A Visual Approach to Knowledge

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A Visual Approach to Knowledge
A Visual Approach to Knowledge
For every family and at every stage in life, health is the number one issue. QA International meets these
concerns with a series of medical reference works for the public at large, providing editorial content approved
by an international scientific committee and medical illustrations of unprecedented quality.
An invaluable reference for exploring the
human body in pictures and words
A comprehensive survey of the processes
occuring within the human body
The essential family reference when it comes
to understanding the treatment and prevention
of illnesses that affect the human body
From detailed sketches to virtual model, using cutting-edge technology
The Visual Dictionary
of the Human Body
An indispensable tool at home, school and the office
With over 350 highly realistic color images, precise terminology and clear
definitions, this dictionary allows readers to discover how the body works and
explore its complexities.
músculo M
músculo M
tecido M muscular
muscle tissue
tejido M muscular
tissu M musculaire
Muskelgewebe N
tessuto M muscolare
muscle | músculo M | muscle M | Muskel M | muscolo M
MÚSCULOS
estrutura F de um músculo M esquelético
structure of a skeletal muscle
estructura F de un músculo M esquelético
structure F d’un muscle M squelettique
Aufbau M eines Skelettmuskels M
struttura F di un muscolo M scheletrico
fáscia F
fascia
fascia F
fascia M
Faszie F
fascia F
músculo M liso
smooth muscle
músculo M liso
muscle M lisse
glatter Muskel M
muscolo M liscio
músculo M
muscle
músculo M
muscle M
Muskel M
muscolo M
feixe M de fibras F musculares
bundle of muscle fibers
fascículo M de fibras F musculares
faisceau M de fibres F musculaires
Muskelfaserbündel N
fascio M di fibre F muscolari
fibra F muscular lisa
smooth muscle fiber
fibra F muscular lisa
fibre F musculaire lisse
glatte Muskelfaser F
fibra F muscolare liscia
músculo M esquelético
skeletal muscle
músculo M esquelético
muscle M squelettique
Skelettmuskulatur F
muscolo M scheletrico
fibra F muscular estriada
striated muscle fiber
fibra F muscular estriada
fibre F musculaire striée
gestreifte Muskelfaser F
fibra F muscolare striata
origem F
origin
origen M
origine F
Ursprung M
origine F
perimísio M
perimysium
perimisio M
périmysium M
Perimysium N
perimisio M
fibra F muscular
muscle fiber
fibra F muscular
fibre F musculaire
Muskelfaser F
fibra F muscolare
projeção F
belly
cabeza F
chef M
Muskelkopf M
capo M
UP TO 6 LANGUAGES
(WITH DEFINITIONS: UP TO 2 LANGUAGES)
144 PAGES + INDEX
228 MM X 301 MM (9 IN. X 11⅞ IN.)
1,600 TERMS
6,600 WORDS PER LANGUAGE
(WITH DEFINITIONS: 30,800 WORDS IN THE MAIN LANGUAGE)
SRP: US$24.95
MÚSCULOS
tendão M
tendon
tendón M
tendon M
Sehne F
tendine M
tipos M de músculos M
types of muscles
tipos M de músculos M
types M de muscles M
Muskelarten F
tipi M di muscoli M
motoneurônio M
motor neuron
neurona F motora
neurone M moteur
Motorneuron N
neurone M motore
tendão M
tendon
tendón M
tendon M
Sehne F
tendine M
inserção F
insertion
inserción F
insertion F
Ansatzpunkt M
inserzione F
fibra F muscular cardíaca
cardiac muscle fiber
fibra F muscular cardiaca
fibre F musculaire cardiaque
Herzmuskelfaser F
fibra F muscolare cardiaca
músculo M cardíaco
cardiac muscle
músculo M cardiaco
muscle M cardiaque
Herzmuskeln M
muscolo M cardiaco
sarcolema M
sarcolemma
sarcolema M
sarcolemme M
Muskelfaserhülle F
sarcolemma M
miofibrila F
myofibril
miofibrilla F
myofibrille F
Muskelfibrille F
miofibrilla F
Peso-Pesado
Juntos, os cerca de 600 ossos do corpo
humano representam quase metade do
total da massa corporal.
36
37
Understanding the Human Body
A definitive guide to understanding human biology
Through stunning visual content, Understanding the Human Body presents the
various components of the human anatomy and details their functions. Combining
text with charts, diagrams and hyperrealistic illustrations, this reference guide makes
it easy to understand complex biological processes.
Neuro n s
The myelin sheath
improves the electrical
insulation of neurons.
Golgi
apparatus
Dendrites are extensions
of the cell body that
receive nerve impulses.
128 PAGES
248 MM X 195 MM (9¾ IN. X 7⅔ IN.)
APPROXIMATELY 31,000 WORDS
OVER 350 ILLUSTRATIONS
SRP: US$19.95
Schwann cell
THE AXON
The axon, a structure unique to neurons, is a cellular
extension that is attached to the cell body at the axon hillock
and is between 1 mm (in the cerebrum) and 1 m (in the leg)
long. Most axons are covered with myelin, a white fatty
substance. Schwann cells (or oligodendrocytes in the central
nervous system) deposit the myelin in layers to form a
sheath, which is divided into segments by narrow sections
called nodes of Ranvier.
Electrical signals
propagate along the
axon at a speed of up
to 400 km/h.
axon hillock
axonal
terminal bouton
nucleus of
Schwann cell
The nervous system
The nervous system
Cells that transmit nerve impulses
The nervous system is based on neurons. These highly specialized cells are unique in that they can
carry electrical and chemical signals and transmit them to other cells (nervous, muscular, glandular,
etc.). Every motor, sensory, and association neuron is made of a cell body and a number of extensions,
including dendrites, which receive electrical impulses, and axons, which transmit these impulses.
The nodes of Ranvier, which
separate Schwann cells,
accelerate propagation of
electrical signals.
Axon terminals have
a branching structure.
endoplasmic
reticulum
Some neurons are
contacted by up to
30,000 synapses.
cell nucleus
The cell body contains
the cell nucleus and
other organelles.
mitochondrion
SYNAPSES
dendrite
cell body
axon terminal
The nerve message passes from one neuron to
another at a site called the synapse. Usually,
two neurons are not in direct contact but are
separated by a very thin cleft, so the electrical
signal must be converted into a chemical signal
in order for transmission to take place.
In a chemical synapse, a
synaptic cleft separates
the two membranes.
dendrite
axon
axonal
terminal bouton
DIFFERENT TYPES OF NEURONS
Neurons are classified into three categories, according to their function.
Motor (or efferent) neurons direct nerve impulses toward muscles and
glands. Sensory (or afferent) neurons transmit messages from the
sensory receptors to the nerve centers. Finally, association neurons
(or interneurons) connect two other neurons. About 90% of all neurons
in the body are of the last type.
44
Neurons can also be distinguished by their structure. Multipolar
neurons ①, the most common, have many dendrites and a long axon.
Most are motor neurons and interneurons. Pseudounipolar neurons ②,
which are always sensory neurons, have a single extension that divides
into two branches. Finally, bipolar neurons ③ have two extensions.
axon
terminal
cell body
When a nerve impulse reaches the terminal
bouton, neurotransmitters are released into
the synaptic cleft from the vesicles that contain
them. When these molecules come into contact
with the receptors of the postsynaptic neuron,
they generate an electrical signal.
synaptic vesicle
axon
axon
terminal
neurotransmitter
dendrite
cell body
axon
neurotransmitter
receptor
postsynaptic neuron
45
Family Guide to Health
Visualize, Heal, Prevent
An essential reference when it comes to the well-being of the entire family
• Plain-language explanations complemented by
state-of-the-art visuals
• An encyclopedia of more than 400 illnesses and
ailments, illustrated and explained
• A guide to healthy living and a first aid manual
developed in collaboration with St. John Ambulance
• Validated by over 300 physicians, medical
specialists and university professors
AWARDS
• Award for Illustrated Medical Book,
Illustrated Books of Scientific or
Medical Nature – Association of
Medical Illustrators (USA)
592 PAGES + INDEX
194 MM X 248 MM (7⅝ IN. X 9¾ IN.)
250,000 WORDS, OVER 1,000 ILLUSTRATIONS
SRP: US$39.95
THE
The cardiovascular system | The body
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THE CAVITIES OF THE HEART
The heart consists of two distinct parts, each containing an auricle and a ventricle. The right part of the heart
is responsible for blood circulation towards the lungs. The left part is responsible for blood circulation to all of
the other organs. The auricles receive the blood while the larger ventricles expel it. The ventricles are closed by
cardiac valves, thin elastic structures that open to allow the passage of blood, then close to avoid its backflow.
Superior vena cava
The superior vena cava
receives the blood coming
from the head and the
upper limbs and transports
it towards the heart.
Aorta
The aorta transports the blood pumped
by the heart to the organs.
Left pulmonary artery
Right pulmonary artery
Right pulmonary veins
Pulmonary valve
The pulmonary valve
prevents the backflow of
blood from the pulmonary
trunk into the right
ventricle.
Aortic valve
The aortic valve prevents the
backflow of blood from the
aorta into the left ventricle.
Mitral valve
The mitral valve prevents the
backflow of blood from the
left ventricle to the left auricle.
Right auricle
The right auricle
receives the oxygenpoor blood from the
venae cavae.
Left ventricle
The left ventricle ejects the
oxygen-rich blood into the
aorta, towards the organs.
Tricuspid valve
The tricuspid valve
prevents the backflow
of blood from the right
ventricle to the right
auricle.
Myocardium
The myocardium consists
of muscular fibers that
form the thickest layer
of the cardiac wall.
Right ventricle
The right ventricle ejects the
oxygen-poor blood into
the pulmonary trunk.
Interventricular septum
The interventricular septum
is a divider separating the
two ventricles.
The respiratory system | The body
Mitral valve
The mitral valve is
open during diastole.
Left ventricle
Tricuspid valve
The tricuspid valve is
open during diastole.
Myocardium
Right ventricle
Inferior vena cava
2. Auricular systole
At the end of diastole, the contraction
of the auricles (or auricular systole)
completes the filling of the ventricles.
The closing of the mitral and tricuspid
valves then produces a muffled sound.
Auricles
During auricular systole,
the auricles propel
the blood they contain
into the ventricles,
which are filled to their
full capacity.
Ventricles
Pulmonary trunk
3. Ventricular systole
Ventricular systole is the period of the
cardiac cycle during which the ventricles
of the heart contract, causing the
expulsion of blood into the aorta and
the pulmonary trunk. The closing of
the aortic and pulmonary valves then
produces a sharper beat than that of
auricular systole.
Aortic valve
The aortic valve opens
permitting the ejection
of blood into the aorta.
Aorta
Pulmonary valve
The pulmonary valve opens to
permit the passage of blood
to the pulmonary trunk.
Mitral valve
The mitral valve is closed
during ventricular systole.
Tricuspid valve
The tricuspid valve is closed
during ventricular systole.
Ventricles
The ventricles contract
and pump the blood into
the arteries.
CARDIAC RHYTHM AND THE PULSE
The cardiac rhythm is the number of cardiac cycles per minute. It can be measured by medical methods such as
auscultation and electrocardiography, but also by the simple taking of the pulse. The pulse is a wave created each time
the blood is expelled from the heart during its contraction (systole). It is perceptible upon palpation of an artery located
near the surface of the skin. Its normal frequency is approximately 70 beats per minute at rest in adults, but it may exceed
100 beats per minute during physical exertion or following a strong emotion. The pulse is normally taken at the radial
artery, on the inside of the wrist, or on the common carotid artery, on the side of the neck.
First aid: How to take a pulse… page 543
251
LUNGS
THE LUNGS
Located inside the rib cage on either side of the heart, the lungs are
responsible for gaseous exchanges between the air and the blood.
Connected to the upper respiratory tracts by the bronchial tubes and the
trachea, these spongy, elastic organs, rich in blood vessels, inflate with
air, then deflate, to the rhythm of breathing.
Arteriole
The pulmonary
artery is divided into
multiple arterioles
that carry the
deoxygenated
blood to the
pulmonary alveoli.
THE PULMONARY LOBES
The pulmonary lobes are subdivisions of the lungs. More
voluminous than the left lung, the right lung consists of
three lobes, while the left lung has two due to the space
occupied by the heart between the two lungs, in the left
center of the thorax.
Bronchus
Stemming from the trachea, the bronchi or bronchial tubes
are conduits that allow the air to reach the inside of the
lungs. They divide into multiple branches in the pulmonary
tissue to form the bronchial tree.
Pulmonary artery
The pulmonary arteries carry the oxygenpoor blood from the heart to the lungs.
Pulmonary vein
The pulmonary veins carry the blood
oxygenated by the lungs to the heart.
Bronchioles
The bronchioles are the narrowest
subdivisions of the bronchial tree,
which end at the pulmonary alveoli.
Middle lobe
Right lower lobe
Pleura
The pleura is a double membrane
that envelops the lungs and covers
the inside of the ribs. Between its
two layers is a small quantity of
lubricating liquid that prevents
it from being irritated during
ventilation.
Rib
The ribs protect the heart
and the lungs. During
respiration, they expand
under the action of the
intercostal muscles.
Venule
The oxygenated blood
is transported by
venules that meet in
the pulmonary veins.
Carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide is carried
by the red blood cells
towards the lungs, where it is
eliminated by respiration.
Left lung
THE HICCUP
The hiccup is an involuntary spasm of the diaphragm that occurs in
episodes whose duration generally does not exceed more than a few
minutes. Each spasm is followed by a sound, which results in the
sudden closing of the glottis and the vibration of the vocal cords.
This is a harmless problem most often related to food ingestion:
ingesting food too quickly, in excessive quantity, or that is too hot
or too cold, etc. A hiccup attack that persists for several hours can
require the use of antispasmodics.
COUGHING
Reflex or voluntary, the cough is an abrupt and noisy exhalation that
forces the expulsion of air from the lungs. It allows the elimination
of excess mucus or irritating elements (dust, foreign body, chemical
agent) present in the larynx, trachea, or bronchial tubes. Normally
temporary, it may also indicate a respiratory problem when it
becomes chronic. Unlike dry cough, a loose cough is accompanied
by expectoration. Persistent dry coughs may be relieved with
antitussives, generally in syrup form, while loose coughs are soothed
by taking expectorants, which liquefy the mucus and facilitate
its expulsion. A spoonful of honey may also soothe slight coughs,
because it contains antioxidants and natural antibacterials.
Blood capillary
The pulmonary alveoli
are surrounded by
numerous blood
capillaries.
Oxygenated air
Alveolar cell
Endothelial cell
of the blood capillary
Left lower lobe
Right lung
Bronchioles
Air heavy with
carbon monoxide
Pulmonary alveolus
The pulmonary alveoli
are small cavities
located at the end of the
bronchioles. Arranged
in clusters, they are
surrounded by a
thin wall that permits
gaseous exchanges
with the adjacent
blood capillaries.
Left upper lobe
Right upper lobe
Trachea
Almost five inches (10 cm) in length, the trachea allows the passage of air
between the larynx and the bronchial tubes. Its interior wall is covered
with a mucous membrane with cilia, whose movements expel the solid
particles and excess mucus towards the upper respiratory tracts.
RESPIRATION
Respiration includes ventilation and hematosis.
Ventilation is the circulation of air in the lungs,
to the rhythm of inhalation and exhalation.
Hematosis is the exchange of gases between the
air and the blood, which takes place in the area of
contact between a pulmonary alveolus and blood
capillaries. The rhythm and amplitude of respiration
may vary according to the level of carbon monoxide
in the blood, age, state of health, physical activity,
and environmental factors such as altitude and
the quality of the inhaled air. The normal rhythm
in an adult in good health and at rest is 12 to 20
respirations per minute.
312
Pulmonary veins
Right auricle
The respiratory system | The body
My Notebook of Questions –
The Body
Left auricle
Cross section of the heart
250
Professor Genius –
My Scrapbook of the Human Body
Superior vena cava
Left auricle
The left auricle receives the
oxygenated blood from the
four pulmonary veins.
Inferior vena cava
The inferior vena cava receives
the blood in the abdominal area
and the lower limbs and carries
it towards the heart.
Children
1. Diastole
Diastole is the period of the cardiac cycle
during which the myocardium relaxes,
permitting the auricles and then the
ventricles to fill with blood.
Left pulmonary veins
The four pulmonary veins carry
the oxygenated blood to the
left auricle of the heart.
Pulmonary trunk
The pulmonary trunk, which
receives the oxygen-poor
blood ejected by the right
ventricle, directs it towards the
two pulmonary arteries.
THE
THE CARDIAC CYCLE
The cardiac cycle corresponds to the relaxation
(diastole) then the contraction (systole) of the
myocardium. It lasts an average of 0.8 seconds in
adults and permits the expulsion of 2.37 oz (70 ml)
of blood in the arteries.
The cardiovascular system | The body
Video
Library
THE HEART
HEART
The heart is a vital organ. As a powerful pump, it propels the blood and makes it circulate
throughout all of the body’s blood vessels. Located in the left center of the rib cage,
between the lungs, the heart contracts an average of 70 times per minute, each day pumping
7,389 quarts (7000 liters) of blood through the vascular system. This organ is essentially
formed by one muscle, the myocardium, which defines four cavities: two auricles and two
ventricles.
Oxygen
The oxygen resulting from respiration
is carried to the cells by the
hemoglobin of the red blood cells.
Diaphragm
The diaphragm is a muscle that
separates the thorax from the
abdomen. During inhalation, it
lowers while contracting, which
enables the lungs to fill up with air.
MILLIONS OF ALVEOLI
The lungs contain approximately 300 million alveoli. The total surface of
the pulmonary alveoli equals that of a tennis court.
Red blood cell
313
Virtual
Human
Body
A lifelike human body depicted from head to toe
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This interactive anatomical atlas allows
the user to view the human body from
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anatomical structures.
The stackable interactive navigation
window even allows for multiple
cross-sectional views to be displayed
simultaneously: the interrelationships
between the various systems composing
the body have never been made so
clearly visible!
1,135 defined anatomical terms
(approximately 19,00 words, including
terms and definitions)
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