comparative figures
have been adjusted to conform with
changes in presentation in the current
year. Where necessary, amounts
relating to prior years have been
reclassified to facilitate comparison
and to achieve consistency in
disclosure with current year amounts.
Goods and services tax
All amounts are shown exclusive of
Goods and Services Tax (GST), except
for receivables and payables which are
stated inclusive of GST.
Operating Leases
Where the entity is the lessee, the lease
rentals payable on operating leases are
recognised in the statement of financial
performance over the lease term.
Leases in which a significant portion
of the risks and rewards of ownership
are retained by the lessor are classified
as operating leases. Payments made
under operating leases are charged to
the statement of financial performance
on a straight-line basis over the lease
term.
amounts at year end. Bad debts are
written off during the year in which
they are identified.
Property, plant and equipment
Property, plant and equipment are
stated at cost less accumulated
depreciation and impairment losses.
Depreciation is calculated to
allocate an asset’s cost to its residual
value over its estimated useful life.
The residual values and useful lives
of assets are reviewed, and adjusted
if appropriate, at each balance sheet
date.
The following depreciation rates
have been adopted in line with those
permitted under the Income Tax Act
2007:
"" Furniture and Fittings: 10% to 19.2%
Diminishing Value
"" Computers and Equipment: 30% to
67% Diminishing Value
Gains and losses on disposal are
determined by comparing the proceeds
with the asset’s carrying amount.
These are included in the statement of
financial performance.
Trade and other payables
The entity is exempt from New Zealand
income tax because it is a registered
charity and has fully complied with
all statutory conditions for tax
exemptions.
These amounts represent liabilities
for goods and services provided to the
entity prior to the end of the financial
year and which are unpaid at the
reporting date.
Liabilities for wages and salaries
and annual leave are recognised and
measured as the amount unpaid at the
reporting date at current pay rates in
respect of employees’ services up to
that date.
Cash and cash equivalents
Income in advance
Cash and cash equivalents comprise
cash on hand and at bank which are
stated at face value.
These amounts represent income
received during the financial year which
relate to the next financial year.
Trade and other receivables
Donated services
Trade receivables are recognised and
carried at the original invoice amount
less any allowance for impairment
of these receivables. An allowance
for impairment of receivables is
established when there is objective
evidence that the amount will not be
collected according to the original
terms of receivables. This allowance
is based on a review of all outstanding
The entity is dependent on the
voluntary services of many volunteers.
Due to the difficulty in determining
value with sufficient reliability, donated
services are not recognised in the
performance report.
Income Tax
These statements must be read in conjunction with the notes to the performance report and the audit report.
18 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
3. Analysis of Revenue
Revenue from providing goods or services
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Ministry of Social Development – Work and Income
69,000
80,626
21,192
13,847
31 Mar 2015
Donations, fundraising and
other similar revenue
ANZ Bank Limited
5,000
5,000
Training fees
Betty Campbell Trust
8,500
5,217
Consultation services
5,000
5,000
Book sales
Department of Internal Affairs
– COGS
16,000
14,500
Department of Internal Affairs
– Settling in Fund
22,000
Department of Internal Affairs
– Support for Vol Fund
18,902
CCM Architects
1,620
300
200
92,012
—
94,773
Interest, dividends and other investment revenue
—
31 Mar 2016
Interest
19,318
31 Mar 2015
4,942
5,732
4,942
5,732
Hutt City Council – Community Development Fund
4,500
Hutt City Council – Youth
Development
2,903
18,506
Hutt Mana Charitable Trust
2,500
2,000
Infinity Foundation
2,014
—
John Ilott Charitable Trust
1,500
—
Salaries and wages
Lion Foundation
1,663
—
Volunteer costs
7,066
7,805
Staff training and recruitment
3,301
1,259
888
845
278,522
270,533
Lottery Grants Board
30,000
—
—
Mazda Foundation
474
—
2,000
—
Nikau Foundation
14,556
5,900
Other Donations
3,607
1,232
Pelorus Trust
2,000
—
Porirua City Council
7,500
8,000
Pub Charity
1,156
—
Regional Lottery Grants
Board
Tai Shan Foundation
—
ACC levies
4,000
—
T G Macarthy Trust
—
5,000
Tindall Foundation
4,000
—
Trust House Foundation
9,000
1,000
Wellington City Council
35,000
38,419
6,325
3,675
211,100
176,567
35,145
12,886
Fees and subscriptions from
NFP members
32,388
28,684
67,533
41,570
267,267
260,624
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
39,141
38,373
Client training costs
17,190
9,971
Telephone and internet
9,317
10,038
Premises costs
7,054
7,059
Travel and meeting costs
6,994
5,367
Printing and photocopying
4,217
6,189
Office supplies and insurance
3,169
2,110
Postage and courier
1,210
4,018
Total
458
906
88,750
84,031
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Other expenses
Depreciation and assets
written off
31 Mar 2015
Fees and subscriptions from
Corporate members
31 Mar 2015
Rental of premises and
moving costs
Advertising
Fees, subscriptions and other revenue from members
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2016
Costs related to providing goods or services
14,800
5,000
Wellington Community Trust
Volunteer and employee related costs
25,000
Mana Community Grants
Foundation
Ministry of Business,
Innovation and Employment
4.Analysis of Expenses
Bank / professional /
membership fees
2,032
2,948
903
1,404
2,935
4,352
These statements must be read in conjunction with the notes to the performance report and the audit report.
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 19
5. Analysis of Assets and Liabilities
Cash and cash equivalents
Income in advance
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Term deposits
95,000
105,000
Deposit account
44,045
28,460
Current account
9,546
4,943
148,591
138,403
Trade receivables
Prepayments
Bonds receivable
Accrued interest
31 Mar 2015
10,970
8,480
7,941
4,044
774
774
31 Mar 2015
26,457
24,167
Corporate subscription fees
14,659
12,830
Wellington Community Trust
10,000
6,325
Nikau Foundation
9,544
9,100
Lion Foundation
8,336
—
Hutt Mana Charitable Trust
2,582
—
Hutt City Council – Youth
Project
—
2,903
Training fees
(130)
NFP membership fees
Trade and other receivables
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2016
Work and Income accrued
revenue
242
232
19,927
13,530
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Annual leave accrual
18,659
20,034
GST payable
10,863
11,451
PAYE payable
3,929
4,865
Trade payables
2,570
5,319
370
580
36,391
42,249
495
(16,250)
(16,250)
55,198
39,570
Trade and other payables
Accrued expenses
6. Property, Plant and Equipment
Opening
Carrying
Amount
Additions
Furniture and fixtures
Office equipment
1,602
1,439
1,156
474
662
298
232
432
1,864
1,183
Computers (and
software)
2,806
—
73
1,368
1,365
5,847
1,630
1,033
2,032
4,412
2016
Disposals
Depreciation
Closing
Carrying
Amount
2016
Furniture and fixtures
1,835
Office equipment
5,793
—
—
7,628
Computers (and software)
35
—
268
1,602
3,686
668
1,439
4,818
40
1,972
2,806
4,853
3,726
2,908
5,847
These statements must be read in conjunction with the notes to the performance report and the audit report.
20 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
7.Reserves
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Reserve fund
75,000
75,000
Total reserves
75,000
75,000
The reserve fund is comprised of two and a half months of operating costs. The reserve fund was created to accumulate
reserves up to six months of operating costs.
8. Commitments and Contingencies
Commitments
Total commitments for future lease rental agreements which have not been provided for in the performance report are as
follows:
31 Mar 2016
31 Mar 2015
Office lease commitments
Within 1 year
49,314
Between 1 to 5 years
Total commitments
56,409
105,723
16,431
—
16,431
Contingent Liabilities and Guarantees
There are no contingent liabilities or guarantees as at balance date. (2015: $Nil)
9. Related Party Disclosures
There were no transactions involving related parties during the financial year. (2015: $Nil)
10. Events After Balance Date
No events occurred after the balance date that would have a material impact on the performance report. (2015: $Nil)
These statements must be read in conjunction with the notes to the performance report and the audit report.
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 21
Thank you…
… for your generosity, skills,
enthusiasm and support which have
made such a difference to our services
during the past year.
Bushell Charitable Trust, COGS;
Department of Internal Affairs Support
for Volunteering Fund; Holcim; Hutt
City Council Community Development
Fund and support for Volunteer Hutt
training; Hutt Mana Charitable Trust;
Hutt News; Infinity Foundation; John
Ilott Charitable Trust; Kapi-Mana News;
Lion Foundation; Lottery Community;
Mana Community Grants Foundation;
Mazda Foundation; Ministry of Business
Innovation & Employment; Nikau
Foundation; NZ Community Trust; Office
of Ethnic Communities Settling-In;
Pelorus Trust; Porirua City Council
Community Outcomes Fund and support
for Volunteer Porirua training; Pub
Charity; Sargood Bequest; St John’s in
the City Presbyterian Church; The Tindall
Foundation; Trust House, Wellington City
Council; Wellington Community Trust;
Work and Income
Premier supporters: ANZ Bank, CCM
Architects; Havana Coffee Works; Tai
Shan
Business friends of Volunteer
Wellington: AON; ACC; Allen & Clarke;
ANZ Bank; Aviat; BECA Engineers; Beef
and Lamb; BNP Paribas, BRANZ, Capital
& Coast Health Board; Chorus; The
Commerce Commission; Contact Energy;
DAC Beachcroft; Deloitte; Grant Thornton;
IAG New Zealand, IBM New Zealand;
iSentia; Kiwibank, KPMG; Morrison Kent
Lawyers; OMD; Parliamentary Counsel
Office; PricewaterhouseCoopers;
Transpower New Zealand; Treasury; Z
Energy.
Individual friends: Sue Hine, Sue Hobbs,
Ann Hodson, Pat Lakeman, Robert Limb,
Helen Middleton, Raewyn Sinclair, Chris
Streatfield, Olwen Taylor
Thank you to organisations and
individuals who have made a
significant contribution.
Jo Goodhew, Minister for the Community
and Voluntary Sector
Celia Wade-Brown, Mayor Wellington
Ray Wallace,Mayor Lower Hutt
Nick Leggatt, Mayor Porirua
Liz Medford, Ida Tai, Victoria University
Careers Services
Department of Internal Affairs Support
for Volunteering Fund
Jenny Rains, Mark Farrar, Wellington City
Council
Community Development teams, Porirua
City Council, Hutt City Council, Upper
Hutt City Council
Wellington and Hutt Valley Community
Law
Sue Hine, managers of volunteers
advocate and writer
Vertia
Volunteering New Zealand
Mathew Matai, Karen Baine, Ota
Savaiinaea, Sharleen Alaifea, Work
and Income
Laura Clavejo, English Language Partners
Job Mentoring Service
Mary O’Regan, Wellington Citizens Advice
Bureau
Riegers Copiers
Chris Streatfield, IT specialist
Sue Hobbs, graphic designer
Nikau Foundation
KPMG
Community Comms Collective
Liz Hampton, IBM
Kat Paton, mentor
John Rogers, CCM Architects
KPMG
Aly McNicholl, Coaching and Mentoring
Centre of NZ
Simon Edwards, Hutt News
Kapi-Mana News
Konica Minolta
Zeal Wellington and Wellington City
Council Events Team
Hell Pizza
Heaven Pizza
Sushi B
New World Metro on Willis
Thank you to all Volunteer Wellington,
Volunteer Porirua and Volunteer Hutt’s
volunteers, who have added such
capacity and vibrancy to our many
different services.
Volunteer Wellington’s board of trustees:
Robert Antonio, Laura Cendak, Ruth
Collingham (former chair), Lesley Daly
(deputy chair, Nathalie Harrington, Alvin
Hu, Louise Lee, David Loveridge, Ryan
O’Connell, Glenn Todd (current chair),
Ming-Chun Wu
Board minutes taker: Parathan Selvarajah
Interviewers and follow-up assistants:
Tanu Agrawal, Kathy Aitken, Zakiah
Amir, Claude Ao, Millie Bannon, Carla
Bentley, Mayumi Burkhart, Bronwen
Close, Patricia Coetzee, Lesley Daly,
Helen Deeble, Olivier De Smedt, Darren
Elliott, Rachel Evans, Ed Hamilton,
Denise Haronga, Nathalie Harrington,
Judith Hatton, Sangeeta Iyer, Shilpi
Jain, Dan Jordan, Meredith Kelly, Pooja
Korday, Shiju Suresh Kumar, Hirotaka
Kuroki, Mary Lachore, Cristian Leaman,
22 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Megha Mohanlal, Gargee Mohanty,
Katie Monteith, Billee Mutton, Anshu
Nanda, Prachi Oza, Smruti Panigrahy,
Samantha Pardo, Anju Parvathy, Lisa
Pederson, Sandhya Poojari, Papanui
Porter-Samuels, Carol Port, Ngawai Reid,
Anna Maria Rossi, Chalaka Salpadoru,
Ava Sanganoo, Nitika Sarna, Anjeli Sheth
Lakshmi Priya Sivapalan, Anne Southern,
Veronika Susac, Ravya Suvarna, Nga
Tokorangi, Julie Toth, Nicole Voykovich,
Ameline Yow, Christine Zhou
Administration assistants: Himani
Ahlawat, Amy Davis, Manisha Guria, Paul
Headifen, Chevahn Morris, Bronwen
Turner
Writers, communications, social media:
Trish Anderson, Suzanne Carty, Amy
Davis, Chris Golder, Jennifer Monk, Lydia
Pincott, Carolyn Williams,
Photographers: Joan Begg, Gary Jones,
Carolina Henriquez, Eva Kaprinay,
Jennifer Monk, Bimali Mudunkotuwa,
Pierre Schmitts
HR assistant: Annana Pal
Comms advisers/mentors: Roslyn Bullas,
Emma Reilly
Forum facilitators/trainers: Aly McNicoll,
Keri Tilby, Rob Jackson, Andy Fryar, Sue
Kobar, Keith Vaughan, Carine Stewart,
Kate Scarlett, Dr Carolyn Cordery,
Hannah Heberley, Fran Drager, Sheena
Thomas, Judith McMorland and Hazel
Hodgkin, Gail Marshall and Sue McCabe
of Community Comms Collective, Jenny
Kieboom and Liz Hampton from IBM.
Auditor: Jonathan Maharaj, Charles Wells
Member liaison: Judith Hatton, Carol Port,
Vivienne Rosvall, Ava Sanganoo, Kamini
Devi Singh
Project managers/Strategic planning:
Lorraine Fowlie, Peter Morten, Pete
Thomson, Chris Streatfield
Information distribution: Nicky Clayton,
Valeria Levina, Zultan Kriebel
Event organisors and promoters: Sheba
Basika, Lydia Pincott, Rajen Pulai, Lou
Niebauer, Rachel Qi
Leader diversification of funding strategy:
Valerie Barnes
IT specialist – Hutt, Porirua, Wellington:
Chris Streatfield
Statistics: Kylie Capundan
Website re-development team: Denny
Forde, Bichitra Panigraphy, Chris
Streatfield, Glenn Todd
Those who have used our services
Access Radio
Activation
AFS Intercultural Programmes
Agape Budgeting Service Ltd
Age Concern New Zealand
Age Concern Wellington Inc
Alicetown Community Centre
Alzheimers New Zealand
Alzheimers Wellington Inc
Aphasia NZ Charitable Trust
Ara Taiohi Inc
Aro Valley Community Centre
Arthritis New Zealand
Arts Access Aotearoa
Asert Tatou Development Trust
Asthma Wellington
Atareira
Autism Intervention Trust
Autism New Zealand Inc
Baggage Arts Charitable Trust
Ballet is for Everyone
Barnardos
Beneficiary Education Advisory Service
BGI
Birthright Hutt Valley
Birthright NZ Inc
Birthright Wellington
Brain Injury Association Wellington
Brooklyn Playcentre
Brooklyn Resource Centre
Buddies Peer Support Service
Bushy Park Trust
Cancer Society of New Zealand
Canine Friends Pet Therapy
Porirua Whanau Centre
CanTeen
Care Share and Wear Wellington
Catacombs
Cats Protection League
CCS Disability Action (Wellington Branch)
Incorporated
Challenge 2000
Changemakers Refugee Forum
Chelsea Day Care Trust
Child Cancer Foundation
Christ Church Preservation Society Inc
Citizen Advice Bureau
– Central Wellington
– Eastern Suburbs
–Johnsonville
–Newtown
– Wellington West
Citizens Advice Bureau – Wellington
Budget Service
Citizen Advice Bureau
– Lower Hutt
– Petone and Budget Service
–Porirua
– Upper Hutt
Clubhouse Naenae – Hutt City Council
Community Gardens
Community Law Wellington and Hutt
Valley
Community Networks Wellington
Community Networks Aotearoa
Conservation Volunteers NZ
Creative Capital Arts Trust
Diabetes NZ Wellington Inc
Disability Information & Equipment Centre
– Kapiti
DCM
Dress For Success
Dwell Housing Trust
Earthlink Incorporated
Eastern Hutt Rotary
Emerge Supported Employment Trust
English Language Partners Hutt
English Language Partners Porirua
English Language Partners Wellington
Enjoy Public Art Gallery
Environment & Conservation
Organisations of NZ Inc
Epilepsy New Zealand
Evans Bay Intermediate
Fertility New Zealand
Film for Change Aotearoa
Focus Trust (Workmates)
Fostering Kids
Friends of Bolton Street Memorial Park Inc
Friends of Maara Roa
Friends of the Mount Street Cemetery
Generosity NZ
GirlGuiding New Zealand
Graeme Dingle Foundation
Great Start
Greenstone Doors
Greyhounds As Pets
Grow Te Ahumairangi Forest
H2O Xtream
Habitat for Humanity (Porirua) Ltd
Habitat for Humanity Hutt Valley
Happiness Inn Charitable Trust
Hearth Trust
Holocaust Centre of New Zealand
Hutt City Budget and Advocacy Service
Hutt City Council
– Hutt City Guides
– Hutt Science Centre
– City Services and Parks Services
– Road Safety
– Leisure Active Business Unite – Holiday
Programmes
– Community Arts & Culture
– Animal Control
– CBD Development
– Youth Inspire
Hutt City Council Library
Hutt Intermediate School
Hutt Playcentre Association
Hutt Rape Counselling Network Inc.
Hutt Safe City Group Charitable Trust
Hutt Valley Activity Centre
Hutt Valley Benefit Education Service Trust
(BEST)
Creative Voice
Hutt Valley DHB
Hutt Valley Disabled Resources Trust
Hutt Valley Riding For The Disabled
Hutt Valley Youth Health Trust – VIBE
IDEA Services
– Wellington and Hutt Valley Area
–Kapiti
–Aranui
– ACTIVE Youth Service
– Te Mana Huarahi (Day Base)
– Specialist Services: Lifeskills
– Alpha Art Studio
IHC (NZ) Inc
– National Office
–Wellington
– Porirua and Kapiti
Inclusive Education Action Group
Inspirational TV Inc.
Interpreting Wellington
Intersex Trust Aotearoa NZ
Island Bay Community Centre
Johnsonville Community Centre
Johnsonville Playcentre
Kaibosh Food Rescue
Kapiti Womens Health Collective
Karori Playcentre
Karori Community Centre
Keep Porirua Beautiful
Kemp Home & Hospital
Khandallah Plunket Toy Library
Kilbirnie Lyall Bay Community Centre
Kites Trust
Kiwi Community Assistance Charitable
Trust (KCA)
Laura Fergusson Trust Wellington
Lesbian and Gay Archives of NZ
Library and Information Association of NZ
(LIANZA)
Literacy Aotearoa Porirua
Literacy Aotearoa Wellington
Lower Hutt Community Foodbank Inc
Lower Hutt Womens Centre
Mana Recovery Oranga
Mana Recovery Trash Palace
Marsden Day Care Trust
Mary Potter Hospice
Mary Potter Hospice Shops
–Karori
–Miramar
–Kilbirnie
–Porirua
–Paraparaumu
MCLaSS (Multicultural Centre for Learning
& Support Services)
ME/CFS Support Group
Media Matters in NZ
Miramar Community Centre
Mix – Connecting Creating Living Lower
Hutt
Mix – Connecting Creating Living Upper
Hutt
Moera Community House
MOSAIC
Mothers Network Incorporating New
Mother Support Groups
National Collective of Independent
Womens Refuges Inc
National Council of Women of New
Zealand Inc.
National Heart Foundation of NZ
Neighbourhood Support Wellington
New Horizons for Women Trust
New Zealand Blood Service
New Zealand CCS Inc
New Zealand Green Bike Trust
New Zealand Police Museum
New Zealand Red Cross National Office
New Zealand Red Cross Humanitarian
Services Wellington
New Zealand Red Cross Shops
–Karori
–Kilbirnie
–Petone
– Upper Hutt
New Zealand Red Cross Refugee Services
Lower Hutt
New Zealand Red Cross Refugee Services
Porirua
VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016 | 23
New Zealand School of Dance
New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
Newlands Community Centre
Newtown Budgeting & Advocacy Service
Newtown Community and Cultural Centre
Newtown Park Flats Community Sewing
Group
Nga Hau e Wha o Papararangi (NHEWOP)
Nga Taonga Sound and Vision
Nikau Foundation
North Porirua Care Centre Trust
Northern Suburbs Stroke Club
Northland Kidz Club
NZ Academy of Fine Arts
NZ AIDS Foundation
NZ Association of Citizen Advice Bureaux
NZ Federation of Multicultural Councils
Old Saint Pauls
Opportunity for Animals / The Animal
Protection Society
–Newtown
–Miramar
Otari-Wilton Bush
P3 Foundation
Pablos Art Studio
Parent Help Wellington
Partners Porirua Charitable Trust
Pauatahanui Wildlife Reserve
People First Central Region
People First New Zealand Inc
Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Aotearoa
Petone Community House
Petone Settlers Museum
Porirua Activity Centre
Porirua Budget Service
Porirua City Council Community
Development
Porirua City Council Library
Porirua College
Porirua Community Guardians
Porirua Community Services Centre
Porirua Healthy Safer City Trust
Porirua Living Without Violence
Porirua Sexual Abuse HELP Foundation
Post & Ante Natal Distress Support Group
Presbyterian Support Central – Central
Offices
– Woburn Elderly Care
– Cashmere Home
– Huntleigh Home
– Cashmere Heights
– Longview Home
– Kilmarnock Heights
Pride Awards Trust
Prison Fellowship NZ
Read Write Plus Inc
Refugee Trauma Recovery
Rimutaka Gymsports
Rimutaka Renegades Inline Hockey
Robson Hanan Trust
Ronald McDonald House
Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society
of NZ
Royal New Zealand Plunket Society
Royal NZ Foundation of the Blind
Royal NZ Plunket Society
Royal Society of New Zealand
Russell School (Porirua)
Sailability Wellington Trust
Samaritans of Wellington Inc
Save Animals from Exploitation (SAFE)
Save The Children New Zealand National
Office
Save The Children New Zealand Lower
Hutt Shop
Scouts New Zealand
Skylight – The Childrens Grief Centre
Charitable Trust
Smokefree Coalition
Special Olympics Hutt Valley
Special Olympics Wellington
Sport Porirua ( PACNET )
Sport Wellington
St John – Retail Lower Hutt
St John Greater Wellington District
St John of God Hauora Trust (Wellington)
St Vincent de Paul Shops
–Johnsonville
–Porirua
–Karori
–Newtown
StarJam
Starship Foundation
Stokes Valley Community House Inc.
Strathmore Park Community Base
Stroke Foundation of New Zealand
Strong Links
Supergrans Charitable Trust Hutt Valley &
Wellington
Supergrans Charitable Trust Porirua
Sustainability Trust
Suzanne Aubert Compassion Centre
T.S Taupo Sea Cadets
Taita Community Patrol
Tautoko Services
Te Aroha Hutt Valley Assn Incorp.
Te Hopai Trust Hospital
Te Omanga Hospice
Te Whare Rokiroki Maori Womens Refuge
Team Naenae Trust
The Dowse
The Hearing Association Hutt Valley
The Malaghan Institute
The New Crossways Community Trust
The New Zealand Breast Cancer
Foundation
The New Zealand Centre for Gifted
Education
The NZ Portrait Gallery
The Salvation Army
– Central Division
– Wellington South Corps
– Communities Ministries
The Salvation Army Family Stores
–Kaiwharawhara
–Kilbirnie
– Lower Hutt
–Miramar
– Nae Nae
–Newtown
–Petone
–Tawa
– Upper Hutt
The Whitireia Foundation
Thumbs Up Charitable Trust
Titahi Bay Lions Club
Trade Aid Wellington
Trade Aid Petone
Trade Aid Kapiti
Trelissick Park Group
Upper Hutt Budget Advisory Service
Upper Hutt City Council
Upper Hutt City Library
Upper Hutt Womens Centre
Upstream – Friends of Central Park
Victim Support
–Kapiti
– Lower Hutt
–Porirua
– Upper Hutt
–Wairarapa
–Wellington
Village Green Charitable Trust Inc
Vincentian Home for the Elderly
Vincents Art Workshop
Virtuoso Strings Charitable Trust
24 | VOLUNTEER WELLINGTON | ANNUAL REPORT | 2015–2016
Volunteer Kapiti
Volunteer Service Abroad
Volunteering New Zealand
Wainuiomata Community Centre
Well Health Trust
WellElder Counselling Trust
Wellington Activity Centre
Wellington After-Care Association Inc
Wellington City Council
Wellington City Housing
Wellington City Mission
– Mission 4 Families
– Mission 4 Independence
– Mission 4 Seniors
– Mission 4 Youth
Wellington Free Ambulance
Wellington Gay Welfare Group
Wellington Hockey Association
Wellington Hospitals Foundation
Wellington Hospitals Foundation
Kenepuru
Wellington North Parents Centre
Wellington Playcentre Association
Wellington Rape Crisis (Inc.)
Wellington Region Free Kindergarten
Association
Wellington Regional Emergency
Management Office
Wellington Regional Prisons
Wellington Riding For The Disabled
Wellington Seafarers Centre Inc Charitable
Trust
Wellington Sexual Abuse HELP Foundation
Wellington Somali Council
Wellington SPCA
Wellington Volunteer Fire Support Unit
Wellington Women's Boarding House
Wellington Women's Health Collective
Wellington Women's Refuge
Wellington Zoo Trust
WellTrust
Wesley Care Hutt Valley
Wesley Community Action
Wesley Community Action Porirua
Wesley Haven Naenae
WETAP (Waterloo Empowerment through
the Arts Programme
Whanau Family Support Services Trust
Wharekai Pepe Charitable Trust
Whitford-Brown Community Trust
Windley School
Women of Worth Charitable Organisation
World Wide Fund for Nature
YMCA
YMCA Porirua Education Programme
YMCA Wellington Education Programme
Young and Hungry Arts Trust
Youthline
YWCA Aotearoa New Zealand
Zealandia