ASAP - Penns Valley Little League Baseball :: Home

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ASAP - Penns Valley Little League Baseball :: Home
 Penns Valley
Little League
League ID: 019-3814
ASAP 2016
1 QualifiedSafetyPlanRequirements
1. LeagueSafetyOfficer:ElizabethKing,isonfilewithLittle
LeagueHeadquarters,astheleaguesafetyofficerforPenns
ValleyLittleLeague.SafetyOfficerisadesignatedboard
positioninPennsValleyLittleLeague.
2. SafetyManual:
PennsValleyLittleLeaguewilldistributeapapercopyofthis
SafetyManualtoatleastonecoach/managerfromeveryteam,
leaguevolunteersandtheDistrictAdministrator.Inaddition
tothesafetymanualbeingdistributedtoeachteam,every
teamwillhaveanassigned“Teamparent”andthatpersonwill
alsoassistwithensuringsafetystandardsarefollowed.Lastly,
ourwebsitehasapagededicatedtosafetyandparentswill
receiveregularupdatesviaemailaboutsafety
issues/standards.
3. EmergencyPhonenumbers:
EmergencyPoliceorFire:
NonEmergencyPoliceneeds‐PSPRockviewcovers all(4)ofourhomefieldlocations;CentreHall,Millheim,
Rebersburg,andSpringMills
911
814‐355‐7545
NonEmergencyFire:
CentreHall‐CentreHallBoroughVolunteerFireCo.
Millheim‐MillheimBoroughVolunteerFireCo. Rebersburg‐MilesTownshipVolunteerFireCo. 2 814‐364‐1816
814‐349‐8164
814‐349‐8149
SpringMills‐GreggTownshipVolunteerFireCo. 814‐422‐8626
LeagueOfficials:BoardMembers:
BrianNiewinski‐President 814‐470‐9063
MikeWatson‐VicePresident
814‐380‐2190
BobGillespie‐PlayerAgent 814‐880‐8712
CrystalConfer‐InformationOfficer 814‐470‐3190
ShannonStover‐Secretary 814‐777‐1985
RichSweitzer‐Treasurer 814‐280‐2000
BethKing‐SafetyOfficer 814‐308‐4703
LeagueOfficials:OfficerPositions:
MaryStoner‐ConcessionsStand 814‐571‐0693
AliciaCornali‐ConcessionStand 814‐571‐6873
ChristineSailors‐Fundraising
814‐777‐2258
MikeWatson‐Equipment 814‐380‐2190
xxx‐FieldMaintenance
814‐xxx‐xxxx
xxx‐UmpireCoordinator 814‐xxx‐xxxx
ShannonStover‐Uniforms 814‐777‐1985
ThisListwillbepostedintheconcessionareasanddugoutareasofour(4)field
locations;CentreHall,Millheim,Rebersburg,andSpringMills.SeealsoAttachment
“A.” 4. VolunteerApplication‐BackgroundChecks:
PennsValleyLittleLeaguewillusetheofficialLittle
LeagueVolunteerApplicationformtoscreenallofour
volunteerstoinclude,butnotlimitedto,boardmembers,
managers,coaches,assistantcoaches,teamhelpers,
umpires,concessionsmanagersandconcessions
committee.Allbackgroundcheckswillbecompleted
priortothestartoftheseason,April8,2016.See
Attachment“B”forthe2016volunteerformused.
3 5. FundamentalsTraining:April10,2016
Atleastonemanager/coachfromeachteamwillbe
requiredtoattendatrainingonfundamentalskills
including,butnotlimitedto,batting,sliding,pitching,and
fieldingetc.Thetrainingwillbeheldonanannualbasis.
Thisyear’strainingwillbeheldatPennsValleyHigh
School.TheheadcoachforPVHSbaseball,ChuckRomig,
willbeinstructingtheclinic.
6. FirstAid:
PennsValleyLittleLeagueBaseballrequiresthatatleast
onemanager/coach/teamparentfromeachteamhave
updatedCPRandFirstAidtrainingcertification.General
firstaidcertificationinformationwillbekeptonfilewith
theleaguesafetyofficer.
Inadditiontogeneralfirstaidtrainingitwillbe
recommendedthatatleastonemanager/coachfromeach
teamtakesanonlineconcussioncourseandaheat
acclimationcourse:
www.concussionwise.com/Pennsylvaia
http://www.NFHSLEARN.com
4 7. Inspectionoffields:
Coachesand/ormanagersarerequiredtowalk/inspect
thefieldspriortoeverypracticeandgamefordebris,
foreignobjectsandotherhazards.Umpires,ifapplicable,
arealsorequestedtowalkthefieldsforhazardsbefore
eachgame.Seeattachment“D”forfieldinspection
handoutreminder.
8. FacilitySurveys:
PennsValleyLittleLeaguehascompletedandsubmitted
our2016FacilitySurveyson‐lineforour(4)field
locations:CentreHall,Millheim,RebersburgandSpring
Mills.
9. ConcessionStandSafety
PennsValleyLittleLeaguehasaconcessionstand
committeeconsistingof3individualswhohavebeen
certifiedinsafefoodhandlingproceduresthrough,
“CookingforCrowds,”aguidetosafefoodhandling
proceduresfornon‐profitandvolunteerorganizations.
ThesafetycommitteewascertifiedonMarch21,2014by
KevinKassab,SupervisorofInspectionsandLoriSowash,
HealthTechnician.Theconcessionstandcommittee
developedconcessionstandsafetyproceduresforeachof
PVLL’s(4)fieldlocations.Thesafetyprocedureswere
approvedbytheboardpresidentandsafetyofficer.
‐SafetyProceduresincludinghandwashing,
directionsonbarbequesafetyandgeneralfood
safetyprocedureswillbepostedineveryconcession
5 stand.Inaddition,amanualcontainingfoodsafety
information,standopening/closingprocedures,
moneyandfoodhandlingproceduresandgeneral
safetyinformationwillbekeptineachconcession
stand.Pleaseseeattachedsafetyflyersand
informationonCookingforCrowdsClassunder
attachment“E.”
‐Themenuforeachofthe(4)concessionstand
locationswillbepostedandapprovedbythesafety
officerandtheLeaguepresident,seeattachedmenu.
10. EquipmentInspection:
Theboardpresident,vicepresident,equipmentmanager
andadditionalboardmemberswillinspectallequipment
inthepre‐season.Inspectionofallequipmentwas
conductedinMarch2016.Equipmentnotmeetinglittle
leaguestandardswasdestroyedandisnotavailablefor
usetoanyone.
‐Managers/coacheswillinspectequipmentpriortoeach
game.
‐Umpires,ifapplicable,willberequiredtoinspect
equipmentpriortoeachgame.
11. AccidentReporting:
TheLeaguewillusetheprovidedincidenttrackingform
providedbyLittleLeagueInternationalviatheirwebsite.
Completedaccident/incidentformswillbeprovidedto
theSafetyOfficerwithin48hoursfollowingthe
incident/accident.Thesafetyofficerwillbenotifiedby
6 phoneofaccidentsresultinginanyinjuriesassoonas
possiblefollowingtheinjuryandnolaterthan24hours
followingtheincident.
‐Seeattachedcopyoftheincident/injuryreporting
form(localuse)andaccidentnotification
instructions/formforLittleLeagueInternational
submissionunderattachment“F.”
12. FirstAidSupplies:
EachteamwillbeissuedanewFirstAidKitpriortothe
startofpractices.Eachteamwillberequiredtohavethe
FirstAidKitavailableatallindoorandoutdoorpractices,
aswellas,allhomeandawaygames.Icepackswillalso
beprovidedtoeachteam.PVLLwillhaveadditionalfirst
aidkits,suppliesandicepacksonhandatthestorage
and/orconcessionlocationsatall(4)fieldlocations;
CentreHall,Millheim,RebersburgandSpringMills.
13. LittleLeagueRules:
PennsValleyLittleLeaguewillrequireallteamsto
enforceallLittleLeaguerulesincluding,butnotlimitedto
thefollowing;
‐Properequipmentforallcatchers
‐Protectivecupsrecommendedforallmaleplayers
andrequiredforcatchers.
‐Recommendtheuseofmouthguardsforinfielders ‐Noondeckbatters
‐Coacheswillnotwarmuppitchers
7 ‐Baseswilldisengageonallfields
Seeattachment“G”foradditionalsafetyinformation
relatedtoLittleLeaguerulesandgeneralsafetypractices
including,lightening/weather,coachesnottowarm‐up
pitchers,properprotectiveequipmentandnoswinging
“ondeck.”
14. ASAPregistrationform‐SeeattachedPVLLASAP
registrationform.
15. AllPennsValleyLittleLeagueplayerrosterdata,
coach/managerinformationandlittleleague
board/officerpositionshavebeenenteredintotheLittle
LeagueInternationaldatacenteratwww.littleleague.org
‐Allinformationwillhavebeensubmittedpriorto
April1,2016
8 Attachments:
A. EmergencyPhonenumbers
B. Copyof2016LittleLeagueVolunteerApplication
C. AdditionalFirstAidSafetyInformation
‐Hydration
‐AsthmaEmergencySigns
‐FirstAidKit‐general
‐FirstAidClinics‐general
‐Reminderstocoaches‐Medicalreleaseformstobecarriedwithyouatalltimes
D. Inspectionoffieldreminderforcoaches
E. ConcessionStandSafetyInformationIncluding
‐FoodSafetyandRegulations
‐HealthAwareness‐FoodEmployeeReportingAgreement
‐CleanandSanitizehandout
‐Keepfoodshot/cold
‐UseaThermometerhandout
‐CuttingBoardhandout
‐ReheatingFoods
‐DrownaGerm‐Washyourhands‐handout
‐RefrigerateforSafetyhandout
‐GoodServingPracticeshandout
‐Usedisposablegloveshandout
‐BBQSafety
F. AccidentReporting
‐Incident/InjuryTrackingReport
‐AccidentNotificationForminstructions
‐AccidentNotificationForminstructionsandapplication
G.LittleLeagueRules/GeneralSafety
‐Lighteningguide
‐Remindertocoachestoletplayers’warm‐up/catchforpitchers
‐Protectplayers/volunteerswiththerightequipmentinfo.
‐Don’tSwing!Handout/reminder
9 Attachment“A”
EmergencyPhonenumbers:
EmergencyPoliceorFire:
NonEmergencyPoliceneeds‐PSPRockviewcovers all(4)ofourhomefieldlocations;CentreHall,Millheim,
Rebersburg,andSpringMills
NonEmergencyFire:
CentreHall‐CentreHallBoroughVolunteerFireCo.
Millheim‐MillheimBoroughVolunteerFireCo. Rebersburg‐MilesTownshipVolunteerFireCo. SpringMills‐GreggTownshipVolunteerFireCo. LeagueOfficials:BoardMembers:
BrianNiewinski‐President MikeWatson‐VicePresident
BobGillespie‐PlayerAgent CrystalConfer‐InformationOfficer ShannonStover‐Secretary RichSweitzer‐Treasurer BethKing‐SafetyOfficer LeagueOfficials:OfficerPositions:
MaryStoner‐ConcessionsStand AliciaCornali‐ConcessionStand ChristineSailors‐Fundraising
MikeWatson‐Equipment xxx‐FieldMaintenance
xxx‐UmpireCoordinator ShannonStover‐Uniforms 911
814‐355‐7545
814‐364‐1816
814‐349‐8164
814‐349‐8149
814‐422‐8626
814‐470‐9063
814‐380‐2190
814‐880‐8712
814‐470‐3190
814‐777‐1985
814‐280‐2000
814‐308‐4703
814‐571‐0693
814‐571‐6873
814‐777‐2258
814‐380‐2190
814‐xxx‐xxxx
814‐xxx‐xxxx
814‐777‐1985
Attachment“C”
AdditionalFirstAidSafetyInformation
‐Hydration
‐AsthmaEmergencySigns
‐FirstAidKit‐general
‐FirstAidClinics‐general
‐Reminderstocoaches‐Medicalreleaseforms
tobecarriedwithyouatalltimes
© 1996 Little League Baseball® and Musco Lighting, Inc.
Drinking Guidelines For Hot Day Activities
Before: Drink 8 oz. immediately before exercise
During: Drink at least 4 oz. every 20 minutes
After: Drink 16 oz. for every pound of weight lost
Dehydration signs: Fatigue, flushed skin, light-headed
What to do: Stop exercising, get out of sun, drink
Severe signs: Muscle spasms, clumsiness, delirium
Asthma Emergency Signs
Seek Emergency Care If A Child
Experiences Any Of The Following:
+ Child’s wheezing or coughing does not improve after taking
medicine (15-20 minutes for most asthma medications)
+ Child’s chest or neck is pulling in while struggling to breathe
+ Child has trouble walking or talking
+ Child stops playing and cannot start again
+ Child’s fingernails and/or lips turn blue or gray
+ Skin between child’s ribs sucks in when breathing
Asthma is different for every person.
The “Asthma Emergency Signs” above represent general
emergency situations as per the National Asthma Education and
Prevention Program 1997 Expert Panel Report.
If you are at all uncertain of what to do in case of a
breathing emergency...
Call 9-1-1 and the child’s parent/guardian!
Michigan Asthma Steering Committee of the Michigan Department of Community Health
(From the Grandville, Mich., Little League 2001 Safety Plan)
Good Procedures to Implement
Checklist for Managers, Coaches, and Umpires
Here are some good procedures
3. Keep loose equipment stored properly
for your league to implement and
4. Have all players remove all personal
jewelry
follow on several required areas
of the safety plan. Requirements
7, 10, 12 and 13 are all included
in the checklists below. These
5. Parents should be encouraged to
provide safety glasses for players
who wear glasses
6. Repair or replace defective equipment
come from several leagues whose
C. Safe Procedures
volunteers are providing safety
Managers and coaches must:
leadership through their efforts
1. Have all players’ medical release
forms with you at every practice
and game
to increase awareness and help
volunteers do the right thing at
the right time.
A. Safe Playing Areas
Regular safety inspections of all fields,
(practice and game), structures, and
dugouts, is the best way to eliminate
conditions that cause accidents.
Managers, coaches, and umpires should
routinely check playing area for:
1. Holes, damage, rough or uneven
spots, slippery areas, and long grass
2. Glass, rocks, foreign objects
2. Have a first aid kit with you all
practices and games
3. Have access to a telephone in case
of emergencies
4. Know where the closest emergency
shelter is in case of severe weather
5. Ensure warm-up procedures have
been completed by all players
6. Stress the importance of paying
attention, no “horse playing allowed”
7. Instruct the players on proper
fundamentals of the game to
ensure safe participation
3. Damage to screens or fences,
including holes, sharp edges,
or loose edges
8. Each practice should have at least
2 coaches in case of an emergency
4. Unsafe conditions around backstop,
pitcher’s mound, or warning track
D. Weather Conditions
5. Proper attire by the catcher at all
times, including in the bull pens
and in between innings
1. Check the weather forecast before
leaving for a game or practice
B. Safe Equipment
All equipment shall be inspected before
each use. Regular safety inspection
of equipment is essential. Managers,
coaches, and umpires should:
1. Be sure all equipment is LL approved
2. Inspect all bats, helmets, and other
equipment on a regular basis. Dispose
of unsafe equipment properly.
8 January-February 2004
Before the Storm
2. Watch for signs of an approaching
storm
3. Postpone outdoor activities if storms
are imminent
Approaching Thunderstorm
1. Take caution when you hear thunder.
If you hear thunder, you are close
enough to get struck by lightening.
During a game, the umpire will
clear the field in the event of an
approaching storm.
2. Move to a safe environment
immediately. Do not go under a
tree or stay in the dugout.
3. If lightening is occurring and there
is not sturdy shelter near, get inside
a hard top automobile and keep the
window up.
4. Stay away from water, metal pipes,
and telephone lines.
5. Unplug appliances not necessary
for obtaining weather information.
Avoid the telephone except for
emergency use only.
6. Turn off air conditioners.
If caught outdoors & no shelter exists
1. Find a low spot away from trees,
fences, light poles, and flagpoles.
Make sure the site you pick is not
prone to flooding.
2. If in the woods, take cover under
shorter trees.
3. If you feel your skin begin to tingle
or your hair feels like it’s standing
on end, squat low to the ground,
balancing on the balls of your feet.
Make yourself the smallest possible
target, tuck your head between
your legs, and minimize your contact
with the ground.
What to do if someone is struck
by lightning
1. The person who has been struck
will carry no electrical charge;
therefore, they are safe to touch.
2. Call 9-1-1 as soon as possible
for help.
3. Check for burns to the body.
4. Give first aid as needed.
5. If breathing and/or heartbeat have
stopped, perform CPR until EMS
arrives.
6. Contact the league Safety Officer
or President ASAP.
Attachment“E”
ConcessionStandSafetyInformation:
‐FoodSafetyandRegulations
‐HealthAwareness‐FoodEmployeeReportingAgreement
‐CleanandSanitizehandout
‐Keepfoodshot/cold
‐UseaThermometerhandout
‐CuttingBoardhandout
‐ReheatingFoods
‐DrownaGerm‐Washyourhands‐handout
‐RefrigerateforSafetyhandout
‐GoodServingPracticeshandout
‐Usedisposablegloveshandout
‐BBQSafety
Concession Stand Tips
Requirement 9
12 Steps to Safe and Sanitary
Food Service Events: The
following information is
intended to help you run a
healthful concession stand.
Following these simple
guidelines will help minimize
the risk of foodborne illness.
This information was provided
by District Administrator
George Glick, and is excerpted
from "Food Safety Hints" by
the Fort Wayne-Allen County,
Ind., Department of Health.
1. Menu.
Keep your menu simple, and keep
potentially hazardous foods (meats, eggs,
dairy products, protein salads, cut fruits
and vegetables, etc.) to a minimum.
Avoid using precooked foods or
leftovers. Use only foods from approved
sources, avoiding foods that have been
prepared at home. Complete control over
your food, from source to service, is the
key to safe, sanitary food service.
2. Cooking.
Use a food thermometer to check on
cooking and holding temperatures of
potentially hazardous foods. All
potentially hazardous foods should
be kept at 41º F or below (if cold) or
140º F or above (if hot). Ground beef
and ground pork products should be
cooked to an internal temperature of
155º F, poultry parts should be cooked
to 165º F. Most foodborne illnesses
from temporary events can be traced
back to lapses in temperature control.
4 January-February 2004
SAFETY FIRST
3. Reheating.
Rapidly reheat potentially hazardous
foods to 165º F. Do not attempt to heat
foods in crock pots, steam tables, over
sterno units or other holding devices.
Slow-cooking mechanisms may
activate bacteria and never reach
killing temperatures.
4. Cooling and Cold Storage.
Foods that require refrigeration must
be cooled to 41º F as quickly as possible
and held at that temperature until ready
to serve. To cool foods down quickly,
use an ice water bath (60% ice to 40%
water), stirring the product frequently,
or place the food in shallow pans no
more than 4 inches in depth and
refrigerate. Pans should not be stored
one atop the other and lids should be
off or ajar until the food is completely
cooled. Check temperature periodically
to see if the food is cooling properly.
Allowing hazardous foods to remain
unrefrigerated for too long has been the
number ONE cause of foodborne illness.
5. Hand Washing.
Frequent and thorough hand washing
remains the first line of defense in
preventing foodborne disease. The
use of disposable gloves can provide an
additional barrier to contamination, but
they are no substitute for hand washing!
6. Health and Hygiene.
Only healthy workers should prepare
and serve food. Anyone who shows
symptoms of disease (cramps, nausea,
fever, vomiting, diarrhea, jaundice, etc.)
or who has open sores or infected cuts
on the hands should not be allowed
in the food concession area. Workers
should wear clean outer garments and
should not smoke in the concession
area. The use of hair restraints is
recommended to prevent hair ending
up in food products.
7. Food Handling.
Avoid hand contact with raw, readyto-eat foods and food contact surfaces.
Use an acceptable dispensing utensil
to serve food. Touching food with bare
hands can transfer germs to food.
8. Dishwashing.
Use disposable utensils for food service.
Keep your hands away from food contact
surfaces, and never reuse disposable
dishware. Wash in a four-step process:
1. Washing in hot soapy water;
2. Rinsing in clean water;
3. Chemical or heat sanitizing; and
4. Air drying.
9. Ice.
Ice used to cool cans/bottles should
not be used in cup beverages and should
be stored separately. Use a scoop to
dispense ice; never use the hands. Ice
can become contaminated with bacteria
and viruses and cause foodborne illness.
10. Wiping Cloths.
Rinse and store your wiping cloths in
a bucket of sanitizer (example: 1 gallon
of water and 1⁄2 teaspoon of chlorine
bleach). Change the solution every
two hours. Well sanitized work surfaces
prevent cross-contamination and
discourage flies.
11. Insect Control and Waste.
Keep foods covered to protect them
from insects. Store pesticides away
from foods. Place garbage and paper
wastes in a refuse container with a tightfitting lid. Dispose of wastewater in an
approved method (do not dump it
outside). All water used should be
potable water from an approved source.
12. Food Storage and Cleanliness.
Keep foods stored off the floor at least
six inches. After your event is finished,
clean the concession area and discard
unusable food.
13. Set a Minimum Worker Age.
Leagues should set a minimum age for
workers or to be in the stand; in many
states this is 16 or 18, due to potential
hazards with various equipment.
Safety plans must be postmarked
no later than May 1st.
.
.
Question of the Month
Make league’s barbeques safe
Keep food safe from bacteria, check grill for problems
Barbecue Safety
fully cooked. For greatest safety,
Safely transporting food,
ground meat should reach 160° F on a
“Can you give us some advice
precooking and preventing cross-contmeat thermometer, and poultry should
on barbecue safety? Every
amination are the major ingredients of
reach 180° F for doneness. Since
Saturday we have a barbecue
barbecue safety.
grilled food often browns very fast on
during the ball games. Are
Chill Foods to Stop Bacteria
the outside, make a “sample cut” to
there guidelines for sanitizing
When transporting food, either from
visually check for doneness. The
utensils between each use,
the grocery store or to a picnic area,
juices should run clear and meat
maintaining food (such as
keep it cool to minimize bacterial
should not be pink, although meat
hamburger beef and tomagrowth. Pack meat, poultry, salads and
color
is not accurate (check Page 3).
toes) to ensure we keep PHFs
other perishables in an insulated
Based on current research findout of the temperature danger
cooler with ice.
ings, eating moderate amounts of
zones, using and storing
Marinade is a savory acidic sauce in
grilled meats, fish, and poultry, cooked
propane tanks, and any other
which a food is soaked to tenderize
thoroughly without charring, does not
barbecue safety info?”
and add flavor. Always marinate meats
pose a health problem.
Douglas Polgar, safety officer
in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
Resources:
Sierra Little League,
Reserve a portion of the marinade that
• USDA Consumer Information
Sunnyvale, Calif.
hasn’t touched raw meat for a dip or
Publication.1996. “Barbecue Food
basting sauce. Don’t reuse marinade
Safety”.
used on raw meat or poultry unless it has been boiled first
• Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA Food Safety
to destroy any bacteria.
Publications.1996.
Take Care With Meat Items
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/barbecue.pdf
• USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline: 1-800-535-4555
Meats and poultry may be precooked on the stove,
Material written by Mary Abgrall and Scottie Misner,
microwave or oven to reduce grilling times. If foods are
May 1998. Part of Food Safety Tips, College of
partially precooked, place immediately on the grill to
finish cooking. Never partially cook meats and poultry and Agriculture, University of Arizona. Document located at
http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/health/foodsafety/az1069.html
wait to finish cooking later. If meats and poultry are
Grilling Safety
completely cooked ahead of time and chilled, they may be
According to the Insurance Information Institute, backreheated on the grill to provide a barbecued flavor.
yard barbecues result in more than 2,000 fires and even
If take-out foods such as fried chicken or barbecued
three deaths each year. Most problems happen when you
beef will be reheated on the grill, and they won’t be
fire up a grill that hasn’t been used for several months.
reheated/eaten within two hours of purchase, buy them
Gas grill: check it over thoroughly before using it.
ahead of time and chill thoroughly.
Check for leaks, cracking or brittleness, and clean out the
Keep Foods Separate, Clean Up Often
tubes that lead into the burner — look for blockages from
Don’t use the same platter and utensils for raw and
spiders or food waste.
cooked meats and poultry. Be sure there are plenty of
Make sure the grill is at least 10 feet from any buildings
clean utensils and platters to allow separate handling of
or trees. And never leave the grill unattended.
raw foods and cooked foods. Pack clean, soapy sponges,
Charcoal grill: use starter fluid sparingly and never put
clothes and wet towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.
it on an open flame. And it’s always best to have a fire
There is an antibacterial soap on the market now that does
extinguisher nearby... it can stop a fire before it spreads.
not need water and would be ideal to carry on a picnic for
Also, be careful if you pick up gas canisters... never
cleaning platters and utensils.
leave them in a hot car. The heat could cause some of the
Cook Foods Thoroughly
gas to leak out.
Cook everything thoroughly. Rare or medium meat or
(Also, see the April, 2000 ASAP News for more food tips.)
poultry can harbor harmful bacteria. Fish should always be
2
News of Note
USDA encourages use of thermometers
WASHINGTON, D.C — The United States Department “Consumers will soon see ‘Thermy™’ at many retail stores
of Agriculture launched a new food safety education
and in broadcast messages as a reminder to purchase and
campaign in Spring 2000 to promote the use of food theruse a food thermometer when cooking,”
mometers. The campaign theme is: “It’s Safe to Bite When
Woteki said.
the Temperature is Right!”
Tom Billy, USDA’s Food Safety
“This national food safety education
and Inspection Service administrator,
campaign is designed to encourage
said, “I am concerned that... only a small
consumers to use a food thermometer
percent of consumers use (food thermomewhen cooking meat, poultry, and egg
ters) often when cooking small foods like
products. Using a food thermometer is
hamburgers, pork chops, or chicken breasts.”
the only way to tell when food has
Food thermometers help ensure food is cooked to
reached a high enough temperature to
a safe temperature, prevent overcooking, and take the
destroy harmful pathogens that may be in
guesswork out of preparing a safe meal. “Food therthe raw food,” said Under Secretary for
mometers should be used every time you prepare
Food Safety Catherine Woteki.
hamburgers, poultry, roasts, chops, egg casseroles,
“Color is misleading and should not
meat loaves, and combination dishes,” says Billy.
be relied on to indicate a safely cooked
Billy said that there are a wide variety of reliable
product. Meat or poultry color can fool
food thermometers available in grocery and kitchen

even the most experienced cook. USDA
stores, and that many are inexpensive. “They are
research shows that one out of every four
high-tech and easy to use. Their cost is minimal when
Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA considering your family’s safety. This is especially
hamburgers turns brown in the middle
before it is safely cooked,” Woteki said.
true for people who are at high risk, including young
™
USDA introduced its new messenger, “Thermy ,” to
children, pregnant women, people over 65, and those with
promote the use of food thermometers in the home.
chronic illnesses.”
Prepare for dangerous storms
3. Unsafe shelter areas include all outdoor metallic
objects like flag poles, fences, light poles, and
metal bleachers. Avoid trees, water, open fields, and
using the telephone.
4. Lightning’s distance from you can be referenced
by noting the time from its flash to the bang of
associated thunder. For each five second count,
lightning is one mile away, i.e. 10 seconds = 2 miles.
Since the distance from one strike to the next can be
up to 1.5 miles, the NLSI suggests you activate your
lightning evacuation plan no later than a count of 15.
5. If you feel your hair standing on end or hear
“crackling noises,” you are in lightning’s electric
field. Immediately remove metal objects and objects
with metal pieces like baseball caps, place your feet
together, duck your head, and crouch like a catcher
with hands on knees.
6. People struck by lightning do not carry an electrical charge and are safe to handle. Apply CPR
immediately if qualified, and get emergency help.
In baseball, three strikes and you’re out. With lightning, one strike is all it takes.
When considering lightning, safety officers should
think in terms of preparation, rather than prevention.
Lightning and dangerous storms cannot be stopped. At
any given time, more than 2000 thunderstorms are in
progress around the world. Strikes to earth are random,
and total protection from lightning impossible. However,
leagues can reduce the risk of catastrophe by educating
personnel and developing an evacuation plan.
The National Lightning Safety Institute lists six steps
to safety for outdoor athletic events:
1. A responsible person should be designated to
monitor weather conditions. Local weather forecasts should be monitored 24 hours prior to events. A
portable weather radio is recommended.
2. Suspension and resumption of activities should be
planned in advance. Safe evacuation sites include
metal vehicles with windows up, enclosed buildings,
or if necessary, low ground.
3

Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA
For Local League Use Only
A Safety Awareness Program’s
Incident/Injury Tracking Report
Activities/Reporting
League Name: _____________________________ League ID: ____ - ___ - ____ Incident Date: __________
Field Name/Location: _________________________________________________ Incident Time: __________
Injured Person’s Name: ______________________________________ Date of Birth: ___________________
Address: __________________________________________________ Age: ________ Sex: ❒ Male ❒ Female
City: ____________________________State ________ ZIP: ________ Home Phone: (
) _____________
Parent’s Name (If Player): ____________________________________ Work Phone:
____________
) _____________
(
Parents’ Address (If Different): _________________________________ City ___________________________
Incident occurred while participating in:
A.) ❒ Baseball
❒ Softball
❒ Challenger
❒ TAD
B.) ❒ Challenger
❒ T-Ball (4-7)
(5-8)
(7-11)
❒ Minor (7-12)
❒ Major (9-12)
(50/70) (11-13)
❒ Intermediate
Junior (13-14)
Senior
(13-16)(16-18) Big League (15-18)
❒ Junior
Senior(12-14)
(14-16) ❒ Big
League
C.) ❒ Tryout
❒ Travel to
❒ Practice
❒ Game
❒ Tournament
❒ Special Event
❒ Travel from
❒ Other (Describe): ________________________________________
Position/Role of person(s) involved in incident:
D.) ❒ Batter
❒ Baserunner
❒ Pitcher
❒ Catcher
❒ First Base
❒ Second
❒ Third
❒ Short Stop
❒ Left Field
❒ Center Field
❒ Right Field
❒ Dugout
❒ Umpire
❒ Coach/Manager ❒ Spectator
❒ Volunteer
❒ Other: __________________
Type of injury: _____________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Was first aid required? ❒ Yes ❒ No If yes, what:________________________________________________
Was professional medical treatment required? ❒ Yes ❒ No If yes, what: ____________________________
(If yes, the player must present a non-restrictive medical release prior to to being allowed in a game or practice.)
Type of incident and location:
A.) On Primary Playing Field
❒ Base Path:
❒ Running or ❒ Sliding
❒ Hit by Ball:
❒ Pitched or
❒ Collision with: ❒ Player or
❒ Thrown or ❒ Batted
❒ Structure
B.) Adjacent to Playing Field
❒ Seating Area
❒ Parking Area
C.) Concession Area
D.) Off Ball Field
❒ Travel:
❒ Car or ❒ Bike or
❒ Walking
❒ Grounds Defect
❒ Volunteer Worker
❒ League Activity
❒ Other: ____________________________________
❒ Customer/Bystander
❒ Other: ________
Please give a short description of incident: ____________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Could this accident have been avoided? How: __________________________________________________
This form is for local Little League use only (should not be sent to Little League International). This document should be used to evaluate
This form is for Little League purposes only, to report safety hazards, unsafe practices and/or to contribute posipotential safety hazards, unsafe practices and/or to contribute positive ideas in order to improve league safety. When an accident occurs,
tive ideas in order to improve league safety. When an accident occurs, obtain as much information as possible.
obtain as much information as possible. For all Accident claims or injuries that could become claims to any eligible participant under the AcFor allInsurance
claims policy,
or injuries
could
becomeNotification
claims, please
fill out
and at
turn
in the official Little League Baseball
cident
pleasewhich
complete
the Accident
Claim form
available
http://www.littleleague.org/Assets/forms_pubs/
Accident
Notification
Form
available
from
your
league
president
and
send
to
Little League
Headquarters
in
asap/AccidentClaimForm.pdf and send to Little League International. For all other claims to non-eligible
participants
under the Accident
Williamsport
(Attention:
Dan
Kirby,
Risk
Management
Department).
Also,
provide
your
District
Safety
Officer
with
policy or claims that may result in litigation, please fill out the General Liability Claim form available here: http://www.littleleague.org/Asa copy for District files. All personal injuries should be reported to Williamsport as soon as possible.
sets/forms_pubs/asap/GLClaimForm.pdf.
Prepared By/Position: ____________________________________
Signature: _____________________________________________
Phone Number: (_____) _____________
Date: _____________________________
Accident Notification Form
“I called today and asked about what
form I fill out for an injured kid. You
are going to send me one in the mail
and I was going to look on-line for
what I need. Is this the Incident
Tracking Form? When I called they
said something about an Accident
Notification Form and I can’t seem to
find it on the website. Can you help?”
John Voyles
Safety Officer
Oviedo, Fla., Little League
Here is an example of the Accident
Notification Form you need to use
in cases of players injured who do
or may require medical attention.
It should be filled out by a league
official and signed by the league
president and sent to Little League
International Headquarters. Look
for it on-line in the League Officials
section under the “Insurance” header
on the left-hand side (http://www.little
league.org/common/insurance/index.
asp?cid=5).
The Incident Tracking Form (on
the next page) is for your league to
use in all accidents – those requiring
medical attention and those not.
Doing this tracking will help your
league determine if additional training
is needed for specifics like sliding
(if several players in a division are
hurting their legs or ankles, but not
enough to go to the hospital); or if
players are getting hurt on a specific
field from bad hops, the field may
need dragging or other work, etc.
“Do you have examples of injury or
accident processes that can be
distributed to league parents? I’m
looking for ideas for a document to be
included in our parent handbook that
explains the process in layman’s terms.”
Pat Gallagher
Safety Officer
Capitola Little League, Soquel, Calif.
That’s a great question. Here’s an
example of what we have in the sample
safety manual. Attached is a tracking
form for your coaches to fill out as
well (on next page); but if an accident
occurs, you should fill out and submit
the Accident Notification Form.
report, the Safety Officer will contact the
injured party or the party’s parents and:
Accident Reporting Procedures
(2) Obtain any other information
deemed necessary;
(1) Verify the information received;
What to Report
An incident that causes any player,
manager, coach, umpire, or volunteer
to receive medical treatment and/or first
aid must be reported to the league safety
officer within 48 hours of incident.
This includes even passive treatments
such as the evaluation and diagnosis of
the extent of the injury or periods of rest.
(3) Check on the status of the injured
party; and
(4) In the event that the injured party
required other medical treatment
(i.e., Emergency Room visit, doctor’s
visit, etc.) will advise the parent or
guardian of the _______________
Little League’s insurance coverages
and the provisions for submitting
any claims.
When to Report
All such incidents described above must
be reported to the Safety Officer within
48 hours of the incident. The Safety
Officer is:
_________________________ who can
be reached (day) at_________________
or (evening) at ____________________
If the extent of the injuries are more
than minor in nature, the Safety Officer
shall periodically call the injured party
to (1) check on the status of any injuries,
and (2) to check if any other assistance
is necessary in areas such as submission
of insurance forms, etc. until such time
as the incident is considered “closed”
(i.e., no further claims are expected
and/or the individual is participating
in the league again).
How to Make the Report
Reporting incidents can come in a
variety of forms. Most typically, they are
telephone conversations. At a minimum,
the following
information
must be given:
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incident as possible
• Preliminary
estimation of the
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• Name and phone
number of the
person reporting
the incident.
Safety Officer’s
Responsibilities
Within 48 hours of
receiving the incident
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Sample Tracking Report
Incident/Injury Tracking Report
A Safety Awareness Program – Activities/Reporting
League Name: ________________________________ League ID: ____ - ___ - ____ Incident Date: _____________
Field Name/Location: _____________________________________________________ Incident Time: ___________
Injured Person’s Name: __________________________________________ Date of Birth: _____________________
Address: _____________________________________________________ Age: ________ Sex: ❒ Male ❒ Female
City: _____________________________State _________ ZIP: _________ Home Phone: (
) _________________
Parent’s Name (If Player): ________________________________________ Work Phone: (
) _________________
Parents’ Address (If Different): _____________________________________ City _____________________________
Incident occurred while participating in:
A) ❒ Baseball
❒ Softball
❒ Challenger
❒ TAD
B) ❒ Challenger
❒ T-Ball (5-8)
❒ Minor (7-12)
❒ Major (9-12)
❒ Senior (13-15)
❒ Junior (13)
❒ Sr./Minor (13-15) ❒ Big League (16-18)
C) ❒ Tryout
❒ Travel to
❒ Practice
❒ Game❒ Tournament ❒ Special Event
❒ Travel from
❒ Other (Describe): ________________________________________
Position/Role of person(s) involved in incident:
D) ❒ Batter
❒ Baserunner
❒ Pitcher
❒ Catcher
❒ First Base
❒ Second
❒ Third
❒ Short Stop
❒ Left Field
❒ Center Field
❒ Right Field
❒ Dugout
❒ Umpire
❒ Coach/Manager
❒ Spectator
❒ Volunteer
❒ Other : __________________
Type of injury: __________________________________________________________________________________
Was first aid required? ❒ Yes
❒ No
If yes, what:___________________________________________________
Was professional medical treatment required? ❒ Yes ❒ No
If yes, what: ______________________________
(If yes, the player must present a non-restrictive medical release prior to to being allowed in a game or practice.)
Type of incident and location:
A) On Primary Playing Field
B) Adjacent to Playing Field
❒ Base Path:
❒ Running or
❒ Sliding
❒ Seating Area
❒ Hit by Ball:
❒ Pitched or
❒ Thrown or ❒ Batted
❒ Parking Area
❒ Collision with: ❒ Player or
❒ Structure
C) Concession Area
❒ Grounds Defect
❒ Volunteer Worker
❒ Other: ____________________________________
❒ Customer/Bystander
D) Off Ball Field
❒ Travel:
❒ Car or ❒ Bike
or ❒ Walking
❒ League Activity
❒ Other: ________
Please give a short description of incident: _________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________
Could this accident have been avoided? How:_______________________________________________________
This form is for Little League purposes only, to report safety hazards, unsafe practices and/or to contribute positive
ideas in order to improve league safety. When an accident occurs, obtain as much information as possible. For all
claims or injuries which could become claims, please fill out and turn in the official Little League Baseball Accident
Notification Form available from your league president and send to Little League Headquarters in Williamsport
(Attention: Dan Kirby, Risk Management Department). Also, provide your District Safety Officer with a copy for District
files. All personal injuries should be reported to Williamsport as soon as possible.
Prepared By/Position: _____________________________________ Phone Number: __________________________
Signature: ______________________________________________ Date:____________________________________
Attachment“F”
AccidentReporting
‐Incident/InjuryTrackingReport
‐AccidentNotificationForminstructions
‐AccidentNotificationForminstructionsand application LITTLE LEAGUE® BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL
ACCIDENT NOTIFICATION FORM
INSTRUCTIONS
Send Completed Form To:
LittleLeague®International
539USRoute15Hwy,POBox3485
WilliamsportPA17701-0485
Accident Claim Contact Numbers:
Phone:570-327-1674Fax:570-326-9280
Accident & Health (U.S.)
1. Thisformmustbecompletedbyparents(ifclaimantisunder19yearsofage)andaleagueofficialandforwardedtoLittleLeague
Headquarterswithin20daysaftertheaccident.Aphotocopyofthisformshouldbemadeandkeptbytheclaimant/parent.Initialmedical/
dentaltreatmentmustberenderedwithin30daysoftheLittleLeagueaccident.
2. Itemizedbillsincludingdescriptionofservice,dateofservice,procedureanddiagnosiscodesformedicalservices/suppliesand/orother
documentationrelatedtoclaimforbenefitsaretobeprovidedwithin90daysaftertheaccidentdate.Innoeventshallsuchproofbe
furnishedlaterthan12monthsfromthedatethemedicalexpensewasincurred.
3. Whenotherinsuranceispresent,parentsorclaimantmustforwardcopiesoftheExplanationofBenefitsorNotice/LetterofDenialfor
eachchargedirectlytoLittleLeagueHeadquarters,evenifthechargesdonotexceedthedeductibleoftheprimaryinsuranceprogram.
4. Policyprovidesbenefitsforeligiblemedicalexpensesincurredwithin52weeksoftheaccident,subjecttoExcessCoverageand
Exclusionprovisionsoftheplan.
5. Limiteddeferredmedical/dentalbenefitsmaybeavailablefornecessarytreatmentincurredafter52weeks.Refertoinsurancebrochure
providedtotheleaguepresident,orcontactLittleLeagueHeadquarterswithintheyearofinjury.
6.AccidentClaimFormmustbefullycompleted-includingSocialSecurityNumber(SSN)-forprocessing.
LeagueName
LeagueI.D.
NameofInjuredPerson/Claimant PART1
SSN
DateofBirth(MM/DD/YY)
Age
Sex
Female Male
HomePhone(Inc.AreaCode) Bus.Phone(Inc.AreaCode)
(
)
(
)
NameofParent/Guardian,ifClaimantisaMinor
AddressofClaimant
AddressofParent/Guardian,ifdifferent
TheLittleLeagueMasterAccidentPolicyprovidesbenefitsinexcessofbenefitsfromotherinsuranceprogramssubjecttoa$50deductible
perinjury.“Otherinsuranceprograms”includefamily’spersonalinsurance,studentinsurancethroughaschoolorinsurancethroughan
employerforemployeesandfamilymembers.PleaseCHECKtheappropriateboxesbelow.IfYES,followinstruction3above.
DoestheinsuredPerson/Parent/Guardianhaveanyinsurancethrough:
DateofAccident
TimeofAccident
AM
EmployerPlan
IndividualPlan
Yes
Yes
No
No
SchoolPlan
DentalPlan
Yes
Yes
No
No
TypeofInjury
PM
Describeexactlyhowaccidenthappened,includingplayingpositionatthetimeofaccident:
Checkallapplicableresponsesineachcolumn:
 BASEBALL
 CHALLENGER (4-18)
(5-18)
 SOFTBALL
 T-BALL
(5-8)
(4-7)
 CHALLENGER
 MINOR
(7-12)
(6-12)
 TAD(2NDSEASON)  LITTLELEAGUE(9-12)
INTERMEDIATE (50/70)
(11-13)
 JUNIOR
(13-14)
 JUNIOR
SENIOR(12-14)(14-16)
 SENIOR
BIGLEAGUE
(13-16)(16-18)
BIG (14-18)







PLAYER
MANAGER,COACH
VOLUNTEERUMPIRE
PLAYERAGENT
OFFICIALSCOREKEEPER
SAFETYOFFICER
VOLUNTEERWORKER







TRYOUTS

PRACTICE
SCHEDULEDGAME 
TRAVELTO
TRAVELFROM
TOURNAMENT
OTHER(Describe)
SPECIALEVENT
(NOTGAMES)
SPECIALGAME(S)
(Submitacopyof
yourapprovalfrom
LittleLeague
Incorporated)
IherebycertifythatIhavereadtheanswerstoallpartsofthisformandtothebestofmyknowledgeandbelieftheinformationcontainedis
completeandcorrectashereingiven.
Iunderstandthatitisacrimeforanypersontointentionallyattempttodefraudorknowinglyfacilitateafraudagainstaninsurerby
submittinganapplicationorfilingaclaimcontainingafalseordeceptivestatement(s).SeeRemarkssectiononreversesideofform.
Iherebyauthorizeanyphysician,hospitalorothermedicallyrelatedfacility,insurancecompanyorotherorganization,institutionorperson
thathasanyrecordsorknowledgeofme,and/ortheabovenamedclaimant,orourhealth,todisclose,wheneverrequestedtodosoby
LittleLeagueand/orNationalUnionFireInsuranceCompanyofPittsburgh,Pa.Aphotostaticcopyofthisauthorizationshallbeconsidered
aseffectiveandvalidastheoriginal.
Date
Claimant/Parent/GuardianSignature(Inatwoparenthousehold,bothparentsmustsignthisform.)
Date
Claimant/Parent/GuardianSignature
For Residents of California:
Anypersonwhoknowinglypresentsafalseorfraudulentclaimforthepaymentofalossisguiltyofacrimeandmaybesubjecttofinesand
confinementinstateprison.
For Residents of New York:
Anypersonwhoknowinglyandwiththeintenttodefraudanyinsurancecompanyorotherpersonfilesanapplicationforinsuranceor
statementofclaimcontaininganymateriallyfalseinformation,orconcealsforthepurposeofmisleading,informationconcerningany
factmaterialthereto,commitsafraudulentinsuranceact,whichisacrime,andshallalsobesubjecttoacivilpenaltynottoexceedfive
thousanddollarsandthestatedvalueoftheclaimforeachsuchviolation.
For Residents of Pennsylvania:
Anypersonwhoknowinglyandwithintenttodefraudanyinsurancecompanyorotherpersonfilesanapplicationforinsuranceorstatement
ofclaimcontaininganymateriallyfalseinformationorconcealsforthepurposeofmisleading,informationconcerninganyfactmaterial
theretocommitsafraudulentinsuranceact,whichisacrimeandsubjectssuchpersontocriminalandcivilpenalties.
For Residents of All Other States:
Anypersonwhoknowinglypresentsafalseorfraudulentclaimforpaymentofalossorbenefitorknowinglypresentsfalseinformationinan
applicationforinsuranceisguiltyofacrimeandmaybesubjecttofinesandconfinementinprison.
PART 2 - LEAGUE STATEMENT (Other than Parent or Claimant)
NameofInjuredPerson/Claimant
LeagueI.D.Number
NameofLeague
NameofLeagueOfficial
PositioninLeague
AddressofLeagueOfficial
TelephoneNumbers(Inc.AreaCodes)
Residence: (
)
Business: (
)
Fax:
(
)
Wereyouawitnesstotheaccident?
Yes No
Providenamesandaddressesofanyknownwitnessestothereportedaccident.
Checktheboxesforallappropriateitemsbelow.Atleastoneitemineachcolumnmustbeselected.
PART OF BODY
INJURY
POSITION WHEN INJURED
 01 ABDOMEN
 01 ABRASION
 01 1ST
 02 ANKLE
 02 BITES
 02 2ND
 03 ARM
 03 CONCUSSION
 03 3RD
 04 BACK
 04 CONTUSION
 04 BATTER
 05 CHEST
 05 DENTAL
 05 BENCH
 06 EAR
 06 DISLOCATION
 06 BULLPEN
 07 ELBOW
 07 DISMEMBERMENT
 07 CATCHER
 08 EYE
 08 EPIPHYSES
 08 COACH
 09 FACE
 09 FATALITY
 09 COACHINGBOX
 10 FATALITY
 10 FRACTURE
 10 DUGOUT
 11 FOOT
 11 HEMATOMA
 11 MANAGER
 12 HAND
 12 HEMORRHAGE
 12 ONDECK
 13 HEAD
 13 LACERATION
 13 OUTFIELD
 14 HIP
 14 PUNCTURE
 14 PITCHER
 15 KNEE
 15 RUPTURE
 15 RUNNER
 16 LEG
 16 SPRAIN
 16 SCOREKEEPER
 17 LIPS
 17 SUNSTROKE
 17 SHORTSTOP
 18 MOUTH
 18 OTHER
 18 TO/FROMGAME
 19 NECK
 19 UNKNOWN
 19 UMPIRE
 20 NOSE
 20 PARALYSIS/
 20 OTHER
 21 SHOULDER
PARAPLEGIC
 21 UNKNOWN
 22 SIDE
 22 WARMINGUP
 23 TEETH
 24 TESTICLE
 25 WRIST
 26 UNKNOWN
 27 FINGER
CAUSE OF INJURY
 01 BATTEDBALL
 02 BATTING
 03 CATCHING
 04 COLLIDING
 05 COLLIDINGWITHFENCE
 06 FALLING
 07 HITBYBAT
 08 HORSEPLAY
 09 PITCHEDBALL
 10 RUNNING
 11 SHARPOBJECT
 12 SLIDING
 13 TAGGING
 14 THROWING
 15 THROWNBALL
 16 OTHER
 17 UNKNOWN
Doesyourleagueusebreakawaybaseson: ALL
SOME
NONE
ofyourfields?
Doesyourleagueusebattinghelmetswithattachedfaceguards?
YES NO
IfYES,arethey Mandatory
or
Optional
Atwhatlevelsaretheyused?
IherebycertifythattheabovenamedclaimantwasinjuredwhilecoveredbytheLittleLeagueBaseballAccidentInsurancePolicyatthe
timeofthereportedaccident.IalsocertifythattheinformationcontainedintheClaimant’sNotificationistrueandcorrectasstated,tothe
bestofmyknowledge.
Date
LeagueOfficialSignature
Attachment“G”
LittleLeagueRules/GeneralSafety
‐Lighteningguide
‐Remindertocoachestoletplayers’warm‐up/catchfor
pitchers
‐Protectplayers/volunteerswiththerightequipment info.
‐Don’tSwing!Handout/reminder
Wear your
helmet
Watch for
cars
Ride with
traffic
© 1996 Little League Baseball® and Musco Lighting, Inc.
PLEASE
Keep’em Safe! Kids Aren’t Cargo!
• Motor vehicle crashes are the
leading cause of death for children 5-15 years of age. Kids
should ride in the back seat with
seat belts fastened.
• Children riding in the beds of
trucks have no safety restraining
devices to protect them in case of
an accident.
• Passengers who are ejected from
a vehicle are three times more
likely to die than those who
remain in the vehicle.
* Information from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
© 1994 Musco Lighting, Inc. and Little League Baseball, Inc.
Little League Baseball & Softball
®
CLAIM FORM INSTRUCTIONS
WARNING — It is important that parents/guardians and players note that: Protective equipment cannot
prevent all injuries a player might receive while participating in baseball/softball.
To expedite league personnel’s reporting of injuries, we have prepared guidelines to use as a checklist in completing
reports. It will save time -- and speed your payment of claims.
The National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pa. (NUFIC) Accident Master Policy acquired through
Little League® contains an “Excess Coverage Provision” whereby all personal and/or group insurance shall be used
first.
The Accident Claim Form must be fully completed, including a Social Security Number, for processing.
To help explain insurance coverage to parents/guardians refer to What Parents Should Know on the internet that
should be reproduced on your league’s letterhead and distributed to parents/guardians of all participants at
registration time.
If injuries occur, initially it is necessary to determine whether claimant’s parents/guardians or the claimant has other
insurance such as group, employer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, etc., which pays benefits. (This information should
be obtained at the time of registration prior to tryouts.) If such coverage is provided, the claim must be filed first
with the primary company under which the parent/guardian or claimant is insured.
When filing a claim, all medical costs should be fully itemized and forwarded to Little League International. If no
other insurance is in effect, a letter from the parent/guardian or claimant’s employer explaining the lack of group or
employer insurance should accompany the claim form.
The NUFIC Accident Policy is acquired by leagues, not parents, and provides comprehensive coverage at an
affordable cost. Accident coverage is underwritten by National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, a
Pennsylvania Insurance company, with its principal place of business at 175 Water Street, 18th Floor, New York,
NY 10038. It is currently authorized to transact business in all states and the District of Columbia. NAIC Number
19445.This is a brief description of the coverage available under the policy. The policy will contain limitations,
exclusions, and termination provisions. Full details of the coverage are contained in the Policy. If there are any
conflicts between this document and the Policy, the Policy shall govern.
The current insurance rates would not be possible without your help in stressing safety programs at the local level.
The ASAP manual, League Safety Officer Program Kit, is recommended for use by your Safety Officer.
TREATMENT OF DENTAL INJURIES
Deferred Dental Treatment for claims or injuries occurring in 2002 and beyond: If the insured incurs injury to sound,
natural teeth and necessary treatment requires that dental treatment for that injury must be postponed to a date more
than 52 weeks after the date of the injury due to, but not limited to, the physiological changes occurring to an
insured who is a growing child, we will pay the lesser of the maximum benefit of $1,500.00 or the reasonable
expense incurred for the deferred dental treatment. Reasonable expenses incurred for deferred dental treatment are
only covered if they are incurred on or before the insured’s 23rd birthday. Reasonable Expenses incurred for
deferred root canal therapy are only covered if they are incurred within 104 weeks after the date the Injury is
sustained.
CHECKLIST FOR PREPARING CLAIM FORM
1.
Print or type all information.
2.
Complete all portions of the claim form before mailing to our office.
3.
Be sure to include league name and league ID number.
PART I - CLAIMANT, OR PARENT(S)/GUARDIAN(S), IF CLAIMANT IS A MINOR
1.
The adult claimant or parent(s)/guardians(s) must sign this section, if the claimant is a minor.
2.
Give the name and address of the injured person, along with the name and address of the
parent(s)/guardian(s), if claimant is a minor.
3.
Fill out all sections, including check marks in the appropriate boxes for all categories. Do not leave any
section blank. This will cause a delay in processing your claim and a copy of the claim form will be
returned to you for completion.
4.
It is mandatory to forward information on other insurance. Without that information there will be a delay in
processing your claim. If no insurance, written verification from each parent/spouse employer must be
submitted.
5.
Be certain all necessary papers are attached to the claim form. (See instruction 3.) Only itemized bills are
acceptable.
6.
On dental claims, it is necessary to submit charges to the major medical and dental insurance company of
the claimant, or parent(s)/guardian(s) if claimant is a minor. “Accident-related treatment to whole, sound,
natural teeth as a direct and independent result of an accident” must be stated on the form and bills. Please
forward a copy of the insurance company’s response to Little League International. Include the claimant’s
name, league ID, and year of the injury on the form.
PART II - LEAGUE STATEMENT
1.
This section must be filled out, signed and dated by the league official.
2.
Fill out all sections, including check marks in the appropriate boxes for all categories. Do not leave any
section blank. This will cause a delay in processing your claim and a copy of the claim form will be
returned to you for completion.
IMPORTANT: Notification of a claim should be filed with Little League International within 20 days of the
incident for the current season.
Emergency Treatment of
Athletic Dental Injuries
Pulp Canal
(root canal)
Root
Dentin
THREE POSITIONS
EXTRUDED TOOTH - Upper tooth hangs down
and/or lower tooth raised up.
1. Reposition tooth in socket using firm finger
pressure.
2. Stabilize tooth by gently biting on towel or handkerchief.
3. TRANSPORT IMMEDIATELY TO DENTIST.
LATERAL DISPLACEMENT - Tooth pushed back
or pulled forward.
1. Try to reposition tooth using finger pressure.
2. Athlete may require local anesthetic to reposition tooth; if so, stabilize tooth by gently biting on
towel or handkerchief.
3. TRANSPORT IMMEDIATELY TO DENTIST.
Pulp
(nerves,
blood vessels)
LUXATION (Tooth in Socket, But Wrong Position)
Crown
Enamel
INTRUDED TOOTH - Tooth pushed into gum looks short.
1. Do nothing - avoid any repositioning of tooth.
2. TRANSPORT IMMEDIATELY TO DENTIST.
FRACTURE (Broken Tooth)
Professionally-made, properly fitted Custom
Mouthguards greatly reduce the risk and severity of
mouth injuries. Mouthguards are recommended
injury prevention equipment for all at-risk sports.
AVULSION (Entire Tooth Knocked Out)
1. Avoid additional trauma to tooth while handling.
Do Not handle tooth by the root. Do Not brush
or scrub tooth. Do Not sterilize tooth.
2. If debris is on tooth, gently rinse with water.
3. If possible, reimplant and stabilize by biting
down gently on a towel or handkerchief. Do only
if athlete is alert and conscious.
4. If unable to reimplant:
Best - Place tooth in Hank’s Balanced Saline
Solution, i.e. “Save-a-tooth.”
2nd best - Place tooth in milk. Cold whole milk is
best, followed by cold 2% milk.
3rd best - Wrap tooth in saline-soaked gauze.
4th best - Place tooth under athlete’s tongue. Do
this ONLY if athlete is conscious and alert.
5th best - Place tooth in cup of water.
5. Time is very important. Reimplantation within 30
minutes has the highest degree of success rate.
TRANSPORT IMMEDIATELY TO DENTIST.
1. If tooth is totally broken in half, save the broken
portion and bring to the dental office as described
under Avulsion, Item 4. Stabilize portion of tooth
left in mouth by gently biting on towel or handkerchief to control bleeding.
2. Should extreme pain occur, limit contact with other
teeth, air or tongue. Pulp nerve may be exposed,
which is extremely painful to athlete.
3. Save all fragments of fractured tooth as described
under Avulsion, Item 4.
4. IMMEDIATELY TRANSPORT PATIENT AND
TOOTH FRAGMENTS TO DENTIST.
Academy for
Sports Dentistry
875 North Michigan Ave.
Suite 4040
Chicago, IL 60611-1901
1800-273-1788
1800-ASD-1788
The Academy for Sports
Dentistry, a professional
organization dedicated to
the dental needs of athletes at risk to sports
injuries, recommends
that every sports
medicine team include a
dentist knowledgeable in
sports dentistry.
MOUTHGUARDS SHOULD NOT BE
OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT
Copy and post in dugouts.
Don’t Swing It
...Until You’re Up to the Plate!
(Photos from North Scott, Iowa, Little League)
Don’t let this happen to
you, or to a teammate.
REMEMBER:
Don’t pick up your bat until you leave
the dugout, to approach the plate.
RULE 1.08, Notes
“1. The on-deck position is not permitted in Tee Ball, Minor League or Little
League (Majors) Division. 2. Only the first batter of each half-inning will be
allowed outside the dugout between the half-innings in Tee Ball, Minor League
or Little League (Majors) Division.”
join the “swat Team” against West Nile Virus
Defend Yourself Against Mosquitoes:
Combata la Picadura:
DRAIN standing water around the house weekly
since it’s where mosquitoes lay eggs, including:
tires, cans, flowerpots, clogged rain gutters,
rain barrels, toys and puddles.
Desague agua estancada alrededor de la casa
(en llantas, cubos de basura, macetas,
canalones y charcos) pues ahí ponen huevos los
mosquitos. Corte la hierba y arbustos y no
riegue demasiado.
DUSK & DAWN are when mosquitoes that
carry the virus are most active., so limit
outdoor activities or take precautions to
prevent mosquito bites.
DEET is an effective ingredient to look for in
insect repellents. Always follow label
instructions carefully.
DRESS in long sleeves and pants during dawn
and dusk or in areas where mosquitoes are
active.
West Nile Virus disease is rare, but if you have
symptoms including high fever, severe
headache and stiff neck, contact your health
care provider immediately.
AL ATARDECER y AMANECER están más
activos los mosquitos que portan el virus.
Evite actividades afuera o tenga precauciones
para prevenir picaduras.
“DEET” es un ingrediente que deben tener los
repelentes de insectos para que sean
efectivos. Siga las instrucciones.
VISTASE con camisas de manga larga y
pantalones cuando esté afuera en la tarde o al
amanecer o donde haya muchos mosquitos.
La enfermedad del virus del Nilo Occidental es
muy rara, pero si usted tiene los siguiente
sintomas como dolor de cuello, fiebre alta y
fuerte dolor de cabeza, contacte
inmediatamente a su proveedor de servicios
www.fightthebitecolorado.com
Submitted by the Tri-Lakes Athletic Association Little League.
Copy and post at dugouts.
[email protected]
5
FOUL BALL
AREA
DANGER
Keep It
Clean!
REMEMBER:
Use good sportsmanship on the field,
even to your language.
Regulation XIV – Field Decorum
a) “The actions of players, managers, coaches, umpires and league officials
must be above reproach . . .”
b) “The use of tobacco and alcoholic beverages in any form is prohibited on the
playing field, benches or dugouts.”
Copy and post at dugouts.
Low-Impact Balls
Help Reduce Injuries By 30%
New USA Baseball Medical/Safety
Advisory Committee report suggests
leagues could reduce injuries
especially in lower divisions by
using reduced impact balls.
While there is no way to prevent players
from being hit by a ball, using a reduced
impact ball would substantially reduce
their risk of injury when ball impacts do
occur. According to a new report, your
league could reduce ball-related injuries
by almost one-third in your Minor
Divisions by using a reduced impact ball.
The report, recently released by the USA
Baseball Medical/Safety Advisory
Committee, suggests that you should
strongly consider adopting reduced
impact balls for your Tee-Ball and other
Minor League divisions that are focused
on skill development.
Study Shows Injuries Largely
Caused by Ball Impacts
The committee conducted two national
research studies. The first study assessed
the injury rate in youth baseball during
the years 1987-1996. The second study
assessed how effective reduced-impact
balls were in preventing injuries during
the 1997 to 1999 seasons.
The results of the injury rate study
showed a low 1.69 injuries per 1,000
participants. Confirming the results of
other studies that have shown ball impact
as the number one cause of injury for all
levels of Little League play, this study
found ball impacts accounted for 52.6%
of all injuries.
Breaking down the ball injury numbers,
the batted ball accounted for 20% of all
injuries, the pitched ball 19%, and the
thrown ball 13%. The body parts most
injured were the face, teeth, head, knee /
ankle, and chest, respectively. These
results show that reducing ball impact
injuries can provide the most potential
benefit in reducing overall injury rates and
making your players safer.
4 Spring 2009
Injury Data Shows Reduced
Impact Balls Reduce Injuries
For the second study, the committee
relied on three sources of national data
from Little League: insurance injury
reports, participation numbers, and a
survey of equipment. The equipment
survey was sent as a questionnaire to the
safety officer for each of the leagues
nationwide and also included telephone
follow-ups for the final two years. The
participation rate in the survey averaged
97%, making the study one of the most
significant sources on injuries in
organized youth baseball.
The study concluded that the reduced
impact ball decreased ball-related injury
risk by 29% for all of the reduced impact
balls. The protective effect of the reduced
impact balls was statistically significant
for the Tee-Ball (5-8) and Minor (7-12)
divisions but not in the leagues with the
more skilled players.
USA Baseball Medical/Safety
Recommends Low-Impact Ball
The USA Baseball Medical/Safety
Advisory Committee recommends your
league adopt for Tee-Ball and other
Minor League divisions reduced impact
balls that meet National Operating
Committee on Standards for Athletic
Equipment standards levels 1 and 2.
USA Baseball is the governing body for
all baseball in the U.S.
In its conclusion, the committee stressed
that switching to a reduced impact ball
does not reduce the importance of
teaching your players fundamental
baseball skills and ball-avoidance
techniques for batters. Skill enhancement
remains the best and most effective way
to prevent ball-related injuries.
Balls Perform Similarly
According to a study published by The
Journal of the American Medical
Association, when labels were removed
from traditional and reduced impact
balls, as both children and adults threw,
pitched, and batted the balls, they were
unable to detect a difference.
These findings are not surprising, since
the reduced impact balls are designed to
look and play like a traditional ball, with
the same size, weight, liveliness, and
surface characteristics. Neither you nor
your players should be able to feel a
change, and your league’s performance
will not be altered. You can even switch
balls when tournaments begin or when
teams move into an older age group with
no detriment to the player’s skill in using
a traditional ball.
With ball-impact continuing to be the
most prevalent cause of injury in Little
League, it makes sense to take the advice
of USA Baseball and adopt the reduced
impact ball for your Tee-Ball and Minor
League divisions.
The charts at left show the top causes
of injuries to infielders and outfielders
in Little League continue to be due to
ball impacts.
Make
Sure
They
Are
Safe!
“Dangling”
REMEMBER:
Catchers must wear helmets during
warm-ups and infield/outfield practice.
RULE 1.17
“...All catchers must wear a mask, ‘dangling’ type throat protector and
catcher's helmet during infield/outfield practice, pitcher warm-up and games.”
Mower/Equipment Safety Rules
1.
2.
Never make adjustments or repairs with the engine running.
3.
4.
5.
Never carry passengers.
6.
7.
8.
Remove rocks, tree limbs, cans, etc. before mowing.
9.
Please report damage or trouble with the mowers so they
can be repaired.
Be sure the area is clear of other people before mowing.
STOP if anyone enters the area.
Do NOT mow in reverse.
ALWAYS look down and behind BEFORE
and WHILE backing.
Always check the oil in the mowers before use.
ONLY adults operate mowers. NO children/others allowed
to ride along with operator of riding mowers.
10. You MUST wear safety glasses when using weed eater.
Modified from Peru, Ind., Little League safety plan
[email protected]
1
____________________________ Little League -- Baseball Game Pitch Log
Team ___________________
Pitcher's
Name
Opponent ___________________
Uniform League
Age
Number
Date _________________
X Cross out the number as that pitch is thrown.
O Circle the number for the last pitch thrown in each half-inning.
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Pitching eligibility varies by the league age of the pitcher, which is the pitcher's age as of May 1 of the current year. The pitching eligibility regulation is
Regulation VI (see current rule book for details). A blank electronic version of this form is available for free download at www.littleleague.org.
Copy and post at dugouts.
Coach, Please
L et Players
Catch!
REMEMBER:
Coaches and managers must not warm
up pitchers. Let Players Catch.
RULE 3.09
“...Managers or coaches must not warm up a pitcher at home plate or in the bull
pen or elsewhere at any time. They may, however, stand to observe a pitcher
during warm-up in the bull pen.”
6 March 2003
DON’T GET CAUGHT
IN A RUNDOWN.
Make it all the way home.
Stay off the tracks.
Trespassing on the rail track is a major league error.
Tracks are for trains, not games. Don’t forfeit your future.
Stay off the tracks.
SPONSORED BY OPERATION LIFESAVER
For more information please call 1-800-537-6224
or visit their Web site at www.oli.org
If You See It, Flee It;
If You Hear It, Clear It
REMEMBER:
• Track approaching storms the best way possible:
Internet radar websites, dedicated storm warning
system at field, or other storm warnings
• Evacuate fields when storms are about 10 miles
away: Have players and spectators go to enclosed
building or to cars with windows rolled up
• Clear fields immediately after thunder has been
heard or lightning seen!
PLEASE WAIT!
- Wait 30 minutes before returning to play after last sign of
lightning activity in your area
- Cars shouldn’t leave until the game is called, so all players
can be accounted for
Guidelines from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Weather Service
Copy and post at dugouts.
What to do if someone is struck by
lightning
8 Lightning victims do not carry an
electrical charge, are safe to handle, and
need immediate medical attention.
8 Call for help. Have someone call 9-1-1 or
your local ambulance service. Medical
attention is needed as quickly as possible.
8 Give first aid. Cardiac arrest is the
immediate cause of death in lightning
fatalities. However, some deaths can be
prevented if the victim receives the proper
first aid immediately. Check the victim to
see that they are breathing and have a pulse
and continue to monitor the victim until
help arrives. Begin CPR if necessary.
STAY INFORMED
Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for the latest
forecast and for any severe thunderstorm
WATCHES or WARNINGS. Severe
thunderstorms produce winds of 58 mph or
greater, or hail 3/4 of an inch or larger in
diameter.
A severe thunderstorm WATCH is issued
when conditions are favorable for severe
weather to develop.
A severe thunderstorm WARNING is issued
when severe weather is imminent. National
Weather Service personnel use information
from weather radar, satellite, lightning
detection, spotters, and other sources to issue
these warnings.
NOAA WEATHER RADIO IS
THE BEST WAY TO RECEIVE
FORECASTS AND WARNINGS
FROM THE NATIONAL
WEATHER SERVICE.
8 If possible, move the victim to a safer
place. An active thunderstorm is still
dangerous. Don’t let the rescuers become
victims. Lightning CAN strike the same
place twice.
Coach’s and Sports
Official’s Guide to
Lightning Safety...
Remember that all thunderstorms produce
lightning and all lightning can be deadly to
those outside.
Lightning Safety Awareness Week is the last
full week of June. For additional information
on lightning or lightning safety, visit NOAA’s
lightning safety web site:
NOAA
LIGHTNING...
the underrated killer!
A SAFETY GUIDE
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
NATIONAL OCEANIC AND
ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION
http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov
or contact us at:
National Weather Service
P.O. Box 1208
Gray, Maine 04039
NOAA
GYX 0301 (August 2003) - Revised
NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE
Gray, Maine
This safety guide has been prepared to help coaches and
sports officials recognize the dangers of lightning and
take appropriate safety precautions.
LIGHTNING KILLS
Play It Safe !
Each year in the United States, more than four
hundred people are struck by lightning. On
average, about 70 people are killed and many
others suffer permanent neurological
disabilities. Most of these tragedies can be
avoided if proper precautions are taken. When
thunderstorms threaten, coaches and sports
officials must not let the desire to start or
complete an athletic activity hinder their
judgment when the safety of participants and
spectators is in jeopardy.
It is important for coaches and
officials to know some basic facts
about lightning and its dangers
8 All thunderstorms produce lightning
and are dangerous. In an average year,
lightning kills more people in the U.S. than
either tornadoes or hurricanes.
8 Lightning often strikes outside the area
of heavy rain and may strike as far as
10 miles from any rainfall. Many deaths
from lightning occur ahead of storms
because people wait too long before
seeking shelter, or after storms because
people return outside too soon.
8 If you hear thunder, you are in danger.
Anytime thunder is heard, the thunderstorm
is close enough to pose an immediate
lightning threat to your location.
8 Lightning leaves many victims with
permanent disabilities. While only a
small percentage of lightning strike victims
die, many survivors must learn to live with
very serious, life-long disabilities.
To avoid exposing athletes and
spectators to the risk of lightning
take the following precautions
8 Postpone activities if thunderstorms are
imminent. Prior to an event, check the
latest forecast and, when necessary,
postpone activities early to avoid being
caught in a dangerous situation. Stormy
weather can endanger the lives of
participants, staff, and spectators.
8 Plan ahead. Have a lightning safety plan.
Know where people will go for safety, and
know how much time it will take for them
to get there. Have specific guidelines for
suspending the event or activity so that
everyone has time to reach safety before the
threat becomes significant. Follow the plan
without exception.
8 Keep an eye on the sky. Pay attention to
weather clues that may warn of imminent
danger. Look for darkening skies, flashes
of lightning, or increasing wind, which may
be signs of an approaching thunderstorm.
8 Avoid open areas. Stay away from trees,
towers, and utility poles. Lightning tends
to strike the taller objects.
8 Stay away from metal bleachers,
backstops and fences. Lightning can
travel long distances through metal.
8 Do not resume activities until 30 minutes
after the last thunder was heard.
8 As a further safety measure, officials at
outdoor events may want to have a tonealert NOAA Weather Radio. The radio
will allow you to monitor any short-term
forecasts for changing weather conditions,
and the tone-alert feature can automatically
alert you in case a severe thunderstorm
watch or warning is issued. To find your
nearest NOAA weather radio transmitter, go
to http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/ and click
on “Station Listing and Coverage.”
If you feel your hair stand on end
(indicating lightning is about to
strike)
8 Listen for thunder. If you hear thunder,
immediately suspend your event and
instruct everyone to get to a safe place.
Substantial buildings provide the best
protection. Once inside, stay off corded
phones, and stay away from any wiring or
plumbing. Avoid sheds, small or open
shelters, dugouts, bleachers, or grandstands.
If a sturdy building is not nearby, a hardtopped metal vehicle with the windows
closed will offer good protection, but avoid
touching any metal.
8 Crouch down on the balls of your feet,
put your hands over your ears, and bend
your head down. Make yourself as small
a target as possible
and minimize your
contact with the
ground.
8 Do not lie flat on
the ground.
NOAA
Suggestions for Warm-up Drills
Heel Cord Stretches
Head and Neck Circles
Low Back Stretches
Lean against a wall. Reach one leg behind you.
Keep the knee straight, heel on the ground, and
toes pointed forward. Slightly bend the leg that’s
closer to the wall. Lean forward. You should feel
the stretch along the back of your calf. Repeat
with other leg.
Make a circle with your head, going around first
in one direction five times. Then reverse and
make five circles in the opposite direction.
Lie on your back, bring one knee up, and pull the
knee slowly toward your chest. Hold and repeat
three times. Switch legs and repeat.
Shoulder Stretches #1
Shoulder Stretches #2
Shoulder Stretches #3
Stand or sit, holding your throwing arm at the
wrist with your other hand. Put your arm over
your head and pull gently, feeling your upper arm
against your head. You should feel the stretch
inside your shoulder.
Stand or sit, holding onto the elbow of your
throwing arm with your other hand. Gently pull
your throwing arm across your chest. You should
feel the stretch inside your shoulder, especially at
the back.
Stand or sit with your pitching arm out to the side
and your elbow bent. Move your arm back until
you feel the stretch in the front of your shoulder.
Thigh Stretches #1
Sit on the ground. Stretch both legs out in front
of you. Reach forward, touching your toes.
Eventually, you want to lean forward far enough
to put your head on you knees. You should feel
the stretch along the backs of your legs.
Thigh Stretches #2
Sit on the ground with one leg stretched out in
front of you. Bend the other knee and put your
foot behind you. Lean backwards. You should
feel the stretch along the front of your thigh.
© 1998 Little League Baseball® and Musco Lighting, Inc.
Equipment Checklist
Keep Your Players Safer
safety on the field? Do you know which optional
items can help keep players safer? Check out the
following list for ideas and reminders.
REQUIRED PLAYER EQUIPMENT
Defense
❑ Athletic supporter – all male players
❑ Metal, fiber, or plastic type cup – all male catchers
❑ Catcher’s helmet and mask, with “dangling” throat
guard; NO skull caps – all catchers; must be worn during
pitcher warm-up, infield practice, while batter is in box
❑ Catcher’s mitt – all baseball catchers
❑ Chest protector and leg protectors – all catchers; must
be worn while batter is in box; long model chest protector
required for Little League (Majors) and younger catchers
Offense
❑ Helmet meeting NOCSAE standards – all batters, base
runners, and players in coaches boxes
❑ Helmet chinstrap – all helmets made to have chinstrap
(with snap buttons, etc.)
❑ Regulation-sized ball for the game and division being
played; marked RS for regular season or RS-T for regular
season and tournament in baseball
❑ Regulation-sized bat – all batters; Little League (Majors)
and younger baseball divisions must have bat marked with
BPF 1.15 beginning in 2009
❑ Non-wood bats must have a grip of cork, tape, or
composite material, and must extend a minimum of
10 inches from the small end. Slippery tape is prohibited.
REQUIRED FIELD EQUIPMENT
❑ 1st, 2nd and 3rd bases that disengage from their anchors
❑ Pitcher’s plate and home plate
❑ Players’ benches behind protective fences
❑ Protective backstop and sideline fences
OPTIONAL PLAYER EQUIPMENT
Defense
❑ Metal, fiber, or plastic type cup – any player,
esp. infielders
❑ Pelvic protector – any female, esp. catchers
❑ Heart Guard/XO Heart Shield/Female Rib Guard –
any defensive player, esp. pitchers, infielders
❑ Game-Face Safety Mask – any player, esp. infielders
❑ Goggles/shatterproof glasses – any player, esp. infielders
or those with vision limitations
Offense
❑ Helmet – adults in coaches boxes
❑ Helmet with Face Guards or C-Flap meeting NOCSAE
standards – all batters, esp. in younger divisions
❑ Mouth guard – batters, defensive players
❑ Goggles/Shatterproof glasses – any player, esp. those with
vision limitations
❑ Batters vest/Heart Guard/Heart Shield/Female Rib
Guard – any batter
❑ Regulation-sized reduced impact ball
OPTIONAL FIELD EQUIPMENT
❑ Double 1st base that disengages from its anchor
❑ Baseball mound for pitcher’s plate
❑ Portable pitchers baseball mound with pitcher’s plate
❑ Protective/padded cover for fence tops
❑ Foul ball return in backstop fencing
IMPORTANT:
Do you know what equipment is required for player
BPF RULE GOES INTO EFFECT
FOR BASEBALL DIVISIONS
Buying bats for your league’s baseball divisions? If it is
composite metal, make sure it has the BPF 1.15 label. Bats in
use in Little League Baseball (Majors Division and younger)
must have the new bat performance factor listed on the bat.
Unless this marking is present, the bat will be removed from games.
Little League officials are aware some bats do not have the required
markings but are Little League approved. And some of the bats on
the approved bat list may not carry the required BPF 1.15 marking,
depending on when they were manufactured and licensed.
Little League is building a list of bats that are approved but do not
have the BPF marking due to special circumstances. For these bats,
the eligibility for play will be extended until December 31, 2009. As
Little League is made aware of bats that meet the BPF rule for this
extension, the bats will be added to the list.
ONLY bats with a BPF 1.15 marking or that are listed below will
be allowed for use in the Little League (Majors) Baseball and
younger divisions in 2009.
Non-BPF-marked bats approved until Dec. 31, 2009:
Adidas – Vanquish (blue design) A newer model of this bat, also
named Vanquish with copper and black markings, has the proper
labeling, so is therefore not subject to the one-year rule.
DeMarini – Black Coyote, Rogue, Distance, Rumble, Tengu,
Mach 10, Patriot
Easton – LZ-810, LZ-800, Stealth Optiflex LST 1,
Louisville Slugger – YB31
NIKE – Areo
Spring 2009
5
Protect Players, Volunteers
Death of batter, head injuries
to catchers, umpires underscore
need to ensure safety of
helmets for those closest
around the plate.
Are you adequately protecting your
batters, catchers and umpires?
Head injuries are an area of critical
importance for any league due to
their severity of risk. One of the
positions most at risk for head
injuries is the batter, because of the
proximity to both pitched, hit and
foul balls. But the catcher and
umpire are both similarly close and
have the same risks and needs. The
death of actress Natasha Richardson
from a skiing fall has raised
awareness around the world of
head injuries.
Does your safety plan address head
safety, from equipment to prevent
injuries to education on what
steps to take if an
injury occurs?
Baseball Death
Underscores Need
The death of high
school batter Patrick
Clegg, a Waynesville, Mo.,
High School baseball player,
who was hit by a pitch while
batting also serves as a
cautionary tale. Clegg, 16, was
batting in a game on April 21. The
pitch was reportedly high and
inside, causing Clegg to turn his
back to it and duck his head.
However, the pitch didn’t hit his
helmet, but his neck, just at the base
of his skull under his helmet.
The story, reported in the
Springfield, Mo., News-Leader,
indicated he was struck in the brain
stem and immediately collapsed on
the field. Two days later, he was
declared brain dead and taken off
life support.
Batting Helmets Must Fit
Part of your plan should be efforts
of prevention, making sure batters,
catchers and umpires have proper
protection. Since many players and
volunteers use community
equipment designed as one-size-
6 May/June 2009
with Proper Equipment
fits-all, make sure it does fit
everyone, or that different models
are available.
Injuries happen when helmets fall
off while the player is running the
bases, too. Make sure chin straps are
on all helmets that have the snaps or
latches to hold the strap in place.
Smaller players are at risk of poorly
fitting helmets falling off, leaving
their heads unprotected. Little
League requires each team to have
six NOCSAE-approved helmets
available for each team’s batters.
Make sure a variety of sizes are
available, to meet the need of
varying sized players’ heads.
Are your league’s helmets inspected
and maintained properly? Another
concern for helmets is the need for
replacement after a hard hit.
Manufacturers state that once a
baseball batting helmet has been hit
hard once, it should be discarded.
Don’t wait for a crack to show that
the shell is compromised, as a break
could happen before an obvious
crack appears.
Helmets cost between $15 and
$40, depending on style and
manufacturer. Don’t put players at
risk over whether a helmet has
served its use.
Umpires Need Quality
Masks, Helmets, Too
In separate instances within a week
of each other, two MLB umpires
were sidelined with head injures
after being hit by a broken bat and a
foul ball while behind the plate.
On April 19, home plate umpire Ed
Hickox was tagged in the center of
his facemask with a foul tip. Hickox
worked the rest of the game but
spent the night in the hospital under
observation. He was expected to be
out of action for a week with the
resulting concussion.
In a more severe injury, MLB
umpire Kerwin Danley was removed
from the field on a stretcher after the
top of a broken bat hit him in the
helmet during a game April 24.
Danley also suffered a concussion,
but because he wore a full hockeystyle mask and helmet, it was
speculated that equipment saved him
from a worse injury.
Does your league provide umpires
with quality masks and helmets?
Make sure these volunteers are well
protected, too.
Don’t Modify Helmets with
Paint, Stickers
Finally, check all your helmets for
unapproved paint or stickers. Helmet
manufacturers have warned Little
League for several years that any
modification, either of stickers or
paint, not approved by the helmet
manufacturer will void the warranty.
That should tell your league the
manufacturer, who knows its
product best, is concerned that these
helmets will fail with no warning if
they’ve been modified, and the
manufacturer won’t be held
responsible. Applying paint or
stickers to the shell can cause a
chemical reaction that destroys the
helmet’s hard, protective ability.
Helmets may not be repainted or
stickers applied unless approved in
writing by the manufacturer.
See rule 1.16 and 1.17 for
specifics on this.
Don’t allow league helmets,
including personal player helmets, to
be used if they have been painted or
stickers have been put on them, for
the players’ safety.
Make Sure Players Wear
Helmets When Required
One concern for any league should be that its players and volunteers
follow proper procedures for wearing helmets.
Here are some reminders on helmet use, for both
practices and games:
Catcher’s helmet and “dangling” throat guard
• Warming up a pitcher
• Catching during infield/outfield warm-ups
• Playing position of catcher during games or practices (with chest
protector, shin guards, and cup for males)
• NOTE: Skull caps not permitted
Batting helmet (facemask optional)
• Batting practice (anywhere on field or in batting cage)
• Batting in games
• Running bases
• Pitching practice (standing in batter’s box while pitchers throw to catcher)
• Players coaching first or third bases in coaches’ boxes
• Optional: Adults coaching first or third bases in coaches’ boxes
May/June 2009
7