MARCH 2010 www.BusinessLinkNewspaper.com THE BUSINESS

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MARCH 2010 www.BusinessLinkNewspaper.com THE BUSINESS
MARCH 2010
www.BusinessLinkNewspaper.com
THE BUSINESS LINK NIAGARA NIAGARA’S BUSINESS NEWSPAPER
21
women who mean
Business
Women Who Mean Business
by scott leslie
“With facts like these, it’s no surprise Niagara has seen its share of strong businesswomen take centre
stage in recent years.”
ob Dylan once sang that “the
times they are a’ changin’”—
and they are—particularly
when it comes to women in
today’s business world. Did
you know..?
• Over the past several decades, the number
of women in the workforce has grown dramatically. According to Statistics Canada, 58%
of all women aged 15 and over had jobs in
2006—that’s up from 42% in 1976. Women
now account for approximately 47% of the
total employed workforce.
• Women have increased their representation in several professional fields in recent
years. They currently make up over half of
those working in both diagnostic and treatment positions in medicine, related health
professions, and in business and financial
professional positions.
• The biggest growth in women employment took place during the late 1970s and
1980s. Between 1976 and 1990, for instance,
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the percentage of adult women participating in the labour force rose from 42% to
54%. (The female employment rate dipped
to 52% during the recession of the early
1990s and hovered around that level for
the rest of the decade. The share of women
with jobs began to rise again, however, increasing to 58% in 2006.)
• In the late 1970s, women aged 25 to 54years-old were only about half as likely as
their male counterparts to be working. By
2006, however, that number had risen with
77% of women in this age group employed
compared to 87% of men.
• The employment level of women with very
young children has also increased substantially. By 2004, 65% of all women with children
under the age of three were employed—more
than double the percentage of 1976.
• A growing number of women are now selfemployed. Women accounted for 35% of all
self-employed workers in 2006—up from 31%
in 1990 and 26% in 1976.
THE BUSINESS LINK NIAGARA NIAGARA’S BUSINESS NEWSPAPER
• Women are also increasingly taking over
managerial positions. In 2006, 36% of all people
employed in managerial roles were women—
up from 30% in 1987.
With facts like these, it’s no surprise Niagara
has seen its share of strong businesswomen
take centre stage in recent years. The following list of “Women Who Mean Business”
represents some of the best entrepreneurs
and business professionals that Niagara has
to offer. Wondering how they became so successful..? Read on!
“Women now
account for
approximately
47% of the total
employed workforce.”
www.BusinessLinkNewspaper.com
MARCH 2010
women who mean
MARCH 2010
www.BusinessLinkNewspaper.com
Business
THE BUSINESS LINK NIAGARA NIAGARA’S BUSINESS NEWSPAPER
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women who mean
Business
Staff from left to right are: Sally Leach, Natalie Fyke, Shirley Proulx, Elizabeth Williams, Krystal Riddell and Janet Lovsin
George Darte Funeral Chapel
Elizabeth Williams
Office Administrator
o matter what challenges life bestows
upon us the inevitable
happens, we require
the guidance and services of a funeral home.
Typically we deal with this later in our lives.
Not always though, as I experienced. My
sister, 29 years old passed away and I was
thrust into making all the arrangements for
her. I was devastated and as a result enrolled
in a grief recovery program sponsored by
my present employer, George Darte Funeral Chapel. From that experience I assisted
in the grief recovery program and working with the team at George Darte Funeral
home. I now oversee a staff of 11 as office
administrator and now in my 20th year of
dedicated service.
My motivation to serving our families
to the best of my abilities comes from being in their shoes. We need to be passionate
about helping the families that we serve.
It might mean holding their hand, giving
them a hug when they need it the most, or
listening to them share a story about their
loved one over and over again. I always remember how I felt and keep that in mind
when walking along side with the families
that we serve.
My husband of 36 years Gary and I are
the parents of two wonderful children and a
new granddaughter Marleigh whom we love
to spend our spare time with.
Janet Lovsin
Administrative Support Staff
“When you work for a successful, private family
owned funeral home in St. Catharines, George
Darte Funeral Home, it brings out a passion that
brings us all together”.
Janet a dedicated and knowledgeable team
member for the past 22 years, is always ready to
lend a helping hand for the families they serve.
Wife, and mother to many outside animals,
a member of an international sorority, Beta
Sigma Phi, which keeps her active in the local community with different venues of service
and friendships.
Proof to success is commitment; along with
sincere interest in and concern for the needs
and values of the families and individuals she
interacts with.
Sally Leach
Executive Assistant
As a 23 year employee serving as a receptionist, grief recovery facilitator, office manager, executive assistant, and being a member of the Bereavement Resource Council
of Niagara, I have always felt a deep satisfaction and pride in helping our families
at their time of need, during and after the
funeral. The most rewarding part of my job
is when someone expresses their thanks
and appreciation for helping them through
a very difficult time, especially in my role
as a bereavement facilitator. That is what
makes working in a funeral home so unique
and fulfilling for me.
Shirley Proulx
Funeral Director Supervisor
What motivates me is the fact that my
profession allows me to have a very strong
sense of pride and to feel that I can be a
source of strength for others. A funeral
director has the honour of reaching into
a family’s deepest moment of grief and
gently walking with them to celebrate the
life lived. The honour of presenting a last-
ing memory picture after a long illness. To
hold a hand, to receive a hug, to know I
helped, brings me back day after day with a
renewed faith in humanity
Krystal Riddell
Funeral Director
As a funeral director, I find there is always an
opportunity to expand my knowledge. I enjoy
meeting people within the community. What
motivates me to succeed is being able to have
the honour and privilege in helping to serve
families at a difficult time in their lives as well
as being able to give back to the community,
in which I live
Natalie Fyke
Funeral Director
Knowing that my career allows me to help and
guide families through a difficult time gives
me a good feeling and sense of pride. I want
to be a well respected and active community
member. With this goal in mind, the people I
meet are a driving force in what motivates me
to give back to those around me. I feel good
when others do!
585 Carlton Street, St. Catharines • 905.937.4444 • www.dartefuneralhome.com
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THE BUSINESS LINK NIAGARA NIAGARA’S BUSINESS NEWSPAPER
www.BusinessLinkNewspaper.com
MARCH 2010
women who mean
MARCH 2010
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Business
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women who mean
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Business
THE BUSINESS LINK NIAGARA NIAGARA’S BUSINESS NEWSPAPER
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MARCH 2010
women who mean
MARCH 2010
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