a pdf of the 2011 Pilothouse Guide

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a pdf of the 2011 Pilothouse Guide
Supplement to
&
July 2011
Port services
Associations
Classic tales & more!
Promoting
sustainable
economies
through
sustainable
fisheries for
over 30 years.
www.alaskaseafood.org
PHG_cvrs_full.indd 1
5/16/11 3:11 PM
JULY 2011
features
4 Biding their time
26 Talkin’ bout China Cove
Patience pays off big as the crew of the
Osprey lands a humongous set in Alaska’s
winter herring fishery.
A Port Townsend yard busts out a steambox
on wheels as it builds an elegant 42-foot
wooden troller.
8 Crabber’s plight
28 Bringing their vision to life
The 1981 Bering Sea king crab season is
the worst of times as the critters vanish
and the gravy train derails.
The work boat they wanted didn’t exist. So
four fishermen designed and built an oddlooking but versatile 32-foot bay boat.
12 The Willie Nelson of fishing
DEPARTMENTS
Barry Fisher, a 1979 NF Highliner,
smokes the Soviets on a joint venture
to catch yellowfin sole.
18 Smooth transition
Our port services listings for Sitka and
84 other West Coast, Alaska and British
Columbia ports start on p. 40.
Cover: Fishing boats on Sitka Sound.
Dave Dapcevich photo
The 123-foot Sea Wolf’s switch from joint
venture boat to delivering pollock to shorebased processors is a howling success.
Editorial3
Directory of Fishermen’s
Organizations32
Port Index
39
Port Listings
40
Advertiser Index
79
Last Set
80
22 Captains courageous
Tender skippers must deliver their goods
even when rough seas are threatening to
submerge the back deck.
National Fisherman (ISSN 0027-9250), July 2011, is published monthly by Diversified Business Communications, 121 Free St., P.O. Box 7438, Portland, ME 04112-7438. Subscription prices: 1 year - U.S. $22.95; 2 years U.S. $43; 3 years U.S. $62. These
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2 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
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T
he staff of National Fisherman is in the habit of looking to Alaska
for a glimpse at the future of fishing. The fleets and abundant
species of the North Pacific set high standards for new management
techniques as well as advances in
handling, processing and marketing
across the country.
In a welcome contrast every year,
the Pilothouse Guide gives us the
opportunity to look back at the
ground floor of Alaska fisheries.
We peek through the window
of time to see how the wild and
woolly North Pacific evolved into a
touchstone for sense and stability
in commercial fishing.
I have no doubt some old timers
(and greenhorns, too) look back
fondly on the days of derby-style
fishing, whatever the risks. Tales of peril are best told when the danger
no longer looms.
But just because no Alaska fishery currently holds the title of deadliest
catch doesn’t mean the elements of nature are suddenly warm and
inviting. Our fisheries are safer, to be sure, but the work of fishing is
by no means predictable and secure.
The Bering Sea is still the Bering Sea, and winter is still long and
dark enough to keep the ocean cold all year.
The pioneering spirit of Alaskans (and those who fish in Alaska)
from the good-old days has carried over into the modern-day frontiers
of globalism and resource management.
Every year Pilothouse Guide celebrates that driving force to keep
innovating and keep fishing. The industry of fishing in Alaska may
have changed, but the people have not.
Though I hail from the East Coast, where fish politics is steeped in
centuries of history, I have a sincere appreciation for the deep cultural
reverence of fish, fishing and fishermen one finds in Alaska and the
Pacific Northwest.
That is the attitude that keeps ports healthy and thriving with
working waterfronts. And for that, we can all be grateful.
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 3
Reprinted from
February 1978
Going after winter herring
by Jack Fargnoli
ishing is always a gamble, but fishing for winter herring is even worse. After all, if only a
dozen boats choose to bother with a fishery in
Southeast Alaska, there must be a reason.
Don Kalk, skipper of the Petersburg seiner Osprey
had first supplied it when he asked if I’d like to go.
“You won’t make any money at it,” he’d said, “and
you’ll spend most of your time just sitting around.”
That was on top of
the fact that we’d be
fishing at night, in
winter, in one of the
coldest parts of the
country. Still, being a
gambler, I’d said yes.
After all, as any fisherman will tell you,
sometimes you just
have to go for it.
Four months later,
that very gamble is
on my mind as the
Osprey pulls out of
Harris Boat Harbor
in Juneau for our last
trip of the season,
to Pelican. Don and
Lisa, his wife, are in
the wheelhouse, Allison is in the galley
stowing her food supplies, and Stu and I are out
on deck. The night is cold and clear, with no moon,
and lime-green ice chunks are bobbing in Gastineau
Channel.
As we watch the orange lights of downtown Juneau disappear, I know both Stu and I are hoping
this trip turns out better than the others. In four
months we’ve had only one full load, and in the
three months Stu’s been aboard we’ve had the gear
in the water only six times. Not exactly what you’d
call heavy gambling.
If there’s a word to describe winter herring fishing, it’s patience. Most of our nights have been spent
in the galley, in rain gear, listening in the dark to
the scratch-scratch of the sonar from the wheelhouse. Since herring are spooked by light, we’ve
read and tried to play Scrabble by candlelight, and
many nights have just slept where we were. As with
SAC interceptor pilots, our routine has been one of
F
4 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
perpetual readiness, the decks always set to go.
Many nights we’ve gone out on deck only to come
back in when the skittish herring disappeared.
Sometimes they’re too deep, sometimes too shallow.
Or they’re on the beach, or clustered around a pinnacle and won’t move off. Twice, too, we’ve had big
sets which we had to turn loose because the herring
were too small. It’s been frustrating.
But all that is behind us now. Refreshed by our
Christmas layover in Juneau, and fueled by the
adrenaline always accompanying stretch runs, everyone is hopeful of getting a load in Lisianski Inlet,
where the opening is. I hope so. It would help our
spirits much more than our pockets.
We even have a Fish and Game observer with us
for the trip, Al Havens, who’s just been transferred
down to Juneau from Soldotna. He’s brought Tbones, a good sign. Everybody is in good spirits as
we swing around Douglas Island and head north for
Point Retreat.
Of course it hasn’t all been hard. Lately there have
been green and purple northern lights in Clarence
Strait. Too, with our steel hull. we’ve spent many
beautiful nights searching by moonlight in small
ice-covered bays. We’ve also hunted deer during
the days, and another time, socked into Idaho Inlet
for two days, we trawled for shrimp, getting lots of
pinks and stripers. Empty-handed in other respects,
Scott (with rifle) and Skipper
Don (in skiff) going deer
hunting, while Allison and Stu
(with float) ham it up in Idaho
Inlet, Chichagof Island.
we’ve taken our wages in things
such as these. A not altogether insubstantial prosperity.
As we come around Point Couverden there are porpoises and
snow. The Coast Guard station at
Sisters Island is ahead now, looking like an oasis of lights against
the blackness. In the darkened
wheelhouse with Stu, himself a
teamster, I feel like a long distance trucker watching a small
town creep by in the night. Neither of us says anything, but it’s
obvious we’re both still wondering about this opening. The fourhour watch drags by.
There’s been humor, too. Once,
coming into Hood Bay, I fled the
fo’c’sle because of a hull-crushing
sound which turned out to be
merely ice cover that we were
breaking. Fleeing for my life, I
bolted into the wheelhouse only
to find Don and Stu laughing,
waiting for me to appear. Another
time Skipper Don tossed a firecracker down into the fo’c’sle to
roust his sleepy crew. And asked
by Allison how he could stand the
tedium, Don had replied, “Why?
Every morning I get to wake up in
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July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 5
Reprinted from
February 1978
so we run out to Nose Head to
switch nets with our packer for
the trip, the Sumner Strait.
The skipper, Bruce Lewis, has
a mammoth seine, and with its
heavy chain lead line he says it’ll
fish down to forty fathoms. As we
pile the mountainous net aboard
the Osprey I myself for the first
time feel optimistic.
At 7:00 pm Don finds a school
of herring, loses it, then finds it
again. In 46 fathoms, we make a
set.
If salmon season is the Super
Bowl of Alaskan seining, winter
herring fishing is the slow-motion replay. Running the gear is
the same, but everything is done
at half speed. The power skiff
doesn’t blast off the stern when
released, but instead eases away
into the night. Nor is there any
6 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
hard uproarious towing against
the tide. Rather, the two boats quietly, almost thievingly round-haul,
closing up as quickly as possible.
On deck the atmosphere of
slow-motion is the same. Any
sharp sound prior to pursing up
(dropped clip or figure-eight, etc.)
will spook the herring, so we all
move about slowly and cautiously
in the eerie red of the work lights.
With our bulky jackets and rain
gear we look more like slow-moving astronauts than fishermen, but
moving carefully is absolutely essential.
As Lisa and I purse, the lines
are tight and bang in our hands
as if we’re hung up. We exchange
glances: not on our last trip, please.
The lines keep coming in, though,
and after an eternity the rings are
finally aboard. We start piling.
As the big seine comes up, the
corks — my job — creep over the
power block like a procession of
armadillos slowly cresting a hill.
The massive web floats down to
Allison like a black snow. Even
the great chain lead line quits being heavy and Lisa piles it silently
on the carpet. There’s mud on it
too: even in 46 fathoms, it has
scraped bottom.
Now the crab lights are on, and
everyone breathes a sigh of relief.
There are enough herring in the
net to fill our packer and send it
off to Juneau Cold Storage. We’ve
done it. At least we’ll have something to show for our last outing.
Brailing in the harsh pool of the
lights, we’re surrounded by what
could easily be an infinite blackness. There’s the air of a mystery
play to it all, of an ancient exchange ritual between man and
cold ocean. We could be anybody,
anywhere, anytime.
It’s 2:30 am before we finish,
but the Sumner Strait is now on
her way with 45 tons of goodlooking herring. For the first time
in weeks, we go to bed happy.
The big surprise, however, is
reserved for the following night.
After sleeping all day, we head
back out towards the mouth of
the inlet and at 6:30 pm make another set. This one is just gigantic,
with herring boiling the water all
the way to the far reaches of the
corkline.
Skipper Don says it’s the biggest set he’s ever seen — perhaps
150 tons. Enough for three boats
if he’s right. He goes inside to call
for anybody else who’s around
and when he comes back out he’s
laughing. The Cape Falcon’s coming, he says, and they’re bringing
along the Ancient Mariner, both
Pelican boats. “They don’t believe
we have that many fish,” he says.
“They’ll see.”
Meanwhile. Al Havens, the Fish
and Game monitor, is watching from up on the bridge, say-
ing over and over again, “Do you
guys always fish like this?” If only
that were true, Al Havens, I’m
thinking, if only that were true.
Within minutes the Cape Falcon
is alongside, and using her 30foot open-ended brailer we start
taking the herring into our hold.
In the darkness the Ancient Mariner has come up, too. I can also
see Stu standing up out in the
skiff, wondering just how many
fish we’ve caught.
The long yellow brailer moves
back and forth through the net
like a giant serpent, raising its
head and tumbling each load of
herring down its neck into our
hold. Back and forth, back and
forth, until we have 45 tons in our
hold and another ton or two on
deck. We’d like more, a full deck
load, but would probably only
lose them overboard out in Icy
Strait. No need to be greedy.
We load the Cape Falcon after
ourselves, then the Ancient Mariner. Between last night’s catch,
we’ve exhausted Lisianski Inlet’s
200-ton quota, so Al Havens officially declares the opening closed.
After eight hours of brailing not
one of us is tired enough to notice. Outside of ten tons caught
the night before by the Cape Falcon, we’ve taken everything: the
grand slam, the hat trick. Back in
the galley afterwards we break
out Stu’s bottle of Courvoisier and
have a tired but long overdue celebration.
It’s just 1:00 am as we leave
Lisianski Inlet and turn into Icy
Strait. How good to be going
home, and with a full load. It may
have been a long season but it’s
had a great ending. Plus, there
have been the good times.
As far as I’m concerned, the
gamble has been a good one. For
love or money, the saying goes,
but as the Osprey points towards
Juneau I’m thinking that with
winter herring it’s a little bit of
both.
You fish, we’ll fly.
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July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 7
Reprinted from
November 1981
‘It doesn’t really matter why the crab
aren’t here, they just aren’t.’
The beast of ugly seasons
By Brad Matsen
or the first couple of weeks of the Bering Sea
king crab season, it made perfect sense, in a
twisted sort of way, to just forget that the forecasts said the crab had vanished. After all, it’s a little
tough to go out into one of the meanest oceans in the
world, burn up enough fuel to light Vegas for maybe
a year, and run the risk of being maimed or killed unless, well, there’s enough money in it.
So during the early going, the wisdom on the radio
from the grounds was: “The first trip doesn’t mean
much, anyway. They’re all dug down in the mud,” and
Brad Matsen photos
F
John M. Pirak, master of the Libra: “The payments
don’t stop if the weather gets bad, so we don’t
stop fishing.”
“They’re here, they’re just not feeding,” and “somebody’s got to be on ’em.”
In Dutch Harbor and Akutan, packers were going
through the usual motions, flying in hundreds of workers at $800 a crack round trip, tuning up the cooking
and freezing equipment, and generally hoping that the
news wouldn’t be all that bad, that the great swarms
of crab would materialize. For five years, the king crab
season had been a license to print money for almost
everyone who showed up out on the Chain, and it was
clear that the expectations were going to die hard.
At Pan Alaska, the tidy blue and white compound on
the Unalaska side of Dutch, Superintendent Greg Gerhardstein held twice daily séances known as “radio
schedule,” when he called around his fleet for scores,
parts and supply orders, and delivery times. Assembled in the office with him were his foremen, parts
boss, assistants of one sort or another, and, crouched
in the corner, the beast of ugly seasons.
8 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
The first loads were coming in
after a full week of fishing and the
outlook wasn’t brilliant. The high
boat came in with about half a
load, and the skip molts and tired
crab shot the dead loss way up. But
Gerhardstein was hanging in there,
and his strong, polite voice reached
a couple of hundred miles across
the Bering Sea.
“Ah, Libra, Libra, Libra. You there,
John?” “Yep. Good morning, Greg.”
“Ah, good morning John. We’ve
got you down here for Wednesday
night, is that still good?” “Sounds
good. We’re still Yankee Lima on
the score. And we’ll need somebody to look at our deck hoist.”
“Yeah, roger that. You need somebody to look at the deck hoist.”
Over in the corner, Daryl Harford
scribbles a note on his pad. Daryl is
the shore man for the seven boats
of Bill White’s “Astrology Fleet,” Libra, Taurus, Aquarian, Virgo, Aries,
Commodore, and the catcher-processor Jeffron.
“Ah, roger, roger, John. That’s
Yankee Lima, Yankee Lima.” Gerhardstein looks at an assistant,
who thumbs through a code book
to translate Yankee Lima to get the
number of crab Libra has in her
tanks. “Yeah, that’ll be Wednesday,
then, John. How’s it going now?”
“Oh, getting pretty scratchy, but
I figure it’s the equinox. They’re
here somewhere.” Heads nod in the
room, as though to say, of course.
If a Bering Sea veteran thinks the
crab are around, that’s good news,
good news; but in the corner the
beast sneers at the optimism.
“Okay, then, we’ll see you.” “Yeh,
Greg. One more thing, we’ll need
somebody to look at Bob’s back
when we get in. It’s hurting him, I
guess.” “Roger that, John. You need
somebody to look at Bob’s back.
Yeah, well, good fishing. WGG65
clear.” “Libra, clear.”
“Ah, Ocean Dynasty, Ocean Dynasty, the WGG65,” Gerhardstein
says, sounding a little like Edward
R. Murrow. And so it went. All the
scores, translated with the code
book, were grim. After a full week,
the top trips were around 90,000
pounds — 250,000 would have been
okay last year — and many, many
boats were dragging in with exhausted crews and 40,000 pounds.
Though the dock price at the
opening was $1.27 and sure to go
up, most of that increase over last
year’s 70¢ to 90¢ per pound would
be eaten up by the fuel and expenses of longer trips and more running
around to find the crab.
And in the face of his overhead,
Gerhardstein was remarkably cool.
Pan Alaska hired 400 people to run
the three shore lines at Unalaska,
“We’re trying
to get used
to a few less
zeros around
here.”
— Frank Bohannon,
the Neahkahnie
and the costs of food, housing and
transportation are astronomical and
fixed. Down in the plant, as the first
loads were coming in, the butchers,
shakers, boxers, and everybody else
were reading the handwriting on
the wall: Layoffs. Even if you stayed
around, it was hardly worth it to
hole up in the Aleutians if, in three
weeks, you work a total of 40 hours.
The rule for a processing worker is
“no crab, no work, no money.”
“The best thing about this kind of
work way out here is that you can
keep what you make, if you make
anything,” said Keith Mattson, a lead
man on the case up crew who’s been
at Pan Alaska for two years straight.
“Unless you’re gambling or drinking it all away. The worst times are
like now, when there’s not a lot of
work, and nothing to do. Then you
end up in the Elbow Room, or the
Unisea.”
The local thumping parlors, as
George Fulton calls the Unisea and
the Elbow Room, weren’t quite the
spectacles of years past, unless you
happened to be sitting with a crew
from one of the oil company exploration boats. Like a new species
colonizing a remote bay, the oil
folks are starting to hit Dutch Harbor, and lot of people are waiting
in line for the money Big Awl will
spread around. Though the dismal
crab season is totally unrelated to
the coming oil development on the
Bering Sea, nobody is talking about
dancing with the one who brung
them, so it’s good-bye crabbers, oh,
so you’re a geologist, tell me about
it.
At sea, with the fleet, the rule is
slightly different from the one at a
packing plant: No crab, more work,
less money. If you’re not on the
crab, you have to look for them, and
that means more picking and stacking, exhausted crews, more injuries
and less incentive to hit the deck
when the skipper calls “Showtime.”
And if you don’t ever find the
crab — because there aren’t many
around — things get particularly
grim in a way that the Bering Sea
fleet is not accustomed to. For quite
a few years, the routine has been
to run a day, spend three or four
days plugging the boat, run in,
wait in line, unload, and get out as
quickly as possible. This year, the
trips were 7-10 days long, unloading was a snap, and skippers and
crew unconsciously found more
and more reasons to stretch their
time at the dock as it grew obvious
that two-thirds of the crab really
had disappeared.
“Why can’t everybody remember that this business just goes in
cycles,” said skipper Mike Angell,
laughing, on the bridge of The Bulldog. “Some of these guys got into
million dollar boats for $10,000
down and are wondering why
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 9
Reprinted from
November 1981
they can’t keep up now. I could
have done it, but I said ‘no way.’ It
doesn’t really matter why the crab
aren’t here, they just aren’t. It could
be the water temperature, it could
be overfishing, it could be that the
cod and pollock ate them five years
ago. Who knows.”
“I’ll tell you what it is,” said John
Pirak, master of the Libra who had
materialized out of the night with
what, at the moment, was the biggest trip into Pan Alaska so far. “It’s
the goddamn foreign trawlers. You
can’t drag all over the Bering Sea,
and expect to have any crab left.”
Pirak is tired and grouchy.
“You ought to make a trip with
me; I’ll show you the foreign fleet.
It’s like a city out there, and I’ll bet
half of them aren’t supposed to be
where they are.”
OK. A ride into the Bering Sea. “If
you can’t stay a full trip, we’ll get
you aboard a boat that’s coming in.
You really ought to see it, though,”
Pirak says, now on the bridge of
the Libra. “I’ll show you what a season like this is all about. You have
to know how to scratch; you have
to pick pots until you’re blind; you
have to fish every area you can,
too. We went up to Norton Sound
this year, even. And we’re going to
go to Adak. And then we’re going
to put drag gear on and learn how
to do that. You can’t just give up.”
On the bulkhead in the pilothouse is a plaque to Pirak after the
Norton Sound expedition. “We are
on a mission from God to pick pots
for the lord,” it reads. “That’s from
the Blues Brothers movie,” Pirak
says. “You ought to see it. What it
means is that this crew can pick
and stack — which is about all we
did up there — faster than they can
pick and dump. You’ll see.”
With promises that transfer at
sea in a survival suit is routine, I
leave on the Libra. On the way out
of Dutch after dumping the dead
loss crab and the garbage, the crew
assembles on the deck for a beer,
to toast the last trip, the coming
one, and the sense of teamwork
10 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
“I’ll show you the foreign fleet. It’s like a city out there, and I’ll bet
half of them aren’t supposed to be where they are.”
that psyches these guys up for what
one of them called the N.F.L. of the
fishing business. Bill, Ski, Loren, and
Tom are there. A new, green teenager just joined the crew and so far no
one has said anything at all to him.
A sixth man, Bob, is in the engine
room. Bob got hit by a pot during
tanner season, and came away with
a spinal concussion. At 37, he figures
this year is the end of it for him. “I’ll
still fish,” he says, “but not this. I’m
too old, and if you can’t keep up on
deck you get hurt. I’ve been at sea
for 20 years, though. I just don’t do
too well on land.”
A day later, before we reach the
grounds, Bob bends over from a
wheelhouse chair to put his shoes
on and can’t straighten up. He will
spend most of the trip in his bunk, in
great pain that even the pills he has
can’t touch. Injuries are part of it, I’m
told, and virtually every boat loses
a man a year to an accident. “If you
don’t have injuries, you’re probably
not working,” one man said. “Most of
the time it’s a bitch though because
it’s usually some guy who doesn’t
know what he’s doing who hurts
somebody who does.” Everybody’s
leery of green men on deck, and
the veterans are worried that as the
paychecks grow smaller, so will the
skill of the crews drop off. “They’ll
be guys who work cheap. There’ll
be more injuries,” one man said.
Pirak decides to stop in Akutan
for hanging bait, and to pick up
some supplies for the rest of the
“Astrology Fleet” at the Ultra Processor, anchored there. The crew of
the Ultra hasn’t seen a crab for two
days, and the atmosphere aboard
the big blue floater is dismal. Tied
alongside as a refrigerated warehouse and extra sleeping quarters
is the Al-Ind-Esk-a-Sea, a Knot ship
conversion that has taken its lumps
during the last two years.
“We’re having a dance tonight,”
says an Ultra crew member who
came to Alaska from New York.
“Maybe they’ll let us have a can of
beer or two. This whole thing is
pretty grim. I’ve worked six hours
since I got here, and talk about
boring. There is just nothing to do,
nothing but wait.”
Out of Akutan in the middle of
the night, the weather changes
from mild to wild. I’m accused of
whistling in the wheelhouse as I sit
in the galley watching “North Dallas Forty” on the TV. It’s a movie
about the National Football League,
about the abuses the players have
to suffer for the money and fame.
“The payments don’t stop if the
weather gets bad, so we don’t stop
fishing,” Pirak says. “Everybody in
the wheelhouse who’s working
to pay last year’s taxes raise your
hands,” one man says. Everybody
laughs and raises their arms. Because the bulk of a crab crewman’s
income comes at the end of a calendar year, the IRS lets them defer
their taxes until the following year.
That worked fine until 1981.
The seas build to 20 feet, the
wind to 40 knots, by the time Pirak arrives at what he calls his test
gear.
“I sacrifice pots in places just in
case they show up where you don’t
expect them to. You have to hunt
them.”
On the radar, Pirak picks up a
large trawl fleet, and in an hour,
we’re jogging a hundred yards from
a Japanese catcher boat, its skipper
smiling broadly out the pilothouse
window as he hauls back. “I’ll bet
he’s not supposed to be here,” Pirak says. “He’ll haul and run, you
wait and see.” And the skipper of
the 180-foot dragger does just that,
heading west to the mother ship
with a 40-ton haul of pollock on
deck.
“I call the Coast Guard all the
time,” Pirak says. “They get sick of
hearing from me but they never
do anything about these guys. I’m
a licensed master so they have to
take my protest, but they tell me
the foreigners have just as much
right to be here as I do and that’s
bullshit. I’m going to go to London for a dragging school and I
don’t want to have to compete with
these guys. These are our fish,” Pirak says. “And besides, they hit the
small ones too hard. Did you see
the size of the mesh on that haul?”
For four days, the crew of the Libra picked pots for the Lord, but
with slim results. Pirak’s coding buddies on the radio report similar low
scores and all of a sudden, even a
20-crab per pot average looks like
fat city. And then it’s time for me to
leave, on a day with standing seas
that make the horizon look like a
saw blade in the dim light of the
Bering Sea morning.
The crew streams about 150 fathoms of line astern to another “Astrology boat” — the Taurus, command
of Bob Nelsen — and Pirak swings
the Libra 180 degrees so we are on
a closing course with the Taurus,
about 200 yards off her beam. I am
on deck, in a survival suit with a
life ring around my middle and the
line to the Taurus fixed to the life
ring. Loren gives me a shot of Wild
Turkey from his going-home bottle,
Bill tells me to sit on the rail, and a
few seconds later, tells me to jump.
I bob beside the Libra, frightened
that I’ll crash into the hull; then I
feel the tug from the Taurus’ pot
hauler and I’m on my way. Just
as I begin to relax and enjoy the
ride, I pop off the crest of one of
the 20-foot swells, turn in midair
and fall back into the sea. To my
horror, I find that I am now being
towed face forward, and I realize
what a sucker I am; I feel like a
fool not realizing that dozens of
things can go wrong in a deal like
this. I try to shift around in the
life ring, and just as I succeed at
that, I look over my shoulder to
see the numbers on the stern of
the Taurus. The prop, I think. But
Nelsen swings the stern away, and
moments later, pale and shaken, I
am on the deck of the Taurus, unable to stand up.
“How’s fishing?” I ask, when I’m
able to speak.
“Oh, not so hot,” one of the crewmen says, “But they got to be here
somewhere. Somebody’s on ’em.”
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 11
Reprinted from
February 1981
Barry Fisher and the
yellowfin sole connection
By Brad Matsen
arry Fisher is one of those
guys who ends up being
called the dean of something, and he didn’t get that way by
tagging along behind the pack. He
has parlayed success in everything
from trawling to a professorship at
a major university into a personality
that is considered alternately abrasive and inspiring. A woman with
considerable savvy in the sea trades
once said, “If Willie Nelson were a
dragger, he’d be Barry Fisher.”
Last summer, Fisher and five other small-trawler skippers lit into
the Bering Sea and a whole bunch
of yellowfin sole on a joint venture with the Russians, and came
back with some good looking balance sheets and heads full of pride
because they beat the Russians
like drums on daily tonnage. “We
weren’t lucky,” Fisher said. “We
planned, and we planned, and we
plugged those Soviet ships with
fish.”
Quite a few years ago, when
Fisher was contemplating a move
from Boston to Newfoundland, his
wife said, “Barry, you shouldn’t do
it. It’s not worth it to go up there
with a million dollar toy to prove
once more that you can outsmart a
codfish.” So he moved to Oregon,
where he eventually outsmarted
West Coast codfish, and now he’s
moving to Alaska.
“I figure I’ve got ten good years
left, and I’m going to spend them
up here, I’m moving my base to
Anchorage, and my new boat
is built to fish up here,” said the
52-year-old Fisher. “I don’t want
to run a processor; I don’t want to
run a government bureau. I want
B
12 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
to fish and that’s what I’m going to
do, I’m going to catch bottomfish.”
“One of the worst things that happened up here happened a couple
of years ago when everybody was
ballyhooing the great bottomfish
bonanza. People always think bonanza when they think Alaska, but
there’s no treasure up here in the
ocean. There is a hell of a fish resource that can be exploited with a
lot of hard work.”
For a man who has been footloose most of 52 years, Fisher came
from an unlikely family: they made
anchors in a Gloucester, Mass., factory. At 14, Fisher figured the anchor business might tie him down
too much, so he went fishing. Then
came the Army, the Korean War,
and a high school equivalency di-
ploma. At that point, he enrolled
at Harvard. A few years later it was
Barry Fisher, Harvard AB in Economics and Modern Asian History,
Harvard masters in Anthropology,
high school teacher, publishing
house denizen, and, just when
anchor terror was about to set in
again, he went back to fishing.
By this time, the early ’60s had
rolled around and Fisher was running a dragger out of New Bedford. He lost that boat in a fire,
which might have been fortuitous
since, in his words, “The foreigners were tearing the Atlantic apart
and prices were bad…”
Fisher figured he’d go drill
around out of Newfoundland, but
right about that time the “outsmarting a codfish with a million
dollar toy” attitude was in the
wind at Barry’s house, so instead
he took a Sea Grant job at Oregon
State University. A fisherman who
was also a bona fide professor was
a hot item.
Fisher enjoyed a few prolific
years at OSU, teaching courses in
applied fisheries science, things
like net work and trawler operations. He published seven articles
during his five years in the groves
of academe, but finally left after
what he called “a series of misunderstandings.”
“I think I just expected too much
of the academic community,” Fisher said, “A lot of it looked ridiculous to me. For instance, once I
proposed a course in net mending and construction which was
turned down in spite of the fact
that they were giving graduate
credit for blacksmithing, for Christ
sake. So I gave the course a new
name — ‘The Applied Hydrodynamics of Marine Organism Sampling
Instruments’ — and it got through.
What bullshit.”
Fisher then dove from the ivory
tower back into the heart of the food
chain and bought himself a 50-foot
dragger with a 6-71 GM. He made
money. He made enough to build
Excalibur. “That boat has been a
phenomenal producer,” Fisher said.
“I need a bigger boat for Alaska
now, but for a 60-foot boat. Excalibur did everything I asked of her.”
Fisher talks about Excalibur with
the same respectful tone Willie reserves for Luckenbach, Texas. Not a
few people are genuinely surprised
that he’s selling her.
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July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 13
Reprinted from
February 1981
it numbers lit up Fisher’s ledgers
and he expanded his horizons
with a pair of 86-foot mid-water
trawlers owned in partnership
with some other people. In 1977,
Fisher became what some call “politically visible.”
“I got involved. I mean I started
talking to people publicly and privately when the whole CCF (Capital Construction Fund) deal looked
like a problem. They were building up a fleet with no market and
harvesting capacity, so it was a
time for visibility. I depend on the
fishing business and I wanted to
have something to say about how
it was going to look in the future.”
In December, at the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council, Captain Barry Fisher delivered
a candid report on last summer’s
yellowfin sole joint venture. Traditionally fishermen have been
reluctant to disclose the intrica-
cies of the operations, but Fisher
is off that beat, too. Every chapter
and verse of his yellowfin venture
is available industry-wide from
the Alaska Fisheries Development
Foundation (AFDF).
Last year AFDF decided to sponsor several bottomfish demonstrations with government guarantees
on the daily gross and a pretty
thick nickel thrown in for conversion costs. When Fisher first heard
about the plans he started bellowing, figuring that fish caught under
such subsidized conditions would
eventually reach a market in competition with his own, privately financed catch.
The AFDF ventures are currently
underway, and Fisher took off in
his own direction. Apparently Sara
Hemphill, the AFDF director, said
the right things to Fisher because
he’s in the fold, and his study on the
venture promises to be a landmark
in terms of detail.
“Right now, joint ventures are
the best way to do it as far as
breaking into the markets,” Fisher
said. “I still feel that these government projects almost always fail
because none of the actors stand
to lose their own money.”
On the other hand, Fisher is a
director of the Oregon equivalent
of AFDF, the West Coast Fisheries Development Foundation. “I’m
resigning from that because I’m
moving up here,” he said. “I don’t
object to the government effort
in developing bottomfish as long
as they aren’t in competition with
private enterprise.”
“Listen,” Fisher said after delivering his report to the NPFMC,
“The only way you prove anything
in this business is to put fish over
the dock and make a profit on that
fish. We need government data and
information, but you can really see
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14 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
the difference between a commercial venture and government
venture when it comes to proving
something about the resource.”
“And there’s one other thing,”
he went on. “To deliver to a plant
in Kodiak, a fishing boat has to
spend two thirds of its time as
a freighter or a warehouse. I’m
not saying that the Kodiak thing
(Alaska Food Company and International Seafoods of Alaska, Inc.)
can’t be successful, but it’s a whole
lot more sensible to develop an atsea venture in the Bering Sea.”
Fisher’s yellowfin sole report will
be published this winter by AFDF.
It is written with the confidence of
a practiced writer, and the insight
of a successful fisherman.
Here are a few excerpts from the
report:
“Marine Resources Company,
Inc. of Seattle, Washington, conducted a joint venture fishery
involving three USSR processing
ships (BMRTs) and five small to
medium sized American trawlers
in the Bering Sea in the summer of
1980 ( June 3 to September 18). The
five American catcher boats caught
8,638 metric tons of food grade yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera), 1,421
metric tons of Pacific cod (Gadus
macrocephalus) and 3,118 metric
tons of fishmeal grade product for
a grand total 13,177 metric tons
valued at approximately $1.6 million during this period. The catches
were immediately transferred via
detachable cod end to three Soviet
processing ships for processing and
freezing.
“The yellowfin sole (and smaller amounts of rock sole, Alaska
plaice and lemon sole) were culled,
washed, and frozen round in ten
kilogram blocks, packed four to a
carton ... The subsequent sale of the
product resulted in “export dollars”
coming home to the United States.
The fishery was an economic success for the participating American
trawlers, Soviet processing ships,
and Marine Resources, Inc.
“The fishery was the first commercial penetration by American
vessels in the Bering Sea yellowfin
sole fishery, a species previously
exploited only by foreign nations.
Careful and detailed planning for
the fishery began in October of
1978. It is felt that the planning
and execution of this fishery may
well serve as a case-study in bottomfish fishery development in
Alaskan waters.
“…The venture was borne entirely by private ‘risk’ capital. No
government support was sought or
received, no minimum payments
or support fees were requested by
the fishermen. The Soviet processors were compensated only for
the fish processed and no support
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July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 15
Reprinted from
February 1981
payments were received by the officers and crews of the Soviet processors other than minimum wages paid during transit to and from
the fishing grounds.
“ ... Briefly put, the fishery was
prosecuted under the game rules
of a free market economy, or as
one skipper put it, ‘Nobody promised us a rose garden; if we catch
fish we all eat; catch a lot of fish
we eat damn well; catch no fish
and we’ll all starve.’
“The (yellowfin sole) fishery was
first prosecuted by the Japanese as
early as 1930. Mother ship operations began in 1933 off Bristol Bay.
Catches rapidly rose as high as
43,000 metric tons in 1937. There
was no fishery in 1938 and 1939
but it resumed again in 1940 and
1941 when the fish were first processed for food. Catches in those
years were 9,600 metric tons and
12,000 metric tons respectively.
“Intensive production of yellowfin sole by the Japanese fleet
began in 1958 with the fish being
processed for both meal and frozen food. The Soviet Union also
entered the fishery in this period.
Catches rose dramatically from
44,000 mt in 1958 to approximately 610,000 mt in 1961. (Catches
averaged 400,000 mt in the period
1959-1962). This level of exploitation proved to be excessive and total catches dropped to only 114,000
mt in 1963.
“Both Japan and the USSR have
continued the yellowfin sole fishery
but have significantly diversified effort into other species in the Gulf
of Alaska and the Bering Sea in the
face of further declining catches in
the mid and late 1960s.
“Time and area restrictions to protect juvenile halibut were imposed
on the foreign fleets in the Bristol
Bay area and general trawling effort targeting on yellowfin sole was
shifted westward to an area banded
on the west by the Pribilof Islands
and in the same general latitudes to
an eastern fishery limit of roughly
163 degrees West longitude.
“The author believes that this
shift of effort resulted in a significant stock recovery of yellowfin
sole in the area of our operations
in 1980 although it increased our
problem of initial commercial ‘stock
assessment’ because of the resultant paucity of data and catch statistics for the Bristol Bay area from
the mid-1960s to the present. We
were forced to rely solely upon very
sketchy data from trawl surveys in
that area conducted by NMFS in
1975 and 1976.”
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16 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Fisher’s report then goes into
the planning process undertaken
by the American fishermen and
Marine Resources prior to going
fishing. The following vessels participated: Silver Challice, Eureka,
California, Captain Bonnar Peterson, 83 feet overall, 600 hp, combination midwater/bottom trawler;
Miss Tracy, Eureka, California,
Captain Felix Garcia, 90 feet overall, 575 hp, bottom trawler; Sleep
Robber, Coos Bay, Oregon, Captain Fred Anderson, 76 feet overall, 450-hp, bottom trawler; Vega,
Akutan, Alaska, Captain Knut Johanneson, 90 feet overall, 550-hp,
bottom trawler; Excalibur, Newport, Oregon, Captain Barry Fisher, 60 feet overall, 350 hp, bottom
trawler. (A sixth American vessel
contracted for the fishery but did
not appear.)
The Soviet processors were
three 278-foot BMRTs with 2,000
hp, and a daily processing capacity
of 45 tons of frozen product and
15 tons of fishmeal.
Fisher’s report also includes
catch by species logs for the Soviet
processors, as well as tow by tow
logs for the Excalibur.
The economic data sheet for operation of Excalibur in the fishery
follows:
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Economic Data Sheet
1. Gross Revenue
Analysis
$378,555
2. Variable Costs
Boat & engine repair
Gear repair & loss
Engine room 2/
Food
Crewshares
Total variable costs
$7,500
$12,300
$32,592
$6,643
$99,364
$158,400
3. Fixed costs
Insurance
Depreciation
Interest on setup capital
Spare parts & vessel support
Miscellaneous 3/
Total fixed costs
$7,850
$16,000
$1,088
$8,300
$2,100
$35,389
4. Opportunity cost of owner’s labor and management
$36,000
Return to owner’s labor, management
and total investment (1 less 2 and 3)
$184,765
Return to owner’s labor and
management (1 less 2 and 3 and 5)
$162,265
Return to total investment
(1 less 2 and 3 and 4), expressed
as percent equals 33% of total
investment for a 6 month period
$157,789
Net cash available for personal outlays
and debt service (return to labor,
management and investment, plus
depreciation and interest on
set up capital)
$201,855
The gross revenue figure of $378,555 for six
months compares very favorably with the average annual gross revenue of Excalibur’s historical economic performance.
5. Total business investment
(10% annual return of market value of
boat; $450,000 divided by 0.5 years) $22,500
Alaska United Fiber System.
EVENT
LATITUDE
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
A/C
60
O
60
O
60
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
59
O
58
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
O
5.075
4.740
4.260
58.000
57.690
57.380
50.500
45.750
45.200
43.800
42.000
39.000
26.600
14.000
0.900
49.200
LONGITUDE
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
O
147
O
147
O
147
O
147
O
147
O
147
O
148
O
148
O
148
O
148
O
148
O
148
O
148
O
147
O
147
O
147
DEPTH (M)
47.250 W
46.975 W
46.900 W
49.400 W
49.640 W
50.050 W
3.600 W
16.600 W
17.650 W
19.150 W
20.000 W
20.000 W
11.000 W
56.000 W
32.000 W
15.000 W
269
317
342
219
210
202
142
155
156
161
173
183
202
183
1019
2476
Note: above cable positions are outside the Prince William Sound
to the end of the continental shelf break.
Keep Alaska Online—Catch Fish, Not Cables
Visit our website or call for complete route position lists and chartletts
GCI owns and maintains high capacity
submarine fiber-optic cable systems
linking Alaska to the lower 48. These
cables provide a vital communications
link between Alaska and the rest of the
world. By avoiding bottom operations
and anchoring in the vicinity of the cable
route, you can prevent outages to this
link, as well as damage or loss of your
bottom gear. If you have entangled gear
on the cable, or believe your gear may
have been in contact with the cable,
please report the incident by calling:
1-888-442-8662
(24 hours, 7 days a week)
5151 Fairbanks Street
Anchorage, AK 99503-2791
1-888-442-8662
1-907-777-5513 Fax
www.alaskaunited.com
[email protected]
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 17
Reprinted from
March 1988
Shorebased Sea Wolf
adapts for survival
By Clark Miller
rriving in Dutch Harbor, I
called Alyeska Seafoods and
asked when the Sea Wolf was
due in. Midnight. Great. She was my
choice. I had heard she was a “fish
killer,” run by friendly people who
wouldn’t mind taking a guest out for
a few days. I wanted to see what Life
After Joint Ventures was like.
After a few hours’ sleep at the
Royal Dutch Inn, I called one of
those five-bucks-gets-you-anywherevan-cabs and made my way to the
plant where, true to her word, the
Sea Wolf stood disgorging 250,000
pounds of pollock for Alyeska’s new
surimi plant.
No sign of the skipper, Ralph
Watson, or his crew. “Try the Elbow
Room,” someone said. It was a clear,
cold night for a walk in Unalaska,
with a scattering of vessel lights out
on Iliuliuk Bay.
In a corner of the bar, Ralph was
talking to a reporter, Hal Bernton,
and a photographer, Erik Hill, from
the Anchorage Daily News. Hal and
Erik had gone out on the Sea Wolf
hoping to witness some roe stripping.
“You’re probably sick of having
the media on board,” I said to Ralph,
“but would you mind taking me out?”
He smiled, shrugged and said okay.
When I arrived at the vessel at noon
the following day, the crew was busy
installing perforated plastic piping in
one of the three holds. We wouldn’t
be off until after supper.
Pollock float, and the pressure had
proved too much for the old screens.
In order not to lose too much time,
the crew had replaced the piping
one hold at a time, during deliveries.
This was the last, and most difficult,
of the holds.
That evening, over beef stew, I met
18 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Clark Miller photos
A
the crew: Gordon “Gordy” Norton,
Benny Roome (pronounced “roam”),
and Bob Baker. We watched the Tyson-Holmes fight on cable television
in the spacious galley.
“This is the best thing they ever
did,” somebody quipped about the
plant providing the cable for tied up
vessels.
Despite Tyson’s brutal work on
Holmes, we all had good appetites
for Gordy’s cooking. Except maybe
Gordy. Down in the hold earlier,
he had taken a bad shot below the
eye from a slipped wrench. Puffed,
black, cut, the eye belonged on Larry
Holmes.
A few fishermen dropped in to
watch a tape of the fight. One of
them, a crabber, brought a bag of
videotapes to exchange: Hoosiers,
Karate Kid II, Extreme Prejudice...
taped on slow speed to get three
movies on one tape.
Surimi Plant Runs Year-Round
The Sea Wolf is one of the first JV
boats to make the transition to yearround shorebased deliveries. Owner
Bob Watson (Ralph’s brother), has a
reputation for being a savvy fisherman who stays one step ahead of the
pack, whether it means switching JV
partners, upgrading gear, or, as of
this year, going to shorebased.
The vessel and two others are contracted to supply pollock for Alyeska’s new surimi plant. The plant
appears to be running smoothly.
The quality control manager, Sinclair
Wilt, had shown the plant to a group
of JV reps and observers, and myself,
earlier in the day.
Five workers were hand-stripping
the roe. “The roe machine was doing
too much damage. . .” Wilt said.
We were all impressed by the
computer technology that allows
the mechanized line to measure and
properly align each fish, removing
the head at the right place.
Someone asked about the need for
so many washings. “You mean they
want to remove proteins?”
“Certain proteins, yes,” Wilt said.
We tasted the tasteless surimi and
tried to see the color differences between grades.
The plant intends to add more
screw presses to increase capacity,
Wilt said. The odorless quality of the
plant gave way to a pleasant “cooking” smell as we neared the area
where sugar, sorbitol and other ingredients are added to the surimi.
“After spring spawning, fishing gets
scratchy. So the plant shuts down for
a month for clean-up,” Wilt said.
Wilt chairs a local advisory committee to Fish & Game. The group is
proposing that the state require observers on crab catcher-processors.
Racing the Clock
That evening, while the crew finished work in the hold, Ralph explained some of the basics of the operation. Skipper and crew work two
months on, one month off, with two
men always rotating out.
“Joint ventures are demanding because you deliver when your number comes up, ready or not,” Ralph
said. “If the codend
is only half full,
tough…[Shorebased] is demanding because there
are a couple hundred workers waiting here to process
your catch.”
Alyeska’s vessels
compete with each
other for speed of
Bob Baker (left) and Gordy Norton watch the hold fill.
delivery, Ralph said,
adding with a grin that the Sea Wolf FS3300, developed by a Simrad subhas been known to lap the other two. sidiary, Mesotech Systems. The Sea
The Sea Wolf is one of a series of Wolf was the first to put it onboard,
123-foot crab boats built by MARCO and now there are 17 or 18 other
Seattle in 1979. Five of the vessels, vessels in the Bering Sea with it, acincluding the Sea Wolf, have the cording to a company rep. Ralph
raised pilothouse. (The four others joked that his brother ought to get a
are the Arctic Wind, the Storm Petrel, commission since 14 vessel owners
the Alaska Beauty, and the Dona bought one, at about $50,000 apiece,
Geneveva.)
after seeing it on the Sea Wolf.
She’s state-of-the-art all the way.
The monitor shows the net openFor instance, the net sonar: a Simrad ing vis-a-vis the bottom, allowing the
Kodiak Kenai Cable Company
GCI is operating and maintain the KKCC submarine cable system for Old Harbor Corp. This
link provides vital communications for Kodiak
and Southcentral Alaska.
Please help prevent damage to this communications infrastructure, as well as damage or
loss of your gear by avoiding bottom operations
and anchoring in the vicinity of the cable route.
If you believe you are entangled in the cable, or
have come in contact with cable, please report
the incident to GCI by calling:
1-888-442-8662
(24 hours, 7 days a week)
Keep Alaska Online—Catch Fish, Not Cables
Visit our website or call for complete route position lists and chartletts
5151 Fairbanks Street
Anchorage, AK 99503-2791
1-888-442-8662
1-907-777-5513 Fax
www.alaskaunited.com
[email protected]
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 19
Reprinted from
March 1988
operator to adjust the net so there
are no open spaces beneath the net,
or collapsed sections of net dragging
on the bottom with risk of damage.
It shows the schools of fish approaching and going into the net,
allowing the operator to adjust his
course to maximize the catch.
Then there’s the 14-inch fish pump
laced into the tip of the codend, with
its own hose running back to the
front of the codend: Only the Sea
Wolf carries one so far, but that’s
bound to change soon, despite the
$150,000 price tag. The pump turns
shorebased trawling into a gentleman’s fishery; the crew never touches a fish.
It was installed last October and
required two months of machine
work — it was so powerful that it
eviscerated fish and tore their heads
off. “We were trashing up to 30 percent of the fish,” Ralph said. “We had
to machine a new rig, with eight
ports and four valves.”
“Now [the damage] is less than
three-tenths of one percent — less
than the damage done just hauling
the codend over the stern ramp,”
Ralph said. The pollock boil into the
hold, and they looked great.
“This pump can pump four times
as many fish as the plant’s pumps,”
Ralph said.
Alyeska’s seafood manager, Frank
Kelty, had told me about the pump
earlier: how it was safer, since the
crew didn’t have to bring the codend
on board; how it speeded up turnaround.
The efficiency of the pump tempted the Sea Wolf to experiment with a
balloon-like 250,000-pound capacity
codend recently. “That’s the ideal,”
Ralph said, “one tow... When you’re
on the fish, you want to hit them and
go home.”
The experiment didn’t pan out, but
the pump allows the vessel to cram
a full 100,000 pounds in a conventional codend, instead of settling for
50,000 pounds. Electronic catch indicators, or “eggs,” on the codend tell
the operator when it is half, threequarters, and 100-percent full.
20 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Finally, there’s the Cat 3516, installed by MARCO Seattle two years
ago. The engine added nearly 600
horsepower to the vessel, up to 1,710
hp from the old Cat 399’s 1,125 hp.
“It made us super competitive,”
Ralph said. “It allowed us to fish bigger gear more efficiently.” Upgrading
the engine meant going up a size
in winches, nets, doors, hydraulic
pumps, the works.
“Fish Killer” In Action
When I awoke about 6 a.m., we
had been running six hours. I was
nauseated, despite the “scop” patch
behind my ear. By everyone’s standards except mine, the sea was mild,
Benny was at the wheel. He was
born in Indiana but raised in the
Florida Everglades, and talks with a
soft, Southern tone. When he was a
teenager he would drive into Miami
to buy guns for his parents’ sporting goods store. He laughed as he
recalled the awesome security of the
gun warehouse; for the drive home,
he kept several loaded pieces in the
cab of the truck.
Benny has a 2-year-old son, James,
who was born “blue” and had to
have heart surgery right off the bat;
James will wear a pacemaker for life.
Benny smiled as he described how
tough, active and demanding his boy
has become.
As I took my first good look at the
lazy aerobics of the Bering Sea, I became sick and had to end the conversation. Gordy was serving breakfast just as I came out of the head.
He forced me to sit down to a cheese
omelet and take a few bites. This set
the pattern for the rest of the day
— get sick, eat some more… crackers, canned pears. By the following
morning I was over it, and grateful
that Gordy had made me eat.
Between the three of them, Benny,
Gordy and Bob have over 60 years
experience in commercial fishing,
even though they’re all relatively
young. Benny started fishing when
he was 17, and is 43 now – 26 years’
experience. He and Gordy are nextdoor neighbors in Anchor Point,
near Homer.
Gordy is 36 and started fishing 16
years ago, spending 10 years as a
crabber. He was born in Vancouver,
Wash., and raised in Oregon. A fingertip is missing thanks to a winch.
He has always been a cook, and said
he learned it from experience. An upbeat guy who used to be nicknamed
“240 Gordy” because of his energy
level, Gordy had quit smoking eight
days earlier and was pretty wired.
Bob, the engineer, is from Nova
Scotia. Since he’s Canadian, he can’t
skipper in the U.S., but he ran boats
for many years on both coasts of
Canada. He lives in Lebanon, Ore.,
and runs several logging trucks.
A driver had just destroyed the
rear axle of a rig by failing to shift
gears once down on the flatlands.
Bob seemed to think it was more
funny than irritating. Laconic, deepvoiced, he finds life mildly amusing.
In fact, that quality characterized everyone on the Sea Wolf.
All three are glad to be making
shorebased deliveries year-round.
The pay is considerably less than last
year, when their JV shares were in
the six figures — but the pay is still
good by anyone’s standards, including corporate execs. And the future
looks relatively secure, while the future of their JV friends... who knows?
We continued running for nine
hours. The crew made a few grumbles about Ralph wanting to be
around his JV buddies, when five
hours would have taken us to fish.
We went right over the ‘Horseshoe,’
a vast larder of pollock. But Ralph
was prepared to defend his choice
— and when we finally stopped, we
were sitting on a mountain of fish.
The day was fading, and JV lights
encircled us, when we let out the net.
In 35 minutes it was full. I watched
the school go into the net on the
monitor, and saw the eggs blip off as
the codend filled.
The mouth of the codend was
reeled up the ramp, where Gordy
screwed the pump hoses together.
The pump was switched on, and the
fish started flying down the ramp
from the dewatering tank, while seawater gushed out of the bottom of
the tank and onto the deck.
As Ralph jogged into the sea to
keep the fish flowing toward the
pump, he radioed a JV buddy to the
east to crow a little. It wasn’t long
until we could see some of those JV
lights moving our way.
The fish were on the small side,
14-15 inches long, fine for surimi.
Within an hour or two we had the
net back on the bottom, filling almost as quickly as the first time.
This looked to be a perfect run.
I was standing under the shelter,
taking pictures of the deck. The Sea
Wolf received new shelter decks last
summer. About half the space beneath the new decks is closed storage.
I heard a loud pop. I figured something must be wrong from the way
the guys were yelling and scrambling around above me. A moment
later, I realized I was covered with
hydraulic oil.
A hose had burst on the winch,
and there was no replacement on
board. Fortunately, the codend had
already reached the stern ramp. We
would have to head in with two
holds full instead of three. Twenty
minutes later, Benny noticed that
one of the crab pumps in the engine
room was getting hot, smelly and
ready to blow — another reason to
go home early.
Ralph was philosophical about
the repairs. Things break. Someone
would be waiting at the dock to the
take the hose and go make a new
one. Same with the pump.
Ralph had been married two
months earlier. A big, prematurely
gray-headed man, he lives in Port
Townsend and flies everywhere in
his own plane. He told me about the
time a snowy owl landed on the boat
70 miles from land. Ralph put him
in the wheelhouse; the owl stood
on the map table, rocking back and
forth like a metronome, all the way
back in.
“I hear there’s 26 Korean processors in Bogoslof, for the roe,” Ralph
said, “and they’re all striking out —
water’s too deep.” He showed me
the area in question on the map table — 35 x 20 miles of poor-quality
pollock, rumored to have good roe.
The JV season would be over in
a few weeks. “A lot of guys won’t
make their payments,” Ralph predicted.
I spent the night in the galley, slumped over the table; it was
the gentlest place on the boat. By
morning, I was hungry, but had to
scrounge around until Gordy served
breakfast at 11. Everyone but the
watch had slept in. Ah, the good life.
By 5 p.m., we’d be back in Unalaska.
With the sea following gently, the
run would be smooth.
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GCI owns and maintains high capacity
submarine fiber-optic cable systems
linking the communities of SE Alaska.
These cables provide a vital communications
link between Alaska and the rest of the
world. By avoiding bottom operations and
anchoring in the vicinity of the cable route,
you can prevent outages to this link, as well
as damage or loss of your bottom gear.
If you have entangled gear on the cable,
or believe your gear may have been in
contact with the cable, please report the
incident by calling: 1-888-442-8662
(24 hours, 7 days a week)
5151 Fairbanks Street
Anchorage, AK 99503-2791
1-888-442-8662
1-907-777-5513 Fax
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Juneau
Angoon
Sitka
Petersburg
Wrangell
Ketchikan
Keep Alaska Online—Catch Fish, Not Cables
Visit our website or call for complete route position lists and chartletts
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 21
Reprinted from
February 1991
Richard V. Crow
Nobody praises
a cautious skipper
The Hetta with her stern under.
By Lonnie Haughton
T
he captain of
a tender is expected to be
fearless. At least during
the relatively peaceful
Alaska summers.
Packing seafood can be a laidback gig when you’re anchored in a
sheltered harbor, playing cribbage,
waiting for the next fish delivery.
22 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
But, once all the fishermen have
unloaded, the tender skipper’s boss
presumes, come hell or high water,
it’s non-stop travel to the processing plant — which may be located
around some cape quaintly named
“Puke Point” by sickened seamen.
Storm-racked seas may have defeated the toughest of local fishermen, but the tender skipper is
expected to complete his voyage.
Fearlessly. Or at least with the stoic,
non-whimpering style that is used
by some to imitate fearlessness.
Once I skippered the tender Hetta
through the notorious Cape Chacon
tide rips in 70-knot winds and 25foot seas. At midnight, as lightning
bolts blazed through the horizontal
rain, every orifice in my body muttered tight-lipped prayers.
When we safely arrived in Ketchikan, though, I briefly and manfully described the seas as “a little
rough.” Real men do not whine. It
was only in my sleep that I whimpered.
That is the advantage of trolling. I
am my own boss, on my own boat.
My comfort levels are set solely by
me. I do not beat into storms; instead, I go with the flow. I leave ma-
chismo to the tough guys.
And, when I hire crewmembers, I
try to avoid the macho ones. Toughness can be contagious if you are
not careful.
Even the most mild-mannered
deckhand can surprise you, though.
When I ran the Hetta, my sole deckhand for the roe herring fishery
was an old college buddy. Rich was
extremely competent and yet very
cautious; hard-working but nonmacho.
Rich, like me, was a man who enjoyed his comforts and had no desire to test his manhood in battles
with Neptune. That’s why I was so
dumbfounded by his lack of fear
when the Hetta almost sank.
The story begins in April 1980 at
the wild Sitka herring roe fishery.
After a few seasons of mechanical
disasters, we had finally managed
to convince our herring pump to
pump herring. Lots of herring.
Over the course of two days we
pumped 82 tons of herring into the
oversized tank. The gross weight,
herring and water, in the tank probably approached 200,000 pounds.
At rest, the Hetta sat heavy, like a
wounded submarine. Once sluggishly underway toward Ketchikan,
the boat settled even lower.
I was alarmed to see that even in
the calm seas of Peril Strait the back
deck was mostly underwater. Lots
of water. I felt like Captain Nemo.
My main concern, of course, was
the weather. I prayed for a continuation of the mild winds and flat
seas. I was certain that the effects
of even a moderate atmospheric
disturbance could overwhelm the
Hetta.
On the other hand, we tender
skippers are expected to be courageous. My image, and perhaps my
employment, would suffer if I did
not deliver these herring promptly
to Ketchikan. In the fishing business you get few pats on the back
for exercising good judgment and
common sense.
If the weather deteriorated, I was
in a no-win situation. If I cowered
in some protected harbor, I risked
my job and my reputation (and 82
tons of fresh herring). If I sank the
boat, I would lose the herring, my
job, my reputation, and probably
two lives.
I was relieved, therefore, when
the Coast Guard broadcast an evening report of continued decent
weather for the next 24 hours. Ketchikan was only 30 hours away.
Surely the good Lord would grant
us six hours of grace.
We plowed around treacherous
Point Gardner in breathless, calm
seas. The rips off Cape Strait were a
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 23
Reprinted from
February 1991
piece of cake. We waved at the early-morning Petersburg squareheads
as we cruised down tepid Wrangell
Narrows. Snow Pass welcomed us
with a slack smile.
It was a bright sunny day and all
the gods seemed still smiling as we
lumbered into the slightly windchopped Clarence Strait. The back
deck sank further into the ruffled
seas, but we were eight hours from
home with not a storm cloud in the
sky.
And even though the Coast Guard
was now forecasting a small, but
intense, SE storm front to sweep
across the Ketchikan area by the
evening hours, I was fairly sure that
we would win the race. Just like the
Pony Express, I envisioned delivering our load on schedule.
As we approached Meyer’s
Chuck, I was less confident. By
normal standards the weather re-
mained excellent, two-foot seas
in a 20-knot breeze. But this was
not a normal situation; waves were
sweeping up Hetta’s stern. Our
back deck looked like a swimming
pool with the 400-meter butterfly
in progress.
I do not like water. Or swimming.
Or drowning. I began brooding
about previous encounters with the
rips between Caamano Point and
Guard Island. It seemed sensible to
open the survival suits and place
them in a convenient location.
Hetta seemed to rise ever more
unwillingly from under the burgeoning waves. What if the storm
struck before we reached the safety
of Guard Island?
I had two options: cowardly shelter behind nearby Grindall Island
until the coming storm abated, or
the manly satisfaction of completing the final death-defying 20 miles
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24 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
of the voyage.
My deckhand, Rich, had gone up
onto the flying bridge to take photos of the aquarium that once had
been our deck. Once he returned
I was sure that he would counsel
prudence. Caution was his middle
name; that’s why I hired him.
Rich was excited, almost babbling in fact, when he came
through the wheelhouse door. But,
to my surprise, it was not our potential doom that concerned him.
Instead, Rich needed more film to
take advantage of the great photo
opportunities.
With watery death looming, Rich
was only concerned about photo
opportunities? Pooh-poohing our
present danger, and my prudent
actions regarding the survival suits,
he hurried topside for more photos.
Whatever happened to the non-
macho, over-cautious deckhand
whom I counted on for his good
sense? You just cannot trust a crewman.
With the autopilot engaged, I followed Rich up to the flying bridge
to continue the discussion. Rich
had years of fishing experience;
perhaps he was right. Perhaps my
urges to change course toward
Grindall Island were fueled by
chickenshit cowardice instead of
sane discretion.
Waves swept the back deck, yet
Rich argued that all was well. He
did not seem too concerned about
the coming storm. Calm and cool,
he snapped more photos. I was almost convinced.
Then, as the Hetta plowed
through one of the larger swells,
the back deck literally disappeared
into the sea. Only sharp eyes could
detect the top of the bulwarks buried a foot under the surface.
Holy micro! Both fear and amazement overwhelmed me. Frozen in
position, I held my breath while the
Hetta struggled back toward the
surface like a hippopotamus seeking air.
Once I realized that we were not
sinking, yet, I hurriedly changed
course for the safety of Grindall Island.
I expected Rich to concur, but he
seemed to have a different interpretation of our recent near-death
experience. Filled with enthusiasm,
my obviously intrepid deckhand
burbled, “Wow! What a great photo.”
Great photo? Of what? There had
been nothing to photograph except
water. Didn’t he realize that the
back deck had totally disappeared?
Where was this man’s supposedly
ingrained sense of self-preservation? Ignoring further advice from
Rich, I skippered Hetta to the lee of
Grindall Island.
Within half an hour of anchoring
Hetta, the storm blasted up Clarence Strait. I thanked God we had
not attempted the crossing to Guard
Island. It was great to be alive.
I was smugly pleased with my
sensible decision-making skills —
until I realized that the skippers of
two other herring tenders, the Westward and the Crane, were continuing into the teeth of the storm.
While I cowered behind Grindall,
they were fearlessly beating through
the Caamano tide rips. Among my
peers, I would surely be branded a
wimp.
Though the Westward lost its
deckload of herring and suffered
physical damage, the skipper fulfilled his mission while I napped
restlessly.
The next morning, with seas calm
again, we cruised home to Ketchikan. Even though we had been
the first to leave Sitka, we were the
last to reach home. No one patted
me on the back.
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 25
Reprinted from
January 1980
Pine tar… an aphrodisiac in Port Townsend
The wood troller returns:
Say hello to an old friend
deck. “We didn’t want all that leSpecial thought has gone into
By John Pappenheimer
he steambox at the Port verage and pressure to be working trying to minimize the inevitable
Townsend Boatworks is on on the frames,” explains Burn — a working of the garboard planks. As
wheels. Like many of the problem that plagues older boats a result the China Cove has a fullideas coming out of Mark Burn’s and eventually leads to rot where length keelson and floor timbers
shipyard it’s a traditional steambox the frames come through the well bracing each pair of frames.
but with a new spin.
deck.
There are plenty of other details
The pride of the boatworks
The China Cove’s builders have in her construction that go a little
these
days,
beyond
traalthough unditional boat
likely to genbuilding to tie
erate a profit
things togethfor the yard,
er. The lower
is the China
rim timbers in
Cove: an elher horseshoeegant 42-foot
stern are carried an extra
troller taking
shape behind
seven feet forthe shop.
ward and are
She’s
betied into the
ing built on
bilge stringers.
“A lot of it is
the lines of
a traditional
overkill,” adhorseshoemits Burn. “If
stern troller,
you calculate
but
from
vessel life exthe very bepectancy
vs.
ginning her
effort and cost
builders
we’ve
probhaven’t been A stout wood troller is taking shape behind the Port Townsend Boatworks’ ably reached
afraid
to shop, which was once a roundhouse for a Port Townsend railroad.
the point of
modify her
diminishing
lines and add some innovations of worked out their own innova- returns.” Nevertheless, Burn has no
their own.
tive system for tying the sponsen, regrets. He wants to launch at least
Carl Chamberlin began lofting frames and deck beams together one well-built commercial boat a
the China Cove last summer from a just below a covering board. They year from the Boatworks. The Chi1943 design by George Calkins. He even added a new timber that is na Cove is to be the first.
softened the turn of the bilge and notched for the frames and ties into
As for Ketchikan fisherman Londropped the lower rim timber in the notched deck beams.
nie Haughton who commissioned
the stern. It was decided at the start
“It grew out of an earlier project the China Cove, he’s getting a barthat the China Cove would be built in the yard,” says Burn. He credits gain. “She’s going to be my home
with aluminum rather than wood the idea to Miguel Winterburn, mas- for the rest of my life,” he says. With
bulwarks eliminating the need to ter shipwright on the project, and proper care she should he good
bring the frames up through the to suggestions from a former client. for 80 years albeit with some new
T
26 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
wood added from time to time.
When Haughton first expressed
interest in having a wood boat
built, Burn suggested a trip to
Marrowstone Island to talk with
George Calkins who designed and
built the very fine troller Teddy Joe.
Haughton went to Port Angeles
to see the Teddy Joe for himself. He
liked what he saw.
Calkins, who is probably best
known for his bartender designs,
was delighted to find there was still
interest in his 42-foot troller design.
“They’ve proved to be good
boats,” he says. He built five of
them starting in 1943 at the mouth
of a salmon stream near Otis Junction, Oregon. All but the Nell,
which burned at Gold Beach, are
still around.
“Do you know what those trollers cost back then?” says Calkins.
“You’ll laugh. With a new Cummins, there wasn’t any electronics in those days, she cost $12,500
ready to fish.”
In contrast, the cost of building the China Cove is estimated at
$160,000 including a GM-71, electronics and fishing gear — and at
that, Burn may only break even.
Despite the costs Calkins has no
doubts about the advantages of
wood. “It’s the only way to go,” he
says. Compared to fiberglass and
steel “wood’s easier to live with. It
doesn’t sweat. It’s easier riding. You
don’t have the noise and vibration
and it probably trolls better.”
The problem has been with the
cost and availability of materials and
finding the craftsmen, says Calkins:
“I hear that in Port Townsend guys
are learning to work and there are
still plenty of trees, so maybe wood
boat building will be coming back
a little.”
Calkins has been over to see the
progress on the China Cove. “They’re
doing a beautiful job,” he says.
Burn himself has been surprised
at the talent that exists around Port
Townsend and he credits the success of the Boatworks — which
now employs 20 full-time work-
Lonnie Haughton (left) and Mark Burn know each other from the days
when they both had trollers on the West Coast of Prince of Wales.
ers — to the skill of the shipwrights
who showed up after the yard got
going in 1977.
“I’m not an idealistic proponent of
wood,” Burn says — and in fact he is
planning to expand into metal boat
building as well. Some of his shipwrights have a much stronger bias
for wood. “They simply won’t work
on fiberglass,” says Burn. “Pine tar
is considered an aphrodisiac in Port
Townsend. We buy it by the fifty gallon drum…”
For much of the design work at
the yard, Burn has relied on Carl
Chamberlin, who has his own business in Port Townsend, Basic Boats.
He’s lofted a number of boats on the
coast, says Burn and was a logical
candidate to loft the China Cove.
Also invaluable to the yard is
Miguel Winterburn, the only shipwright at the Boatworks with previous experience building new boats
on the scale of the China Cove.
Because of her financing, the China Cove probably won’t be launched
for another year even though planking has begun on her hull.
Plans call for a moderate size pilothouse with a galley and day bunk
on deck. She will have four fuel
tanks carrying a total of 1,000 gallons of fuel.
Her hatch coaming is being de-
signed to allow two aluminum
slush tanks, with a total capacity for holding about 10,000 lbs.
of salmon, to be lowered into her
holds and still leave room for conventional icing.
Getting lumber for the boat, says
Burn, has been primarily a matter
of research. You have to keep track
of what everybody has. To give a
rough idea of her scantlings: her
keel is built from 8" x 10" fir, her
keelson is from 8" x 16" fir, her
bowstem is from 8" x 14" balau
wood, her forefoot is 8" x 16" balau,
her deck beams are 4" x 4.5", her
frames are 1.75" x 2.75" white oak
from Oregon, her planking is 1.5"
fir and her decking is 1.75" fir.
The China Cove is not visible
from the waterfront; however, she
has already begun to draw visitors.
Some folks no doubt just like to be
reassured that such boats are still
being built.
Burn, always thinking, has plenty
of other projects that should appeal
to gawkers: he wants to build a mobile shop complete with bandsaw,
electrical outlets and tools that, like
his steambox, can be wheeled out
to any project in the yard.
And one day he plans to build
a large marine railway on rubber
tires.
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 27
Reprinted from
April 1980
“The boat we wanted just didn’t exist”
Distinctive work boats
to take on the Bay
By Brent Evans
our enterprising young fishermen have put their heads
together to design a 32' x 12'
Bay boat with capacity, comfort and
speed, but by the admission of her
own builders, the looks of “Woody
Woodpecker.”
Not one but three of these boats
are being completed by Mike Sherlock and his friends, Chip Dodge,
Bill Conner and Steve Baughn, in
the welding shop of Mike’s father
near Clinton, Washington, on Whidbey Island.
“It’s a boat we figure to be able to
use in almost any fishery,” explains
Mike Sherlock, “and we’ve incorporated features you won’t find on
most small boats.
“I know they’re strange looking,
but we put a lot of work into design, trying to maximize speed, usable living and working space, hold
capacity and versatility.”
All three boats have a distinctive
high, double-cupped bow and a
hull similar to a Boston whaler. The
pilothouses are forward and twin
inboard diesels are all the way aft.
The boats are also double hulled,
an idea Mike Sherlock borrowed
from Dick Carr. Mike fished for Carr
last year out of Petersburg in one of
five boats using this design.
“Dick’s boats had double bottoms
and air tanks in the sides,” says
Mike. “Together with Carl Crome
and Dick Carr, we netted 245 tons
of herring last year in three boats.
Sometimes we completely filled
F
28 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Looking over the 12' x 20' working deck.
Left to right, Laurie and Mike Sherlock, Steve Baughn, Pat Sherlock
and Chip Dodge (not shown — Bill Conner).
the boats, but never had a problem
with flotation.”
Mike also met his friends Chip
Dodge, Bill Conner and Steve
Baughn last year while working on
Nels Otness’s Dorothy Jean, also
out of Petersburg. A good season
and a strong friendship led to plans
to build their own boats.
“When a fisherman builds his
own boat, he gets virtually everything his own way,” says Mike Sherlock. “The boat we wanted just
didn’t exist.
“The fast boats you saw on Bristol Bay last year were just a gas engine and a bare hull with no holding capacity or cabin. We didn’t
want to sleep on somebody else’s
barge or set up a tent.
“We also wanted to be able to get
in on seining for herring. We figure
you can seine on good days and
gillnet on poor ones and stay pretty
busy… and make your money on
volume rather than high price.”
Mike Sherlock gained experience
in aluminum fabrication working
at Nichols Brothers Boatyard on
Whidbey Island over the last four
years. Chip and Bill, who are building their own boats, and Steve,
Mike’s crewman, have been learning on the job.
“My father agreed to let us use
his workshop. We added to it and
purchased the additional equipment we needed… We’ve been
working without a break since the
Production model no. 1, Bill Conner’s June Bug in profile.
first of November, usually till late
every night. I can’t remember when
I last had some time off.”
The boats are scheduled to be
barged up to Alaska on April 7th.
Bill Conner’s boat has already
been on the waters around Whidbey Island for initial testing. Without the mast, boom or other fishing
hardware his June Bug was about
2000 pounds light.
“The thing really moves,” says
Mike Sherlock. “Set up for gillnetting she’ll probably do 30 knots.
With all the gear we plan for her,
however, we expect to get 24 or 25
knots.”
The hard chine really gives high
speed cornering and prevents the
boat from sliding out from under
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July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 29
Reprinted from
April 1980
you,” says Mike. “With the outdrives
up, the hulls will float in 10 inches of water. The double cupping
of the bow extends back six feet
under the hull. This guides oncoming waves under the box reducing
pitch and keeping the bow high.”
The design started with small
scale models Mike Sherlock built
of wood. Mike incorporated many
ideas suggested by his father, Pat
Sherlock, who spent years working
for Hughes Aircraft.
“There’s no reason boats can’t
use the honeycomb construction
techniques used in the aircraft industry to provide strength and
light weight,” says Pat. “The side air
tanks and the airtight double hull
with partitions every 18 inches not
only provide flotation but gives the
boat tremendous strength.”
Mike’s father cooperated in designing the 12' x 10' cabin that is
“stouter than any we’ve ever seen.”
The cabin windows, for example,
are not only bolted from the inside
but are riveted from the outside. The
boats will also have removable 3/5"
plexiglass visors fitted over the forward cabin windows to absorb the
impact of breaking waves on the
long trip to and from Bristol Bay.
Each of the boats will have a full
complement of electronic gear including autopilot, three flashers,
VHF-CB, scanner, 40-mile radar,
loran, paper recorder and sonar.
Chip Dodge’s boat will be carrying
a Weatherfax. “When we’re running
from Bristol Bay to Petersburg, it’ll
be nice to know the weather in advance.
We don’t like taking chances,” says
Chip.
Some changes in design have been
made along the way. After the trial
run of the June Bug, Mike’s Appari-
tion and Chip’s Endurance had flying bridges added.
“The trial runs convinced us that,
in nice weather, topside is a very
nice place to be,” says Mike Sherlock. “You’ve got great visibility.” A
hinged window in the deck of the
flying bridge functions as both a
cabin vent and a means to observe
the interior instruments from the
bridge controls.
The boats are built entirely out
of 3/16" 50-86 marine grade aluminum which, according to Mike,
“costs more but is a lot less corrosive and will last.”
For power, the three boats are
each equipped with two 130 hp
Volvo AQD-40 turbo diesels. Dual
backup systems are used throughout. Two Borg Warner 20 gallon hydraulic pumps are fitted to each engine, and each boat has two 1750
Rule auto bilge pumps. Twin sets
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Aluminum or Fiberglass
253-272-9319
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www.modutechmarine.com
30 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
of hydraulic, fuel and water lines,
all using 3/8" tubing, are also standard. All hydraulic lines and electrical wiring pass through 4 ½” PVC
tubing which serves as a sealed
conduit connecting cabin and engine compartment.
Built into the boats’ sealed side
air tanks are two separate insulated
98 gallon fuel tanks. Another 200
gallon fuel tank is located aft. The
boats also have two 50 gallon water tanks and a 28 gallon, hydraulic
reservoir built into an aft bulkhead.
Under the 20' x 12' work deck
are six 5' x 5' x 3 ½' holds (525
cubic feet) which Mike Sherlock estimates will hold 30,000 lbs. of fish.
An 84 gallon/minute Jabsco waterpump will drive the brine system
planned for the three boats.
Insulation is used liberally
throughout the cabin and hull. A
3/16" nonskid surface will go on
the gunwales around the house
and on the seine deck “for safety
and to cut down on noise and vibration.”
Each boat will be fitted with
unique a drum designed to pivot
horizontally ninety degrees allowing nets to be taken either over the
stern (for salmon) or over the side
(for herring). In the latter case, the
drum functions like a power roller
sliding the boat sideways down a
gillnet to retrieve the catch while
leaving the net in position.
A large A-frame mast with six
crab lights attaches to a hinged
mount on the aft cabin bulkhead
allowing the mast along with the
boom to fold down for shipping.
The 18-foot boom supports a power block and two winches, one for
brailing and one for raising and
lowering the boom. A hydroelectric
gurdy will be installed for seining.
Though the cabin layouts differ
to suit the particular preference of
each builder, all three boats have
three bunks, an L-type dinette,
stove, deep sink, AM-FM cassette
stereo, and, instead of refrigerator,
a 100 lb. capacity freezer to “enable
us to stay out longer.”
Obviously, the boats are costing them a bundle. “We had a processing firm lined up to back us
when we were in Petersburg,” says
Mike Sherlock, “but when we got
down here, none of their representatives in Washington had ever
heard of us.” With their life savings
wrapped up in boat materials and
a loan for the rest, the men are bet-
ting heavily that the design will be
a winner. Each boat is insured for
$100,000.
“We’d like to build more of these
boats next year,” states Mike, “and
perhaps another, bigger boat.”
However, even with new boats
ready to fish, they still face an immediate problem — not one of
them has a Bristol Bay salmon
permit.
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 31
Directory of Fishermen’s Organizations
Alaska Commercial Fishermen’s
Memorial in Juneau
Box 20092, Juneau, AK 99802
(907) 789-4725
Bruce Weyhrauch, President
Alaska Crab Coalition
3901 Leary Way N.W. #6, Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 547-7560 • Fax: (206) 547-0130
Lance Farr, President
Arni Thomson, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1986
The ACC is celebrating its 22nd
year as a registered non-profit trade
association in Washington, Alaska and
Oregon. Primary goals are promotion
of conservation, rebuilding and longterm sustained yields of king and tanner and snow crab resources of the
Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands.
Alaska WHITEFISH ASSN.
P.O. Box 991, Kodiak, AK 99615
(907) 486-3910 • Fax: (907) 486-6292
E-mail: [email protected]
Al Burch, Executive Director
Jay E. Stinson, President
Year Founded: Late 1960s,
Incorporated 1974
Number of Members: 45 boats
Annual Dues: 0.5% of vessel income,
$2,500 max
For more than 35 years, the Alaska
Draggers Association has represented trawl fishermen working out
of Kodiak. During those years it
has established itself as an effective
organization, holding many state and
federal positions that allow it to fully
represent the Kodiak groundfish fleet
and support the community’s fishing
interests.
Alaska Independent Fishermen’s
Marketing ASSN.
P.O. Box 60131, Seattle, WA 98160
Phone/Fax: (206) 542-3930
E-mail: [email protected]
David Harsila, President
Year Founded: 1966
Number of Members: 300
Annual Dues: $300
AIFMA’s mission is to protect the
renewable salmon resource and promote economic sustainability for
commercial salmon permit holders in
Bristol Bay. AIFMA has worked for
over 40 years in political and regulatory arenas. The association strives to
improve salmon quality and encourages expansion of fresh/frozen sockeye
32 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
salmon markets in the United States.
AIFMA is working with other bay
groups to establish a buyback program. AIFMA also offers an excellent
marine insurance program.
ALASKA INDEPENDENT
TENDERMENS ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 431
Petersburg, AK 99833
Phone: 907-518-1724
Website: www.alaskatenders.org
Email: [email protected]
Jim Edson, President
Year Founded: 2003
Number of members: 80
The Alaska Independent
Tendermens Association (AITA) was
formed in 2003 by a group of tender owners and operators. These
Tendermen recognize the need to
establish an organization of professionals with a common interest.
Fish tendering in Alaska has been
around as long as there has been
commercial fishing. AITA is organized
exclusively for promoting the common business interest of its members,
independent vessel owners and operators, and to serve as one voice in the
Alaska commercial fishing industry.
Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Assn.
P.O. Box 1229, Sitka, AK 99835
(907) 747-3400 • Fax: (907) 747-3462
E-mail: [email protected]
Linda Behnken, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1976
Number of Members: 100
Annual Dues: $100 annual fee + 1%
of longline gross up to $500; max
$600.
ALFA represents longline fishermen
in both state and federal forums. The
association promotes opportunities for
longline fishermen and sustainable harvest of Alaska’s fisheries. ALFA’s membership includes both deckhands and
vessel owners. Members own and operate vessels that range in size from skiffs
to schooners and participate in blackcod, halibut, and rockfish fisheries.
Alaska Marine Conservation
Council
P.O. Box 101145, Anchorage, AK 99510-1145
(907) 277-5357 • Fax: (907) 277-5975
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.akmarine.org
Dorothy Childers, Executive Director
Number of Members: 900
Membership Dues: $25
The Alaska Marine Conservation
Council is a community-based group
of fishermen, subsistence users, processors, biologists and others throughout Alaska working together to protect
the health and diversity of our marine
ecosystem.
Alaska Marine Safety Education
ASSN.
2924 Halibut Point Road, Sitka, AK 99835
(907) 747-3287 • Fax: (907) 747-3259
Website: www.amsea.org
Jerry Dzugan, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1985
Number of Members: 100
AMSEA is a community-based organization composed of fishermen, subsistence
users, processors and others providing
safety training to reduce deaths and injuries of commercial fishermen and to meet
Coast Guard requirements for commercial fishing vessels.
Alaska Marketing ASSN.
4917 Leary Ave. N.W., Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 784-8948 • Fax: (206) 784-9813
Jake Jacobsen, Manager
The AMA represents the Bering Sea
crab fishing fleet with the purpose of
securing fair and equitable ex-vessel
prices.
Alaska Trollers ASSN.
130 Seward Street #211, Juneau, AK 99801
(907) 586-9400 • Fax: (907) 586-4473
E-mail: [email protected]
Dale Kelley, Executive Director
David Otte, President
Year Founded: 1925
Number of Members: 450
Annual Dues: $250 power troll and
associate; $150 hand troll; $65 crew
American Fisheries Society,
Alaska Chapter
P.O. Box 240020, Douglas, AK 99824-0020
(907) 465-4257 • Fax: (907) 465-4944
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.fisheries.org/afs-ak
Hal Geiger, Chapter President
Founded: 1870
AFS is the oldest and largest
professional society representing
fisheries scientists.
The Alaska Chapter is one of the
larger ones with over 400 members.
Major activities include our annual
meeting, which consists of technical
paper presentations, special guest
Bristol Bay Driftnetters Assn.
lecturers, and continuing education
courses for fisheries professionals.
We have completed a comprehensive
taxonomic key called the “Fishes of
Alaska” on sale through our website.
2408 Nob Hill North
Seattle, WA 98109-2048
(206) 285-1111 • Fax: (206) 284-1110
E-mail: [email protected]
Dan Barr, President
Year Founded: 1985
At-sea Processors ASSN.
4039 21st Ave. W. #400, Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 285-5139 • (907) 276-8252
Fax: (206) 285-1841
Website: www.atsea.org
Stephanie Madsen, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1985
APA represents U.S.-flag at-sea
processing vessels that participate in
the groundfish fisheries of the North
Pacific. Our principal fishery is the
midwater pollock fishery. APA is committed to working with fishery managers, scientists, and our colleagues to
ensure the continued health of our
marine ecosystems.
BBDA is an association working
to enhance the salmon resources of
Bristol Bay. The association serves
as a forum and voice for Bristol Bay
fishermen with many different agencies and organizations, including the
Alaska Board of Fish. BBDA members
receive the BBDA Newsletter.
Cordova District
Fishermen United
Concerned Area M Fishermen
CDFU represents all the gear types
in Area E: seine, gillnet, groundfish, set
net and pound. CDFU’s mission is to
preserve and protect Alaska’s Area E
fisheries and promote safety at sea. Our
priorities are the legislative and regulatory arenas and promoting the benefits
of our healthy, wild-caught fish.
35717 Park Road, Homer, AK 99603
(307) 235-2631
Steve Brown, President
Year Founded: 1984
Number of Members 80+
Annual Dues: $500—permit holder;
$50—associate.
Bering Sea Fishermen’s AssN.
705 Christensen Drive, #3
Anchorage, AK 99501
(907) 279-6519 • (888) 927-2732
Fax: (907) 258-6688
E-mail: [email protected]
CAMF represents the Area M driftnet
fleet at Board of Fisheries meetings.
We are a group member of UFA and
continually work with ASMI and Area
M processors to improve product quality in Area M and all of Alaska.
Incorporated: 1980
Communities Represented: 192
Represented Population: 114,000+
Cook Inlet Aquaculture Assn.
40610 Kalifornsky Beach Rd.
Kenai, AK 99611
(907) 283-5761 • Fax: (907) 283-9433
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.ciaanet.org
BSFA began in 1979 with 150 fishermen from western Alaska. These
fishermen united to become involved
in fisheries that were developing in
their backyard, and build an organization that was concerned with helping
fishermen gain full economic benefits
from existing commercial fisheries.
BSFA is governed by a board made up
of fishermen from Bristol Bay, Yukon,
Kuskokwim, Norton Sound, Kotzebue
and St. Paul.
and to contribute fish to the commonproperty fisheries. Activities include
lake fertilization, stocking, hatchery
operation, and construction of fish ladders, flow-control devices and spawning channels.
Brent Johnson, President
Gary Fandrei, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1976
A non-profit corporation founded
by commercial fishermen to engage
in salmon enhancement activities
throughout the Cook Inlet watershed
P.O. Box 939, Cordova, AK 99574
(907) 424-3447 • Fax: (907) 424-3430
E-mail: [email protected]
Jerry McCune, President
Page Herring, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1935
Number of Members: 275
Deep Sea Fishermen’s Union
of the Pacific
5215 Ballard Ave. N.W., Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 783-2922 • Fax: (206) 783-5811
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.dsfu.org
Tim Henkel, President
Dave Soma, Executive Director
Sara Chapman, Operations Manager
Year Founded: 1912
DSFU, the oldest organization of
crew members and skippers in the
North Pacific, represents the longline
schooner fleet crewmen under a Set
Line Agreement with the FVOA and
crab crewmen along the entire West
Coast. The union’s goals are straightforward and practical: fair wages;
improved benefits; access to IFQ loan
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Learn more at www.amsea.org or call 907-747-3287
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 33
Directory of Fishermen’s Organizations
programs; proper long-term management of resources for healthy fisheries;
fair and straightforward treatment of
vessel, skipper and crew; professional
work standards; and the prerogative of
fishermen to stand together.
The union’s long-range vision is to
serve as the umbrella organization for all
fixed-gear fishermen. Toward that end,
the union has an expanding associate
membership and has increased its political activity.
Fishing Vessel Owners’ Assn.
4005 20th Ave. W. #232, Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 284-4720 • Fax: (206) 283-3341
Website: www.fvoa.org
Eric Olsen, President
Robert D. Alverson, Manager
Year Founded: 1914
Number of Members: 85
FVOA is a trade association representing Seattle-based longliners. The association promotes longlining as a habitatsafe harvest method and continues its
effort to minimize bycatch in all North
Pacific fisheries.
Groundfish Forum
4241 21st Ave. W., Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 213-5270 • Fax: (206) 213-5272
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.groundfishforum.org
Year Founded: 1996
Number of Members: Nine
The Groundfish Forum is a trade
association representing nine trawl
companies with a total of 19 headand-gut vessels, which catch and
process groundfish in the Bering Sea
and Gulf of Alaska. Our mission is to
craft meaningful solutions to issues
such as discards, incidental catches,
and impact on habitat, and to inform
government officials of the economic
contribution of the head-and-gut fleet
to Alaska and the Pacific Northwest.
Halibut Commission and works on
marketing policy matters.
Kenai Peninsula
Fishermen’s ASSN.
43961 Kalifornsky Beach Road, Suite F
Soldotna, AK 99669-8240
(907) 262-2492 • Fax: (907) 262-2898
E-mail: [email protected]
Paul Shadura II, President
Year Founded: 1954
KPFA’s main goal is to Ensure the
Future of Our Fishery. We strive to
be fair and accessible to all fisheries
gear types and areas within Cook Inlet
waters. A non-profit association, we
are operating under the rules governing a trade association. Primarily a
set-net representation organization, we
do not restrict membership to any one
gear type. KPFA is actively involved
with the community groups. We
believe the primary focus of revitalization should take into consideration the
social, historical and economic concerns of the regional commercial fishing families.
Kodiak Fishermen’s
Wives & Associates
Box 467, Kodiak, AK 99615
(907) 486-8080 • Fax (907) 486-3823
E-mail: [email protected]
Colleen Newman, President
Founded by local fishermen’s wives,
this community service group works
with others close to the Kodiak commercial fishing industry to promote
the consumption of Alaska seafood
and foster safety within the fleet. In
addition, the group maintains the
Kodiak Fishermen’s Memorial, and
sponsors an annual memorial service and survival suit race during the
Kodiak Crab Festival.
Kodiak Regional
Aquaculture ASSN.
Halibut ASSN.
of North America
P.O. Box 3407, 104 Center Ave. #202
Kodiak, AK 99615
(907) 486-6555 • Fax: (907) 486-4105
John Woodruff, President
Contact: Peggy Parker
Lawrence M. Malloy, Executive
Director
Year Founded: 1983
Number of Members: 611
This trade association of halibut
processors in Alaska, Washington,
Oregon, and British Columbia represents the industry’s interests before
the North Pacific Fishery Management
Council and the International Pacific
KRAA is composed of 611 CFEC
permit holders dedicated to the stabilization of Kodiak’s salmon production.
The association funds numerous salmon enhancement tasks in the Kodiak
area. Long-term production goals are
P.O. Box 872, Deming, WA 98244
(206) 325-3413 • Fax: (206) 324-7590
34 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
addressed through three strategies: 1)
improved management and research,
2) rehabilitation of depressed wild
stocks and supplemental production,
and 3) salmon habitat monitoring,
improvement and protection.
Kodiak Seine Boat Owner’s Assn.
P.O. Box 1035, Kodiak, AK 99615
(907) 486-3453 • Fax: (907) 486-8362
Jeff Stephan, Manager
Year Founded: 1989
KSBOA, a subsidiary of the United
Fishermen’s Marketing Association,
represents Kodiak seiners before
governmental and other entities with
regard to important legislative, regulatory, research, management, political, quality and marketing issues that
affect the economic welfare of Kodiak
seiners.
Kvichak Setnetters’ ASSN.
P.O. Box 91118, Anchorage, AK 99509
(907) 277-0187 • Fax: (907) 276-4771
E-mail: [email protected]
Al Bauman, President
Year Founded: 1992
Dues: Members, $150; Crew, $25;
Auxiliary Member by donation
Northern Southeast Regional
Aquaculture ASSN.
1308 Sawmill Creek Rd., Sitka, AK 99835
(907) 747-6850 • Fax: (907) 747-1470
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.nsraa.org
Pete A. Esquiro, General Manager
Year Founded: 1977
Number of Members: All Southeast
Alaska salmon permit holders
NSRAA is the Regional Aquaculture
Association for northern Southeast
Alaska. In addition to Hidden Falls
and Medvejie hatcheries, NSRAA
operates the Deer Lake coho-rearing
project, two spawning channels,
the sockeye enhancement project at
Chilkat Lake, incubation boxes and
works cooperatively on a number of
other projects with other agencies.
Additional information is available on
the NSRAA website and in its newsletter.
North Pacific Fisheries Assn.
Box 796, Homer, AK 99603
(907) 235-1091
Buck Laukitis, President
Year Founded: 1955
NPFA is a non-specific gear group
Diesel engines
& generators
working politically in areas of
resource management, fisheries conservation, and public awareness of
commercial fishing interests and contributions.
TAC apportionments to fixed-gear fisheries; seasonal apportionment of TAC
to avoid bycatch; seabird avoidance
and conservation-oriented fishing in
general.
North Pacific Fishing Vessel
Owners’ ASSN.
Northwest Fisheries ASSN.
Vessel Safety Program
1900 W. Emerson, Suite 101
Fishermen’s Terminal
Seattle, WA 98119
(206) 285-3383 • Fax: (206) 286-9332
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.npfvoa.org
Leslie J. Hughes, Executive Director
Lou Fleming, President
Year Founded: 1985 (non-profit
since 1969)
Annual Dues: $75-$600
The NPFVOA Vessel Safety Program
is a non-profit association dedicated to
safety education and training for the
commercial fishing industry and other
mariners. NPFVOA’s program offers
hands-on Coast Guard–approved safety
courses; customized and portable safety training; and regular seminars on
relevant industry topics. NPFVOA also
provides a wide range of safety-related
educational materials, including videos
and the Vessel Safety Manual.
North Pacific Gillnet Alliance
2408 Nob Hill North,
Seattle, WA 98109-2048
(206) 285-1111 • Fax: 284-1110
Dan Barr, Chairman
Year Founded: 1991
The NPGA addresses the common
concerns and needs of gillnet fishermen
on the West Coast. The alliance has
been a pioneer in reducing and eliminating high seas salmon interception
in the North Pacific and led the effort
that secured passage of the High Seas
Driftnet Moratorium Enforcement Act.
North Pacific Longline AssN.
4029 21st Ave. W., Suite 300
Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 282-4639 • Fax: (206) 282-4684
Thorn Smith, Executive Director
Bill Atkinson, President
Year Founded: 1990
The purpose of the NPLA is to influence federal regulation of groundfish
fisheries under the jurisdiction of the
North Pacific Fishery Management
Council. We have promoted the careful release of halibut bycatch; separate
2208 N.W. Market St. #318,
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 789-6197 • Fax: (206) 789-8147
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.northwestfisheries.org
Sales • Service • Parts
1-888-283-5501
•
•
•
•
•
•
NORTHERN LIGHTS/LUGGER
CUMMINS • CAT • JOHN DEERE
YANMAR • MITSUBISHI
SCANIA • BALDOR
KOHLER • ONAN
EMD • ALCO
Barry Lester, Executive Director
Marilyn Klansnic, Business Manager
Year Founded: 1951
Number of Members: 170
NWFA is an association of primary
and secondary seafood processors,
brokers, distributors and support
industries.
Mission Statement: Provide members
an arena in which to network business
opportunities, and to provide current,
accurate information and education on
new and existing issues.
1-888-283-5501
Northwest Indian Fisheries
Commission
6730 Martin Way E.,
Olympia, WA 98516-5540
(360) 438-1180 • Fax: (360) 753-8659
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.nwifc.wa.gov
Billy Frank Jr., Chairman
Assisting treaty Indian tribes in conducting biologically sound fisheries
and providing a unified tribal voice on
fisheries management issues.
The long-term goals of economic
stability, renewable resources and
regulatory certainty are shared by the
tribes, who are working toward their
own self-sufficiency.
Oregon Fishermen’s Cable
Committee
2021 Marine Drive, Suite 102
Astoria, OR 97103
(503) 325-2285 • Fax: (503) 325-7012
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.ofcc.com
Scott McMullen, Chairman
Year Founded: 1998
The goal of the Oregon Fishermen’s
Cable Committee is to promote communication, coordination and cooperation between members of the commercial fishing industry and undersea
fiber-optic cable industry so that they
can amiably discuss and resolve concerns. The OFCC works with undersea
BorgWarner • G.E. • BrownBoveri/
Nigata • Holset • Clark • IHI
• Cooper • Man • EMD • MTU • Elliot
• Napier • Garrett • Rajay
WelDing
& Metal
Fabrication
stainless ✦ steel
✦ aluMinuM ✦ all alloys
✦ Marine exhaust
systeMs ✦ elboWs ✦ Flex
✦ risers ✦ cans
1-888-283-5501
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 35
Directory of Fishermen’s Organizations
cable owners to route cables for maximum burial in the fishing grounds and
with the fishing industry to safely fish
around cables. The OFCC provides
submarine cable routes in popular
marine navigation software formats to
West Coast trawlers.
Pacific Coast Federation of
Fishermen’s Associations
Old Coast Guard Bldg, 991, P.O. Box 29370
San Francisco, CA 94129-0370
(415) 561-5080 • Fax: (415) 561-5464
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.pcffa.org
Pacific Whiting Conservation
Cooperative
Washington Business Address
4039 21st Ave. W., Suite 400
Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 285-5139
Oregon Business Address
205 S.E. Spokane St., Suite 338
Portland, OR 97202
(503) 238-7492
Peninsula Marketing AssN.
P.O. Box 248, Sand Point, AK 99661
(907) 383-3600 • Fax: (907) 383-5518
Zeke Grader, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1976
Number of Members: 22 organizations representing 2,500 individuals
Petersburg Vessel Owners Assn.
PCFFA is a non-profit umbrella organization representing working men and
women in the West Coast commercial
fishing fleet. Throughout its history it
has been engaged in issues ranging from
resource protection (habitat, etc.) to marketing programs, such as establishing
the California Salmon Council.
Cora Crome, Director
Arne Fuglvog, President
Year Founded: 1954
Number of Members: 64 vessels and
18 business associates
Pacific Marine Conservation
Council
P.O. Box 59 (390 Industry),
Astoria, OR 97103
(503) 325-8188 • (800) 343-5487
Fax: (503) 325-9681
Website: www.pmcc.org
Peter Huhtala, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1997
Annual Dues: $25-$500
P.O. Box 232, Petersburg, AK 99833
Phone: (907) 772-9323 • Fax: (907) 772-4495
E-mail: [email protected]
PVOA is a non-profit commercial
fishing advocacy group for conservation and rational management of the
fisheries resource in the North Pacific.
Members participate in salmon, herring, crab, halibut, blackcod, and cod
fisheries from Dixon Entrance to the
Bering Sea. PVOA actively participates
at the NPFMC, IPHC, the Board of
Fisheries, in state and federal legislation as well as numerous other fisheries forums. Membership is open to
members of all communities.
PMCC is a non-profit corporation
studying the ecosystem as it relates to
groundfish populations, habitat and
sustainability. An 18-member board
consists of charter and commercial
fishers, marine scientists, environmentalists and others living in West Coast
ports from Santa Barbara to Seattle.
Prince William Sound
Aquaculture Corp.
Pacific Seafood Processors
AssN.
PWSAC is a private, non-profit
regional aquaculture corporation
formed to provide economic stability
to Prince William Sound commercial
salmon fisheries and added opportunity to the regional sports, subsistence
and personal use fisheries.
1900 West Emerson Place, Suite 205
Seattle, WA 98119-1649
(206) 281-1667 • Fax: (206) 283-2387
E-mail: [email protected]
Glenn Reed, President
PSPA, a non-profit trade association,
was established in 1914 to address
issues of concern to member companies. PSPA encourages conservation,
enhancement, and optimal utilization
of our renewable fishery resources.
36 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
P.O. Box 1110, Cordova, AK 99574
(907) 424-7511 • Fax: (907) 424-7514
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.pwsac.com
David Reggiani, General Manager
George Covel, Chairman
Year Founded: 1974
Purse Seine Vessel Owners AssN.
1900 W. Nickerson, Suite 320
Seattle, WA 98199-1650
(888) 284-7733 • Fax: (206) 283-7795
410 Calhoun Ave., Suite 206
Juneau, AK 99801
(907) 523-3004 • Fax: (907) 523-3005
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.psvoa.com
Robert P. Zuanich, Executive
Director
Year Founded: 1936
Number of Members: 378
PSVOA is governed by a 13-member
Board of Directors representing smallboat owners operating throughout the
West Coast and Alaska. PSVOA actively participates in the development of
federal and state fisheries management
plans and related legislative policy. To
further these activities, PSVOA manages a group of member-owned affiliates
providing a variety of marine insurance services and conducts business
in Alaska under the name of Alaska
Seine Boat Owners at the above
Juneau address.
Seafood Producers Cooperative
Administrative Office
2875 Roeder Ave., Bellingham, WA 98225
(360) 733-0120 • Fax: (360) 733-0513
Website: www.spcsales.com
Tom McLaughlin, President/CEO
Year Founded: 1944
Number of Members: 520
The mission of Seafood Producers
Cooperative is to maintain an opportunity for fishermen to participate in a
cooperative organization that provides
the processing, marketing and support services which allow members to
maximize the benefits of their fishing
efforts and provide the consumer with
the highest quality seafood possible.
Southeast Alaska Fishermen’s
Alliance
9369 North Douglas Hwy, Juneau, AK 99801
(907) 586-6652 • Fax (907) 523-1168
E-mail: [email protected]
Kathy Hansen, Executive Director
Year Founded: 2000
SEAFA is a member-driven organization whose goal is to preserve, promote, protect and perpetuate the fishing industry for salmon, crab, shrimp,
and longline fishermen of Southeast
Alaska; To further promote legislation,
conservation, management, safety at
sea and the general welfare for the
mutual benefit of all members.
Southeast Alaska Seiners
526 Main Street, Juneau, Alaska 99801
Juneau, year round: (907) 463-5030
Fax: (907) 463-5080
Ketchikan, summer: (907) 225-5156
Fax: (907) 225-5258
Dan Castle, President
David Bedford, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1968
Seiners founded SEAS, a memberbased organization, to promote the
vitality of the commercial seine fleet
and the sound stewardship of the
salmon resource in Southeast Alaska.
SEAS is composed of seine skippers,
deckhands, and businesses that have
an interest in a productive seine fishery. Major issues SEAS will confront
include: federal subsistence takeover,
Pacific Salmon Treaty negotiations,
fishery legislation, Board of Fisheries
salmon issues, ADF&G budget, and
identifying opportunities that could
improve benefits fishermen receive
from hatchery programs.
sels account for at least 85 percent
of all Alaska pollock and Pacific cod
harvested in the Bering Sea, Aleutian
Islands and Western Gulf by vessels
that do not process onboard.
Goals include rational fisheries management, sustained yields, reduced
bycatch, and maintaining member market share.
United Cook Inlet Drift AssN.
43961 K-Beach Rd., Suite E
Soldotna, AK 99669
(907) 260-9436 • Fax: (907) 260-9438
E-mail: [email protected]
Steve Tvenstrup, President
Year Founded: 1980
Number of Members: 300
Annual Dues: $100; associate $25
UCIDA serves Cook Inlet drift fishermen by its involvement with the Board
of Fisheries, state and federal legislation, political endorsements, marketing,
in-season price information, environmental and oil spill concerns.
UCIDA is strongly committed to fighting attacks against the commercial fishing industry in Cook Inlet and Alaska.
Southern SOUTHEAST Regional
Aquaculture ASSN.
14 Borch St., Ketchikan, AK 99901
(907) 225-9605 • Fax: (907) 225-1348
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.ssraa.org
John Burke, General Manager
Year Founded: 1978
Number of Members: All salmon permit holders in southern S.E. districts
The SSRAA was established and
funded by salmon fishermen for the
purpose of enhancing the endangered
salmon stocks in the southern Southeast
districts and for monitoring the environment and any activities that may affect
the fisheries in those areas. Although
there are no dues, the association
members voted to impose a 3 percent enhancement tax on themselves.
Whenever they sell salmon, this 3 percent tax goes into a state general fund,
then the state contracts the money back
to the association on a quarterly basis.
United Catcher Boats
4005 20th Ave. W., Suite 116
Fishermen’s Terminal
Seattle, WA 98199
(206) 282-2599 • Fax: (206) 282-2414
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.ucba.org
Brent Paine, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1993
Number of Members: 59 vessels
UCB was founded by industry leaders to unify the owners of vessels
that trawl for Alaska groundfish and
West Coast whiting. Crab member vesJuly 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 37
Directory of Fishermen’s Organizations
United Fishermen of Alaska
211 4th St., Suite 110, Juneau, AK 998011172
(907) 586-2820 • Fax: (907) 463-2545
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.ufa-fish.org
Robert Thorstenson Jr., President
Mark Vinsel, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1974
Number of Members: 31 member
groups plus approximately 500 individual, crew and business members
Annual Dues: individual, $150;
crew, $50; lifetime, $1,500; group
membership, $2,500; business
memberships at $300, $1,000, and
$2,000 levels
UFA’s mission is to promote and
protect the common interest of
Alaska’s commercial fishing industry
as a vital component of Alaska’s social
and economic well-being. UFA maintains a statewide trade organization
with core functions, including legislative presence, communication within
the fishing industry, continued access
to fisheries resources, and promoting
positive public relations for Alaska’s
commercial fishermen.
The UFA voting board of directors
is composed of representatives from
group members and four at-large representatives elected by the individual
and lifetime (fishing permit holder)
members.
United Fishermen’s Marketing
ASSN.
P.O. Box 1035, Kodiak, AK 99615
(907) 486-3453 • Fax: (907) 486-8362
Jeff Stephan, Manager
Year Founded: Mid-1930s
UFMA membership includes Pacific
cod pot fishermen; crab fishermen;
halibut, blackcod and Pacific cod longliners; salmon and herring seiners; and
other groundfish harvesters who participate in the diversified fisheries of
the Gulf of Alaska and the Bering Sea/
Aleutian Islands. UFMA represents vessel owners with regard to many important state and federal legislative, regulatory, research, conservation, management, political, quality and marketing
issues that affect the economic welfare
of member vessels. Issues include crab,
groundfish and halibut management,
population assessments and other
research, habitat protection, bycatch
reduction, observer programs, blackcod/halibut IFQ program, IFQ/CDQ
38 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
fee proposals, inshore/offshore, license
limitation, BSAI crab bycatch, etc.
United Seafood ASSN.
P.O. Box 762, Kodiak, AK 99615
Bruce Schactler, President
Year Founded: 1997
Number of Members: 1,000
The United Seafood Association is a
fishermen’s marketing association
dedicated to increasing market share
and prices for wild-caught Alaska seafood.
United Southeast Alaska
Gillnetters
P.O. Box 22427, Juneau, AK 99802
(907) 586-5860 • Fax: (907) 780-6621
E-mail: [email protected]
Year Founded: 1978
Annual Dues: $250
USAG is an association of about 150
men and women who participate in
the Southeast Alaska gillnet salmon
fishery. USAG promotes and protects
the interests of its members by an
active involvement in legislation (local,
state and national) that affect the gillnet fishery such as allocation, marketing, quality, taxes, safety, environment
and enhancement programs. USAG
offers a vessel insurance program to
members and publishes a biannual
newsletter.
Western Fishboat Owners AssN.
WFOA or AFRF
P.O. Box 992723, Redding, CA 96099
(530) 226-9398 • Fax: (530) 226-9463
E-Mail: [email protected]
Website: www.wfoa-tuna.org
Wayne Heikkila, Executive Director
Lewis Hill, President
Year Founded: 1967
Western Fishboat Owners
Association is a California-based nonprofit trade association established
in 1967, representing approximately
400 albacore tuna troll-vessel owners based in California, Oregon,
Washington, Alaska, Hawaii, New
Zealand and British Columbia. These
are family-owned boats that fish albacore tuna during summer and fall
months. Some fish the South Pacific
waters January to April. WFOA’s
primary mission is to promote trollcaught albacore tuna through market and management issues. WFOA
also manages the affairs of American
Fishermen’s Research Foundation.
Women’s Maritime ASSN.
1916 Pike Place, #12, PMB 743
Seattle, WA 98101
Answering service: (206) 441-5678
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.womensmaritimeassoc.com
Year Founded: 1980
Number of Members: 350
Annual Dues: $35
Non-member Newsletter
Subscription: $20
The Women’s Maritime Association
is an informational and support network of seafaring women and men.
WMA is based in Seattle, with members from all over the United States
and several other countries. Our
membership includes women who
work on ferries, tugs, fishing vessels,
deep-sea merchant ships, and yachts
as well as women who are seeking
employment in the maritime or fishing industries, or who are students in
maritime training programs.
WMA’s purpose is to promote communication among women and men
in maritime industries. Our newsletter provides a forum for exchanging
information on employment, health
and safety, training and achievements
of our members. As a network, the
WMA provides mentoring and leadership, historical references, humor, and
camaraderie.
Yukon River Drainage Fisheries
ASSN.
725 Christensen Drive, Suite 3-B
Anchorage, AK 99501
(907) 272-3141 Fax: (907) 272-3142
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.yukonsalmon.com
Jill Klein, Executive Director
Year Founded: 1990
Number of Members: 250
The YRDFA hosts a four-day meeting each winter. Its 16-member board
works on a consensus basis to craft
workable solutions on allocation and
management issues confronting this
complex fishery. The YRDFA also
conducts various projects on salmon
bycatch identification, habitat restoration and stock assessment as well as
marketing and promotion of Yukon
River salmon in the Pacific Northwest.
They also publish a quarterly newsletter distributed to over 2,000 commercial and subsistence-fishing households in the drainage.
Port Index
Adak..............................................40 .
Akutan...........................................40
Anacortes......................................40
Anchorage.....................................40
Angoon..........................................41
Astoria...........................................41
Bandon..........................................41
Bellingham....................................42
Berkeley........................................42
Bethel............................................42
Blaine............................................43
Bodega Bay (Spud Point Marina).......43
Brookings......................................43
Charleston (Coos Bay).....................44
Chignik..........................................45
Cold Bay........................................45
Cordova.........................................45
Craig.............................................46
Crescent City................................47
Depoe Bay....................................47
Dillingham.....................................47
Dutch Harbor.................................48
Egegik (Coffee Point)........................50
Elfin Cove......................................50
Eureka (Humboldt Bay).....................51
Everett...........................................51
False Pass.....................................52
Florence (Siuslaw)...........................52
Fort Bragg (Noyo Harbor).................52
Friday Harbor................................53
Garibaldi........................................53
Gig Harbor....................................53
Gold Beach...................................53
Haines...........................................54
Homer...........................................54
Hoonah.........................................55
Hydaburg.......................................55
Ilwaco............................................56
Juneau..........................................56
Kake..............................................57
Kenai.............................................57
Ketchikan......................................58
King Cove......................................59
Kodiak...........................................60
La Conner (Port of Skagit County)......61
La Push (Quileute Marina).................61
Metlakatla......................................62
Moss Landing................................62
Naknek/King Salmon....................62
Neah Bay (Makah Marina)................63
Newport.........................................63
Nome............................................64
SATELLITE ALASKA
Pelican..........................................64
Petersburg.....................................64
Port Angeles..................................65
Port Townsend...............................66
Saint George.................................66
Saint Paul......................................67
Sand Point.....................................67
San Francisco...............................67
Seattle...........................................68
Seldovia........................................70
Seward..........................................70
Sitka..............................................71
Skagway........................................72
Tacoma.........................................72
Tenakee.........................................72
Thorne Bay...................................73
Valdez...........................................73
Warrenton...................................... 74
Westport (Grays Harbor)................... 74
Whittier.......................................... 74
Winchester Bay (Salmon Harbor)......75
Wrangell........................................75
Yakutat..........................................76
B.C. Ports......................................77
Vancouver.....................................79
We work where you work
Satellite Alaska provides telephone communication
and data transfer via satellite for a major portion of
the Pacific—from Alaska to California.
We can keep you in touch using either or both of two
different systems:
* Full Duplex Telephone — cost effective service
that can connect with the regular telephone
network.
* Two-way Dispatch (half duplex) — provides
privacy and group calling over a private network.
Contact us for authorized sales and service dealers
Satellite Technical Services
P.O. Box 69592
Seattle, WA 98188
206.321.6896
From the commercial fishing fleet to remote
mining sites – we provide affordable and
highly effective communication services
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 39
Adak-Anchorage
❯ Adak
Adak Marine Services
ambulance
• Medical transport by plane to
Anchorage
• LifeFlight..........................800-478-9111
Reisner Distributor....................293-2197
Processors (Area Code 360)
Trident Seafoods......................293-7701
Port Office...........................907-592-0185
Port Fax...............................907-592-4171
[email protected]
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game.......................907-592-2407
U.S. Post Office..................907-592-8113
❯ Akutan
At the Dock
Port Office Ph/Fax..............907-698-2265
VHF Channel........................................... 6
Moorage
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Processors (Area Code 907)
Adak Fuels.................... phone: 592-8330
..........................................fax: 592-4171
............................................. VHF Ch. 16
Joe Galaktionoff, Manager
Trident Seafoods......................698-2211
or VHF 73
Processors (Area Code 907)
Adak Fisheries LLC...................592-4193
or VHF 16 or 69
At the Dock
•harbormaster: Elaine Smiloff
Rates
• 0-32’: $80/24 hrs.
• 33-60’: $100/24 hrs.
•61-75’: $150/24 hrs.
• 76-100’: $175/24 hrs.
• 101-125’: $190/24 hrs.
• 126-150’: $200/24 hrs.
•151-200’: $250/24 hrs.
• 201-250’: $300/24 hrs.
• 251-300’: $350/24 hrs.
• 301’ and up: $2/ft./24 hrs.
Amenities
• indoor/outdoor storage
• fresh water/grocery store
• hotel services
• pay phones at store
• expediting services
• cafe, bar and grill
Repair Facilities
• closest haulout is Dutch Harbor
• welder and machinist on island
Air Transport
• Alaska Airlines (pax & cargo)
Sundays & Thursdays, flight 160/161
..........................................907-592-3121
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Adak Medical Clinic/M.D. on duty
• EMTs and volunteer service
40 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Dale Fowler
• 950 berths
• 150-200 transient berths
• waiting list for permanents; no
waiting list for temporary (winter)
Rates
• harbormaster: Lawrence Prokopioff
• city dock worker: Brett Willis
• Pelkey’s Dive Service: VHF 6
• guest: call Harbor Office 360-293-0694
or VHF radio channel 66A
• qualifying commercial fish moorage:
$5.94/ft./mo. (doesn’t include excise tax)
Moorage
Amenities
• 200’ limited dock space
• 2 hrs. free parking. Call on VHF
before docking: VHF 6
• electricity/restaurants/restrooms
• county public transportation
• fresh water/loading pier/showers
• pump-out facilities (free)/pay phones
• laundry/net mending dock
• groceries/marine store
• in the heart of Anacortes
Amenities (Area Code 907)
• general store/hotel/laundry/museum
• library......................................698-2230
• U.S. Post Office.......................698-2200
• City of Akutan.........................698-2228
• VPSO.......................................698-2315
• church and gym......................698-2239
• Roadhouse Bar
Transport (Area Code 907)
• PenAir Seaplane (daily flights
from Dutch Harbor)................581-1383
• Freighters: Coastal Transportation,
Western Pioneer, Sealand
Haulouts
• two 1-ton dock hoists
• 3 marine railways in area
• boat hoists in harbor up to 37’;
in town up to 65’
• 2 dry docks available in town,
haul up to 300’
Repair Facilities
• full repair facilities (0’ to 500’)
Medical (Area Code 907)
Air Transport
• clinic........................................698-2208
• port-owned airport
3,000’ paved runway
❯ Anacortes
Port Office...........................360-293-0694
Port Fax ..........................360-299-0998
[email protected]
www.portofanacortes.com
VHF Channel...................................... 66A
Fish & Game.......................360-902-2200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
Cap Sante Boat Haven..............293-0694
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• hospital 10 blocks away
Special Events
• Waterfront Festival: May 16-17
• Arts Festival: August 1-2
• July 4 fireworks at marina
❯ Anchorage
Port Office...........................907-343-6200
Anchorage-Bandon
Port Fax ..........................907-277-5636
[email protected]
www.ci.anchorage.ak.us
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Coast Guard.......................907-271-6700
Fish & Game.......................907-267-2100
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
VHF Channel(s)........................... 14 & 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Angoon Oil and Gas.................788-3436
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Albin Frederickson
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Inlet Petroleum..........................274-3835
Shoreside Petroleum................344-4571
Amenities
Processors (Area Code 907)
Moorage
Alaska Seafood Services..........276-4551
Great Pacific Seafoods.............248-7966
Tenth & M Seafoods.................272-3474
Whitney Foods..........................243-3311
Yamaya Seafood.......................563-5588
• 45 berths (waiting list)
• limited transient berths;
contact City Office
• no dryland storage
At the Dock
• port director: Governor
William J. Sheffield
• port operations manager:
Stuart B. Greydanus
Dockage
• 5 terminal berths totaling 3,488
linear feet available
• some dock space for transients
• average tidal range: 30 feet
Amenities
• electricity
• fresh water at berths
• pay phones at boat launch
• taxis
• showers & laundry about 1 mile away
• sewage pumpout
• tariff rates available upon request
or on Web site
• in design process for dock expansion
• electricity
• net mending dock, pay phones
• restaurant, restrooms
• sewage pumpout, showers
Haulouts
• Astoria Marine Construction —
Warrenton Shipyard
• Port of Astoria
• 80-ton travel lift
Repair Facilities
• Full service repair facilities,
machine shops, welding, electronic
repairs, dive service and marine
supplies — all available locally
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• one tidal grid
• search & rescue
• sheriff stationed at harbor
• medics/ambulance
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Special Events
• local clinic........................907-788-4600
• emergency.......................907-788-3237
• Fisher Poets’ Gathering in February
• Crab Festival in April
• Marine Swap Meet in April
• Vessel & Industry Tour in July
• Astoria Regatta, 2nd weekend in Aug.
• Silver Salmon Celebration, 2nd
weekend in October
Haulout and Repair
❯ Astoria
Mooring Basin Office.........503-325-8279
Port Office...........................503-325-4521
Fax Attn: Hrbrmaster.........503-325-4525
[email protected]
www.portofastoria.com
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 74
Fish & Wildlife....................503-338-0106
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 503)
❯ Bandon
Port Office...........................541-347-3206
Fax......................................541-347-4645
[email protected]
www.portofbandon.com
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Port of Astoria.......................... 325-2101
Wilcox & Flegel ........................325-3122
or 741-0144
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 541)
Repair Facilities
Processors (Area Code 503)
At the Dock
• full repair facilities available in area
• haulout available upon request
Bornstein SeaFoods.................325-6164
Fergus-McBurendse.................325-9592
Fishhawk Fisheries Inc.............325-5252
• Port of Bandon staff
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Moorage
• 100 berths
• Providence Hospital........907-562-2211
• Coast Guard.....................800-478-5555
At the Dock
❯ Angoon
Moorage
City Office...........................907-788-3653
City Office fax.....................907-788-3821
Harbormaster.....................907-788-3960
Port Fuel Dock...........................347-1901
• Port of Astoria staff
• 416 berths in west and east basin
• dry storage available
Rates
• daily: 20-29 ft. – $12-$17; 30-39 ft. –
$18-$23; 40-49 ft. – $24-$29; 50-59 ft. –
$30-$35; 60 ft. – $36+
• call for monthly, quarterly or
yearly rates
Amenities
• electricity, fresh water, laundry
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 41
Bandon-Bethel
Amenities
• charter services, electricity, fresh water
• pay phones, adjacent to Old Town
• pumpout stations/restrooms
• no showers
• 20 spaces for commercial transients
• all berths assigned: 1st come,1st served
• private yard can store about 40
boats on land
• 4-lane boat launch
Air Transport
Rates
• Small airport a few miles south of
Bandon; commercial airport in
North Bend (25 miles north)
• phone for rates
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• hospital with state-of-the-art
equipment
• USCG: May-Sept.
• ambulance services
Special Events
• Old Fashion 4th of July Celebration
• Blessing of the Fleet
• Cranberry Festival
• Bandon Dunes Golf Resort
❯ Bellingham
Harbor Offices....................360-676-2542
Port Fax...............................360-671-6149
[email protected]
www.portofbellingham.com
VHF Channel................................ 16 & 68
Fish & Game................... 1-800-477-6224
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Amenities
• 2 mile walking path around harbor
• 2 fuel docks
• 40,000 sq. ft. dry storage for
commercial fishing
• electricity at all berths
• five restaurants
• fresh water at all berths
• pay phones nearby
• 4 shower and 3 laundry facilities
• two 2-ton stiff-leg cranes
Haulouts
• 2 large floating dry docks;
2,800-ton and 1,000-ton
• private mobile crane for
engines and gear
• 4 haulout locations
• Coast Guard has small base
Repair Facilities
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
At the Dock
• Harbormaster: Ann Hardinger
Moorage
• 10 transient berths
• 1,000 total berths
• commercial berths available
• dry land storage: $80/mo.
Rates
• visitors: $0.50/ft.
Amenities
• electricity/pay phones
• fresh water
• fuel docks/pump out stations
• restrooms/showers
Haulouts
• travel lift
Repair Facilities
• Berkeley Marine Center
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• local fire dept.; Alta Bates Hospital
Air Transport
• Oakland Airport
Harbor Marine Fuel...................734-1710
Hilton Harbor Marina................733-1110
• 3 net suppliers
• 2 net working areas
• 1,200 ft. of work/loading piers
• 4 yards can repair aluminum, glass,
wood; also engines and electronics
• full service boat repair & outfitting
facilities & shops
Processors (Area Code 360)
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Arrowac Fisheries.....................676-1606
Bellingham Cold Storage.........733-1640
Bornstein Sea Foods................734-7990
Icicle Seafoods..........................676-5885
San Juan Seafoods...................734-8384
Seafood Producers Co-op........733-0120
Trident Seafoods......................734-8900
• St. Joseph, Main Campus:... equipped
for general surgery, 360-734-5400
• dentists in town
• jet runway with daily flights
• 3 miles to airport
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
At The Dock
❯ Berkeley
At the Dock
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
• harbormaster: Mike Endsley
• operations coordinator: Dave Warter
• moorage coordinator:
Andy Peterson
Moorage
• 1,417 slips
• 150 commercial berths
42 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Air Transport
Marina.................................510-981-6740
[email protected]
www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/marina/
Harbormaster fax...............510-981-6745
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game.......................707-944-5500
Special Events
• 4th of July
❯ Bethel
Port Office...........................907-543-2310
............open Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Port Fax...............................907-543-2311
VHF Channels. 10 & 16 (May 1 to Nov. 1)
Fish & Game.......................907-543-2433
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Bethel Fuel Sales......................543-2217
• acting port director: Peter A Williams
[email protected]
• admin. assistant: Joanne Galliart
Moorage
• up to 2,000’ of 5,000’ seawall
available for transients
• small boat harbor with finger
Bethel-Brookings
floats for local small-boat fleet
• dry land storage available year
round, vessels and cargo
Rates
• daily dockage: $0.50 & up
depending on LOA
• monthly: $5 per linear foot
• season: $16/ft.
• winter storage: $0.10/sq. ft./month
Amenities
• fuel available at petroleum dock
• showers available at laundromat in town
• free phones at harbor (toll restricted)
• water delivered by truck
• general, grocery stores with delis nearby
• restaurants—free delivery
• book exchange at city dock office
• forklifts, cranes and dock equipment—
call dock office for list of handlers holding current terminal use permits
• taxicab services
Coast Guard.......................360-734-1692
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Blaine Marina Inc. ....................332-8425
North Coast Fisheries...............875-3576
Bodega Bay Fisheries...............875-2822
Tides Wharf (fish dock)............875-3560
Lucas Wharf..............................875-3571
Processors (Area Code 360)
At the Dock
Boundary Fish Co. Inc..............332-6715
Starfish Inc................................332-8066
• harbormaster: Noah Wagner
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
At the Dock
Moorage
• 244 berths/check for available transient
• harbormaster: Andy Peterson
Moorage
• 629 total berths (commercial/pleasure)
• dry land storage
• commercial moorage available 26’-58’, call for larger sizes
Rates
• phone for rates
Amenities
• crane available for emergency
repairs with advance notice
• beach ramp or main cargo dock
• two-lane boat launch
• electricity/fresh water
• pay phones/restrooms/showers
• laundry facility
• 20 minutes to Bellingham
Repair Facilities
Haulouts
• outboard motor repair
• steel and aluminum welding available
• 30-ton travel lift
• dock hoists at processors
• 250-ton marine railways
Haulouts
Processors (Area Code 707)
Rates
• Daily: $20 up to 30’, $30 for 30’ to 40’, $40
for 41’ to 50’, $60 for 61’ to 90’, over 90’
$100
• Monthly: $6.55/ft.
Amenities
• commercial flake ice facility
• electricity/fresh water/laundromat
• fuel and ice service (24 hours)
• commercial service dock/pay phones
• restrooms/showers/security gates
• 3-ton J.I.B. crane and 1-ton crane
• 30 amp & 50 amp electric
Haulouts
• none available
Air Transport
Repair FacilitieS
Repair Facilities
• some mechanical
Air Transport
• daily jet service by Alaska Airlines
• local villages: scheduled flights
and charters
Walsh Marine
Blaine Marine Services
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Special Events
• Bethel Family Clinic.........907-543-3773
• Bethel Health Center
• Coast Guard facilities in Kodiak
• Yukon Kuskokwim Delta Regional
Hospital............................907-543-6000
• Bethel Search & Rescue
• Fishermen’s Memorial Service
• Annual Fisherman’s Festival, third
week in April (arts and crafts,
BBQ, boat races)
❯ Bodega Bay
❯ Brookings
❯ Blaine
Harbor.................................360-647-6176
Fax......................................360-332-1043
[email protected]
www.portofbellingham.com
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 68
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
(Spud Point Marina)
Marina Office......................707-875-3535
Marina Fax..........................707-875-3436
[email protected]
spudpointmarina.org
VHF Channel......................................... 16
USCG Station ....................707-875-3596
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 707)
• bus available to airport daily
Special Events
Port Harbor.........................541-469-2218
Port Fax...............................541-469-0672
[email protected]
www.port-brookings-harbor.org
VHF Channel......................................... 12
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 541)
Port of Brookings.... 469-2218 or VHF 12
(call for large truck quantities)
Spud Point Fuel Dock...............875-3535
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 43
Brookings-Charleston
Processors (Area Code 541)
Rates
Hallmark Fisheries ...................469-4616
Caito Fish Co.............................469-7628
Blaine Crab................................661-4774
www.charlestonmarina.com
VHF Channel...........................12 KVY560
Pollution Hotline (US)........800-424-8802
Pollution Hotline (OR)........800-452-0311
At the Dock
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 541)
• harbormaster: Mike Blank
• executive director: Dave Scott
Russell’s.....................................888-4711
• daily: $10.00-$26, based on length
• monthly: all sizes $6/ft.; $90 min.,
paid in advance. Based on 30 consecutive days
• annual moorage available, please call
541-888-2548 for rates
Processors (Area Code 541)
Amenities
Chuck’s Seafood.......................888-5525
Hallmark Fisheries....................888-3253
Bandon Pacific..........................888-9626
North Coast Fisheries...............297-8737
• 6-lane launch ramp
• fuel dock, propane, pump-outs,
security
• tackle, bait and marine supplies
• restrooms/showers/laundromat
• dry land storage
Moorage
• 657 berths/80 transient
• dry land storage available
Rates 24’-70’+
• daily: $10.10 to $28.10
• monthly: $187.90 to $504.90
• annual: $28/ft.
Amenities
• bulk ice
• electricity/fresh water/laundry
• net mending dock/pumpout/
dump stations
• fresh water and electricity at each slip
• 6-lane launch ramp/retail center
Haulouts
• 25-ton crane/60-ton travel lift
(16’ max bm)
Repair Facilities
• self-help yard & various craft
businesses
Air Transport
• small airport with privately owned
planes
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Chetco River Life Boat Station
• Curry County Sheriff
• many doctors and chiropractors
• nearest hospital: 27 miles
• Search & Rescue
• Southern Curry Mercy Flights
• U.S. Coast Guard
❯ Charleston
(Oregon International
Port of Coos Bay)
Port Office...........................541-888-2548
Port Fax...............................541-888-6111
[email protected]
44 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Ice
Charleston Ice Dock...........541-888-2212
At the Dock
• harbormaster: check at marina office
Moorage
• 560+ berths/150+ transients
• upland vessel storage in
Charleston shipyard
Haulouts (at Charleston)
• Shipyard phone:.....................883-3703
• 12-ton mobile crane and 4-ton forklift
• 60-ton travel lift boat hoist
• 200-ton marine railway at shipyard
• 1,000-ton dry dock in Coos Bay
Repair Facilities
• Giddings Boatworks
Charleston-Cordova
• Skallerud Marine
Air Transport
• Southwest Oregon Regional Airport,
Horizon Air, plus air cargo services
• Charter/Rental: Coos
Aviation Inc., Menasha Corp.
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Emergency....................................... 911
• Search & Rescue Emer. ........756-4141
• Bay Area Hospital...................269-8111
• Bay Cities Ambulance............269-1155
• 24 hr. Poison Hotline.......800-452-7165
Special Events
• Charleston Merchant’s Crab Feed;
second Saturday in February
• Charleston Oyster Fest, last
Saturday in April
• Charleston Seafood Festival; third
weekend in August
• Bay Area Fun Festival; third
weekend in September
• Bay Area Chamber of
Commerce.......................800-824-8486
• Charleston Visitor’s
Center (May-Sept.)..........541-888-2311
❯ Chignik
City Office...........................907-749-2280
Fax......................................907-749-2300
Public Safety Office...........907-749-2273
VHF Channel........................................... 6
Fish & Game (Summer)....907-845-2243
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 907)
Trident Seafoods......................749-2210
Norquest Seafoods Inc.............749-2276
Trident support side.................749-2276
At the Dock
• contact processors via VHF ch. 6 or 73
Moorage
• 1 dock and a few buoys for transients
• 2 docks in summer
• storage on land; contact processor
Amenities
• 1 grocery store in summer & winter
• 1 non-denominational church
• community hall
• electricity/fresh water
• phones 5 minutes from dock
• showers at bunkhouse
Haulouts
• 2 cranes at processors
• 2 travel lifts, maximum capacity
30 tons
• processors have engineers for
some repairs
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Chignik Bay Sub-Regional
Clinic................. 907-749-2282 or VHF 6
• nearest hospital, Kodiak
or Dillingham
• nearest Coast Guard facilities—Kodiak
• physician’s asst. at clinic (summer)
x-ray machine, advanced cardiac
life support system, limited
pharmacy and laboratory, and
summer ambulance squad
• Search & Rescue ............907-749-2273
• VPSO................................907-749-2273
AIR TRANSPORT
• daily flights
❯ Cold Bay
City Office...........................907-532-2401
Fax......................................907-532-2671
[email protected]
VHF Channels................................ 6 & 16
Fish & Game (Seasonal)....907-532-2419
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
At the Dock (Area Code 907)
• harbormaster: Alan Ellis 532-2478.
$35/use+ hookup fee
• fork lift rental (if reserved)
• pay phone at end of causeway
• restrooms/showers at Bearfoot Inn
Alaska
Repair Facilities
• closest repair at King Cove facilities
• travel lift available by reservation
Air Transport
• Peninsula Airways
Transport
• Alaska Marine Highway
• Western Pioneer/
Coastal Transportation
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• clinic with on-duty FNP
• EMTs and volunteer service ambulance
• medical transport by plane to
Anchorage
• LifeFlight..........................800-478-9111
❯ Cordova
Port Office...........................907-424-6400
Port Fax...............................907-424-6446
[email protected]
www.cityofcordova.net/harbor
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 68
USCGC Sycamore..............907-424-3434
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Cordova Terminal
Moorage
• transient moorage available at Cold
Bay City Dock
Rates
• 6 hr. grace period is allowed, then
daily rates apply
• under 31’, free; 32-46’, $10; 47-60’, .$15;
61-75’, $20; 76-90’, $50; 91-105’, $75;
106-125’, $90; 126-150’, $100;
151’-up, $100+$1/ft. over 150’
Amenities
• fresh water is available; $15 per
1,000 gal. min. charge $30;
A Petro Marine Affiliate
Serving You With:
•MarineFuels
•HeatingFuels
•Petroleum
Equipment
•PropaneGas
•BulkGas
•ChevronLubricants
•MobilLubricants
•FPPFFuel
Additives
(907) 424-3264
VHF Channel 16
www.shoresidepetroleum.com
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 45
Cordova-Craig
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Haulouts
Processors (Area Code 907)
Shoreside Petroleum................424-3264
•150-ton marine travel lift with washdown facilities
• 160-ft., 250-ton steel tidal grid
• 180-ft., 90-ton timber tidal grid
• dry storage for boats, pots, other
marine gear
• launch ramp
E.C. Phillips/Craig Fish .............826-3241
Noyes Island Smoke House ....826-2596
Jody’s Seafood Specialties..... 755-2247
Wildfish Co............................... 755-2247
Klawock Oceanside ..................755-2146
Processors (Area Code 907)
Cannery Row Inc.......................424-5920
Norquest Seafoods...................424-5390
Ocean Beauty Seafoods...........424-7171
Prime Select Seafoods.............424-7750
Copper River Seafoods............424-3721
Trident Seafoods......................424-7111
• harbormaster: Michael Kampnich
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• 729 berths
• slips available for vessels up to 100’
• Coast Guard
• medical center; AirVac to
Anchorage.......................907-424-8000
• Cordova Medical Clinic......................... ..........................................907-424-3622
• dental clinic
• LifeFlight:.........................800-478-9111
Rates
Air Transport
• annual: $30.75/ft.
• monthly: $10.75/ft.
• daily: $0.80/ft. in advance;
$0.95/ft. invoiced
• daily jet service to Anchorage
and Seattle
• turboprop service to Anchorage
• charter service available
Amenities
❯ Craig
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Dale R. Muma
Moorage
• electricity/fresh water on floats
• laundry in town
• phone hookups
• showers in town and harbor office
Services
• outboard & engine repair
• welding and machine shops
• marine hardware and electronic
services available year-round
Proudly Serving Cordova
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
46 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
At the Dock
Port Office...........................907-826-3404
Port Fax...............................907-826-3278
[email protected]
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Klawock Delta Fuel...................755-2909
Petro Marine Services..............826-3296
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
FINE FUELS.
SUPER SERVICE.
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
We’ve
got you
covered in
Craig.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-826-3296
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
Moorage and Rates
• 45 Transient spaces
• Trans. Moorage: 14’ to 150’ vessels
• Daily - $7.50 - $120
• Assigned - $13/ft./per year
• water hookup: free with moorage
• electrical hookup is $50.40
• gear storage: $12-$35 per month
Amenities
• electricity – 120/30 amp, 208 single
phase/50 amp
• fresh water on floats
• garbage disposal, used oil disposal
• public restrooms and showers at harbor office located at North/South Cove
Harbor
• two public launch ramps, parking
Services
• outboard sales and service
• marine hardware stores/grocery stores
• clothing stores/laundromat
• welding/fabrication
• ice house with ice for public, private,
recreational, commercial, cold storage
– contact harbormaster
Haulouts
• crane/3,700-lb capacity
• crane/10 ton capacity
• 4 tidal grids
• private haulout service for vessels up
to 32’
• boat trailer for up to 28’ vessels available for rent/harbor dept.
• haulout by hydraulic boat trailer for
vessels up to 58’/60 ton-contact harbor
dept.
• vessel storage - private storage in
fenced secure lot
• public storage for vessels 30’+, contact
harbor dept.
Craig-Dillingham
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Craig Police Department: 826-3330
• Alaska State Troopers: 755-2918 or
755-2291
• Craig Harbor Department: 826-3404,
VHF 16
• Coast Guard: VHF 16
• Craig Clinic: 826-3257
• Alicia Roberts Medical Ctr: 755-4800
• Southeast Dental Center: 826-2273
• USCG cutter.....................707-464-2172
• Sutter Coast Hsptal.........707-464-8511
❯ Crescent City
Harbor District....................707-464-6174
Fax......................................707-465-3535
VHF Channels................................ 9 & 16
CGV Dorado.......................707-464-2172
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 707)
❯ Depoe Bay
Port Office...........................541-765-2361
Port Fax...............................541-765-2129
[email protected]
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 541)
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Delta Western Fuel...................842-5441
Processors (Area Code 907)
Icicle Seafoods (office).............842-5204
Peter Pan Seafoods (active).....842-5415
Trident Seafoods (office)..........842-2519
At the Dock
• Depoe Bay Fuel Station
• harbormaster...................907-842-1069
....................... cell phone 907-842-3631
At the Dock
Rates
• harbormaster: Phil Shane
• seasonal, $70/yr. under 25’
• seasonal, $260/yr. over 25’
• transient, $25/24 hrs. over 25’
• transient, $12.50/24 hrs. under 25’
(10% discount if purchased by 4/30)
• 500-600 transients spaces
Moorage
• 100’ transient space
• 90 reserved berths
C. Renner Dist...........................465-4200
Processors (Area Code 707)
Fish & Game.......................907-842-3958
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Rates
Amenities
Alber Seafood Co......................464-8122
Pacific Choice Seafoods...........464-5558
• daily: $12 under 45 ft.
• daily: $18 over 45 ft.
• annually: $609 to $1,267
At the Dock
Amenities
• harbormaster: Rich Young
• electricity
• fresh water
• restrooms
• pumpout dock
• hoist
• fish cleaning station
• $25 per launch/haulout for vessels ..... under 25’
• $70 per launch/haulout for vessels ..... over 25’
• $100 in & out for vessels over 25’
Haulouts
Repair Facilities
• boat ramp
• repairs available for aluminum, glass,
Moorage
• 245 berths
• number of transient berths varies
Rates
• daily $14 to 30 ft./$32 to 70 ft.
Amenities
• cable repair (dock area)/net mending
• ice/marine supply stores
• electricity/fresh water/laundry
• pay phones/restrooms/showers
Haulouts
• dock hoists
• SyncroLift, 270 long tons
• 30-ton travel lift operated by
the harbor
Repair Facilities
• Fashion Blacksmith, full-service yard
Air Transport
• Air Ambulance
• Regularly scheduled airlines
Air Transport
• Newport, Ore.
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Depoe Bay Fire Dept.
• U.S. Coast Guard
Special Events
• annual Fleet of Flowers, Memorial Day
• Wooden Boat Show/Crab Feed
❯ Dillingham
Harbor Emergency............ 907-842-5354
City Office...........................907-842-5211
Harbor Fax .........................907-842-4573
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 10
• fresh water, laundromats, phones,
public bathhouse, shower, 24-site
campground
Haulouts
Proudly Serving Dillingham
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 47
Dillingham-Dutch Harbor
wood, props, hydraulics & engines
Air Transport
• Peninsula Airways ....907-842-5559
• Alaska Airlines ..........800-252-7522
• Frontier Flying Svc ... 800-478-6779
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• volunteer fire dept ...907-842-2288
• EMS ambulance ..........907-842-2288
• Bristol Bay Health Corp
(Kanakanak Hosp)...........907-842-5201
❯ Dutch Harbor
Port Office...........................907-581-1254
Fax......................................907-581-2519
[email protected]
www.unalaska-ak.us
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Delta Western Fuel...................581-1295
North Pacific Fuel......................581-1350
Offshore Systems Inc...............581-1827
Rolls-Royce Marine
Dutch Harbor, AK
Processors (Area Code 907)
Alyeska Seafoods Inc...............581-1211
Icicle Seafoods..........................282-0988
Royal Aleutian Sfds..................581-1671
Trident Seafoods......................581-1241
Unisea........................................581-1258
Westward Seafoods.................581-1660
Bergen Diesel Rauma Brattvaag
Norwinch Aquamaster
Ulstein Kamewa Tenfjord
Frydenbo Brown
Brothers Bird Johnson
Sales Parts Service
n
n
n
n
• Harbormaster: John Days
• Port Director: Alvin Osterback
• 24 hours, 7 days a week
Moorage
• over 15 privately owned docks in area
• small boat floats in Iliuliuk
Harbor near Unisea Inn
• city dock includes
Horizon container crane
• compulsory pilotage by Southeast
Alaska Pilot’s Assoc. and Alaska
Marine Pilots; to avoid delay, contact
n
n
n
At the Dock
n
n
n
n
n
Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206-782-9190
Toll Free . . . . . . . . . . . 800-426-6826
Fax Number . . . . . . . . 206-782-0176
Web . . . . . . . www.rolls-royce.com
NETS
Dutch Harbor
2663 Airport Beach Rd.
Dutch Harbor, AK 99692
Ph: 907-581-2900
Fax: 907-581-2850
[email protected]
OSI in Dutch Harbor, AK
is the premiere marine and
fisheries support terminal
in Western Alaska. This
is the only marine support
terminal in Dutch Harbor
currently offering purpose-built
dry warehousing and cold storage.
Other services include:
• 24 x 7 stevedoring services
• 1,500 linear feet of dock space
• crab pot handling and storage
• material handling equipment
• outside gear storage
• potable water
• A full line of fuel, filters, lubricants,
sorbent pads and rags.
Offshore Systems, Inc.
Jared Davis - Nick Reed
Phone: 907-581-1827 Dutch Harbor
www.offshoresystemsinc.com
48 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
The International
PORT OF DUTCH HARBOR
The Aleutian Connection
...Your Strongest Link in the Chain
F
International Port
of Dutch Harbor
P.O. Box 610
Unalaska, Alaska 99685
(907)581-1254 • 581-2519 FAX
D
IVE
IVERSE
F
ULL
UNALASKA
MARINE CENTER
DUTCH HARBOR
SPIT DOCK
2,051 Linear Feet
Vessels up to 900 ft.
2,200 Linear Feet
Vessels up to 200 ft.
• Fuel & Water
• Warehouse &
Loading Dock
• Container & Storage
Areas
• Refuse Removal
• Telephones
• Long & Short Term
Moorage
• Electrical Hook-ups
• Refuse Removal
• Telephones
• Water
Alvin Osterback, Port Director
S
ERVICE
F
ACILITIES
ROBERT STORRS
SMALL BOAT
HARBOR FACILITY
LIGHT CARGO DOCK
400 Linear Feet
• Water
• Refuse Removal
• Electrical Hook-ups
2,040 Linear Feet
71 Slips
Vessels up to 60 ft.
CARL E MOSES
BOAT HARBOR
• Permanent &
Transient Slips
• Long & Short Term
Rates
• Electrical Hook-ups
• Water
• Refuse Removal
5740 Linear Feet
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
John Days, Harbor Master
www.unalaska-ak.us
C
ARL
E
M
OSES
SCHEDULED
TO
OPEN
N
Vessels up to 150 ft.
Permanent & Transient Slips
Long & Short Term Rates
Electrical Hook-ups
Water
Refuse Removal
Drive Down Loading Dock
OVEMBER
2011
VHF CHANNEL 16—24 HOUR HARBOR PATROL • ALASKA’S FACTORY TRAWLER BASE
C
I
T
Y
O
F
U
N
A
L
A
S
K
A
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 49
Dutch Harbor-Elfin Cove
Harris ElEctric DutcH Harbor
2315 Airport BeAch roAd
dutch hArBor, AK 99692
tel: 907-581-1679
FAx:907-581-1873
A full-service Electrical Contractor
Marine Electrical Contractor
Marine Electronic Sales & Service Shop
We provide systems, components,
parts and service for:
• Gillnetters
• Seiners
• Longliners
• Crabbers
• Factory Trawlers
We build equipment that meets UL, American Bureau
of Shipping and US Coast Guard standards.
port at least 12 hours prior to ETA
• cranes: 100,000-lb. Paceo container
lift at APL facility; mobile cranes at
other facilities up to 150 tons;
request through shipping agents or....
West Construction on VHF 9
• land storage on request
Rates
www.alaskaregional.com
Dutch Harbor
Amenities
• electricity at Spit & Light cargo docks
• potable water at city dock, fuel
docks and processors
At canneries:
• electricity
• fresh water
• net mending dock
• pay phones/showers
• restrooms/laundry
• solid waste dumpster
• divers available for underwater
surveys and repairs
• most deck, hull, engine, radar,
gyro, hydraulic, electrical,
refrigeration and marine electronic
repairs
P.O. BOX 315
DUTCH HARBOR, AK 99685
(907) 581-1498
(800) 275-3820
50 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
At public dock:
• fishing boat dockage
• fresh water at face of dock
• solid waste removal
• police department services
Repair Facilities
• unavailable
Air Transport
• PenAir...............................907-581-1383
• air shuttle to/from Akutan
• Peninsula Airways — daily service
• Arctic Circle Air Inc.
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• CG Marine Safety............907-581-3466
• Emergency Coordination Center:
U.S. Coast Guard
• health clinic; nearest hospital in
Kodiak
• nearest Coast Guard, Kodiak
• local police/fire/ambulance
• clinic:................................907-233-2229
• public safety officer
• July 4th celebration
COMPLETE ELECTRONICS CENTER WITH
SALES, SERVICE AND INSTALLATION
FOR ANY SIZE VESSEL
• fishing boats: $10/day; $125/season
Air Transport
Special Events
MARINE ELECTRONICS, INC.
• freight public use
• dry land storage at canneries
• Egegik City Dock – 40’ x 80’
for freight only
Amenities
Repair Facilities
1-800-478-9111
Moorage
Rates
• 1 container crane
• private marine ways available
up to 400 gross tons
Direct Airport Access
Bedside to Bedside Critical Care
Alaska Gen. Seafds (AGS)........233-2212
Icicle Seafoods..........................233-2205
• competitive with other Alaska
ports; daily, monthly moorage
available on request
Haulouts
A World of Caring
Processors (Area Code 907)
❯ Egegik
(Coffee Point)
City Office...........................907-233-2400
Fax......................................907-233-2231
[email protected]
VHF Channel........................................... 9
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
❯ Elfin Cove
No Port or City Office;
contact Cross Sound Marketing Assoc.
907-239-2300 (www.fairweatherfish.
com) or contact Lodges in Summer
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game (Douglas).....907-465-4250
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Elfin Cove Fuel, see ad
Moorage
• no assigned berths
• about 25 spaces for transients
Elfin Cove-Everett
Rates
Processors (Area Code 707)
At the Dock
• no charge for moorage
Caito Brothers Fisheries...........443-0550
Pacific Choice............................442-2981
• harbor attendant: Jeff Lozeau
Amenities
• Hardware Plus - marine hardware and
supplies..............................907-239-2240
• Patti’s F.P. Smokery........907-239-2244
• grocery store
• approx. 7 lodges in area –
primarily in summer
• cafe (Coho’s Restaurant)
• fuel service: gas/diesel
• fresh water available at floats
• pay phones at the top of each ramp
• showers/laundry available
June through mid-September
Haulouts
• tidal grid will handle boats
up to 60’
Repair Facilities
• Pelican handles mechanical repairs;
shipwright work is in Juneau,
Hoonah, Wrangell and Sitka
• Shipwright work also by David and
Susan Abel.........................907-957-0837
• Welding: Happy Thoughts Welding,
Mike Nelson, fabrication and repair
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• no medical service available;
nearest hospitals in Juneau or Sitka
• nearest Coast Guard facilities in
Juneau or Sitka
Air Transport
• floatplanes run almost daily
during summer
Special Events
• July 4th celebration
❯ Eureka
(Humboldt Bay)
Harbor Dist.........................707-443-0801
District Fax..........................707-443-0800
[email protected]
www.humboldtbay.org
VHF Channels.............................. 14 & 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 707)
Englund Marine Supply...........444-9266
At the Dock
• dockmaster: Suzie V. Howser
Moorage
Woodley Island Marina
• 30’ to 130’
• 237 berths
Rates
• daily/weekly/monthly/
annual rates per foot
• power and water included in all rates
Amenities
• bar/cafe
• electricity/bilge pumpout
• fresh water/laundry/showers
• work yard/hoists
• pay phones/restrooms
• sewage pumpouts
• 24-hr. security guard
Haulouts & Repair Facilities
• 1-ton and 2-ton hoists
• Humboldt Bay Harbor Dist.:
150-ton travel lift
• Air Transport
• United Express
Medical/Rescue Facilities
(Area Code 707)
Moorage
• permanent moorage available for
commercial seiners and gillnetters
• limited rafting for additional
moorage
• temporary moorage available
Rates
• commercial seine $5.57/ft./month
• rafting rate $0.45/ft./day
Amenities
• full service marina
• boat repair & supplies
• electricity
• fresh water
• pay phones
• restaurants
• light provisions
• hotel
• showers
• laundry
• 4 pump-a-heads/2 dump stations
Haulouts
• 2 port-operated travel lifts,
30 and 35 tons
• Marine ways at Fisherman’s
Boat Shop
• Private haulout available for
large boats
• Mad River Comm. Hosp.........822-3621
• St. Joseph’s Hospital.............445-8121
• USCG rescue .....................839-6100
❯ Everett
Port Office...........................425-259-6001
Port Fax...............................425-259-0860
[email protected]
www.portofeverett.com
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Wildlife....................425-775-1311
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
FUEL SUPPLIERS (AREA CODE 425)
Port fuel dock............................388-0689
Processors (Area Code 425)
Northport Fisheries............425-335-3466
(processor)
HANSEN BOAT CO.
NEW CONSTRUCTION OR REPAIR
(425) 252-4021
4124 34th Ave NE, Everett, WA. 98201
•140’X48’DRYDOCK
•866TONLIFTCAPACITY
•SANDBLASTING&
PAINTING
•DOCKSIDEREPAIRS
•NEWPILOTHOUSES
•WORKDECK
RENOVATIONS
•PIPINGSYSTEM
RENEWAL
•INTERIOR
RENOVATION
•BOWBULBS
•ENGINE&
EQUIPMENT
INSTALLATION
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 51
Everett-Fort Bragg
Medical/Rescue Facilities
(Area Code 425)
• Everett General Hospital........261-2000
• Providence Everett Medical Center
Colby Campus.................425-261-2000
Pacific Campus................425-261-2000
and ETTs, volunteer service
ambulance
• medical transport by plane to
Anchorage via Cold Bay
Repair Facilities
dock
• two dump stations
Haulouts
• dock hoist for gear and product only
• marine railway
• closest repair in King Cove
Air Transport
• Paine Field Airport
(general aviation)
• Seattle-Tacoma Int’l Airport
about an hour away
❯ False Pass
Air Transport
• Pen Air flights 3 days a week
depending on weather
❯ Florence
(Siuslaw)
Processors (Area Code 907)
Port of Siuslaw
P.O. Box 1220, 1499 Bay St.
Florence, OR 97439
www.portofsiuslaw.com
[email protected]
Port Office...........................541-997-3426
Port Fax...............................541-997-9407
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
RV Campground Office.....541-997-3040
Peter Pan Sfds Fish Camp........548-2208
Bering Pacific Seafoods...........548-2347
Fuel DOCK
Port/City Office...................907-548-2319
Port/City Fax.......................907-548-2214
[email protected]
home.gci.net/~cityoffalsepass/
VHF Channel........................................... 6
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Rates
• vessels moored to False Pass City
Dock will be allowed a 6-hr.
grace period; any vessel remaining
longer will be assessed the
following amounts (or 48 hrs.
for boats actively involved in
loading or unloading cargo):
• under 20’, $7/day; 21-31’, $10/day
• 32-46’, $15/day; 47-60’, $20/day
• 61-75’, $25/day; 76-90’, $30/day
• 91-105’, $40/day; 106-125’, $50/day
• 106-125’, $50/day; 126-150’, $60/day
• 126-150’, $60/day; 151’-over, $70/day
Amenities
• crab pot storage — Isanotski Corp
• fresh water and pay phones — Peter . Pan Dock and City Dock (summer only)
• fuel available at Peter Pan Dock
• 69 very nice people & 1 old grouch
Boat Haulout
• Hydraulic boat trailer:
boats up to 44’
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• clinic with CHA on duty, EMTs
52 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Repair Facilities
• Siuslaw Marine at Cushman
•Oregon Marine Construction
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Peace Harbor Hsptl..........541-997-8412
• Western Lane Ambulance
• Siuslaw Coast Guard station
Special Events
• Rhododendron Days Festival,
third weekend in May
❯ Fort Bragg
(Noyo Harbor District)
• Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. daily,
$10 after-hours surcharge
• Call 541-999-1256 or 541-997-3040
to request fueling
Harbor Dist.........................707-964-4719
Harbor Dist Fax..................707-964-4710
[email protected]
VHF Channel..................................... 66-A
USCG Noyo River..............707-964-6612
Fish & Game Marine..........707-964-9078
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 541)
Processors (Area Code 707)
Contact Port Manager
Caito Fisheries, Inc....................964-6368
At the Dock
At the Dock
• port manager: Mark Freeman
• manager: Jere Kleinbach
Moorage
Moorage
• 65 berths
• 10 transient berths
• waiting list
• limited dry land storage
•265 berths/dry-land storage
•waiting list for small vessels
Rates
• daily: $12 to $15
• monthly: $74 to $161
• annually: $597 to $1,106
Rates
•daily: $18 to $24
•monthly: $3.50/ft. (permanent
berths only)
•temporary berths are at 1.5x the
normal permanent rate
•now accepting Visa for payment
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water
• laundry/pay phones
• restrooms/showers
• commercial ice machine
• fuel dock
• 480 three-phase power on transient
Amenities
At mooring basin:
•electricity, fresh water, pay phones
•laundromat, pharmacy, deli,
grocery store-shopping center near
Fort Bragg-Gold Beach
mooring basin
•net mending area
•restrooms/showers
Haulouts
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Inter-Island Med Center........................
..........................................360-378-2141
• nearest Coast Guard facilities at
Bellingham & Port Angeles
charter planes only
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard/volunteer
fire/medical
•dock hoists/marine railways
Repair Facilities
•located nearby
Medical/Rescue Facilities
•Coast Guard/hospital
Special Events
•4th of July salmon barbecue
❯ Friday Harbor
Port Office...........................360-378-2688
Port Fax...............................360-378-6114
www.portfridayharbor.org
VHF Channel..................................... 66-A
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Air Transport
Special Events
• 3,400’ lightplane runway w/
daily flights
• largest commercial seaplane
base in Lower 48
• Garibaldi Days, last weekend in July
• Blessing of the Fleet in May
• Crab Races in March
❯ Garibaldi
Port Office...........................503-322-3292
Port Fax...............................503-322-0029
[email protected]
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
www.portofgaribaldi.org
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 503)
❯ Gig Harbor
Port Office...........................253-851-8136
Port Fax...............................253-851-8563
[email protected]
www.gigharborguide.com
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Visitor Information .......888-843-9444
or 888-VIEWGIG
Garibaldi Marina................503-322-3312
Tillamook Bay Boathouse....................... ..........................................503-322-3600
At the Dock
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
Processors
Moorage
I.P.S............................................378-3114
Tillamook Bay Boathouse....................... ..........................................503-322-3600
Garibaldi Pacific Seafood
..........................................503-861-2201
Garibaldi Cannery..............505-322-3344
• transient space at Jerisich Park
Dock (no electricity)
• numerous private docks available
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Tami Hayes
Moorage
• 463 berths/1,500’ of floating
breakwater
• boat ramp 1 mile from marina
• private yard stores some boats
on land
Amenities
• 2 floats — net repair and
equip. loading
• electricity, fresh water, showers
• laundry near harbor
• net repair float, net loading, forklift
• pay phones nearby, some hookups
Haulouts
• 2-ton crane
• full service shipyard nearby
• travel lift for boats up to 40'
Repair Facilities
• 1 private yard and several shops
will repair aluminum, glass, wood;
also, engine and electronics repairs
At the Dock
• city administrator: Rob Karlinsey
Rates
• Jerisich Park Pier: no fee (honor system)
• port manager: Kevin Greenwood
• harbor administrator: Betty Thomas .. or Jessi Lothman
• maintenance/harbor: Virgil Loudon
• maintenance supervisor:
David Olson
• 13 private net sheds
• marine hardware store
• restrooms/pay phones
• tavern/restaurants/grocery/shops
Moorage
Haulouts
• 277 berths/400 linear feet for
transients
• travel lift to 65’/85 tons
Rates
• daily: $15 up to 30', $20 over 30'
• season: $750 up to 30', $1000 over 30'
May-Oct.
Amenities
• fresh water/pay phones
• restrooms/showers
Air Transport
• Tillamook (13 miles),
Amenities
Special Events
• Blessing of the Fleet
• Lighted Boat Parade
• Maritime Gig Festival, 1st Sat. in June
• Heritage Row, September
❯ Gold Beach
Port Office...........................541-247-6269
Port Fax...............................541-247-6268
[email protected]
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 53
Gold Beach-Homer
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
At the Dock
At the Dock
• Port Manager: Errol Roberts
Moorage
• 75 slips to 24’
• 36 slips to 40’
• 3 slips to 80’
• 1 slip to 150’
• dry-land storage available
Rates
(Commercial boats 20-61’)
• daily: $13.75 to $33
• monthly: $120 to $240
• annually: $450 to $810
• prices subject to change
AlAskAn MAde
Products
• harbormaster: Ed Barrett,
[email protected]
• assistant: Joe Parnell
Moorage
• 140 permanent berths
• 100 spaces for transients
• dry land storage 5 miles
from town, $0.15/sq. ft.
Rates
• annual: $0.95/sq. ft. (length x width)
• transient: $0.30/ft./day
• monthly: $3.50/ft./mo.
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water/pay phone
• showers and laundry nearby
Amenities
Haulouts
• electricity on commercial dock
• fresh water
• restrooms/NO showers
• restaurants/shops on
port property
• city tidal grid/private
haulout nearby
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Curry Gen. Hospital.........541-247-6621
• US Coast Guard June-Sept.
• 2 doctors & dentist at health center
• nearest Coast Guard facility in Juneau
Special Events
Air Transport
• Rogue River jet boat marathon,
first weekend in June
• July 4 fireworks & Bash on the Bay
• Wings of Alaska, Air Excursions, providing daily prop service
Repair Facilities
Visit Our Web Site
For All Your Gear Needs
nomaralaska.com
Slush Bags
Freezer Covers
Brailer Bags
Boat Covers
xtratuff boots Boat Upholstery
104 E. Pioneer Avenue
Homer, Alaska 99603
907-235-8363 / 800-478-8364
FAX: 907-235-4135
Proudly Serving Homer
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
• 2 boatbuilders who also do repairs
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
❯ Homer
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
4350 Homer Spit Rd., Homer, AK 99603
Port Office...........................907-235-3160
Port Fax...............................907-235-3152
............................port[email protected]
.................http://port.ci.homer.ak.us
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 10
USCG Hickory....................907-235-5234
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Edgewater Marine Services
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Haines Propane.........................766-3191
Delta Western Fuel...................766-3190
Homer Fuel Dock......................235-8548
Petro Marine Services..............235-8818
Box 3505, Homer, Alaska 99603
Phone/Fax 907-235-1063
Cell:907-299-2145 • 907-299-1839
Email:[email protected]
Processors (Area Code 907)
Processors/Buyers (Area Code 907)
Dejon Delights...........................766-2505
Bell’s Seafood...........................766-2950
Auction Block............................235-7267
The Fish Factory........................235-1300
Homer Odyssey........................226-1111
❯ Haines
Port Office...........................907-766-2448
Cell Phone..........................907-314-0173
Port Fax...............................907-766-3010
[email protected]
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game.......................907-766-2830
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
54 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
th
MARINE SURVEYOR
Condition/Valuation
Repair Consultant/Vessel Watch
Paul & Lara Fleenor
Homer-Hydaburg
Icicle Seafoods..........................235-8107
Kachemak Bay Seafood...........299-1551
Ocean Beauty Seafoods...........776-8174
Snug Harbor Seafoods.............283-6122
Rates
• private 55’ travel lift a few minutes
steaming from harbor (picks 70 tons)
• 50-ton wood tidal grid
• $10/day 20-25’; add $1 for every 3’
• annual, $17/ft.
Repair Facilities
Amenities
• harbormaster: Bryan Hawkins
• ice plant............................907-235-3162
• repairs for aluminum, glass and
wood done by private companies
with mobile repair units
Moorage
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• 920 reserved stalls
• 750’ transient float system
available with 3-phase power for
large vessels
• transient moorage for boats
up to 150’
• 110-ft. Coast Guard rescue vessel,
Roanoke Island
• Coast Guard Rescue; USCG
auxiliary, Rescue 21 with Safeboat
rescue vessel, also the buoy tender
Hickory
• dentists/doctors in town
• So. Peninsula Hospital ...907-235-8101
• 2 pay phones-new harbor, 1
downtown
• electricity available in stalls,
$5/night
• pressure washer rental available
at harbor
• showers (metered), laundry,
phones
• dry storage available
• winter water, year-round
fresh water
At the Dock
Fish Dock
• 383’ face, 2 side berths, approx 460’...
total berthing face
• 8 self-operated cranes, available 24 ...
hrs./day; $22 per 15 minutes
Deep Water Dock
• 345 ft. face and 3 breasting dolphins
and 2 mooring buoys
• 40 ft. water depth at MLLW
• 1 crane (5 ton)
Pioneer Dock
• 469 ft. face
• 40 ft. water depth at MLLW
Rates
• $35.22/ft. per year plus $50 admin ......
fee; contact harbormaster for more i. nfo
on daily and monthly fees
Amenities
• 5-lane boat ramp, $13 per launch
• 24-hr. security in harbor
• 6,000’ of transient float
• barge ramp
• cold storage holding room
• electricity
• fresh water
• ice making/holding at $119/ton,
auger delivered
• laundry in town and harbor
• pay phones on the spit and in town
• showers at the campground on the spit
Haulouts
• daily flights
• 2 tidal grids, inner/outer harbor
• dockside hoist
• 35-ton hydraulic trailer
Special Events
Repair Facilities
• July 4th Homer Spit 10K Race
• Halibut Derby, May-mid-Sept.
• Shorebird Festival, early May
• Winter King Salmon Derby, midMarch
• Kachemak Bay Sea Festival, Memorial
Day weekend
• aluminum shop/divers available
• fiberglass repair
• general marine services/supply
stores
• shipwright in town/2 portable
welders
Air Transport
❯ Hoonah
Port Office...........................907-945-3670
Port Fax...............................907-945-3674
[email protected]
VHF Channels......................... 16, 9 or 14
Fish & Game (Douglas).....907-465-4250
Fish & Wildlife Prot............907-945-3620
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Hoonah Med. Center.......907-945-3722
• health clinic; health technician
available
• nearest hospital in Juneau
• search & rescue unit available
❯ Hydaburg
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Port Office...........................907-285-3761
Port Fax...............................907-285-3670
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Hoonah Trading Fuel................945-3211
and VHF 11
At the Dock
• harbormaster: John Joseph Burr
Processors (Area Code 907)
Hoonah Cold Storage...............945-3264
Buy-n-Pack Seafoods................945-3388
At the Dock
Moorage
• 70 berths
• limited dry space available
• room for 20-30 transients
• harbormaster: Paul Dybdahl
Haulouts
• 200-ton commercial steel tidal grid
• private mobile crane available for
pulling engines and gear
Moorage
• approx. 100 transients spaces
• berths 24’, 30’, 44’, 48’ and up
Rates
• annually: $11/ft., prorated daily
or monthly
• subject to change
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 55
Hydaburg-Juneau
Amenities
• electricity and cable TV access
• waste oil/garbage holding
disposal cans
• crew licenses avail. at general store
• water avail. at dock/mooring floats
• grocery store, deli, gifts
• net mending on dock mooring floats
• pay phones at locations in town
• divers
• restaurants, post office, two churches
on length), 51’ to 75’ - $25; over 75’ ..
- $50.
• monthly: $6/ft. + tax
• annual: $17.75-19/ft. + tax
(commercial rate)
Amenities
• Promech Airlines bush pilot service
• bus service
• dockside motels
• electricity
• fresh water
• restrooms/public showers
• fuel dock
• garbage service
• shops/galleries
• pay phones
• restaurants
• back-in launch
• seafood stores
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Haulouts
• health clinic......................907-285-3462
• public safety officer
• ambulance
• volunteer EMS squad 24 hrs./day
• 1 travel hoist, 50-ton
• 1 stationary hoist
Haulouts
• adjacent to boat harbor, up to 65’
• dock hoist: City of Hydaburg Dock
Air Transport
AUKE BAY
LOADING FACILITY
Serving Commercial and
Fishing Vessels
• Barge/Landing Craft Ramp
• Heavy Duty Drive-Down Float
• Two 2-Ton Cranes
• Staging/Storage Sites
• 30 and 50 Amp Service
Juneau, Alaska
Contact
Auke Bay Harbor at VHF 74
(907) 789-0819
www.juneau.org/harbors
Repair Facilities
• self/full-service boatyard
Special Events
• July 4th celebration
❯ Ilwaco
Port Office...........................360-642-3143
Port Fax...............................360-642-3148
www.portofilwaco.org
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
Ilwaco Fuel Dock.......................642-2435
Wilcox Oil..................................642-3231
Processors (Area Code 360)
Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Co.............642-3773
At the Dock
• port manager: Jim Neva
[email protected]
Moorage
• 800 berths
• dry land storage
• transient berths
Rates
• daily: $12 to $25/ft./day (dep.
56 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Air Transport
• airport for small craft
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard
• Ocean Beach Hospital
Special Events
• Saturday market, May thru Sept.
• Blessing of the Fleet
• Loyalty Days
• Fireworks at the port in July
• Slow Drag in September
• check www.funbeach.com
• www.portofilwaco.com
❯ Juneau
Harbor Office......................907-586-5255
Harbor Fax..........................907-586-2507
[email protected]
www.juneau.org/harbors
VHF Channels.............................. 73 & 16
Coast Guard.......................800-478-5555
Fish & Game (Douglas).....907-465-4250
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
FINE FUELS.
SUPER SERVICE.
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
We’ve
got you
covered
in Juneau.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Protective Coatings
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-586-4400
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
Juneau-Kenai
Fuel Suppliers/Private Marinas
(Area Code 907)
Tesoro Fuel Dock......................586-2402
Delta Western Fuel...................586-2800
Donohue’s Marina....................789-7851
Outboard Shop, The.................789-1927
Petro Marine Services..............586-4400
Taku Oil Fuel Dock....................586-1276
Seadrome Marina.....................463-8811
DeHarts Marina.........................789-7401
Fisherman’s Bend.....................789-7312
Processors (Area Code 907)
Alaska Seafood Co....................780-5111
Jerry’s Meat & Sfds..................789-5142
Alaska Glacier Seafoods..........790-3590
At the Dock
• harbormaster:
Phil Benner ................907-586-5255 .... (or VHF 16)
• Juneau marine operator
(ALASCOM) VHF 25 or 26
• port director:
John Stone ..................907-586-0292
[email protected]
Moorage
• tidal grids at Harris Harbor
Haulouts
• tidal grids, 2 uptown and at Portage
Repair Facilities
• minor repair available
Repair Facilities
• mechanics in logging camp
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Bartlett Mem. Hosp.........907-586-2611
• USCG dist HQ here; 41’ and 95’
search & rescue vessels;
aircraft at Sitka
• dentists in town
• private emergency care facility
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Air Transport
Special Events
• daily flights/jet service
• Dog Salmon Festival, July
• 17th annual Culture Camp, July
Special Events
• 4th of July celebration
• Friday evening concerts in
Marine Park
• March, statewide Folk Festival
• May, Juneau Jazz &
Classics Festival
• Juneau Maritime Festival, May 14
❯ Kake
• ambulance and clinic (Kake EMS)
Air Transport
• LAB Flying, Air Excursion
• several charters
❯ Kenai
Port (summer only)............907-283-9538
City of Kenai.......................907-283-7535
City Fax...............................907-283-3014
www.ci.kenai.ak.us
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 907)
• 500 spaces for transients
• 800’ transient moorage downtown
for vessels up to 250’/864 berths
• 2,000’ deep-draft dock available
with three-phase power from Oct. 1
through April 30 in the downtown
area for over-winter moorage
• waiting list for berths: 175
Portage Harbor...................907-785-3251
Harbor Fax..........................907-785-4815
VHF Channels............................ 16/CB 15
Police Department ........907-785-3393
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Rates
Processor (toll-free)
• daily moorage rates and other
fees avail. on the web and in
PDF format
Kake Foods Inc...................800-524-2487
At the Dock
At the Dock
• dock manager (seasonal)
• harbormaster: 283-7535 x236
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Kake Tribal Fuel........................785-3601
Snug Harbor Seafoods.............283-6122
Inlet Salmon Company.............283-9275
Salamatof Seafoods................283-7000
Tras-Aqua Int.............................283-7322
Pacific Star Seafoods................283-7787
Cook Inlet Processing...............776-8174
R & J (at dock)...........................283-9246
Custom Sfd (Soldotna).............262-9691
Ed’s Kasilof Sfds (Soldotna)....262-9572
• harbormaster: Wilbur Brown Sr.
Amenities
• electricity year-round on all floats
• fresh water on all floats year-round
• ice/showers and laundry nearby
• pay phones and phone hookups
available
• Wi-Fi
Haulouts
• 4 cranes total available on docks
• 240’ fisheries dock with 2 cranes
• addtl 180’ fisheries loading
dock w/2 cranes
• private haulouts available
Moorage
• 90 berths
• inside portage
• transient berths only as necessary
• waiting list
Rates
• daily: $0.30/ft.
• annually: $6/ft.
Amenities
Moorage/Rates
• city mooring buoy in river: $10/day
• seasonal pass per boat:
$150/season
• skiff at land side of dock, $7/day
Amenities
• fuel, gas and diesel/water
wash down
• fresh water/launch ramps
• phones/restrooms
• 3 unloading cranes; forklift
• hotels, rooms & showers, grocery
stores, laundromat
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 57
Kenai-Ketchikan
Haulouts
• haulouts available at individual
processors & city dock via boat ramp
Silver Lining Seafoods.............225-6664
Trident Seafoods......................225-4191
Moorage
At the Dock
Repair Facilities
• private boat yard between Kenai &
Soldotna can do alum. &
fiberglass repairs
• 1,068 berths
• space for about 250 transients
• waiting list: 213
• Steve Corporon, Director of
Port and Harbors
• winter: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; summer:
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard MSC....907-283-3292
• nearest Coast Guard base in Kodiak
• hospital in Soldotna, equipped
for general and some emergency
surgery
❯ Ketchikan
Port Office...........................907-228-5632
Port Fax...............................907-247-3610
[email protected]
www.city.ketchikan.ak.us/ds/ph.html
VHF Channels.......... 16 or 73 (preferred)
CG Marine Safety...............907-225-4496
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Anderes Oil Co..........................225-2163
Petro Alaska..............................225-1985
Petro Marine Services..............225-2106
Tesoro Alaska............................561-5521
Processors (Area Code 907)
AK General Seafoods...............225-2906
Blue Fin Seafoods.....................225-5328
EC Phillips & Son......................225-3121
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
Open 7 Days A Week
During the Summer
S O M E P R O D U C T S W E C A R RY:
• Longline gear
• Shrimp gear
• Crab gear
• Troll gear
• Seine gear
Steve Corporon - Director
2933 Tongass Avenue; Ketchikan, AK
Tel: (907) 228-5632 • Fax: (907) 247-3610
Web: www.city.ketchikan.ak.us/ds/ph.html
58 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
•
•
•
•
•
Electronics
Dickinson stoves
8-D batteries
Charts
Hydraulics
We Ship Anywhere
Kethikan:
1-800-478-3135
907-225-3135
Seattle
Fishermen’s
Memorial
SUPER SERVICE.
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
We’ve
got you
covered
in Ketchikan.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Protective Coatings
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-225-2106
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
THINKING ABOUT
REBUILDING or REPLACING
YOUR VESSEL?
KETCHIKAN
Dry Dock No. 1
Overall length 432 ft.
Dry Dock No. 2
Overall length 229 ft.
Make ASD a part
Berth No. 1
of your design and
Land level repair
construction team for … and
assembly
Contact Harbormaster
vHF channel 16 & 73
* ELECTRICITY
* POTABLE WATER
* HYDRAULIC CRANES
* 120’ GRIDIRON
* NET FLOAT
FINE FUELS.
Supply of Alaska, LLC
“Alaska’s
First
City”
* ICE FREE MOORAGE
* SHOWERS
* PUMP-OUT STATION
* BOAT LAUNCHES
6 a.m.-10 p.m.
n NEw SHIpBUILdING COmpLIANCE UpGRAdES n CONVERSIONS n mAINTENANCE n dAmAGE REpAIR
n
206.782.6577
seattlefishermensmemorial.org
Berth No. 2
Enclosed ship
conversion and
assembly hall
available June 2012
BUILt BY ALASkANS fOR SERvICE IN ALASkA
Alaska Ship & Drydock, Inc.
www.akship.net 907-225-7199
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
Ketchikan-King Cove
Rates
• daily electricity at $0.12/ft. per day
• port daily rates, $0.33 to $2.54/ft.
per day
• harbor daily rate $0.59/ft. per day;
30 and 90 day permits are available
at reduced rates;
• reserved moorage is $11.49/ft./6 mo.
inside city limits, $13.79/ft./6 mo.
outside city limits
Amenities
• 70’ x 90’ fishing gear repair float
at Bar Harbor
• electricity available at Captain B.H.
“Casey” Moran Harbor (formerly
City Float)
• fresh water available for all boats
• phone hookups available in
reserved moorage only
• pay phones at dock
• showers and laundry available
near Bar Harbor and Thomas Basin
Haulouts
• dry dock at local yard
• haulout at marina in Refuge Cove
• marine ways and travel lifts
available at repair yards
• tidal grids (4); 3 at Thomas
Basin will handle boats up to 80’;
1 at Bar Harbor will handle up to 75’
Repair Facilities
• 2 repair yards available for
aluminum, glass, wood boats; also
a mobile welding service available
for dockside repair
• electronic, refrigeration, engine,
hydraulic repair services available
Medical/Rescue (Area Code 907)
• Coast Guard keeps 110’
Cape Nashaun in town, and one
47’ motor life boat and two 25’
Response (homeland security) boats
• Coast Guard; search & rescue, emergency
• Ketchikan General Hospital ......225-.... 5171; Airlift N.W. to Seattle
for severe emergency cases
• search & rescue aircraft from Sitka
• City of Ketchikan Fire Dept
(ambulance service) and H/V
Newell (fire boat)
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
Peter Pan Seafoods..................497-2234
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Dave Bash
Moorage
• 3,600 sq. ft. harbor cargo warehouse/86 berths
• 1,500’ transient moorage space
• 4 acres of crab pot storage
• city ferry & freight dock
• processor dock handles cargo
• upland and warehouse storage
Rates
Air Transport
• call for rates
• crab pots: $0.25/month per pot;
$1.50/pot over dock
• wharfage all city docks, $4/ton
• jet runway with daily flights
• local flight services
Amenities
Special Events
• August Blueberry Festival,
225-3184 for more info
❯ King Cove
Port Office...........................907-497-2237
Port Fax...............................907-497-2649
[email protected]
VHF Channel........................................... 6
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• churches/taxis/12-room motel
• restaurants and bars/AA meetings
• community library/rec. programs
• electricity, water available
• one general store/marine supplies
• processor has store and cafeteria
• vehicle rentals
• coming soon: diesel fueling station in
harbor; container handling up to
80,000 lbs.; 3 new acres for storage
Haulouts
• 150-ton travel lift
• forklift and other heavy equipment
Two good harbors run by
the good people of King Cove.
Proudly Serving Ketchikan
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
Processors (Area Code 907)
Ask us what’s new!
For more
information
For
more
visit
information
visit
www.pacificmarineexpo.
www.pacificcom
marineexpo.com
• Permanent & transient
moorage
• 150-ton haulout
• New harbor house/cargo
warehouse
• Three phase shore power
to new harbor
• Shower
• Uplands boat storage
• Deep water dock
• 30-foot draft at dock face
• Weekly barge
• Freight handling
• Support services
• Crab pot storage
Good Rates!
Phone: 907-497-2237
Fax: 907-497-2649
Monitor: VHF 6
Email: [email protected]
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 59
King Cove-Kodiak
ComFish® Alaska 200
ComFish® Alaska 200
ComFish® Alaska 200
ComFish® Alaska 200
ComFish® Alaska 200
ComFish2011
ComFish® Alaska 200
• Get
• tidal grid up to 80’ capacity
Processors (Area Code 907)
• service 6 days/week to and
from Anchorage
Alaska Fresh Seafoods.............486-5749
Alaska Pacific Seafoods...........486-3234
Global Seafoods.......................486-0355
Island Seafoods........................486-8575
Ocean Beauty............................486-5791
Trident Seafoods......................486-3266
Western Alaska Fisheries.........486-4112
Medical/Rescue (Area Code 907)
At the Dock
• fire dept...................................497-2555
• King Cove Med. Clinic............497-2311
• police (non-emerg.)................497-2210
• EMT rescue squad/health clinic
• emergency MedEvacs available
• nearest hospital in Anchorage
• volunteer fire dept. and 24’
rescue boat
• harbormaster: Marty Owen
• harbor operation officer: Lon White
Repair Facilities
• fiberglass/carpentry/welding
Air Transport
❯ Kodiak
Harbormaster’s Office.......907-486-8080
Wireless Matrix.............................. #6926
Port Fax...............................907-486-8090
[email protected]
www.city.kodiak.ak.us/harbor
VHF Channels.............................. 12 & 16
USCG Marine Safety.........907-486-5918
Fish & Game.......................907-486-1830
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Kodiak Oil....................486-3245, VHF 16
Petro Marine................486-3421, VHF 10
60 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Moorage
• over 600 berths for vessels up to 150’
• transients: 3 piers for larger vessels,
2 docks at harbor for unloading gear
• short-term storage on land for staging ...
of fishing gear and equipment
Amenities
• 925’ blacktop stage area,
Pier II Fisherman Terminal
• complete web-mending areas
• electricity/fresh water
• laundry/pay phones/public restrooms
Haulouts
• 600-ton lift and boatyard
• tidal grid up to 350 tons
• travel lifts available for
vessels under 150 tons
Repair Facilities
• boatyard at north end of town
Gear
• Get
the InformatIon
Alaska2011
Alaska2011
Alaska2011
Alaska2011
Alaska2011
Alaska2011
Alaska2011
the
www.comfishalask
ComFish® is Alaska’s largest and b
commercial fisheries trade show
For information: 907-486-55
Celebrating Alaska's 50 Years of
Commercial Fishing and Processing
Kodiak Harbor Convention Center
Kodiak, Alaska
www.comfishalaska.com
ComFish® is Alaska’s largest and best
commercial fisheries trade show.
For information: 907-486-5557
Proudly Serving Kodiak
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
Kodiak-La Push
available for aluminum, glass,
wood; lifting capacity 150-200 tons
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard station is main
base for central and western
Alaska; equipped with numerous
search & rescue vessels, air station
• dentist in town
• hospital (486-3281 or 486-9595): 25
beds, intensive care, equipped for
general and some emergency surgery;
Jetair to Anchorage
Air Transport
• Era Airlines
• Alaska Airlines
• jet runway with daily flights
Special Events
Amenities
• Crab Festival last week of May
• July 4 celebration
• Labor Day weekend: Alaska State Fair
and Rodeo. For more info: 486-5557
• Comfish, mid-March
• electricity/fresh water/showers
• pay phones nearby/laundry
• gas/diesel/propane
Haulouts
• 50-ton/85-ton nearby
• crane at harbor with 2-ton capacity
❯ La Conner
Repair Facilities
(Port of Skagit County)
• engine shop/repair yards
Marina.................................360-466-3118
Port Fax...............................360-466-3119
www.portofskagit.com
VHF Channel...................................... 66A
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• medical center.................360-466-3136
• dentists in town
• health clinic; nearest hospital
in Mt. Vernon
• nearest Coast Guard facility,
Bellingham
La Conner Landing...................466-4478
Air Transport
At the Dock
Net Systems
• Skagit Regional Airport, 8 miles
• harbormaster: Paul Mattos
Special Events
Moorage
Kodiak Branch
325 Shelikof St.
Kodiak, AK 99615 USA
Tel: 1.907.486.5350
Fax: 1. 907.486.2655
E-mail: [email protected]
• February, Smelt Derby
• April, Skagit Valley Tulip Festival
• August, Classic Boat Show
• 2 – 2400’ docks for transients
• waiting list
• 450 covered berths, 150 open
• storage on land for 100 boats
(dry) and 150 (open)
❯ La Push
(Quileute Marina)
Rates
• daily: $1/ft., $.80/ft. Oct. 1 - Apr. 30
• monthly: open, $5.72 - $8.64
• monthly: covered, $7.50 - $13.21
• annual: monthly rate x 12
At the Dock
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
FINE FUELS.
SUPER SERVICE.
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
We’ve
got you
covered
in Kodiak.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Protective Coatings
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-486-3421
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
Port Office...........................360-374-5392
Port Fax...............................360-374-6311
VHF Channel......................................... 80
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• harbormaster: Arnold Black, Jr.
Moorage
This is probably the last chiller
you’ll ever have to buy!
All welded
construction
Stainless
Steel &
Titanium
Toll Free:
877-COLDSEA (265-3732)
758 Tillamuk Drive, LaConner, WA 98257
Phone: 360-466-5850 • Fax: 360-466-1531
[email protected]
• transient berths
• 96 slips
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water/mini-stations
• pay phones at local store and resorts
• showers, public restrooms, laundry
room (@ R.V. Park & Store)
• sewage pumpout
• new boat ramp
• new fuel system, waste-oil facility
• dock carts
• Lonesome Creek Store
• Ocean Park Resort (beach front
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 61
La Push-Naknek/King Salmon
cabins, hotel, campgrounds)
• River’s Edge Restaurant
Haulouts
• ramp
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard, Quillayute River Station
Special Events
• Quileute Days in July; baseball
tournament, canoe races, food,
music, fireworks show
• Elders Week Celebration - March
❯ Metlakatla
Harbor.................................907-886-4646
Harbor Fax..........................907-886-7997
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 80
Fish & Game (Ketchikan) ...907-225-5195
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Annette Is. Gas Services..........886-7851
Processors (Area Code 907)
Annette Is. Cold Storage..........886-4661
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Bruce W. Guthrie Sr.
Moorage
• 4 transient berths/180 berths
• private dry-land storage available
Rates
• daily: $5 & $10/day, depending on size
• annually: $5.50/ft.
Amenities
• electricity: $5/day for visitors
• fresh water
• pay phone at grocery store
• police station
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Medical/Rescue (Area Code 831)
• Annette Island Service Unit
• Metlakatla Volunteer Fire Dept.
• Salinas Valley Memorial........757-4333
• Community Hospital..............624-5311
• Coast Guard............................647-7303
❯ Moss Landing
Harbor Operations.............831-633-2461
Port Fax...............................831-633-4537
[email protected]
www.mosslandingharbor.dst.ca.us
VHF Channels................................ 9 & 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• general manager/harbormaster:
Linda G. McIntyre
Moorage
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
• no moorings/no anchorage
• dry-land storage
Bristol Bay Contractors............246-3360
Crowley Marine Services.........246-4421
Delta Western Fuel...................246-6174
Worldwide Fuel.........................246-3835
At the Dock
Rates
• district berths: available to 100’+
• $0.80/ft./night or $10.18/ft./mo.
for transient/temporary vessels
including amenity fee
• $6.31/ft./mo. for assigned
vessels, plus amenity fee of $45.14/mo.
• 3% off for 3 months paid in advance
• 5% off for 12 months paid in advance
• private berths available
• permanent slips available
Alaska General Sfds.................246-4285
Ocean Beauty............................246-8660
Pederson Point (NPPI)..............246-4461
Peter Pan Seafoods..................246-4227
Red Salmon/Wards Cove.........246-4295
Trident Sfds (Naknek)...............246-4275
Trident Sfds (S. Naknek)..........246-6510
Unisea........................................246-3328
Amenities
At the Dock
• fuel dock/groceries/laundromat
• yacht club/post office/showers
• kayak outfitter/launch ramps
• liquor store/restaurants/restrooms
• party boats/6-pack fishing/
whale watching/picnic tables
• bilge/sewage pumpout/
waste oil facility
• BBQs/playground
• port foreman: Joe Harris
Haulouts
• 3 tidal grids available
• marine railways at Annette Is. Packing
• contact: Harbor Office
Repair Facilities
Air Transport
Air Transport
• Pacific Air and Promech Air
• Monterey Peninsula Airport, jet
service
• Watsonville, small planes only
62 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
King Salmon
Port Office...........................907-246-6168
Port Fax...............................907-246-3493
[email protected]
www.theborough.com/port.html
VHF Channel......................................... 12
Fish & Game.......................907-246-3341
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• 100-ton travel lift
Haulouts
❯ Naknek/
• electronics/hydraulics
• diesel/welding
Processors (Area Code 907)
Harris ElEctric Bristol Bay
C/O NakNek MariNe CeNter
NakNek, ak 99633
tel: 907-246-4493 (seasonal)
Fax: 907-246-6284
A full-service Electrical Contractor
Marine Electrical Contractor
Marine Electronic Sales & Service
We provide systems, components,
parts and service for:
• Gillnetters
• Seiners
• Longliners
• Crabbers
• Factory Trawlers
We build equipment that meets Ul, american Bureau
of shipping and Us Coast Guard standards.
Naknek/King Salmon-Newport
Moorage
• no berths; dock moorage $10/day,
or $150/season for boats up to 32’
• mainly a freight facility; major port
for Northland Services Inc.
• lighterage also available from
several Bristol Bay companies
Amenities
• cargo/freight shipping & receiving,
including vessels & gear avail. to/from:
Western Alaska, Anchorage, Seattle,
Dutch Harbor & Japan
• commercial ice machine
• convenient access to supplies,
groceries, restaurants, bars, hotels,
repairs, showers, laundry, public
swimming pool & other recreation
• electricity/fresh water/pay phones
• limited parking/restrooms/fish grinder
Haulouts
• 140-ton, 70-ton & 27-ton cranes;
2.5-ton to 41-ton forklifts
• all sizes of vessels lifted
• private locations at storage
• public boat ramp
Repair Facilities
• state troopers
Air Transport
• charter service available at
Naknek field
• daily commuter flights to
surrounding villages
• daily flights by Pen Air,
Reeve Air & Alaska Airlines
• Naknek Clinic
• Coast Guard services
• native health clinic in Naknek,
King Salmon and South Naknek
• police, ambulance, fire dept.
Proudly Serving
Naknek/King Cove
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
• local Coast Guard...................645-2236
• Neah Bay Police......................645-2701
• Public Health Clinic................645-2233
• helicopter and ambulance
Special Events
• annual Fishtival Celebration at
the end of the fishing season
• Makah Days Celebration (grand
parade, street fair, canoe races, tra–
ditional “slahal” games, dancing,
singing, feasting, a spectacular fire works show and more!); 3rd or 4th
weekend in August
❯ Neah Bay
❯ Newport
Special Events
(Makah Marina)
Port Office...........................360-645-3015
Port Fax...............................360-645-3016
Tribal Center.......................360-645-2201
www.makah.com
VHF Channels.................................. 16/66
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 360)
Makah Fuel................................645-2749
Big Salmon Resort....................645-2374
• businesses located in town for repairs
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Processors (Area Code 360)
Port Office...........................541-265-7758
Port Fax...............................541-265-4235
www.portofnewport.com
VHF Channel......................................... 12
Fish & Wildlife....................541-867-4741
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 541)
Carson Oil..................................336-2512
Hockema Coast Oil...................265-5111
PMK Distributing.......................335-3836
Processors (Area Code 541)
High Tide Seafoods..................645-2189
Pacific Shrimp Company..........265-4215
Trident Seafoods......................265-7279
At the Dock
At the Dock
• port director: Bob Buckingham
• harbormaster: Kevin Bryant
Moorage
Moorage
• 200 berths/year-round
• 250 berths — vessels up to 110’
• dry land storage
Rates
• daily/monthly/annual rates available
• subject to change
Amenities
• water/general store/electricity
• pumpouts
• restrooms/showers
• cultural museum....................645-2711
• U.S. Post Office.......................645-2325
• camping & hookups available
• waterfront espresso and ice cream
• local cafes, pizza shops, and
gift/clothing shops
Haulouts
• tidal grid handles up to 58’ limit seiners
Rates
• daily: 1-26’: $10.14 and up
• monthly: 1-26’: $186.80 and up
• annually: 1-26’: $984.53 and up
Rates subject to change
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water/gear lot/phones/
restrooms/service dock/showers
Haulouts
• dock hoists (4)
Repair Facilities
• Riverbend Moorage
• Yaquina Boat Equipment
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 63
Newport-Petersburg
• Port of Toledo Boat Yard
• Kevin Hill Marine
Air Transport
Amenities
• fuel delivered by truck/pay phone
• some bulk fuel delivered by barge
• fresh water available
• showers at Pelican Seafoods
• Laundromat and Highliner Lodge
• U.S. Post Office
• Internet
Haulouts
Haulouts
• crane & tug avail. intermittently
• 3 tidal grids, 2 for boats up to 50’,
1 for boats up to about 100’
• dockside hoist at cold storage
• Sea Port Airlines
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Pacific Comm. Hosp........541-265-2244
• U.S. Coast Guard.............541-265-5381
• Pacific West
Ambulance.......................541-265-3175
Special Events
• Blessing of the Fleet — March
• Loyalty Day & Sea Fair
Festival — first weekend of May
• Seafood & Wine Festival, last
weekend of February
• Microbrew Festival — October
• HMS SeaFest — June
• Newport Wild Seafood Weekend - 1st
weekend after Labor Day
❯ Nome
Port Office...........................907-443-6619
Port Fax...............................907-443-5473
[email protected]
www.nomealaska.org
VHF Channels........................ 10, 12 & 16
Fish & Game.......................907-443-5167
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Bonanza Fuel.............................443-2561
Crowley Marine Services.........443-2219
West Refueling/AK Cab............443-2335
Repair Facilities
• various repair shops/welding
Air Transport
• Alaska Airlines daily to Anchorage
• daily flights to surrounding villages
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• fire/ambulance................................. 911
• Norton Sound Hosp........907-443-3311
❯ Pelican
Pelican, City of...................907-735-2202
Port Fax...............................907-735-2258
[email protected]
www.pelican.net
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 10
Fish & Game (Douglas).... 907-465-4250
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Pelican Fuel Dock......................735-2211
Processors (Area Code 907)
Pelican Seafoods......................735-2204
Seafood Producers Coop.........747-5811
At the Dock
• harbormaster: David J. Duffey
Processors (Area Code 907)
• Norton Sound Sfd Prod.........443-2304
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Joy Baker
Moorage
Moorage
• 98 berths
• all berthing permanent
• transient space available at dock
• dockside hoist at cold storage
Rates
• 2 docking facilities along causeway
• flat rates-vessels stored Nov-May
• moorage available at inner harbor
• on arrangement with harbormaster
• storage on land, $0.045 & $0.05/sq. ft./wk.
• daily/seasonal rates available
depending on length
• electricity: inquire with
harbormaster/city hall
Rates
Amenities
• daily: up to 200’, $1/ft. ; over 200’,
$1.50/ft.
• fresh water
• pay phones near dock
• restaurant, bar & grills, library
64 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Marine Repair Facilities
• Terry’s Marine Repair............735-2233
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• 21’ search & rescue vessel
• call 911; nearest hospital Sitka
or Juneau
• Coast Guard surface vessels in
Juneau and aircraft in Sitka
• Pelican Health Clinic...............735-2250
Air Transport
• floatplanes only
Special Events
• July 4th celebration
• Boardwalk Boogie
• Salmon Derby
❯ Petersburg
Port Office...........................907-772-4688
Port Fax...............................907-772-4687
[email protected]
petersburg.org/visitors/ports.html
VHF Channels................................ 9 & 16
USCG Anacapa..................907-772-4235
Fish & Game.......................907-772-3801
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Petro Marine................................. VHF 16
..........................................907-772-4251
Processors (Area Code 907)
Coastal Cold Storage................772-4177
Trident Seafoods......................772-3333
Northern Lights Smokeries......772-4608
Ocean Beauty Seafoods...........772-4242
Alaska Longline Co...................772-4835
Petersburg Fisheries.................772-4294
Tonka Seafoods........................772-3662
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Glorianne Wollen
Petersburg-Port Angeles
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
FINE FUELS.
SUPER SERVICE.
• harbor office open 24 hrs
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
Moorage
We’ve
got you
covered
in Petersburg.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Protective Coatings
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-772-4251
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
Proudly Serving Petersburg
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
• 600 berths
• 105 transient spaces
• 75 on waiting list
• storage on land, $0.18/sq. ft.
Rates
• transient moorage: $0.40/ft./day;
$4.00/ft./mo.
• annual: monthly rate x 12
• grid fees: $0.60/ft. on wood grid;
$0.96/ft. on steel grid
Amenities
• electricity at berths over 17’
• fresh water at loading zones
• laundry in town/pay phone
• showers at harbor
❯ Port Angeles
Port Office...........................360-457-4505
Port Fax...............................360-457-4921
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 360)
Elwha Fish Company................457-3344
High Tide Seafoods..................452-8488
Fuel Supplier
Port Angeles Marine.................457-4505
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Chuck Faires
Haulouts
• 5-ton and 2.5-ton crane at city
dock, $20/hr.
• 120’ dock with 5-ton hoist for
loading and unloading
• 200’ work float
• marine railway (up to 300 tons)
and floating dry dock (up to 38’) at
local shipwright
• private travel lift outside boat harbor
• tidal grids 2 will handle up to 200 tons
Repair Facilities
• 180’ x 16’ float for working on gear
• local shipwrights provide dockside
welding & repair facilities for
steel, aluminum, fiberglass & wood
• machine shops and electronic repairs
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Petersburg Hospital.........907-772-4291
• 2 dentists in town
• 110’ Coast Guard patrol boat and
65’ boat; aircraft in Sitka
• Petersburg Hospital will stabilize
emergency cases and MedEvac to
Seattle or Juneau
Sales, Trades or 1031 Exchanges
• King Salmon Derby; tagged
fish worth $10,000 — May
• Octoberfest­ Moorage
• 30 transients; 500 berths
• dry storage: 30 boats
Rates
• daily: $16.50/day up to 30’, add
$0.30/ft. for boats longer than 30’
• monthly: $4.68-$5.68/ft.
Amenities
• diesel fuel & gas; laundry nearby
• electricity, fresh water, showers
• pay phones nearby; some floats
have hookup capability
Haulouts
• dockside hoist, 4,000-lb. capacity
• marine ways to 250 tons
• travel lift to 75 tons
• Platypus Marine, Inc. .. (360) 417-0709,
up to 330 tons
Repair Facilities
• several private shops can repair
aluminum, glass, wood, engines,
electronics
Air Transport
Medical/Rescue (Area Code 360)
• jet service from Seattle
• runway with daily flights
• Olympic Mem. Hospital.........417-7000
• Coast Guard air station and several
vessels from 41’ to 210’
• dentists in town
Special Events
• July 4th celebration
• Norwegian Festival — May
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 65
Port Angeles-Saint George
Air Transport
• jet runway with daily flights
❯ Port Townsend
Port Office...........................800-228-2803
Port Fax...............................360-385-3988
[email protected]
www.portofpt.com
VHF Channels......................66A, 09 & 16
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• 400 berths
• waitlist for 30’, 35’, 40’, 45’ & 50’ slips
Rates
• monthly: $5-5.36/ft. + leasehold
tax (permanent tenants)
• dry storage: $0.30/ft. per day;
see harbormaster for winter
dry storage and haulout fees
Amenities
At the Dock
• electricity/fresh water
• pay phones, hookups at
permanent berths
• restaurants nearby
• sewage pumpout/fuel dock
• showers/laundry
• grocery nearby
• harbormaster: Ken Radon
(operations manager)
Haulouts
Processors (Area Code 360)
New Day Fisheries....................385-4600
Moorage
• 4 public yards can store 200
boats on land
• 50 spaces for transients
• 3 travel lifts, 70, 75 and 300 tons
• private mobile crane for engines & gear
• high pressure wash down
Seattle
Fishermen’s
Memorial
Repair Facilities
• about 100 private businesses will
repair aluminum, glass, wood,
steel; also engines and electronics
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard has one 80’ vessel moored
• dentists in town
• Jefferson Gen. Hosp.......360-385-2200
emergency/general surgery, will
stabilize and evacuate severe cases
Air Transport
• light plane runway with daily flights
Special Events
• Wooden Boat Festival, 2nd
weekend in September
❯ Saint George
City.................................907-859-2263 x5
and/or..................................907-859-2261
City Fax...............................907-859-2212
VHF Channels.......................... 9, 12 & 16
Fish & Game (Dutch H)......907-581-1239
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
St. George Delta Fuel...............859-2456
or VHF 68
Processors (Area Code 907)
Snopac Products (seasonal)... 859-CRAB
Bluewave (seasonal).................859-2441
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Alvin Merculief
Moorage
• 3 docks, 60’, 75’ and 250’
• “square miles” of all-purpose
storage adjacent to port, call St.
George Tanaq Corp. (907) 859-2255
• 2 newer docks, by St. GeoTanag Corp.
Rates
206.782.6577
seattlefishermensmemorial.org
• 2 hr. free period for fueling
• cargo barge: $0.23 per hr.
• vessels 150’ and less, $0.15 per hr.;
greater than 150’, $0.18 per hr.
Amenities
• 1 store in town/acres of pot storage
• electricity/hotel/marine fuel
66 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Saint George- San Francisco
• pay phones/water service (VHF Ch. 9)
• diving services available
• Bone’s Diving .........................859-2204
• water & fish waste outfall — all docks
Haulouts
North Pacific Fuel......................546-3145
Delta Fuel...................................546-2404
At the Dock
Processors (Area Code 907)
Moorage
Trident Seafoods......................546-2377
Icicle Seafoods..........................546-2540
• 148 berths/200’ dock
• 2,000 feet of space for transients
• storage on land
• boat ramp
Repair Facilities
• boat repair — hydraulics, diesel,
diving, welding: contact harbor
Air Transport
• airport next to harbor-5,000’ runway
• air freight 3x/week, No. Air (cargo)
• airport terminal & weather station
• Peninsula Air, nonstop to and
from Anchorage 3x/week
• Ace Cargo (weekdays)
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• St. George Island Clinic.........859-2254
• 24 hr. on-call ETT
• fully equipped clinic
• nearest search and rescue: Kodiak
• VPSO: Charles Ward..............859-2415
Mike Lejaraza
At the Dock
Rates
Moorage
• daily rates: $7 to $70/day
(dep. on length)
• TDX dock, 300’/2 city docks,
100’ & 200’
• storage on land, open and covered
Amenities
• electricity/water at South Dock
• fuel & water at both city docks
Haulouts
Rates
• city docks: vessels 150’ and less,
$1.50/ft. for 12-hr. period; greater
than 150’, $1.70/ft. for 12-hr.
period; first 3 hrs.-$75
• TDX dock: vessels 150’ and less, $2.25/
ft. for 12-hr. period; vessels 150’ and
greater, $2.50/ft. for 12-hr. period
• service everything from aluminum
to generators; contact harbor
• 1 public launch ramp
• 200’ ferry dock
• privately owned mobile cranes
available for engines and gear
• tidal grid will handle up to 100’ boat
• travel lift will handle up to 150 tons
• 35-ton travel lift
Air Transport
Repair Facilities
• daily flights/Penn Air
• daily Ace Cargo
• fiberglass repair; carpenter shop
• marine electronics repair (seasonal)
• sm. engine repair, two welding shops
Port Office...........................907-546-3140
Port Fax...............................907-546-3186
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Repair Facilities
• TDX Corp, small boats only, 32’
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Direct Airport Access
Bedside to Bedside Critical Care
1-800-478-9111
www.alaskaregional.com
Saint Paul
Amenities
• ice and fuel at Trident
• pay phones at harbor
• storage space for approx.
75 boats, 40’ & under
• some space for work on 58’
& under boats
• 2 marine supply stores
• 4 restaurants, 20-room hotel, bar
• electricity, fresh water at floats
• laundry nearby, showers
• one general store, specialty shops
• wireless Internet service at floats
❯ Saint Paul
A World of Caring
• harbormaster: Richard Kochuten Sr.
• harbormaster: Jason Merculief
Haulouts
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Saint George-San Francisco
• CG loran station (not a rescue base)
• Dept. of Public Safety
• St. Paul Clinic...................907-546-2310
Air Transport
❯ Sand Point
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Harbor.................................907-383-2331
Fax......................................907-383-5611
VHF Channels................................ 6 & 16
Fish & Game (Summer)... 907-383-2066
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 907)
Trident Seafoods......................383-4848
• Pen Air 7 days/wk to Anchorage
• AK-Central Express (cargo)
• health clinic......................907-383-3151
• nearest hospital: Anchorage
❯ San Francisco
Port Offices.........................415-274-0533
Port Fax...............................415-274-0628
[email protected]
www.sfport.com
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 67
San Francisco-Seattle
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 80
USCG..................................415-399-3451
Fish & Game.......................650-688-6340
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 415)
Clipper Yacht Co. (Sausalito) 332-3500
San Francisco Marine...............673-2928
At the Dock
• harbormaster:
Hedley Prince..........................274-0513
Moorage
• 115 berths, seasonal and long-term
• marina (62 additional berths)
• 1,400’ transient moorage
• gear storage/waiting list: long term
Rates
• Old harbor:
daily transient: $0.46/ft./day
monthly transient: $210
permanent berth: $1.88 ft./mo.
• New harbor:
daily transient: $0.59/ft.
monthly/permanent: $5.18 ft./mo.
Amenities
• fuel dock w/water, ice available
• oil & filter recycle, hotels,
restaurants
Haulouts
• 1 public launch ramp; 2 private
dry docks
• private hoists
Repair Facilities
• 1 private yard, others in area
• numerous marine services
Air Transport
• numerous private municipal fields
• San Francisco and Oakland
airports
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• numerous hospitals and clinics
• CG/Vessel Assist Program
Special Events
• Blessing of the Fleet — Oct.
68 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
❯ Seattle
Fishermen’s Terminal........206-787-3395
Terminal Fax......................206-787-3393
www.portseattle.org
VHF Channel......................................... 17
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Rolls-Royce Marine
Seattle
Bergen Diesel Rauma Brattvaag
Norwinch Aquamaster Ulstein
Kamewa Bird Johnson Tenfjord
Frydenbo Brown Brothers
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
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Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 206)
Ballard Oil..................................783-0241
Covich-Williams Co. Inc...........784-0171
Crowley Marine Services.........443-8100
Rainier Petroleum Corp............623-3480
Shilshole Texaco.......................783-7555
Time Oil Co................................285-2400
Sales Parts Service
n
n
1731 13th Ave SW
Seattle, WA 98134 . . . . 206-782-9190
Toll Free . . . . . . . . . . . 800-426-6826
Fax Number . . . . . . . . 206-782-0176
Web . . . . . . . www.rolls-royce.com
Processors
ADF Inc...............................206-784-5170
Alaska Fresh Seafoods......206-285-2412
Aleutian Spray Fisheries...206-784-5000
All Alaskan Seafoods.........206-285-8200
American Seafoods...........206-448-0300
Arrowac Fisheries..............206-282-5655
Besecker, Dana F. Co.........206-232-5040
Blue Wave Sfds/7 Seas......206-448-3107
Clipper Seafoods Ltd.........206-284-1162
Cook Inlet Processing........206-789-7255
Crown Fisheries Ltd...........206-789-6330
Deep Sea Fisheries Inc......425-742-5562
Golden Alaska Sfds...........206-441-1990
Golden Shamrock Inc........206-282-5825
Icicle Seafoods...................206-282-0988
Independent Packers.........206-285-6000
Jubilee Fisheries................206-784-2592
Kelliher Fish Co..................425-771-6036
Kirkland Custom Sfds........425-828-4521
Kyokuyo America...............206-405-2670
Nakamura & Assoc............206-624-7653.
NorQuest Seafoods...........206-281-7022
North Pacific.......................206-726-9900
Northern Aurora Fish........425-450-0187
Nova Fish./Sunwave..........206-781-2000
Ocean Beauty Seafds........206-285-6800
Ocean Fresh Seafds...........206-285-2412
Oceantrawl Inc...................206-448-9200
Orca Bay Seafoods Inc......425-204-9100
Pacific Salmon Co..............206-682-6501
Pathfinder USA Inc............206-283-1137
Peter Pan Seafoods...........206-728-6000
Premier Pacific Sfds...........206-286-8584
Regal Fish...........................206-283-0224
Sea Freeze Sfd Proc...........206-767-7350
Snopac Products................206-764-9230
Star Offshore Co. Inc.........206-634-3399
Harris ElEctric, inc.
4020 23rd Avenue West
seAttle, WAshington 98199
Phone: 206-282-8080
FAx: 206-284-3187
A full-service Electrical Contractor
Marine Electrical Contractor
Marine Electronic Sales & Service
We provide systems, components,
parts and service for:
• Gillnetters
• Seiners
• Longliners
• Crabbers
• Factory Trawlers
We build equipment that meets UL, American Bureau
of Shipping and US Coast Guard standards.
®
NORTHWEST POWER CENTER
Factory Trained Technicians
Major engine overhauls
Complete vessel repowering
Located in Canal Boatyard
1-800-223-5284
4300 11th Ave. NW • Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 784-3703 • FAX (206) 784-8823
www.coastalmarineengine.com
Seattle
[email protected]
Tohatsu • Achillies • A.B. • Aqua Pro
THE LEADER IN ALUMINUM
BOTTOM RIBS SINCE 1988
Trident Seafoods...............206-783-3818
Unisea Inc...........................425-881-8181
Westward Seafoods..........206-682-5949
Yardarm Knot Inc...............206-216-0220
At the Dock
Fishermen’s Terminal, 206-787-3395
Maritime Industrial Ctr, 206-787-3395
manager: Kenneth Lyles
Moorage
www.ballardinflatables.com
BALLARD INFLATABLE BOATS
SALES • SERVICE • ACCESSORIES
(206) 784-4014 •
fax:
(206) 784-5547
ND HYDRAULI
SOU
CS
T
,I
GE
.
NC
PU
ph:
• 300 berths
• 2,500’ of loading dock available;
schedule use through terminal office
• freshwater moorage for fishing
vessels ranging from 27-300’
• large vessel moorage available
at other port facilities
• over 300 spaces for transients
• for central waterfront moorage,
call for information: 206-615-3952
• 5000’ linear dock available
Rates
• daily/monthly for active fishing
RELIABLE
MOBILE
SERVICE
vessels, varies by size: 30-79’,
80-125’, and over 125’
• daily/monthly for commercial
vessels, varies by size: 30-79’,
80-125’, and over 125’
• daily/monthly for non-commercial
vessels, varies by size
Amenities
• crab pot lifters
• dockside hoist
• electricity & water at all docks
• forklifts
• mobile power blocks
• net repair areas
• pay phones nearby
• recycling programs for nets, scrap
metal and cardboard
• retail and restaurant tenants onsite
• short-term crab pot storage
• short-term gear staging
• showers and laundry at
fishermen’s day room
• now accepting commercial vessels
in addition to active fishing vessels
DESIGN
REPAIRS
INSTALLATION
A COMPLETE QUALITY LINE OF
SERVICE AND EQUIPMENT
4440 23rd Ave West • Seattle, WA 98199
Fax (206) 283-1026
www.pugetsoundhydraulics.com
[email protected]
(206) 283~0966
Proudly Serving Seattle
With Durable, Dependable
Quality Deck Equipment
For Over 25 Years
For Our Complete Line of Deck
Gear go to:
www.kinematicsmarine.com
KINEMATICS
Marine Equipment, Inc.
5625 48 Dr. N.E. Unit B Marysville, WA 98270
Phone: (360) 659-5415 • Fax: (360) 653-5151
th
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 69
Seattle-Seward
Medical
Repair Facilities
• Swedish Medical/Ballard...... 782-2700
• minor repairs in town, major in Homer
Special Events
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Blessing of the Fleet: 2nd Sunday
in March
• Seattle Fishermen’s Memorial
Ceremony: 1st Sunday in May
• Fishermen’s Fall Festival 2005:
mid-September
• Pacific Marine Expo
• Seldovia Health Clinic.....907-234-7825
• Maritime Emergency.......800-478-5555
• Volunteer Fire Dept
(Emergency)........ 911 or 907-234-7812
• nearest USCG facilities in Homer
• nearest hospital in Homer
❯ Seldovia
Port Office...........................907-234-7886
Port Fax...............................907-234-7430
[email protected]
[email protected]
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 10
Fish & Game (Homer)........907-235-8191
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Seldovia Fuel and Lube............234-7622
..................................... VHF Channel 16
At the Dock
Air Transport
• float plane dock
• Homer Air and Smoky Bay Air
❯ Seward
Port Office...........................907-224-3138
Port Fax:..............................907-224-7187
[email protected]
www.cityofseward.net/harbor
VHF Channel......................................... 17
USCG Marine Safety.........907-271-6700
USCG Mustang..................907-224-5202
Fish & Game.......................907-224-3935
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
•harbormaster: Layla Jandt-Pederson
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Moorage
Petro Marine Services..............224-3190
Shoreside Petroleum Inc..........224-8040
• 125’ city dock space for transients,
plus space in Kachemak Bay
• 149 berths at small boat harbor
Rates: paid in advance
• daily: $0.94/ft. or stall length
• monthly: $5.25/ft.
• annual: $17.95/ft.
• 6-mo. rate: $13.86/ft. or stall length
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water
• haulout and wash down facility
• fenced vessel storage
• laundry in town
• pay phone at harbor office building
• showers
• nearby restaurants
Haulouts
• haulout and wash down facility
• 1 tidal grids, capacity 80’
• dry dock storage area
70 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Processors (Area Code 907)
Resurrection Bay Sfds..............224-3366
Seward Fisheries......................224-3381
Ocean Beauty Processing........224-7066
RONALD E. LONG
MARINE SURVEYS
Auction Block............................224-2286
At the Dock
•harbormaster:
Kari Anderson.........................224-3138
Moorage
• 7 year wait, 32’ berths; 10 year, 75’
• 724 berths
• 2,988 linear feet for transients
• other docks outside harbor
• storage on land for vessels up
to 250 tons: $13.65 per day,
$136.50/month for 50’
Rates
• daily: $0.54/ft.
• annual, semi-annual and
quarterly rates available
Amenities
• fresh water/pay phones
• showers at harbormaster office
• laundry nearby
• 2 launch ramps
• nearby restaurants, bars, hotels
Haulouts
• 50-ton travel lift
• 250-ton travel lift
• 5,280-ton Syncrolift for vessels
up to 330 feet
• dockside hoist for engines and gear
Repair Facilities
• available for aluminum, glass,
wood; engine repair
Seward Terminal
• Surveys, Consulting,
Project Management,
Regulatory Compliance
Ultrasonic testing
• All Alaska Ports
United States Surveyors Association
American Boat and Yacht Council
Society of Naval Architects
and Marine Engineers
P.O Box 2464 • Seward, AK 99664
(907) 224-7068 • FAX (907) 224-5707
[email protected]
A Petro Marine Affiliate
Serving You With:
•MarineFuels
•HeatingFuels
•PropaneGas
•BulkGas
•Petroleum
Equipment
•TexacoLubricants
•ChevronLubricants
•MobilLubricants
•Baldwin&Racor
Filters
•FPPFAdditives
(907) 224-8040
VHF Channel 16
www.shoresidepetroleum.com
Seward-Sitka
Seward-Sitka
• boat owners may do their own
repair or hire service at all city
haulout yards, except on
the Syncrolift
• Seward Ships Chandlery
❯ Sitka
Air Transport
• runway with scheduled flights
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• ambulance service, EMTs
• Coast Guard base with 110’
patrol boat
• dentist in town
• Providence Seward (907-224-5205):
MedEvac to Anchorage available
• LifeFlight: 800-478-9111
Rates
Harbor Dept........................907-747-3439
Harbor Fax:.........................907-747-6278
www.cityofsitka.com
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Air Station (Emrgcy)..........907-966-5401
USCG Marine Safety.........907-966-5454
Commercial Fish Dev........907-747-6688
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• 30 day permit fee: $6/ft. up to 150’;
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Petro Marine Services..............747-3414
Processors (Area Code 907)
Special Events
• Mt. Marathon 3 mile race, 4th of July
• Halibut Derby in June
• Silver Salmon 10K, Saturday
before Labor Day
• Silver Salmon Derby, starts
• private 400-ton floating dry dock
• all berths assigned by
harbormaster: 1st-come, 1st-served
2nd Saturday in August
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
FINE FUELS.
• no public storage on land, but
commercial yard will store boats
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
We’ve
got you
covered
in Sitka.
Alaska Bounty Seafoods..........966-2927
Seafood Producers Co-op........747-5811
Sitka Sound Seafoods..............747-6662
Moorage
SUPER SERVICE.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Protective Coatings
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-747-3414
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
www.sewardships.com
Seward Ship’s Drydock, Inc.
Mile 7 Nash Road, PO Box 944
Seward, AK 99664
PH: (907) 224-3198
FAX: (907) 224-5376
e-mail: [email protected]
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 71
Sitka-Tenakee
$9/ft. 151’ plus
• waitlist and permanent moorage is .... $1.90/ft. per month, billed quarterly
• daily: $0.35/ft. per day up to 80’;
$0.60 per foot per day 81’ to 150’;
$0.90 per foot per day 151’ and
above
Amenities
• fresh water
• laundry and showers nearby
• 3,000’ for transients
• 1,327 berths
• work float with power
Haulouts
• 88-ton travel lift available at
commercial yard
• tidal grids (4) will handle up to
58’ limit seiners
Repair Facilities
• 2 repair yards for alum/glass/wood
Air Transport
Sitka-Tenakee
Moorage:
• volunteer EMS squad
• 110 berths
• 700’ transient tie-up
• call prior to arrival
• land storage $0.20/sq. ft.,$50/mo. min.
• upland storage space available
Rates
• daily: $0.30/ft.; monthly: $3/ft.
• annual: $12/ft. w/wait list
• transient moorage: $0.30/ft./
day or $3/ft./month
• long-term storage: $0.20/sq. ft./mo.
• pressure washer: $15/hr.
• grid fee: $15/day; haulout
fee: $200/round trip
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water — seasonal
• groceries, restaurants, hardware,
bank, post office, laundry, phones
• showers/restrooms/pressure washer
• space for water & power for
people to work on their boats
❯ Tacoma
Port Office...........................253-383-5841
Port Fax...............................253-593-4570
www.portoftacoma.com
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 253)
Mayco Fish Co. Ltd...................572-3070
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Tacoma
Fire Dept...........................253-591-5798
• managed by City Marina,
Steve Morrison................253-572-2524
Moorage
• 66 commercial slips, 70 pleasure slips
• net sheds/storage on land/wait list
• jet runway with daily flights
Haulouts
Rates
• call City Marina
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• 2-ton harbor crane/80’ tidal grid
• hydraulic haul-out trailer,
to 20-ton/40’
• Coast Guard has a station with H-3 ....
helicopters and a buoy tender
• dentists in town
• Sitka Comm. Hospital...........747-3241:
can handle routine and some
emergency surgery
Special Events
• 4th of July celebration
• Alaska Day, October
• Salmon Derby, May-June
❯ Skagway
Small Boat Harbor.............907-983-2628
Port Fax...............................907-983-3087
VHF Channels...........................16/work 9
Fish & Game (Douglas).....907-465-4250
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Petro Marine..............................983-2259
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Matt O’Boyle
[email protected]
72 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Air Transport
• daily fights to Juneau/seaplane float
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• clinic with 2 physicians’ assistants
• dentist available every 6-8 weeks
ALASKAN OWNED AND OPERATED – 50 YEARS RUNNING
FINE FUELS.
SUPER SERVICE.
QUALITY LUBRICANTS.
We’ve
got you
covered
in Skagway.
• Fuels & Additives
• Lubricants & Greases
• Protective Coatings
• Cleaners & Supplies
• Tanks & Containers
907-983-2259
1-800-478-7586
www.petromarineservices.com
Amenities
• electricity and fresh water at
all moorage except city dock
• laundry/cafe on-site
• pay phones; contact phone
company for hookups at harbor
❯ Tenakee
Port/City Office...................907-736-2207
Port Fax...............................907-736-2207
[email protected]
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game (Douglas).....907-465-4250
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Wendy Stern
• harbor billing clerk: J.C. Tomas
Moorage
• 2 breakwaters with 12 additional
transient berths
• 10 transient berths/40 permanent
• now have electricity for $10/day
transient; $10/day for grid
Tenakee-Valdez
Tenakee-Valdez
Rates
• Transient: Daily, $0.40/ft./day;
monthly, $3.50/ft.
• Permanent: $15/ft.
over 50', 39¢/ft.
Amenities
• grid will handle boats up to 45’
• electricity and water avail. at harbor
• 1-lane boat ramp
• tidal boat grid
• new restrooms and shower at dock
• market/gas station/rental cars
• propane/roadside fuel
• outboard repairs in town
• post office........................907-828-3490
Repair Facilities
Air Transport (daily service)
• nearest repairs in Juneau and Sitka
• Pacific Airways
• Promech Air
• Taquan Air
Amenities
• non-potable water at fuel dock
• bottled water at general store
Haulouts
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Boston Whaler search & rescue boat
• helicopter pad for emergencies
• nearest Coast Guard facility in Juneau
• nearest medical Coast Guard in Sitka
Air Transport
• float planes 2x daily to Juneau;
charters available to Sitka
Special Events
• 4th of July celebration
• Fireman’s Ball (spring date
changes annually)
❯ Thorne Bay
Harbormaster.....................907-965-4138
City office............................907-828-3580
Fax......................................907-828-3374
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• medical clinic, M, T, Th......................... ..........................................907-828-8848
❯ Valdez
Harbor Office......................907-835-4981
Harbor Fax..........................907-835-2958
[email protected]
www.ci.valdez.ak.us/harbor
VHF Channels................................ 16 & 7
USCG Marine Safety.........907-835-4791
Fish & Game (Cordova).....907-424-3212
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
North Pacific Fuel......................835-4850
Valdez Fuel Co...........................835-5009
Processors (Area Code 907)
Peter Pan Seafoods..................835-2080
“The Port” Fuel Dock................828-3995
At the Dock
At the Dock
• port director/harbormaster
• harbormaster: Shane Ulery
Moorage
• 108 stalls for vessels up to 60’
transient moorage available for
vessels up to 100’
Rates (all plus tax)
• 23' stall, $6.60/day; $45.54/mo.;
$367.40/yr.
• 32' stall, $9.49/day; $62.63/mo.;
$505.23/yr.
• 37.5' stall, $14.19/day
• 50' stall, $18.77/day for transients;
Moorage
• 300’ fisherman’s dock; gear unloading, etc.
• 525 berths/land storage-100 boats
• 600’ open moorage/transient side
tie-ups
• boats must call-in prior to arrival
Rates
• all transient moorage paid on arrival
• annual tenant: $22/ft./yr.; advance
transient annual: $25.30/ft./yr.;
$8.75/ft./mo. & $0.70/ft./day, billed
$13.13/ft/mo. & $1.05/ft./day
• Contact the Port Office for
dockage/wharfage rates for the
City Dock and Container Terminal
Amenities
•electricity/laundry/pay phones/
showers/water
• 2 - 30’ x 6’’ concrete washdown pads
at travel lift w/power & water service
• 8 - 20’ x 60’ concrete maintenance pads
in btyd w/power & water service
• paved boat storage yard
• used oil collection facility
Haulouts
• 2 dockside hoists will handle
up to 10,000 lbs.
• 250-ton tidal grid/travel lift to
60 tons; $140/hr.
Repair Facilities
• public repair yard: works on
aluminum, glass, wood; also
has mobile shop
Air Transport
• daily flights
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• CG marine safety office
• health clinic
• hospital.............................907-835-2249
Special Events
• Halibut Derby, mid-May to early Sept.
• Silver Salmon Derby, July 30-Sept. 3
Valdez Small Boat Harbor
The Interior’s Gateway to
Prince William Sound
The Following Services are
Available at the Harbor:
• New Paved Boatyard
• Concrete Maintenance Pads Equipped
with Power and Water
• Dry Upland Vessel Storage and
75-Ton Haulout Service
• Fishermen’s Dock Equipped with
Tidal Grid and Hoists
• Transient Moorage Available
• One Locally Based Fish Processor
• Full Service Fuel Docks on Each Side of Harbor
Valdez Small Boat Harbor
Post Office Box 275 Valdez, Alaska 99686
www.ci.valdez.ak.us/harbor • [email protected]
Office (907) 835-4981 Fax: (907) 835-2958
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 73
Warrenton-Whittier
❯ Warrenton
City Office...........................503-861-3822
Marina Fax..........................503-861-2351
[email protected]
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Processors (Area Code 503)
Bornstein Seafoods..................325-6164
Fishhawk Fisheries...................325-5256
Warrenton Deep Sea................861-1233
Pacific Coast Seafoods.............861-2201
At the Dock
Valdez-Westport
• annual fish fry & crab dinner for
Deep Sea Fishermen Benefit Fund
• old-fashioned 4th of July parade,
talent show, fireworks
❯ Westport
(Port of Grays Harbor Marina)
Port Office...........................360-268-9665
Fax......................................360-268-9413
[email protected]
www.portofgraysharbor.com
VHF Channel......................................... 71
Fish & Game.......................206-976-3200
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
• harbormaster: Keith Pinkstaff
Moorage
• 1-2 year waiting list
• 515 slips
Rates
• daily: 0-19’= $10; add $1
for each additional 10’
• monthly: 1/3 annual rate
• annually: $20/ft.; 2-yr. waiting list
Amenities
• boat storage
• electricity/fresh water/pay phones
• groceries/restaurants
• laundry in town/net-mending yard
• restrooms/showers
Haulouts
• 1 to 3,000-lb. capacity crane
• Warrenton Boat Yard
Repair Facilities
• adjacent to Marina-Warrenton
• fuel dock at Hammond Basin
Air Transport
• contract air service, approx. 2 miles
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard air station
• Life Boat station at the
mouth of Columbia
• WFD 1st Responder Medical Aid
Special Events
• annual crab & seafood festival with
specialty booths, wine tasting, etc.
74 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
Fuel Suppliers
Masco Petroleum...............360-268-0076
Processors
D & M Live Crab.................360-268-9319
Nelson Crab....................... 360-267-2911
or 800-262-0069
Ocean Gold ....................360-268-9286
WA Crab Producers...........360-268-9161
Westport Seafood
Exchange............................360-268-0133
At the Dock
•marina manager: Robin Leraas
[email protected]
•operations manager: Ken Rausch
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard lifeboat station
• dentists in Westport, Grayland,
Aberdeen and Hoquiam
• hospitals-1 in Aberdeen: Grays
Harbor Community Hospital
Air Transport
• Hoquiam: jet runway, fuels
• Westport: hard surface year round
Special Events
• Annual Crab Races, 3rd
weekend in April
• 4th of July festivities
• Rusty Scupper’s Pirate Daze Festival, .
last weekend in June
• Westport Art Festival, 3rd
weekend in August
• Annual Seafood Festival & Craft Show,
Saturday of Labor Day weekend
❯ Whittier
Port Office....... 907-472-2327x115 or 110
Port Fax...............................907-472-2472
[email protected]
www.whittieralaska.gov
VHF Channels.............................. 16 & 68
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Shoreside Petroleum Inc..........472-2314
Moorage
• 550 berths 30-80’+ and side
ties up to 200’
Rates
• call harbor for complete list of rates or
www.portofgraysharbor.com
Whittier Terminal
Amenities
• electricity/fresh water
• launch ramp for net/gear repair
• showers and laundry nearby
• restaurants/groceries
• bus service county-wide
Repair Facilities
• several private shops can repair
steel, aluminum, glass, engines,
hydraulics, electronics
• vessel haulouts up river (Hoquiam)
A Petro Marine Affiliate
Serving You With:
•Marine
•FPPF
Fuels
Additives
•Chevron/Texaco •Racor
Lubricants
Filters
(907) 472-2314
VHF Channel 16
www.shoresidepetroleum.com
Whittier-Wrangell
Westport-Wrangell
Processors (Area Code 907)
Rate Samples
Great Pacific Seafoods.............472-2400
• annual: 24’, $726; 54’, $1,453
At the Dock
Amenities
• harbormaster: Sue Miller
• electricity/fresh water
• restrooms/showers
• marine fueling facility
Rates
Moorage
permanent moorage holders are
out of town, berth is available
for transients
• open area storage only
• Heritage Harbor; 1,500’ lineal side tie
• 334 slips, most permanent
• limited dry storage available in winter
• 8 vessel maintenance stations in
summer
Haulouts
• daily: $0.30/ft. (pre-paid); $0.60/ft.
(invoiced); monthly: $3/ft.; annual: $21/ft.
• Reedsport Machine & Fabrication
• Winchester Bay Marine
Amenities
Rates
Air Transport
• daily: $1.00/ft., monthly: $19.50/ft.,
annually: $58.50/ft.
• 22 miles south at North Bend, Ore.
Amenities
Medical/Rescue facilities
• electricity/fresh water
• pay phones/showers
• Coast Guard
• Lower Umpqua Hospital
(within 3 mi)
Haulouts
Special Events
• 2 tidal grids
• 25-ton marine travel lift
• crane hoist for heavy lifting: $41.50/hr.
• 4th of July fireworks
• Dune Fest (Aug.)
• Ocean Festival (July)
• Cool Coastal Nights (Aug.)
• The Crab Contest (Aug. - Labor Day)
• Salmon Festival (Sept.)
• Dune Mushers Mail Run,
first weekend in March
Repair Services
• marine services available
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• medical clinic with physician’s
assistant and several EMTs
Air Transport
• private charter out of Anchorage
Special Events
• 4th of July celebration
• Walk to Whittier, June 2008
❯ Winchester Bay
(Salmon Harbor Marina)
Marina.................................541-271-3407
Marina Fax..........................541-271-2060
[email protected]
Umpqua, Port of................541-271-2232
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
At the Dock
• harbor manager: Jeff Vander Kley
• slips/some transient
• 500 berths/25 transient berths
Haulouts
• 32’ x 80’ work float
• dockside hoist available,
❯ Wrangell
Port Office...........................907-874-3736
Port Fax...............................907-874-3197
[email protected]
www.wrangell.com
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game.......................907-874-3822
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
City Market & Sentry
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
Delta Western Fuel...................874-2388
Wrangell Oil Inc........................874-3276
Processors (Area Code 907)
Breakwater Seafoods...............874-3642
Sea Level Seafoods Inc............874-2401
Trident Seafoods......................874-3346
At the Dock
• harbormaster: Greg Meissner
Moorage
• electricity available transient
moorage, $5/day; $10/day; $50/ 3ph ... day
• sewer pumpout at Reliance
• fresh water/hotel/laundromat
•wireless internet by local provider
• school has swimming pool,
showers, racquetball, weight room
• travel lift haul out & marine repair
yard
Moorage
Full Grocery, Meats & Produce
Photo Developing & Video Rentals
Fax, Copy & Postage
• 0 to 6-month wait for berths
• “hot” berthing system: when
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 75
Wrangell-Yakutat
2-ton limit, in 4 locations
• all-tide launch at Heritage Harbor,
with floating dock alongside
• tidal grid at Shoemaker can hold
up to four 50’ boats
• tidal grid will handle boats up
to 40’ @ Reliance
Repair Facilities
• 1 repair yard available for
alum/glass/wood
• 2 aluminum shops
• freelance mechanics
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard has 95’ patrol boat in
Petersburg; aircraft in Sitka
• dentists in town
• Wrangell Hospital
• local search & rescue
Air Transport
• charter service available
• jet runway with daily flights
Wrangell
Special Events
.................................................784-3491
• July 4th celebration
• April, Fisher Fest
• May, Salmon Derby, 1st place $5,000
• Tent City Days, February
❯ Yakutat
Moorage
• 20 transients during summer season,
no reserved transient moorage
• 89 berths in the small boat harbor
• waiting list for assigned berths
Rates
Port Office...........................907-784-3491
.....................................or 907-784-3323
Port Fax...............................907-784-3281
VHF Channel......................................... 16
Fish & Game.......................907-784-3255
Pollution Hotline................800-424-8802
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 907)
• daily: $0.45/ft.; annually: $15/ft.
Amenities
• fresh water
• some electrical hookups- $5/day
Haulouts
Delta Western Fuel.................. 784-3311
or VHF 12
• several dockside hoists at Ocean
Cape dock
• tidal grid will handle up to 50’
Processors
Repair Facilities
Yakutat Seafoods ..........907-784-3392
• fiberglass
• some repairs available for glass,
wood, and welding
At the Dock (Area Code 907)
• harbormaster: Erving Grass
Medical/Rescue Facilities
Seattle
Fishermen’s
Memorial
New Boat Harbor
150 ton Travel Lift
Boat and Gear Storage
Transient Moorage
www.wrangell.com
907-874-3736
76 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
206.782.6577
seattlefishermensmemorial.org
• health center...........907-784-3275/3391
• nearest Coast Guard facilities
at Sitka
• nearest hospital Juneau or Sitka
Air Transport
• runway with 2 daily flights
• year-round charter available
Yakutat-Nanaimo
Yakutat-Campbell River
Special Events
• 4th of July celebration at Cannon
Beach
• Fair Weather Day, 1st week of Aug.
❯ B.C. Ports
Alert Bay
Marine Operator: VHF 66A
Weather: VHF 21
At the Dock
• harbor manager: Dan Kennedy
(250) 974-5727, cell (250) 974-8255
• Fax: (250) 974-5470
• E-mail: [email protected]
• Web: www.alertbay.ca
• Customs: no local agent
Amenities
• 2,900’ paved airstrip
• credit union/24-hr. ATM
• grocery/dry goods/
hardware/restaurants
• hotels/post office/liquor/
drug store/salon/fitness/pubs
• 1 laundromat by boat harbor
• public Internet access
• radio and electronic repairs outlet
• showers available at campground
• bowling alley, tennis courts,
bike/hike trails
• ferries/fishing & sightseeing charters
• fishing licenses available locally
Moorage
• at boat harbor, float “C” reserved
for pleasure boats only;
rafting possibilities if fleet is in
• 2 boat ramps
• 20 and 30 amp electrical
• fresh water, garbage, recycling
• moorage also available in center
of town at municipal dock
• good anchorage on sand bottom
can be found at head of bay in
depths of 40-50 feet of water
• Namgis First Nation Boat
Harbor........................... (250) 974-5556
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• call Comox Coast Guard while
in this vicinity
• 3 doctors, 1 dentist
• acute care 4-bed hospital/BC
ambulance service
• volunteer fire dept.
• RCMP............................. (250) 974-5544
• Cormorant Island Health
Centre......... (250) 974-5585 Local #221
Campbell River
Weather: VHF 16
At the Dock
• Harbour Office.............. (250) 287-7931
• Harbour Fax.................. (250) 287-8495
• VHF Channel................................... 66A
• Harbor Manager,
Phyllis Titus.................. (250) 287-7931
• Customs........................ (250) 286-5804
Fuel Suppliers
• Petro Canada (Quathiaski
Cove)............................. (250) 285-3212
• Esso Marine (Discovery
Harbor).......................... (250) 287-2456
• Carmac Diesel............... (250) 287-2171
Moorage
• 200’ dock
Amenities
• Klemtu: grocery store/water
• Hartley Bay: diesel, gas, stove oil,
grocery store
Fuel Suppliers
• First Nations Fuel.................................. (250) 839-1233 or VHF 6
Lund
VHF Channel 6
At the Dock
• Coast Guard.................. (604) 485-7511
(Powell River)
• Harbor Manager: Rosemary
O’Neill........................... (604) 483-2379
(emergencies only)
• Harbor Office................ (604) 483-4711
• Fax....................................604-483-9990
Moorage
• $1.28/meter per day
Moorage
• rafting may be required year-round
• Fisherman’s Wharf....... (250) 287-7931
• Discovery Harbor.......... (250) 287-2614
• Quathiaski Cove Government
Harbor........................... (250) 285-3622
Haulout and Repair
• tidal grid at harbor
• full marine services
• travel lift
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Coast Guard.................. (250) 287-8612
• Campbell River and District
General Hospital........... (250) 287-7111
• R.C.M.P.......................... (250) 286-6221
Klemtu/
Hartley Bay
At the Dock
• Percy Starr, Klemtu Band Manager
....................................... (250) 839-1255
Fax................................. (250) 839-1256
Fuel Suppliers
• Esso Gas Dock.............. (604) 414-0474
Amenities
• showers available
• coin laundry at hotel
• general store has marine supplies
• dive shop located in hotel
• water taxi...................... (604) 483-9749
Haulout and Repair
• 75-ton marine ways with 75’
capacity (contact Lund Hotel)
• travel lift available........ (604) 483-3515
• full marine services; towing & barge
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Powell River.................. (604) 485-3211
• ambulance.................... (604) 485-4211
• RCMP (Powell River)
....................................... (604) 485-6255
• first aid: Lund Fire Dept.................. 911
Nanaimo
Marine Operator.......................... VHF 67
Weather........................... (250) 245-8899
www.npa.ca
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 77
Nanaimo-Shearwater
At the Dock
• Marina Manager: David Mailloux
......................... (250) 754-5053; VHF 67
• Coast Guard SAR (Victoria)
....................................... (800) 567-5111
• Customs........................ (250) 754-0341
• harbormaster: Capt. Edward Dahlgren
....................................... (250) 753-4146
• Fax....................................250-754-4186
Moorage
• supplied upon request
• reservations
Amenities
• ice/shopping plaza
• laundry/shower
• grocery stores/restaurants
• eco-barge
Fuel Suppliers
• Esso............................... (250) 753-6122
• Petro Canada................ (250) 754-7828
Haulout and Repair
• full marine services
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Nanaimo Regional General
Hospital......................... (250) 754-2141
Air Transport
• float plane to Vancouver harbor
• ferries (both car & passenger) to
Vancouver
Port Hardy
Marine Operator.......................... VHF 24
Monitor Channel 66A at Fisherman’s
Wharf
At the Dock
• Coast Guard.................. (250) 339-3613
• Customs........................ (250) 949-7999
(May through October)
• Fisherman’s Wharf (250) 949-6332,
VHF 66A
• Harbor managers: Pat McPhee and
Mary-Ann Smith........... (250) 949-6332
Fax................................. (250) 949-6037
Moorage
• Fisherman’s Wharf, public facility
owned by the District of Port Hardy
• Seine float for the larger vessels
• Summer T-floats which are in place ... 78 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
May to October
• Quarterdeck Marine Industries, private
facility next to Fisherman’s Wharf
Fuel Suppliers
• Chevron......................... (250) 949-6405
• Petro Canada................ (250) 949-9988
Air Transport
• Pacific Coastal
Prince Rupert
Marine Operator..............VHF 25 and 27
Weather........................... (250) 624-9009
Haulout and Repair
At the Dock
• tidal grid at Fishermen’s Wharf
• travel lift, 60-ton capacity
• full marine services
• harbormaster: Gary Paulson,
(250) 627-8899, Fax (250)627-8980
• Fairview Float.............. (250) 624-3127,
VHF 16
• Rushbrooke Float........ (250) 624-9400,
VHF 16
• Coast Guard................. (250) 627-3074;
SAR cutter Port Henry
....................................... (250) 627-3063
• Customs........................ (250) 627-3003
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Port Hardy Hospital...... (250) 949-6161
• R.C.M.P.......................... (250) 949-6335
• Emergencies: fire/police/
ambulance....................................... 911
Air Transport
• Pacific Coastal Airlines
• Air Cab
• Port Hardy Airport Manager
....................................... (250) 949-8213
• Seaplane Base Manager
....................................... (250) 949-6156
Fuel Suppliers
Powell River
Medical/Rescue Facilities
(Westview Harbor)
At the Dock
• Wamplers Esso............. (250) 624-5000
• Petro Canada................ (250) 624-6666
Haulout and Repair
• 150-ton marine ways, 80’ capacity
• Prince Rupert Regional
Hospital......................... (250) 624-2171
Special Events
• Sea Fest, June
Marine Operator: VHF 66A
• harbormaster: Jim Parsons,
(604) 485-5244; Fax (604) 485-5286
• Coast Guard.................. (604) 485-7511
• no Customs
• Harbor expansion in 2011
Shearwater
Fuel Suppliers
At the Dock
• Westview Fuel.............. (604) 485-2867
• general manager: Al Tite
....................................... (250) 957-2305
Fax...................................250) 957-2422
Repair SHOP
(Bella Bella)
Shearwater Marine Operator...VHF 6
and 66A in summer
• welders, divers available
Amenities
• taxis/shuttles
• showers, laundromat
• water/power 15 & 30 amp.
• pub/bakery
• supply depot/marine chandlery
• golf
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Powell River General Hospital
....................................... (604) 485-3211
Amenities
• fresh water/electricity
• general store/hotel/pub/restaurant
• net-mending dock
• pay phones
• showers/restrooms/laundry
Moorage
• 100 transient berths
• daily: $1/ft.
• dry storage available
Shearwater-Vancouver
Fuel Suppliers
Haulout and Repair
• McMillan J S Fisheries...........255-5191
• North Sea Products Ltd..........327-0481
• Ocean Fisheries Ltd................254-5751
• S.M. Products (Delta).............946-7665
• Seafood Products Com..........255-3141
• 70-ton travel lift
• 1 tidal grid
At the Dock
Marine Supplies
• harbormaster: Capt. Yvette Myers
....................................... (604) 665-9086
• Shearwater Fuel Station:
(250) 957-2304
• Shearwater Marine Ltd.
Moorage
Medical/Rescue Facilities
• Harbormaster monitors
movement of all commercial
deep-sea vessels, cruise ships,
fishing vessels, ferries, tugs and
• R.W. Large Hospital, 250) 957-2314
Air Transport
barges, pleasure craft
Amenities
• Vancouver’s International
Airport
• Bus service
Medical/Rescue Facilities
(Area Code 604)
• Vancouver General
Hospital...................................875-4111
• St. Paul’s Hospital
(downtown)............................682-2344
• emergency/ambulance................... 911
• Pacific Coastal Airlines
• B/B Port Hardy
Advertiser Index
Special Events
• Gumboot Days, July long weekend
❯ Vancouver
Phone............................... (604) 665-9000
Toll Free........................ 1-888-PORTVAN
[email protected]
www.portmetrovancouver.com
VHF Channel......................................... 12
Fax................................... (604) 665-9099
Fuel Suppliers (Area Code 604)
• Chevron...................................681-7725
• Petro Canada..........................681-6020
• Esso.........................................681-3841
Processors (Area Code 604)
• Aero Trading Co. Ltd..............327-6331
Rolls-Royce Marine
Vancouver, BC
Bergen Diesel Rauma Brattvaag
Norwinch Aquamaster Ulstein
Kamewa Bird Johnson Tenfjord
Frydenbo Brown Brothers
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Sales Parts Service
n
n
96 North Bend St.
Coquitlam, BC
Canada V3K 6H1 . . .(604) 942-1100
Fax Number . . . . . . .(604) 942-1125
Web . . . . . . . www.rolls-royce.com
AdvertiserPage
AdvertiserPage
Alaska Air Cargo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Alaska Marine Safety Education Assn . 33
Alaska Regional Hospital . . . . . . . . 50,67
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute . . . . 1
Alaska Ship & Dry Dock Inc . . . . . . . . . 58
Alaska United / GCI . . . . . . . . . 17,19, 21
Alaskan Quota & Permits . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Ballard Inflatable Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Chevron USA Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cvr 4
City of Ketchikan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Coastal Marine Engine Inc . . . . . . . . . . 68
Cold Sea Refrigeration Inc/Sirsa Titanio61
Cook Inlet RCAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Delta Western, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Dock Street Brokers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Edgewater Marine Services . . . . . . . . . 54
Fremont Maritime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Grundens/Stormy Seas . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
H O Bostrom Co Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Hamilton Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Hansen Boat Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Harris Electric Inc . . . . . . . . . . 50, 62, 68
Hatton Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Kinematics Marine Equipment Inc 46, 47,
54, 59, 60, 54, 63, 65, 69
Kodiak Area Chamber of Commerce/
Comfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
LFS Inc Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Lunde Marine Electronics Inc . . . . . . 2, 50
Marco Global Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
MER - Marine Engine & Repair . . . . . . 29
Modutech Marine Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Murray Pacific Supply Corp. . . . . . . . . 58
NET Systems Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 61
NOMAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Offshore Systems Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Oregon International Port of Coos Bay . 44
Pacific Net & Twine Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Pacific Power Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Petro Marine Services . . . 45, 46, 57, 58,
61, 65 71, 72
Port of Dutch Harbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Port of Juneau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Port of Kodiak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Port of Port Townsend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Puget Sound Hydraulics . . . . . . . . . . . 69
R W Fernstrum & Company . . . . . . . Cvr 2
Radar Marine Electronics Inc . . . . . . . . 13
Rolls-Royce
Commercial Marine Inc . . . . . . 48, 68, 79
Ronald E Long Marine Surveys . . . . . . 70
Rozema Boat Works Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Satellite Technical Services . . . . . . . . . 39
Scania USA Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cvr 3
Sentry Hardware & Marine/City Market 75
Seward Ship’s Drydock Inc . . . . . . . . . 71
Shoreside Petroleum . . . . . . . . 45, 70, 74
Simrad Fisheries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15
Taku Oil Sales, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
The Blue Heron Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
The City of King Cove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Valdez Small Boat Harbor . . . . . . . . . . 73
Washington Chain & Supply Inc . . . . . 24
WESMAR - Western
Marine Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Wrangell Ports & Harbors . . . . . . . . . . 76
July 2011 • Pilothouse Guide 79
LAST SET
1969
Unloading halibut
at Petersburg, Alaska.
NF file photo
80 Pilothouse Guide • July 2011
PHG_cvrs.indd 2
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Power to propel both vessels
and business.
12 liter – ratings from 300 to 700 horsepower
Since 1902, commercial mariners around the world
have relied on Scania engines to power their
fishing boats, patrol boats, tug boats and ferries. No
matter the application, Scania marine engines have
earned a reputation for their robust performance,
legendary durability and outstanding fuel economy.
Read more at www.scaniausa.com
16 liter – ratings from 525 to 800 horsepower
Scania
Scania U.S.A. Inc.
Scania U.S.A., Inc.• San Antonio, TX • Phone 210.403.0007 • Fax 210.403.0211
E-mail: [email protected] • Web site: www.scaniausa.com
DISTRIBUTORS
Northeast/Great Lakes
Mack Boring & Parts Co.
908-964-0700
PHG_cvrs.indd 3
Northwest
Cascade Engine Center
206-764-3850
Southeast/Gulf Coast
Certified Diesel
954-583-4465
Southwest
Boatswain’s Locker
949-642-6800
Central/Eastern Canada
ADF Diesel
800-517-1489
5/12/11 4:21 PM
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© 2007–2010 Chevron U.S.A. Inc. All rights reserved.
All trademarks are the property of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC.
PHG_cvrs.indd 4
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