June 16, 2016 - The Sheridan Press

Comments

Transcription

June 16, 2016 - The Sheridan Press
THURSDAY
June 16, 2016
131st Year, No. 23
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
NWCCD
contributes
$127.5 million
to local
economy
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Despite
cuts to its budget, the
Northern Wyoming
Community College
District continues to be
one of the region’s top
economic drivers.
The NWCCD added
$127.5 million to the local
economy during the 201314 school year, according
to data from the college
district’s economic impact
study. At a Wednesday
board meeting, NWCCD’s
Vice President of External
Relations and Economic
Development Dr. Susan
Bigelow gave a presentation showing the results
of those studies.
The results pertained
to the economic impact
in Sheridan, Gillette and
Buffalo. The college district accounts for approximately 1.6 percent of
the total region’s gross
domestic product.
The college provided
jobs for 485 full- and parttime employees during
the 2013-14 school year
resulting in $26.5 million
in payroll, most of which
was spent in the areas
surrounding the college,
according to the study.
The students attending
Sheridan College have a
massive impact on the
college as well. Around
32 percent of the students
attending the colleges
originated from outside
the service areas. Many of
them have elected to stay
in the area after attending
college. Student spending
impact in the area contributed $7.5 million to
the local economy.
The return for the average landlord renting to
students is approximately
9.1 percent.
Students attending the
college received a present
value of $169.2 million in
increased earnings during
their working lives. This
translated to a return of
$4.50 in future earnings
for every dollar spent on
receiving an education.
Taxpayers gained
an added state revenue and social savings
of $2 for every dollar
spent. Alumni employed
in the area contributed
$86.5 million in added
income during the 2013-14
year.
“The investments we
have made in aligning our
academic program with
the local and regional
economy is paying off,”
Dr. Paul Young, NWCCD
president said in a press
release. “We have strong
connections among our
students, faculty and
employers.
THE SHERIDAN
Press
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEO AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Bard, Enloe named
spring Athletes of
the Year. B1
2016 SPRING SPORTS
FEMALE ATHLETES
OF THE YEAR
BAILEY BARD & CASSIDY ENLOE
JU
University of Wyoming president to evaluate program cuts
BY BOB MOEN
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LARAMIE (AP) — University of Wyoming
President Laurie Nichols said she will
declare a financial crisis that will allow for
the evaluation and possible elimination of
academic and nonacademic programs at the
state’s only public four-year university.
The university has to cut more than $40 million from its budget over the next two years
to compensate for reduced state aid because
of a drop in tax revenue from the downturn
in Wyoming’s energy extraction industry.
Nichols said declaring a financial crisis
allows her to appoint a committee that will
review all programs at the university this
summer.
“It kind of opens the door to allow you to
really look at elimination of academic programs,” she said.
SEE PROGRAM CUTS, PAGE 3
Conrad retires after 20 years with SCSO
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — In a time when,
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, the average worker
stays at each job for 4.4 years, a
long stint in one organization is
uncommon.
Lt. Mark Conrad has put in 20
years of service at the Sheridan
County Sheriff’s Office. On
Thursday he’ll retire.
“When somebody is getting
ready to retire, you realize you
spend a lot of time at work,”
Sheridan County Sheriff Dave
Hofmeier said of Conrad. “It’s
like your second family. He’s like
family.”
Hofmeier added that he has
worked with Conrad for nearly
the entire 20 years Conrad was
with the SCSO and said the lieutenant has been a professional,
valuable colleague.
‘When somebody is
getting ready to retire, you
realize you spend a lot of time
at work. It’s like your second
family. He’s like family.’
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan County Sheriff’s Office Lieutenant Mark Conrad retires today after 20 years of service.
made his exit.
Conrad grew up in Sheridan.
He went to Coffeen, Sheridan
Junior High School and Sheridan
Dave Hofmeier
High School, where he graduated
Sheridan County Sheriff
in 1988. He spent two years at
Sheridan College and graduated
“A lot of times, when I’m not
from Chadron State College in
there, he’s not only my right1992 with a bachelor’s in criminal
hand man, but my left hand
justice.
as well,” Hofmeier said. “He’s
Conrad said he returned to
always been that way.”
the Sheridan area briefly after
Hofmeier added that the two
graduation, but couldn’t work for
often bounced ideas off of each
the Sheridan Police Department
other and noted that despite
because his brother already
his exemplary years of service,
did and the city had a nepotism
Conrad wanted little fanfare as he policy. At the SCSO, there was
little turnover and no job openings at the time. So, he applied
to jobs in Campbell County and
in Nebraska, accepting a job in
Gordon, Nebraska.
He spent two years there, just
south of the border of the Pine
Ridge Reservation. In that time
frame, Conrad said he learned a
lot. He also noted that it felt like
he saw more violence there than
the 20 years he spent in Sheridan.
Conrad made his way back
to Sheridan in 1996 to work
for the SCSO. He worked
with the Division of Criminal
Investigation, became a sergeant
in 1999 and lieutenant in 2008.
While anyone who works in a
career for 20 years is bound to see
change, Conrad said more than
anything he’s noticed a shift in
the tone of how law enforcement
is talked about. He also said he’s
been asked often if working in
the town you grew up in is a benefit or detrimental.
“I think it was a benefit. People
were more willing to keep you
in the loop, especially with the
advent of these,” Conrad said,
picking up his smartphone.
SEE CONRAD, PAGE 2
‘School starts Sunday’ at the
Big Horn Equestrian Center
BY KRISTIN MAGNUSSON
[email protected]
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Learning camping skills
Twelve-year-old Chloe Miller licks her fingers as she prepares to roast her hot
dog during the Girl Scouts’ Camp Rowena Wednesday at the Poulson Griffith
youth camp on Big Goose Road. The day camp is designed to teach camp skills
and safety to girls.
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
BIG HORN — The Big Horn
Equestrian Center will host
the season opener for the Big
Horn Polo Club with the Big
Horn Smokehouse Kickoff tournament beginning at 2 p.m. on
Sunday.
After the polo game, spectators and players can retire to
the clubhouse, also known as
the “Old Schoolhouse,” for a
meet-and-greet open house.
According to Kate Hamrich,
director of the Big Horn
Equestrian Center, the clubhouse is officially changing its
name to the “Old Schoolhouse.”
This year is the 30th anniversary of the Old Schoolhouse’s
move to its current site.
According to a story titled
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
Today’s edition is published for:
Rhonda Fitzpatrick
of Sheridan
“The Traveling Schoolhouse,”
written by Dr. Bob Connell, the
Old Schoolhouse was built in
the 1920s to house the Upper
Beaver Creek School, which
served the community in the
Beaver Creek drainage.
The location selected for the
building was across from the
current entrance of the JC
Ranch on Beaver Creek Road,
owned by Perk Connell, president of Big Horn Polo Club, and
her family.
The building originally had
two rooms and two entry halls,
each with a door that faced
east. It had large windows facing south, east and north, to
provide light for the students.
There was no electricity on site.
SEE POLO, PAGE 3
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
SPORTS
CLASSIFIEDS
COMICS
OUTDOORS
B1
B3
B8
B10
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
Balow tells Congress Wyoming needs new coal policies
ral resources ‘in the ground’ present a very
misguided and dangerous policy prescription, which would have significant negative
SHERIDAN — Key Wyoming figures are
effects on people across the country,” she
joining the fight to end a federal coal lease
said.
moratorium and push for Western states and
Kean, who spoke on behalf of Gov. Matt
tribes to have more say in coal regulations.
Mead, told the subcommittee that as the No.
Superintendent of Public Instruction Jillian 1 coal producer in the country, Wyoming has
Balow and Alex Kean, administrator of the
the biggest stake in the federal coal program
Wyoming Department of Administration and and should have a greater say in regulating
Information, testified in a House subcomit. For the past decade, money from federal
mittee hearing Tuesday in support of a bill
mineral royalties has accounted for at least a
introduced by Montana’s Republican Rep.
fifth of the state’s annual revenue.
Ryan Zinke.
By January of 2019, the bill would lift a
The bill, dubbed the Certainty for States
moratorium on federal coal leasing that
and Tribes Act, is still in the early stages of
took effect in January of this year. It would
the legislative process and would need to go
also require the government’s review of the
through markup and pass a committee vote
coal program to be completed by that time
before making it to the House floor.
and reestablish an advisory committee that
Rep. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyoming, has
lapsed in 2014.
signed on as a co-sponsor and Sen. Mike
The Interior Department let that commitEnzi and Sen. John Barrasso, both Wyoming tee lapse because it was already receiving
Republicans, are co-sponsoring a companion feedback from stakeholders through existing
bill in the Senate.
advisory bodies and other methods, a departBalow told congressmen on Tuesday that
ment official said Tuesday. The official,
Wyoming relies on coal lease bonus payDeputy Assistant Secretary Amanda Leiter,
ments to build schools and that 25 percent
added that the government used similar
of the state’s K-12 operating budget comes
pauses on coal leasing during reviews of the
directly from federal mineral royalties.
federal coal program in the 1970s and 1980s.
“Efforts by some to keep our nation’s natuThe bill would also create a new body of
BY PHOEBE TOLLEFSON
[email protected]
Western state and tribal representatives that
could delay for further review any federal
energy regulation it deemed would hurt state
or tribal revenues.
The committee’s top Democrat, Rep. Alan
Lowenthal of California, said this part of the
bill goes too far.
“The powers given to that board and the
entire Royalty Policy Committee go far
beyond what an advisory committee is ever,
and I repeat that, is ever empowered to do,”
Lowenthal said. “Instead of just providing
advice, this legislation would make the committee effectively able to stop a regulation
in its tracks if it estimates there will be a
negative economic impact. As far as the
Congressional Research Service can tell, this
is unprecedented.”
A Montana labor leader for coal miners testified in favor of the bill while a Colorado law
professor and Leiter, the DOI official, spoke
against it.
Lummis, who is retiring from Congress this
year, invited both Balow and Kean to testify.
“Wyoming livelihoods are at stake in the
ongoing review of the federal coal program,
and this bill ensures Wyoming voices are
represented through a reconstituted and
strengthened Royalty Policy Committee,”
Lummis said in a press release.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Lighting the campfire
Eight-year-old Cierra Maher, left, and Sydney Herrigel, 9, place pine cones to start a campfire
during the Girl Scouts’ Camp Rowena Wednesday at the Poulson Griffith youth camp on Big Goose
Road. The day camp is designed to teach camp skills and safety to girls. Camp Rowena has been
held every year at Poulson Griffith since the 1960s.
Medical
pot backers
seek stay
on Montana
court decision
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The
Montana Cannabis Industry
Association is asking a district
judge to further delay enforcement of stringent new medicinal marijuana restrictions that
are to go into effect Aug. 31.
The association on Tuesday
filed a motion with Montana’s
1st Judicial District Court
in Helena for a stay until the
U.S. Supreme Court takes
action on an appeal or until
the November election, when a
proposed initiative expanding
access to medicinal marijuana
could be decided by Montana
voters. Backers say they have
collected more than the 24,175
signatures needed to place the
measure on the ballot, pending
certification by elections officials.
In February, the state
Supreme Court affirmed key
provisions of a 2011 state law
restricting medical marijuana providers from selling
the drug to more than three
patients. The court later
agreed to delay enforcement
until August, but soon after
the cannabis association
asked the federal high court
to reverse the state court’s
ruling.
In a petition filed in May
with the nation’s high court,
the association argues that
the underpinnings of the state
court’s February ruling mistakenly assumed that marijuana is universally illegal under
federal law. The group says
that rationale led the court to
uphold provisions in the 2011
state law limiting the number
of patients marijuana providers can serve.
The federal court has yet to
announce whether it will hear
the case. It could do so by the
end of this month, when the
court ends its current term —
or wait until it reconvenes in
October.
If the high court decides
against taking up the case,
medicinal marijuana backers
argue that it would be prudent to delay enforcement
until voters can weigh in on
Initiative-182. If approved,
the measure would lift the
three-patient limit put in place
by Senate Bill 423, establish
licensing fees to pay for administering the program and
include post-traumatic stress
disorders among the conditions permissible for treatment
using medicinal marijuana. It
would also require providers
to be licensed and their dispensaries to undergo yearly
inspections.
UP plans work on Wyoming rail network
RAWLINS (AP) — Union Pacific is
planning to spend $28.5 million this
year to improve its rail network in
Wyoming.
The Rawlins Daily Times reported
that the work includes maintenance
on track and bridges.
Between 2011 and 2015, UP has
pumped more than $160 million to
improve Wyoming transportation
infrastructure. This year’s investments are part of an ongoing strategy
to improve efficiency along the rail
giant’s 874 miles of Wyoming track.
UP spokesperson Calli Hite said the
railroad will work closely with local
communities on any impacts of the
work.
CONRAD : Making plans for the future
FROM 1
He noted that he has no regrets and has
enjoyed working with the SCSO. His retirement, he said, has nothing to do with the
job or the people with whom he works. He
said he’d miss those things.
“I have an opportunity to spend more
time with my kids, who are 8 and 10, and
I can go do things with them before they
turn 16 and move on,” Conrad said.
Besides the people at the SCSO and those
he worked with in other organizations,
Conrad said he would miss working closely
with the Sheridan Area Search and Rescue
volunteers.
“That role was very rewarding,” Conrad
said, adding that helping to find those who
needed aid always felt good. But, he said,
working with the volunteers themselves,
observing their dedication and seeing the
level at which the organization functioned
was rewarding as well.
Conrad said he’s been asked if he’s nervous about retirement. His response: a
chuckle and a shake of the head.
“I’m excited,” he said.
Beyond spending time with his wife and
children, Conrad said he’s started a small,
one-employee (him) company. He will do
small acreage maintenance work in the
springs. The work will be part time and
include things like aerating, spraying and
other tasks he said he does on his own land
and figured he could do part-time for others.
“But that’s not until spring,” he said with
a grin.
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
PROGRAM CUTS : Most faculty spend half their time in classroom, half on research
FROM 1
But she stressed that the
university will not do anything that will hurt enrollment or the quality of education students receive.
The UW Board of Trustees
would have to approve any
program elimination.
The trustees unanimously approved a resolution
Wednesday supporting
Nichols’ plans to immediately save about $26 million,
beginning July 1, and to
review additional cuts in
the future.
Nichols said the immediate savings will come from
a number of actions, including eliminating 70 faculty
and staff positions that are
currently vacant, asking
faculty to spend more time
teaching, eliminating overtime and offering an incen-
tive for early retirement.
It is hoped that at least 50
employees will accept early
retirement.
Some positions will be
reallocated to where they
are needed most, she said.
“The overall goal is downsizing,” Nichols said. “We
are not going to be able to
replace every position.”
She is also considering a
four-day furlough during
the December break in
classes, but Nichols said she
wants to avoid that step if
possible.
Nichols said the idea
behind faculty doing more
teaching is to save money
by not hiring part-time faculty.
Robert Sprague, associate
professor of legal studies
in business and a member
of the UW Faculty Senate,
said most faculty now spend
about 50 percent of their
time in the classroom and
50 percent on research,
which includes producing
books, articles, inventions,
artwork and finding new
discoveries.
Increasing the teaching
load will result in less
research, Sprague said.
“If a majority of faculty
who also perform research
are going to have to teach
an additional course load,
we will have to lower either
the quantity or the quality
of the research that is generated by that faculty,” he
said.
Sprague also noted many
departments are already
short of faculty and some
programs need part-time
faculty to handle student
demand.
The Legislature trimmed
spending by about 1.5 per-
cent during its budget session earlier this year. That
resulted in about $3 million
a year less for the university.
But the state’s revenue
picture has worsened since
lawmakers left Cheyenne,
and Gov. Matt Mead says
the state will have to cut
about an additional 8 percent from the state’s $3 billion two-year budget. Mead
has already told the UW
trustees that the university
will see its state support
reduced by about another
$35 million.
Mead is scheduled to meet
with the Legislature’s Joint
Appropriations Committee
next Tuesday to detail proposed cuts in other state
agencies.
For the university, the
cut in state funding is compounded by a need to find
about $13 million over a
two-year period to cover
costs related to a new financial and reporting system,
increased utility expenses
and other needs that the
Legislature said it could not
fund. That means reallocating money it had planned
for other things.
Wyoming derives most
of its tax revenue from the
extraction of coal, oil, natural gas and other minerals.
However, low prices, growing wind and natural gas
competition and new federal
regulations have taken a
toll on the industry. Several
major coal companies with
mines in Wyoming have
filed for bankruptcy and
hundreds of mine workers
have been laid off in recent
weeks. Thousands of other
jobs directly and indirectly
linked to the energy industry also have been lost over
the last year.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2016 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Periodicals Postage Paid in
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
VA benefits
chief
retiring; was
suspended
in relocation
scam
1 Mo.
3 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
Motor
Route
$14.75
$41.25
$79.50
$150.00
County
Mail
$16.25
$47.75
$88.50
$168.00
Out of
Area
$22.75
$63.75
$123.00
$234.00
ONLINE RATES
1 Mos.
3 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
$8.50
$24.00
$45.00
$79.00
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to The Sheridan Press,
P.O. Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Becky Martini
Chad Riegler
BY MATTHEW DALY
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON (AP)
— The acting head of
the Veterans Benefits
Administration is retiring — three months
after he was suspended
for allowing two officials to manipulate the
agency’s hiring system
for their own gain.
Danny Pummill will
leave the Department
of Veterans Affairs on
June 23. Pummill was
suspended without pay
for 15 days in March
for his role in a relocation scam that has
roiled the agency for
more than a year.
The VA says Pummill
failed to exercise proper oversight as the two
officials forced lower-ranking employees
to accept job transfers
and then took the
vacant positions themselves — keeping their
senior-level salaries
while reducing their
responsibilities.
Pummill leads an
agency with a $2.7
billion budget that provides disability benefits to about 4.3 million
veterans.
City
Carrier
$12.75
$35.25
$67.50
$126.00
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Getting ready for a race
Tyler McKinley ties a colored scarf around Penny before the wiener dog races Tuesday evening outside of the Black Tooth Brewing Company. The event was hosted by Muddy Paw Prints.
Earth breaks heat record again,
but not by as much as before
WASHINGTON (AP)
— Federal scientists say
Earth sizzled to its 13th
straight month of record
heat in May, but it wasn’t
quite as much of an overthe-top scorcher as previous months.
The National Oceanic
and Atmospheric
Administration says
May’s global average
temperature was 60.17
degrees Fahrenheit
(15.65 degrees Celsius).
That’s 1.57 degrees (.87
degrees Celsius) above
the 20th-century average, besting the old May
record by .04 degrees.
It’s the first time since
November that a month
wasn’t a full degree
Celsius (1.8 degrees
Fahrenheit) hotter than
the 20th-century average.
So far, 2016 is averaging
55.5 degrees (13.06 degrees
POLO : Evolving through the years
FROM 1
The building didn’t have plumbing
either, so there were outhouses at the
edge of the schoolyard. The schoolhouse
had hardwood floors that endure to this
day.
By the mid-1950s the school had grown
to 11 students. The inner wall was
removed, so that all the students were in
one large room. By 1959, the Beaver Creek
School District and the Big Horn School
District were combined. The schoolhouse
was sawed in half from east to west,
moved to the grounds of the Big Horn
School and placed on a brick foundation.
Two bathrooms, a water fountain and
central heating were installed; a wall
was built to create two classrooms; and a
cloakroom and library were added to the
building.
The renovated schoolhouse housed
classrooms for first- and second-graders.
In the early 1980s, a new elementary
school was built, so the old schoolhouse
was transformed into a music building.
In 1986, the space was no longer needed,
and the building was put up for sale.
Meanwhile, according to the Big Horn
Polo Club website, the Polo Ranch, which
had been the home for the Big Horn Polo
Club since 1898, was sold. The sale forced
the club to find another field.
In June 1984, a new location for the polo
fields was selected by the Taylor family,
Bill King and Kim Cannon on the Burns
Ranch on Bird Farm Road, outside of Big
Horn. The lease was signed May 2, 1985,
and the fields were built by Bob, Mike and
Orrin Connell. The Big Horn Equestrian
Center was born. The club decided that it
needed a clubhouse on the new property,
so in 1986, the old schoolhouse was purchased from the Big Horn School District
for $1,500.
Kurt Ludlow orchestrated the move to
the new equestrian center, sawing the
building in half again, and remodeling it
into its current layout. Despite moving
twice and being cut in half twice, the
north and east sides still have the original
windows and the original hardwood floors
are still sound after almost 100 years.
With the polo season opener and the
celebration of the 30th anniversary of
the Old Schoolhouse’s move to its final
destination, “school starts Sunday,” Kate
Hamrich said.
Celsius), which beats the
previous January to May
record set last year by 0.43
degrees.
Marketing Director
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Louis burgers
recalled by fan
T
onight’s the night.
The first Third Thursday Street
Festival of 2016 begins at 5 p.m.
Always a good time.
••••••
The recent New
Yorker story by
Kathryn Schulz about
former Sheridan resident Zarif Khan has
flooded local emails
with digital links to
“Hamburger Louis”
PUBLISHER’S aka “Tamale Louis.”
(Why, I’ve even got
NOTEBOOK
the “hard” copy — a
|
magazine via subStephen Woody
scription.)
His shop was a
fixture in downtown Sheridan for generations. He died in 1964. An Afghan
immigrant, he worked hard every day
to provide food to a devoted clientele.
He was frugal, saving money that provided a basis for family members to also
assimilate into the American culture
and become local hospitality entrepreneurs.
Longtime newspaper pal Jim Hicks
writes in his popular Buffalo Bulletin
column that while he was growing, a
trip to “the big city,” always meant
bringing back a sack of burgers. (They
likely didn’t make it back to Johnson
County, consumed en route.)
Bill Baas recalls he ate “hundreds” of
burgers from Louis.
The New Yorker story mentioned how
there was some mystery in the recipe;
why they tasted so good. It’s said that
he cut his own meat, added his own
tallow/fat, or, according to Baas, “there
was something special in the grease.”
Baas also says that the Louis’ griddle,
used daily, seven days a week, 365 days
a year, was essential to his success.
“Fried burgers just taste better,” he
says. His burger stand was located on
the south side of Grinnell with a service
window, and doors in the front and
back.
The recipe was simple, Baas says:
burgers with mustard, pickles and
onions. “I would watch his hands chop
the onions and pickles and he was fast.
He told me one day that he had worn
out three chopping boards.”
Baas left Sheridan after his junior
year at Sheridan High School, relocating to Chattanooga, Tennessee. He is
chairman of Candela Corp., a supplier
of lighting and accessories to the electrical industry with three nationwide
distribution centers. He and Terri
Baas live at the Powder Horn and in
California. Louis’ burgers provide an
enduring memory of growing up in
Sheridan.
“I never once ate a tamale. I couldn’t
get back the burgers. I always had two.”
••••••
“Mr. Hockey,” Gordie Howe, died last
week at 88.
Former Lovell and Thermopolis newspaper publisher Pat Schmidt posed the
question about the difference between
a “hat trick” and a Gordie Howe hat
trick.
The hat trick is three goals by one
player; the Gordie Howe hat trick is a
goal, an assist and a fight.
••••••
Tip of the golf visor…..
Homer “Scotty” Scott and Janet
Diebold Scott were married 60 years ago
today.
My. What a deep and broad reach
they’ve had with local philanthropy,
business and ongoing engagement to lift
the community in so many ways.
Congratulations!
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen
Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Chad Riegler
Production
Manager
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
QUOTABLE |
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“He was a homosexual and he was trying to pick up men. He
would walk up to them and then he would maybe put his arm
around ‘em or something and maybe try to get them to dance a
little bit or something.”
— Jim Van Horn, 71, who told The Associated Press that he
saw Orlando nightclub shooter Omar Mateen repeatedly at the
bar Pulse and talked to him once.
“If someone seriously thinks we don’t know who we’re fighting, if there’s anyone out there who thinks we’re confused about
who our enemies are, that would come as a surprise to the thousands of terrorists we’ve taken off the battlefield.”
— President Barack Obama, who blasted Donald Trump’s
anti-Muslim rhetoric as dangerous and contrary to American
values.
“That’s the kind of anger he should have for the shooter and
these killers that shouldn’t be here.”
— Donald Trump to supporters at a rally in Greensboro,
North Carolina, after noting that President Barack Obama
appeared to be angrier at him than at Orlando gunman Omar
Mateen.
Trump exploits Orlando tragedy to smear Muslims and Obama
H
ow long will it be before American
Muslims are forced to wear yellow
badges with the star and crescent?
Donald Trump, the man
Republicans will nominate to be president, has already said that, in addition to
banning Muslim immigration, he would
also look at closing mosques and forcing
Muslims already in the country to register
with the authorities.
And now, exploiting the weekend’s massacre in Orlando, Trump
is claiming “thousands”
of American Muslims,
protected and hidden by
their coreligionists, are
prepared to commit even
greater carnage because
of their hatred for the
country in which they
DANA
live.
“You have many,
MILBANK
many, many people,
|
right now living in the
United States who are
worse than him, who are
more hateful than him,” Trump said on
Fox News Monday morning. Trump determined that “you have thousands of shooters like this, with the same mentality out
there in this country.”
The presumptive nominee, speculating
that the trouble could be “in their religion,” said “you have many, many people,
thousands of people, already in our country that are sick with hate. And people that
are around them, Muslims, know who they
are, largely.”
If that were too subtle, Roger Stone,
Trump’s confidant and informal adviser,
said on Sirius XM that Huma Abedin, a
Muslim who is a top Hillary Clinton adviser, could be a Saudi spy or a “terrorist
agent.”
Trump also floated, again, the notion
that President Obama is in cahoots with
DROP US A LINE |
The Sheridan Press welcomes letters to
the editor. The decision to print any submission is completely at the discretion of
the managing editor and publisher.
Letters must be signed and include an
address and telephone number – which
will not be published – for verification
purposes. Unsigned letters will not be
published, nor form letters, or letters
that we deem libelous, obscene or in
bad taste. Email delivery of letters into
the Press works best and have the best
chance of being published.
Letters should not exceed 400 words.
the terrorist enemy — thus accusing the
commander in chief of the capital crime
of treason. Trump said Obama “should
immediately resign in disgrace” if he
refuses to use the phrase “radical Islamic
terrorism.” Obama, like George W. Bush
before him, avoids words that needlessly
inspire further radicalization. But Trump
saw a conspiracy, telling Fox that Obama
perhaps “gets it better than anybody
understands” and “has something else in
mind. ... There’s something going on. It’s
inconceivable.”
Pressed on NBC about this inconceivable
“something,” Trump said that “there are
many people that think maybe he doesn’t
want to get it.”
Trump has long floated versions of
Obama-as-Muslim-traitor conspiracy
theories for years. Last year, he said of
Obama’s decision to allow Syrian refugees
into the United States: “A lot of people
think it’s evil intentions.” At another point
Trump said Obama was “emphatic on
not solving the problem” with terrorism
because “there’s something we don’t know
about.”
Before that, of course, was his questioning of Obama’s birth: “He doesn’t have
a birth certificate or, if he does, there’s
something on that certificate that is very
bad for him. Now somebody told me ...
that where it says ‘religion’ it might have
‘Muslim.’”
The Orlando tragedy has allowed Trump
to shift the conversation from his racist
attacks on a federal judge of Mexican
descent. But the shocking carnage in
Orlando doesn’t lend itself to simple politicization. The killer appeared to have
mental problems and, while claiming allegiance to Islamic State, he was obviously
motivated by anti-gay hatred. And Trump
couldn’t blame immigrants because the
killer was American-born.
Still, Trump tried, saying in a prepared
speech Monday afternoon — using the
teleprompter he once forswore -- that “the
only reason the killer was in America in
the first place was because we allowed
his family to come here” and that Muslim
communities must “turn in the people who
they know are bad — and they do know
where they are.”
As part of his conspiracy theory spinning on Fox Monday morning, Trump
declared that “ISIS took over our passport
machines. They make passports now better
than we do.” (Actually, U.S. intelligence
has warned that terrorists might be able
to make authentic-looking passports with
their own machines.)
Trump, as I’ve written, has spread dozens of conspiracy theories, many with racist overtones and often couched by saying
he’s merely repeating what “some” or “a
lot” of people think — much as he denies
culpability when he retweets the work of
white supremacists.
Before the Orlando shooting, Mitt
Romney told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer that he
worried about Trump’s “trickle-down racism.” Good phrase, though Trump is more
accurately tapping underground racism
and causing it to gush freely.
Trump, hours after the Orlando slaying, tweeted: “Appreciate the congrats for
being right on radical Islamic terrorism.”
He does deserve congratulations — for
a new wave of radicalization. Trump’s
anti-Muslim hostility makes it easier for
terrorists to recruit and to inspire disaffected young Muslims. Trump warned
Monday that the terrorism seen in Orlando
“is going to get worse and worse” — and,
thanks to him, that’s probably true.
DANA MILBANK is a political reporter for The Washington Post and
has authored two books on national political campaigns and the national
political parties.
IN WASHINGTON |
The best-read letters are those that stay
on a single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
com
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. John Barrasso
Sen. Mike Enzi
307 Dirksen
Senate
Senate
Russell
Office Building
Building 379A
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably
to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
SCSD3 announces
fourth-quarter
honor roll
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan
County School District 3 officials
recently released the list of students named to the Honor Roll
and Board of Trustee’s Honor
Roll for the fourth quarter.
The following students had a
3.0-3.49 GPA and were named to
the Honor Roll.
Seventh grade —William Dyess,
Harry Fort, Cameron
Klatt
Eighth grade — Colin Malli
Freshmen — Ryan Deyess,
Kristin Klaahsen, Cassidy
McBride
Sophomores — Derick Buhr,
Riley Malli, Shaye Neil
Junior — Sean Covall
Senior — Joe Atkinson
The following students had a
3.5-4.0 GPA and were named to
the Board of Trustees Honor Roll.
Seventh grade — Kerri Malli,
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Krista Malli, Charlynn Mercer
Eighth grade — McKenna
Auzqui, Ashlynn Fennema
Freshmen — Terissa McClure,
Taziree Smith
Sophomores — Clayton Auzqui,
Galen Kretschman
Juniors — Ida Clausen,
Flavia Ferrus Marimon, Kylar
Klaahsen, Clancy Kretschman,
Tommy Nimick, Cameron Weigle
Seniors — Sam Reinke, Tristan
Troll
Taking a
trip on the
train
Nine-year-old Amia
Koltiska climbs onto the
train with the help of
a BNSF GV^alVn crew member duringV 2016 BNSF
employee appreciation
ZkZciTuesday in Sheridan.
The private event was held
for BNSF employ-ees,
families and other guests
to ride on the exclu-sive
passenger cars from
Sheridan to Clearmont and
back.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Sheridan County Museum to host Tidbit Tuesday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Tidbit Tuesday presentations will continue on June 21
from 10 a.m. to noon at the Sheridan
County Museum.
The topic for the event will be dan-
delions and native flowers in Sheridan
County. The two-hour workshop will
include a story and a fun hands-on
activity that shares history with children. The program is for children 4-10
years old, but older children are welcome.
‘Collage with Neltje’
workshop set for June 25
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sagebrush Community Art
Center will host “Collage
with Neltje” on June 25
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Cost to attend is $60 for
a member and $70 for a
non-member.
Supports and glue will
be provided, including pictures from newspapers or
magazines and trinkets or
earrings.
Supplies will cover an
area approximately 20 inches by 15 inches.
Participants are encouraged to bring a sack lunch
or the class will go out to eat
during the one-hour lunch
break.
The Sagebrush
Community Art Center is
located at 201 E. Fifth St.
DARE recognizes
design contest winners
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The
Sheridan County Sheriff’s
Office received a new 2016
Toyota Tacoma, donated by
Fremont Toyota to use for
its D.A.R.E. program.
A competition was held
for Sheridan County
School Districts 12 and 3
ILIWKJUDGH'$5(
students to create a design
for the new vehicle.
Samantha Eliason won
first prize with Bridger
Dewey in second place and
a three-way tie for third
place was rewarded to
Annie Hoffmann, Hailey
Springsteen and Brooke
Sanders.
SHS class of 1953
to meet for lunch at
Holiday Inn on June 20
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan High School class of 1953
will meet for lunch at the Holiday Inn on June 20 at noon.
Lunch can be ordered off the menu and everyone is invited.
For more information call Lu Reeves at 674-9711.
The Holiday Inn is located at 1809 Sugarland Drive.
There is no cost to attend. An adult
or responsible teenager must accompany all children. To reserve a spot oU
for more information call the
Sheridan County Museum at 675-1150.
The Sheridan County Museum is
located at 850 Sibley Circle.
A5
Delivery
problems?
Call
The Sheridan Press
at 307-672-2431
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events
and the stories that will be
talked about today:
1. WHAT NIGHTCLUB
SHOOTER DID IN FINAL
HOURS BEFORE RAMPAGE
Orlando gunman Omar
Mateen apparently made a
series of Facebook posts in
which he raged against the
“filthy ways of the west,”
according to a U.S. Senate
committee letter.
2. OBAMA TO SEEK HEALING
IN ORLANDO
The U.S. president will offer
solace to Central Florida,
even as the political world
turns last weekend’s shooting into a fresh excuse to
fight about terrorism and
gun control.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
3. MUSLIM VIEW OF LGBT
PEOPLE IN SPOTLIGHT
AFTER ATTACK
Along with denouncing the
attack by the gunman on a
gay nightclub, Nihad Awad
of the Council on AmericanIslamic Relations expresses
unequivocal support for
LGBT civil rights.
4. AP: MINORITIES MISSING
IN MANY LEGISLATURES
An analysis by the AP finds
that minorities remain significantly underrepresented
in Congress and nearly every
state legislature, though they
comprise a growing share of
the U.S. population.
5. HOW DISNEY IS DEALING
WITH AFTERMATH OF
GATOR ATTACK
The entertainment giant is
reviewing whether to add
warning signs after an alligator killed a 2-year-old boy
from Nebraska by snatching
him out of shallow water at a
resort beach.
6. US COMMANDER IN
AFGHANISTAN TO ASSESS
WAR
Army Gen. John W.
Nicholson’s report on what
it’s going to take to defeat
the Taliban comes just days
after Obama authorized
more airstrikes against
insurgents.
7. CIA CHIEF ENVISIONS
EXTREMISTS’ FUTURE
TACTICS
John Brennan says Islamic
State militants are training
and attempting to deploy
operatives for further
attacks on the West and will
rely more on guerrilla-style
warfare.
8. THAT COKE ZERO IS
GOING TO COST YOU IN
PHILLY
The City Council is poised
to adopt a 1.5 cent per ounce
tax on sugary and diet
drinks, which would make
Philadelphia the first big
city with such a levy.
9. MICKEY MOUSE CHINA’S
LATEST STAR
Shanghai Disneyland, the
entertainment giant’s first
theme park in mainland
China, opens its gates with a
gala celebration, promising
to be “distinctly Chinese.”
10. OAKMONT THE COURSE
OF CHAMPIONS
One measure of a great
golf course is the quality
of its champions and the
Western Pennsylvania track
is regarded as the best, with
eight of its 11 major champions already in the Hall of
Fame.
Measuring for a family’s future
Volunteer Renae Morris measures a cut for siding during Habitat for Humanity of the Eastern Bighorns’ Women Build day
Saturday at Poplar Grove in Sheridan. The event was a volunteer effort for women to help build a home for local resident
Kathy Baker and her children.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Next volleyball tournament at
Whitney Park set for Saturday
SHERIDAN — The next community volleyball
tournament will be Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at Whitney Commons Park.
The outdoor event will feature teams of youth triples from the age of 12-18 at $15 per person to raise
money for the Cloud Peak Volleyball Club’s youth
club travel fees. T-shirts will be given to the first 20
teams registered and prizes will be awarded to the
top three finishers.
For more information or to register online visit
www.cloudpeakvolleyball.com or contact Dannette
Brinkerhoff at 248-0115 or email [email protected]
Whitney Commons Park is located on Paul
Street.
Young Riders Rodeo set for this
weekend
SHERIDAN— The Young Riders Rodeo will
take place Saturday at the Sheridan County
Fairgrounds from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The senior events (ages 14-18) will be chute dogging, barrel racing, pole bending, breakaway roping, goat tying, fast lane team roping and adult/
youth team roping.
The junior events (ages 10-13) will include steer
riding, barrel racing, pole bending, goat tying,
breakaway roping, flag race and three no-horse
events — dummy roping, calf scramble and fast
lane dummy roping.
The buckaroo events (ages 5-9) and Pee-Wee (up
to age 4) events will include steer roping, barrel
racing, pole bending, flag race and no-horse events
— goat tail tying, dummy roping, stick horse race
and fast lane dummy roping.
Entries are due by June 11. There is no charge
for spectators. For more information contact Judy
Ferguson at 752-2534 or (406) 757-2241 or email [email protected]
The Sheridan County Fairgrounds is located at
1753 Victoria St.
VA organizing ‘Welcome Home’ event
for Saturday
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Veterans Affairs
health care system with the Transition and Care
Management Office will hold an annual “Welcome
Home” event for veterans Saturday from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. in the auditorium.
The event will include a U.S. Air Force honor
guard presentation, family barbecue, raffle and
guest speaker.
For more information contact the TCM office
at 675-7061 or email [email protected] to
RSVP for the event.
The Sheridan VA Medical Center is located at
1898 Fort Road.
‘Sweeties on Wheelies’
to take annual ride Saturday
SHERIDAN — The annual “Sweeties on
Wheelies” all women motorcycle run will take
place Saturday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. This event will
start at the Holiday Inn’s south parking lot and
the 93-mile ride will travel through Sheridan to
Ucross, Buffalo, Lake DeSmet, Story and Big Horn
before returning to Sheridan.
The cost to register is $65 and includes a T-shirt,
poker hand and dinner.
For more information and to register see http://
sweetieonwheelies.org or call Cyndy Wheler at 2692113 or Jill Knox at 267-4498.
The Holiday Inn is located at 1809 Sugarland
Drive.
FRIDAY EVENTS |
• All day, Big Horn Mountain Wild and Scenic Trail Run, Scott Bicentennial park, Dayton
• 5-7 p.m., Juried show artists reception and awards, Sagebrush Community Art Center, 201 E. Fifth St.
• 7:30 p.m., “Thoroughly Modern Millie Jr.,” WYO Theater, 42 N. Main St., $12 for adults, $10 for students
NOTABLE OBITUARIES |
Gregory Rabassa, translator of
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, dies
NEW YORK (AP) — Gregory Rabassa, a translator of worldwide influence and esteem who helped
introduce Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Julio Cortazar
and other Latin American authors to millions of
English-language readers, has died.
A longtime professor at Queens College,
Rabassa died Monday at a hospice in Branford,
Connecticut. He was 94 and died after a brief illness, according to his daughter, Kate Rabassa
Wallen.
Rabassa was an essential gateway to the 1960s
Latin American “boom,” when such authors as
Garcia Marquez, Cortazar and Mario Vargas Llosa
became widely known internationally. He worked
on the novel that helped start the boom, Cortazar’s
“Hopscotch,” for which Rabassa won a National
Book Award for translation. He also worked on the
novel which defined the boom, Garcia Marquez’s
“One Hundred Years of Solitude,” a monument of
20th century literature.
Garcia Marquez often praised Rabassa, saying he
regarded the translation of “Solitude” as a work of
art in its own right.
“He’s the godfather of us all,” Edith Grossman,
the acclaimed translator of “Don Quixote” and
several Garcia Marquez books, told The Associated
Press on Tuesday. “He’s the one who introduced
Latin-American literature in a serious way to the
English speaking world.”
Rabassa’s other translations included Garcia
Marquez’s “The Autumn of the Patriarch,” Vargas
Llosa’s “Conversation in the Cathedral” and Jorge
Amado’s “Captains of the Sand.” In 2001, Rabassa
received a lifetime achievement award from
the PEN American Center for contributions to
Hispanic literature. He was presented a National
Medal of Arts in 2006 for translations which “continue to enhance our cultural understanding and
enrich our lives.”
Survivors include his second wife, Clementine;
daughters Kate Rabassa Wallen and Clara Rabassa,
and granddaughters Jennifer Wallen and Sarah
Wallen.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On June 16, 1963,
the world’s first female
space traveler, Valentina
Tereshkova, 26, was launched
into orbit by the Soviet Union
aboard Vostok 6; she spent 71
hours in flight, circling the
Earth 48 times before returning safely.
On this date:
In 1567, Mary, Queen of
Scots, was imprisoned in
Lochleven Castle in Scotland.
(She escaped almost a year
later but ended up imprisoned
again.)
In 1858, accepting the
Illinois Republican Party’s
nomination for the U.S.
Senate, Abraham Lincoln said
the slavery issue had to be
resolved, declaring, “A house
divided against itself cannot
stand.”
In 1903, Ford Motor Co.
was incorporated.
In 1911, IBM had its beginnings as the ComputingTabulating-Recording Co. was
incorporated in New York
State.
In 1933, the National
Industrial Recovery Act
became law with President
Franklin D. Roosevelt’s signature. (The Act was later
struck down by the U.S.
Supreme Court.) The Federal
Deposit Insurance Corp.
was founded as President
Roosevelt signed the Banking
Act of 1933.
In 1941, National Airport
(now Ronald Reagan
Washington National
Airport) opened for business
with a ceremony attended
by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt.
In 1943, comedian Charles
Chaplin, 54, married his
fourth wife, 18-year-old Oona
O’Neill, daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill, in
Carpinteria, California.
In 1944, George Stinney,
a 14-year-old black youth,
became the youngest person
to die in the electric chair as
the state of South Carolina
executed him for the murders of two white girls, Betty
June Binnicker, 11, and Mary
Emma Thames, 7.
In 1956, poets Sylvia Plath
and Ted Hughes were married
in London.
In 1978, President Jimmy
Carter and Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos ratified the
Panama Canal treaties.
In 1987, a jury in New York
acquitted Bernhard Goetz of
attempted murder in the subway shooting of four youths
he said were going to rob him;
however, Goetz was convicted
of illegal weapons possession.
(In 1996, a civil jury ordered
Goetz to pay $43 million to
one of the persons he’d shot.)
In 1996, Russian voters
went to the polls in their
first independent presidential election; the result was
a runoff between President
Boris Yeltsin (the eventual
winner) and Communist challenger Gennady Zyuganov.
Sportscaster Mel Allen died
in Greenwich, Connecticut, at
age 83.
Ten years ago: The House
rejected a timetable for pulling U.S. forces out of Iraq,
256-153. In Iraq, three 101st
Airborne Division soldiers
were killed in an attack while
two others were abducted
(their mutilated bodies were
found three days later).
Five years ago: U.S. Rep.
Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y.,
announced his resignation
from Congress, bowing to the
furor caused by his sexually
charged online dalliances
with a former porn actress
and other women.
One year ago: Real
estate mogul Donald Trump
launched his campaign for
the Republican presidential
nomination.
Thought for Today: “Our
memories are card indexes
consulted and then returned
in disorder by authorities
whom we do not control.” —
Cyril Connolly, British critic
(1903-1974).
ALMANAC
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
Roasting hot
dogs at Girl
Scout camp
Patricia “Trish” N. Fleming
Patricia “Trish” N. Fleming, 62, of Ranchester, died
Tuesday, June 14, 2016, at her residence.
A memorial service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday, June 18, 2016, at the United Pentecostal
Church, 720 S. Sheridan Ave., with Pastor Michael
Fleming officiating. Catered food and fellowship will
follow.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Wednesday
• Activated fire alarm, 3000
block Coffeen Avenue, 11:09
a.m.
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 800 block
Leopard Street, 5:31 p.m.
• Filthy premises, West
Burkitt Street, 9:11 a.m.
• Malicious destruction,
Avoca Court, 9:21 a.m.
• Suspicious circumstance,
Mydland Road, 10:04 a.m.
• Dog at large, Kendrick
Park, 10:37 a.m.
• Animal found, Kendrick
Park, 10:37 a.m.
GOOSE VALLEY FIRE
• Mental subject, Coffeen
DEPARTMENT
Avenue, 10:52 a.m.
Wednesday
• Accident, South Custer
• Medical, 2100 block Dana Street, 11:47 a.m.
Avenue, 7:40 p.m.
• Animal welfare, South
Main Street, 11:55 a.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
• Theft (cold), West Works
AMBULANCE
Street, 12:24 p.m.
Wednesday
• Parking complaint,
• No reports available at
South Main Street, 1:04 p.m.
press time.
• Dog at large, West 14th
Street, 1:07 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
• Civil dispute, Marion
HOSPITAL
Court, 1:16 p.m.
Tuesday
• Sex battery (cold),
• Admissions — Jessie L
Holmes Avenue, 2:31 p.m.
Bennick, Sheridan; Griffin
• Assist agency, Delphi
Thomas Bennick, Sheridan
Avenue, 2:43 p.m.
• No dismissals reported.
• Dog at large, Weeping
Wednesday
Willow Court, 2:58 p.m.
• Admissions — Bohdie
• DUI (citizen report),
Lynn Longhofer, Sheridan
Main Street, 3:11 p.m.
• Dismissals — Jessie L
• Animal injured,
Bennick, Sheridan; Griffin
Kentucky Avenue, 4:17 p.m.
Thomas Bennick, Sheridan
• Harassment, Dunnuck
Street, 5 p.m.
SHERIDAN POLICE
• Medical, Clarendon
DEPARTMENT
Avenue, 5:49 p.m.
Information in the police
• Burglar alarm, Broadway
reports is taken from the
Street, 5:52 p.m.
SPD website.
• Barking dog, Highland
Wednesday
Avenue, 7:10 p.m.
• Welfare check, Sugarland
• Dog bite, Fourth Avenue
Drive, 12:09 a.m.
East, 8:13 p.m.
• Driving under suspen• Suspicious circumstance,
sion, Wyoming Avenue, 2:06 North Main Street, 8:48 p.m.
a.m.
• Removal of subject,
• Welfare check, North
North Main Street, 9:52 p.m.
Main Street, 5:43 a.m.
• Domestic, South Main
• Dog at large, South
Street, 9:54 p.m.
Sheridan Avenue, 6:35 a.m.
• Barking dog, Sumner
• Malicious mischief,
Street, 11:15 p.m.
Avoca Court, 7:02 a.m.
• Welfare check, North
• Barking dog, Littlehorn
Main Street, 11:42 p.m.
Drive, 7:35 a.m.
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Wednesday
• Welfare check, Dana
Avenue, 2:06 p.m.
• Harassment, Main Street,
Dayton, 3:19 p.m.
• Neighbor dispute, Dana
Avenue, 8:27 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance,
Willow Street, Big Horn,
11:01 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until the
individuals have appeared
in court.
Wednesday
• Marie Ann Mclean, 29,
Sheridan, probation violation/revocation, circuit
court, arrested by SCSO
• Carla Gail Jefferson, 53,
Sheridan, probation violation/revocation, circuit
court, arrested by SCSO
• Robert Harry Neuman,
59, Sheridan, warrant, circuit court, arrested by SPD
• David Paul Showers, 26,
Sheridan, warrant, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
• Adam Charles Helvik, 29,
Sheridan, failure to maintain lane of travel, DWUI,
circuit court, arrested by
SPD
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 60
Female inmate count: 7
Inmates at treatment facilities (not counted in daily
inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 4
Number of book-ins for
the previous day: 5
Number of releases for the
previous day: 2
82
Partly sunny and Partly sunny and
warmer
cooler
51
93
Almanac
54
77
Temperature
High/low .........................................................81/47
Normal high/low ............................................76/46
Record high .............................................98 in 1931
Record low ...............................................36 in 1991
Precipitation (in inches)
46
79
Wednesday ..................................................... 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.30"
Normal month to date .................................... 1.23"
Year to date .................................................... 7.76"
Normal year to date ....................................... 7.28"
Rise
Set
Today
Friday
Saturday
5:21 a.m.
5:22 a.m.
5:22 a.m.
8:56 p.m.
8:56 p.m.
8:57 p.m.
Today
Friday
Saturday
Full
Rise
Set
5:20 p.m.
6:18 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
3:18 a.m.
3:50 a.m.
4:26 a.m.
Last
New
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
48/78
Ranchester
49/82
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
57/86
Basin
54/87
48/82
June 20
June 27
July 4
July 11
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
Clearmont
53/83
Story
47/77
Gillette
51/84
Buffalo
53/80
Worland
52/89
Wright
55/84
Kaycee
53/82
Thermopolis
53/87
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
48/81
Dayton
51/82
Lovell
54/83
First
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Wednesday................ 0.00"
Hardin
51/85
Broadus
55/84
46
The Sun
The Moon
Shown is Friday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Friday's highs.
Mostly sunny
and nice
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Wednesday
National Weather for Friday, June 17
MONDAY
Billings
50/81
48
Breakfast
Estimated jackpot:
$169,000,000
Regional Weather
SUNDAY
SATURDAY
Mostly sunny
BIG
Winning numbers:
4-22-24-31-33;
Power Ball 10
Power Play 2X
REPORTS |
FRIDAY
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Here are the results
of Wednesday’s
Power Ball
lottery drawing:
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Mainly clear
A7
DEATH NOTICE |
Seven-year-old Cypress Nixon
roasts her hot dog over the
campfire during the Girl Scouts’
Camp Rowena Wednesday
at the Poulson Griffith youth
camp on Big Goose Road. The
day camp is designed to teach
camp skills and safety to girls.
Camp Rowena has been held
every year at Poulson Griffith
since the 1960s.
TONIGHT
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
81/54/pc
84/50/s
82/55/s
78/52/pc
76/50/t
84/56/t
83/54/s
72/41/t
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
88/55/pc
90/52/s
87/58/s
86/54/pc
79/48/s
93/57/s
87/57/s
74/39/s
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
77/50/pc
87/48/pc
87/56/pc
75/49/pc
78/50/pc
80/49/pc
86/54/pc
71/39/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
79/45/s
84/61/t
84/47/s
85/54/s
80/50/s
90/61/t
78/58/t
66/36/t
Sat.
Hi/Lo/W
85/50/s
91/60/s
87/51/s
90/54/s
84/52/s
97/67/s
87/58/s
67/35/pc
Sun.
Hi/Lo/W
85/48/pc
85/56/pc
87/48/pc
87/52/pc
82/50/pc
96/60/pc
76/51/pc
63/33/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Friday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
Dem senator wages filibuster, claims progress on gun control
BY MARY CLARE JALONICK
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON (AP) — A
Democratic senator who
mourned the loss of 20 children in his home state of
Connecticut waged a roughly 15-hour filibuster into
the early hours Thursday,
asserting as he yielded the
floor that Republican leaders had committed to hold
votes on expanded gun background checks and a ban
on gun sales to suspected
terrorists.
With a compromise on
the gun issue still improbable, Sen. Chris Murphy
stood on the Senate floor
for most of Wednesday and
into Thursday. Speaking
in the wake of the mass
shooting early Sunday at a
Florida nightclub, Murphy
said he would remain there
“until we get some signal,
some sign that we can come
together.” He concluded the
filibuster at 2:11 a.m., EDT.
Although Murphy talked
optimistically about his
cause, it is unlikely the
amendments Democrats
are seeking will pass the
Republican-run Senate.
Murphy spent much of
the time speaking about
the shooting at Newtown,
Connecticut’s Sandy Hook
Elementary School in
December 2012. He finished
his filibuster by talking
at length about one of the
young boys who died there.
As Murphy had been
standing on the floor for
more than nine hours, his
own young sons, ages 4 and
7, briefly appeared in the
Senate gallery.
“I hope you’ll understand
some day why we’re doing
this,” Murphy said, address-
ing his oldest son from the
floor. “Trying and trying
and trying to do the right
thing is ultimately just as
important as getting the outcome in the end.”
Democrats have revived
the gun debate after 49
people were killed at a
nightclub in Orlando, the
worst such incident in modern history. The fight pits
strong proponents of the
Second Amendment right
to bear arms against those
arguing for greater restrictions on the ability to obtain
weapons.
Murphy’s call for the two
votes came as presumptive
Republican presidential
candidate Donald Trump
said he would meet with the
National Rifle Association
to discuss ways to block people on terrorism watch lists
or no-fly lists from buying
guns. The same day, Trump
told a rally in Georgia: “I’m
going to save your Second
Amendment.”
Murphy was joined by
more than 30 Democratic
colleagues on the floor,
many of whom angrily told
stories of mass shootings in
their own states and called
for action.
“The next time someone
uses a gun to kill one of
us, a gun that we could
have kept out of the hands
of a terrorist, then members of this Congress will
have blood on our hands,”
said Massachusetts Sen.
Elizabeth Warren.
Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y.,
asked: “Where is our
spine?”
Attempts at compromise
appeared to collapse within
hours of surfacing in the
Senate Wednesday, underscoring the extreme difficulty of resolving the divisive
issue five months from
November’s election. Sen.
Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.,
who had been involved
in talks with Sen. John
Cornyn, R-Texas, said there
was no resolution.
Murphy, 42, began speaking at 11:21 a.m., and was
showing few signs of fatigue
when the filibuster ended.
By Senate rules, he had to
stand at his desk the entire
time to maintain control of
the floor. When asked by
another senator how he was
feeling just before 7:30 p.m.,
Murphy said rehabilitation
from a back injury in his
20s had helped him build up
endurance.
Tourists and staff filled
the galleries past midnight, and Democratic
Sens. Richard Blumenthal
of Connecticut and Cory
Booker of New Jersey
stayed with Murphy on the
floor for most of the debate.
Like Murphy, Booker did
not sit down for the full 15
hours.
It’s been nearly a decade
since Congress made any
significant changes to
federal gun laws. In April
2007, Congress passed a law
to strengthen the instant
background check system
after a gunman at Virginia
Tech who killed 32 people
was able to purchase his
weapons because his mental health history was not
in the instant background
check database.
Murphy is seeking a
vote on legislation from
Feinstein that would let
the government bar sales
of guns and explosives to
people it suspects of being
terrorists. Feinstein offered
a similar version of the
amendment in December, a
day after an extremist couple killed 14 people in San
Bernardino, California, but
the Republican-run Senate
rejected the proposal on a
near party-line vote.
The Orlando shooter,
Omar Mateen, was added to
a government watch list of
individuals known or suspected of being involved in
terrorist activities in 2013,
when he was investigated
for inflammatory statements
to co-workers. But he was
pulled from that database
when that investigation was
closed 10 months later.
2016 SPRING SPORTS
FEMALE ATHLETES
OF THE YEAR
BAILEY BARD & CASSIDY ENLOE
JUSTINSHEELY|THESHERIDANPRESS
B2
SPORTS
RECORD-SETTING SENIORS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
Bard, Enloe set the tone for Big Horn’s back-to-back state titles
BY MIKE PRUDEN
[email protected]
BIG HORN — It took a total team
effort to bring a second straight
track and field state championship
to Big Horn High School this spring.
Bailey Bard and Cassidy Enloe will
be the first to tell you that.
Their coaches will echo the sentiments, and truthfully, that’s all
the two seniors really wanted
as they wrapped up their high
school careers.
But they got so much more.
“What’s great about track,
whether event you’re doing,
the results are black and white.
You’re either hitting your
marks or you’re not,” Big Horn
track coach Kirk McLaughlin
said. “With Bailey and Cassidy,
the marks they’re hitting,
there’s the truth. That’s all the
proof you need as to why you
put in extra time.”
A team title was the overall
goal, but it ended up being
icing on a cake filled with
individual performances
that turned heads across the
entire state.
Bard and Enloe utterly dominated
the competition at the state meet,
and that might be putting it gently.
The duo combined for seven gold
medals at the 2016 2A state track
and field championships. The two
seniors alone scored 75 points for
the Lady Rams, which alone
would have taken second place
in the 2A team standings.
For Bard, winning became an
expectation.
She took home three gold
medals in 2015, along with
a silver medal in the 200meter dash. Her trophy
case was already full.
Bard was forced to come
into 2016 with a different
mindset. Not, necessarily better or worse. Just different.
The first objective was
turning her lone second-place into a first. Next,
it became improving her
times and, she hoped, setting records.
SEE TRACK, PAGE B4
2016 Athletes
Of the Year
Clark
records
no score
in third
go-round
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — After a
promising first two days of
the College National Finals
Rodeo, Sheridan College
bronc rider Tayte Clark
stumbled in his performance Wednesday.
In the third go-round,
Clark recorded a no score
after rides of 65.5 and 71.5 in
rounds one and two, respectively. Clark is still sitting
in a good position, in seventh place with 137 points.
He is 78.5 points behind first
place.
The Sheridan College
men’s team is tied in
39th place heading into
Thursday.
The CNFR will wrap up
Saturday night.
Phil Mickelson keeps chasing elusive US Open
time. This is the tournament I want to win the
most to complete the four majors. There’s no
question. I have to put that out of my head and
OAKMONT, Pa. (AP) — One year before
try to execute and be patient and not think
Jordan Spieth was born, Phil Mickelson made
about results.
his professional debut with a 68 in the 1992 U.S.
“You start thinking about results, you’ll
Open at Pebble Beach and was two shots out of never play your best golf.”
the lead. The next day, he shot 81 and missed
the cut.
All these years later, Mickelson is still chasing the one major he thought he would have
won by now.
He turns 46 on Thursday when the U.S. Open
returns to Oakmont for the ninth time, and
Phil Mickelson
that only adds to the urgency. No one that old
Golfer
has ever won the U.S. Open. Only three players that old have won a major — Julius Boros,
Jack Nicklaus and Old Tom Morris.
But the only time Mickelson showed his age
Oakmont is enough to grab everyone’s attenis when he flew home to San Diego for the
tion. Reputed to be the toughest golf course
eighth-grade graduation of daughter Sophia.
in America, it has all the traditional elements
“It’s just important for me to be there for that required for the major billed as the toughest
stuff,” Mickelson said Wednesday. “At 46 years test in golf — tight fairways, thick rough, punold now, come tomorrow, those are the differishing bunkers, fast greens.
ence that I’ll have, where a lot of the young
The only hope was from the weather, with
guys in their 20s don’t really have to think
thunderstorms in the forecast for the first few
about it yet. But it’s also brought me some of
days.
the greatest joy in my life.”
“Rain or no rain on this golf course, it’s still
The U.S. Open? Not so much.
a very, very hard test of golf,” Rory McIlroy
His six runner-up finishes are a record. His
said.
double bogey on the 72nd hole at Winged Foot
Adam Scott showed up at Oakmont a week
is the one moment that still eats at him. And
ago to prepare and played in firm, fast conit’s hard for him to ignore the significance of
ditions. It rained that night, and he returned
winning a U.S. Open, which is all that keeps
for a practice round with McIlroy and found a
him from the career Grand Slam.
more forgiving course.
“I could BS you and tell you I don’t think
“Both of us probably made five or six birdies
about it,” he said. “No, I think about it all the
each that day,” Scott said.
France to deport
20 Russians for
violence at Euro 2016
BY DOUG FERGUSON
AP GOLF WRITER
‘I view this week as a great opportunity
to complete something that would be
historic in my mind in a career.’
BY ROB HARRIS
AP GLOBAL SOCCER WRITER
LENS, France (AP) — French authorities will deport 20 Russian men next
week for their role in the violence
that has marred the first week of the
European Championship.
Stephane Bouillon, prefect for the
region that includes the southern
French city of Marseille where the
worst outbreak of violence in Euro
If anything makes Mickelson feel relaxed
going into this U.S. Open, it might be what has
transpired off the golf course. He was named
in a federal complaint that accused Las Vegas
gambler Billy Walters and a former board
member of Dean Foods Co. of making tens of
millions of dollars in illicit stock trades.
The government claimed Mickelson only
benefited from the misdeeds of others and did
not charge him. He agreed to repay the $931,000
he made in a single trade of Dean Foods in the
summer of 2012.
Since then, Mickelson played well at
Memorial and was runner-up last week at the
St. Jude Classic, which he hopes will give him
momentum going into Oakmont.
A coincidence? Maybe.
“It might have something to do with the
fact that it’s behind me that I’ve played well
the last two weeks, and I feel like I’m playing
stress-free and much better golf,” he said.
“That might have something to do with it. I
don’t know. But I’m excited that it’s behind
me. I’m excited I’m at one of my great opportunities.
“I view this week as a great opportunity to
complete something that would be historic in
my mind in a career.”
Mickelson doesn’t mind the difficulty of
Oakmont, even though he hasn’t done well in
his two previous U.S. Opens here. He finished
18 shots out of the lead in 1994 and missed the
cut in 2007 when he played with a bone bruise
from chipping too much out of the rough
during a scouting trip to Oakmont.
This time, Mickelson hasn’t done a lot of
chipping.
2016 took place, said Thursday that the
unnamed men will be deported Monday.
Bouillon said they are suspected of
“participation in skirmishes linked to
the England-Russia game on June 11 in
Marseille” and are currently being held
in a detention center.
The men were among 43 Russian fans
detained Tuesday after their bus was
stopped by French police near the town
of Mandelieu in a check for hooligans.
UEFA has already told Russian soc-
cer authorities that their team could
be kicked out of Euro 2016 if there’s a
repeat of the violence that surrounded its match last Saturday against
England.
Of particular concern to Europe’s
governing body is that Russian fans
stormed a section of English fans inside
the stadium.
SEE FANS, PAGE B4
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
Dray Day: Green vows to be better for Warriors in Game 6
BY TIM REYNOLDS
AP BASKETBALL WRITER
CLEVELAND (AP) — For all the criticism of Golden
State’s Draymond Green and his penchant for committing
flagrant fouls during these playoffs, Wednesday may have
brought the harshest words yet.
The critic: Green himself.
Saying he let the Warriors down and that he was a “terrible teammate,” Green spoke on how it pained him to be
suspended for Game 5 of the NBA Finals — and how he
will make amends Thursday night in Game 6, when the
Warriors visit the Cleveland Cavaliers and get a second
shot at winning what would be their second straight championship.
“I owe to my teammates to come back and give all that I
have, all that I can do to better this situation,” Green said.
“I have strong belief that if I play Game 5, we win. But I
didn’t because I put myself in a situation where I wasn’t
able to play.”
Golden State leads the series 3-2, but now knows it will
play the rest of the series without starting center Andrew
Bogut because of a left knee injury. Green — who missed
Game 5 because of how many flagrants he has accrued
during the playoffs — will be called upon to play some center in Game 6, as he has plenty of times in this postseason
already.
“Draymond is the spirit of what we do,” said Warriors
guard Stephen Curry, the NBA’s two-time reigning MVP.
“You see it out on the floor.”
This series is back in Cleveland largely because LeBron
James and Kyrie Irving could not be stopped in Game
5, when the Warriors’ best defender was watching the
Cavaliers’ star duo score 41 points apiece from a suite at
the adjacent baseball stadium that the Oakland Athletics
call home. Green alone could not have stopped their
onslaught, but it surely stands to reason that life would
have been more difficult for Cleveland if he was in uniform.
With Green watching, the A’s won by nine.
Without Green playing, the Warriors lost by 15. He’s
already spoken to his teammates about his mistakes, and
made clear that watching Game 5 from next door left him
hurting.
“Everybody’s helped with Draymond being on the floor,”
Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “So that will be nice to
have him back. We missed him the other night. We were
disappointed in our performance without him. We thought
we could still get it done, but we didn’t. So now it’s time to
recharge the batteries and get ready.”
The straw that got Green suspended was when he took
a swipe at James’ groin area in Game 4. But when asked
what he expected when he sees Green in Game 6, James
showed he’s only focused on bigger pictures and no manoa-mano battle.
“My only job is to get this win, man,” James said.
Green met with reporters for about 11 minutes before
practice, and didn’t shy away from his mistakes in these
playoffs. Some thought he merited a suspension when he
kicked Oklahoma City’s Steven Adams in the groin area
during the Western Conference finals. The NBA upgraded
the foul and fined him after reviewing that play, and when
another flagrant was assessed after-the-fact for taking the
shot at James a suspension was automatic.
“I move on from the suspension. We move on. It was
Game 5. We’re here in Game 6,” Green said. “So it’s behind
us. We’ve got an opportunity to do something that, I don’t
know if it’s ever been done ... where you win a champion-
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Defensive drills at Sheridan College
Mark Gilbert smacks the floor at the start of a defensive-slide drill at the Sheridan College summer boys basketball camp Tuesday at the Bruce
Hoffman Golden Dome.
A really big hit in Japan: Suzuki picks off Rose’s total
TOKYO (AP) — Ichiro Suzuki’s latest milestone has been a really big hit
in Japan.
Newspapers published special editions for the morning rush hour, the
national broadcaster led with the
news, and fans and dignitaries paid
tribute Thursday after Suzuki raised
his career hits total in the Japanese
and North American major leagues
to 4,257, passing Pete Rose’s record
Major League Baseball total.
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe praised
Suzuki’s mark as “an amazing
record.”
“A Japanese athlete has once again
made a monumental contribution,”
Abe said, “and I feel tremendous
pride.”
The 42-year-old Suzuki singled in
the first inning against the San Diego
Padres and doubled in the ninth to
move past Rose, who had 4,256 hits
over 24 seasons. Suzuki had 1,278 hits
for Orix in Japan’s Pacific League
(1992-00) and the rest with the Seattle
Mariners, the New York Yankees and
his current team, the Miami Marlins.
In his 16th season in Major League
Baseball, Suzuki has 2,979 hits in the
majors and is rapidly approaching the
3,000-hit club.
“He is like a national treasure,”
office worker Tadahito Inaga said. “It
will be fun to watch him go for 3,000.”
Japan’s national broadcaster NHK
reported that Suzuki “broke the
record for most hits ever by a Major
League ballplayer” while acknowledging the record is unofficial because it
spans two professional leagues.
Rose has previously played down the
comparisons.
Rose was quoted recently by the
USA Today newspaper as saying: “I’m
not trying to take anything away from
Ichiro, he’s had a Hall of Fame career,
but the next thing you know, they’ll be
counting his high-school hits.”
The debate over Suzuki’s mark is
reminiscent of when Japanese slugger
Sadaharu Oh passed Hank Aaron’s
record of 755 home runs in 1977.
Japanese fans regarded it as a world
record but many in the U.S. said
the records were not equivalent, as
Japanese ballparks tended to be smaller.
Oh, who would finish his career in
Nippon Professional Baseball with 868
home runs, also had high praise for
Suzuki.
“To do this at 42, he is an inspiration
to baseball fans around the world,” Oh
said. “I look forward to following him
as he continues to get more hits.”
The Japanese professional baseball hit record is 3,085 held by Isao
Harimoto in 2,752 games.
400,000 fans greet Penguins at Stanley Cup parade
PITTSBURGH (AP) — The
Pittsburgh Penguins turned around a
once-disappointing season and fired a
coach before winning a fourth Stanley
Cup, adversity that seemed to make
Wednesday’s city-wide celebration
that much sweeter.
Fans lined the victory parade route
more than 10 deep as the players,
coaches, their families and support
staff rolled by in pickup trucks, convertibles and amphibious duck boats.
“We were slow at one time but,
man, were we fast when we finished,”
general manager Jim Rutherford told
the crowd at the end of the parade
route.
The parade was held seven years to
the day that the 2009 team celebrated
its Stanley Cup championship with a
downtown victory lap.
That parade drew about 375,000
spectators, and city and county public
safety officials said this one topped
out at 400,000.
“Well the one thing I’ve learned is
this is one crazy sports town,” said
coach Mike Sullivan, hired to replace
Mike Johnston when the team was
out of playoff contention in December.
Some fans arrived 12 hours ahead of
time for the 11:30 a.m. parade, despite
overnight drizzle.
The skies largely cleared, though,
as fans threw ribbons and confetti,
peered out of office windows and
from parking garage platforms, and
thronged the city’s main downtown
streets.
ship on someone else’s floor two years in a row.”
Teams have won at home in consecutive years, but to do
it in the same road locale has only happened once before
— the Boston Celtics celebrated on the Los Angeles Lakers’
home floor in back-to-back years, 1968 and 1969.
Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue was asked if his team might
try to prod Green a bit, knowing another flagrant foul or
two technicals in Game 6 would mean another suspension
for Game 7.
“You just play the game,” Lue said.
Green, who acknowledged that he’s been working on
keeping emotions in check, didn’t sound worried.
“I think I’ve got to come out and play my game regardless,” Green said. “But there are those little fine lines
where you just know you can’t cross them.”
If Cleveland wins, Game 7 is in Oakland, California on
Sunday.
If Cleveland loses, the Warriors will celebrate on the
Cavs’ home floor for the second consecutive year — exactly
one year to the day from last year’s clincher. And if Golden
State gets to spray champagne the cramped visiting locker
room at Quicken Loans Arena around again, those bubbles
will likely wash away most of not all the sting Green is
feeling for letting his team down.
“Nobody will remember this down the road if we get this
done tomorrow night,” Curry said. “So that’s really all we
need to talk about.”
GO ONLINE!
www.thesheridanpress.com
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TRACK: Stellar all-around athletes
FROM B2
“I still knew that I wanted to (set personal
records),” Bard said. “I just never really
thought of not working hard and improving, so it was just kind of second nature to
do those things.”
Enloe’s mindset this year was different,
too, and it was based on becoming the fieldevent counterpart to Bard’s sprinting.
Her 2015 wasn’t as eventful as her
gold-medal winning teammate’s. That’s
not to say Enloe didn’t impress — she took
third in long jump, fifth in triple jump and
was part of the champion 4x100-meter relay
team. It just wasn’t where Enloe wanted to
be.
She wanted titles.
“It’s the work she put in in the weight
room; it’s the work she put in for the last
three years in practice; she bought in when
coach McLaughlin pushed them,” coach
Andrew Marcure said of Enloe’s mindset to
get better. “She came a long way.”
Bard admitted she didn’t have too many
setbacks this year, which wasn’t too surprising based on her previous success. She
really just built on that success.
And while Enloe was building on her own
successes, there was one event that really
put things in motion toward her massive
finish.
Things weren’t going her way at the
Billings Invite in April.
“I was not competing well at all. It was
my worst meet of the season through
indoor and outdoor,” Enloe said. “I was
upset for a little bit, but it kind of helped
fuel me to refocus and keep thinking of the
goals I was headed toward.”
Overall, both girls wanted to get better. They wanted improvements on their
respective times, and they wanted their
desire to trickle down to the rest of the
Lady Rams team.
And it did.
While Bard and Enloe collected a massive
75 points, the rest of the team was right
behind them. The Lady Rams added an
additional 61.5 points, which still would
have placed them fourth overall. Their
136.5-point total was a 50-point improvement from 2015’s championship team.
“Expanding on the points difference,”
Bard said of the team goals. “Last year, we
didn’t win by a whole lot, but this year we
totally dominated. That was exciting.”
Still, team titles weren’t going to happen
without individual improvements, and
Bard’s and Enloe’s clearly stood out.
“We each want to contribute by doing
our absolute best, and each season we want
to improve our absolute best,” Enloe said.
“Coming into this year, we knew we had a
good chance of winning the championship,
but we also wanted to improve all of our
individual distances and times. That was a
big part of this season.”
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
By the numbers
15 State titles
2 Team titles
8 School records
You can look well beyond the state championship to determine what goals were
reached this season. Actually, you might
have to look backward. It didn’t happen
over night.
But the offseasons in the weight room,
the countless hours at practice, even the
recruitment of Enloe to join the team —
she quit soccer her sophomore year to run
track, a move that both McLaughlin and
Marcure were thankful for — it all showcased how far dedication can take someone.
While the girls collected seven state titles
in their senior year alone, they finished
with 15 during their high school careers,
with improvements each year. Bard went
from one title to four from freshman to
senior year, adding one each season.
Enloe jumped two gold medals in the last
ears
two years.
They finished with eight school records,
three regional records and one state record
— in the 4x100-meter relay with Morgan
Nance and Jill Mayer.
Bard and Enloe left their mark on not just
Big Horn track, but Wyoming high school
track and field as a whole. Their times will
remain imprinted in record books; their
championships will hang on the wall at the
high school. Their personalities, though,
will be missed.
“We’re going to miss their speed; we’re
going to miss their jumping ability and
everything,” McLaughlin said. “But, man,
the attitude, the leadership they brought to
it, that’s what we’re going to miss the most.
They were just awesome kids.”
FANS: Details of the policing operation disclosed by French interior ministry
FROM B2
English soccer’s governing body
has also been warned about the
behavior of its fans but the team’s
participation in the competition
was not under immediate threat
on Thursday despite a fresh outbreak of fan violence in France
that required riot police to deploy
tear gas.
Though English fans in Lille
were involved in further unrest
Wednesday night at Euro 2016,
UEFA has said there are no plans
for an emergency meeting of its
executive committee to discuss
any further warning or sanctions
against the English Football
Association.
Earlier this week, UEFA’s leadership ruled that England — along
with Russia — faced potential disqualification if there was a repeat
of the violence that surrounded
their match in Marseille.
“UEFA regrets the skirmishes which occurred in Lille last
night,” European soccer’s governing body said in a statement
Thursday. “Police forces made
several arrests and were quick to
restore order and keep the situation under control.”
The trouble in Lille on
Wednesday did not reach the
levels of Marseille where English
fans were involved in three days
of occasionally vicious fighting
with Russians.
Local authorities said police
made 37 arrests and detained 15
people in custody.
The French interior ministry
also disclosed details of the policing operation throughout the first
week of Euro 2016, saying 323 people had been detained, 196 jailed,
eight convicted and 24 expelled
from the country.
In Lille, some mobs of
Englishmen in Lille went on a
rampage searching for Russian
fans whose team played Slovakia
in the city.
Authorities said there were no
recorded brawls between British
and Russians.
But in a late-night charge,
French riot police sprayed tear
gas in an attempt to disperse
hundreds of England fans who
were staying in Lille ahead of
Thursday’s game in nearby Lens
against Wales.
SCOREBOARD |
NBA PLAYOFFS |
(SS;PTLZ,+;
)LZ[VM
-09:;96<5+
,(:;,95*65-,9,5*,
*SL]LSHUK+L[YVP[
:\UKH`(WYPS!*SL]LSHUK+L[YVP[
>LKULZKH`(WYPS!*SL]LSHUK+L[YVP[ -YPKH`(WYPS!*SL]LSHUK+L[YVP[ :\UKH`(WYPS!*SL]LSHUK+L[YVP[ ;VYVU[V0UKPHUH
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!0UKPHUH;VYVU[V 4VUKH`(WYPS!;VYVU[V 0UKPHUH
;O\YZKH`(WYPS!;VYVU[V0UKPHUH
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!0UKPHUH;VYVU[V
;\LZKH`(WYPS!;VYVU[V0UKPHUH
-YPKH`(WYPS !0UKPHUH;VYVU[V
:\UKH`4H`!;VYVU[V 0UKPHUH
4PHTP*OHYSV[[L
:\UKH`(WYPS!4PHTP*OHYSV[[L >LKULZKH`(WYPS!4PHTP*OHYSV[[L
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!*OHYSV[[L 4PHTP
4VUKH`(WYPS!*OHYSV[[L 4PHTP
>LKULZKH`(WYPS!*OHYSV[[L 4PHTP
-YPKH`(WYPS !4PHTP *OHYSV[[L :\UKH`4H`!4PHTP*OHYSV[[L
([SHU[H)VZ[VU
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!([SHU[H)VZ[VU
;\LZKH`(WYPS !([SHU[H )VZ[VU
-YPKH`(WYPS!)VZ[VU([SHU[H
:\UKH`(WYPS!)VZ[VU([SHU[H 6;
;\LZKH`(WYPS!([SHU[H)VZ[VU
;O\YZKH`(WYPS!([SHU[H)VZ[VU >,:;,95*65-,9,5*,
.VSKLU:[H[L/V\Z[VU
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!.VSKLU:[H[L/V\Z[VU
4VUKH`(WYPS!.VSKLU:[H[L/V\Z[VU
;O\YZKH`(WYPS!/V\Z[VU .VSKLU:[H[L :\UKH`(WYPS!.VSKLU:[H[L/V\Z[VU >LKULZKH`(WYPS!.VSKLU:[H[L/V\Z[VU
:HU(U[VUPV4LTWOPZ
:\UKH`(WYPS!:HU(U[VUPV4LTWOPZ
;\LZKH`(WYPS !:HU(U[VUPV 4LTWOPZ
-YPKH`(WYPS!:HU(U[VUPV 4LTWOPZ
:\UKH`(WYPS!:HU(U[VUPV4LTWOPZ 6RSHOVTH*P[`+HSSHZ
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!6RSHOVTH*P[`+HSSHZ
4VUKH`(WYPS!+HSSHZ6RSHOVTH*P[`
;O\YZKH`(WYPS!6RSHOVTH*P[`+HSSHZ
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!6RSHOVTH*P[` +HSSHZ
4VUKH`(WYPS!6RSHOVTH*P[`+HSSHZ
7VY[SHUK3(*SPWWLYZ
:\UKH`(WYPS!3(*SPWWLYZ7VY[SHUK >LKULZKH`(WYPS!3(*SPWWLYZ7VY[SHUK
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!7VY[SHUK 3(*SPWWLYZ
4VUKH`(WYPS!7VY[SHUK 3(*SPWWLYZ
>LKULZKH`(WYPS!7VY[SHUK3(*SPWWLYZ -YPKH`(WYPS !7VY[SHUK3(*SPWWLYZ
*65-,9,5*,:,40-05(3:
)LZ[VM
,(:;,95*65-,9,5*,
*SL]LSHUK([SHU[H
4VUKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK([SHU[H >LKULZKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK([SHU[H -YPKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK([SHU[H
:\UKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK([SHU[H
;VYVU[V4PHTP
;\LZKH`4H`!4PHTP;VYVU[V 6;
;O\YZKH`4H`!;VYVU[V 4PHTP 6;
:H[\YKH`4H`!;VYVU[V 4PHTP 4VUKH`4H` !4PHTP ;VYVU[V6;
>LKULZKH`4H`!;VYVU[V 4PHTP -YPKH`4H`!4PHTP;VYVU[V :\UKH`4H`!;VYVU[V4PHTP
>,:;,95*65-,9,5*,
6RSHOVTH*P[`:HU(U[VUPV
:H[\YKH`(WYPS!:HU(U[VUPV6RSHOVTH*P[` 4VUKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[` :HU(U[VUPV -YPKH`4H`!:HU(U[VUPV6RSHOVTH*P[` :\UKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[`:HU(U[VUPV ;\LZKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[` :HU(U[VUPV ;O\YZKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[`:HU(U[VUPV
.VSKLU:[H[L7VY[SHUK
:\UKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L7VY[SHUK
;\LZKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L7VY[SHUK
:H[\YKH`4H`!7VY[SHUK.VSKLU:[H[L
4VUKH`4H` !.VSKLU:[H[L7VY[SHUK6;
>LKULZKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L7VY[SHUK
*65-,9,5*,-05(3:
)LZ[VM
,(:;,95*65-,9,5*,
*SL]LSHUK;VYVU[V
;\LZKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK;VYVU[V
;O\YZKH`4H` !*SL]LSHUK;VYVU[V
:H[\YKH`4H`!;VYVU[V *SL]LSHUK
4VUKH`4H`!;VYVU[V*SL]LSHUK
>LKULZKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK;VYVU[V
-YPKH`4H`!*SL]LSHUK;VYVU[V
>,:;,95*65-,9,5*,
.VSKLU:[H[L6RSHOVTH*P[`
4VUKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[`.VSKLU:[H[L
>LKULZKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L6RSHOVTH*P[`
:\UKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[`.VSKLU:[H[L
;\LZKH`4H`!6RSHOVTH*P[`.VSKLU:[H[L ;O\YZKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L6RSHOVTH*P[`
:H[\YKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L6RSHOVTH*P[`
4VUKH`4H`!.VSKLU:[H[L 6RSHOVTH*P[`
-05(3:
)LZ[VM"_PMULJLZZHY`
.VSKLU:[H[L*SL]LSHUK
;O\YZKH`1\UL!.VSKLU:[H[L*SL]LSHUK
:\UKH`1\UL!.VSKLU:[H[L*SL]LSHUK
>LKULZKH`1\UL!*SL]LSHUK.VSKLU:[H[L -YPKH`1\UL!.VSKLU:[H[L*SL]LSHUK 4VUKH`1\UL!*SL]LSHUK.VSKLU:[H[L ;O\YZKH`1\UL!.VSKLU:[H[LH[*SL]LSHUK WT
_:\UKH`1\UL !*SL]LSHUKH[.VSKLU:[H[LWT
MLB |
(TLYPJHU3LHN\L
,HZ[+P]PZPVU
> 3 7J[ .)
)HS[PTVYL
·
)VZ[VU
·
;VYVU[V
;HTWH)H`
ñ
5L^@VYR
ñ
*LU[YHS+P]PZPVU
> 3 7J[ .)
2HUZHZ*P[`
·
*SL]LSHUK
·
+L[YVP[
*OPJHNV
ñ
4PUULZV[H
>LZ[+P]PZPVU
> 3 7J[ .)
;L_HZ
·
:LH[[SL
ñ
/V\Z[VU
ñ
3VZ(UNLSLZ
6HRSHUK
ñ
>LKULZKH`
*[email protected]@HURLLZ
;VYVU[V7OPSHKLSWOPH
)VZ[VU)HS[PTVYL
;HTWH)H`:LH[[SLPUUPUNZ
/V\Z[VU:[3V\PZ
*OPJHNV>OP[L:V_+L[YVP[
2HUZHZ*P[` *SL]LSHUK
3((UNLSZ4PUULZV[H
;L_HZ6HRSHUK
;O\YZKH`
:LH[[SLH[;HTWH)H`!WT
;L_HZH[6HRSHUK!WT
;VYVU[VH[7OPSHKLSWOPH!WT
)HS[PTVYLH[)VZ[VU!WT
[email protected]@HURLLZH[4PUULZV[H!WT
+L[YVP[H[2HUZHZ*P[`!WT
-YPKH`
;VYVU[V:HUJOLaH[)HS[PTVYL>YPNO[!
WT
*OPJHNV>OP[L:V_8\PU[HUHH[*SL]LSHUK)H\LY
!WT
:HU-YHUJPZJV:HTHYKaPQHH[;HTWH)H`(YJOLY
!WT
:LH[[SL0^HR\THH[)VZ[VU,SPHZ!WT
*PUJPUUH[P3HTIH[/V\Z[VU4J*\SSLYZ!
WT
[email protected]@HURLLZ;HUHRHH[4PUULZV[H+LHU!
WT
+L[YVP[-\STLYH[2HUZHZ*P[`=LU[\YH!
WT
;L_HZ/HTLSZH[:[3V\PZ>HJOH!WT
3((UNLSZ:OVLTHRLYH[6HRSHUK.YH]LTHU
!WT
:H[\YKH`
[email protected]@HURLLZH[4PUULZV[H!WT
3((UNLSZH[6HRSHUK!WT
:LH[[SLH[)VZ[VU!WT
;VYVU[VH[)HS[PTVYL!WT
*PUJPUUH[PH[/V\Z[VU!WT
:HU-YHUJPZJVH[;HTWH)H`!WT
;L_HZH[:[3V\PZ!WT
*OPJHNV>OP[L:V_H[*SL]LSHUK!WT
+L[YVP[H[2HUZHZ*P[`!WT
5H[PVUHS3LHN\L
,HZ[+P]PZPVU
> 3 7J[ .)
>HZOPUN[VU
·
5L^@VYR
4PHTP
7OPSHKLSWOPH
([SHU[H
ñ
*LU[YHS+P]PZPVU
> 3 7J[ .)
*OPJHNV
·
:[3V\PZ
ñ
7P[[ZI\YNO
ñ
4PS^H\RLL
*PUJPUUH[P
>LZ[+P]PZPVU
> 3 7J[ .)
:HU-YHUJPZJV
·
3VZ(UNLSLZ
*VSVYHKV
(YPaVUH
ñ
:HU+PLNV
>LKULZKH`
*[email protected]@HURLLZ
3(+VKNLYZ(YPaVUH
:HU+PLNV4PHTP
:HU-YHUJPZJV4PS^H\RLL
>HZOPUN[VU*OPJHNV*\IZPUUPUNZ
;VYVU[V7OPSHKLSWOPH
([SHU[H *PUJPUUH[PPUUPUNZ
[email protected][Z7P[[ZI\YNO
/V\Z[VU:[3V\PZ
;O\YZKH`
*PUJPUUH[PH[([SHU[H!WT
;VYVU[VH[7OPSHKLSWOPH!WT
7P[[ZI\YNOH[[email protected][Z!WT
4PS^H\RLLH[3(+VKNLYZ!WT
>HZOPUN[VUH[:HU+PLNV!WT
-YPKH`
7P[[ZI\YNO3PYPHUVH[*OPJHNV*\IZ(YYPL[H
!WT
(YPaVUH9H`H[7OPSHKLSWOPH4VYNHU!WT
([SHU[H.HU[H[[email protected][Z/HY]L`!WT
*VSVYHKV.YH`H[4PHTP*VUSL`!WT
:HU-YHUJPZJV:HTHYKaPQHH[;HTWH)H`(YJOLY
!WT
*PUJPUUH[P3HTIH[/V\Z[VU4J*\SSLYZ!
WT
;L_HZ/HTLSZH[:[3V\PZ>HJOH!WT
4PS^H\RLL+H]PLZH[3(+VKNLYZ<YPHZ!
WT
>HZOPUN[VU9VZZH[:HU+PLNV-YPLKYPJO
!WT
:H[\YKH`
(YPaVUHH[7OPSHKLSWOPH!WT
*PUJPUUH[PH[/V\Z[VU!WT
*VSVYHKVH[4PHTP!WT
:HU-YHUJPZJVH[;HTWH)H`!WT
;L_HZH[:[3V\PZ!WT
([SHU[HH[[email protected][Z!WT
7P[[ZI\YNOH[*OPJHNV*\IZ!WT
4PS^H\RLLH[3(+VKNLYZ!WT
>HZOPUN[VUH[:HU+PLNV!WT
WNBA |
(SS;PTLZ,+;
,(:;,95*65-,9,5*,
>
3
7J[
([SHU[H
5L^@VYR
*OPJHNV
>HZOPUN[VU
0UKPHUH
*VUULJ[PJ\[
>,:;,95*65-,9,5*,
>
3
7J[
4PUULZV[H
3VZ(UNLSLZ
7OVLUP_
:LH[[SL
+HSSHZ
:HU(U[VUPV
>LKULZKH`»Z.HTLZ
5VNHTLZZJOLK\SLK
;O\YZKH`»Z.HTLZ
5L^@VYRH[*VUULJ[PJ\[WT
:LH[[SLH[+HSSHZ!WT
-YPKH`»Z.HTLZ
*OPJHNVH[([SHU[H!WT
0UKPHUHH[:HU(U[VUPVWT
7OVLUP_H[3VZ(UNLSLZ!WT
:H[\YKH`»Z.HTLZ
([SHU[HH[>HZOPUN[VUWT
.)
·
ñ
ñ
ñ
.)
·
ñ
ñ
ñ
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 days . . . . . . . . 6 days . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . $10.75 . . . . . . $16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . $40.00
Run Day
Tuesday................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . . $4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50
Email : classifi[email protected]
Wednesday ........................................................... Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday .......................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday ..................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ..................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you
for your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper.
The Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be
considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can
be made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Bids and Notices
WHAT’S YOUR
GOVERNMENT UP
TO? Find out for
yourself! Review public
notices printed in all of
Wyoming’s
newspapers! Visit
www.wyopublicnotices.
com or www.pub
licnoticeads.com/wy.
Household Goods &
Appliances
(2) METAL folding
chairs in covered seat
$7.00 ea
674-7270
(6) DRAWER Chest.
Excellent Condition
43"L x 14.5"D x 32"H
$49
674-7270
ANTIQUE LAMP w/
Colorful Shade. $50.
751-1866
BOOK SHELVES. Full
back. Sturdy & good
looking. 48"T x 12"D
$49.00
674-7270
CARD TABLE. $15
674-7270
COMFORITABLE
MATCHING chairs. (2)
$30 each
(307)674-7270
HARD COVER Explore
America series. 10
books. $25/set. 307674-4086.
MODERN GLASS coffee table 38" round.
$50.00. Janet.
307-630-6037
MODERN GLASS tv
stand. 16" wide. 58"
long. $50.00. Janet
307- 630-6037
NOVELTY OLD Fashion Ice Box. Ideal for
storage. Top opens.
20"w x 29"h x 12"d. $30
674-7270
Household Goods &
Appliances
SLEEP INNOVATIONS Queen 2" foam
topper good condition.
$40.00.
Janet 307-630-6037
SPRING CLEANING?
NEED TO
DECLUTTER?
SELL ANY ITEM
($50 or less)
FOR FREE IN THE
SHERIDAN PRESS!
For more details,
call Amber 672-2431.
Boats
HEALTH PROMPTS
Sale. '12 Tracker 17' w/
60HP Merc. 4 stroke.
Less 30 hrs use. Many
options. New $25k sell
for $15k 307-684-7382
Horses
6YR OLD buckskin mini
mare 31" tall broke to
ride & drive $850. Harness & Cart for sale
$850. Call 672-8641
Farm & Ranch Supplies
10" 3 Point. Post Hole
Auger. $175 obo
307-763-1004
FORD 8N tractor with
blade. Rebuilt & restored. $4000 OBO.
672-2638
Heavy Equipment
TREE EQUIP for Sale.
56' Aerial lift.
$30,000
1250 Vermeer Chipper.
$14,000
If interested call
751-5277
Hardware & Tools
HUD-SON portable saw
mill. Model 230. With
accessories. $4500
Buffalo. (307)689-4276
OFFICE DESK. Excellent Condition. Metal 3
drawers. 40"L x 24"D
$49.00
674-7270
SHOP VAC Ultra Plus.
8 gal. 3.5 peak H.P.
New! $45.00 674-7270
PICTURES. 1. Boy Blue
2. Pink lady 3. With
Frame 22"x19" $25 ea.
674-7270
SHOP VAC. All around.
Never Used. Wet/ Dry
Vac. All tools included.
$49.00
674-7270
Computers-Accessories
Services
COMPUTER INTEL I-3
syst. 4 GB ram. 500 GB
HD. Dvd drive w/ 20"
flat screen. Canon
Copy/ fax mx320 new
cartridge. Comp. desk.
$200.00 752-3134
GARDEN
ROTOTILLING
4' Tractor Mt.
Ave Garden (12'x20')
Approx. $50
Sheridan Area
751-7775
Miscellaneous
GREAT FRAME western cowgirl picture.
41 x 34. $50.00. Janet
307-630-6037
HAVE AN ITEM you
want to sell for
$50 or more?
Advertise with us!
ONLY $20.16!!!
Run it until it sells!
Call Amber
672-2431
HAVE SOMETHING
TO SELL? WANT TO
ANNOUNCE YOUR
SPECIAL EVENT?
Reach over 361,000
Wyoming people with a
single classified ad
when it is placed in
WYCAN (Wyoming
Classified Ad Network).
Only $135 for 25 words.
Contact this newspaper
for details.
HOT TUB. 6 Person.
Like New. $3400
(307)429-9908
RUBBER STAMPS &
Supplies for sale!
Holliday/ All occasion.
Most are BRAND NEW!
Saturday 9a-12n
1305 LaClede 674-7295
Miscellaneous for Sale
MEN'S XL VARSITY
Jacket. Dark Green w/
black leather sleeves.
Only worn twice. $100.
307-683-6529.
WESTERN STAR
POST FRAME BUILDINGS - 24x24x8$5,554, 30x32x10$7,947, 36x40x12$10,873, 40x48x14$13,801. Complete material packages with instructions. Experienced
and insured crews
available. 1-800-6585565.
JOURNEY MAN
painter for hire. 35 yrs
experience. Interior &
Exterior. Excel. Work!
(307)752-4197
BIZZARO
PICKLES
Lawn & Garden
Equipment
DELUXE DOUBLE
Hammock Arc shaped
wood stand. In excellent condition. $150
674-1960
Musical Instruments
ROLAND DIGITAL Piano. In pristine condition. $1500 obo
674-1960
Wanted to Buy
GUITAR WANTED!
Local musician will pay
up to $12,500 for pre1975 Gibson, Fender,
Martin & Gretsch quitars. Fender amplifiers
also. Call toll free!
1-800-995-1217.
WANTED WYOMING
Jade! Call Bob
408-316-9291
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
1 BR. Util pd exc. elec.
No Smk/pets. Garage.
$495+Dep 674-5838
NON SEQUITUR
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
Bridge
Friedrich
Nietzsche
said, “Every
extension of
knowledge
arises from
making the
conscious the
unconscious.”
This week, we are conscientiously studying “cover
an honor with an honor ...
or not.” We have seen that
usually the defender should
cover the last of touching
honors. However, there is
an important extension to
be added: “but only when it
might gain a trick.”
For example, dummy
(North) has the Q-J-8-7 of
clubs and the next player
(East) holds K-5-4-2. Declarer runs the club queen
(everyone follows), then
calls for the club jack. It
is the last of the touching
honors, but it cannot gain
East to cover with the king,
because his club spots are
so low; and it could cost a
trick if South started with,
say, A-9-3.
In today’s deal, what is
declarer’s best line in six
spades after West leads the
Unfurn Apts for Rent
Phillip Alder
club queen, and how should
East defend?
North was right to respond three spades, a
game-invitational limit
raise. Although he had only
nine high-card points, he
had two aces, five trumps
and a potential ruffing
value in his
doubleton.
The mirror
distribution
of the NorthSouth hands
seems to
leave two
unavoidable
losers: one
spade and
one club. But
South can
set a trap
for East by
winning the
first trick
with his club
ace, crossing
to the board
in a red suit,
and leading
the spade
jack. If East
covers the
last of touch-
ing honors (the only honor),
there is a loud crash as
the queen, ace and king all
appear on the same trick.
But East should realize that
since his partner has at
most one spade, it cannot
gain to cover.
ED
T
REN
EXTRA LARGE 2 BR.
Low utils. $650/mo. +
$500 dep. 1 yr. lease.
Ref's req'd. 751-2445.
1 BR. W/D. No
smk/pets. $600/m+ Util.
752-5852.
1 BR. $600/mo
incl. utils. & cable
No smk/pets. 763-2848.
2 BR/1 Ba. W/D hookups. W/S/G & Lawn
care provided. Big Horn
$700/mo. No pets/
smoking. (307)7517718
NICE 1 BR. in 4 unit
bldg. Most utils. incl.
Pets neg. $575/mo. +
dep. 751-2105.
Houses, Unfurn for Rent
Dear Readers: Recently,
I asked you for your stories about how SPRING
-CLEANING has been done
in your family through the
generations, and wow, did
you respond! Here are just a
few of them:
“Dear Heloise: Your
remarks in the Dayton
(Ohio) Daily News about
spring-cleaning bring back
memories. My favorite
chore was using wallpaper
cleaner to clean the soot off
the walls. With a coal furnace, by spring there was
always a fine layer of soot,
and it was fun to see the
clean area after using the
cleaner and know that you
really made a difference in
removing the dirt.” -- Carolyn N., Huber Heights, Ohio
“Dear Heloise: In the rural
area where I grew up, we
used wood, coal and corn
cobs in a stove for heat,
which left the room covered with a sooty film. So
spring-cleaning consisted
of washing all the walls,
ceilings and windows, along
with washing and starching
the curtains. Oh, the smell
of the freshly laundered curtains hung out on the line in
the fresh air to dry, and the
newly washed walls!” -- Connie S., Wahoo, Neb.
“Dear Heloise: A warm,
sunny day (or three) is a
must!
“1. Wash all my curtains
and bedding. Hang on my
clothesline for that wonderful fresh scent.
“2. Wash the blinds. Hang
outside.
“3. Clean baseboards and
windowsills.
“4. Shampoo area rugs by
hand, and air-dry outside.
“5. Switch winter and
summer clothes.
“6. Wash windows inside
and outside.”
-- Evelyn C., Conway, Ark.
“Dear Heloise: Getting
older and being unable to
do spring-cleaning like I
used to, I now spring-clean
one room per month. That
is, I wash the woodwork,
windows, curtains, touch up
the paint, clean out shelves,
closets, etc. This way, every
room gets a deep cleaning
twice a year, and I am not
overwhelmed.” -- Carol V.
in Ohio
Everyone’s hints are
wonderful! Way to get the
job done! Do you need some
assistance with low-cost
but effective and environmentally friendly cleaners,
sanitizers and deodorizers
to combat stinks and stains?
I’ve compiled a collection of
my BEST cleaning solutions
in a handy pamphlet.
If you’d like to receive one
to help you along the way,
Heloise
send a long, self-addressed,
stamped (68 cents) envelope,
along with $5, to: Heloise/
Cleaners, P.O. Box 795001,
San Antonio, TX 78279-5001.
You also can visit my website, www.Heloise.com, and
place your order there. As
my mother, the original
Heloise, said: “Do what you
can. But enjoy it.” -- Heloise
P.S.: Here’s one more
spring-cleaning hint, but
with a twist:
“Dear Heloise: My husband was an Air Force
officer, and we moved often
with our three children:
one son and two daughters.
When the first daughter
was grown and married,
she came to me one day
and asked, ‘Mom, what is
spring-cleaning?’
“I explained, as you did,
that it meant to deep-clean
the house. She replied, ‘You
never did that!’ My answer
was, ‘No, we just moved!’”
-- Patricia S., via email
THE EYES HAVE IT
Dear Heloise: Since eyebrow pencils wear down in
no time, I have a solution
for how to use them down to
an inch.
Take one or two tops and
add them to the end of the
pencil, and you have a long
pencil again. Works great! -C.B., Hershey, Pa.Heloise
Houses, Unfurn for Rent
Storage Space
Help Wanted
2BR/1 BA completely
remodeled inside & out.
$950/mo + dep. Pets
negotiable. 751-2105
CIELO STORAGE
752-3904
NIGHT SECURITY/
Youth Services Aide,
Wyo. Girls School,
Sheridan; Class Code
SOYS03-04322; Target
Hiring Range: $2184$2730/mo. General
Description: Provide
overnight security for
residents, staff,
property, buildings &
dormitories. For more
info or to apply online
go to:
https://www.govern
mentjobs.com/ca
reers/wyoming.
The State of Wyo. is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer & actively
supports the ADA &
reasonably
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
HOUSE IN the country for rent 2 bedroom, 1 bath, large
yard with garden spot.
$950 per month plus
utilities and $950 deposit. Call 307-6726179
NICE CLEAN 2 BR,
quiet neighborhood,
ldry. hkps, sm storage
unit. $650/mo + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease.
Refs. req. 751-2445.
Hints from Heloise
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
1 BR/1 Ba. Bonus rm.
12'x16' storage shed.
W/D. $750/mo + util,
dep & 6 mo lease. No
smkg/ No pets. 307672-3507.
4BR/ 2BA Garage.
Fenced Yard w/ kennel.
Great view. By Kendrick
Golf Course. 1 yr lease.
Pets ok. $2500/ month
752-7835
2 BR, No pets $725 +
$725 deposit & utils.
751-3563
3 BR House for Rent.
$900/mnth + $500 deposit. No Smk/Pets.
Tenant pays utilities.
Call 751-7474
Business Building for
Ren
4,200 sq. FT. office/
shop w/ lot on Coffeen
Ave. $1750/mo. Agent
owned. ERA Carroll
Realty. Call 752-8112
Office/Retail Space for
Rent
2500 SQ FT Office Retail space w/ parking.
1415 N. Main. 752-4662
AVAILABLE JULY 1st,
1530 sq/ft office space
located on Coffeen Ave.
High visibility & parking.
Please call for lease
terms & rates.
(307)751-4915.
PROF. OFFICE SPACE
5200 sq/ft. Great
location & excellent
parking. Avail. early fall.
Contact Steve
672-0785.
INTERSTATE STORAGE. Multiple Sizes
avail. No deposit
req'd. 752-6111.
ELDORADO STORAGE Helping you conquer space. 3856 Coffeen. 672-7297.
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
15' X 30' storage unit for
rent. 673-5555
Help Wanted
WELL ESTABLISHED
company is looking for
exper. journey man
plumber for commercial
& residential work.
674-5574 leave msg.
REAL ESTATE
Assistant
Part time & flexible
5-10 hrs/wk +/Mac computer skills
essential
E-mail resume to:
realestatehelper0711
@gmail.com
or box 244, c/o The
Sheridan Press, PO
Box 2006, Sheridan
NOW HIRING
Housekeeping,
Front Desk, Maintenance, Night
Audit & Laundry.
Top wages. Apply
in person at
Comfort Inn &
Suites
or Hampton Inn
ARBY'S is looking for
friendly clean-cut
personnel to work all
shifts. Top starting
wage
DOE & Benefits.
Please apply in person.
NOW HIRING
Housekeeping
Front Desk, Maintenance, Night
Audit & Laundry.
Top wages. Apply
in person at
MOTEL 6 &
QUALITY INN.
Commercial Space for
Rent
602 E. 6th St. 2,100 sf
w/ 2 bay shop, office,
waiting room, restroom,
laundry room & work
benches. Good location & nice clean property w/ parking.
$1000/mo. 307-7631628.
Storage Space
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
John Gallagher Jr. was
born in Wilmington, Del.,
today in 1984. This birthday guy co-starred as Jim
Harper on “The Newsroom” from 2012-2014 and
portrayed Christopher in
the 2014 mini-series “Olive
Kittredge.” On the big
screen, Gallagher’s film
resume includes “10 Cloverfield Lane,” “The Heart
Machine,” and “Short Term
12.” On the stage, Gallagher
has starred in productions
of “Spring Awakening,”
which he won a Tony award
for in 2007.
ARIES (March 21-April
19): When life hands you
lemons make a lemon meringue pie. You should be
able to turn problems to
your advantage in unique
ways. You can add a flourish to ordinary tasks and
enjoy a sense of satisfaction
for your resourcefulness.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Kindness is better than
money in the bank. Generosity doesn’t consist of
simply throwing a few dollars in the kettle. The praise
or compliment you give to
someone might make them
stronger and more confident.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
The focus is on the fabulous
and fantastic. You may be
more romantic than usual
so plan on doing something
that fulfills your fantasies.
A movie, the theater or even
a creative activity could
offer ample inspiration.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): A special someone
might encourage you to embrace a high-minded work
ethic. The desire to impress
a loved one or potential
partner might inspire you
to find new ways to make
money or to strive harder in
your career.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You
can receive a power boost
from the profound. You can
use insights as inspiration
and fantasies as fodder
to achieve your dreams.
Gather mental momentum
even though some of your
actions are held in check.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Your ability to win friends
and influence events is at a
peak. People will be willing
to help you and support
your plans for the future.
Hold key meetings or discussions while you can easily foster a team effort.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Inspiration can lead to perspiration. You are willing
to work hard to realize your
dreams. A glimmer of hope
Jeraldine Saunders
might turn into a burning
candle in the near future.
Be wise and handle issues
of trust with kid gloves.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Use reliable sources of
knowledge. The facts are
only as good as the source.
Don’t be fooled by advertising and propaganda. You
may receive praises for a
job well done which you did
little to merit.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The proof is in
the pudding. Don’t assume
there is an error. You might
be led to believe that a family situation is a problem. If
you check the facts or take
the time to learn about details you will be pleasantly
surprised.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Think ahead and
use your head. Assess the
dangers, risks and rewards
before you place a bet.
Don’t wait until the roulette
wheel begins turning or the
dice start rolling to wonder
if you chose the right number.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can’t win by relying on the toss of the dice.
This is not a good time to
risk your heart or your
money. You may receive
numerous special offers and
promotional items, but new
is not necessarily better.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): High ideals will raise
your spirits. Practice makes
perfect, but the people who
love you the most don’t
expect you to be perfect all
of the time. Take the time
to sit down and discuss the
key issues in an important
relationship.
IF JUNE 17 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You can relax
and enjoy some creature
comforts during the upcoming six to eight weeks.
Group activities and new
social connections may add
a touch of diversity to your
life. During August you
might be too eager to take
risks and more competitive
than usual. Avoid gambling
and extravagance but do
enjoy some time outside
the regular routines. Your
business savvy is particularly acute in October when
a new friend or group offers
allies that could become
and benevolent influence
in your life. That is a good
time to reassess your finances or to make business
and career decisions.
CLASSIFIEDS
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
HOT SPRINGS
COUNTY HIGH
SCHOOL in beautiful
Thermopolis Wyoming,
seeking a teacher who
is motivated to join a
young and aggressive
department developing
a model PE program.
Preference will be given to a candidate with
the ability to assume
the Head Football
Varsity Coaching position and have the ability to coach other sports
as well. Email
[email protected]
org or visit www.hotsprings1.org for details.
Position open until
filled. EOE.
CHARTWELLS AT
Sheridan College is
looking for skilled
Culinarians. If you
would like to join our
dynamic team please
stop by Sheridan
College. Thorne Rider
Campus Center
Chartwells Business
Office to apply or Call
674-6446 ext
4106/4108 available
positions include cook/
food prep & server,
bakery production, cashier & utility associate.
THE CITY of Sheridan
is actively recruiting a
personable, energetic
and dynamic individual
with skills in customer
service for the position
of Customer Service
Specialist. This position
is responsible for
performing technical,
clerical, and financial
accounting duties in
support of the City’s
Customer Service
operations. This is a
fully benefited position
including health, dental,
vision, and life
insurance, state
pension retirement,
tuition reimbursement,
paid time off and a
wellness program. The
hiring range is $17.17$18.97 an hour DOE.
Candidates must pass a
comprehensive
background and credit
check. Qualified
applicants should
submit a completed City
of Sheridan job
application to City Hall,
55 Grinnell Plaza by
6/17/16. Full job
description, required
minimum qualifications
and application can be
found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The City of Sheridan is
a drug-free work place.
YOUTH SERVICES
Aide. Wyo. Girls
School. Sheridan; Class
Code SOYS03-04577;
Target Hiring Range:
$2184-$2730/mo.
General Description:
During night shift &
while residents are
sleeping (10:00pm to
8:00am) provide a safe
& secure environment
for residents & staff at
the Wyoming Girls
School, an institution for
adjudicated female
youth. For more info or
to apply online go to:
https://www.govern
mentjobs.com/careers/
wyoming. The State of
Wyo. is an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
actively supports the
ADA & reasonably
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
PERKINS RESTAURANT is accepting
applications for all positions. Day and evening shifts available.
Apply in person at
1373 Coffeen Ave or
online at
www.please applyon
line.com/sugarlanden
terprises. EOE
DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED! Become a
driver for Stevens
Transport! NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! New drivers
earn $800+ per week!
PAID CDL TRAINING!
Stevens covers all
costs!
1-888-589-9677.
drive4stevens.com
Delivery problems?
Help Wanted
Help Wanted,
Professional
THE
SHERIDAN PRESS
is looking for:
Independent
Contractors
to deliver papers.
If interested please
stop by:
The Sheridan Press
144 East Grinnell
St. Sheridan, WY
82801
COMPUTER SCI. Instr.
/School Dist. Liaison
Teach computer
science courses,
introduce & teach CS &
programming in local
K-12 schools. Master’s
& teaching exp.
required.
Apply online at:
https://jobs.sher
idan.edu
EOE.
Call 672-2431
Help Wanted
RECRUITMENT
#16-06:
Road Maintenance
Technician/Equipment
Operator in the Decker,
Montana area. $16.00
per hour. Big Horn
County (Montana) Road
& Bridge Department.
Duty hours Mon-Thurs,
6:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Performs duties as a
laborer, flagger,
operates construction
equipment & works as a
member of a fire crew.
Requires physical
involvement including
lifting up to 100 pounds.
Must possess or
acquire within 60 days a
Montana Class A, Type
1 Commercial Driver
License (CDL). MUST
BE AN INSURABLE
DRIVER. Applicant
must be a high school
graduate or equivalent
& two years experience
in operating medium to
heavy construction &
maintenance
equipment. Some work
experience in
construction or
maintenance desired.
Fire fighting is required.
Must be willing to fight
fires & respond to both
fire & road emergencies 24 hours a day.
This position is subject
to Pre-Employment
Drug & Alcohol testing.
Also, the PACK test will
be administered to the
successful applicant.
Employment is
contingent upon
successful completion
of these tests. County
housing is provided;
employee pays utilities.
Submit Big Horn County
application to the
Big Horn County
Human Resources
Office,
P.O. Box 908,
Hardin, MT 59034
or deliver to the
Big Horn County
Courthouse,
121 W. 3rd St.,
Room 302.
Phone (406)665-9735.
Applications must be received or postmarked
no later than 5:00 p.m.
on Friday, June 17,
2016. AAO/EOE.
FULL TIME gardener
needed for the summer
months, south east of
Sheridan. Fax resume
to 737-2339 or call
751-5133. Wage based
on experience.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Pickups & Vans
2005 CHEVY C-4500
stock full size box.
Duramax 75k miles.
Custom painted. Dual
axles. semi tires.
674-8252 $39,000 obo
VEHICLE
FOR SALE?
Lost & Found
FOUND LEATHERMAN tool. @ Kleanburn recreation area.
Sun 22nd of May. Call
751-7947 to claim
2011 GMC Denali HD
3500, Crew Cab,
every option available,
108k highway miles,
Duramax Diesel,
Allison Transmission.
New Tires,
$33,000 752-1259
Real Estate
Help Wanted,
Professional
CERTIFIED MATH
Teacher,
Wyo. Girls School,
Sheridan; Class Code
ETCT09-04612; Target
Hiring Range: $4,128$5160/mo. Min. Qual.
Bachelors in
secondary
mathematics education
w/the ability to acquire a
Wyoming Teaching
Certificate; (Preference:
experience in
educational technology
and/or foreign
language). For more
info or to apply online
go to: https://www.gov
ernmentjobs.com/ca
reers/wyoming.
The State of Wyo. is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer & actively
supports the ADA &
reasonably
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
HOUSE FSBO. Great
location 927 Absaraka.
1 level home. 3/4 of an
acre. 3BR 1.5 BA. Older
garage & workshop in
back. Landscaped.
Must see to appreciate!
$275,000 obo.
307-752-1391
Autos & Accessories
13 SP Fuller transmission. $1600. 4 GMC 8
hole wheels 165. $100.
4 875 R165 tires. $300.
OBO. Like new. 7522887
16 K Fifth wheel swivel
hitch with rails & hardware. $225
(307)672-5119
2 LEATHER CAR SEAT
COVERS. $50. 7511866.
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup Flatbeds, Krogman Bale
Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
Motorcycles
Campers, Trailers
2006 DYNA Wide
Glide 5k mi. screaming
eagle pipes. $8500
Call 751-6723
2011 STARCRAFT Autumn Ridge. 278 BH. 29
Ft. Great Condition. Under book @ $10,300.
674-5381
GET IT While it's cold!
2004 Harley Davidson Electra glide classic. Excellent condition.
Many Extras. 20k mi.
Ready to Ride $8800
307-674-8259
Motor Homes & RV’s
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
2011 GMC Sierra
SLT 3500, Crew Cab,
103,000 highway mi.
Duramax Diesel.
Allison Transmission.
New Tires, $29,000
752-1259
'07 CAMEO.
35' 5th wheel.
3 slides. Fireplace.
4 Season. B&W hitch.
Skirt. Lots of storage.
$25k obo
751-4206/752-6141
1998 34' Cardinal 5th
BRAHMA TRUCK topwheel. 3 slides. Very
per. Black. Excellent
nice. $13,500. 672shape. 5' wide x 7'3"
7935
long. $200 OBO. 7634631.
2001, 1061 Lance Pickup Camper. Full Loaded,
Excel. Cond. Slide
NEW DODGE PU
out.
Satellite. In-board
starter. Fits 1999 & othGenerator $16,000
er. Fits 360 or 318 en751-2501 or 751-6154
gines. $35. 672-5119.
LUXURY 2013 Komfort by Dutchman. 5
slides, w/ fireplace. Tall
ceilings. Dble fridge &
freezer. King sized bed.
Arctic pkg. cust. skirting
$55,500 obo 674-8252
Garage Sales
1353 CATTAIL Ct. Sat.
7a-??. Furniture. Lots of
misc.
2 HOUSE garage/ moving sale. 1400 block of
Champion Dr. Sat 8a12n. Misc items. Boy
clothing (10-12). Bikes.
Knick knacks.
2121 COLONIAL Dr.
First Presbyterian
Church.
Sat 8a-12. Chapter AM
PEO Sale.
408 W. Works.
Sat. 7a-12n. Children
clothing/shoes. work out
equipment. Couch.
Paper back books.
Kitchen items. Misc.
SET OF re-conditioned
heads. Dodge 360 engine. Around 1999 model. $50. 672-5119.
2 GUN scabbards for a
Can-Am ATV.
Brand New. $225.00
(307)429-9908
2012 BIGHORN 32'.
3 slides. Central Vac.
Pwr Awning. Fireplace.
Asking $32,000. Very
clean. 307-752-3388.
KEYSTONE MONTANA
High Country 323 RL
fifth wheel. Lots of
Extras incl. W/D!!!
3 slide outs. Stored
inside. $32,000
307-763-9469
2012 THOR Chateau
Motor Home 23u. Like
new. 8K Mi. Michelin
Tires. V10 Auto Extended Service Warranty
$52,000 307-674-8259
Campers, Trailers
ATV’s & Snowmobiles
B7
2008 KEYSTONE
Everest like new. 37
feet long. 3-slides. 1
1/2 baths. Sleeps 6.
4-season pkg. $25,000.
Call 672-0996
ESTATE SALE. 1327
Hillpond Dr. Sat. 8a-1p
Sun. 7a-11a. Antiques.
Collectables. LOTS OF
TOOLS. (retired carpenter) Fishing & Misc
R ea d the
f ine print.
In every issu e, Th e Sh erid a n Press pu b lish es Pu b lic N o tices.
Th ey inclu d e f a cts a b o u tw h en a nd w h ere pu b lic m eetings a re h eld , priva te la nd tra nsf ers, th e sa la ries o f pu b lic o f f icia ls,
th e no tice o f esta te m a tters. And m u ch m o re.
It’s th e pu b lic’s b u siness. It’s yo u rb u siness.
Th e f ine print– o f ten b o ring a nd b o ilerpla te – m erits yo u ra ttentio n.
Th e Sh erid a n Press
w w w .th esh erid a npress.co m
144 GrinnellSt.
Sh erid a n, W yo .82801
( 307) 672-2431
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
When Chubby Checker
crooned “Limbo Rock” in
1966, he asked agile folks
“How low can you go? ...
unda the limbo stick.”
For limbo queen Shemika
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
Charles, the answer in 2010
was a record-setting 8 1/2
inches. Lower also can be
a winning strategy when it
comes to blood pressure for
folks 75 and up, according to
a new study in JAMA online.
It revealed that lowering
systolic (the top number) BP
to less than 120 (compared
with the standard recommendation of 140 or less) reduces
the relative risk of major
cardiovascular events, like
stroke and heart attack, by
25 percent. There was also a
27 percent lower relative risk
of death from any cause. The
researchers, using data from
the Systolic Blood Pressure
Intervention Trial (SPRINT),
found that among the 2,510
participants, over three years
just 73 folks died who aimed
DEAR ABBY
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
COUPLE CAUGHT IN THE
MIDDLE OF IMPENDING
FAMILY AFFAIR
DEAR ABBY: My fiance,
“Rick,” and I have been
together for years and recently got engaged. We are over
the moon about it, and genuinely in love. However, this
exciting time in our lives has
been met with some difficulties.
We recently learned Rick’s
mother has been having an
affair, which makes for a
very uncomfortable situation. My future mother-inlaw doesn’t know we know.
Rick’s father came to us for
help because he suspects
she’s cheating.
She engages with this man
for a lower BP, while 107
folks died who were at the
higher level.
Should you lower your
BP to 120 or less if you’re 75
or older? This study indicates that if you don’t have
diabetes (going too low may
increase medication side
effects) lowering your BP
may be a life-saver. So ask
your doc about lowering
your BP to 120 or less. And do
everything you can through
lifestyle changes to control
BP as well. Increase physical
activity to 30 minutes five
days a week; eat 5-9 servings
of fruits and veggies a day;
avoid tobacco, excessive alcohol and the Five Food Felons;
maintain a healthy weight;
and reduce stress with mindful meditation.
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
publicly by texting, calling,
etc. when we spend time with
her, so I avoid her because I
don’t want any part of it. It’s
hard to ignore because we
live with Rick’s family.
He believes we should say
nothing. I spoke to our priest
about it because I am so deeply disturbed by her behavior
and was told to “pray for
them.” I’m worried this
will be a negative influence
on my fiance and me, and
that by remaining quiet we
have become part of her lie.
What should I do? -- CLEAN
CONSCIENCE IN THE EAST
DEAR CLEAN
CONSCIENCE: Listen to the
advice you received from
your priest. Pray for your
almost in-laws, but do not
involve yourself in their marital problems. If Rick’s father
approaches you again for
help, tell him that he needs to
discuss his suspicions with
his wife because that’s the
only way his problems will
be resolved.
DEAR ABBY: I lost my
favorite cat a year ago to kidney disease. I had noticed she
wasn’t doing well, but when I
told my parents, so we could
take her to the veterinarian,
they insisted she was fine.
They said she didn’t need
to see the vet because her
ailments were just age. They
refused to have her examined
until it was too late, and by
then, the vet’s attempts to
help her only weakened her.
She died in my arms on the
way home.
I am devastated. She was
my therapy animal and she
helped me combat my anxiety disorders for over seven
years. When she died, my
family seemed to be suddenly struck with grief, even
though they ignored her
most of the time. This makes
me angry because I feel their
hesitation to take her to the
vet and refusal to listen to
me are what killed her.
I’ve forgiven them for
what happened, but I still
feel upset and angry toward
them whenever I see my cat’s
picture by her urn on my
memory shelf. Am I wrong
for feeling this way? -- NOT
FEELING PURRFECT
DEAR NOT FEELING
PURRFECT: Please accept
my sympathy for the loss
of your cat. What happened
to her is regrettable, but
holding a grudge won’t help.
What might help would be
for your parents to get you
another therapy cat, and I’m
advising you to suggest it.
DEAR ABBY: My daughter
recently had her first child
(my first grandchild), and I
am wondering if there’s any
protocol regarding the first
visit. Should I wait until
my daughter invites me, or
should I just tell her I want
to come? I’m afraid it would
be rude to just invite myself
before she’s ready to show off
her newborn. -- BABY STEPS
IN VIRGINIA
DEAR BABY STEPS: Give
your daughter some time to
rest and for her and her husband/partner to establish a
routine, and then ask when
it would be convenient for
you to come and if she’d like
you to help out in any way.
I’m sure that approach would
be better received than an
announcement.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that
it is working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause
by carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and
are presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob Rolston
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
John Palmer Williams, Jr and his wife Elizabeth Carrie
Williams are pictured here. John was a carpenter, hired for
railroad construction which ended at Parkman. John moved
his wife and family from Omaha, Nebraska and spent the first
winter in a tent in what was then Pioneer (now Kendrick) Park.
The photo is from the Williams collection in the Sheridan County
Museum’s Memory Book collection.
Your Right To Know and be informed
of government legal proceedings
is embodied in public notices. This
newspaper urges every citizen to read
and study these notices.
We strongly advise those seeking
further information to exercise their
right of access to public records and
public meetings.
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon – It will be published in Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon – IIt will be published in Friday’s paper.
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
Wednesday Noon – It will be published in Saturday’s paper.
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-751-6428
Wednesday Noon – It will be published in Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon – It will be published in Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon – It will be published in Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing information are required with
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
each legal notice. A PDF is required if there are any signatures, with a Word
Mark
Kinner
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-674-4777
Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause delay in publication. All legal
notices must be paid in full before an “AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION” will be
issued.
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in
the event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is
not supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
EJ7A>8CDI>8:
CDI>8:D;688:EI6C8:
6C9;>C6AE6NB:CI6C9H:IIA:B:CI
Cdi^XZ^h]ZgZWn\^kZci]Vidci]Z'%i]YVnd[?jan'%&+!
[^cVahZiiaZbZcil^aaWZbVYZWni]Z8^ind[H]Zg^YVc!
[dgVcYdcVXXdjcid[VXdcigVXil^i]9^X`6cYZghdc
8dchigjXi^dc[dgi]Z8^ind[H]Zg^YVc8ZbZiZgnBV^c"
iZcVcXZ7j^aY^c\egd_ZXi#
I]ZVWdkZldg`]Vk^c\WZZcXdbeaZiZYVcYVXXZeiZY
VXXdgY^c\idi]ZeaVchVcYheZX^[^XVi^dchd[9^X`6cYZg"
hdc8dchigjXi^dc!VcYi]ZVWdkZYViZWZ^c\i]Z)&hi
YVnV[iZgi]Z[^ghiejWa^XVi^dcd[i]^hcdi^XZ!i]ZhV^Y
8dcigVXidgl^aaWZZci^iaZYid[^cVahZiiaZbZciVcYeVn"
bZcii]ZgZ[dgZ#
6cneZghdc!eVgicZgh]^e!VhhdX^Vi^dc!V\ZcXndgXdgedg"
Vi^dcl]dh]Vaa]VkZVcnjceV^YXaV^bhV\V^chihV^Y
8dcigVXidg[dgdgdcVXXdjcid[i]Z[jgc^h]^c\d[aVWdg!
bViZg^Vah!Zfj^ebZci!hjhiZcVcXZ!egdk^h^dch!dgdi]Zg
hjeea^ZhjhZYdgXdchjbZYWnhjX]XdcigVXidgVcY$dg
hjWXdcigVXidg^cdgVWdjii]ZeZg[dgbVcXZd[hV^Yldg`
bVnViVcni^bZ!jeidVcY^cXajY^c\i]ZYViZd[[^cVa
hZiiaZbZciVcYeVnbZci![^aZVkZg^[^ZYhiViZbZcid[
VcnVcYVaaVbdjcihYjZdcVXXdjcid[hjX]XaV^bl^i]/
BVi]Zgh=jZX`
8^ind[H]Zg^YVc
**<g^ccZaaEaVoV
H]Zg^YVc!LN-'-%&
;V^ajgZdci]ZeVgid[i]ZXaV^bVciid[^aZhjX]hiViZ"
bZcieg^dgid[^cVahZiiaZbZciVcYeVnbZcil^aagZa^ZkZ
VWhdajiZani]Z8^ind[H]Zg^YVc![dgVaadgVcna^VW^a^in[dg
hjX]XaV^b#
$h$?d]c=ZVi]
BVndg!8^ind[H]Zg^YVc
EjWa^h]ZY/?jcZ.!&+!'(!'%&+
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal advertising department at 672-2431 if
you have questions.
B9
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest
in property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
COUNTY
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
CDI>8:D;>CI:CIID9>HIG>7JI:6HH:IHD;I=:
7#7G69;DG9L6I:GHIGJHIJ$I$696I:9
;:7GJ6GN&)!'%%+VhVbZcYZY
IdVaa^ciZgZhiZYeZghdch/
IV`Zcdi^XZi]VidcdgV[iZg&'%YVnh[gdbi]Z[^ghi
ejWa^XVi^dcd[i]^hcdi^XZ!i]ZIgjhiZZd[i]Z7#7gVY"
[dgYLViZghIgjhiJcYZgIgjhi6\gZZbZciYViZY;ZWgj"
Vgn&)!'%%+VhVbZcYZY^ciZcYhidY^hig^WjiZi]ZIgjhi
egdeZginVcYVhhZihejghjVciidi]ZiZgbhd[hV^YIgjhi#
6cneZghdcdgZci^in]Vk^c\VXaV^bV\V^chii]Zegde"
ZgindgVhhZihdgl^h]^c\idXdciZhii]ZkVa^Y^ind[hV^Y
IgjhibVn[^aZdghjWb^iVXaV^bidi]ZIgjhiZZ!K^g\^a<#
@^ccV^[email protected]^ccV^gYAVlD[[^XZ!6iidgcZnhViAVl!
)).H#BV^cHi#$E#D#7dm+',!H]Zg^YVc!LN-'-%&!dc
dgWZ[dgZ&'%YVnh[gdbi]Z[^ghiejWa^XVi^dcd[i]^hcd"
i^XZ#
6cneZghdcdgZci^in[V^a^c\idbV`ZXaV^bdg[^aZV
_jY^X^VaegdXZZY^c\idXdciZhii]ZkVa^Y^ind[hV^YIgjhi
l^i]^ci]Zi^bZegdk^YZYl^aaWZ[dgZkZgegd]^W^iZY[gdb
bV`^c\VcnXaV^bV\V^chii]ZVhhZihdgegdeZgind[hV^Y
IgjhidgXdbbZcX^c\Vcn_jY^X^VaegdXZZY^c\V\V^chi
hZiiadg7#7gVY[dgYLViZghdgi]ZVhhZihVcYegdeZgind[
hV^YIgjhi#
9ViZYi]^h&(i]YVnd[?jcZ!'%&+#
K^g\^a<#@^ccV^gY!IgjhiZZ!
7#7gVY[dgYLViZghIgjhiJcYZgIgjhi6\gZZbZciYViZY
;ZWgjVgn&)!'%%+VhVbZcYZY
$h$K^g\^a<#@^ccV^gY
@^ccV^gYAVlD[[^XZ!E#8#
)).H#BV^cHi#$E#D#7dm+',
H]Zg^YVc!LN-'-%&
(%,$+,'".,,&
(%,$+,'"-'))P[VmR
EjWa^h]/?jcZ&+!'(!'%&+
CDI>8:D;;DG:8ADHJG:H6A:
9Z[Vjai]Vk^c\dXXjggZYVcYVaaegZgZfj^h^iZhid
[dgZXadhjgZ]Vk^c\WZZcbZi!cdi^XZ^h]ZgZWn\^kZci]Vi
i]Zbdgi\V\Z\^kZcWnLZhiZgcHiViZh9ZkZadebZci!
AA8!VLndb^c\A^b^iZYA^VW^a^in8dbeVcn!bdgi\V\dg!
^c[Vkdgd[IZmVh8Ve^iVa7Vc`!bdgi\V\ZZ!YViZY?Vcj"
Vgn''!'%&(!gZXdgYZY?VcjVgn'(!'%&(!Vh>chigjbZci
CjbWZg'%&(",%'(-%^ci]ZD[[^XZd[i]Z8djcin8aZg`
d[H]Zg^YVc!Lndb^c\!\^kZcidhZXjgZeVnbZcid[V
cdiZ^ci]Zdg^\^cVaVbdjcid[C^cZin"IldI]djhVcY
I]gZZ=jcYgZYIlZcin"DcZ9daaVghVcY%%$&%%
.'!('&#%%^h^cYZ[Vjai#HV^YcdiZVcYbdgi\V\Z
lZgZVhh^\cZYid=dbZKZhidgh>ckZhibZcih!>cX#Wn6h"
h^\cbZciYViZY?VcjVgn&(!'%&(VcYgZXdgYZYHZeiZb"
WZg)!'%&)Vh>chigjbZciCjbWZg'%&)",&))'+^ci]Z
D[[^XZd[i]Z8aZg`d[H]Zg^YVc8djcin!Lndb^c\#I]Z
VbdjciYjZVhd[?jcZ&+!'%&+^hDcZ=jcYgZYI]^gin"
;djgI]djhVcY!C^cZin"DcZ9daaVghVcY)($&%%
&()!%.&#)(!eajhVXXgj^c\^ciZgZhi![ZZhVcYXdhih#
HV^Ybdgi\V\ZXdciV^chVedlZgd[hVaZl]^X]WngZVh"
dcd[YZ[Vjaii]ZdlcZgd[i]ZCdiZVcYBdgi\V\ZYZ"
XaVgZhid]VkZWZXdbZdeZgVi^kZVcYcdhj^idgegd"
XZZY^c\]VhWZZc^chi^ijiZYViaVlidgZXdkZgi]ZYZWi
hZXjgZYWni]Zbdgi\V\ZdgVcneVgii]ZgZd[!cdg]Vh
VcnhjX]hj^idgegdXZZY^c\WZZc^chi^ijiZYVcYi]Z
hVbZY^hXdci^cjZY#Lg^iiZccdi^XZd[^ciZciid[dgZ"
XadhZi]ZBdgi\V\ZWnVYkZgi^hZbZciVcYhVaZ]VhWZZc
hZgkZYjedci]ZgZXdgYdlcZgVcYi]ZeVgin^cedhhZh"
h^dcd[i]Zbdgi\V\ZYegZb^hZhViaZVhiiZcYVnheg^dg
idi]ZXdbbZcXZbZcid[i]^hejWa^XVi^dc#I]Zegde"
ZginWZ^c\[dgZXadhZYjedcbVnWZhjW_ZXiiddi]Zga^"
ZchVcYZcXjbWgVcXZhi]Vil^aacdiWZZmi^c\j^h]ZYVi
i]ZhVaZVcYVcnegdheZXi^kZejgX]VhZgh]djaYgZhZVgX]
i]ZhiVijhd[i^iaZWZ[dgZhjWb^ii^c\i]ZW^Y#
I]ZgZ[dgZ!hV^Ybdgi\V\Zl^aaWZ[dgZXadhZYWnhVaZ
d[i]Z[daadl^c\YZhXg^WZYgZVaegdeZginadXViZY^c
H]Zg^YVc8djcin!Lndb^c\!YZhXg^WZYVh/
ADI(D;I=:HJ79>K>H>DCD;I=::6HI=6A;D;
[email protected])(!D;H=:G>96CA6C98DBE6CNÈH699>"
I>DCIDI=:IDLC!CDL8>IND;H=:G>96C!>C
H=:G>96C8DJCIN!HI6I:D;LNDB>C<#
l]^X]]Vhi]ZVYYgZhhd[)*+:#(gYHigZZi!H]Zg^YVc!
LN-'-%&!idWZhdaYWnejWa^XVjXi^dcWni]ZH]Zg^[[id
i]Z]^\]ZhiW^YYZg![dgXVh]!Vi&%/%%V#b#dc;g^YVn!?j"
an''!'%&+!Vii]Z[gdcihiZehd[i]ZH]Zg^YVc8djcin
8djgi]djhZ!'')Hdji]BV^cHigZZi!H]Zg^YVc!LN
-'-%&#I]ZhVaZl^aaiV`ZeaVXZdcan^[VgZegZhZciVi^kZ
d[i]Z=dbZKZhidgh>ckZhibZcih!>cX#!dg^ihV\Zci!^h
egZhZci#
=dbZKZhidgh>ckZhibZcih!>cX#
7n/8]g^hide]ZgB#LV\Zh
I]ZLV\Zh<gdje!AA8
&(%Hdji]BV^cHigZZi
7j[[Vad!LN-'-()
(%,+-)"'%%EjWa^h]/?jcZ&+!'(!(%!?jan,!'%&+#
I]Z9dlcZgCZ^\]Wdg]ddY>begdkZbZciHZgk^XZ9^h"
ig^Xi^h]daY^c\i]Z^gVccjVaWjY\ZibZZi^c\I]jghYVn!
?jcZ'(!'%&+Vi,/%%EB^ci]ZH]Zg^YVcHZc^dg8ZciZg
dcHb^i]#>bbZY^ViZan[daadl^c\^hi]Zbdci]anWjh^"
cZhhbZZi^c\#
EjWa^h]YViZh/?jcZ'!.!&+!'%&+#
;Zg\jhdcLViZgldg`h^hVXXZei^c\W^Yh[dgi]Z
8DH$H6LHLViZgBZiZgEgd_ZXi[gdb97:hjWXdcigVXi"
dgh[dgi]Z[daadl^c\XViZ\dg^Zh/
6ciZccVVcY7VhZHiVi^dc^chiVaaZgh
<ZcZgVa8dchigjXi^dcH^iZldg`VcY:aZXig^XVa
EajbW^c\A^XZchZY
Hd[ilVgZVcY>ciZ\gVi^dc
EaZVhZXdciVXi7dW;Zga^X'%-".'&".%(&dg
ZbV^agdWZgi#[Zga^X5[Zg\jhdc#Xdb
EjWa^h]YViZh/?jcZ&%!&&!&(!&)!&*!&+!&,!&-!'%!'%&+
Cdi^XZd[6kV^aVW^a^in
Heg^c\8gZZ`B^cZA76&
:ck^gdcbZciVa6hhZhhbZci
I]ZJ#H#9ZeVgibZcid[i]Z>ciZg^dg9D>!D[[^XZd[Hjg"
[VXZB^c^c\GZXaVbVi^dcVcY:c[dgXZbZciDHBG:!
LZhiZgcGZ\^dcD[[^XZ!]VhegZeVgZYVcZck^gdcbZciVa
VhhZhhbZci :6 [dg i]Z Heg^c\ 8gZZ` B^cZÈh H8B
b^c^c\eaVcbdY^[^XVi^dc[dg[ZYZgVaXdVaaZVhZBIB
.)(,-Heg^c\8gZZ`B^cZA76&:6Pi]ZEgd_ZXiR#;ZY"
ZgVaXdVaaZVhZBIB.)(,-lVh^hhjZYWni]Z7jgZVjd[
AVcYBVcV\ZbZci7AB^c9ZXZbWZgd['%%,#I]Z
9D>6hh^hiVciHZXgZiVgn[dgAVcYVcYB^cZgVah6HAB!
^cVXXdgYVcXZl^i]i]ZB^cZgVaAZVh^c\6Xid[&.'%!
hjWhZfjZcian VeegdkZY H8BÈh [ZYZgVa b^c^c\ eaVc
bdY^[^XVi^dcid^cXajYZ[ZYZgVaXdVaaZVhZBIB.)(,dc?jcZ',!'%&'#I]Z'%&'Heg^c\8gZZ`[ZYZgVab^c^c\
eaVcVeegdkVaVji]dg^oZYhjg[VXZXdVab^c^c\dc&!&&,#,
VXgZh d[ [ZYZgVa XdVa l^i]^c BIB .)(,-# H88 Xdb"
bZcXZYb^c^c\l^i]^c[ZYZgVaXdVaaZVhZBIB.)(,-^c
'%&'^cVXXdgYVcXZl^i]^ihhiViZb^cZeZgb^iVcY[ZY"
ZgVab^c^c\eaVcbdY^[^XVi^dcVeegdkVah#
I]ZH8B^hadXViZYVeegdm^bViZan('b^aZhcdgi]d[
H]Zg^YVc!Lndb^c\#I]ZH8BjhZhVXdbW^cVi^dcd[
YgV\a^cZVcYigjX`h]dkZab^c^c\bZi]dYh#
7ZXVjhZd[VgZXZciXdjgiYZX^h^dc!DHBG:]VhegZ"
eVgZYi]^h:6idgZZkVajViZi]ZZck^gdcbZciVa^beVXih
gZhjai^c\[gdbi]Zdg^\^cVaanegdedhZYVcYXjggZcianVe"
egdkZYb^c^c\eaVcbdY^[^XVi^dc[dg[ZYZgVaXdVaaZVhZ
BIB.)(,-!ejghjVciidi]ZgZfj^gZbZcihd[i]ZCV"
i^dcVa:ck^gdcbZciVaEda^Xn6Xid[&.+.C:E6#HZZ
?VcjVgn'&!'%&+dgYZgd[i]ZJ#H#9^hig^Xi8djgi[dgi]Z
9^hig^Xid[BdciVcV!^cXVhZL^aY:Vgi]<jVgY^Vchk#J#H#
D[[^XZd[Hjg[VXZB^c^c\GZXaVbVi^dcVcY:c[dgXZbZci
ZiVa#!8VhZ&/&)"Xk"%%%&("HEL9#Bdci##
I]Z:6jeYViZh!XaVg^[^Zh!VcYegdk^YZhcZlVcYVYY^"
i^dcVaZck^gdcbZciVa^c[dgbVi^dc[dgi]ZEgd_ZXi#6hd[
9ZXZbWZg(&!'%&*!Veegdm^bViZan&-#)b^aa^dcidchd[
[ZYZgVa XdVa ]VkZ WZZc gZXdkZgZY [gdb BIB .)(,aZVhZWdjcYVg^Zh#6hVgZhjaid[i]Z:6egdXZhh!DHBG:
]VhYZiZgb^cZYi]ZgZVgZcdh^\c^[^XVciZck^gdcbZciVa
^beVXihVcY]Vh^hhjZYVcjch^\cZY;^cY^c\d[CdH^\"
c^[^XVci>beVXi;DCH>#I]Z6HABl^aaVeegdkZ!Y^hVe"
egdkZ!dgXdcY^i^dcVaanVeegdkZi]Zb^c^c\eaVcVeegdk"
VaYdXjbZcil^i]^ci]Zb^c^c\eaVcYZX^h^dcYdXjbZci!
VhgZfj^gZYjcYZgi]ZB^cZgVaAZVh^c\6Xid[&.'%#
I]Z:6VcYjch^\cZY;DCH>VgZVkV^aVWaZ[dggZk^Zldc"
a^cZVi/
]iie/$$lll#lgXX#dhbgZ#\dk$^c^i^Vi^kZh$Heg^c\XgZZ`"
B^cZA76&#h]ib#
Eg^ciZYkZgh^dchd[i]Z:6VcYjch^\cZY;DCH>VgZVahd
VkV^aVWaZ[dggZk^ZlVii]Z[daadl^c\adXVi^dch/
" DHBG:!LZhiZgcGZ\^dc
&...7gdVYlVn!Hj^iZ(('%
9ZckZg!8D-%'%'
7ZilZZci]Z]djghd[-/%%6Bid)/%%EBBdcYVn
i]gdj\];g^YVn8adhZYHVijgYVnVcYHjcYVn
" 7AB!B^aZh8^in;^ZaYD[[^XZ
&&&<VggndlZcGdVY
B^aZh8^in!BI*.(%&
7ZilZZci]Z]djghd[-/%%6BVcY)/(%EB
BdcYVni]gdj\];g^YVn8adhZYHVijgYVnVcY
HjcYVn
" H]Zg^YVc8djcin8djgi]djhZ
'')HBV^cHi
H]Zg^YVc!LN-'-%&
7ZilZZci]Z]djghd[-/%%6Bid*/%%EBBdcYVn
i]gdj\];g^YVn8adhZYHVijgYVnVcYHjcYVn
" 7^\=dgc8djcin8djgi]djhZ
DaYJ#H#-,
=VgY^c!BI*.%()
7ZilZZci]Z]djghd[-/%%6Bid*/%%EBBdcYVn
i]gdj\];g^YVn8adhZYHVijgYVnVcYHjcYVn
" H]Zg^YVc;jabZgA^WgVgn
((*L6a\ZgHi
H]Zg^YVc!LN-'-%&
7ZilZZci]Z]djghd[./%%6BVcY./%%EB
BdcYVni]gdj\]I]jghYVn!;g^YVnVcYHVijgYVnÃ
7ZilZZc./%%6BVcY*/%%EB!8adhZYHjcYVn
" 7^\=dgc8djcinA^WgVgn
)&.C8jhiZg6kZ
=VgY^c!BI*.%()
7ZilZZci]Z]djghd[&%/%%6BVcY,/%%EB
BdcYVni]gdj\]I]jghYVn!;g^YVnÃ7ZilZZc&%/%%
6BVcY+/%%EB!8adhZYHVijgYVnVcYHjcYVn
NdjVgZ^ck^iZYidY^gZXindjgXdbbZcihdci]Z:6VcY
jch^\cZYDHBG:;DCH>id/6IIC/Heg^c\8gZZ`B^cZ
A76&:6!8$D/AVjgZcB^iX]Zaa!DHBG:LG!&...7gdVY"
lVn!Hj^iZ(('%!9ZckZg!8D-%'%'"(%*%#8dbbZcih
bVnVahdWZZbV^aZYid/dhb"cZeV"bi5dhbgZ#\dk!Zc"
hjgZi]ZhjW_ZXia^cZgZVYh/6IIC/DHBG:!Heg^c\8gZZ`
B^cZA76&:6#6aaXdbbZcihbjhiWZgZXZ^kZYdgedhi"
bVg`ZYWn?jan*!'%&+idWZXdch^YZgZY#
7Z[dgZ^cXajY^c\ndjgVYYgZhh!e]dcZcjbWZg!Z"bV^a
VYYgZhh!dgdi]ZgeZghdcVa^YZci^[n^c\^c[dgbVi^dc^c
ndjgXdbbZci!ndjh]djaYWZVlVgZi]VindjgZci^gZ
XdbbZciÃ^cXajY^c\ndjgeZghdcVa^YZci^[n^c\^c[dgb"
Vi^dcÃl^aaWZejWa^XanVkV^aVWaZ#L]^aZndjXVcVh`jh
^cndjgXdbbZciidl^i]]daYndjgeZghdcVa^YZci^[n^c\
^c[dgbVi^dc[gdbejWa^XgZk^Zl!lZXVccdi\jVgVciZZ
i]VilZl^aaWZVWaZidYdhd#6aahjWb^hh^dch[gdbdg"
\Vc^oVi^dchdgWjh^cZhhZhVcY[gdb^cY^k^YjVah^YZci^[n"
^c\i]ZbhZakZhVhgZegZhZciVi^kZhdgd[[^X^Vahd[dg\Vc"
^oVi^dchdgWjh^cZhhZhl^aaWZVkV^aVWaZ[dgejWa^XgZk^Zl
idi]ZZmiZciXdch^hiZcil^i]Veea^XVWaZaVl#
6YY^i^dcVa^c[dgbVi^dcgZ\VgY^c\i]^hEgd_ZXibVnWZ
dWiV^cZY[gdbAVjgZcB^iX]ZaaVi(%('.("*%'-dg
ab^iX]Zaa'5dhbgZ#\dk#
EjWa^h]YViZh/?jcZ'!&+!'%&+#
B10
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
OUTDOORS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2016
Exploring the history of ties in the Bighorns
Hacks had
a dangerous
job to tackle
T
he railroad tie industry was
developed in the 1860s to
accommodate the first transcontinental railroad across
southern Wyoming. Tie hacking
became a way of life for many, with a
specialized vocabulary and tie hack
camps resembling small towns with
all the comforts of town life.
Wyoming’s tie hacking industry
was developed
in four regions
around the state,
including the
eastern slopes
of the Bighorn
Mountains.
Tie hacking
requires three
things: hearty
SUSAN
men with broadDOUGLAS
axes, suitable
|
stands of timber
and water courses to drive the
ties downstream.
The railroad required ties to be
8 feet long with a width and depth
of 7 inches. The ideal tree for ties
was about 11 inches in diameter at
breast height. A tree 16 inches in
diameter could yield as many as
six ties.
Each tie hack was assigned a
strip of timber about 200 feet wide
and up to one-half mile long. He
first cut an 8-foot wide skid road
so the finished tie could be hauled
out. Tie hacks — typically, but
not always, Scandinavian men
— began the hacking process by
felling a suitable tree with a crosscut saw and then limbing it with a
double-bitted ax. The double-bitted
ax was exchanged for a broadax,
which weighed seven pounds and
had a 10- to 12-inch blade. The log’s
surfaces were then hewn along
the grain of the wood to the final
dimensions.
An experienced hack could make
up to 25 ties per day.
The tie hauler and his team of
horses stepped in when the ties
were stacked along the haul road.
Ties were hauled in the winter
and spring when snow cover made
hauling easier. Sixteen-foot long
sleds, called go-devils, could carry
50 ties per trip. Ties were stacked
until the spring thaw.
Most tie cutting areas were laid
out around major rivers, where the
ties from the smaller tributaries
could be driven downstream to
shipping points. Sometimes flumes
were built to negotiate waterways
with steep canyons such as along
the Tongue River. The tie driver,
called a river rat, was a skilled
tie handler who could wade ice
cold water over slick rocks. The
river rat’s job was to keep the ties
moving steadily, avoiding rocks,
islands or other obstructions. Lead
COURTESY PHOTO | U.S. FOREST SERVICE
These photos from 1910 show Dead Man’s Curve along the Tongue River tie flume. Four men died here in 1894.
gangs worked ahead of the river
rats to keep ties from floating into
side channels and low spots.
The first cutting operation in
the Bighorns was started in 1891
on Sheep Creek to provide 1.6 million ties for the expansion of the
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy
Railroad. A steam-powered sawmill was built to saw the lumber
needed to build a flume down
Sheep Creek to transport the ties
to the Tongue River.
The V-shaped flume was extended from Sheep Creek down the
Tongue River Canyon. It was estimated that a tie could travel 11
miles to the mouth of the Tongue
River Canyon in nine minutes.
Three to four flume walkers
patrolled the flume watching for
log and tie jams.
Main camps and secondary
camps were moved as timber
became depleted. Camps could
include a commissary, office,
boardinghouse, barns, cook house,
blacksmith shop, sawmill, meat
house, privies and root cellar.
Some hacks built their own cabins
and moved their families there.
Numerous fires, lulls in timber
contracts, litigation over worker
deaths, road disputes with the
county and depletion of timber
along the flumes and water ways
led to the demise of the tie hacking industry in the Bighorns. The
last major tie cutting operation
in the Bighorn National Forest
started west of Buffalo in late 1925.
Operations ended in about 1933.
The Wyoming railroad tie industry provided stable employment
for hundreds of local residents.
The camps required vast quantities of supplies from local ranchers, farmers and merchants. The
tie industry also contributed to the
system of mountain roads recreationists enjoy today. The Swedish,
Norwegian, Finnish, Austrian
and German immigrants drawn
to hacking brought their cultures,
customs and lifestyles that became
part of the overall American fabric.
Because one of the primary
duties of the Forest Service is to
manage and regulate the use of
timber products, the tie industry
represents a major chapter in
the history of the Forest Service.
Tie hacking’s presence resonates
today in the Bighorn National
Forest in the eponymous Tie Hack
Campground, Tie Hack Reservoir
and Tie Flume Campground.
SUSAN DOUGLAS is a public affairs specialist with the
Bighorn National Forest.
Man fined,
collected
thermal
water in
Yellowstone
YELLOWSTONE
NATIONAL PARK (AP) —
A tourist from China was
fined $1,000 for walking
off the boardwalk in the
Mammoth Hot Springs area
of Yellowstone National
Park and collecting thermal
water, apparently for medicinal purposes, park officials
said Wednesday.
A witness reported seeing
the man break through the
fragile, rock crust surrounding the hot springs. The witness took photos of the man
that were turned over to
park rangers, officials said.
The incident came only a
week after an Oregon man
died after falling into one of
Yellowstone’s hot springs.
The Chinese tourist told
rangers he did not read the
safety information given to
him when he entered the
park. The man, whose name
was not released, reportedly
wanted the water for medicinal purposes, said park
spokeswoman Charissa Reid
“The irreplaceable nature
of the thermal feature
weighed heavily in the
court’s decision to levy such
a stiff fine,” Reid said in an
emailed response to questions about the case.
The 2.2 million-acre park
has seen a string of incidents over the past month
where tourists got into trouble.
Some got too close to
wildlife and several others
walked off boardwalks near
hot springs.
On June 7, 23-year-old
Colin Nathaniel Scott of
Portland slipped on gravel
and fell into scalding, acidic
water after leaving a boardwalk in the Norris Geyser
Basin. Park officials were
unable to recover his body.
A day after Scott’s death,
six people received $130
citations for walking off
trail in the Grand Prismatic
Springs area.
Park regulations require
visitors to stay on trails
and boardwalks for their
own safety as well as to protect Yellowstone’s natural
resources. It is a violation of
federal regulations to collect
any park resources.

Similar documents

July 19, 2016 - The Sheridan Press

July 19, 2016 - The Sheridan Press Scan with your smartphone for latest weather, news and sports

More information

Discovering the universe

Discovering the universe night with a family barbecue. Also on Friday is the pet parade in Scott Park. Children can dress up their pets — any pet — and show them off. For 37 years, the pet parade has been a hallmark event ...

More information

Collecting memories of service

Collecting memories of service THE SHERIDAN PRESS | JUSTIN SHEELY

More information