ATHREE-EOOMEDCOTTAGE, well situ-

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Transcription

ATHREE-EOOMEDCOTTAGE, well situ-
Bay
Hawke's
*p
WONGA
ARRIVED,
WONGA @ WELLINGTON,
In splendid condition.
1A AAA
I\J»\J\J\J
7
quicks
2000 Sweet Briars
NEW SUMMER GOODS 1 !
OPENED,
Ex "Electric" from Londtm via Dunedin,
JUST
ONE
W. RATHBONE
CASES PALE BRANDY
20 cases Old Tom
20 cases Whiskey
12 cases Ginger Wine
12 cases Port Wine, 2 dozeneach
]2 cases Sherry Wine, 2dozen each
—
10 cases Raspberry Balm
20 casks Ale and Porter, in quarts
10 casks Ale and Porter, in pints
3 qr.-casks PortWine
3 qr.-casks Sherry Wine
2 qr.-casks Brandy
2 hhds. Jamaica Rum
2 half- tierces Tobacco
100 bags Crown Flour
150 bags Sugars assorted
5 chests Tea
6 half-chests Tea
10 boxes Tea
3 cases Bottled Fruit
4 cases Sardines
5 cases Lobsters, preserved in tins
2 cases Salmon
do.
do.
2 cases Oysters
20 boxes SydneySoap
20 boxes Sperm Candles
20 bags Salt
40 kegs Ewbank's Nails, assorted
10 drums Linseed Oil, 5 gallons each
1 bale Blankets
1 bale Pea Jackets
1case Saddlery
2 cases Hosiery
6 cases assorted Clothing
1 cask Sheet Zinc, 5 cwt.
1 case Biscuits in tins
1cask Blacking in bottles
—
J-f
—
—
—
THE
To arrive ex Telegraph,
.
ALE
BOTTLED
Tea
Coffee
Sugar
304
ANDREW LUFF,
Shakespeare-road
SHEEP STATION FOR SALE.
Moreens, Muslins, Infant's Robes,
Sleeves,Cuffs, Collars, &c.
1 case Crinolines, Hair Notts, Sewing, Crotchet
and Flowering Cottons
2 cases Ladies' Under-clothing, Gent's Lambs
Wool Pants and Shirts, Bootees,
and general winter Hosiery
1case Patent and Buff Leather Leggings,
Men's, Boy's, andLadies' Leatherand:
Elastic Belts,Blue,Brown, andScarlet
Darning and Knitting Yarn, Ladies'
Zambia Skirts, &c.
2 cases Children's Fancy and CordovanBoots
1case Women's Brussels Carpet Shoee, Men!s
Buff Slippers, &c.
mHE BANK grant Draftsand Letters of Credit, and
JL forward for collectionBills
drawn uponany of the'
abovenainedplaces.
ApprovedBills discounted, Cash Creditsgranted, Bills
of .Exchange purchased, and advances made uponBills
of Ladingaccompaniedby policies of Insurance.
Eates of Interest, and general terms of business, may
beascertained upon application.
Interest allowed on fixed Deposits.
S. G. BKANDON,
Manager,Napier.
3
WATT, KENNEDY, & WATT,
MERCHANTS 4' COMMISSION AGENTS,
4
EASTERN SPIT, NAPIEB.
WOOL.
HHHE UNDERSIGNED will advance on Wool
J. and other Produce consigned to their London.
Agents— Messrs. Robinson & Fleming-.
WATT, KENNEDY & WATT.
156
In the Estate of John Ross— deceased.
TVTOTICE ISHEEEBY GIVEN that all perJJI sons who are indebted to the abovenamed
-
°
°
"
FB.
a Woman as general servantWANTED,
Liberal wages will be given to one who
understands her work. Apply to
MRS. TUKE,
3TOJSS
45
——
STUART &CO.
Eedcliffe, Napier.
405
f
NEWTON, IRVINE,& CO.
"
—
"
21 Office— Opposite the Government Buildicgs.
"
Singapore, &c
-IHil^-
consequence of the dissolutionof partnership
ofMessrs. Munro & Blair, the undersigned
beeu instructed to sell by private contract, Ex "Devonshire," and "Nimrod," via Auckland
at a very moderate price, the valuablesheep run
1case Alma Caps, Regatta Shirts, Fingering
now called
Half- Hose, Coloured Cotton Velvets,
THE GLENGARRY STATION,
Blue Serge, Crimson and GreenBaize
1case Youth's Stout Kip Boots
To arrive per Affiance,
beautifully situated on the Mangaone river, w1thcase Ladies' Cloth and Stout Cordovan Boots
in 16 miles of Napier,and in the vicinity of an
Invoioeof Wines, Spieits, Ciothing, &o;
An
1
Silk
Dresses
and
Dress
Fancy
Stuffs,
extensive bush run, with good homestead, outcase
newest styles and good qualities, to
Particularsina,future advertisement.
Btation, and 60 acres fenced land. Including
be sold cheap
freeholdproperty, the right
Waipawa, August 19,1863.
888
' of run extends over
upwards of10,000 acres. 2,000 sheep,40 headof
SILTSTRIA,"
EX
cattle, and 4 horses will be sold with therun.
JUST RECEIVED, 'ESTHER,'
As this property will be disposed of at a very
1bale
Crimean
Wool Shirting, Crimean Shirts,
moderate pi-ice, it presents an unusually good opJVROM WELLINGTON,
Coburgs and Tweeds
portunity for any enterprisingperson of moderate
1
case
MaDtles
and
in
Jackets,
plain
and
fancy
i
Transhipped
means wishing to commence sheep farming.
es Queen ofPerth, fromMelbourne.
Tweed and Velvets, Ladies' WaterFor further particulars apply at the Btation, or
!A
proof Mantlea and Jackets
I
to
OHRYSTAIiS SUGAR
5 bales Blankets, White, Blue and Scarlet,
6 qr.-casks W. I.Rum
made to order and will be found suit- ,
STUART
& CO.
2 cases Clothes Pegs American spring
42
able for the trade
Napier.
3 cases Collins Axes 4£ to 6 lb.
1case AxeHandles
'
ANDREW LUFF,
Five per cent, discount allowed on CASH pue«
2 dozen Pick Handles
chases to the extent of twenty shillings and
6 $ barrels DriedApples
AGENT,
LAND AND GENERAL
'
upwards in theDrapex'y department.
2 cases AmericanOffice Clocks.
NAPJEE.
IN
have
"
The Bank ofVictoria
NationalBank of Australasia
Adelaide
Inland Towns Australia Oriental
Bank
"" Corporation
""
India
"""
Ceylon
"
""
Mauritius
""
""
China
"
Geelong
O^E
Cravats, Scarfs, Gloves, Gauntlets,
Chairs
Sundries
AGENCIES :Oriental
" Bank
" Corporation
"
United Kingdom
Sydney
Melbourne
—
i
ON SALE BY THE UNDERSIGNED
BEER
6 cases Pickles, in quarts
4 cases Picldes, in pints
3 cases Castor Oil
3 cases BottledFruits
2 cases Column's Mustardin tins
1 case Biscuits in tins
1case Red Herrings, in tins of 2doz. each
3 cases PreservedFish
ditto
2 cases assorted Crockery
2 cases Pipes
1case Axes
1case Cutlery
1 cask Glassware
1 case MoleTrousers
Branches and Sub-Branches in HEW 'EALAND
New Plymouth
Christc1 rch
Napier
Kaiapoi
Wellington
Timaru
Nelson
Dunedin
Picton
Oamaru
Invercargill
Blenheim
Lyttelton
Riverton
JOHN ROSS, are requested forthwith to pay tha
amount of their respective debts to the account
of the executors appointed by the Will (J.B.
Bbaithwaite and John Ajdexakdek Smith,
Esquires) at theUnion Bank of Australia,Napier.
And further, that all persons having any claims
or demands against theabove Estate, are requested
to send in the same in order that they may ba
adjusted and Liquidated.
To arrive ex Delaware,
BROOKE TAYLOR,
Solicitor to the above namedExecutors.
5 cases Saddleey,comprising Ladies' Side
Saddles, Bridles, Whips, MarNapier,
400
tingales,Embossed FeltSaddle Cloths,
August 27, 1863.
&c. ;Gent.'s Saddles,Bridles, Whips,
"
Spurs, Saddle Bags,Saddle Cloths, &c.
STEAM TO SOUTHERNPORTS.
1 case Wax Vestas, plaidboxes
of the I-C.R.M. Company's
*n
v_/
powerful screw steamers will
h
To arrive ex William Carey,
'
eav eflere f° r th0 South (carrying
10 hhds. Burton Ale, No. 3
H>M Mails) n r about the 9th
30 casks BottledAle in quarts, Allsop's
September, unless under any en5 casks
do.
do.
pints
gagement with the General Government.
30 casks Bottled Porter in quarts, Guiness's
MALTBY & CO.,
10 casks
do.
pints
do.
409
Agents.
cases
Ginger
20
Wine
cases
20
Raspberry Vinegar, quarts
On Sale by the Undersigned,
10 cases Cherry Brandy, quarts
cases
2
Figs inboxes
/"\NE TUN LAMP OIL
2 cases French Plums in bottles
6 cases Jams in jarß
1case of goodElectroPlate, consisting of
1case Lea andPorrins' Sauce
Tea, Table, andDesert Spoons
1case Pastes in pots
Table and Desert Forks
6 cases Pickles, pints
Mustard, Salt and Gravy Spoons
6 boxes Raisins
4 qr.-casks Vinegar
A Lot of RODGEES' BEST CUTLERY.
1cask Blacking in boxes
1cask containing 12 tins Orange, Lemon, 415
M. BOYLAN.
and Citron Peel
1cask containing Rim Locks, Butt Hinges, SETTLERS' HOTEL LIVERY STABLES.
Screws,Files, Knives, &c.
3 oases containing Turkey Stones, Augers,
PEREETT begs leave most respectfully
Hoes, Garden Rakes, Table Cutlery,
toinform the public thathe has taken the
T HiDges, <fee.
above Stables, and trusts by strict attention to
merit patronage.
416
NEWLY OPENED,
A Large Shipment of CROCKERY, GROCERIES, & IRONMONGERY.
30 cases Key brand Geneva
"Ariina," from London, via Otago,
Per
5 half-cases
do.
4 qr.-casks Brandy
Fine ENGLISH TEAS, in chests half-chests
6 do.
and boxes
Sherry
5 do. Port
30 case3Geneva
cases
Blue
2
Pilot Cloths, Tweeds, Does,kin6,
1puncheon Demerara Rum
sT ;
&c, &c.
;v
2 qr.-casks W.I. Rum
2 cases Navy Canvas, Welsh and Saxony
5 cases Marsala
Flannels, Scotch Plaidings, Wincey
"
10 cases Champagne
Skirts, Wool Scarfs, Scarlet and
25 cases best Islay Whiskey.
White diced Bed Covers, &c.
VAUTIER JANISCH.
1case Black Gro and Glace Silk, Black and
384
Napier, August 20, 18G3.
Coloured Coburgs, Alpacas, Crimson
CASES
—
HEAD OFFICE:-ATJCKL ND.
London Office: 50, Old Broad Strt. City.
AJTO OTHERLATE ARRIVALS.
*±Af\
\J
£500,000.
Capital
CASE Fancy and Crossover Mohair
"
"
U\j 20 cases Porter
10 hhds. Ale
BANK OP NEW ZEALAND.
HAS FOR SALE,
EX ROYAL BRIDE, CITY OF MELBOURNE,
Dress Checks
500 Ash
, One case Erench De Lames, Coburgs, and
250 Sycamore
Crossover Wincies
100 Apple Trees, assorted
One case Plain Wincies
100 Pears,
One case Scotch Tweed, Magenta, Mauve, and
100 Cherries,
Crimean Shirting Flannels
100 Raspberries
One case Cords and Moleskins in piece good
100 Black Currants
fabrics
100 Red Currants
One case Wool Table Covers, Linen Diapers,
24 White Currants
Blea Hucks. Brussels Carpets, Lappet
48 Cob Nuts
Blinds, Plain and Twilled Turkey Cloths,
30 Apricots
Gents's Silk Scarfs, Window Hollands,
25 Plums
White and Colored Counterpanes, &c.
12 Medlars
One case Women's and Men's Merino Hose and
24 Rhubarb— Bucks Scarlet
Sox, &c.
50 Birch
One case 6 to 30 row Crinolines, Hosiery,
1 2 Horse Chesnuts
Ribbons, &c.
30 Laburnums
One case Ladies' Head Dresses,Reticules,Por12 Oaks— English
tfolios, Framed Engravings, Miniature
12 Oaks— Turkey
Portraits, and Fancy Boxes
24 Arborvitae
One case Ladies' and Maids' Elastic Kid Boots
12 Common Holly
,>
Four qr.-casks Scotch Malt Whiskey
12 Common Laurels
Six hhds. Rum, 36, O P
6' Magnolias
Cypress, Cryptomeria, Japonica, Pinus Australia, Daily expectedex " Milledge" arrivedat^Otago
Laurestinus, Guelder Rose,
,
on tlie (jthi?ist.,
. "'
Syringa, Climbing Rose,Lilacs,Oranges, Lemons,
A shipment of the largest and best assortment of
Ivys, Cainelias, Guanas, LauresLinus,
SUMMER, STOCK
&c.
&c,
Hitherto imported by Newton, Irvine, & Co.,
I. R. SUTTON,
Including
Meanee Flat.
858
One case Plain and Flowered Bonnet Fronts
Countess, Princess Alice, &c.
FOR SALE,
One case Flowers Jessamine, Lillies, Orange
BY PRIVATE CONTRACT,
Blossom, &c.
One case Ladies1, Children's, Babieß*, Men's
South Eastern half of Town Section No,
and Boys' Straw Hats
434, with the buildings erected thereon.
One case Ladies' Trimmed Straw Bonnets in
This valuable allotment has a frontage of 66 feet
great variety
to Shakespeare-road,by a depth of 2\ chains. The
A lar^e stock of Summer BonnetRibbons, Kidcottageis in good order; the allotment is being
derminster andBrussels Carpets,Crumb
fenced, and" a"site for a large building nas been
Cloths (white ground,) Summer Prints,
preparedat considerable expense.
French De Lames (all shades,) a large
This property, sivuateiV i<n tb-> main thoroughvariety of light fabrics for Summer
faro, in tho most improving locality m tlie "1 own
Dresses, Ginghams, Derries, Moreens,
of Napier,close to f^e Union Bank, deserves the
a large stock ot Summer Tweeds, Cords,
attention of,any.-v-erson desiring a good business
Moleskins, Damasks for Bed and Winstand ir this town.
dow Curtaius, Brown and White ditto
Foa" plans and particulars apply to
for Table Cloths, Horrocks'Long Cloths,
VAUTIER JANISCH.
Quilts, Counterpanes, Sheeting, Black
Silk Mantles, Cloth ditto, Misses' ditto,
Napier,August 14, 1863.
374
Hosiery and Small Wares, Boots and
Shoes suitable for the season.
EXESTHER and LATE ARRIVALS.
<)f\
[Tol. c.
NAPIER, HAWKE'S BAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1863.
No. 417. ]
JUST
Herald.
FOR SALE,
COTTAGE, well situated in Carlyle-btreet. A decidedbargain
ATHREE-EOOMED
Apply to
.
19
ATS
G. A. BEYAN.
a si
MAIZE
ON SALE BX
575
SAMUEL BEGG.
S3
BEGG,
— SPRING CARTS
TILTGrassAND
Seed assorted.
SAMUEL
2
THE HAWKE'S BAY HERALD, SEPTEMBER
TO ARRIVE PER "DELAWARE,"
DAILY EXPECTED,
—
-i A QR.-CASKS PORT WlNE— Sandeman's
lv 10 qr.-casks Sherryw Wine Ruskin's
4 octaves
40 dozen Ginger Wine Bishop's
30 dozen SparklingMoselle
10 qr.-caßks Martell'sDark Brandy
4
Pale Brandy
10
W.I. Rum, 12-o>p.
10
Ardbeg Islay Whiskey,11.0 o.p.
50 cases and 20 half cases Geneva
50 cases Booth's Old Tom
—
"
"
"
Under the immediate patronage of Donald M'Lean, Esq., Superintendent of
Hawke's Bay.
"
MR. W ORGAN'S
GB <Z> 52T CB £3 SB. <CP .
"
Will
TAKE KLACE INTHE
©®yK]©Q[L
©taAD&iune^
OK
WEDNESDAY,
57x863.
BIRTH.
AtNapier, onthe 3rdSeptember, the wife of Mr.Isaac
Doitsh,of ason.
k
Local Intelligence.
MONTHLY SUMMARY.
'
Thb-«HERALD MONTHLY
pub-'
SUMMARYwillbe
lished onWEDNESDAY next, the 9th inst. Copies
of the 'SOUTHERNCROSS' SUMMARY,containing
full details of the War, are expected to arrive by the
steamer, and will be onsale at^this office.
Copies ofeither posted to order.
—
"
the 9th inst.,
HAWKE'S BAY HERALD
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK.
The Supposed Sunken Eock in
Hawkb's Bay. Consequent upon the report madeby Capt. Gibsonof s.s. Auckland
of his vesselhaving touchedupon a sunken
rock when leaving Napier roadsteadfor
Wellington, Mr. Murray, the pilot, went
out to the spot indicatedbut could discover
no rock or any trace of one. On Thursday
last another examination wasmade by the
deputy pilot, who with two boats' crews,
was engaged from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. inthe
search, but wholly without success. Indeed, in the spot where the rock should
be, according to the bearings given by
Capt. G-ibson, they found nine fathoms of
water. It was surmised by one of the
Southern papers, at the timeof the occurrence being reported,that,as no suchrock
was laid down in the Admiralty charts of
1861, the earthquake of February last
might have been the means ofraising it
15bales 8 and10lb.Woolpacks— full weight
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER5, 1863.
WORGAN'S Vocal Corps beingstrength2bales 3-bushel Bags— 2 and halflb.
ened by the accession of Fresh Talent, to10 dozen Turkey Slips
gether with the co-operation of some able Instru- The present time, as characterised by the
15dozen Sorby's Sheep Shears
2bales Seaming Twine, Fishing Lines, &c. mentalists, he confidently trusts to gratify his organization into militia and volunteer
friends with a few hours of charming recreation. companiesof theable-bodied population of
20 tons best Wire Fencing, Nos. 4, 5, and6
Napier, seems to us a fitting opportunity
PROGRAMME.
1ton Wrought Staples, Straining Screws
to revert to a subject which has often
1ton Roofing Zinc
PART I.
been
brought under public notice in these
SoloPiano Forte— "Haydn's March," (by desire)
10 cwt. White CloverSeed
Glee— "DowntheBourne."
Dr.Corfe columns that of the formation of a fire
-brigade. It is true that the work of a
50 bushelsCocksfoot
Song— ""Comin' thro'theEye."
Glee— Hardy
Norseman."
Neifliart militia company and of afire brigade have from thebed of the sea. The general
"
6 half-tierces Negrohead, small fig
Duett " I'vewanderedin Dreams."
Wade no necessary connection with each other ; opinion now, however, is that the AuckSong— Knowest thou theLand."
100 boxes 16 oz. NevaStearine Candles
JBeetlioven but we thiuk that the mere fact of men land struck upon no rock at all, but came
"
25 cases Oilmen's Stores, Crosse&Blackwell's Song The Skipper andhis Boy."
Gabriel'
"
being regularly trained for one public pur- into collision with a spar or other frag6 caseslarge andsmallboxes Sardines
Trio— To theMountains,"
EooJce
pose should greatly simplify the task of ment of the wreck of the Eoyal Bride,
Song— "Orange Bower."
1 ton Scotch Oatmeal, 28 and 561btins
which might quite possibly at the time
obtaining their services for another.
11cases Soda, Carbonate of Soda, Tartaric
Acid, and Saltpetre
apathy displayed upon this subject have been floating about alittle under the
PART 11.
The
3 cases Whiting, 10 cases Colman's Mustard,
SoloPianoForte—" The Shower ofPearls."
Osborne is to us unaccountable.
One destructive surface.
Thumb Blue, and Starch
"Mary's Dream."
Glee—
already
Dr.Corfe
firehas
visited
; and others
Napier
cwt.
and
2
cwt.
White
Concert. It willbe seen from ouradBlack,
Pepper
5
Song—" The Boatman."
have been imminent. Our buildings ge- vertising columns that Mr. Worgan pur10 qr.-casks Champion's best Vinegar
C.JZorn nerally are constructed of the most in10bxs. Candy, 2 cses. Carraway& Mxd. Spice Duett— "lknow aBank."
poses giving a concert on the evening of
,
5 barrels Currants, 30 boxes Eleme and InstrumentalTrio— Tenor,Bass & PianoForte... Bellini flammable materials; at any moment a Wednesday next. We learn that, on this
Song "Sweet
Spirit."
Wallace
Muscatel Raisins
"
Parry firemay break out which will carry des- occasion, he willbe assisted, not merely
Duett Flow gently,Deva."
2 barrels Shell Almonds, 40 boxes Figs
Song— "Gay young Spring."
31.Allen tructionin its train,and that too to a very by the amateurs who have so often and so
2 pockets fine Kent Hops
Glee—" Harvest Time."
10 casks crushed Loaf Sugar
serious extent; for, in such an event, the successfully exerted themselves to afford
SoloandChorus—" God save the Queen."
bystanders, however willing to save pro- the public a musical treat, but by several
10 chests and 20 half-chests Tea
could, from sheer want of organiza- effective additions which have lately been
Admission : Reserved Seats, ss. each ;Body perty,
tion, do little more than standby and look made to the "available talent" of Napier.
obtained
of
may
of
the
3s.
Tickets
be
Hall,
15 tons CoarseSalt,1cwt.bags
Mr. BRIDGE or of Mr. WORGAN, Carlyle-st. pu.H '■ The subject is indeed a very serious The entertainment promises to be one of
5 tons Fine
one; and we trust that our fellow-towns- a highly pleasing character.
T. A. BRIDGE,
Seceetaey. men will not commit the folly of remain411
Auxtis for Waipawa. On Thursday
10 barrelsStockholm Tar, 5 barrelsPitch
iug inactive in this matter until,perhaps, morning early 200 stand of
1ton assorted Paints, 30 drums oil
arms were
N.Z. STEAMNAVIGATION CO. forced to do something by the recurrence despatched for the use the militiaand
S barrelsColza Oil
MR.
—
—
—
...
—
—
—
"
"
—
_
of calamity.
of the steamers beThrough the liberality of one of our In3 hhds.Holloware,1 ton Camp Ovens
sJli^&aSk. /"VNElonging
to the above surance Companies, a fire engine, said to
5 cwt. Bullock Bows, 5 cwt.Maul Rings and
will
leave
Company
Napier
Wedges
*3ffife«s&&Q!lYßm& for Auckland onor about the be very efficient ifkept in good working
10 dozen GalvanisedBuckets, Cattle Bells
order, has been provided. The Govern18th inst., returning immediately.
Hook and Eye, T, and other Hinges
ment has also doneitspart by the erection
Cabin Passage
£6 6s.
Tin Tacks, Flooring Brads,Packing Needles
Steerage
£4> 4s.
of an engine house in a central position.
Fish Hooks, Hand, Pit, and Crosa-cut Files
Return Tickets
One-sixth less.
B V Sickles, Soythes, Foster's Spades
Somethiug more is wanted in the shape of
25 boxes T D and other Pipes
For Freight or Passage, apply to
butts, buckets, &c, and we submit that
20 gross Wine Corks
VAUTIER JANISCH,
the other companies would perform a
2 cwt. Lamp Wick
Agent.
graceful, yet not altogether disinterested,
423
Napier, Sept. 4, 1863.
act by providing the same. If they don't
2bales 11 and12-4 Witney Blankets
the Government should ; for, assuredly,
FEET
AND
and
CEDAR
BOARDS
Blue,Scarlet,
Navy
1bale
Blankets
1Kf\f\
PLANKS
for
Sale
with it will rest muchofthe responsibility
by
Mole
and
Cord
Trousers
lOvU
pairs
200
10 dozen Crimean Shirts
S. BEGG.
should a fire spring up and spread unre10dozen Blue Serge Shirts
Custom House-street,
sistingly through want of means to arrest
"
20 dozenScotch Twill Shirts
420 its
September 4, 1863.
progress. The militia and volunteers
square
30 dozenTartan Wool Shawls,
& long
should
do the rest, either as companies or
50 dozen Grey Shetland Half-Hose
FOR SALE,
-^yP|g||l|j|g
... ...
WATT, KENNEDY & WATT.
Napier, Sept., 1863.
4 ]8
SUMMER GOODS.
A. BROWNE, of A. & M.BROWNE,
having gone to Sydney to purchase Summer Stock, is expected toreturn about the ninth
of nextmonth, at farthest, with a LargeandVaried
Assortment ofGOODS suited to the approaching
MR.
season.
Napier, Sept. 4, 1863.
-i
f\f\f\ EWES for 3 years
g~T—^p I\J\J\J in the vicinity of
fep^^l?
WETHERS
the Ruataniwha Plains. Forty per
interest will be guaranteed,
free from all casualties, excepting loss arising from
any general and unforseen calamity. Half of
Wool allowed.
Immediate applicationis necessary to
cent,
STUART &CO.
LOST OR ST OL E N,
otherwise, as mightbe resolvedupon ;but
we incline to the idea that each of the
40 Head ofCattle
three companies should take alternate
Forparticulars,apply to
charge of the engine say in spells of two
PHILIPDOLBEL.
421 or three months the men to act under
Springfield, Sept. 4, 1863.
——
their own officers.
This would ensure
TO BE SOLD, A BAEGADT,
organization, without which nothing efALLOTMENTof LandinHastings-street, fective can be done.
with Cottage and Stable thereon.
i Theloss which a fire occasions to aperApply to
son in;ibusiness is generally understood to
Chas. Stttton,
be at least partially covered by insurance
Hastings-street.
AN
414
425
SHEEP WANTED, ON TERMS.
ijf&ssjbm-
Kf^Cl
O\J\J
£1
of the property destroyed. Nevertheless,
the loss may be serious, if only in the
—
REWARD.
from Napier, on the 7th inst., a stoppage of trade the dispersion of a
dark (dun) Chesnut Gelding, shod all round, connection, collected, perhaps, with much
branded N on the near fore shoulder, brand care and trouble. But how much more
rather indistinct, has a few white hairs on the aggravated does this inconvenience beforehead ; was bred at the Wairoa. The above
reward will be paid to any one securing the above come when the sufferer is aware that an
organised fire-brigade, aided by even a
horse, and giving notice to the owner.
supply of water from casks, wouldhave
T.K. NEWTON.
404 protected him from injury ? The fire
Napier,4ug. 26, 1863.
might not have originated on his premi-
STRAYED
TO BELET OR SOLD,
419
of
volunteers at Waipawa. Capt. Withers,
adjutant of the civil forces, went up at the
same time ; but there was no escort.
This might appear to be an unnecessary
risk ; but we may add that the nipples
were all unscrewed, with the view ofbeing sent up by a different opportunity.
RESIDENT MAGISTRATE'S COURT.
Friday, Sept. 4.
[Before John Curling, Esq., < 8.M., and M.Fitzgerald, Esq., i.p.
Scbley and another v. J. 3L Stuart^-This was
an adjourned case the plaintiffs not havinghad
their witnesses at the previoushearing. Stej/Xitu
McGreevy was examined for the plaintiffs as to
the state of the tarpaulin which was in dispute,
and stated that it was used at Clive and found
full of holes in the morning. The defendant's
storeman was called, who stated thatthe tarpaulin, when returned, had some holesin it.but they
were, to his belief, caused by the corners of cases,.
&c. Judgment for defendant, with costs, 9s.
The defendant stated thathe would allow plaintiffs £3 off the price of the tarpaulin as it had
not suited them.
Dyett v. Marsh. This was a claim for £20,—
the plaintiff having abandoned £6 8s 9d to bring
the amount within the jurisdiction of the court.
The defendant paid into court £6 12s, andproduced a letter from Mr. Loxley, of Wellington,
stating that he had placed £20 to theplaintiff's
credit on account of defendant, andwhich plaintiff had only credited as £10. Plaintiff explained
this by stating that Mr. Loxley had written to
him, stating that, although he owed Capt. Marsh
£20, he could only at present spare £10. Plaintiff, however, could not produce the letter. Another item of £3, for theservice of anentirehorse,
had not been deducted as agreed. These amounts,
with the sum paid into court, and 8s tendered by
defendant, made up the amount of £20. Judgment for defendant, and costs, 9s.
One or twoother debt cases oflittle importance
also engaged the attention of the Court.
—
3
—
ses, and a timely though limitedsupply of
COMFORTABLE FIVE-ROOMED COT- intelligence and water might have saved Open
Column.
TAGE,well situatedin Craven-street,near them from destruction. But as things are
Newton
&
to
Apply
Irvine's
store.
Napier,
at
in
a
fire
present
fFTHE following Goods, whilein transit between
should
break
To theEditor of the Hcwke's Bay Herald.
M.BOYLAN, or out in alocality at all crowded, it would
Najjier and the Ruatauiwha Plains :
MRS. BLAKE.
426
Looking over thecolumns of your paper of
probably continue until everything within Silt,
1pair Men's Boots elastic sides ;1Crinoline,
September, Ithought Isaw something
the
2nd
4th
May,
devouring
element was le- that was not exactly correct, or, as sailors say,
forwardedby JohnBrears' dray,
a MAN tomakehimself generally reach of the
"
1863, to Mr. Inglis' station.
useful on a Station at Mohaka. Apply velled with the ground. We trust that not according to Gunter." Inthe first place I
1Sausage Machine, forwarded by Wm. Sim- to PHILIPDOLBEL.
that no member of the "Defence
something will now be done in this most am confident
"
Waipnwa.
mons' dray, 4th May, 1863, to
Springfield,Sept. 4, 1863.
422 important matter.
Force was within hail of Havelock on"the day
you mentioned;andI
may also say that the men
Any person giving information leading to their
did not all get leave from Mr. La Serre, but
recovery will be wellrewarded.
The following remarks on Mis Rye'smission
"
" to mostly from Mr. Anderson, Inspector of 2nd
412
STUART & CO.
New Zealand appear in the HomeJVms : The Troop, and Ithink when you commenced the
~~
failure of Miss Eye's scheme of female emigration matter you might have actedmore fairly towards
PORT OF
NAPIER.
COALS.
at Otago has occasioned -miuch regret in Eng- the men of the Defence Force, by stating that
AEEIVED.
land ;but we cannot aay that the result is con- those men hadbeen for the last two months bard
September4t—Lady Bird, Abraham* from Mahi?, with sidered very surprising. The want of a proper at work drilling morn, noon and night, day
"if\f\ TONS BEST ENGLISH, hourly ex- 100 bushels maize, 80 kits
potatoes, C casks oil (1-i organisation for the reception of the emigrants i after day during all which time they have netuns),3 caskspork, 4 sides bacou,order. Passengers,
pected per Telegraph."
not fail ver had the taste of liquoi", although the officers
80 natives. "William Lechner, agent.
was a defect in the project which could fact,
Price— £3 per ton from the punts for cash on
too, were,and still are, allowed as much
" as" they can
4 Gem,Paul, from Wairoa, with, corn,pork, to lead todisastrous consequences. The
September
delivery.
and apples. Master, agent.
that these emigrants had gone out with a main . decently stow away in their holds without
should like to know why
view tobalance the .disproportionof the sexes in getting top heavy. I
413
STUA&T & CO,
The ship British Crown, fromLiverpool, with the first Otago, did not help the case. That fact ought i they are not allowed a canteen up at this camp
of
at
emigrants,
Lyttelton
Lancashire
arrived
on
for a Sheep Station on the Eatt batch
have been made so prominent. The pub- of theirs. Surely the Commander should have
ndfcto
the16th August.
of
licity jgiven to thatbranch of the speculation had: enough common senseto know that a number
Coast, a MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN, to
the inevitableeffect of making the emigrants cal- "" men, and most of them diggers, all used to haymake herself generally useful about the House.
Liberal wages will be given.— For further partiMr. J. Eeid Mackenzie, for many years general culate upon matrimonial rather than any other ing their grog, will have it, let the result be what
of engagements, and at the same time of : it may.
culars apply to Mr. WILLIAM LB CHNER, at manager of theBank of Ceylon, hasbeen appoint- kind
Yours, &c,
his office, Eastern Spit; or at his private resi- ed manager oftheNew Zealand Banking Corpora- making the cojouists who wanted wives very
A BESIDEOT.
tion (Limited) and proceeds to New Zealand cautious how they approachedladies who wereI
dence, Milton-road.
Spit, Sept. 2.
known to be looking out for husbands."
424 forthwith. SameNews.
Napier, Sept. 4, 1868.
X
—
—
A
WANTED,
—
Shipping Record.
I\J\J
"
—
—
—
WANTED,
—
—
—
—
—
THE HAWKE'S BAY ELEEALD, SEPTEMBER 5, 1863.
3
drinksof healthy men." "To Australians," he to make play with thespur from first to finish, if differ fromhim, and that is, in his depreciation
adds elsewhere, "it becomes, then, pertinent to allowed.
of the greyhorse, viewed as to color. We do not
"Horses brokenby them seldom walk well, and forget the opinion of Abd-el-Kader that black,
inquire how.we are likely to be served by the
instructions of .such incompetent guides. Even rarely trot at all. They look well on their horse, sorrel,dark, and red bay are the distinguishing
wereourpreconceptionsjustifiedby the testimony and in the points spoken of seem all to excel. tintspar excellance of supremacy in a horse, but
of facts, even were all that Englishmen have With us the reverse is" the case, for many white we should not exclude the pigeon blue altogether.
"
[Promthe Melbourne Argus."
written about their own horses correct, still our' men canneverlearn to ride,however muchprac- Those best acquainted with the stud-book tell us
The authorof this little work apparently set out prejudices and their experience would require tice they can have. The fact is their figure and that the origiual foundersof the English breed
"with theintention of doing for the private studs modification
when applied to our circumstances/ 1
? nerve suits the occupation; but intellect, and, were almost invariably white or grey. In Queen
"
of Australia whatGeneral Daumashad employed
What the Australian wants is a good, sound,- above all, care, are wanting."
Anne's reign, the majority of the running horses
himself in achieving for the public studs of pleasant, fleet, hardworking, abstemious, handItmay be news
to new arrivals to know that were white or grey. We have only to name the
"
France. Like the general, he possesses unusual some, hardy saddle-horse. Such an animal we in Australia, as in America, we have consider- achievements of Chanticleer, Grey momus, Caqualifications for the task. No professional can get, not out of the delicate thoroughbreds of able herds of wild horses, the offspring of such as millus, Gustavous . Otho, to show that white and
jockey, innocent of Tattersall's, unskilled as lia- England, but from the genuine, sound, docile, have at various times escaped from stations, and grey horses have not been without a witness to
rey himself in Leicestershire and Epsom lore, his vigorous, and enduring, Arab alone." Of the remained for years undiscovered or unyarded. the capacity even in comparatively late years.
study of horse flesh, unsophisticated by the race Arab, Mr. Curr, as we have said, is the most Itia, of course, quite impossible to say to what Victorian sportsmen, by way of additional testicourse, has been pursued with all the earnestness enthusiastic champion. Inthe heat of his advo- their numbers may amount, but it is probable mony, would probably add to the list the names
HORSE-BREEDING.
Pure Saddle Horses, a%d Iwm to dreed them in
Aastrelia. By Edwakd M. Cube. Melbourne :Wilson and Mackinnon. 1863.
—
of a devoteein every clime where the breed of
horses might suggest improvement or invention.
His mission and he does not attempt to disguise it— is to overthrow the empire of the English race horse in favor of the Arab, regarded
as the orthodox seminal principle of the hack.
With this end, ashe warms to the revolutionary
task he has set himself, he summons before his
tribunal, one by one, all the traditionary authorities on the subject, andhandlesthem in the spirit
of v Jacobin. There can be no doubt that for a
long time a reaction has been setting in against
the dictatorship of Youatt and Stonehenge. The
latter's outrageous advocacy of the superiority of
the English horse in general, and the race horse
in particular, had provoked, both at home and
abroad, doubts about the merit of a cause that
was pleaded with so little reference to the logic
"of fact, and so muchirrational ardour inbehalf
of traditional theory. But perhaps one of the
most vigorous embodiments of that reaction is
now before us in the shape of Mr. Curr's treatise.
No one before him has, by the light of personal
experienceand collateral testimony, shown with
so much clearness the rottennessof the foundation on which the alleged supremacy of the English raceris based as the sireof the saddle horse.
Taking Stonehenge as his text book,he makes
him convict his favorite out of his own mouth.
He makes him bear testimony to the fact that
ihe high-bred animal of the English turf is getting more and more useless an overfed,prematurely developed,
" soft, and washy creation of the
stud-book, on the road a failure, on the turf a
national folly." Thereal origin of the deterior-ation we have ourselves always attributed to the
introduction of short heats and light weights.
The moment the four miles and twelve stone became unfashionable, the forcing system comnieuced. Soundness and endurauce gave way to
speed and stride :and as the latter qualifications
could be obtained without maturity, the race of
pampered fillies followed. It is easy to see how
in this way a progeny of fleet roarers and cripplers were gradually propagated. From horses
bred to meet these requirements, mere weeds of
the turf, does the saddle horse inherit its long
legs, straight .shoulders, weak constitution, and
■want of all those qualities for which, in other
days, the old English horse was renowned. At
the same time,there are exceptions to every rule.
Achievements are recordedof the English horse
equal to, and far less legendary than those of
Dick Turpin's mai'e, wliich neither ourselves nor
Mr. Curr should wilfully overlook. This is the
testimony which the newly-published story of
Sir Tatton Sykqs1.life offers to-hisprowess. "On
one occasion after .riding sixty-three miles from
Sledmere that morning, he was second in the
four miles Maccaroni Stakes at Pontcfract, slept
at Doncaster that night, and was beaten
in ano" Splitpost
ther foui-"mile heat race against
Douglass," at Lincoln, next day. Twice over lie
journeyed from Sledmere to Aberdeen withhis
racing-jacket under his waistcoat, and a clean
shirt and a razor inhis pocket, for the sake of a
mount,on the Marquis of Huntley'sKutusuff, and
Sir DavidMoncrieffs Harlequin, when the Welter Stakes was the greatest race in Scotland ;
and, without stopping to dine, went back to sleep
at Brechin that night, and reached Doncaster.
after a six days' ride, just in time to see Blacklock beat for the St. Leger. The 360 miles were
done, principally in the forenoon, on a little
bloodmare, and with the exception of a little
stiffness, she seemed no worse." His rides to
London and back were no unusual achievement. Itwas the ordinary way of travelling to
the unencumbered roadster. A recent critic tells
us that a Yorkshire squire, within his own recollection, used toperform the two hundred and odd
miles on one marein an incredibly small number
of hours ; and most Yorkshire families of note
can tell ofsimilar achievements. As our recent
remarks on Mr. Curr's book elsewhere have anticipated the necessity of any formal review, we
will confine ourselves to the production of a few
of theauthor's opinions onhismain topic. Without comment, then, this is whathe says of the
animal We have just been discussing :
"He is absolutely a cross-bred animal,
save in
'
a few exceptionalcases, where a sticket' racer
is draftedinto the hunting-stable, and hence, if
there is any meaning in the words pure blood,
and the stress laid on them by all writers, he
is necessarily and inevitably inferior. He is got
by the thoroughbred out of any mare, andis only
accidentally asaddle-horse, for as far as his blood
is concerned, he might have been hack,. hunter,
or charger, gigster, park-horse, or coacher ; or
have filled one of the other fifty refuges, which
are open to his reception. Though tallof stature,
and possessedof grace and beauty captivating to
the eye of many, he cannot deceive those who
havemuch general experience of horses, and indeedhe becomes distasteful to them. How long
letme ask, would ahorse of his appearance last
in war? How would he stand the bivouac1
How would he stand the wear and tear of light
cavalry practice before an enemy where forage
might be scarce or bad1 How would he suit a
bushman? How would cold, or thirst, or hunger
agree with this typeof animal ?"
An Englishman's qualifications tohe a judge
of horses he altogether denies. With the insularity so characteristic of him, he proves by
the example of" Stonehenge himself, that his
criticismis not entitled to a hearing on the other
side of the Mediterranean. "He has never been
in a position to compare his own with other
horses, and accordingly he does not know whata
really good horse can do or suffer, but is like a
person who has lived in an hospital till groans
seem music, and jalap and squills the proper
—
—
cacy,he collects testimony to its perfection from that they do not fall short of 20,000. Iv the
every source— French officers,Indians, wandering neighborhood of stations where they exist they
Bedouins, vice-regal pachas. His favorite wit- have become a serious evil, frequently enticing
ness is General Daunias, a copy of whose cele- away the domesticatedhorses, which are rarely
brated work, Las Chevauxde Sahara,theEmperor recovered. As the rule, wild horses that are capof theFrench presentedto the MelbourneLibrary. tured are found to be small, light-boned, weedy,
One of the most poetic passages in his book is a anduseless."
soliloquy on the enviable advantages Avhich the
An account of the chase after these wild horses
Frenchman's well-known intimacy with Abd-el- we insert, in justice to the graphic descriptive
ELader afforded him. As a specimen of style we powers of the writer. It is no exaggeration to
reproduceitentire :
say that the whole passage"woulddo no discredit
He wroteunder circumstances more fortunate to the author of Eothen :—
than are ever likely to fall to the chance of an"In the meantime a large herd of about 150
other, for as he completed each chapter of his
wild horses hadbeen seen, and the conductor of
book he submitted it to the judgment of Abd-el- the
hunt, too eager for gain, instead of being
Kader, then a prisoner inFrance. A remarkable satisfied
whathe had captured, andtaken
position,not unlike one sitting with Pompey in them with
to the yard to be subdued by thirst and
the vessel that bears him to Egypt, listening to
him speak of Mithridates and Pharsalia, before hunger, as he had done in the first instance,
writingthe fall of the Gommonwealth. A subject determined to take this other lot also withhim.
for the poet or the painter ! Ouly^fancy the great, Steadying his former captives, aud leaving what
the unfortunate emir, the scimitar-surrounded men he could spare in charge of them, he moved
with the rest of his party, and was not long
prince of the desert, the manof his day, for a offfalling
in with and heading down the other
commentator; wh0,.1may say, receiving into his iv
Away they came in the direction of his
hand a discussion, adorns it, fetches itinto pic- 150.
tures, throws onit the shadow of the burnous, depot party, each as hard as he could rattle, in a
string the stallions and strong horses
strews flowers upon the page, andreturns authen- long
the old, the lame, and the
ticatedinto the hand that gavehim the dry truth, leading, the mares,
out, but following the lead at
a poem rich with the imagery, the feel, theodour foals stringing
that
ofhis Eastern faney inmatter a truth,in manner their best pace. On their approach, those now
an ode ! As Ireadjthe page, Ifeel again in the had only just been joined to the crawlers,
iv wind, began to cock their ears, whinny,
East; the -teat, the saud, the date-tree on tfie wellbecome
restless. Their anxietycommunicated
horizon, the Arab maiden coming from the well* and
to the lot first captured;and, as these feelthe camel, the horse, the odourof the chibouque itself
ings of alarm are very contagious amongst
is in my nostril, the musical guttural of the Be- gregarious
animals, even the wretched crawlers
douinis again in my ear."
began to get uneasy. Inthemeantime the tramp
Mr. Curr's own credentials as a judge of the of feet grew louder,and the 150 drew near,racing
are fastidiously insisted upon :
Arab,
over the plain, mad with excitement their tails
" About
ten yearsago I
had many opportunities streaming in the air, and clouds of dust flying
of seeing Arab horses in Syria, Turkey, the Holy from their hoofs, with a thunder of feet that
saw them I
had might be heard miles off. Such wastheir impetLand, and Egypt, and before I
already had some experience of the horses of uosity that the quiescent body of half-subdued
England, France, and Spain, besides those of material was unable to stop them, and the whole
Australia and Tasmania, in none of which coun- affair became a rout, and every horse there, to
tries I
had resided less thana year. I
had also the poorest crawler joining in the rush, was carseen those of Greece, Italy, Flanders, Belgium, ried away by the excitement of the moment, in
Switzerland, Turkey, andother places too numer- whirlwinds ofdust ; amidst its mantling clouds,
ous to mention, so that Imay be said to have the tossing of manes and streaming of tails, a
approached the examination of the Arab after thousand incidents flash indistinctly for a mohaving seen most of the best breeds in existence. ment onthe eyeof thebeholder ;the tall grey that
Since then Ihave had an opportunity of again has runheadlongagainst ano ther amidcareer,rearreviewing them, ami, if necessary,of revising my ing high abovetherest for aninstanthis fullheight
first impression. In all these countries Ibave tumbles backward with his neck broken ; the
riddenmoreor less, andhadoriginally in Tasmania vicious old mare, that hates a throng, with head
and Australia been unceasingly in the saddle."
bowed to the ground,kicking all that come withItis to Australia that he would now transplant in reach; the foal, overthrown, rollingamongst
the subject of all his enthusiasm. Australia, not the feet of the multitude ; the neigh the savage
Europe, he considers to be the analogue of the yell the scream of terror the thunder of hoofs
Arab's native home. The dry, arid atmosphere
the rival stallions meeting in the eddy, with
is exactly the climate toinvigorate
the condition outstretched neck, snake-like head, and ears laid
"
of this growth of the desert. Here he would back, true to their nature, springing with fury on
be stout, abstemious, mettlesome, hardy. Amid cacli other, to satisfy in a moment of mortal termoisture he is peevish, soft, washy, relaxed,and ror the jealousy and hate which never brook
unenduring." Food, as well as climate too,has postponment of battle ; all had been and disapits influence onhis development; and in the dry pearedin aninstant, for nothing could restrain
inlands of our continent is to be found the true them. Bursting from their captors, blind and
regimen ofhis favorite. As one situation inthe deaf to danger, headed by someresolute stallions
same country is more favorable than another for refusing to be turned, the whole lot broke from
the production of the horse, Mr. Curr appends control, and sweptover the plains. The yells and
cannon-like reportsof the whips of the pursuers
his own estimate of a site :
addedfuel to thefire. The wholelot escaped,
"Could Ihave a site and all facilities for ' only
were soon out of sight behind the swells of
saddle-horse breeding in Australia just cut out \6 and
the plain, the cloud of dense dust floating in the
my fancy, Iwould have it inthis way: On'a 'dry air marking the direction of their flight, the
flat of poorish,salty soil, Iwould grow oaten and1 person at whose expense the hunt had been got
barley hay. This for nine months out of the ;up having toreturn home with his party, losing
twelve should be the food of the stud. Between the whole of his horses except those on which he
the hay-racks where the horses were fed and the and his men were mounted, with the pleasant rewatering place Iwould have a mountain, bare, flection
that the domesticated horse, once free
rugged, rocky, and steep ;over this the horses and joined
with wild ones, is not a whit easier to
should travel daily to water, arid back again to recapture than
the wildest deuisen of the plain."
their feed. The distance to be accomplished
daily would depend in a great measure on the a With this extract we must close our notice of
steepness of the mountain, and be graduated book that we have perused from beginning to
besides to the variousages of the horses, ranging, end, we hardly know with more of interest than
say between ten miles a day for the four-year-old of agreeable surprise. However the author's
horses, and two miles a day for those under a views may be received in England, in Australia
year. During the three spring months of the at least they will find few to cavil with them.
year Iwould indulge the stud with abundauce So much soundratiocination,so much undisputed
of luxuriant grassand salty herbage, watereasily fact, so much precept and example, have rarely
accessible, and almost a complete cessation from been brought to the confirmation of individual
toil. The site of my breeding-ground should be experience and personal opinion. It is clear
inthe most favored path of the hot wind, andin that, for us atleast, the empire of Stonehenge
and Youatt must yield to the founder of a new
the most arid district that could be found.
is no doubt that the underhippocracy.
The merits of the aborigines as horsemen, on . taking whichThere
is the ultimate object of Pure Sadtheother hand, he thus disposes of :
dle Horses, and Sow to Breed tlteni in Australia
Itmay not be uninteresting to mentionthat is not the work of a single generation.
"At the
"
the Australian aborigines, when practised,become same time," says the author, we possess all the
excellent horsemen in some respects. Almost great elements of the amelioration of the horse,
any black between the ages of fifteen and thirty climate and food that are admirably Fuited to
will, at the end of a month's practiceon a quiet his constitution. Starting with the miserable
horse, sit any unbroken colt, and most of them, beasts we now have, Ibelieve that in course of
at the end of another month's practice with time, by constant and judicious selection, even
buck-jumpers, will ride anything that can be without the introduction of pure blood, a breed
produced. Their other strong point is as scrub- of saddle-horsesof much virtue and distinction
riders, in which, on the whole, perhaps they are might be created. The use of pure saddle-horse
unequalled. The universality with which they sires would of course much facilitate the underexcel, wheu allowed to try, is very remarkable. taking." The literary merits of Mr. Curr's book
Where they are employedas stockmen and rough- are in every way proportioned to the interest,
riders, they pride themselves very much on their and, in a social sense, themagnitude, of his topic.
performance. The wonderfulpart of thebusiness His good taste is as decidedly shown in what he
is how they get on with their horses. They are has omitted as in what he has included in his
quiet but not familiar seldom irritating, and task. Thus, he has very politically declined all
never caressing them. A horse broken by a discussion as to the vexed question of the birthblackfellow has always a wretched mouth, will1place of the horse, and the priority of Barb or
never lead, and is usually very shy of objects '.Ai;ab. At the same time, his total abstinence
with which he has not been rendered familiar. "from all pedantry on a subject so provocative
His education is very limited. They all ride rb|'classicalreferences to the white Cicilians, the
with short stirrups ;rough-riding andscrub-riding ""brown
and the running mares of
are the only points in which they excel when Thesally, constitutes him a pattern to moreprerace-riders,
country
mounted. As
in which at
tentious writers.
On the soundness of his judgment we have
meetings they are a good deal employed as light
weights, they are very indifferent. They enjoy already chronicled our estimate. We recollect
the sport, ride with a loose rein, and are very apt but one instance where we shouldbe disposed to
"
—
of Alice Hawthorn and the Dangerous Grey.
Though General Daurnas suggests the objection
to our author, yet ia Gen. Daumas's book the
greatest feat recorded is performedby a dapplegrey mare. Under these circumstances, we are
inclined to treat the question of physique as independent of the question of color, or rather to
believein the integrity of theold Englishproverb,
which says that a good horse cannot be a bad
color.
—
"
—
—
,
—
—
—
"
—
—
—
—
New ZealandInsurance Co. The following
was adopted
at"the last General Meeting of the Proprietors:
The Directors, withmuchpleasure, submit to
the Shareholders the accompanying statement,
showing,as the result of the Company'soperations
for the past half-year, a balance of £11,560 10s.
sd. TheDirectors recommend that a Dividend
of 10 per cent, for the half-year be declared,and
that the residue of £10,060 2s. 2d.be added to
the Reserve Fund, which will then be increased
to £2G,520 10s. sd. The Directors further recommend the Company to take £15,000 from the
Eeserve fund and apply it to the augmentation
of the paid-up Capital, to be reckoned as a payment by the present proprietors of £(> per share.
The amount of the paid-up Capital will then
stand as £30.000, or £12 per share, still leaving
an ample Eeserve Fund of £11,820 10s. oq. The
Directors, anxious to extend the Company's operations over a wider Held, have made arrangements for openingAgenciesinLiverpool,Glasgow,
Mauritius, and Adelaide. The Directors give
their bestattention to the interest of the Company,
and are confident of thefuture ;but, at the same
time, they look to the Shareholders for their active
co-operation,not only in maintaining the position the Company holds, but still further to
increase its income by influencing new business."
The T. S. Moet, whose loss at sea we chronicled the other day, wasa vessel to which a strange
history is attached, as will be seen from the
following paragraph, taken from a Sydney
Herald of April last : Most of our mercantile
readers will remember the destruction by fire
of the fine ship Sovereign of the Seas, some
months back, as also the circumstances connected with the raising, and subsequent sale of
her hull, to Mr. Cuthbert, of Sydney. From the
hands of this gentleman, the hull afterwards
passed into the possessionof Capt. Rountree,of
Waterview Bay, who at once set about converting it again into sea worthiness. This object he
has most successfully accomplished, and under
the name of the T. S. Mort, the ruins of the
Sovereigu of the Seas now floats in the form of a
trim-looking auxiliary screw steamer. The whole
of the work incidental to this metamorphosishas
been carried out in Waterview Bay, even to the
fitting of the engines and screw propellers, the
latter being adjusted so as to bemovable at pleasure. This objectis securedby means of a powerfuliron framework on the stern, so that, in calm
weather, or entering, or leaving port, steam
power may be availed of. In a few days she
will depart for New Zealand under the command
of an experienced captain, her destination being
the timber trade.
Language. We are told on good authority
by a country clergyman that some of the laborers
in his parish hadnot 800 wordsin their vocabulary. The vocabulary of the ancient sages of
Egypt at least so far as itis known to us from
the hieroglyphic inscriptions amounts to 685
words. The libretto of an Italian opera seldom
displays a greater variety of words. A well-educatedperson in England, who has been at a public
school and at the university, whoreads his Bible,
his Shakspeare, the Times, and all the books of
Mudie's library, seldom uses more than about
3000 or 4000 words in actual conversation. Accurate thinkers and close reasoncrs, who avoid
vague and genei'al expressions, and wait till they
find a wordthat exactly fits their meaning,employ
a larger stock ;and eloquent speakers may rise
to a command of 10,000. Shakspeare, who displayed a greater variety of expression than probably any writer in any language, produced all
his plays withabout 15,000 words. Milton's works
are builtup with 8000 ;and the Old Testament
says all that it has to say with 5642 words.
Max Mutter.
In
" our present issue we publish the prospectus
of The New Zealand Flax,Hemp, and Cordage
Company, Limited." The company intend working certain discoveries of Lieut-Colonel Nicolle,
by which the native flax, so abundant inNew
Zealand, canbemanufacturedintoexcellentrope,
cordage, &c, with a largemargin of profit. The
directors, and all parties concerned, are highly
respectable, and form a sufficient guarantee as to
thebona fidecharacter of the undertaking. We
have seensome of the flax and rope of excellent
quality, and the market price quotedby Messrs.
Simpson and Co is £33 per ton, only £6 less than
the best Russian whilst Messrs. Jas. Scott and
Son express anopinion that whatever the priceof
Russian. New Zealand grown would only beabout
£4 per ton less. Mr. Hindly, Mr. S. W. Silver,
and a Dundee correspondent of thelatter gentleman's firm, also bear testimony to its excellence.
A three-;
nch tarred rope was officially tested at
Loyd's Chain Testing Machine, Jersey, andbore
a strain of nearly three tons. Ibid.
The letters of allotment of the Bank of Otago
(Limited), were issued on the 29th ult. Of the
5,000 shares offered we learn that 4000 havebeen
subscribed for. This amount of capital the directors consider quite sufficient to commence business with. It is also sufficient to entitle the
company to a settlementand official quotationin
Stock Exchange. A. andIS, Z. Gazette,
report of this prosperous institution
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
THE HAWKE'S BAY HEEALD SEPTEMBER 5, 1863.
4
TO ARRIVE
UNION BANK OF AUSTRALIA.
Pcr TELEGRAPH," from London
Paid-up Capital...One MillionPounds.
DRAUGHT ENTIRE.
NEW ZEALAND
Wxn&t
11
rpO STAND TO COVER this
laife
JhLjs||Jb|%^ Jl
W^^»^^^r
Season, at Oakbourne, Wallingford, the celebrated Draught
"CONQUEEOR,"
allowedby all competent judges to be the best
Horse bred or imported into theProvince.
"■ Conqueror
is by the well-known imported
English horse, England's Hopej" out of a first
class Van Diemen's Land mare. He is a dark
"
"
NOW IN AUCKLAND.
Wines, Spirits, &c.
<V QR.-C ASKS MARTELL'S
-fJLjU
3 casks Caoipbelltown
j
—
Horse will travel for the
commencing the Ist of
"
"
"
"
"
"
2balsWhite}
"
"
Fees for service : Single Mares, £4 ;Two or
more, property of same owner, £3 10s., to be paid
on or before Ist January.
Mares hobbledat the option of the Groom.
different kinds)
7 eases Column's Starch
7 cases Worcester Sauce (Lea andPerrin's)
DAVID CARMICHAEL.
417
1case Hair Oil
1 case Essences and CodLiver Oil
1case SeidlitzPowdera
7 casks Soda Chrystals .
6 kegs Carb. Soda
1case TartaricAcid
3 tons Fine I «,.
11tons Coarse ) &ait
4 cases Lozenges and Confectionery (containing 2 dozen different kinds)
20boxes London
")
20 boxes Superior London ( a
leaseSkin
(SoaP
)
4 boxes Curd Tablet
20 boxes Belmont Candles
4 half-hogsheads Champion's Vinegar
6 cases Raisins
2 cases Nuts
10 barrels Currants
THE RED BOOT,
SHAKESPEARE ROAD.
to informhis friends and the
, publicbegs
gnerally of Napierand Burrounding
JWOOD
district that he has ju6t received large assorta
ment of
ladies', gentlemen's and children's
boots and shoes,
DIEECT FEOM ENGLAND.
Having been been made to his special order he
can recommend them withthe greatest confidence
which willbe followedby other shipments, thereby '
ensuring goods to suit the seasons.
Country Storekeepers Supplied.
233
Drapery, &c.
2 cases Mole Trousers
1 case Marcella Vests
1 case Men's Sacs and Trousers
1case Regatta and Fancy Shirts, &c.
1bale Twill and Blue Serge Shirta, &c.
1case Black Silk Handkerchiefs, Shawls,
Plaids, &c.
2 balesFancy Prints
cases
2
Men'sand Women'sStrawHats, &c.
TA-ILOEING IN ALL ITS j
DEPARTMENTS.
A LAEGE and well assorted stock of first-class
materialat unprecedented low peices
always onhand.
NEWTON, IRVINE & Co.
27
NAPIER AND WELLINGTON,
.
Chairs
nnHE "Favorite Schoonee
30 packages Hardware, &c, ia great variety
9 Sun Dials
3 bales Wheat Sacks
40 bags Shot,1, 2, 3, and4
1cask Putty
1cask Ruddle
7 casks PipeClay,Rough Clay,and Whiting
IB tons annealed drawn oiled Fencing Wire
11 cwt. Staple?, Screws and Nutsand Strain-
J-
SEA SERPENT,"
kj^^^j^ 90 tons, Axexb.Bxaib,Master,will
JJ|jl|iiJsy continue to traderegularly as above.
F 1 Freight or Passage apply in Wellington to
Messrs. Beth^ne & Htjnteb, or in Napier to the
35
Masteb, onboard.
Church of England Hawke's Bay Trust.
ing Screws
43
fpHE UNDERSIGNSD has been appointed
A Agent.
M FITZGERALD,
252
Land Agent, &c.
Mb. BROOKE TAYLOR,
SOLICITOR AND NOTARY PUBLIC
STUART & CO,
MR. B D. DAMERS,
%
Eor the Sale and Purchase
OF
LAND AND STOCK.
SHAKESPEAEE-BOAD,IfAPIEB.
[A CARD.]
G. HUNTER offers his services in the
VETERINARY PRACTICE to the set-
MR.
tlers of Hawke's Bay.
npHE UNDERSIG-NED are Cash Buyers of
WOOL,
X
and advance on consignments to their correspondents, Messrs. Mileß, Brothers &Co., London.
KINROSS & CO.
34 NAPIER AND HAVELOCK.
H. R. HOLDER,
MANUFACTURER and IMPORTER
OF EVEET
DESCRIPTION OF
SADDLERY
00
EX SEA BREEZE,"
N.8.-LAEGE STOCKS CONTINUALLY onHAND
Country Stores Suppliedon Libeeai.Teems.
A BAGS Poa Pretends GRASS SEED
£{
6 \J
PEE S.S.
—
" WONGA WONGA,"
15 tons Fencing Wire
1ton Staples
162
.
KINROSS & Co.
*«* Repairs promptly executed.♥«*
OPPOSITE THE GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS,
NAPIER.
COALS! COALS!! COALS!!!
"
"
.
Ex City of Melbourne" and Hirondelle,"
SHEEP FOR SALE.
Or A TONS COALS, superior to any ever
',
&JtJ\J imported. Apply to
EWES (to lamb in Sop- 268
y|
.J. H. VAUTIER. i
ty\J\-S
f
tember)
ijj^U? 200 Wef hers
TO MEEGHANTS, SHIPPEBS, and SETTUSES.,;
<
Terms Moderate. ■■
w£>«i»Ptt*Apply to
STEVEN, Ship Smith and Engineer
has commenced business at the Spit, op803
STUAEtT&QO.
posite Mr. Le Quesne's, where he trusts, byv
LEAVES.— A fresh supply received strict attention to business, to merit a share of
at the Herald office.
jjtiuonage.
334
*—
'""^^
"
AB.
MAHOE
-
...
£500,000.
EACH
(WITH POWEE TO
various Branches in NEW ZEALAND— VIC- 2,000 SHABES TO BE BESEEVED FOE NEW ZEALAND
TOErA, NEW SOUTH WALES, QUEENSDirectors.
LAND, SOUTH AUSTRALIA,andTASMANIA
Clifford
Late Speakerof the
also, on INDIA, CHINA, MAURITIUS, and Sir Charles
Houseof Assembly New Zealand.
CEYLON.
Captain Henry Carr Glyn, K..N. 15, Eaton Terrace,
EatonSquare.
This Bank's DEAFTS and LETTEES of
Esq
Messrs. Dalgety &
CREDIT on its LONDON OFFICE are Negoti- F. G.Dalgety,
Co., Gresham-Street.
able throughout GREAT BEITAIN and IRE- H. Selfe Selfe,
Esq.,
English Agent for
the Government of Canterbury,New Zealand.
LAND.
Esq.,
Messrs.
&
Eates of Interest, Discount, Exchange, and R. A.Brooks,
Co., St. Peter's Chambers,Cornhill. Brooks
general Terms of Business, may be ascertained at
Bankers.
the Bank.
IN LONDON
MESSES. GITN,MIIIS & CO.
J. B. BRATHWAITE.
IHE UNIONBANK OP AUSTRALIA
INNEWZEAIAND
2
Manager.
Solicitors.
MESSES. EEESHFIELDS &NEWMAN.
J
SL LARGE,
Brokers.
.
Cabinet Maker,
MESSES. MULLENS, MAESHAXL
MESSES.
A.J.
& DANIELL,S LOMBAED
STEEEI.
BEUNTON& SON, ATJCXION MAEX.
Secretary.
W. D.CAEETJTHEES,ESQ. (pro tem.J
OFFICES.— 3I,NEW BBOAD-STEET, CUT E.C.
in all thelatestpatterns.
mHIS COMPANY is established for the purpose of
-L supplying to the thrivingand increasingly imporCAEPETS MADE TO ANY SIZE OR SHAPE.
tant Colony of New Zealand, those advantages which are
already
enjoyedby theColonies of Australiaand Canada,
Chairs, Sofas, &c, re-stuffed (plain or spring.) by the Trust
andLoan Societies now existing.
BEDS, PILLOWS, MATTRASSES, &c,
Itsoperations will consist of Loans andAdvances on
uponreal
security in New Zealand, for which
Mortgage
tfPOlf THE SHOETEST NOTICE.
the system of Public Registration of Land established
great
facility,
affords
withperfect safety.
MAKER OP THE PATENT SPRING MATTRASS. there
The Company willalso be prepared to make Advances
onsecurities of asubstantial character, including those
toMunicipal Bodies upon theirBonds.
296
Old Furniture neatly repaired.
It is not proposed that more than£5 shalIbe called
up on each £25 Share (of which £2 willbe sulficient for
EASE AND HEALTH TO THE SICK. present purposes),but that to the extent of the remaining £20 per Share,the Company shallexerciseitsborrowingpowers for procuringmoney in Great Britainupon
:
SKIN.,
DISEASES
;
OF THE
Debentures for terms of yearsat a fixed rate ofinterest.
£:"
This money will alsobe lent in the samemanner as the
Universal approbationhasbeenawarded to this famous Paid-up-Capital,
and the lenders will be protected both
Ointment for its efficiency in removing diseases of the bysecurities takenand
by the subscribed but uncalled
scrofula,scurvy,scalyheads, andall eruptions Capital,
islrih. For
which.will itself be equal to the entireamount
of the skin, both in infancy and maturer years, no
borrowed.
remedy canbe applied which so quickly cures as HolZealand offers peculiarly favourableopportunities
loway's Ointment. Inthe nursery it should always be forNew
operations of the nature proposed;the prosperity of
at hand to ease the many skin affections to which the the Settlers enables them to employ with
profit large
majority ofchildren are liable. In all heat and tooth sums
money at rates of interest considerably higher
rashes, theOintmentis wonderfullycooling andcurative. than of ordinarily
those
current in England;the simplicity
To soldiers, sailors, miners, and travellers in foreign of thelocal
Laws alfeeting real estate affords a safeandl
lands, itis invaluable.
inexpensive mode of granting security ;and property is
of steadilyimproving value, as the energies of the coloSORES, WOUNDS, BAD BREASTS, BAD LEGS. nist,
theincrease of population,audthe resources of the
Inthisclass of maladies, an improvement in the ap- Colony itself
become further developed.
pearance ofthe disease of the patient followa the first
circumstances, and the successful operations of
These
dressing with the Ointment.
Companies
of this description in other Colonies, justify
Itmust not only be smeared on the wound, or sore, the Directors
in anticipating an amply remunerative
but be briskly rubbedfor someinches round about the return
to
Shareholders.
269
diseased,swollen or painfulparts. It will penetrate to
the blood vessels, nerves, and mascles, andevento the
bone, andwill exercise the most wholesome healing and
purifying power over everytissue requisite for^ thorough
reparation. The eileet of the Ointment is increased by JOINER, CABINET-MAKER, & UPHOLSTERER,
fomenting with warm water before the Ointment is
rubbed in;but sores, when healing, should never be
Carlyle-street, "Napier.
cleansed with sponge or any thing else,as theyoung and
new llesh which appears like a cream, wouldbe washed
away.
GOOD SUPPLY (OF FUHNITTTRE
always on hand, comprising:
. BLOOD TO THE HEAD, APOPLEXY.
Nothinggives so much ease inthese complaints from
Chests of Drawers, Washstands
many
Holloway's
cooling
healing
suffer as
and
which so
Toilette Tables and Glasses, boras, Tables
Ointment, \Vhenrubbed upon the spine, it acts most
Sideboards,Cheffoniers, &c, &c.
energetically in drawingsurplus blood from the brain;
evento children in teething;this Ointment has a miBeds, Hair and Elax Mattrasses,Bolsters
raculous effect in preventing fits, and convulsions, so
Pillows, and Straw Paliasse3
often attendant on tooth cutting. The Pills should be
20 dozen Chairs in stock English, American,
used according tothe directions.
and own make
RHEUMATISM, GOUT, STIFF JOINTS.
Curtain Poles, Rings, and every description of
Every one suffering from these painful affections
Ointment,
as
it
has
rescued
purifying
Wood Tuskingdone on the premises
should use this
other means
thousands from alife of torture, after every
J.
D.
trustsby
low charges and prompt attention
should
be
well
had been tried invain. The Ointment
a day, after it has to Town and Country Orders to secure a conruhbed into the skin at least twice salt
water,
and
and
been properly fomented with warm
tinuance of the liberal support he has hitherto
dried. Theinflammation soon yields,andthepatient no received.
263
longerhelples resumeshis accustomed occupation.
GLANDULA SWELLINGS,BRONCHITIS,MUMPS
FURNITURE SHOW ROOMS,
SORE THROATS, AND DIPTHERIA.
with success, a remedy is
To combat these diseases
HASTINGS-STREET.
■required which will have the whole absorbent system
has always on hand a select as■underits control. Such a remedy is Holloway's Ointrubbed on the skin, it penetrates to the
ment ; when
sortment of Fuenitttee, including
glands, andremovesany obstruction or impurity which
Hair-seated, Oak Dining, Oak Astors, Oak
maybe impeding their healthy action. This Ointment
Arm, Grecian Stripe Kitchen Chairs,
acts on the very mainspring of life, for through the
glands pass all newmatter required for the body's reTables, Washstands, Book-cases,
paration;in all the above class of cases, the Ointment
Cheffoniers,Chests ofDrawers,Framed
will
act
so
and
conjointly,
searchingly
andPills used
Engravings, MattrasseSj &c.
certainly, as to effect cures in themost deplorable cases
FISTULAS AND PILES.
Inspectionrespectfully invited.
All inflammations and ulceratiqns of sensitive parts
may bepresently relieved, and ultimatelycured, by the
diligentuse of this cooling and healing Ointment, aided [J£§p°
All hinds of Furniture, Mattrasses, Boors
water. Imme- 251
twice daily bybathing the parts in coldperseverance
and Sashes made to order.
is
j
diate ease springs from this treatment
cure.
J. DINWIDDIE,
—
A
—
—
"
ABRYSON
necessary to en'ect a permanent
ASTHMA,SHORTNESS OF BREATH.
In these complaints the Ointment should be well
rubbed twice a day upon the chest, and between the
shoulders, it will penetrate to thelungs, stimulate them
torenewedexertions,prevent stagnation of blood, moperate the pulsations of the heart, regulate the current
of air through the bronchial tubes, and thus en'ect a
W©o
L
.
SUBSCRIBER will either PURCHASE,
nnHE
_L or make AMPLE ADVANCES on SHIPMENTS of WOOL for nett proceeds.
—
SAMUEL BEGGL
Agents:
Messrs. James Morrison & Co.,
Both the Ointment and Pills should be used in the
Philpot Lane, London';
followingcases:
Wool Broker and Valuer,
Chiego-foot Elephantiasis SoreNipples
Bad Legs
Fistulas
Sore-throats
BadBreasts Chilblains
Mr. Henry P. Hughes,
Chapped
Burns
Gout
SkinDiseases
Basinghall-street, London.
Scurvy
Hands
Glandular
Bunions
Swellings Sore-heads
Bite of Mos- Corns (Soft)
Custom-house
256
Street,
Spit,
Lumbago
Tumours
chetoes
Cancers
Ulcers
and Sand Contracted Piles
and Stiff Rheumatism Wounds
Flies
ME. FITZGERALD,
Joints
Scalds
iTaws
Coco bay
LAND
AGENT, CIVIL ENGINEER, AND
Sold at theEstablishment of Peofessok Hoixoway,
224, Strand, (near Temple Bar), London; also by all
SURVEYOR
respectableDruggists andDealers inMedicines throughworld,at the followingprices: Is.l£d.,
out the civilized
SHAKESPEAR
E-R O A D,
Cd.,
225.,
11s.,
2s.Od., 4s.
and 335. eachPot.
83" There is a considerable saving by taking the larger 11
NAPIER.
sizes.
in every THE NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY
N.B.— Directions for the guidance of patients
disorder are affixedto each Pot,
(Established 1536.)
Agentsfor Hawke's Bay.—
FOE
PIEE
ANDlI3FE ASSTJEANCB AT HOME AND
BARRAUD & BRIDGE, Chemists, Napieb,
ABEOAD.
Bub~agents:
mHE UNDERSIGNED have been appointed
W.RATHBONE.Waipawa | W. JARVIS,Clive,
Agents, for Napier.
ai- From whomthis valuableMedicine maybe obtained
NEWTON, IRVINE & CO.
28
PAPERHANGINGS !! I PAPERHANGINGS !!
SALE.— SECTIONS in Coote-eoad.—
To Arriveper Telegraph," from London,
266
Apply to ROBERT FRANCE.
PIECES OF PAPERHANGINGS,
QAAA
£i\j\j\j all patterns of this year.
Napier, Province of Hawke's Bay, Colony of New
Zealand, Printed andPublished by James "Wood, at
N. WILLIAMS,
the Herald
General Printing Establishment, Tenny-sou Street.
234
Oil and Color Shops, Hastings-street.
—
—
Ploughing by Contract, §c.
£25
£1 per Shai'e to be paid on Application,
aud £1 on Allotment.
permanent cure.
Horse Teams for Hire by Day or Contract.
8
262
Sundries.
5 cases Imitation Rosewood and Birch
A E"EGtTLAB TBADER.
a "V.
PP
7 cases assorted Biscuits (containing 24
Napier, Sept. 1, 1863.
K.
OP
18-CEEASE.)
BEANCH.
grants DRAFTS and LETTEES of CEEDIT on LONDON, and its
UPHOLSTERY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.
WINDOW DRAPERY andBED FURNITURE
.-
—
vided.
.npHIS BRANCH
NAPIEE
„<»
6 cartons Mixed Spice
8 boxes Candy
10 bags Rice
6 chests
1 xe*
60 half-chests j T
barrels
Crushed
Sugar
20
40 boxes Eleme } Raisms
D
20 boxes Layers )
10 barrels Currants
5 cases Figs
Will be at MeaneeBridge everyMonday forenoon
"
Tuesday
Puketapu
*" Meanee
Bridge
Wednesday
f
Waipureku
Thursday
«
«
Friday
Havelock
At whichplaces proper accommodationis pro-
CAPITAL,
IK 200,000 SHAKES
HASTINGS STREET, NAPIER.
1case Pearl
7n~
2 case Soluble Cocoa
5 chests ) «
} Sag°
24 tins
2 bags Black ) «„„„
Pe er
npHE above well-known Entire
tjPj^*^O season
. ...
Groceries, &cc
M A U I.
iPfife.
A
j^k^Pfetes.
~\
.
mare.
Every attentiongiven to the mares,but no responsibilityincurred in case of loss or accident.
Mares hobbledat the option of the groom.
Allfees to be paid at the Station onor before
the IstJanuary, 1864.
Oakbourne Station,
407
Wallingford, Aug. 20, 1863.
1*
BRANDY
.
j
"'""""
gtaro tap»#,
LIMITED,
Reserved Fund...Two Hundred Thousand Pounds.
(UABIIiITX OP SHABEHOLDEBS TJNUMITED.)
50 cases Saucel (Jameß Stewart > Whiskey
)
and Co.)
100 cases Geneva
16 octaves
■«
j\ Porfc
8 qr.-casks
18 qr.-casks Pale Sherry
25 cases Champagne
21dozen Raspberry Syrup ") extra uaUty
4
21.dozen Raspberry Vinegar
50 cases Brandy
30 hhds. Dawson's Ale
100 casks Porter
40 hhds. Ale
")
70casks (280 doz.)IndiaPale | j jeg«
& Co>
30 do.
do. SparkUng |
Ale in jugs
J
iron grey, with great symmetry,combining power
withactivity 5 immense bone withfully developed
muscle; and of a most docile temper. Heis three
years old, and stands 16 hands high.
Terms, £4 4s each mare, limited to 60 mares.
Paddocks gratis for one month ; if not then removed a charge willbe made of 3s per week for
«ach
1 ■-»
r
rnxfl,
—
—
X
"
ON
'

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