North American Company Profiles - Smithsonian

Comments

Transcription

North American Company Profiles - Smithsonian
8x8
North American Company Profiles
8X8
8x8, Inc.
2445 Mission College Boulevard
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 727-1885
Fax: (408) 980-0432
Web Site: www.8x8.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
8x8, Inc. • Bucks, England
Telephone: (44) (1628) 890984 • Fax: (44) (1628) 890938
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
36
5
7
1993
31
(1)
7
1994
34
(0.3)
7
1995
20
(6)
8
1996
29
(3)
8
114
100
105
110
81
Company Overview and Strategy
8x8, Inc. was founded originally as Integrated Information Technology, Inc. (IIT) in 1987 to supply math
coprocessors for 286 and later 386 microprocessor chips. Since June 1995, the company has been
discontinuing all efforts unrelated to video conferencing, including dropping product lines and development
efforts in math coprocessors, x86-compatible microprocessors, graphics ICs, and MPEG decoders.
Along with the new business strategy came the new name, 8x8 Inc., in early 1996. The 8x8 name reflects the
company’s focus on programmable integrated circuits for video conferencing applications in a wide range of
consumer and PC multimedia products. An 8x8 block of picture elements (pixels) is the basis of many video
compression algorithms.
8x8 continues to place greater emphasis on its video compression semiconductors, which for fiscal year 1996
represented 63 percent of total sales, compared to only 12 percent in 1994. The company is planning reliance on
a new line of cost effective VideoCommunicators for the consumer video conferencing market.
The company launched its initial public offering in November of 1996. Export sales accounted for almost half of
8x8’s revenue in fiscal 1996.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-1
8x8
North American Company Profiles
Management
Joseph L. Parkinson
Y. W. Sing
Keith Barraclough
Paul Voois
Sandra Abbott
David Harper
Bryan Martin
Chris McNiffe
Michael Noonen
Samuel Wang
Doug Bailey
Kevin Deierling
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Vice Chairman
President and Chief Operating Officer
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, European Operations
Vice President, Engineering and Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Business Development
Vice President, Process Technology
Director, Worldwide Sales
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
8x8 Inc. develops highly integrated programmable single-chip compression and decompression ICs and related
software for video phone and video conferencing equipment.
The company’s family of processors include the following:
•
•
•
Video Communications Processor (VCP) is a single-chip programmable video subsystem and multimedia
communications processor for conferencing over ISDN telephone lines. In early 1997, the company
introduced a simple and inexpensive video phone, dubbed ViaTV Phone, that contains the VCP device.
Low-bit-rate Videophone Processor (LVP) is a single-chip programmable video-phone processor for
conferencing over ordinary telephone lines.
Multimedia Encode Processor (MEP) for powering a PCI video capture and compression board using Intel’s
wavelet-based Indeo interactive video compression technology.
The company’s video compression semiconductors are based on its proprietary architecture, which combines a
RISC microprocessor, an advanced DSP core, specialized video processing circuitry, and SRAM technology.
1-2
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
ACC Micro
North American Company Profiles
ACC MICRO
ACC Microelectronics Corporation
2500 Augustine Drive
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 980-0622
Fax: (408) 980-0626
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
ACC Microelectronics Corporation (ACC Micro™) was established in 1987 to design, develop, and market a variety
of VLSI circuit devices for computer system control, computer system board integration, and communication
applications. The company's flagship products are a line of single-chip solutions targeted at the desktop,
notebook, and subnotebook computer industries.
Management
Wei-Tau Chiang, Ph.D.
Mark Shieu
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Products and Processes
ACC Micro supplies chipsets and controller chips for 386/486-based and Pentium-based computers.
products include buffer chips, power management chips, and single-device floppy-disk controllers.
Other
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
ACC Micro has second-source licensing agreements with Motorola to support delivery schedules.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-3
Actel
North American Company Profiles
A CTEL
Actel Corporation
955 East Arques Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94086-4533
Telephone: (408) 739-1010
Fax: (408) 739-1540
Web Site: www.actel.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Actel Europe Ltd. • Basingstoke, Hampshire, England
Telephone: (44) (1256) 29209
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
1992
41
(0.3)
9
—
1993
56
5
11
—
1994
76
8
14
4
1995
109
(1)
21
3
1996
149
15
24
4
168
211
245
320
356
Employees
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1985, Actel Corporation designs, develops, and markets field programmable gate arrays (FGPAs) and
associated software development systems and programming hardware. Its products are used by designers of
computer and computer peripheral, telecommunications, military, aerospace, industrial control, and other
electronic systems.
ROW
5%
Military/Aerospace
11%
Computers/
Peripherals
21%
Japan
10%
Communications/
Networking
46%
Industrial Control
22%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
1-4
Europe
18%
United States
67%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Actel
North American Company Profiles
Actel is a leader in the development of antifuse-based FPGAs and believes it was the first company to achieve
volume production of such devices. The company's objective is to become the leading supplier of FPGAs by fully
exploiting the capabilities of its proprietary antifuse and circuit architectures.
In April 1995, Actel completed the acquisition of the antifuse FPGA business of Texas Instruments, which was the
only second-source supplier of Actel’s products.
Development Systems
3%
FPGAs
97%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Management
John C. East
Esmat Z. Hamdy
Jeffrey M. Schlageter
David M. Sugishita
Michelle A. Begun
Douglas D. Goodyear
Dennis F. Nye
Robert Smith, Ph.D.
David L. Van De Hey
Warren Miller
Robert Nalesnik
David Stieg
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Technology and Operations
Senior Vice President, Engineering
Senior Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Software
Vice President and General Counsel
Director, Silicon Planning and Strategic Applications
Director, Product Marketing
Director, North American Distribution Sales
Products and Processes
Value Series
• The ACT1 family consists of two devices, a 1,200-gate part and a 2,000-gate (6,000 PLD equivalent gates)
part, and offers system performance of up to 25MHz. This family of circuits utilizes 1.0µm or 0.9µm CMOS
technology.
• The ACT2 family consists of three devices ranging from 2,500 to 8,000 gates (20,000 PLD equivalent gates)
and offers system performance of up to 50MHz. This family of circuits utilizes 1.0µm CMOS technology.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-5
Actel
North American Company Profiles
Accelerator Series
• The ACT3 family consists of devices ranging from 1,500 to 10,000 gates (25,000 PLD equivalent gates) and
on-chip performance of up to 250MHz (system performance up to 75MHz). This family of circuits is based on
0.8µm double-level-metal CMOS technology.
• The ACT3 PCI family consists of fully PCI-compliant devices with 4,000 to 10,000 usable gates and on-chip
performance of up to 250MHz. This family of circuits is based on 0.6µm double-level-metal CMOS technology.
Integrator Series
• The 1200XL family features parts ranging from 2,500 to 8,000 gates and offers system performance of up to
60MHz. This family of circuits is based on 0.65µm CMOS technology.
• The 3200DX family is Actel’s newest series of FPGAs with capacities ranging from 6,500 gates to 40,000 gates
and offering system performance of up to 100MHz. These high-performance FPGAs offer fast dual-port
SRAM, fast decode, and data path circuitry based on 0.65µm double-level-metal CMOS technology.
Reprogrammable SPGAs
• Actel’s ES family of system programmable gate arrays (SPGAs) are non-antifuse PLDs designed to address the
system-on-a-chip market. The fine-grained array of logic module blocks enables gate counts from 50,000
gates up to 400,000 gates. The SRAM-based SPGAs permit the integration of complex intellectual property
(IP) cores and support in-system programmability (ISP). Actel jointly developed the SPGA technology with the
Silicon Architects Group of Synopsys.
Radiation-Hardened FPGAs
• Actel’s RadHard family of FPGAs currently consists of radiation-hardened versions of its 2,000-gate ACT1
device and its 8,000-gate ACT2 device. These devices were first shipped in 1996 and ramped more quickly
than any other product in the company’s history. The RadHard family is based on 0.8µm double-level-metal
epitaxial bulk CMOS technology jointly developed with Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems.
Mask Programmed Gate Arrays (MPGAs)
• Offered as an alternative to traditional gate array conversions, Actel’s MPGAs provide significant cost
reductions for high-volume applications. An Actel FPGA used for prototyping and initial production can be
replaced by a corresponding MPGA (masked version of the device).
To support its FPGA products, Actel offers software products, including its CoreHDL IP portfolio consisting of
telecommunications cores, industrial cores, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) interface, and Actel-developed CorePCI
models, as well as proprietary and third-party design automation software. In addition, Actel provides programming
and test hardware and a diagnostic option that provides special in-circuit debug and diagnostic capabilities.
1-6
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Actel
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Actel's FPGAs are manufactured by Chartered Semiconductor, Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems, Matsushita,
Texas Instruments, and Winbond.
The company’s first foundry suppliers were Matsushita and TI. As part of the 1995 acquisition of TI’s FPGA
business, Actel signed a three-year manufacturing agreement (1.0µm design rules).
Also in 1995, Actel and Matsushita extended their five-year manufacturing relationship (0.8µm, 0.9µm, and 1.0µm
design rules). In addition, Matsushita is assisting Actel in developing next-generation antifuse technology.
Actel’s relationship with Chartered began in 1994 when the company purchased a minority equity interest in
Chartered. In return, Actel is guaranteed access to Chartered’s advanced 200mm wafer capacity (0.6µm design
rules).
Since being signed on in 1994, Winbond has become one of Actel’s largest fab partners, providing the company
with advanced wafer production services (0.8µm and 0.6µm design rules).
Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems is the sole source of Actel’s rad-hard FPGAs, which are being jointly developed
by the two companies (0.8µm design rules).
Key Agreements
• In 4Q96, Actel signed a multi-year agreement with Swiss IP provider, Inicore AG, for several
telecommunications and industrial control cores. The cores have been optimized for Actel’s ACT3, ACT3 PCI,
1200XL, and 3200DX families of FPGAs, as well as the ES family of SPGAs.
• Actel and Synopsys announced an agreement in mid-1996 to jointly develop Actel’s SPGAs, which combine
the features of FPGAs and mask programmed ASICs in a single chip. Under the agreement, Actel licensed the
cell-based array (CBA) architecture of the Silicon Architects Group of Synopsys for use in the maskprogrammed portion of the SPGAs.
• In 2Q96, Actel signed an agreement with IP provider, Technical Data Freeway, Inc., giving Actel and its
customers access to over 90 synthesizable DSP, telecommunications, multimedia, and MCU cores.
• Actel completed an agreement with Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems Company in Manassas, Virginia, in 1H95
to jointly develop radiation-hardened FPGAs. Lockheed Martin FSC is manufacturing the devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-7
Allegro MicroSystems
North American Company Profiles
A LLEGRO M ICRO S YSTEMS
Allegro MicroSystems, Inc.
115 Northeast Cutoff
Worcester, Massachusetts 01615-0036
Telephone: (508) 853-5000
Fax: (508) 856-7434
Web Site: www.allegromicro.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Allegro MicroSystems Europe Ltd. • Annecy, France
Telephone: (33) (4) 50-51-2359 • Fax: (33) (4) 50-51-2083
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Capital Expenditures
1992
115
13
Employees
1993
124
10
1994
161
14
1995
181
61
1996
201
n/a
2,000
Company Overview and Strategy
Allegro MicroSystems is the former semiconductor branch of Sprague Technologies, Inc. In 1990, Sprague was
purchased by Japan's Sanken Electric and renamed Allegro MicroSystems. Today, Allegro is functionally and
structurally an independently operating organization as a wholly owned subsidiary of Sanken Electric.
Allegro MicroSystems specializes in the design, manufacture, and marketing of advanced mixed-signal ICs. The
company is the world leader in Hall-effect sensor ICs and a prominent supplier of power and smart power ICs.
Allegro's customers are OEM's primarily serving the automotive and industrial markets, but also the consumer,
telecommunications, computer mass storage, and printer markets.
1-8
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Allegro MicroSystems
North American Company Profiles
Telecommunications
5%
EDP
8%
Consumer
14%
Japan
14%
Industrial
47%
Automotive
26%
Far East
15%
Europe
19%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
United States
52%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Allan S. Kimball
Dan Ax
Dennis Fitzgerald
John Kokulis
Andy Labrecque
John MacDougell
Steven W. Miles
Fred Windover
Marybeth Perry
President
Vice President, Business Development
Vice President, Quality Systems
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Product Development
Vice President and General Counsel
Director, Human Resources
Products and Processes
Allegro's product offering is outlined below by end-use market segment.
Automotive Market
Magnetic field sensors
Power driver ICs
Signal processing ICs
Radio components
EDP Printer and Communication Markets
Printer head driver
Paper transport motor driver
Battery management
Computer Mass Storage Market
Spindle motor controller/driver
Servo/voice-coil motor driver
Combination drivers
Industrial and Consumer Markets
Chip supply for hybrids
Smoke detector electronics
Switch Mode Power Supply Market
AC-DC converter (>10W to <250W)
Universal input switching (<1kW)
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-9
Allegro MicroSystems
North American Company Profiles
Allegro exited the discrete market in December 1996 and sold its inventory of discrete semiconductor diodes and
transistors. In recent years, sales of discrete products has represented about 6 percent of Allegro’s total
revenues.
The semiconductor processes used by Allegro range from standard bipolar to CMOS, power DMOS (doublediffused MOS), and combinations of all of them.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Allegro MicroSystems, Inc.
115 Northeast Cutoff
Worcester, Massachusetts 01615-0036
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS, DMOS
Products: Power and smart power ICs,
signal processing ICs, sensors
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-8.0µm
Allegro MicroSystems, Inc.
3900 Welsh Grove Road
Willow Grove, Pennsylvania 19090
Cleanroom size: 15,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS, DMOS
Products: Power and smart power ICs,
ASICs (mixed-signal), sensors
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-8.0µm
Allegro plans to invest $80 million to expand wafer capacity at its Worcester fab facility. A 150mm wafer line will be
added to support 1.5µm production of its power and smart power ICs and sensor products. Allegro is also
planning to double the capacity at its Willow Grove facility.
1-10
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Alliance Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
A LLIANCE S EMICONDUCTOR
Alliance Semiconductor Corporation
3099 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134-2006
Telephone: (408) 383-4900
Fax: (408) 383-4999
Web Site: www.alsc.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
Employees
1993
22
2
2
—
1994
55
9
4
—
1995
119
24
8
7
1996
201
11
15
95
1997
83
(17)
n/a
n/a
35
40
74
130
150
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1985, Alliance Semiconductor designs, develops, and markets memory products and memory
intensive logic products for high-performance applications. Such applications are in the desktop and portable
personal computer, networking, telecommunications, and instrumentation markets.
The company originally manufactured its own devices in a fab facility near Kansas City, Missouri, leased from AT&T.
However, high overhead costs and low demand in its product markets caused the plant to operate at a significant
loss until its closure in February 1990. The company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March 1991 and
then emerged with a new business strategy to operate as a fabless supplier of high-performance SRAMs and
other memory products.
The majority of Alliance’s revenues historically have been from sale of fast SRAMs in the PC marketplace.
Recently, the company has placed greater emphasis on diversifying its product offerings. Its newest product lines
include high-performance DRAMs, flash memories, and multimedia user interface (MMUI) accelerators.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-11
Alliance Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
MMUI Accelerators
5%
Europe
18%
SRAMs
95%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Asia
25%
North America
57%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
In 1995, Alliance abandoned its “fabless” IC supplier strategy, to a certain extent. The company announced plans
in that year calling for a substantial portion of the company’s future wafer capacity to come from fabs in which it has
partial ownership. As a result, Alliance made a number of substantial investments in wafer manufacturing facilities,
including an equity investment in Chartered Semiconductor (see Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities below).
Management
N. Damodar Reddy
C.N. Reddy
Charles Alvarez
Kamal Gunsagar
Angela Kupps
Ken Poteet
Phil Richards
Sunit Saxena
Bharat Shastri
Ritu Shrivastava
Datar Lalvani
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Engineering and Operations
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Contract Manufacturing
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Integrated Memory Products
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Product Engineering
Vice President, Systems Engineering
Vice President, Technology Development
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
SRAMs
Alliance Semiconductor offers a variety of high-speed asynchronous and synchronous CMOS SRAMs for
networking, telecommunications, modem, and mainframe computer applications. Its asynchronous SRAM
products range from 5V 64K devices with speeds as fast as 8ns to 3.3V 1M and 4M devices with speeds as fast as
12ns. Its 3.3V synchronous SRAM products include 1M (32K x 32) and 2M (64K x 32) pipeline burst SRAMs
designed for high-performance Pentium applications with access times as low as 5ns.
DRAMs
Volume production of a new line of high-speed fast page mode and EDO 4M and 16M DRAMs began in mid- and
late-1996, respectively.
1-12
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Alliance Semiconductor
Flash Memories
Alliance’s flash memory products include 1M and 2M 5.0 volt-only NOR-type devices that are compatible with AMD
and Intel flash chips, and 4M 5.0 volt-only devices that are compatible with AMD and Atmel flash chips.
MMUI Accelerators
The company's first foray beyond memory chip markets came in late 1994, when it unveiled its line of ProMotion™
MMUI accelerators. The ProMotion line includes the ProMotion-6410 64-bit MMUI accelerator, the ProMotion6422 MMUI accelerator with integrated DAC, and the ProMotion-AT24 128-bit accelerator with integrated DAC.
The fourth-generation ProMotion device, the AT3D chip, was introduced in late 1996. The AT3D is a 3D/2D/video
accelerator that integrates a 128-bit internal drawing engine, DVD, and live video input port with support for various
software drivers.
Currently, most of Alliance’s products are manufactured using 0.45µm CMOS technology, with many of its newest
products being developed using a 0.35µm process. The company’s SRAMs are based on a two-poly, one-metal
CMOS process and its DRAMs on a three-poly, one-metal CMOS process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Alliance’s IC products are manufactured through a combination of independent foundry suppliers and joint
venture facilities. The independent foundry suppliers Alliance uses for the manufacture of its ICs include Rohm
and TSMC.
In October 1995, Alliance entered an agreement with UMC and other parties to form a separate Taiwanese
company, United Silicon Inc. (USI), for the purpose of building and managing a semiconductor manufacturing
facility in Taiwan. The investment by Alliance will total approximately $60 million, representing an initial equity
ownership of about 10 percent. In return for its investment, Alliance will receive 12.5 percent of the manufacturing
capacity in the USI fab, which is expected to move into production in 1Q98.
Earlier in 1995, Alliance entered into a partnership with UMC and S3 Incorporated to establish a new jointly owned
wafer foundry company in Taiwan called United Semiconductor Corporation (USC). Alliance’s investment in USC
will total approximately $70 million, representing an equity ownership of 19 percent. In return for its investment,
Alliance will receive 25 percent of the manufacturing capacity in the USC fab. The fab will be a 200mm wafer,
0.35µm plant capable of producing 5,000 to 6,250 wafers per week. The fab started manufacturing wafers for
Alliance, S3, and other semiconductor companies in 3Q96.
Also in 1995, Alliance announced a $52 million investment in Chartered Semiconductor to obtain a minority
ownership stake in the company and a guaranteed portion of the capacity in Chartered’s Fab II facility that began
production of 200mm wafers in 4Q95.
Alliance’s equity investments in UMC and Chartered so far total about $200 million. By the end of 1997, the
company expects wafers from the UMC and Chartered fabs it has invested in will represent more than 50 percent
of its capacity.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-13
Alliance Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Key Agreements
• Alliance and UMC signed an agreement in 4Q95 calling for UMC to expand allocation of wafer fabrication
capacity to Alliance for the manufacture of Alliance’s DRAM products. In return, Alliance granted UMC a license
to produce for itself a certain number of Alliance DRAM products. As discussed above, UMC and Alliance are
also cooperating in the manufacture of ICs through two new IC foundry companies in Taiwan.
• Alliance signed an agreement with 3Dfx Interactive, Inc. in late 1995 to work together on ensuring compatibility
between Alliance’s ProMotion multimedia chips and 3Dfx Interactive’s Voodoo Graphics three dimensional
graphics accelerator designed for 3D entertainment applications.
• Alliance licensed Aspec Technology's Portfolio™ family of ASIC design tools in 2Q95. These tools will allow
the company to create low-cost ASIC gate array and embedded memory array products.
• Alliance entered into a joint development, manufacturing, and marketing agreement with Japan's Rohm Co.,
Ltd. in mid-1994 calling for Rohm to furnish Alliance with fab capacity for the production of SRAMs. Rohm will
also help Alliance sell and market the products in Japan; Alliance will, in turn, assist Rohm in developing highperformance, low-power SRAMs.
1-14
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Altera
North American Company Profiles
A LTERA
Altera Corporation
2610 Orchard Parkway
San Jose, California 95134-2020
Telephone: (408) 894-7000
Fax: (408) 435-1394
Web Site: www.altera.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Altera Japan Ltd. • Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3340-9480 • Fax: (81) (3) 3340-9487
Europe:
Altera U.K. Limited • Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1494) 602000 • Fax: (44) (1494) 602001
Asia-Pacific:
Altera Hong Kong • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2538-6895 • Fax: (852) 2538-6896
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
Employees
1992
101
12
16
4
1993
140
21
17
—
1994
199
15
22
1
1995
402
87
34
1
1996
497
109
50
93
477
527
667
881
918
Company Overview and Strategy
Altera Corporation, founded in 1983, is a leading supplier of high-performance, high-density CMOS
programmable logic devices (PLDs) and associated development tools. Its broad line of "off-the-shelf" userconfigurable chips, together with Altera-developed software, enable system manufacturers to create custom logic
functions in-house for a wide variety of applications. Altera believes its products and services provide its
customers with faster time-to-market than custom (ASIC) solutions. The company's name was derived from the
word Alterable.
Altera products are used in a variety of applications, including telephone switching systems, computer networking,
multimedia boards, broadcast video and video conferencing, and medical instrumentation.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-15
Altera
North American Company Profiles
Development Software
and Hardware
6%
Military
4%
Consumer
4%
Other
1%
Industrial
14%
CMOS Programmable
Logic Chips
94%
Computer
19%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Communications
58%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
Asia-Pacific
7%
Japan
19%
Europe
21%
North America
53%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Rodney Smith
Denis Berlan
Clive McCarthy
Erik Cleage
Jack Fitzhenry
Thomas J. Nicoletti
Nathan Sarkisian
Peter Smyth
Chris Henry
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Senior Vice President, Development Engineering
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Business Development and Investor Relations
Vice President, Finance
Vice President, Sales
Director, Customer Marketing
Products and Processes
Altera's PLD products extend from 24 to 599 pins with usable gate counts up to 130,000 gates and process
technologies advancing to 0.35µm through its fabrication partners. The company has released some details
regarding its next major family of PLDs. Code-named Michelangelo, the new family of devices will be pin
compatible with the MAX 7000 Family, Altera’s most popular line. Michelangelo PLDs, ranging from 32 macrocells
on the low end to 1,008 on the high end, will start shipping in the first half of 1998.
1-16
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Altera
North American Company Profiles
FLEX 10K Family
• 10,000-100,000 usable gates
• In-circuit reconfigurable
• 84-503 pins
• Performance: 104MHz
• SRAM-based CMOS technology
• 5V operation
• MultiVolt interface supports 3.3V
• 0.5µm
FLEX 10KA Family
• 10,000-250,000 usable gates
• In-circuit reconfigurable
• 84-599 pins
• Performance: 104MHz
• SRAM-based CMOS technology
• 3.3V operation
• MultiVolt interface supports 5V and 2.5V
• Megafunction support
• 0.35µm
FLEX 8000 Family
• 2,500-16,000 usable gates
• In-circuit reconfigurable
• 84-304 pins
• Performance: 125MHz
• SRAM-based CMOS technology
• MultiVolt interface supports 3.3V
• 0.5µm
MAX 9000 Family
• 6,000-12,000 usable gates
• In-system programmable
• 84-356 pins
• Performance: 125MHz
• EEPROM-based CMOS technology
• MultiVolt interface supports 3.3V
• 0.5µm-0.65µm
MAX 7000/E Family
• 600-5,000 usable gates
• High pin-to-gate ratio
• 44-208 pins
• Performance: 178MHz
• In-system programmable
• EEPROM-based CMOS technology
• 0.65µm-0.8µm
MAX 7000/S Family
• 600-5,000 usable gates
• In-system programmable
• High pin-to-gate ratio
• 44-208 pins
• Performance: 178MHz
• EEPROM-based CMOS technology
• 0.5µm-0.65µm
MAX 5000 Family
• 600-3,750 usable gates
• High register count
• 24-100 pins
• Performance: 83.3MHz
• 0.65µm
Classic Family
• 200-900 usable gates
• Zero-standby power
• 24-68 pins
• Performance: 100MHz
• 0.65µm
The company also offers 64K, 213K, and 1M EPROMs designed to configure its FLEX devices, as well as maskprogrammed logic devices (MPLDs) for high-volume applications. MPLDs are pin-, function-, and timingcompatible with Altera’s PLDs and are available for all families.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-17
Altera
North American Company Profiles
Coinciding with the company’s migration from 0.8µm to 0.6µm in 1993, Altera moved from two to three layers of
metal. Today, the FLEX10KA Family is based on a 0.35µm triple-layer metal process, and is expected to add a
fourth layer of metal in 1997. The Michelangelo PLDs will be implemented in a 0.35µm EEPROM-based CMOS
process with four-layers of metal. For future products with gate densities reaching 250,000 usable gates and
above, Altera is developing a 0.25µm, five-layer metal process.
Altera supplies proprietary software development systems (MAX+PLUS II™) to support its PLD products.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Altera has foundry agreements with Sharp, TSMC, Cypress, and Intel. It owns 17 percent of Cypress
Semiconductor's wafer fab in Round Rock, Texas. Through this ownership, Altera has the right to buy a
percentage of the wafers produced by Cypress approximately equal to the percentage of its ownership.
In November 1995, Altera signed a letter of intent for joint ownership of a TSMC joint venture fab facility, located in
Camas, Washington. Under the terms, Altera will invest $140 million to take an 18 percent equity stake in, and also
gain the rights to 27 percent of the output from the new fab. Construction on the facility, called WaferTech, began
in July 1996. Potential output from the plant is expected to be 7,500 200mm wafers per week, with production
scheduled to start in 1998. Design rules will start at 0.35µm and migrate to 0.25µm.
Key Agreements
• In February 1996, Altera purchased a minority stake in I-Cube Inc., a privately held supplier of programmable
switching and interconnect devices (PSIDs).
1-18
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
AMCC
North American Company Profiles
A PPLIED M ICRO C IRCUITS (AMCC)
Applied Micro Circuits Corporation
6195 Lusk Boulevard
San Diego, California 92121-2729
Telephone: (619) 450-9333
Fax: (619) 450-9885
Web Site: www.amcc.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Applied Micro Circuits Corporation • Munich, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 92404-136 • Fax: (49) (89) 81213-180
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Employees
1992
39
1993
47
1994
50
1995
51
1996
60
275
300
310
270
255
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1979, Applied Micro Circuits Corporation (AMCC) develops, manufactures, and markets standard
and application-specific high-speed, high-performance interface ICs for the communications, computer,
instrumentation, and military markets. The privately-held company also offers a comprehensive line of low EMI, low
skew precision clock products.
AMCC is a leader in bipolar manufacturing and bipolar ECL logic arrays, the company’s focus in recent years has
been shifting from ASICs to standard products, particularly chips for the telecommunications and networking
markets, areas where bipolar’s high frequency characteristics can be exploited.
Management
David Rickey
Joel O. Holliday
Anil Bedi
Laszlo Gal
Darwin Slindee
Thomas Tullie
Brent Little
Carol Oster
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Sales
Director, ASIC Products
Director, Quality Assurance
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-19
AMCC
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
AMCC produces and sells bipolar and BiCMOS gate array and standard cell ASICs, custom bipolar IC products, and
standard bipolar and CMOS products.
The company’s portfolio of ASSPs for high-performance networking, clock/timing, and bus interface applications,
and ASICs include the following:
Sonet/SDH Interface Circuits
Fibre Channel Interface Circuits
HiPPI Source and Destination Interface Circuits
Gigabit Ethernet Interface Circuits
ATM Interface Circuits
Q20000 Series ECL/TTL “Turbo” Logic Arrays
MicroPower 3V, low power, bipolar, standard cell ASICs
PCI Bus Controllers
Crosspoint Switches
Clock Generators/Synthesizers
Clock Drivers
ECL Terminator
As part of its push into communications markets, AMCC redesigned its G3.0 bipolar process, obtained through a
technology alliance with Plessey, to allow for 3.3V operation. Parts derived from the 1.0µm process can be
operated at up to 2.4GHz.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
AMCC operates from a 120,000 square foot facility in San Diego, California, that includes a design center for
customer design use and training, a Class 10 cleanroom for bipolar IC production, and an assembly and test facility.
The company has established strategic foundry partners to augment its wafer supply.
Applied Micro Circuits Corporation
6195 Lusk Boulevard
San Diego, California 92121
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,200
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs, custom ICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm, 2.0µm, 3.0µm
AMCC's capacity is only about half utilized and the company expects its current manufacturing resources to reach
maximum levels in a few years.
1-20
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
AMD
North American Company Profiles
A DVANCED M ICRO D EVICES (AMD)
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
One AMD Place
P.O. Box 3453
Sunnyvale, California 94088-3453
Telephone: (408) 732-2400
Fax: (408) 774-7216
Web Site: www.amd.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Advanced Micro Devices (UK) Ltd. • Firmley, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1276) 803100 • Fax: (44) (1276) 803102
Japan:
Advanced Micro Devices • Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3346-7550 • Fax: (81) (3) 3342-5685
Asia-Pacific:
Advanced Micro Devices Far East Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2956-0388 • Fax: (852) 2956-0588
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
1,514
234
238
224
1993
1,648
208
279
390
1994
2,155
271
295
586
1995
2,468
216
416
650
1996
1,953
(69)
401
494
11,674
12,203
11,994
12,981
12,181
Company Overview and Strategy
Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) was founded in 1969 and is today one of the largest U.S.-based merchant
manufacturers of integrated circuits. With a focus on the personal and networked computing and communications
markets, the company produces microprocessors and related peripherals, flash memories, programmable logic
devices, and circuits for telecommunications and networking applications.
AMD’s strategy is to be competitive only in those markets where it can be a leading factor. The company has been
a major supplier of microprocessors since 1975, it is a leading supplier of non-volatile memories, a leader in ICs for
local area networks and linecards for public communications applications, and is one of the largest suppliers of
programmable logic devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-21
AMD
North American Company Profiles
In a move to significantly enhance its core competency in advanced microprocessor design, AMD acquired
NexGen, Inc. for nearly $1 billion in early 1996. The acquisition brought together the engineering resources of
NexGen and AMD’s sub-0.35µm process technology and manufacturing capability to enable AMD to offer future
generations of microprocessors in a competitive timeframe.
To address the unique requirements of the market for programmable logic devices (PLDs), AMD spun off its PLD
operations in the second half of 1996 to form a new subsidiary business unit called Vantis Corporation (a separate
profile of Vantis is included in this publication). Vantis will continue to rely on AMD for manufacturing services and
plans to eventually become an independent company.
AMD is organized into three product groups: the Communications and Components Group (CCG), the
Computation Products Group (CPG), and Vantis Corporation. CCG products include flash memory devices,
EPROMs, voice and data communications products, embedded processors, I/O devices, and network products.
CPG products include microprocessors. Vantis products are high-speed PLDs.
Computation
Products
17%
Vantis
13%
Asia-Pacific
26%
Communications
and Components
70%
1996 Sales by Product Group
North America
47%
Europe
27%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
W.J. Sanders III
Richard Previte
Marvin Burkett
Gene Conner
S. Atiq Raza
Stanley Winvick
Stephen Zelencik
Donald M. Brettner
Vinod Dham
Richard Forte
Gary O. Heerssen
William Siegle
Terryll R. Smith
Benjamin M. Anixter
Gary Ashcraft
Kathryn Brandt
Randy Burdick
1-22
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial and Administrative Officer and Treasurer
Senior Vice President, Operations
Senior Vice President and Chief Technical Officer
Senior Vice President, Human Resources
Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Executive
Group Vice President, Manufacturing Services Division
Group Vice President, Computation Products Group
Group Vice President, Communications and Components Group, and
President and Chief Executive Officer, Vantis
Group Vice President, Wafer Fabrication Group
Group Vice President, Technology Development Group, and Chief Scientist
Group Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, External Affairs
Vice President and GM, Communication Products Division
Vice President, Business Systems
Vice President, Information Technology Management
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
AMD
North American Company Profiles
Susan T. Daniel
James Doran
Tom Eby
Curt Francis
Robert R. Herb
Larry Hollatz
Mike Johnson
Robert M. Krueger
Gerald A. Lynch
Walid Maghribi
Robert McConnell
Thomas M. McCoy
Giuliano Meroni
Daryl Ostrander
Geoff Ribar
Jack Saltich
Danne Smith
Tom Stites
Michael Van Buskirk
Jerry Vogel
Vice President, Human Resource Operations
Vice President, Technical Operations
Vice President, Strategic Marketing, Communications and Components Group
Vice President, Corporate Planning and Development
Vice President, Strategic Marketing, Computation Products Group
Vice President and GM, Texas Microprocessor Division
Vice President, Advanced Research and Development
Vice President and GM, Network Products Division
Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Asia/Pacific-Japan
Vice President and GM, Non-Volatile Memory Products Division
Vice President and GM, Logic Products Division
Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Europe
Vice President, Austin Wafer Fabrication
Vice President, Finance, and Corporate Controller
Vice President and GM, European Microelectronics Center, Dresden
Vice President, Corporate Quality
Vice President, Communications
Vice President, Engineering, Non-Volatile Memory Products Division
Vice President and GM, California Microprocessor Division
Products and Processes
MOS MEMORY
ANALOG
DRAM
SRAM
✔
✔
✔
Consumer/Automotive
EPROM
Voltage Regulator/Reference
EEPROM
✔
✔
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array
Field Programmable Logic
Comparator
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
✔
✔
Standard Cell
✔
Data Conversion
Other (Includes Telecom)
MOS LOGIC
✔
Interface
Flash Memory
ROM
✔
Amplifier
Bipolar Memory
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array/Standard Cell
✔
Other Special Purpose Logic
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
✔
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
✔
✔
✔
MPU
OTHER
MCU
Full Custom IC
MPR
Discrete
DSP
Optoelectronic
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-23
AMD
North American Company Profiles
Microprocessor Products
AMD-K6™ MMX Microprocessors—Shipments of AMD’s sixth-generation K6 MMX microprocessor, the second
member of AMD’s K86 family of superscalar RISC MPUs, began in the second quarter of 1997. The K6 has been
designed to be competitive in performance with Intel’s forthcoming single-chip version of its Pentium Pro
microprocessor, which is expected to be introduced in 1997. The 8.8-million-transistor device is based on AMD’s
0.35µm five-layer-metal CMOSCS34 technology. The first versions in the K6 family operate at 166MHz, 200MHz,
and 233MHz. A 266MHz version is expected in 2H97. In order to reach 300MHz, AMD plans to migrate the K6 to
a 0.25µm process by the end of 1997, at the earliest.
AMD-K5™ Microprocessors—The first member of AMD’s K86 family, the K5 is a fifth-generation alternative to
Intel’s Pentium. It is based on 0.35µm CMOS technology and is offered in five speed versions, the PR75, PR100,
PR133, PR150, and PR166. The PR nomenclature suggests which specific higher-clock-rate Intel Pentium each
of the members best compete with. Unfortunately, AMD was late in getting its K5 processor to market, and thus
does not expect it to generate the levels of revenues achieved by the Am486 microprocessor over its product life.
Am5x86 Microprocessors—The 5x86 is said to offer Pentium-class performance using a fourth-generation
architecture. It is based on a 0.35µm CMOS process and runs at a quadrupled clock rate of 133MHz.
Am486 Microprocessors—AMD’s 486DX4 microprocessors offer clock-tripled performance speeds of up to
120MHz and feature “enhanced” power management capabilities.
Embedded Processor Products
For processing/control applications in communications, mobile computing, networking, mass storage, or industrial
control systems, AMD offers its E86™ Family of x86-compatible embedded processor products. The E86 family
ranges from 16-bit MCUs to 32-bit MPUs, general purpose processors to “PCs on a chip.” The E86 family includes
several versions of Am186/188 16-bit microcontrollers, Am386SX/DX and AM486DX 32-bit microprocessors,
ElanSC300/310 32-bit microcontrollers based on a 386 core, and ElanSC400/410 32-bit microcontrollers based
on a 486 core.
With the success of its E86 family, AMD is putting less emphasis on its venerable 29K™ family of embedded RISC
processors. AMD will continue to support current product designs and customers using its 29K products.
However, development of new 29K devices has been discontinued. AMD cited the high cost of supporting the
proprietary architecture as the reason for putting an end to the product line.
Communications, Network, and I/O Products
AMD’s communications and networking products include ICs for public infrastructure, including subscriber line
interface circuits (SLICs), subscriber line audio-processing circuits (SLACs™), and ISDN controllers; ICs for
networking, including FDDI chips and PCnet™ Ethernet LAN devices; ICs for data communications, including PCI
small computer systems interface (SCSI) circuits, serial communications controllers (SCCs), and TAXIchip™
devices; and ICs for wireless communications, including CT2 PhoX™ controllers for digital cordless telephones
and PCnet-Mobile devices for wireless LANs.
1-24
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
AMD
Non-Volatile Memory Products
Am29Fxxx Flash Memories—5.0V-only sector-erase flash memory devices available in densities ranging from 1M
to 16M. Some devices are available in bare die form.
Am29LVxxx Flash Memories—2.7V-only sector-erase flash memory devices available in densities ranging from 2M
to 8M. Some devices are available in bare die form.
Am29LLxxx Flash Memories—AMD’s new family of “zero-power” flash chips that incorporate new power
management circuitry to lower current consumption in sleep mode to only 75nA. The first member of the 2.2Vonly sector-erase flash family is an 8M part.
Am28Fxxx Flash Memories—This is the company’s first generation family of 5.0V/12.0V bulk-erase flash memory
devices. They are available in densities ranging from 256K to 2M.
EPROM Products—AMD’s CMOS UV and OTP EPROMs are offered in densities ranging from 64K to 4M. Lowvoltage versions are available in 1M and 2M densities.
ExpressROM Products—These are standard EPROM die that are pre-programmed and then encapsulated in
plastic packaging before delivery. They are offered in densities ranging from 64K to 8M.
Programmable Logic Products
The PLD products of Vantis include a variety of CMOS and bipolar programmable array logic (PAL) devices and its
line of MACH (Macro Array CMOS High-Density) advanced complex PLDs (CPLDs). See individual profile of Vantis
Corporation.
Other IC Products
The company’s other IC products include bipolar PROMs and RAMs, FIFO memories, high-performance CMOS
and bipolar bus interface devices, transmission line drivers and receivers, and dynamic memory management
circuits.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
AMD is building a $1.9 billion sub-half-micron semiconductor manufacturing facility in Dresden, Germany, for the
manufacture of its K86 microprocessors. Groundbreaking took place in the fourth quarter of 1996, with
production scheduled to start by the end of 1998.
AMD and Fujitsu broke ground in late 1995 on their second joint-venture manufacturing facility in Japan, a $1.2
billion fab for the production of flash memories. Initial output is expected in early 1998.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-25
AMD
North American Company Profiles
Advanced Micro Devices
5204 East Ben White Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78741
Telephone: (512) 385-8542
Fab 10
Cleanroom size: 22,000 square feet (Class 100)
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,500
Wafer size: 125mm
Process: CMOS
Products: PLDs
Feature size: 0.9µm
Advanced Micro Devices
5204 East Ben White Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78741
Telephone: (512) 385-8542
Fab 14
Cleanroom size: 22,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories, EPROMs
Feature size: 0.8µm
Advanced Micro Devices
5204 East Ben White Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78741
Telephone: (512) 385-8542
Fab 15
Cleanroom size: 22,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Logic, telecom, and network ICs;
MPUs; microperipheral ICs
Feature size: 0.7µm
Advanced Micro Devices
901 Thompson Place
Sunnyvale, California 94088
Telephone: (408) 732-2400
Fab 17 and Submicron Development Center
Cleanroom size: 42,500 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: R&D, MPUs, flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.8µm
Advanced Micro Devices
5204 East Ben White Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78741
Telephone: (512) 385-8542
Fab 25
Cleanroom size: 86,700 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, logic ICs, flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm (0.25µm capability)
AMD Saxony Manufacturing GmbH
Dresden, Saxony, Germany
Fab 30
Cleanroom size: 90,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, logic ICs, R&D
Feature size: 0.25µm (0.18µm capability)
(Expected to start production by the end of 1998.)
1-26
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
AMD
North American Company Profiles
Fujitsu AMD Semiconductor Ltd. (FASL)
Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
FASL I
Cleanroom size: 69,900 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
(upgrading 0.5µm lines to 0.35µm)
Fujitsu AMD Semiconductor Ltd. (FASL)
Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan
FASL II
Cleanroom size: 88,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.35µm
(Expected to start production in early 1998.)
AMD’s back-end manufacturing facilities are located in Penang, Malaysia; Bangkok, Thailand; and Singapore. In
1996, AMD began the construction of a new assembly and test facility in Suzhou, China.
Key Agreements
• Micron, Motorola, and AMD joined together with DuPont Photomasks Inc. (DPI) in 1996 to form a technology
venture, called DPI Reticle Technology Center, to develop advanced mask technology and provide pilot line
fabrication of leading-edge reticles.
• AMD and Intel signed a new five-year cross-licensing agreement in early 1996 that gives the two companies
rights to use each other’s patents and certain copyrights, excluding microprocessor microcode beyond the 486
generation.
• Fujitsu and AMD opened a large flash memory fabrication facility, called Fujitsu-AMD Semiconductor Ltd.
(FASL), in Japan in September 1994. Production of flash memory chips began in 1Q95. FASL is currently
building its second fab, also to be dedicated to flash memory production. The partnership also involves joint
development of flash devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-27
AMI
North American Company Profiles
A MERICAN M ICROSYSTEMS (AMI)
American Microsystems, Inc.
2300 Buckskin Road
Pocatello, Idaho 83201
Telephone: (208) 233-4690
Fax: (208) 234-6795
Web Site: www.amis.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
AMI-Japan • Nerima-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5399-7831 • Fax: (81) (3) 5399-7834
Europe:
AMI-GmbH • Dresden, Germany
Telephone: (49) (351) 31-99-1500 • Fax: (49) (351) 31-99-1501
Financial History ($M)
Sales
1992
135
1993
150
1994
171
1995
221
1996
256
Employees
1,685
1,657
1,265
1,265
1,439
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1966, American Microsystems Inc. (AMI) was a pioneer in the development of application specific
ICs (ASICs). Today, the company's products and services range from digital and mixed-signal ASICs, to CMOS
foundry services, application-specific standard products (ASSPs), and high-level integrated solutions through
multichip modules. AMI currently specializes in producing both digital and mixed-signal systems on a chip and is
the number one U.S. manufacturer of mask ROMs.
The company is comprised of three business units and two divisions: the Mixed-Signal Business Unit, the Digital
ASIC Business Unit, the Foundry Business Unit, the Standard Products Division, and the Multichip Products
Division, which specializes in contract manufacturing solutions utilizing multichip modules. Each of the five units
has the responsibility, along with the marketing and engineering resources needed, to sell its respective products
and services.
Recently, AMI's sales strategy underwent a significant shift from a primary focus on direct sales to increased
reliance on the company's growing international network of manufacturer's representatives, distributors, and
design centers. This network markets AMI's cell-based and gate array ASICs as well as its ROMs.
1-28
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
AMI
North American Company Profiles
Standard
Cell
9%
Standard
Products
9%
Multichip
Products
1%
Foundry
34%
Mixed Signal
16%
Gate Array
31%
1996 Sales by Business Segment
In 1997, AMI released several wireless IC devices targeting the direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) IC
market. The three devices include a transceiver, receiver-only, and a transmit-only device, and are designed for
various applications including security systems and remote medical devices.
Also during 1997, AMI acquired Focus Semiconductor, which is located in Gwynedd, Pennsylvania. Focus
Semiconductor is a mixed-signal IC vendor who has used AMI as a foundry in the past. Focus will be folded into
AMI as a separate business unit and remain in Pennsylvania.
AMI's products serve markets such as telecommunications, consumer electronics, computer peripherals, military,
industrial, and automotive equipment.
Automotive
6%
Medical
4%
Other
1%
Japan
Europe 1%
3%
ROW
1%
Industrial
9%
Consumer
11%
Military
14%
Communications
32%
EDP
23%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North America
95%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1-29
AMI
North American Company Profiles
Management
Gerald "Jerry" E. Homstad
Harold Blomquist
Randy Cook
Paul Pimentel
Tom Schiers
Dan Schroeder
Bob Smith
Grant Hulse
Chris Laytun
Al Morrison
Troy Murray
John Rankin
Marv Yancey
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Business Operations
Vice President, Multichip Products Division
Vice President, Finance/Purchasing
Vice President, Digital ASICs
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Standard Products Division
Director, New Business Development
Director, Mixed-Signal
Director, Foundry
Manager, Site Services
Manager, Japanese and Southeast Asian Sales
Manager, Sub-Micron Program
Products and Processes
AMI offers the following products and services:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard-cell and gate array digital ASICs
Mixed-signal ASIC development services
Mask programmable ROMs (16K to 16M density)
Digital and mixed-signal ASIC design software
Wireless ICs (include mask programmable system devices)
Foundry services
Contract design and manufacturing
Multichip modules
Custom packaging
AMI's digital ASIC standard library, which supports both gate arrays and standard cells, contains over 500 cells and
operates from 2.5V to 5.5V. The company’s arrays have up to 464,000 usable gates.
AMI's mixed-signal processes allow the analog voltage to run from –5V to +5V or from 0V to 12V, and will
accommodate a wide range of functions.
The company's semiconductor products are fabricated using CMOS and NMOS process technologies, with
geometries as fine as 0.35µm.
1-30
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
AMI
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
AMI
2300 Buckskin Road
Pocatello, Idaho 83201
Cleanroom size: 33,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,500
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, NMOS
Products: ASICs, ROMs, telecom and datacom ICs,
MCMs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.6µm-5.0µm CMOS;
3.0µm-5.0µm NMOS
AMI
Pocatello, Idaho
Fab 10
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.8µm
(Operations began in mid-1997)
AMI's facility in the Philippines performs sort and final testing, while assembly work is contracted out.
Key Agreements
• AMI has an alliance with WSI Inc. to jointly develop mask-programmable versions of WSI's line of microcontroller
peripherals and both companies are separately marketing the complete range of devices. AMI is manufacturing
the parts.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-31
Anadigics
North American Company Profiles
A NADIGICS
Anadigics, Inc.
35 Technology Drive
Warren, New Jersey 07059-5197
Telephone: (908) 668-5000
Fax: (908) 668-5068
Web Site: www.anadigics.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Anadigics, Inc. • Somerset, England
Telephone: (44) (1935) 822611 • Fax: (44) (1935) 826696
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
20
(2)
5
1993
29
2
7
2
1994
35
2
9
5
1995
51
7
12
9
1996
69
12
12
16
115
200
270
320
430
Company Overview and Strategy
Anadigics was founded in 1985 when it initiated macrocell development. A year later, it completed construction of
its wafer fab, and in 1987, started GaAs IC production with the introduction of both MMIC and fiber optic IC
products. Today, the company is a leading designer and producer of GaAs ICs for high-volume, high-frequency
receiver applications. The company launched its initial public offering in April 1995.
The company had originally relied on defense contracts to survive. However, with lucrative military pacts becoming
more of a rarity, Anadigics looked to the commercial and consumer electronics marketplaces to sell its products.
Today, Anadigics has established itself as a leading supplier of high-volume, low-cost, high-performance analog
GaAs ICs for applications including direct broadcast satellite (DBS) systems, cable TV systems, cellular phones,
fiber optic communications, and personal communication systems (PCS).
1-32
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Anadigics
North American Company Profiles
Engineering Services
5%
Fiber Optics/ATM
17%
Wireless
35%
Cable TV
20%
Direct
Broadcast Systems
23%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
Asia-Pacific
29%
Europe
36%
North America
35%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Ron Rosenzweig
George Gilbert
Charles Huang, Ph.D.
John F. Lyons
Robert Baytuns
Sheo Khetan
Javed S. Patel
Phillip Wallace
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Executive Vice President, Market Research and Business Development
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Research and Technology
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President, Marketing and Sales
Vice President, Product Development
Products and Processes
Among the company's GaAs IC products are low-noise block converters and tuners for DBS systems, upconverter
chips for use in cable TV converters, cellular telephone power amplifiers and receivers, and fiber optic (SONET)
transimpedence amplifiers. Anadigics produces all of its ICs using its GaAs MESFET process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In October 1996, the company began to convert its existing fab from 3in to 100mm wafers and expects to
complete the conversion by the end of 1997. The company is also in the process of constructing an additional
facility for both manufacturing and administration purposes. The building, also located in Warren, New Jersey, will
house a 12,000 square-foot Class 100 cleanroom that will manufacture 100mm GaAs wafers. Production at the
new facility is not expected to begin before 4Q97.
Anadigics, Inc.
35 Technology Drive
Warren, New Jersey 07059-5197
Cleanroom size: 8,000 square feet (Class 100)
Capacity (wafers/week): 500
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: GaAs MESFET
Feature size: 0.5µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Anadigics, Inc.
141 Mt. Bethel Road
Warren, New Jersey 07059
Cleanroom size: 12,000 square feet (Class 100)
Capacity (wafers/week): 500
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: GaAs MESFET
(Production to begin in late 1997 or early 1998.)
1-33
Analog Devices
North American Company Profiles
ANALOG DEVICES (ADI)
Analog Devices, Inc.
One Technology Way
P.O. Box 9106
Norwood, Massachusetts 02062-9106
Telephone: (617) 329-4700
Fax: (617) 326-8703
Web Site: www.analog.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Analog Devices, GmbH • Munich, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 57005-0 • Fax: (49) (89) 57005-527
Japan:
Analog Devices, K.K. • Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5402-8210 • Fax: (81) (3) 5402-1063
Asia-Pacific:
Analog Devices Hong Kong, Ltd. • Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2506-9336 • (852) 2506-4755
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends October 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
1992
567
15
88
66
—
1993
666
44
94
67
—
1994
773
74
107
91
—
1995
942
119
134
213
14
1996
1,194
172
178
234
49
Employees
5,200
5,300
5,400
6,000
6,900
Company Overview and Strategy
Analog Devices, Inc. (ADI) was founded in 1965 and is today a leading designer and manufacturer of highperformance linear, mixed-signal, and digital integrated circuits that address a wide range of real-world signal
processing applications.
The company's products are typically incorporated by OEMs in equipment and systems for a variety of
applications, including communications equipment; computers and computer peripherals; engineering, medical,
and scientific instruments; factory automation equipment; military/aerospace systems; high-end consumer
electronic products; and automotive equipment.
1-34
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Analog Devices
North American Company Profiles
ROW
13%
Japan
14%
North America
42%
Europe
31%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Analog Devices’ products can be divided into three groups: general purpose, standard-function linear and mixedsignal ICs (SLICs), including amplifiers and data converters; system-level ICs, including general-purpose digital
signal processors (DSPs), special-purpose linear and mixed-signal ICs, and hard disk drive ICs; and assembled
products such as hybrids and multichip modules. Integrated circuits accounted for 95 percent of the company's
total revenues in fiscal 1996.
Assembled Products
5%
System-Level ICs
and DSP ICs
38%
Standard
Linear ICs
57%
1996 Sales by Product Group
ADI's strategy is to focus on major opportunities for DSPs and system-level ICs as its primary sources of revenue
growth, while at the same time, continuing its efforts to sell traditional SLIC product lines. Revenues from the
company’s assembled products group has been declining for several years, primarily due to shrinking demand for
hybrid devices.
In addition, the company plans to continue to extend its core technologies to include new technologies, such as
RF/IF signal processing for wireless communications applications and surface micromachining for automobile air
bag system accelerometers. To support its move into the wireless communications market, Analog Devices
acquired RF/IF circuits designer Mosaic Microsystems Ltd. of Kent, England, and its U.S. subsidiary Mosaic, Inc. in
mid-1996.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-35
Analog Devices
North American Company Profiles
Management
Ray Stata
Jerald G. Fishman
Ross Brown
Dennis Buss
David D. French
Russell K. Johnsen
Robert R. Marshall
Robert McAdam
Brian P. McAloon
Joseph E. McDonough
Joe Reichbach
Volkmar Schaldach
Shozo Sugiguchi
H. Goodloe Suttler
Geoffrey R.M. Thomas
Franklin Weigold
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President and General Manager, Computer Products Division
Vice President and General Manager, Communications Division
Vice President, Worldwide Manufacturing
Vice President and General Manager, Standard Linear Products Division
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales, North America
Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Europe
Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Japan
Vice President, Marketing, Quality, and Planning
Vice President and Manufacturing General Manager, ADSC
Vice President and General Manager, Transportation and
Industrial Products Division
Products and Processes
Analog Devices offers high-performance linear, digital, and mixed-signal ICs such as data converters, amplifiers,
voltage references and comparators, signal processors and conditioners, application-specific ICs for the
consumer, disk drive, telecommunications, and automotive industries, and temperature and accelerometer
sensors.
SLICs
Analog Devices principal SLIC products are high-performance amplifiers and data converters. Other SLIC
products include analog signal processing devices, voltage references, and comparators. High-speed
products introduced in 1996 included the company’s first RF and IF SLICs, which operate at up to 2GHz. The
company continues to expand its SLIC product line to include offerings in areas where it traditionally has had
limited focus, primarily interface circuits and power management ICs, and to include a much larger number of
products designed to operate from single-supply 3-volt or 5-volt power sources.
System-Level ICs
ADI’s system-level ICs include general-purpose DSPs and multi-function devices that feature high levels of
functional integration on a single chip. All of the company’s DSPs share a common architecture and code
compatibility. The company is aggressively pursuing the 32-bit floating-point DSP market with its line of
SHARC™ products. In early 1997, its first low-priced SHARC DSP was announced. The ADSP-21061
features high performance of 120 MFLOPS, 1M of on-chip dual-port SRAM, and 240 Mbytes/sec I/O
bandwidth.
Most of the company’s other system-level ICs are mixed-signal devices (with some incorporating a DSP core)
and special-purpose linear ICs generally designed to meet the needs of a specific application. The company
also offers sensors and surface micromachined ICs.
1-36
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Analog Devices
Assembled Products
The company’s assembled products consist of hybrids, multichip modules (MCMs), and printed-board modules
(primarily I/O modules used in industrial control and factory automation equipment).
In addition to utilizing standard bipolar and CMOS process technologies, ADI employs a number of proprietary
processes specifically tailored for use in manufacturing high-performance linear and mixed-signal SLICs and
system-level ICs.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Analog Devices meets most of its need for wafers fabricated using linear and mixed-signal processes with
company-owned production facilities and uses third-party wafer fabricators for most wafers that can be produced
on industry-standard digital processes. Its two principal foundries are Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing
(TSMC) and Singapore’s Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing.
During 1995 and 1996, Analog Devices expanded its relationships with TSMC and Chartered in response to the
rapid growth of its systems IC business. These transactions included an equity investment in Chartered,
advanced payments to both Chartered and TSMC in order to secure access to future wafer capacity, and most
significantly, the announcement of a joint venture agreement with TSMC and other investors to construct and
operate a fab facility in Camas, Washington. ADI agreed to invest $140 million in the joint venture, called
WaferTech, in return for an 18 percent equity ownership and up to 27 percent of the plant’s total output.
Recent expansions of company-owned fabs have included the conversion of its Wilmington, Massachusetts,
fabrication facility from 100mm to 150mm wafer production for high-speed linear devices. In addition, ADI is
upgrading and modernizing the fab in Sunnyvale, California, it acquired from Performance Semiconductor in
1995. Production at the fab was scheduled to begin in late 1996, but was delayed because of the slowdown in
the market.
In 1996, Analog Devices established a wafer fabrication facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts, dedicated to the
development and production of the company’s surface micromachined ICs. The fab is located in a building
previously used by Polaroid Corporation as an R&D fab.
Analog Devices, Inc.
Semiconductor Division
804 Woburn Street
Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887
Cleanroom size: 34,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs, DSPs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm CMOS
1.5µm BiCMOS, bipolar
4.0µm BiCMOS, complementary bipolar
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Analog Devices, Inc.
PMI Division
1500 Space Park Drive
Santa Clara, California 95052
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,750
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs
Feature size: 1.5µm
1-37
Analog Devices
Analog Devices, Inc.
610 East Weddell Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: BiCMOS, complementary bipolar
Products: Linear ICs
(Acquired from Performance Semiconductor in 1995)
North American Company Profiles
Analog Devices Ireland, Ltd.
Bay F-1, Raheen Industrial Estate
Limerick, Ireland
Cleanroom size: 15,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 1.0µm, 2.0µm
WaferTech, LLC
Camas, Washington
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Foundry
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.35µm
(Joint venture between TSMC, Analog Devices, Altera,
and ISSI. ADI owns 18 percent. Scheduled to begin
operations in late 1998.)
Analog Devices has its own test and assembly facilities located in California, Massachusetts, North Carolina,
Ireland, the Philippines, and Taiwan.
Key Agreements
• In early 1997, Analog Devices licensed TEMIC Semiconductors its ADSP-21020 DSP architecture. TEMIC will
build radiation-tolerant versions of the high-performance 32-bit floating-point DSP.
• ADI licensed its ADSP-21xx 16-bit digital signal processor core to AMD and Acer Laboratories (Taiwan) in early
1996. AMD will embed the core in communications-related ICs and Acer Labs will use it for future PC telephony
and telephone-answering devices.
• Analog Devices announced a license agreement with Hitachi in February 1996 for Hitachi’s 16-bit
microprocessor H8/300H core. ADI also has the option of licensing Hitachi’s next-generation H8S/2000 core.
The core will be used by ADI’s Wireless Communications Division.
• In early 1996, Aspec Technology licensed to Analog Devices its high-density ASIC architectures. The
agreement includes Aspec’s family of embedded array and standard cell architectures, as well as associated
design tools.
• Analog devices entered an agreement with Noise Cancellation Technologies Inc. (NCT) to provide design and
foundry services for NCT's first line of custom chipsets.
1-38
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Analog Devices
• Analog Devices is working with DSP Group to provide DSP Group's TrueSpeech voice compression
technology on ADI's digital signal processors.
• Analog Devices has an alliance with IBM in the joint design, production, and marketing of mixed-signal and RF
ICs based on IBM's silicon-germanium (SiGe) process technology.
• Analog Devices is developing surface micromachined accelerometers with Delco Electronics and LockheedMartin for both defense and commercial applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-39
Array Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
A RRAY M ICROSYSTEMS
Array Microsystems, Inc.
1420 Quail Lake Loop
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906
Telephone: (719) 540-7900
Fax: (719) 540-7950
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
41
Company Overview and Strategy
Array Microsystems, a privately-held company, was founded in 1990 to design, develop, and market highperformance digital signal processing (DSP) products with a focus on video compression technologies and
system level designs for multimedia applications. Array’s mission is to become the leading supplier of optimum
performance, low-cost digital video chipset solutions for consumer and professional markets.
Management
Surendar S. Magar, Ph.D.
Tom Kopet
Matt Ready
E. Flint Seaton
Shannon Shen, Ph.D.
David W. Still
Roger Westberg
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Systems Technology
Vice President, Sales
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, IC Technology
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Marketing
Products and Processes
Array Microsystems has developed a complete line of processor and controller ICs, SRAM memory modules,
software simulators, and processor boards. The company's first product family, the a66, includes proprietary VLSI
chipsets, development tools, and array processor boards that set industry performance standards for frequency
domain processing. Array's two-chip video compression chipset, based on unique vector data flow architecture,
forms the core of the VideoFlow product family. One of the chips is called an image compression coprocessor
(ICC) and the other a motion estimation coprocessor (MEC).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Array Microsystems is a fabless IC supplier. The company's devices are produced by other companies, including
Samsung and Atmel.
1-40
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Array Microsystems
Key Agreements
• Array Microsystems has a technology development pact with Samsung that provides Array with a strong
foundry partnership. The two companies codeveloped the initial VideoFlow video compression technology.
The deal provides Array with access to Samsung's advanced 0.5µm and 0.35µm CMOS fab capacity for the
manufacture of its products. In 1993, Samsung secured a 20 percent equity ownership position in Array
Microsystems, and in mid-1995, Samsung increased its stake to 37 percent.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-41
Atmel
North American Company Profiles
A TMEL
Atmel Corporation
2325 Orchard Parkway
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 441-0311
Fax: (408) 436-4200
Web Site: www.atmel.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Atmel Japan K.K. • Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5641-0211 • Fax: (81) (3) 5641-0217
Europe:
Atmel U.K. Ltd. • Camberley, Surrey, England
Telephone: (44) (1276) 686677 • Fax: (44) (1276) 686697
Asia-Pacific:
Atmel Asia, Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2721-9778 • Fax: (852) 2722-1369
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
140
14
18
14
1993
222
30
26
74
1994
375
59
43
183
1995
634
114
70
270
1996
1,070
202
110
400
998
1,250
1,900
2,900
3,900
Company Overview and Strategy
Atmel designs, manufactures, and markets a broad array of high-performance CMOS memory, logic, and analog
integrated circuits. Founded in 1984, the company serves the manufacturers of communications equipment,
computers, and computer peripherals as well as producers of instrumentation, consumer, automotive, military, and
industrial equipment. Much of Atmel's ICs are based on its proprietary non-volatile memory technology. The
company's name was derived from Advanced technology: memory and logic.
1-42
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Atmel
North American Company Profiles
Networking
10%
Military
10%
Consumer
15%
Japan
19%
Telecommunications
40%
Computer
Peripherals
25%
Europe
20%
North
America
39%
Asia
22%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
Atmel is a leading supplier of EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memory components. Nevertheless, the company is
shifting its focus away from being primarily a memory company toward having a balanced portfolio of memory and
logic products. Still, the company hopes to continue expanding its share of the memory market even as logic
products take over a larger share of its production capacity.
MPR
15%
In-System
Programmable
Non-Volatile
EPROM
Memories*
21%
Logic
42%
(PLD, FPGA, ASIC)
22%
*Flash and EEPROMs
1996 Sales by Device Type
Atmel has made several acquisitions over the past few years in support of its core product lines, non-volatile
memory and logic ICs. The company bought out FPGA supplier Concurrent Logic in 1993, acquired Seeq
Technology's EEPROM product line in early 1994, and made a minority investment in SRAM producer Paradigm
Technology in 1995 in return for certain SRAM product rights. In 1996, Atmel acquired an 8-bit RISC
microcontroller architecture and design team from Nordic VLSI in Trondheim, Norway. Also in 1996, the company
acquired DSP architecture and development from an organization called TSMC in Berkeley, California.
The company’s most substantial acquisition came in April 1995, when it purchased a majority interest (75 percent)
in the French IC manufacturer ES2. By the end of 1995, Atmel increased its ownership of the company to more
than 90 percent and renamed it Atmel-ES2. Atmel is expanding Atmel-ES2’s existing fab facility and is
constructing a new 0.35µm, 200mm wafer fab at the site that will be operational by late 1997.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-43
Atmel
North American Company Profiles
Management
George Perlegos
Gust Perlegos
Tsung-Ching Wu
Bernard Pruniaux
Chih Jen
Ralph Bohannon
Kris Chellam
James Hu
B. Jeffrey Katz
Ken Kwong
Krish Panu
Jack Peckham
Steve Schumann
Mikes Sisois
Graham Turner
Tashiki Wada
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and General Manager
Executive Vice President, Technology
Chief Executive Officer, Atmel-ES2 Operations
Senior Vice President and General Manager, Asian Operations
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Process Development
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, North American Sales
Vice President, MCU, PLD, FPGA Operations
Vice President and General Manager, ASIC Operations
Vice President, Non-Volatile Products
Vice President, Planning and Information Systems
Vice President, European Operations
Vice President, Atmel Japan
Products and Processes
Atmel's products are outlined below.
NonVolatile Memory ICs
• EPROMs—Standard, high-speed, and low-voltage parts ranging in density from 256K to 8M.
• EEPROMs—Serial-interface parts ranging in density from 1K to 256K.
—Parallel-interface parts ranging in density from 4K to 4M.
• Flash memories—Single voltage supply (5V or 2.7V) parts ranging in density from 256K to 8M.
Programmable Logic Devices and Field Programmable Gate Arrays
• PLDs—Generic PAL-type ICs including fast, low-power, and 3V flash-based versions of the standard
22V10, 16V8, and 20V8.
—Complex PLDs with densities to 5,000 gates.
• FPGAs—SRAM-based devices with 2,000 to 40,000 usable gates and very low power. Partial or full
reconfiguration, in system, during normal operation.
ASIC Devices
• Gate arrays—High speed with up to 1.2 million routable gates.
• RFID ASICs—Analog, digital, and memory on a single-chip ASIC.
• Cell based ASICs—Mixed-technology.
Other Products
• Microcontrollers—Combine Intel's 80C51 core logic or Atmel’s proprietary AVR 8-bit RISC core logic with
1K, 2K, 4K or 8K of Atmel's flash memory.
• Standard logic devices—Multimedia system, controllers/chipsets.
• Flash memory cards.
• Spread spectrum cordless phone chipset.
1-44
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Atmel
North American Company Profiles
Atmel uses proprietary CMOS and BiCMOS technologies for the processing of its chips. Most products are
produced with 0.6µm and 0.5µm line widths. The company's newest Colorado Springs fab facility is capable of
producing ICs with 0.35µm feature sizes, as is the not yet commissioned fab in Rousset, France.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Atmel announced plans to build its next sub-half micron CMOS wafer fab facility, to be called Fab 8, adjacent to its
existing Colorado Springs, Colorado facilities. The facility will house a 75,000 square-foot cleanroom.
Atmel Corporation
1150 East Cheyenne Mountain Boulevard
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906
Telephone: (719) 567-3300
Fab 3
Cleanroom size: 33,900 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: EEPROMs, EPROMs, flash memories,
PLDs, FPGAs, ASICs, MCUs, linear ICs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm, 1.0µm
Atmel Corporation
1150 East Cheyenne Mountain Boulevard
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906
Telephone: (719) 567-3300
Fab 5
Cleanroom size: 43,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 9,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: EEPROMs, flash memories, EPROMs
Feature size: 0.4µm
Atmel-ES2
Zone Industrielle
13106 Rousset Cedex
France
Telephone: (33) (4) 42-33-40-0
Fab 6
Cleanroom size: 15,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Cell-based ASICs, MCUs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm, 1.0µm
Atmel-ES2
Zone Industrielle
13106 Rousset Cedex
France
Telephone: (33) (4) 42-33-40-0
Fab 7
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Cell-based ASICs, MCUs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.6µm
(Scheduled to start production by 3Q97)
Atmel maintains a facility for IC test and qualification at its headquarters in San Jose and assembly work is
performed offshore.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-45
Atmel
North American Company Profiles
Key Agreements
• Atmel licensed “Oak” and “Pine” DSP core logic and development tools from DSP Group in 1996.
• Atmel-ES2 licensed from Advanced RISC Machines in mid-1995, the ARM7DMI 32-bit RISC processor core
and associated software tools. The company will develop standard Flash-based MCUs using this architecture.
• Atmel and Paradigm Technology formed an alliance in May 1995 concerning Paradigm's SRAM products.
Atmel provides manufacturing capacity for Paradigm's SRAMs in exchange for product rights. Atmel also
purchased approximately 19 percent of Paradigm. The companies are developing new-generation SRAMs
with speeds below 8ns.
• Atmel has a cross-licensing and product exchange agreement with Philips Semiconductors covering several of
each company's proprietary PLDs.
• Atmel established an agreement with Wireless Logic Inc. of Hong Kong in 1994 that calls for the
codevelopment and joint marketing of special-purpose DSP and microcontroller chipsets for the spreadspectrum wireless communications market.
• Fuji Film Microdevices and Atmel are collaborating in the development of flash memory-based products such as
ATA-interface memory cards.
1-46
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Austin Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
A USTIN S EMICONDUCTOR
Austin Semiconductor, Inc.
8701 Cross Park Drive
Austin, Texas 78754-4566
Telephone: (512) 339-1188
Fax: (512) 339-6641
Web Site: austinsemi.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1993
7
1994
14
1995
19
1996
21
60
110
114
150
Company Overview and Strategy
Austin Semiconductor, Inc. (ASI) was founded in 1988 to supply high-reliability semiconductors and microcircuit
devices to the military and aerospace industries. In 1993, privately-held ASI acquired the Micron Semiconductor
Military Products Group, and now supplies standard memory chips to those industries.
The company's business is currently divided into two distinct groups: a custom product line and a standard
product line (consisting primarily of the former Micron products). At the end of 1996, about 70 percent of ASI's
business was in memory products, with the balance in custom products.
Management
Roger C. Minard
H. Donald Ludwig
Marty Lanning
Ed Walker
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and General Manager, Operations
Vice President, Marketing
Director, Sales
Products and Processes
ASI's standard IC products include: 64K to 16M DRAMs, 64K to 4M SRAMs, and 1M VRAMs, as well as
EEPROMs, flash memories, and SCSI interface processors. ASI also has the right to introduce military-grade
versions of Micron's new products as they are brought out.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-47
Austin Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
ASI's custom product capabilities include testing and packaging of a wide array of custom memory products,
including DRAMs, SRAMs, EEPROMs, and flash memories, interface devices, and analog/digital communications
products. ASI also offers devices manufactured using a silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
ASI is a fabless IC supplier, but maintains a Class 100 assembly, packaging, and test facility on site. As part of its
purchase of Micron's military products group, ASI receives wafers from Micron. The firm also uses other major
manufacturers for the fabrication of its product wafers.
1-48
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Benchmarq
North American Company Profiles
B ENCHMARQ M ICROELECTRONICS
Benchmarq Microelectronics, Inc.
17919 Waterview Parkway
Dallas, Texas 75252
Telephone: (972) 437-9195
Fax: (972) 437-9198
Web Site: www.benchmarq.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1994
23
2
Employees
1995
29
4
2
1996
40
7
3
180
235
Company Overview and Strategy
Benchmarq Microelectronics, founded in 1989, has a worldwide presence in the power-sensitive and portable
electronic systems marketplace. It provides integrated IC and module solutions that address real-world problems
in managing battery-operated, low-power, and power-sensitive equipment. Benchmarq's products are adopted
by companies producing PCs, cellular phones, telecommunications equipment, and portable electronics systems.
In 1996, international sales accounted for approximately two-thirds of total sales.
Management
Derrell Coker
Al Schuele
Wallace E. Matthews
Will Davies
Reginald McHone
Jim Vernon
Gene Armstrong
David Freeman
David Heacock
Loren Reifsteck
Eric Smith
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing and Product Development
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales
Director, Product Development—Communication and Consumer Components
Director, Product Development—Industrial and Intelligent Peripherals
Director, Marketing and Corporate Communications
Director, Quality Technology and Assurance
Director, Manufacturing Operations
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-49
Benchmarq
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
Benchmarq's product portfolio consists of CMOS and BiCMOS mixed-signal circuits. The focus is on low-power,
battery-backed ICs and ICs for battery management. Geometries on its devices range from 0.8µm to 1.2µm.
Benchmarq’s IC product families include:
• Battery management ICs and modules that provide fast charge control, sophisticated battery conditioning, and
“gas gauge” capacity monitoring of many different types of battery-operated systems.
• Real-time clock ICs and modules, which provide highly integrated clock/calendar solutions for microcomputerbased designs. The RTCs are available with 3V or 5V operation.
• Nonvolatile SRAM (nvSRAM) and PSRAM (nvPSRAM) ICs in densities ranging from 64K to 16M.
• Nonvolatile controller ICs and modules that provide power monitoring, write protection, and supply switching to
convert standard SRAM and a battery backup into a reliable, predictable nonvolatile memory.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
The company is fabless, relying instead on domestic and overseas foundries for wafer fabrication. Burn-in and test
of ICs and value-added assembly of hybrid circuits is performed at the company's headquarters in Texas.
1-50
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Burr-Brown
North American Company Profiles
B URR -B ROWN
Burr-Brown Corporation
P.O. Box 11400
Tucson, Arizona 85734-1400
Telephone: (602) 746-1111
Fax: (602) 889-1510
Web Site: www.burr-brown.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Burr-Brown Japan Ltd. • Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa, Japan
Telephone: (81) (4) 6248-4695
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
163
1
18
5
1993
169
3
20
7
1994
194
6
22
12
1995
269
29
26
18
1996
220
30
28
32
Employees
1,566
1,547
1,825
1,900
1,400
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1956, Burr-Brown Corporation is primarily engaged in the design, manufacture, and marketing of a
broad line of proprietary standard high-performance analog and mixed-signal ICs used in the processing of
electronic signals. The company’s products are used in applications such as electronic and medical
instrumentation, process and industrial control, communications, manufacturing automation, automatic test
equipment, consumer audio, computer peripherals, and multimedia.
Burr-Brown is moving away from its traditional focus on older IC processing technologies—primarily linear bipolar—
and instead going in new directions such as CMOS and BiCMOS technologies. The company has also been
strategically shifting some of its production to outside foundries, a trend that is expected to continue in order to
access sub-micron CMOS technology.
In early 1996, Burr-Brown sold its interest in Power Convertibles Corporation (PCC). PCC, formerly a majorityowned affiliate of Burr-Brown, manufactures DC-to-DC converters and battery chargers used in cellular telephone
applications. The divestiture of PCC is part of Burr Brown’s strategic plan to build a stronger focus on its analog
and mixed-signal IC business. New product development will focus on developing standard linear ICs (SLICs) as
well as application-specific standard products (ASSPs).
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-51
Burr-Brown
North American Company Profiles
Computer and
Multimedia
6%
Communications
15%
Other
4%
Industrial and
Process Control
30%
Digital Audio and
Test and
Video
Instrumentation
20%
25%
Other
7%
Data Conversion ICs
46%
Analog ICs
47%
1996 Sales by Product Type
1996 Sales by Application
In 1995, Burr-Brown set new directions for its foreign operations. Burr-Brown’s Japanese development subsidiary
is now concentrating primarily on the digital audio and other consumer markets, while the company’s Livingston
Scotland operations has been re-directed from subcontract manufacturing to in-house product R&D.
Europe
26%
Asia
40%
North America
34%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Thomas R. Brown, Jr.
Syrus P. Madavi
Scott Blouin
Michael Paugh
Michael M. Pawlik
Paul Prazak
Robert E. Reynolds
Bryan Rooney
R. Mark Stitt
Charles Lewis
Toshiyuki Yamasaki
1-52
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Quality
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Data Conversion Division
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Linear Division
General Manager, Scotland Division
President, Japan Operations
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Burr-Brown
Products and Processes
Burr-Brown's product portfolio includes operational, instrumentation, power, and isolation amplifiers,
optoelectronic ICs, digital audio devices, digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, data communications
products, LAN products, microterminals, design and development software, and board-level microcomputer
subsystems. The company’s products are manufactured using processes that include bipolar, complementary
bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS.
The following describes the various processes that Burr-Brown utilizes in the manufacture of its ICs.
40 Volt Bipolar Process:
This is a high-voltage (40V) bipolar process (±15V or 36V power supplies) used to make high-voltage
operational and instrumentation amplifiers. High precision in these products is made possible by the capability
of ion implanted JFETs and trimmable resistors. Other typical products made from this process are universal
active filters, isolation amplifiers, and high-voltage power amplifiers.
20 Volt Bipolar Process:
This is a lower voltage (20V) bipolar process especially suited for data acquisition and PCM components.
These are faster circuits utilizing smaller devices with lower Rc. Trimmable resistors allow high precision
products.
Dielectrically Isolated Bipolar Process:
This is a dielectrically isolated high-voltage bipolar (40V) process used for low noise, high precision, and low
drift. Very high-performance amplifiers are built using this process where the noise and drift characteristics are
important, especially in the medical equipment markets that it serves.
Complementary Bipolar Dielectrically Isolated Process:
This is a dielectrically isolated process with complementary NPN and PNP bipolar transistors. It is used to
manufacture high-voltage operational amplifiers, voltage-to-frequency converters, and sample/hold circuits.
CMOS Double-Level Metal Poly-Poly Process:
This is a 3.0µm double-level metal CMOS process that also makes use of parasitic bipolar devices. This is a ±5V
process with compatible thin-film resistors and very high quality poly-poly capacitors. It produces high density,
high precision (16-bit and 18-bit) single and dual analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters.
BiCMOS Process:
This double-poly, double-metal 3.0µm process is optimized for analog circuitry including critical thin-film resistor
capability. The process is primarily used for data conversion products.
Processes not available internally are sourced from various foundries, including Lucent Technologies, Mitel
Semiconductor, Oki, Hualon Microelectronics, and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC). Such
processes include 2.0µm, 1.2µm, and 0.6µm BiCMOS and CMOS processes, and a very high-frequency bipolar
process for products such as video amplifiers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-53
Burr-Brown
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Burr-Brown Corporation
6730 South Tucson Boulevard
Tucson, Arizona 85706
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square feet
Capacity (wafer/week): 4,200
Wafer size: 100mm (Planning conversion to 150mm wafers)
Processes: CMOS, Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Digital and linear ICs, monolithic and hybrid assembly
Feature sizes: 2.0µm-3.0µm
Burr-Brown has IC assembly facilities in Tucson and Scotland. The company also incorporated plastic multichip
module (MCM) assembly capability in its Tucson facility in 1995.
Key Agreements
• Burr-Brown is jointly developing with Oki, 20-bit BiCMOS A/D and D/A converter chips for business digital audio
equipment.
1-54
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
C-Cube Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
C-C UBE M ICROSYSTEMS
C-Cube Microsystems Inc.
1778 McCarthy Boulevard
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 944-6300
Fax: (408) 944-6314
Web Site: www.c-cube.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
C-Cube Japan • Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
Telephone: (81) (45) 474-7571 • Fax: (81) (45) 474-7570
Europe:
C-Cube Microsystems • Crawley, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1293) 651100 • Fax: (44) (1293) 651119
Asia-Pacific:
C-Cube Microsystems International Inc. • Wanchai, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2511-6683 • Fax: (852) 2511-6939
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
14
(5)
7
Employees
1993
24
(1)
7
1994
45
5
10
1995
124
25
14
1996
320
(73)
44
112
140
254
669
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1988, C-Cube Microsystems is a provider of highly integrated, standards-based, programmable digital
video and still image compression products and systems. The company's innovative encoder, decoder, and
codec products bring full motion video and still image capabilities to a broad range of end-user products in the
consumer electronics, computer, and communications markets. Such products include video CD players,
interactive game equipment, and computer add-in cards that allow full-motion video, desktop video conferencing
systems, interactive digital cable TV systems, and direct broadcast satellite (DBS) systems.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-55
C-Cube Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
In 1995, C-Cube acquired Media Computer Technologies (MCT), a supplier of PC-based digital video processing
and video-windowing technology. As a subsidiary of C-Cube, MCT is responsible for developing ASICs,
reference designs, and application software, and contributing to development projects of C-Cube’s PC
customers. In 1996, C-Cube acquired DiviCom Inc., a digital video networking company that designs, integrates,
and markets complete systems for the delivery of broadcast video networks. DiviCom will operate as a wholly
owned subsidiary of C-Cube.
U.S.
33%
International
67%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Alexandre A. Balanski, Ph.D.
Mark K. Allen
James G. Burke
Brian T. Conners
Alex Daly
Richard Foreman
Sai-Wai Fu
Didier Le Gall, Ph.D.
Richard S. Rasmussen
Senjeev Renjen, Ph.D.
Nolan Daines
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President and Chief Information Officer
Vice President, Hardware Engineering
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President and General Manager, JPEG Division
Vice President, Decoder Engineering
President and Chief Executive Officer, DiviCom Inc.
Products and Processes
C-Cube's single-chip and chipset products include: MPEG 1 video and audio/video encoders and decoders for
consumer electronics applications; highly integrated MPEG 1 video and audio/video decoders, JPEG codecs,
multistandard codecs, video conferencing codecs, and multimedia video processors for computer applications;
and MPEG 2 video encoders and decoders and MPEG 2 transport demultiplexers for communications
applications. In February 1997, C-Cube introduced the ZiVA family of single-chip DVD products, which include
decoders, encoders, and system-level solutions for consumer and multimedia OEMs.
C-Cube’s IC products are currently manufactured using two- or three-layer metal CMOS process technology with
0.65µm, 0.5µm, or 0.35µm feature sizes.
The company also markets a line of design example boards and demonstration systems products.
1-56
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
C-Cube Microsystems
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
C-Cube does not manufacture its own ICs; it uses independent foundries. The company’s principal IC foundry is
Texas Instruments. Other foundry partners include Matsushita, Yamaha, TSMC, and Samsung. AMD is also a
foundry partner, but it is not presently manufacturing products for C-Cube. Assembly, test, and packaging of its
devices is also subcontracted to third parties.
In 2Q96, C-Cube signed an agreement with foundry partner TSMC. As part of the agreement, C-Cube agreed to
make advanced payments to secure wafer production capacity through 2001.
Key Agreements
•
In October 1995, C-Cube licensed Sun Microsystems’ MicroSPARC processor core technology for use in a
multifunction chip, to be introduced in 1997, intended for digital compression and decompression.
•
C-Cube entered into an agreement with Matsushita, JVC, and Sharp to jointly develop MPEG 1 and MPEG 2
decoders. Matsushita also provides C-Cube with preferential access to its 0.5µm and 0.35µm manufacturing
processes. In return, Matsushita has the rights to use and sell a limited amount of the decoders.
•
C-Cube has an agreement with TI under which TI provides C-Cube with foundry services in exchange for
access to its core technology for use in creating derivative products. In addition, C-Cube has access to TI’s
MPEG audio decoding technology on a reciprocal basis. C-Cube has a similar agreement with AMD.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-57
California Micro Devices
North American Company Profiles
C ALIFORNIA M ICRO D EVICES (CMD)
California Micro Devices Corporation
215 Topaz Street
Milpitas, California 95035-5430
Telephone: (408) 263-3214
Fax: (408) 942-9505
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1993
30
1
4
1994
27
(7)
3
3
1995
36
(31)
4
1
1996
40
5
3
4
1997
33
1
4
n/a
247
273
229
297
300
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1980, California Micro Devices (CMD) is a designer, manufacturer, and marketer of integrated thin-film,
silicon-based termination and filtering passive components and active electronic circuitry. These products are
targeted primarily at applications in the computer, networking, and communications industries. CMD exited the
military market in 1996.
Medical
4%
Instruments
6%
Auto
3%
Military
2%
Workstations
16%
Other
3%
PCs/Peripherals
36%
Communications/Networking
30%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
1-58
Technology
3%
Semiconductor
Products
33%
Thin Film Products
64%
1996 Sales by Product Type
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
California Micro Devices
North American Company Profiles
In 1996, CMD introduced its new line of thin-film P/Active™ devices, which combine the company’s thin-film
technology with active semiconductor components and techniques to create enhanced passive networks called
applications specific passive network (ASPN™) products. With these products, CMD is striving to become an
expert in the matters of high-performance termination systems for PCs, workstations, and networking equipment,
as well as in the filtering and complimentary functions necessary in both computers and mobile communications.
Foreign sales, primarily in Europe, Canada, and Asia, accounted for approximately 31 percent of net product sales
in fiscal 1996.
Management
Wade Meyercord
Jeffrey C. Kalb
Nick Bacile
Robert Filiault
John Jorgensen
Rao R. Penumarty
Basker B. Rao, Ph.D.
Arieh Schifrin
John E. Trewin
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President and General Manager, Milpitas Operations
Vice President and General Manager, Tempe Operations
Vice President, Operations
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Products and Processes
CMD's thin-film products use silicon-based thin-film materials and process technology to combine multiple passive
elements in a single package. They fall into two categories: the traditional IPEC™ family, consisting of custom and
general purpose devices; and the new P/Active ASPN components, which use semiconductor techniques and
devices to enhance the performance and functionality of its traditional thin-film passive technologies. Its first
P/Active devices include termination devices for the Intel Pentium and Pentium Pro and Motorola Power PC
processor buses, bias networks for Linear Technology’s and Harris’ PC voltage regulators, special diode clamping
circuits for second-generation PCI, memory, and other computer buses, and filter circuits for parallel ports in PCs.
CMD also offers a variety of precision and non-precision thin-film resistors and capacitors as well as combinations of
those elements with and without semiconductor devices. The company has particular strength in the area of
resistor-capacitor filters.
The company's semiconductor products include analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits, such as data
communications and interface devices and telecommunication dual tone multi-frequency (DTMF) receiver and
transceiver products. These products are used in personal computers, answering machines, portable
telephones, and switching systems. They are manufactured in 1.25µm through 3.0µm BiCMOS and CMOS
processing technologies.
CMD also offers the use of its Tempe fabrication facility as a foundry and test service.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-59
California Micro Devices
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
CMD plans to convert certain of its fabrication facilities from 125mm to 150mm wafers during the next couple of
years.
California Micro Devices, Microcircuits Division
2000 West 14th Street
Tempe, Arizona 85281
Telephone: (602) 921-6000
Cleanroom size: 16,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS (SM/DP, DM/SP, DM/DP);
BiCMOS (SM/DP, DM/DP)
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs, thin-film
devices, foundry services
Feature sizes: 1.25µm-3.0µm CMOS;
1.25µm, 1.5µm BiCMOS
California Micro Devices
215 Topaz Street
Milpitas, California 95035-5430
Telephone: (408) 263-3214
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 750
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 4.5in square
Products: Thin-film discretes
The company uses subcontractors in Asia, primarily Thailand and the Philippines, for the assembly and packaging
of most of its products. Most of its product testing is done in-house, but its assembly partners are increasingly
being used for testing purposes.
Key Agreements
• California Micro Devices has a comprehensive strategic alliance with Hitachi Metals, Ltd. (HML), a subsidiary of
Hitachi, Ltd., that involves joint IPEC product development, manufacturing, marketing, and worldwide
distribution. Also under the alliance, HML holds a 10 percent stake in CMD.
1-60
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Calogic
North American Company Profiles
C ALOGIC
Calogic Corporation
237 Whitney Place
Fremont, California 94539
Telephone: (510) 656-2900
Fax: (510) 651-3025
IC Manufacturer
Employees
200
Company Overview and Strategy
Calogic is a privately held company, founded in 1983. The company offers a line of standard and full custom
semiconductor products made using several technologies including CMOS/DMOS and bipolar. Its product line is
specifically designed for high-performance applications. The company strives to form relationships with its
customers by offering technical expertise from design to processing to final test.
Management
Manny Del Arroz
Charlie Bevivino
Brenda Hill
President
Director, Sales
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
Calogic offers bipolar standard products (e.g., switches, multiplexers, and op amps) and CMOS, DMOS, and JFET
full custom ICs. Calogic acquired a small signal discrete line from Harris and now offers one of the broadest small
signal FET product lines in the industry. In addition, Calogic offers its production facilities as a foundry service.
CRT Related Products:
CRT driver amplifiers (30MHz to 185MHz)
Pre-amplifiers
Buffers
Video Products:
Widebank buffers and amplifiers
Instrumentation Products:
Op amps
References
Analog switches
Full Custom and Semicustom Capabilities:
Design, layout, manufacturing, and test
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-61
Calogic
North American Company Profiles
Discretes:
High-speed lateral DMOS FET switch and switch arrays (switching speeds under 1ns)
Vertical MOS FET switches
JFETs
MOSFETs
Diodes
Calogic’s process technologies include a dielectrically isolated (DI) complementary bipolar process, a high
frequency (1GHz), low-noise bipolar process, and a medium-voltage, medium-frequency, bipolar process for
supply voltages up to ±20 volts.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Calogic Corporation
237 Whitney Place
Fremont, California 94539
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 900
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, DMOS, bipolar
Products: ASICs (gate arrays, full custom ICs); peripheral, linear, and logic ICs; discretes
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-5.0µm
1-62
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Catalyst
North American Company Profiles
C ATALYST S EMICONDUCTOR
Catalyst Semiconductor, Inc.
1250 Borregas Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Telephone: (408) 542-1000
Fax: (408) 542-1200
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Nippon Catalyst K.K. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5340-3781 • Fax: (81) (3) 5340-3780
Europe:
Catalyst Semiconductor, Inc. • Oxford, England
Telephone: (44) (1865) 481-411 • Fax: (44) (1865) 481-511
Asia-Pacific:
Catalyst Semiconductor, Inc. • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 345-6192 • Fax: (886) (2) 729-9388
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends April 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
29
(7)
7
1993
33
(2)
5
1994
54
(22)
7
1995
49
2
7
100
90
60
65
1996*
60
4
9
82
*In February 1996, fiscal year changed from ending March 31 to April 30.
Company Overview and Strategy
Catalyst Semiconductor, established in 1985, designs, develops, and markets a broad range of nonvolatile
memory IC products that have applications in the computer, consumer electronics, wireless communications,
network, automotive, industrial, and instrumentation markets.
The company's strategy is to become a leading supplier of flash memory devices while maintaining its position as a
leading supplier of EEPROM products. The company’s development efforts are focused on improving its
fabrication processes and the development of advanced products. During 1996, development work began on
next-generation versions of its flash memory and EEPROM products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-63
Catalyst
North American Company Profiles
Japan
16%
Europe
21%
United States
40%
Far East
23%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
C. Michael Powell
Chris Carstens
Heber Clement
Scott Parker
Alan Renninger
Daryl Stemm
Radu Vanco
Fred Leung
Richard Palm
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Quality and Reliability
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Director, Strategic Marketing
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
Catalyst's family of nonvolatile devices includes flash memories (512K, 1M, 2M, 4M, and 8M), serial EEPROMs (1K
to 64K), parallel EEPROMs (16K to 256K), battery-backed SRAMs, and NVRAMs (i.e., shadow RAMs and devices
that combine EEPROM with SRAM). Catalyst also offers a line of BiCMOS data converters and other specialized
products such as its application-specific electrically erasable devices (ASEEDs™).
Most of the company's products are designed and manufactured using a 1.0µm CMOS EEPROM process or a
0.7µm flash memory process, however, the move to a 0.8µm CMOS EEPROM process and a 0.5µm flash memory
process are currently under way.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Through the establishment of long-term licensing agreements, Catalyst has contracts with Oki, Seiko Epson,
Chartered Semiconductor, UMC, and Newport Wafer-Fab Ltd. for the fabrication of its devices.
1-64
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Catalyst
Key Agreements
• In 1996, Catalyst announced an agreement with United Microelectronics Corp. (UMC). As part of the
agreement, UMC will take a 10 percent equity stake in Catalyst and will provide significant wafer foundry
capacity. Also, UMC and Catalyst will jointly develop 0.5µm and 0.35µm process technologies, geared for flash
memory products.
• In November 1995, Catalyst signed a cross-licensing agreement with Intel. The agreement provides Catalyst
with the right to utilize all of Intel’s flash memory patents.
• Catalyst signed on Wales, U.K.-based Newport Wafer-Fab Ltd. in May 1995 for the manufacture of its
EEPROMs and for process technology development.
• Catalyst formed an alliance with Zilog that calls for the joint development of 20M and 40M 2.5-inch solid-state
disk drives merging Catalyst's flash memory devices with Zilog's compression and controller technology. The
two companies are also developing other devices combining flash and microcontroller technology.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-65
Cherry Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
C HERRY S EMICONDUCTOR
Cherry Semiconductor Corporation
2000 South County Trail
East Greenwich, Rhode Island 02818-0031
Telephone: (401) 885-3600
Fax: (401) 885-5786
Web Site: www.cherrysemiconductor.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends February 28
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
229
5
266
10
275
11
339
15
425
11
36
3
1
45
5
4
56
7
7
75
11
17
99
5
20
415
450
500
550
975
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
Net Income
Capital Expenditures
Employees
Company Overview and Strategy
Formed in 1972 as Micro Components Corporation, Cherry Semiconductor originally manufactured linear bipolar
ICs with a focus on the photography market. In 1977, MCC was acquired by The Cherry Corporation and renamed
Cherry Semiconductor Corporation (CSC). The market orientation of CSC began to include more automotive
business as the photo market began to sag. In 1985, the company committed to two major market focuses:
automotive and computer. Within these two markets, CSC focused further on four applications areas: dedicated
automotive, power supply control, motor control, and memory management (high-performance disk drive circuits).
In 3Q95, CSC was organized into three business groups: automotive OEM, automotive electronics, and
computer and industrial. The companies global customer base includes automotive equipment manufacturers
and suppliers, power systems suppliers and resellers, computer OEMs, and telecommunications systems
manufacturers.
1-66
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Cherry Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Europe
5%
Telecom
16%
Computer
16%
Asia-Pacific
14%
Automotive
68%
1996 Semiconductor Sales
by End-Use Market
United States
81%
1996 Semiconductor Sales
by Geographic Region
Management
Alfred S. Budnick
Andrew F. Durette
Walter E. McMann
Dennis Gaetano
President, Cherry Semiconductor
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Finance and Administration
Director, Worldwide Sales and Marketing
Products and Processes
Cherry Semiconductor designs and builds standard linear and mixed-signal ICs and semicustom and full-custom
ICs (ASICs). The company’s automotive ICs are most often custom designs, while its standard ICs are usually
targeted at the computer market.
CSC developed its high-performance PowerSense™ BiCMOS process for automotive circuits. It is a mixed-signal
process that allows analog power functions and compact digital logic to be combined on a single chip. It uses 15
masks and has five critical alignments. In addition, CSC has developed a 16-volt BiCMOS process for disk drive
applications and a 2.5MHz bipolar process for computer applications. The firm’s bipolar processes feature vertical
and lateral PNP transistors, up-down isolation, and low leakage diodes.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Cherry Semiconductor Corporation
2000 South County Trail
East Greenwich, Rhode Island 02818
Cleanroom size: 24,000 square feet
Capacity (wafer/week): 2,500
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs and ASICs
Feature size: 1.4µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-67
Cherry Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Key Agreements
• Cherry Semiconductor works with Motorola to develop ASICs for the automotive industry. The two companies
struck their first agreement in the late 1980's.
1-68
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Chip Express
North American Company Profiles
C HIP E XPRESS
Chip Express Corporation
2903 Bunker Hill Lane, Suite 105
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 988-2445
Fax: (408) 988-2449
Web Site: www.chipexpress.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe/Middle East:
Chip Express Ltd. • Haifa, Israel
Telephone: (972) (4) 855-0011 • Fax: (972) (4) 855-1122
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1994
10
1995
18
1996
28
80
110
140
Company Overview and Strategy
Chip Express started its operations in 1990 when it was spun out from Elron Electronics Industries Ltd. (an Israeli
high technology holding company). The company provides a complete “Time-to-Market Solution™” featuring
rapid turn application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) products and services. The company offers flexible ASIC
production with a seamless migration path for transferring a logic design from netlist to fast-turn prototypes and
then to volume production. The company’s product, called LPGA (laser programmable gate array), is a customized
gate array fabricated with a patented technology.
The company’s product offering includes 24 hour laser prototypes, one week pre-production/low-volume
qualities, and one month high-volume ASIC production. Rapid prototyping service is provided utilizing its
proprietary QuICk® laser micro-machining system to personalize one die at a time in less than two hours. Lowvolume production is provided using the OneMask® technology to personalize a single wafer at a time with a single
mask, in a single etch process of multi-layers. Cost-effective mass production is provided by implementing the
same layout, using the TwoMask® personalization technology at conventional fabs.
Chip Express believes its ASIC design methodology combined with easy re-spin and fast turnaround time
significantly reduces the product development cycle. The company provides complete design kits supporting
popular EDA design environments, including Cadence, Viewlogic, and Synopsys.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-69
Chip Express
North American Company Profiles
Management
Zvi Or-Bach
Howard Brodsky
Paul Indaco
Uzi Yoeli
Meir Janai
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Research and Development (Chip Express Israel)
Chief Scientist
Products and Processes
Chip Express offers CMOS gate arrays with densities that range from 4K to 125K gates. In 2Q96, the company
introduced the new CX2000 gate array family, which features a 0.6µm triple metal device with approximately 200K
gates plus configurable embedded memory of up to 128K bits. In 1Q97, the company introduced the next
generation CX2001 product family with added features such as analog PLL, ATPG, and better access to memory.
In addition, in 2Q97, the company developed a 0.5µm device.
Planned for release during 1997 is the CX3000 product family featuring a 0.35µm triple-level-metal process
technology, which is being co-developed with foundry partners.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Chip Express provides prototyping and production services with on-site manufacturing. The company has a
37,000 square foot facility that provides gate array prototyping and low volume production services. The laserbased QuICk System operates in a computer room, but the production areas within the machine are cleanroom
environments. The prototype is personalized in a self-contained Class 100 laminar air flow cell. Chip Express uses
base arrays that are manufactured by international gate array vendors and are compatible with their gate array
families. For ASIC prototyping, the QuICk System disconnects the predefined links of multi-layer metal in a single
operation with 20,000 per second. A real time computer and image processing system use the Cut-List to control
the automatic laser cutting process.
For low-volume ASIC production, Chip Express employs its OneMask technology. The OneMask operation is in a
Class 10 cleanroom environment, processing a single wafer at a time, in a single etch step using only a single mask
for personalization.
The LPGA fabrication is provided by Tower Semiconductor and Yamaha. Additional foundry partners for the LPGA
development include Sony, Seiko Epson, and Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing.
1-70
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Chips and Technologies
North American Company Profiles
C HIPS AND T ECHNOLOGIES
Chips and Technologies, Inc.
2950 Zanker Road
San Jose, California 95134-2126
Telephone: (408) 434-0600
Fax: (408) 894-2082
Web Site: www.chips.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
141
(64)
46
1993
98
(49)
23
1994
73
3
12
1995
105
9
13
1996
151
26
20
400
220
180
185
209
Company Overview and Strategy
Chips and Technologies (also known as Chips) supplies advanced semiconductor devices to the worldwide
personal computer industry. The company has a product portfolio that includes display controllers, graphics
accelerators, video devices, communications ICs, and system logic chipsets. These products are built into a wide
range of systems from compact portables to high-performance desktop computers.
Chips’ product strategy has taken several turns since it was founded in 1984. The company initially placed its
primary focus on system logic chipsets and built up this particular business to represent 87 percent of total
revenues in fiscal 1989. Chips’ annual sales in 1990 grew over 100 percent from that in 1988. However, the
company’s logic chipset business took a turn for the worst and the company reported a net loss in 1991, the first
since its inception.
In an effort to move the company out of the red, Chips sold off several product lines in 1993 and implemented a
plan to reorganize the company’s strategy. With its new objectives—to provide highly-integrated silicon and
software solutions to the PC industry by creating unique, high-quality products—the company slowly turned
around.
Today, the focus of Chips is on single-chip systems for emerging markets such as graphics controllers for
notebook PCs. Chips’ has been successful in building this business; its flat panel display graphics controllers
represented 84 percent of total revenues in fiscal 1996. Future plans are to move beyond graphics, core logic,
and I/O to add multimedia products, as well as more communications-related devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-71
Chips and Technologies
North American Company Profiles
North America
33%
Asia and Europe
67%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
James F. Stafford
Morris E. Jones, Jr.
Keith Angelo
Lee J. Barker
Timothy R. Christofferson
Richard E. Christopher
Lawrence A. Roffelsen
Jeffery Anne Tatum
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President and Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, General Counsel
Products and Processes
Chips' product line includes CRT and flat-panel graphics controller ICs, graphical user interface (GUI) accelerators,
PC video circuits, I/O and peripheral controllers, and system logic chipsets. The company's LCD controllers have
been well received by makers of industry-leading products in the laptop, notebook, and sub-notebook industries.
In 1996, Chips’ introduced a line of LCD flat panel/CRT controllers and accelerators, called the HiQVideo™ family,
which are based on a new 64-bit display graphics engine architecture and feature multiple window display,
zoomed video, and full-motion video acceleration and scalability.
Planned for release in 1997 is portable graphics controller chips with embedded DRAM, designed with foundry
partner Samsung Semiconductor. The two companies announced in mid-1996 a plan to jointly develop
integrated memory products as part of a plan by Chips to introduce a new generation of low-power, highbandwidth, and high-performance products that are software-compatible with its HiQVideo product family.
The majority of Chips’ products are built using 0.6µm and 0.5µm triple-layer-metal CMOS processes.
company plans to utilize 0.5µm and 0.35µm process technology for many of its future products.
1-72
The
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Chips and Technologies
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Chips and Technologies uses subcontractors for the fabrication and assembly of its semiconductor components.
Currently its foundry partners include Chartered Semiconductor, IBM, NEC, Samsung, LG Semicom, and TSMC.
Key Agreements
•
Chips and Technologies signed a production agreement with Chartered Semiconductor. Chips agreed to pay
Chartered $20 million for guaranteed production capacity support of 200mm wafers through 2000.
•
In fiscal 1996, Chips and Technologies established a long-term foundry agreement with TSMC. The
agreement called for Chips to make deposits totaling $23.5 million to TSMC in exchange for a guaranteed wafer
supply through 2000.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-73
Cirrus Logic
North American Company Profiles
C IRRUS L OGIC
Cirrus Logic, Inc.
3100 West Warren Avenue
Fremont, California 94538-6423
Telephone: (510) 623-8300
Fax: (510) 226-2240
Web Site: www.cirrus.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Cirrus Logic K.K. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3340-9111
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Joint Venture Investment
1993
355
21
73
27
—
1994
557
45
127
36
—
1995
889
61
166
47
64
1996
1,147
(36)
239
128
45
1997
917
(46)
231
n/a
n/a
Employees
1,353
1,854
2,331
3,500
2,600
Company Overview and Strategy
Cirrus Logic, founded in 1984, is a leading supplier of advanced integrated circuits for multimedia (graphics, video,
audio), communications (modems, networking, high-speed I/Os), mass storage (magnetic hard disk and CD-ROM),
and data acquisition. The company’s products and technologies focus on desktop, portable, and handheld
computing systems, as well as industrial and consumer electronics.
Cirrus Logic targets both emerging high growth markets and large existing markets that are undergoing major
product or technology transitions. Cirrus Logic’s major customers consist of original equipment manufacturers
(OEMs) of personal computers and PC add-in boards, as well as disk drive manufacturers.
1-74
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Cirrus Logic
North American Company Profiles
Mass Storage
21%
Communications
24%
Graphics
29%
Crystal
Semiconductor
26%
1997 Sales by Product Group (est)
Japan
19%
Europe
7%
North America
40%
Asia-Pacific
34%
1997 Sales by Geographic Region (est)
From its initial public offering in 1989 through its fiscal year 1995, Cirrus Logic posted record revenue growth and
was consistently profitable year after year. During this period, the company set industry growth records as it
quickly reached the billion dollar revenue run rate. This rapid growth was challenged in fiscal year 1966, as the
company faced a combination of softening market conditions, a delayed transition to new products, and a
diversion of engineering resources to support manufacturing at a dozen foundries around the world. As a result,
Cirrus Logic posted its first-ever losses in fiscal 1996. This prompted the company to streamline operations and
intensify its focus on key product development within its core competencies of multimedia, communications, and
mass storage. A workforce reduction and the divestiture of non-core businesses was also included in its
streamlining efforts.
Cirrus Logic has invested substantially in R&D and in the acquisition of key technologies to develop its “systems in
silicon’’ expertise. Past acquisitions include Pixel Semiconductor (1991), Crystal Semiconductor Corporation
(1991), Acumos Inc. (1992), Pacific Communication Sciences, Inc. (1993), PicoPower Technology, Inc. (1994),
the 3D graphics chip technology of Austek Microsystems (1994), and the graphics and disk interface IC
businesses of Appian Technology (1994). The intellectual property gain from these acquisitions, combined with
Cirrus Logic’s on-going research and development, have enabled the company to broaden and deepen its
technology portfolio in the areas of mixed-signal design, digital audio, graphics acceleration,
modulation/demodulation algorithms, and digital wireless communications.
As part of the company’s streamlining efforts in fiscal 1996, certain acquisitions were divested, including
PicoPower Technology (sold to National Semiconductor in May 1996), PCSI’s Wireless Infrastructure Equipment
Group (sold to ADC Telecommunications in December 1996), and PCSI’s Wireless Semiconductor Group (sold to
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems in January 1997).
In early 1997, Cirrus Logic set up a new organizational structure under which came the establishment of the Office
of the President and the integration of the company’s product operations into four divisions: Personal Computer
Products—which includes all graphics/video products from the former Graphics Company, the PC audio products
from Crystal Semiconductor, and the PC modem chipsets from the former Personal Systems Division;
Communications Products—which includes the WAN and LAN networking products from Crystal Semiconductor,
and adds enterprise networking and Internet access chip solutions from the former Personal Systems Division;
Mass Storage Products—which includes magnetic hard disk and CD-ROM products; and Crystal Semiconductor
Products—which includes products from the former Industrial Products Division of Crystal.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-75
Cirrus Logic
North American Company Profiles
Management
Michael L. Hackworth
Suhas S. Patil
George Alexy
Thomas F. Kelly
Michael L. Canning
William W.Y. Chu
James H. Clardy
Robert V. Dickson
Edward Ross
William D. Caparelli
Kenyon Mei
Robert F. Donohue
Patrick Boudreau
Thomas P. Rigoli
Halappa Ravindra
Ron Shelton
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chairman and Executive Vice President, Products and Technology
Chief Products and Marketing Officer, and Office of the President
Chief Operating Officer and Office of the President
President, Mass Storage Products Company
President, Graphics Company
President, Crystal Semiconductor Corporation
President, Graphics Company
President, Worldwide Manufacturing
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Senior Vice President and GM, Personal Systems Business Unit
Vice President and Chief Legal Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Corporate Communications
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Products and Processes
Multimedia Graphics/Video
Cirrus Logic’s graphics/video chip solutions provide high-performance 2D/3D acceleration and full-motion
video for mainstream personal computing for both desktop and portable applications. During fiscal 1997, the
company introduced its Laguna3D™ graphics accelerator, the industry’s first graphics chip solution to employ
the Rambus memory architecture. Cirrus Logic was also one of the first to sample and demonstrate a 3D
graphics chip solution incorporating Intel’s AGP (accelerated graphics port). As Cirrus Logic continues to
expand its family of Rambus-based Laguna3D chips, the company is also working closely with Microsoft on the
“Talisman” initiative, which will result in a DirectX, Rambus-based, hardware reference design for 2D and 3D
graphics, video, and advanced audio functionality. This reference design is expected to facilitate the
deployment of Talisman-driven motherboard implementations and graphics accelerator cards beginning in
calendar year 1998.
Multimedia Audio
Cirrus Logic offers one of the industry’s most advanced audio chip solutions for multimedia PCs through its
Crystal Semiconductor subsidiary in Austin, Texas. Crystal has distinguished itself as a leading supplier of 16bit stereo codecs for PCs, pioneering the use of delta sigma technology in 1988, and enabling 16-bit PC
audio with a single-chip codec in 1991. In 1995, Crystal developed the first single-chip audio solution that
complied with Windows 95, and in 1996 its leadership continued with the integration of 3D sound into a
single-chip solution for PC motherboards. Crystal recently announced the PC industry’s first single-chip
solution integrating PCI-compliant 3D audio acceleration and Dolby AC-3 decoding. The company’s portfolio
of multimedia audio chips include solutions for audio processing for consumer products such as digital audio
tape, digital compact cassettes, and automotive sound systems.
1-76
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Cirrus Logic
Communications
Cirrus Logic launched the industry’s first two-chip intelligent fax/data/voice modem in 1992. More recently,
the company introduced a high-performance, three-chip version as part of its FastPath™ Telephony Platform.
The chipset, which employs a 32-bit Advanced RISC Machines (ARM) processor, is software configurable to
accommodate high-speed 56 Kbps Internet access, using the x2 protocol from U.S. Robotics. By simply
downloading software, the FastPath platform can be upgraded to conform to the worldwide 56 Kbps standard
when it is established. In addition to its powerful family of modem chips, Cirrus Logic also offers high-speed
serial and parallel I/O devices for multi-channel, multi-protocol communications. Moreover, through its Crystal
Semiconductor subsidiary, the company is a leading supplier of monolithic T1/E1 line interface circuits, CMOS
Ethernet LAN line interface circuits, and infrared interface circuits.
Mass Storage
Cirrus Logic is a leading supplier of chips that perform the key control function in the most advanced hard disk
drives. The company’s controllers comply with AT (IDE), PCMCIA, SCSI, and high-speed SCSI2 standards.
Cirrus Logic began offering read-write electronics for disk drives in 1993, and was the first supplier to provide
Partial Response Maximum Likelihood (PRML) data-detection technology in its ICs. The company’s most
recent PRML chip solutions enable 3.5-inch hard disk drives to achieve more than 1G per platter area density
using thin-film read heads. The company’s line of hard-drive controller chips also features “ID-less”
technology that can increase the capacity of a hard-disk drive by up to 10 percent. In 1996, Cirrus Logic
introduced high-speed encoder/decoder chips for next generation CD-ROM applications. These new
encoders support CD-Recordable/Erasable (CD-R/E) capabilities, which lets the end-user record, erase, and
re-use the CD. Available in SCSI interface and ATAPI interface versions, the encoders also support the
industry’s fastest 18x read and 8x record speeds.
Data Acquisition
Through its Crystal Semiconductor subsidiary, Cirrus Logic has established a broad line of analog-to-digital
converters consisting of general-purpose and low-frequency measurement devices. The family includes
more than twenty products used in industrial automation, instrumentation, medical, military, and geophysical
applications.
The majority of Cirrus Logic's IC products are manufactured using 0.8µm, double-layer-metal CMOS and 0.6µm,
triple-layer-metal CMOS process technologies, although some use other CMOS processes (high and low voltage),
while others use BiCMOS or GaAs processes (for RF chips).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In 1994, Cirrus Logic made a move to abandon its completely fabless approach by forming a joint venture with IBM
to manufacture ICs for both companies at one of IBM's East Fishkill, New York, fab facilities. The venture is
operating as a separate company, named MiCRUS (see Key Agreements).
In late 1995, Cirrus Logic announced a program to expand its manufacturing infrastructure, emphasizing both fab
ownership and foundry relationships that target 0.35µm and 0.25µm process capabilities. The program called for
the company to invest approximately $2 billion over a five-year period. In early 1997, the amount was reduced by
half.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-77
Cirrus Logic
North American Company Profiles
The initial phase of the program resulted in the expansion of MiCRUS and the formation of Cirent Semiconductor,
a new joint venture with Lucent Technologies, that operates within an existing Lucent wafer manufacturing facility
in Orlando, Florida. Cirent is 40 percent owned by Cirrus Logic and 60 percent by Lucent Technologies. The two
firms will equally split the production output of the new 200mm wafer facility, which is initially focusing on 0.35µm,
with plans to migrate to 0.25µm processing in 1998.
With both of its joint manufacturing ventures now in production, Cirrus Logic has reduced its dependence on
foundries. Whereas the company used a dozen foundries before the joint ventures, the company now depends
on less than half that number to meet its production needs. Cirrus Logic continues to nurture its foundry
relationships, which include long-standing relationships with TSMC and UMC.
Under a foundry venture agreement with UMC and two other U.S. semiconductor companies, a new company,
United Silicon, Inc., has been formed in Hsinchu, Taiwan. Production at the new fab is scheduled to commence in
1Q98. Meanwhile, Cirrus Logic will expand its current relationship with TSMC to include a long-term purchase
agreement.
MiCRUS
1580 Route 52
Hopewell Junction, New York 12533
Telephone: (914) 892-2121
Capacity (wafers/week): 9,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, MPRs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.6µm
(Joint venture with IBM Microelectronics.
See Key Agreements.)
Cirent Semiconductor
9333 South John Young Parkway
Orlando, Florida 32819
Telephone: (407) 345-6000
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, MPRs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
(See Key Agreements.)
Key Agreements
• In 1996, Cirrus Logic entered into a licensing agreement with U.S. Robotics that gave the company rights to
use U.S. Robotics’ x2 protocol for high-speed (56 Kbps) access. Cirrus Logic’s proprietary line of FastPath
modem chipsets is software configurable.
• Cirrus Logic licensed the Rambus high-performance DRAM interface architecture in early 1995. The license
gives Cirrus the right to use the Rambus interface in its graphics controllers.
• Cirrus Logic is licensed to embed Advanced RISC Machines' ARM processor in its future ICs for
communications, computer, consumer, and other applications.
• IBM and Cirrus Logic formed a joint manufacturing venture called MiCRUS in 1994. IBM and Cirrus Logic own
52 percent and 48 percent of MiCRUS, respectively. Volume production of logic chips for Cirrus and memory
ICs for IBM began in mid-1995. The agreement does not include product and/or technology exchange. In
1996, Cirrus Logic entered into a similar joint venture agreement with Lucent Technologies to form Cirent
Semiconductor in Orlando, Florida. In each joint venture, Cirrus Logic has rights to 50 percent of the
manufacturing output.
1-78
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Crosspoint Solutions
North American Company Profiles
C ROSSPOINT S OLUTIONS
Crosspoint Solutions, Inc.
694 Tasman Drive
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 324-0200
Fax: (408) 324-0123
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
With equity funding from ASCII Corporation, Crosspoint Solutions was founded in 1989 to develop a fieldprogrammable replacement for standard gate arrays. A proprietary cell and routing architecture, coupled with a
unique interconnect technology, enables Crosspoint to meet the performance and density demands of the
mainstream CMOS gate array market. Crosspoint was one of the first companies offering a field-programmable
challenge to gate arrays.
Management
Robert N. Blair
Thomas Chan
John Daws
Scott Graham, Ph.D.
Michael Levis
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President, Business Development and Product Marketing
Products and Processes
The gate array granularity and transistor-level interconnect of Crosspoint's FPGA are made possible by the
company's proprietary cell and routing architecture and a unique antifuse technology. An antifuse is a
programmable switch that has a very high impedance initially, but exhibits a low resistance after programming.
Crosspoint's unique antifuse fabrication technique provides antifuse elements with very low capacitance and low
"on" resistance. This translates directly to higher operating speed. The programming is permanent and nonvolatile, resulting in one-time-programmable (OTP) devices.
In 1996, Crosspoint unveiled its CP20K CrossFire™ family of FPGAs. The CP20K series consists of six gate
density options covering the 2.2K to 20K range with I/O counts ranging from 91 to 250. The FPGAs are
manufactured using a high-performance 0.6µm two-layer-metal CMOS process and are architecturally compatible
with standard mask-programmable gate arrays.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-79
Crosspoint Solutions
North American Company Profiles
Also in 1996, Crosspoint announced its CoreBank™ program for realizing system-level FPGAs. CoreBank
comprises a rich library of systems building blocks developed by Crosspoint Solutions and its CoreBank program
partners. CoreBank includes digital signal processing, communications, computer, and networking cores, as well
as a large selection of functions ranging from register files to interface circuits.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Crosspoint has a long-standing foundry partnership with Hitachi. LG Semicon was added on in 1996 as a foundry
partner (see Key Agreements).
Key Agreements
•
In 1Q96, Crosspoint gave LG Semicon limited licensing, manufacturing, and marketing rights to its CP20K
FPGA architecture in exchange for foundry access to LG’s 0.8µm and 0.6µm two- and three-layer-metal IC
technology.
1-80
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Cypress Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
C YPRESS S EMICONDUCTOR
Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
3901 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134-1599
Telephone: (408) 943-2600
Fax: (408) 943-2796
Web Site: www.cypress.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Cypress Semiconductor Japan K.K. • Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5296-0781 • Fax: (81) (3) 5269-0788
Europe:
Cypress Semiconductor International • Waterloo, Belgium
Telephone: (32) (2) 357-02-20 • Fax: (32) (2) 357-02-30
Asia-Pacific:
Cypress Semiconductor Singapore • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 735-0338 • Fax: (65) 735-0228
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
272
(21)
65
32
1993
305
8
50
56
1994
406
50
53
112
1995
596
102
72
195
1996
528
53
84
195
Employees
1,529
1,262
1,423
1,859
2,171
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1983, Cypress Semiconductor is a designer, developer, and manufacturer of high-performance digital
integrated circuits for a variety of markets including networking, military, computers, telecommunications, and
instrumentation. Cypress’ product offerings include SRAMs, EPROMs, specialty memories, programmable logic
devices (PLDs), data communications products, PC chipsets, timing devices, and USB microcontrollers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-81
Cypress Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Suffering its first revenue decline in 1992, Cypress initiated a restructuring program. From the company's
beginning, it had been known for its niche-market strategy of acquiring and managing smaller autonomous
businesses. That approach, however, has been modified to take advantage of Cypress' lowered manufacturing
costs, allowing the company to compete effectively in high-volume markets such as the PC market. Cypress has
also turned to a more market-driven focus.
Restructuring activities included the selling of its SPARC processor subsidiary, Ross Technology, to Fujitsu and
the realignment of its subsidiaries Aspen Semiconductor and Multichip Technology under the company's four
business units (today there are five): the Memory Products Division (MPD), the Programmable Products Division
(PPD), the Data Communications Division (DCD), and the Computation Products Division (CPD). Cypress also
made a few strategic acquisitions, including Seattle-based IC Designs, Inc., a supplier of clock-frequency
synthesis chips for the PC market, and the high-speed FCT logic product line from Performance Semiconductor.
Programmable
Products
19%
International
27%
North America
73%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Data Communications
and Computation
Products
30%
Memory
Products
51%
1996 Sales by Product Division
During 1996, Cypress experienced a decline in sales due to price erosion in the memory market, but still had a
profitable year. Cypress entered 1997 with a reinforced strategy to continue developing new products and
processes utilizing its proprietary technologies to address the needs of its target markets as well as enter new
markets in order to reduce its dependence on specific markets.
Several strategic activities took place at Cypress during the late-1996 to early-1997 timeframe. Cypress entered
the microcontroller market in late 1996 with its first 8-bit RISC-based family of universal serial bus (USB)
microcontrollers. Designed for use in peripherals and hub products, the MCUs integrate digital logic, analog,
PROM, SRAM, and microcontroller logic.
In early 1997, Cypress announced the creation of the Non-Volatile Memory Division that will focus directly on the
EPROM market. The creation of this business unit reinforces the company’s commitment to remain a key player in
the EPROM market.
Also in early 1997, Cypress announced that it would no longer market its FPGA products. As part of a new
agreement with QuickLogic (see Key Agreements), Cypress will no longer be a second-source for QuickLogic’s
FPGA products and will only produce FPGA devices for QuickLogic. Cypress will redirect its efforts toward its PLD
products. For 1997, the company plans to reach the 20,000 gate level.
1-82
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Cypress Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Another market Cypress entered in the first part of 1997 was the slow-speed SRAM market. In March 1997,
Cypress rolled out a family of ultra-low power, slow asynchronous SRAM devices that feature access times of 70ns
and range from 1.65V to 5V. The devices are manufactured using Cypress’ proprietary six-transistor (6T), 0.5µm
RAM3 process technology.
Management
Pierre Lamond
T.J. Rodgers
Antonio Alvarez
Dan Barrett
Lou Chetaud
Bernard Glasauer
Emmanuel Hernandez
Larry Jordan
Jeff Kaszubinski
Paul Keswick
Jim Kupec
Jeff Linden
Lothar Maier
J. Daniel McCranie
Christopher Norris
Rich Parker
John Ramacciotti
Sean Salehi
R. Michael Starnes
Joyce Sziebert
Bruce Threewit
John Torode
Ron Treadway
William Verde
Michael Villott
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, European Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Worldwide Manufacturing
Vice President, Quality and Reliability Assurance
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Memory Products Division
Vice President, New Products Division
Vice President, Products Division
Vice President, Non-Volatile Memory Division
Vice President, Worldwide Wafer Manufacturing
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Programmable Logic Division
Vice President, North American Distribution
Vice President, Procurement
Vice President, Management Information Systems and
Chief Information Officer
Vice President, Process Technology
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Systems Development
Vice President, Computer Products Division
Vice President, Data Communications Division
Vice President, Strategic Accounts
Vice President, North American Sales
Products and Processes
Highlights of Cypress Semiconductor's product portfolio are given below. Its integrated circuits are fabricated
using proprietary 0.5µm, 0.65µm, and 0.8µm CMOS and BiCMOS technologies.
SRAMs
• 4K to 1M CMOS SRAMs
• 64K and 256K BiCMOS SRAMs
• 1K and 16K ECL SRAMs
• 64-bit x 18 cache tag RAMs
• 128K and 256K cache RAMs
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Specialty Memories and Memory Modules
• Industry-standard FIFOs
• Bidirectional FIFOs
• Clocked FIFOs
• Asynchronous FIFOs
• Dual-port RAMs
• Memory accelerator MCMs
1-83
Cypress Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
UltraLogic PLDs/Tools
• Flash370 CPLDs (44-288 pins)
• Development tools
Industry-Standard PLDs
• 20-pin CMOS/BiCMOS PLDs
• 16V8 GAL-compatible PLDs
• 22V10 flash/BiCMOS PLDs
• MAX CPLDs (28-84 pins)
PROMs/EPROMs
• 4K to 512K CMOS PROMs
• 4K-1M CMOS EPROMs
Data Communications
• HOTLink point-to-point communications
• Fast Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and ATM/
SONET transceivers/receivers
Timing Technology Products
• Motherboard frequency synthesizers
• Low-power system logic devices
• Graphics frequency synthesizers
• Programmable products
• Custom oscillators
• Pentium clock synthesizers/drivers
Logic and Bus Products
• FCT logic chips
• VMEbus controllers
• ECL-TTL translators
• Bit slice/multipliers
• Programmable skew clock buffers
• Low-skew clock buffers
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In 3Q96, Cypress announced its decision to restructure its Fab I facility. Previously, Fab I was used for lowproduction but now is used for research and development purposes only. Also during 3Q96, Cypress put
construction of Fab V, which began in 1995, on hold until market conditions look more favorable.
Cypress Semiconductor Inc.
3901 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134
Telephone: (408) 943-2653
Fab I
Cleanroom size: 12,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: R&D
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.8µm
1-84
Cypress Semiconductor (Texas) Inc.
17 Cypress Drive
Round Rock, Texas 78664
Telephone: (512) 244-7789
Fab II (17 percent owned by Altera)
Cleanroom size: 25,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,700
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: SRAMs, PLDs, FPGAs, EPROMs,
datacom ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.2µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Cypress Semiconductor (Minnesota) Inc.
2401 East 86th Street
Bloomington, Minnesota 55425
Telephone: (612) 851-5100
Fab III
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,400
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: SRAMs, PLDs, FPGAs, logic chips,
datacom ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.2µm
Cypress Semiconductor
Cypress Semiconductor (Minnesota) Inc.
2401 East 86th Street
Bloomington, Minnesota 55425
Telephone: (612) 851-5100
Fab IV
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: SRAMs, specialty memories
Feature size: 0.5µm
Cypress Semiconductor
Round Rock, Texas
Fab V
Cleanroom size: 35,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000 (when fully equipped)
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: SRAMs, EPROMs, Logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-0.5µm
(Production tentatively scheduled for 1998)
Key Agreements
• In February 1997, Cypress and QuickLogic announced the cancellation of a previous joint-develop, licensing,
and foundry agreement for high-performance FPGA products and released plans for establishing a new
foundry alliance. As part of a new five-year agreement, Cypress will no longer market and sell antifuse FPGA
products, but will continue to serve as a foundry for QuickLogic’s FPGAs. In addition, QuickLogic agreed to
purchase all of Cypress’s existing FPGA inventory. Cypress holds a stake of less than 10 percent in
QuickLogic.
• In 2Q96, Cypress settled its PLD litigation with AMD with a cross-licensing agreement.
• Cypress expanded its agreement with Altera Corporation regarding Altera's MAX 5000 EPLD line to bring a
family of smaller, faster devices to market.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-85
Cyrix
North American Company Profiles
C YRIX
Cyrix Corporation
2703 North Central Expressway
Richardson, Texas 75080-2010
Telephone: (214) 994-8388
Fax: (214) 699-9857
Web Site: www.cyrix.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Cyrix K.K. • Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Japan
Telephone: (81) (45) 471-1661 • Fax: (81) (45) 471-1666
Europe:
Cyrix International, Ltd. • Swindon, Wiltshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1793) 417777 • Fax: (44) (1793) 417799
Asia-Pacific:
Cyrix International, Ltd. • Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2485-2285 • Fax: (852) 2485-2920
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures*
Employees
1992
73
8
8
7
1993
125
20
16
15
1994
246
38
25
24
1995
228
16
29
80
1996
184
(26)
32
13
150
220
309
400
391
*As part of the agreement made with IBM in early 1994, Cyrix purchases substantially all of the equipment required
by IBM to manufacture Cyrix products.
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1988, Cyrix Corporation designs, develops, and markets high-performance x86 software-compatible
microprocessors for the desktop and mobile computer markets. The company seeks to serve the needs of the PC
marketplace as an alternative source for x86 microprocessors of original design with competitive
price/performance characteristics.
1-86
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Cyrix
North American Company Profiles
Fiscal 1996 was a difficult year for Cyrix financially. The transition from the old 486 product line to the 6x86™
processor did not occur as quickly as expected. The 6x86 was recognized with numerous awards for its
exceptional processing power, but it did not gain broad market acceptance until late in the year. Significant
demand for the 6x86 was experienced in 4Q96.
Plans for 1997 include a focus on promoting the company’s 6x86 while managing a transition to a successor
product, code-named M2. The M2 will feature significant architectural enhancements and will be fully compatible
with multimedia extension (MMX) technology. In addition, Cyrix has developed a new product called the
MediaGX™ processor that is targeted at the sub-$1,000 consumer PC market. The MediaGX™ integrates audio,
video, and certain system functions within the processor unit, providing a complete system solution. Cyrix also
designed the entire reference system for the MediaGX to accelerate market acceptance and enable quick time-tomarket for manufacturers.
Asia-Pacific
24%
North America
46%
Europe
30%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Cyrix has strategic alliances with IBM Microelectronics and SGS-Thomson Microelectronics for the production of its
high-performance microprocessors. These agreements support the company's current strategy to focus its
resources on product design, market development, and customer support.
Management
Harvey B. Cash
James W. Swent*
Kenneth B. Edoff
Kevin C. McDonough*
Mark W. Bluhm
Nancy B. DeChaud*
Russell N. Fairbanks, Jr.
Robert D. Maher
Lewis R. Paceley
Richard Rippeteau
Everett J. Roach
Stephen A. Tobak
Chairman
Chief Financial Officer and Acting Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Sales
Senior Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Strategic Planning and Business Development
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President and General Counsel
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Sales, Americas
Vice President, Sales, Asia-Pacific
Vice President, Corporate and Channel Marketing
*Office of the President
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-87
Cyrix
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
Cyrix’s first products were math coprocessors. The company delivered its first x86 microprocessors in 1992. It
then moved quickly to develop a full line of 486 processors with advanced power management, clock-doubling
capabilities, integrated math coprocessors, and write-back cache. In 1995, Cyrix introduced its fifth-generation
5x86 and sixth-generation 6x86 high-performance processors (the 486 products are no longer in production).
Cyrix’s 6x86 (formerly called the M1) is based on a superscalar, superpipelined architecture and a RISC core. The
6x86 is offered at several performance levels ranging from PR133+ to PR200+. The PR+ nomenclature suggests
which specific higher-clock-rate Intel Pentium each of the members best compete with.
Launching of the company’s M2 processor was scheduled to occur in May 1997. Building on the 6x86 core, the
six-million-transistor M2 features Cyrix’s fully compatible MMX technology, a quadrupled (64KByte) internal cache,
enhanced memory management, and other architectural and performance innovations. The M2 is claimed to
deliver up to twice the performance of the 6x86 processors on 32-bit applications. Meanwhile, the development
of the seventh-generation processor, called the M3 or 7x86, is under way.
Cyrix began shipping its first MediaGX processors in early 1997. Due to the number of functions integrated onchip, the MediaGX eliminates the need for L2 cache, memory controller, graphics controller, graphics memory, and
audio card. Although not socket compatible with competing Pentium processors with MMX, Cyrix’s 120MHz and
133MHz MediaGX processors have equivalent Winstone 97 performance to Intel 120MHz and 133MHz
processors. The MPU interfaces with the Cyrix-designed Cx5510 core logic chipset that provides a PCI-ISA
bridge. By the end of 1997, the MediaGX is expected to reach 200MHz.
The company currently uses 0.35µm five-layer-metal CMOS technology for its 6x86 products. The initial MediaGX
processor is being produced with IBM’s 0.44µm three-layer-metal CMOS process, with a 0.4µm process
scheduled for implementation by the end of 1997. The M2 is being produced with IBM’s 0.33µm five-layer-metal
CMOS process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Cyrix currently has relationships with IBM Microelectronics and SGS-Thomson for the manufacture of its ICs. SGSThomson has been a manufacturing partner of Cyrix since October 1990. In early 1994, their pact was extended
and is now valid through the end of 1997. The two companies are said to be negotiating another extension.
Most, if not all, the 6x86 production by SGS-Thomson is currently being sold under the ST name and not sold
back to Cyrix.
Cyrix's agreement with IBM Microelectronics was established in April 1994 and is good through the end of 1999.
As part of the agreement, Cyrix made a capital equipment investment of about $88 million in an IBM fab in 1995.
Cyrix expanded its partnership with IBM in May 1996 to increase the quantity of wafers supplied by IBM through
the end of 1997.
1-88
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Cyrix
To complement its partnerships with SGS-Thomson and IBM, Cyrix is negotiating to sign up a third manufacturing
partner. However, the arrangement will likely be for foundry supply only. IBM and SGS-Thomson are licensed to
also produce Cyrix-designed x86 processors under their own names.
The construction of its own fabrication facility is not part of the company’s current business plan. However, the
option is not being ruled out. A jointly owned fab is a more likely option.
Key Agreements
• In 1Q96, Cyrix announced an agreement with Cadence Design Systems. Under the agreement, Cadence will
provide a broad range of technologies and services to Cyrix, and work together in designing Cyrix’s seventhgeneration x86 microprocessor, called the M3.
• Cyrix extended its wafer supply agreement with SGS-Thomson in 1994. Under the new arrangement, SGSThomson increased the number of wafers it produces for Cyrix and is allowed to make a certain percentage of
those same wafers for itself. In addition, Cyrix granted SGS-Thomson the right to use certain Cyrix-designed
chips as part of SGS-Thomson’s ASIC libraries. SGS-Thomson is allowed to produce and sell such ASIC
products under its own name in unlimited quantities, with Cyrix receiving royalties from the sale of the devices.
Also, Cyrix has the right to sell the SGS Thomson-designed ASICs under its own name.
• Cyrix and IBM announced a five year agreement in early 1994 under which IBM is manufacturing Cyrix's x86compatible microprocessors. The agreement calls for the two companies to equally share the output of the
Cyrix-designed chips.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-89
Dallas Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
D ALLAS S EMICONDUCTOR
Dallas Semiconductor Corporation
4401 South Beltwood Parkway
Dallas, Texas 75244-3292
Telephone: (972) 371-4000
Fax: (972) 371-3715
Web Site: www.dalsemi.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Dallas Semiconductor • Birmingham, England
Telephone: (44) (121) 782-2959 • Fax: (44) (121) 782-2156
Asia-Pacific:
Dallas Semiconductor Taiwan • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 698-3940 • Fax: (886) (2) 698-3941
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
120
18
16
16
1993
157
26
19
21
1994
181
30
23
45
1995
233
37
29
49
1996
288
38
35
60
696
748
850
1,000
1,300
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1984, Dallas Semiconductor designs, manufactures, and markets high performance CMOS ICs and
semiconductor-based systems that provide innovative and cost-effective solutions to electronic design problems
in a wide range of markets. The company's continuous new product development strategy serves as a means to
increase future revenues and avoid dependence upon a single industry, market, or customer. Its products are
sold to OEMs in the personal computer and workstation, scientific and medical equipment, industrial control,
automatic information, telecommunications, and other markets.
1-90
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Dallas Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Computing
33%
Industrial
34%
Communications
33%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
Europe
19%
Asia
30%
North America
51%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Charles Vincent Prothro
Chao C. Mai, Ph.D.
Michael L. Bolan
Alan P. Hale
F.A. Scherpenberg
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President
Vice President, Marketing and Product Development
Vice President, Finance
Vice President, Computer Products
Products and Processes
Dallas Semiconductor's product groups include:
• Timekeeping circuits
Commercial
Computing
• Microcontrollers (8-bit)
Secure MCUs
High-speed MCUs
• Non-volatile RAMs (16K to 4M)
Integrated battery backup
Intelligent sockets
• Automatic Information
Cryptographic iButton™
iButton™
• Telecommunications ICs
T1 and E1 circuits
SCSI terminators
• System extension circuits
CPU supervisors
Digital potentiometers
Thermal and battery management
• Silicon timed circuits
In 1996, Dallas’ Automatic Information product division introduced a device called the Cryptographic iButton. The
device is said to provide safer transfer of sensitive information such as credit card numbers or electronic transfer of
funds. The device consists of a processor, an arithmetic accelerator, a true time clock, a random number
generator, and 8K of SRAM.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-91
Dallas Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Dallas Semiconductor
4401 South Beltwood Parkway
Dallas, Texas 75244-3292
Cleanroom size: 17,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 150mm (2 lines)
Process: CMOS
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.6µm
1-92
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Digital Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
D IGITAL S EMICONDUCTOR
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Semiconductor
77 Reed Road
Hudson, Massachusetts 01749
Telephone: (508) 568-6868
Web Site: www.digital.com/semiconductor
Captive IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor*
Sales
Internal Sales
External Sales
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
13,931
(2,796)
14,371
(251)
13,451
(2,156)
13,813
122
14,563
(112)
230
230
—
240
235
5
270
245
25
305
255
50
375
290
85
Employees
2,500
*Calendar year
Company Overview and Strategy
Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) is one of the world's largest manufacturers of computers and computerrelated products. The company provides network computer systems, systems integrator, computer peripheral
equipment, software, and associated computer accessory equipment to customers in more than 100 countries.
DEC began developing semiconductor products in 1975 for use in its electronic systems. In 1993, Digital
expanded its semiconductor charter to become a merchant vendor. As part of its push into the merchant market,
DEC spun out its semiconductor operation in mid-1994 to become an autonomous business unit, called Digital
Semiconductor. For the past several years, Digital Semiconductor has worked to establish itself as an
independent semiconductor vendor, but its largest customer always has been Digital Equipment, which bases its
workstations and servers on its proprietary high-performance RISC microprocessor, called Alpha. Still, the
company desires to expand its merchant focus.
Digital Semiconductor designs, manufactures, and markets a broad portfolio of semiconductor products including
its Alpha processor and PCI-based networking, bridge, and graphics/multimedia devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-93
Digital Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Management
Robert B. Palmer
Charles F. Christ
R.E. Caldwell
William N. Johnson
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and General Manager, Components Division
Vice President, Digital Semiconductor
Vice President, Marketing, Digital Semiconductor
Products and Processes
Digital Semiconductor’s IC products include its Alpha 64-bit RISC microprocessors with speeds as fast as 533MHz;
the high-performance, low-power StrongARM 32-bit RISC microprocessor; PCI-compliant system and peripheral
logic chipsets; PCI-PCI bridge devices; Ethernet and Fast Ethernet LAN controller ICs; and graphics and
multimedia coprocessors.
Digital’s Alpha 21164 microprocessor is available in speed grades ranging from 366Hz to 533Hz. It is designed for
use in high-performance computing systems like network servers and workstations. A 600MHz version of the
21164 entered the sampling stage in early 1997. Also in early 1997, Digital announced its first Alpha chip
designed for use in a desktop PC. The 21164PC die is 34 percent smaller than its big brother 21164 and requires
86 fewer pins. The result is a high-performance 533MHz RISC microprocessor for systems that sell for as little as
$2,500.
Digital's IC products are built using primarily CMOS and bipolar technologies, with all advanced process
development centered on CMOS technology. Its leading-edge 0.35µm, four-level interconnect, CMOS-6
process technology is being used to manufacture the latest versions of the Alpha 21164.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In 1995, Digital Semiconductor sold to Motorola its South Queensferry, Scotland, fabrication facility.
Digital Semiconductor
75 Reed Road
Hudson, Massachusetts 01749
Telephone: (508) 568-4000
Fab 6
Cleanroom size: 64,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, MPRs, ASICs, logic ICs, custom ICs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm (eventually, 0.18µm)
1-94
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Digital Semiconductor
Key Agreements
• Samsung Electronics became a licensee of the Alpha architecture in 1996 and is manufacturing and selling
Alpha microprocessors to its customers as an independent alternate source of Alpha technology.
• Mitsubishi agreed to be both a second source for Digital's Alpha MPUs and a development partner. The
Japanese company began producing Alphas for Digital at its Saijo facility in late 1994. Subsequently,
Mitsubishi began designing and fabricating its own versions of the RISC architecture for use in its own systems
and for sale to its own customers.
• In 1995, Advanced RISC Machines Ltd. began jointly developing with Digital and Apple Computer a family of
high-performance microprocessors compatible with the ARM RISC line. The 32-bit processor, called
StrongARM, is being produced by Digital using its 0.35µm CMOS-6 process. Volume shipments began in the
first half of 1996 and are targeted at applications in digital imaging, multimedia, set-top boxes, handheld
computers, and communications products, as well as Apple's Newton line.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-95
Dionics
North American Company Profiles
D IONICS
Dionics Inc.
65 Rushmore Street
Westbury, New York 11590-4839
Telephone: (516) 997-7474
Fax: (516) 997-7479
IC Manufacturer
Employees
35
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1969, Dionics is a developer, manufacturer, and marketer of innovative high-quality integrated
circuits and discrete products. It targets these devices at areas of the industrial and military markets where high
voltage, high frequency, and unusual structures are required.
Using a dielectric isolation process, Dionics has evolved from a supplier of discrete components to a manufacturer
of hybrid circuits and photovoltaic ICs, solid-state relays (SSRs), and MOSFET-drivers. The products were initially
targeted for use in digital watches but have since made their way to markets that require high reliability that is
inherent to the dielectric isolation process.
Management
Bernard L. Kravitz
Sherman Gross
President
Vice President
Products and Processes
Photovoltaic ICs, SSRs, and MOSFET-drivers.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Dionics Inc.
65 Rushmore Street
Westbury, New York 11590-4839
Cleanroom size: 3,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 400
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Dielectric isolation bipolar
Products: Photovoltaic ICs, SSRs, and MOSFET-drivers
Feature sizes: 2.0µm-5.0µm
1-96
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
DSP Group
North American Company Profiles
DSP GROUP
DSP Group, Inc.
3120 Scott Boulevard
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 986-4300
Fax: (408) 986-4323
Web Site: www.dspg.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
DSP Group Japan • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5496-1611
Europe:
DSP Group Europe • Massy, France
Telephone: (33) (2) 47-68-67-54
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
9
(6)
4
1993
12
(0.4)
2
Employees
1994
29
4
4
1995
50
7
8
1996
53
6
8
106
115
120
Company Overview and Strategy
DSP Group, Inc. develops, licenses, and markets digital signal processing (DSP) ICs, cores, and related software
targeted at digital speech applications in the multimedia personal computer, consumer telephony, and computer
telephony markets.
DSP Group began business in 1987 with the purchase of a small design house that was involved in paramilitary
DSP-related design for applications such as noise cancellation and eavesdropping. The company began
developing its own DSPs and established a design center in Israel in 1990.
The company’s strategy is to combine three key technologies—speech processing algorithms, telephony
algorithms, and digital signal processors—to deliver a wide range of enabling application-specific DSPs to its target
markets.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-97
DSP Group
North American Company Profiles
Royalties/
Licensing/Other
23%
DSPs
77%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Much of DSP Group’s revenues are generated in international markets, primarily in Europe and Asia.
Management
Igal Kohavi
Eli Ayalon
Martin Skowron
Avi Basher
Irving Gold
Moshe Shahaf
Gideon Wertheizer
Serdar Yurdakul
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, DSP Core Technology
Chief Technology Officer
Vice President, VLSI Design Center
Vice President, PC Telephony and TrueSpeech Licensing
Products and Processes
DSP Group has developed a family of low-power consumption, low-cost DSP core architectures that are suitable
for consumer, mobile computer, and wireless communications products.
The company’s products are
manufactured using 0.6µm-0.8µm CMOS technologies.
SmartCores Products
• The company’s SmartCores products are a family of standard DSP macrocells for use in standard cell ASIC
libraries. The SmartCores are designed for speech/audio processing, telecommunications, digital cellular, and
embedded control applications. The first two members of the family are the PineDSPCore™ and the
OakDSPCore™, both of which are 16-bit general-purpose, low-power, low-voltage, and high-speed DSP core
architectures. The PineDSPCore is based on 0.8µm or 0.6µm double-level-metal CMOS technology (scalable
to 0.5µm and below). The OakDSPCore is based on 0.6µm double-level-metal CMOS technology (scalable to
0.5µm and below).
TrueSpeech Software
• TrueSpeech® is a proprietary software-based digital speech compression technology. It is designed for a wide
range of applications, including video conferencing, computer telephony, the Internet, and personal
recorders.
1-98
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
DSP Group
CT Products
• DSP Group’s CT products are coprocessors that implement real-time TrueSpeech compression and
decompression functions. They are available for Windows 95 messaging, DSVD (digital simultaneous voice
and data) modem, video conferencing, and multimedia visual telephony applications.
TAD Products
• The company’s D6000 family of products are for digital telephone answering device (TAD) and voice recorders.
They implement all functions of TrueSpeech compression and decompression, voice prompts, telephone line
signal processing, and memory management.
Current licensees of the PineDSPCore and OakDSPCore architectures include Adaptec, Asahi Kasei
Microsystems, Atmel-ES2, DSP Communications, GEC Plessey Semiconductors, Harris, Hyundai/Symbios Logic,
Integrated Circuit Systems, LSI Logic, NEC, Rohm, Samsung, Siemens, TI/Silicon Systems, TEMIC, TSMC, VLSI
Technology, and Xicor.
Licensees of DSP Group’s TrueSpeech technology include Atmel, Cirrus Logic, Creative Labs, Intel, LSI Logic,
Lucent Technologies, Microsoft, Siemens, Sierra Semiconductor, U.S. Robotics, and VLSI Technology.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
As a fabless supplier, DSP depends on foundries for the manufacturing of its devices.
established foundry relationships with several companies, including TSMC and Samsung.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
The company has
1-99
EDI
North American Company Profiles
E LECTRONIC D ESIGNS (EDI)
Electronic Designs, Inc.
One Research Drive
Westborough, Massachusetts 01581
Telephone: (508) 366-5151
Fax: (508) 836-4850
Web Site: www.electronic-designs.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Electronic Designs Europe Ltd. • Surrey, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1276) 472637 • Fax: (44) (1276) 473748
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1995*
40
(3)
3
85
1996
59
4
3
125
*Pro forma data. Electronic Designs, Inc. was acquired by Crystallume in October 1995 and the entire company
was renamed Electronic Designs, Inc. in March 1996.
Company Overview and Strategy
Electronic Designs, Inc. was originally established in 1984 under the name of Crystallume. From 1984 to October
1995, the company had been primarily engaged in research and development of diamond coatings using CVD
technologies. In October 1995, Crystallume acquired Electronic Designs, Inc., a fifteen-year-old privately held
Massachusetts-based company involved in the manufacture of high density memory components and activematrix LCDs. As a result of the acquisition, the company has shifted its emphasis from diamond coatings to the
design, manufacture, and sale of semiconductor and flat panel display products. To reflect this shift in business
focus, the company changed its name from Crystallume to Electronic Designs, Inc. (EDI) in March 1996.
1-100
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
EDI
North American Company Profiles
Diamond Products
2%
Displays
6%
Memory Products
92%
1996 Sales by Product Type
EDI’s memory products are used in many segments of the electronic equipment industry, including computer
systems and peripherals, telecommunications, medical equipment, and military systems. The company
emphasizes a time-to-market advantage for its high-speed SRAM modules. Other memory products incorporate
SRAM, DRAM, flash, and EEPROM technologies. The company recently announced the release of a line of
PCMCIA memory cards. Memory product development is currently focused on the design and prototyping of new
module and monolithic products based on 4M SRAM, as well as on new MCM-L, flash memory, and high-density
DRAM designs.
EDI’s offering of AMLCDs includes various sizes of ruggedized panels for use in display heads, monitors, and
computer systems. The company is developing technology for a PC system incorporating its displays, in addition
to electronic circuit boards for “smart” displays.
The company’s diamond research is focused on improving tooling products and related diamond coating
processes as well as developing numerous other applications for its diamond coating process. Furthermore, EDI
is developing a semiconductor product incorporating diamond as a heat spreader to significantly improve heat
removal and thus improve device performance and reliability in heat sensitive applications.
In fiscal 1996, approximately 34 percent of EDI’s revenues were represented by export sales to customers
primarily in Europe.
Management
Don McGuinness
Frank Edwards
Ken Buckley
Daniel R. Doyle
Frank Muscolino
Richard J. Sawers
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Marketing and Sales
Vice President, Display Products
Vice President and General Manager, Display Products
Vice President
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-101
EDI
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
EDI's products include the following:
• High-speed monolithic 1M and 4M CMOS SRAMs (industrial or military)
• High-density CMOS SRAM modules (1M to 32M) with speeds of 8ns-70ns (commercial, industrial, or
• JEDEC pinout super high-density DRAM modules (64MB to 288MB; commercial or industrial)
• JEDEC pinout flash SIMM modules (4M to 64MB; commercial or industrial)
• Active-matrix LCDs for avionics and other specialty applications
military)
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
EDI handles assembly, test, and QCI at its headquarters in Westborough. For the production of its memory
products in wafer, die, and component form, the company has partnerships with major semiconductor
manufacturers in the U.S. and the Far East, including Micron, Mitsubishi, Samsung, and Sharp.
Key Agreements
• EDI formed an agreement with Atmel in 1994 calling for EDI to design, manufacture, and market high-density
memory modules using Atmel's flash memory devices.
• EDI signed a licensing agreement with Thomson-CSF that enables EDI to make and market products using the
French company's technology for 3D stack memory products.
1-102
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
EG&G Optoelectronics
North American Company Profiles
EG&G OPTOELECTRONICS
EG&G, Inc.
Optoelectronics Group
2175 Mission College Boulevard
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 565-0700
Fax: (408) 565-0777
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
EG&G, Inc., Reticon Division • Munich, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 92692-666 • Fax: (49) (89) 911-008
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Optoelectronics
Sales
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1,320
88
1,319
59
1,333
(6)
1,420
68
1,427
60
210
201
213
259
270
Company Overview and Strategy
EG&G Optoelectronics is one of three product groups within EG&G, Inc., a $1.4 billion company involved in
diversified technology markets. The EG&G Optoelectronics business segment consists of eight autonomous
divisions, including EG&G Amorphous Silicon, EG&G Canada Ltd., EG&G Electro-Optics, EG&G Heimann
Optoelectronics, EG&G IC Sensors, EG&G Judson, EG&G Reticon, and EG&G Vactec. These businesses
specialize in photonic products that are sensitive in the X-ray and ultraviolet to far infrared region of the light
spectrum.
Optoelectronics
19%
Mechanical
Components
19%
Technical Services
39%
Instruments
23%
1996 Sales by Business Segment
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-103
EG&G Optoelectronics
North American Company Profiles
The divisions involved in the production of integrated circuit-related devices are EG&G Reticon and EG&G IC
Sensors. Reticon was founded in 1971 and became a subsidiary of EG&G in 1976. From its start, Reticon has
been a leader in image sensing and signal processing technology. It was among the first semiconductor
companies to specialize in solid-state imaging components and vision system products. IC Sensors was formed
originally as a spin-off from Foxboro/ICT in 1982 and was acquired by EG&G in 1994. It is a leading developer and
manufacturer of pressure sensors, accelerometers, valves, and custom microstructures utilizing advanced silicon
micromachining technology.
Management
Richard Brownhill
Chris Raanes
General Manager, EG&G IC Sensors
General Manager, EG&G Reticon
Products and Processes
EG&G Reticon Products
• Image sensing products—character scan devices, instrumentation devices, multiplexer array chips,
photodiode arrays, pinned photodiode arrays, and CCDs.
• Solid state camera products.
EG&G IC Sensors Products
• Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices, such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, precision
microvalves, and custom microstructures for a broad range of applications, including medical, industrial,
automotive, consumer, and aerospace.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
EG&G Reticon
345 Potrero Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94086
Telephone: (408) 738-4266
Fax: (408) 738-3832
Capacity (wafers/week): 625
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, PMOS, CCD
Products: Linear ICs and image sensing devices
Feature size: 2.0µm
1-104
EG&G IC Sensors
1701 McCarthy Boulevard
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 432-1800
Fax: (408) 434-6681
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: MEMS devices and sensors
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Elantec Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
E LANTEC S EMICONDUCTOR
Elantec Semiconductor, Inc.
1996 Tarob Court
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 945-1323
Fax: (408) 945-9305
Web Site: www.elantec.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Elantec Semiconductor, Inc. • Wokingham, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1189) 776080
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
15
0.3
1993
18
1
4
1
1994
23
1
4
1
1995
27
3
5
2
1996
37
4
6
2
110
120
125
155
162
Company Overview and Strategy
Elantec Semiconductor, Inc., founded in 1983, designs, manufacturers, and markets high-performance analog
and mixed-signal integrated circuits for the video/multimedia, data processing, instrumentation, and
communications markets. The company serves these markets with standard products and application-specific
standard products (ASSPs), using primarily high-speed complementary bipolar and advanced CMOS
technologies.
Elantec has transformed itself from a military hybrid IC supplier to a company focused on providing highperformance analog intensive functions for growing commercial markets. At one time, military hybrid sales
accounted for 90 percent of the company's total sales, versus about nine percent in 1996.
In October 1995, the company completed its initial public offering.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-105
Elantec Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Europe
13%
North America
48%
Asia
39%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Donald T. Valentine
David O'Brien, Ph.D.
Richard E. Corbin
Ralph S. Granchelli, Jr.
Terrence W. Plette
Barry L. Siegel
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Bipolar Design
Vice President, Marketing and Sales
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Products and Processes
Elantec's analog and mixed-signal ICs for commercial markets include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Op amps
Video circuits
Analog buffers
Fully integrated DC/DC converters
Comparators and ATE pin drivers
IGBT drivers
•
•
•
•
•
•
H-sync Genlock-computer video circuits
DC restore subsystems
Fader circuits
MOSFET drivers
PWM controllers
Laser diode drivers
Elantec has developed and used a variety of technologies for its products. In particular, Elantec has focused on
developing advanced complementary bipolar technology, using dielectric isolation and silicon-on-insulator (SOI)
techniques, and advanced CMOS technology. The company utilizes external foundries for other technologies
such as ultra high-speed bipolar and BiCMOS.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Elantec Semiconductor, Inc.
1996 Tarob Court
Milpitas, California 95035
Cleanroom size: 4,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 300
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Complementary bipolar, complementary bipolar dielectric isolation (DI), JI bipolar, CMOS
Products: Analog ICs
Feature sizes: 5.0µm (bipolar); 1.2µm, 2.0µm (CMOS)
1-106
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
ESS Technology
North American Company Profiles
ESS TECHNOLOGY
ESS Technology, Inc.
48401 Fremont Boulevard
Fremont, California 94538
Telephone: (510) 492-1088
Fax: (510) 492-1098
Web Site: www.esstech.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Asia-Pacific:
ESS Technology, Inc. • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 346-5300 • Fax: (886) (2) 346-1698
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
24
5
4
1993
15
0.2
3
Employees
1994
33
8
4
1995
106
30
9
1996
227
22
20
145
253
Company Overview and Strategy
ESS Technology, founded in 1984, designs, develops, and markets highly integrated mixed-signal
semiconductor solutions for multimedia applications in the PC and consumer markets, primarily to multimedia
desktop and notebook computer manufacturers. ESS is a leading supplier of mixed-signal PC audio solutions that
integrate all essential audio components on a single chip. In 1996, PC audio products represented 92 percent of
sales.
In an effort to broaden its product offerings, ESS made two company acquisitions in 1Q96. The company
acquired VideoCore Technology, Inc., a developer of digital video technology, and OSEE Technology, Inc., a
developer of fax/modem technology.
Current development is focused on new PC audio and multimedia products for the PC and consumer markets that
provide video and fax/modem/voice capabilities.
In 1996, 92 percent of ESS Technology’s total sales were to international customers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-107
ESS Technology
North American Company Profiles
Management
Fred S.L. Chan
Robert L. Blair
Nicholas A. Aretakis
John H. Barnet
Hoover J. Chen
Johnston Chen
Jan Fandrianto
Hadi Ibrahim
Robert S. Plachno
Roger K. Shum
Chi-Shin Wang
Gary Breeding
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Sales
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Asia-Pacific Sales
Vice President, Video Group
Vice President, Engineering, Multimedia Technology Design (Austin, Texas)
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President and Chief Technical Officer
Director, Marketing Communications
Products and Processes
ESS Technology has three principal product lines: the AudioDrive™ family, which targets the PC digital audio
market; the VideoDrive™ family, which targets MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 decompression-based consumer products,
such as DVD, video compact disk players, and set-top boxes; and the TeleDrive™ family, which focuses on
integrated audio-fax/modem applications, including full duplex speakerphone, digital simultaneous voice and
data, and videoconferencing.
ESS Technology’s audio chips have migrated from 12-bit to 16-bit and from mono to stereo sound. The company
has also developed a core library of audio semiconductor designs, including microcontroller, bus interface, codec,
mixer, filter and FM synthesizers, and device drivers, as well as application software.
The company’s chips are manufactured using mixed-signal 0.5µm and 0.6µm CMOS process technologies.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
ESS has contracts with several independent foundries for the manufacture of its products. The majority of its
devices are currently manufactured by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), its primary
supplier since 1989. The company also uses UMC, Sharp Corporation, and IC Works.
In December 1995, ESS announced a wafer supply program to commit approximately $62 million, and an option to
commit another $31 million, over a three year period for expanding manufacturing capacity and developing
advanced technology. The company expanded its relationship with TSMC by entering into a long term agreement
for an increased amount of wafer capacity. ESS agreed to pay approximately $32 million to TSMC in exchange for
wafer supply through 1999. ESS also obtained an option to further expand this agreement for additional capacity.
ESS also entered into a joint venture agreement with United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC) of Taiwan. ESS
agreed to invest $30 million for a five percent equity ownership in UMC’s new 200mm wafer joint manufacturing
facility, United Integrated Circuits Corporation (UICC). The wafer fab, located in Taiwan, was expected to begin
production by mid-1997.
1-108
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Exar
North American Company Profiles
EXAR
Exar Corporation
48720 Kato Road
Fremont, California 94538
Telephone: (510) 668-7000
Fax: (510) 668-7017
Web Site: www.exar.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Exar Japan Corporation • Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa, Japan
Telephone: (81) (44) 922-9411 • Fax: (81) (44) 922-9368
Europe:
Exar, Ltd. • Crowborough, East Sussex, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1892) 665718 • Fax: (44) (1892) 664354
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1993
146
14
11
1994
162
16
11
1995
159
(11)
14
1996
126
14
16
1997
92
(9)
14
500
525
468
447
325
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1971, Exar Corporation is involved primarily in the design and marketing of analog and mixed-signal
application-specific standard products, primarily for use in communications, consumer electronics, and computer
products. Nearly 80 percent of the company’s revenues are generated from sales to these three markets. Other
markets served by Exar include automotive, industrial, and medical. The company also produces digital ICs and
general-purpose analog ICs that are used primarily to complement its other products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-109
Exar
North American Company Profiles
ROW
1%
Sensor and Accelerometer
1%
Consumer
11%
Industrial,
Automation,
and Specialty
14%
PC
11%
Telecommunications
32%
Data Converter
31%
1996 Sales by Product Line
Europe
12%
Asia
10%
North America
45%
Japan
32%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Exar’s business strategy has changed significantly in recent years. Before 1990, Exar was a wholly owned
subsidiary of Rohm in Japan. As of January 1994, Rohm was no longer an affiliate of the company and today,
holds less than one percent ownership in Exar. In April 1994, Exar transferred its epitaxial and bipolar wafer
manufacturing operations to Rohm, thereby making Exar a fabless IC supplier.
In mid-1995, Exar withdrew from two long-standing businesses, mass storage ICs and Rohm-designed consumer
electronics IC products. Its departure from the hard disk drive market was involuntary, a result of actions taken by
SGS-Thomson, its foundry supplier of wafers for mass storage ICs.
To counter its discontinued businesses, Exar has made a series of acquisitions. In 2Q94, the company acquired
Origin Technology, Inc. for its automatic speech recognition technology and products, and Micro Power Systems,
Inc. for its data acquisition technology and access to the document imaging market. In 1995, Exar acquired
Startech Semiconductor, Inc., a supplier of ASSPs for a variety of markets, and Silicon Microstructures, Inc., a
company involved in silicon sensors for the medical, automotive, and consumer markets. These acquisitions
complement the company’s strategy to apply its mixed-signal technology expertise to niche segments within the
automotive, industrial, and medical markets.
Although Exar’s total revenues have been on the decline for the past few years, its core business has been
growing. Its core business represented nearly all of total revenues in fiscal 1996 versus about 45 percent in fiscal
1993.
Management
Donald L. Ciffone
Ronald W. Guire
Aurelio E. Fernandez
Roubik Gregorian
Jim Knutti
John Sramek
Suhas "Sid" Bagwe
Thomas W. Jones
Stephen W. Michael
1-110
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Chief Technical Officer, and General Manager,
Communications and Computer Division
Vice President and General Manager, Silicon Microstructures Division
Vice President and General Manager, Video and Imaging Division
Vice President, Strategic Planning and Long Range Development
Vice President, Reliability and Quality Assurance
Vice President, Operations Division
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Exar
Products and Processes
Exar’s IC products can be divided into five major market groups: communications, data communications, video and
imaging, silicon microstructures, and other products.
•
For the communications market, the company offers T1/E1 and T3/E3/STS1 line interface circuits, network
interface circuits, speech recognition devices through its Origin Technology subsidiary, speakerphone and
other telephony-oriented components, PLLs, and tone decoders.
•
For the data communications market, Exar supplies UARTs/DUARTs/QUARTs, clock oscillators/clock
multipliers, line drivers/receivers, frequency timing generators and Super I/O devices through its Startech
Semiconductor subsidiary, and fax/data/voice modem chipsets.
•
For video and imaging applications, Exar supplies A/D and D/A converters, CCD analog signal processors and
conditioners, automatic track finding (ATF) circuits, switched capacitor filters, and BBE® sound enhancement
circuits.
•
Subsidiary Silicon Microstructures currently offers high-precision pressure sensors for applications such as
engine control and tire pressure in automobiles, angioplasty and inter uterine pressure in medical instruments,
and HVAC and pressure transducers in industrial equipment.
Silicon Microstructures also supplies
accelerometers for automotive applications.
•
Other products include general purpose analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters for a wide variety of
applications, including pace makers, handheld digital voltmeters, and high-speed digital communications.
Through several foundry partnerships, Exar has access to a multitude of process technologies, including bipolar,
silicon gate and moly gate CMOS, and BiCMOS. The design rules of its bipolar processes range from 2.0µm to
6.0µm. The CMOS processes in use include 0.6µm 2P3M, 0.8µm 2P2M, 1.2µm 2P2M, and 1.6µm 2P2M
(5V/18V). Exar plans to implement a 3.3V 0.5µm 1P3M CMOS process in 1997 and a 0.35µm 1P2M process in
1998. For BiCMOS, the company uses a 0.8µm process and plans to move to a 0.6µm process in 1997.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Exar obtains approximately half of its wafer requirements from Rohm. Its other foundry partners are American
Microsystems, Nippon Precision Circuits, TSMC, and Chartered Semiconductor.
In 1995, Exar announced an agreement with IC Works calling for Exar to invest $15 million to help upgrade IC
Works’ fab from 125mm to 150mm wafers and improve its process technology. In return, Exar was to receive a
guaranteed portion of the fab output over a five-year period. In early 1997, it was announced that the agreement
was terminated as a result of dramatically changed market conditions for wafer pricing and availability, the recent
business redirection of Exar, and delays in the commencement of anticipated production by the foundry.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-111
Fairchild Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
F AIRCHILD S EMICONDUCTOR
Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation
333 Western Avenue
South Portland, Maine 04106
Telephone: (207) 775-8100
Fax: (207) 761-6027
Web Site: www.national.com/fairchild
IC Manufacturer
Employees
6,400
Company Overview and Strategy
Fairchild Semiconductor was relaunched in March 1997 when the combined logic, memory, and discrete
businesses of National Semiconductor were purchased by private investors. Fairchild Semiconductor originally
emerged in the late 1950’s when the late Sherman Mills Fairchild sponsored a small group of scientists—among
them Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore—in the development of a new process for the manufacturing of
transistors. The team reached their goal in 1959 with the introduction of the Planar process. A facility was
established in 1962 in South Portland, Maine, for the manufacture, test, and assembly of transistors.
Beginning in 1978, Fairchild became a major force in the development and production of logic circuits. Its first
innovation was the FAST® (Fairchild Advanced Schottky Technology) family of advanced Schottky TTL logic
circuits. Next came the invention of the FACT™ (Fairchild Advanced CMOS Technology) family of logic circuits in
1985. Still today, Fairchild is the leading supplier of FAST and FACT, as well as LCX, logic products.
In 1987, National Semiconductor purchased Fairchild from Schlumberger Ltd., a French conglomerate that had
acquired the company in 1979. National dropped the Fairchild name, but resurrected it in mid-1996 when its logic,
memory, and discrete businesses were combined to form the Fairchild Semiconductor Division. The division was
sold in March 1997. National retains a 16 percent stake in Fairchild.
Together with its advanced logic IC products, Fairchild’s high-performance non-volatile memory and discrete
semiconductor technologies form the foundation of the new company’s product portfolio. The fiscal 1996 (ended
May 31) revenues from these products were approximately $600 million.
Fairchild is investing in research and development to enhance its portfolio in the fast-growth areas of CMOS, lowvoltage logic, power and small-signal discretes, and non-volatile standard and application-specific memories.
Applications for Fairchild’s products include automotive entertainment systems, communications products,
desktop and portable computers, security, consumer products, and satellites and aerospace systems.
1-112
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Fairchild Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Management
Kirk Pond
Colin Cohen
Stephen Hamilton
Darrell Mayeux
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and General Manager, Memory Products Group
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Products and Processes
MOS MEMORY
ANALOG
DRAM
✔
✔
✔
✔
Amplifier
SRAM
Interface
Flash Memory
Consumer/Automotive
EPROM
Voltage Regulator/Reference
ROM
Data Conversion
EEPROM
Comparator
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
Other (Includes Telecom)
MOS LOGIC
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array
Bipolar Memory
✔
Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array/Standard Cell
✔
✔
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
MPU
OTHER
MCU
MPR
DSP
Full Custom IC
✔
Discrete
Optoelectronic
Logic Products
Fairchild offers 17 families of standard logic devices utilizing CMOS, bipolar, and BiCMOS process technologies.
The company claims to be the world’s third-largest supplier of standard logic ICs.
Its logic products include FAST® high-speed, low-power bipolar devices; FACT™ high-performance advanced
CMOS devices; FACT QS™ low-noise, high-performance advanced CMOS devices; LVQ low-voltage CMOS
devices, LCX/LVX high-performance, low-voltage CMOS devices with over-voltage protection; and VHC HCreplacement, low-noise, high-speed CMOS devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-113
Fairchild Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Memory Products
Fairchild’s memory products include several varieties of non-volatile memory ICs. It is among the world’s leading
suppliers of serial EEPROMs and EPROMs. Its EEPROM product group includes several families of standard
devices as well as application-specific devices such as a Plug-and-Play controller for ISA cards, a serial presence
detect (SPD) device for the memory module market, and the HiSEC™ family of products for remote keyless entry
applications. The company’s EPROM products include 5V devices with densities ranging from 16K to 4M and lowvoltage 1M parts.
Through an alliance formed originally by National and Toshiba in 1992, Fairchild also offers flash memory devices
compatible with Toshiba’s NAND and NOR architectures.
Discrete Products
Fairchild’s principal discrete products are DMOS power MOSFETs. Its other discrete products are small-signal
components such as small-signal transistors, JFETs, and diodes.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Fairchild Semiconductor Corp.
333 Western Avenue
South Portland, Maine 04106
Telephone: (207) 775-8100
Fax: (207) 761-6027
Cleanroom size: 51,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 12,350
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm, 150mm
Processes: CMOS, bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Logic ICs, discretes
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-2.5µm
Fairchild Semiconductor Corp.
3333 West 9000 South
West Jordan, Utah 84088
Telephone: (801) 562-7000
Fax: (801) 562-7500
Cleanroom size: 86,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 8,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, DMOS
Products: EPROMs, EEPROMs, logic ICs, discretes
Feature size: 0.8µm
Some of Fairchild’s IC products continue to be produced at fabs owned by National Semiconductor and vice versa.
Fairchild’s semiconductor assembly and test plants are located in Penang, Malaysia, and Cebu in the Philippines.
Key Agreements
• National and Fairchild remain closely linked through a long-term agreement to make the transition as smooth as
possible. The two companies also share and swap fab capacity.
• Motorola, Toshiba, and Fairchild Semiconductor announced in early 1997 they would jointly develop nextgeneration high-speed CMOS logic ICs. The three companies will work to develop 2.5V and 3.3V devices with
a propagation delay time of 2ns.
• Fairchild has a long-term partnership with Toshiba for the development, licensing, design, and manufacture of
NAND and NOR flash memories. The agreement was signed by Toshiba and National Semiconductor in 1992.
1-114
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Genesis Microchip
North American Company Profiles
G ENESIS M ICROCHIP
Genesis Microchip Inc.
200 Town Centre Boulevard
Suite 400
Markham, Ontario
Canada L3R 8G3
Telephone: (905) 470-2742
Fax: (905) 470-2447
Web Site: www.genesis-video.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
70
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
North America:
Genesis Microchip Corporation • Mountain View, California
Telephone: (415) 428-4277 • Fax: (415) 428-4288
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1987, Genesis Microchip is a technology leader in digital video/image manipulation. The company
designs, develops, and markets leading-edge ICs targeted at both existing and emerging applications demanding
high-quality video/image processing. Genesis sets the standard in video/image resizing. Markets are divided into
high-end chips (gm865 class), middle tier (gm833 class), and commodity, low-cost, high-performance cores.
Management
Paul M. Russo
Peter Dakin
Eric Erdman
Hamid Farzaneh
Lance Greggain
Stephen Solari
Scott Baker
Perry Chappell
Jordan Du Val
Shyam Nagrani
Jay Giblon
David Green
Graham Loveridge
Peter Mandl
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing Operations
Vice President, Finance and Administration
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Product Development Operations
Vice President, Marketing and Business Development
Director, Product Development Operations
Director, Sales
Director, Marketing
Director, Sales
Manager, Information Systems
Manager, Sales
Manager, Customer and Product Support
Manager, Video DSP Technology
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-115
Genesis Microchip
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
Genesis' products include the Genesis Scaling™ series of video/image resizing ICs (gm865x1, gm833x2,
gm833x3, gm833x3F), the gm2242B half-band filter, and the gmVLD family of video line doublers plus supporting
evaluation boards and software. The patented algorithms and architectures provide improvement in
computational efficiency over traditional finite impulse response (FIR) filter structures. All of Genesis' design
efforts currently employ 0.8µm (and below) CMOS technology. Several products are described below.
•
gm865x1—This is the first of the Genesis Scaling chip series. The gm865x1 IC is a single-channel device
that provides high-quality video/image processing technology for medical imaging, broadcast equipment,
and projection systems.
•
gm833x2—This is the second of the Genesis Scaling chip series and first in the mid-range family of
GenScale chips. The gm833x2 is a dual-channel device for use in workstation, projection systems, and
multimedia applications.
•
gm833x3—This is a triple-channel version in the 833 class designed for use in projection systems,
videographic workstations, and scan conversion equipment.
•
gm833x3F (fast) “Bullet”—This is a 68MHz version of an RGB scaler, featuring low power and an advanced
0.35µm, 3.3V CMOS process.
•
gm2242B Half-Band Filter—This is a decimating/interpolating digital filter for use in applications requiring
pre- or post-filtering of digital video signals. The gm2242B supports NTSC, PAL, SECAM, and square pixel
video standards.
•
gmVLD8/gmVLD10 Video Line Doublers—This is a single-chip de-interlacing device for use in equipment
such as large screen televisions, video walls, projection systems, video-in-a-window workstations, and home
theater screens.
1-116
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Gennum
North American Company Profiles
G ENNUM
Gennum Corporation
P.O. Box 489, Station A
Burlington, Ontario
Canada L7R 3Y3
Telephone: (905) 632-2996
Fax: (905) 632-2055
Web Site: www.gennum.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Gennum Japan K.K. • Suginami-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3334-7700 • Fax: (81) (3) 3247-8839
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends November 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
26
4
7
3
1993
27
4
7
2
1994
33
5
8
3
1995
42
7
9
4
1996
53
10
10
5
233
240
247
255
300
Company Overview and Strategy
Gennum Corporation, formed in 1973, is a Canadian high technology company that designs, manufactures, and
markets electronic components, primarily silicon integrated circuits and thick-film hybrid circuits, for special
applications in the information world.
The company's products include low-voltage audio electronic amplifiers and analog signal processing circuits
supplied to the world hearing instrument industry; video signal distribution and processing components sold to
the professional video and broadcast television markets; and user specific ICs for a wide variety of specific
applications where information is being conditioned, transmitted, or interpreted.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-117
Gennum
North American Company Profiles
User-Specific ICs
3%
Canada
9%
Pacific Rim
20%
United States
42%
Europe
29%
1996 Sales By Geographic Region
Video/Broadcast
Components
42%
Hearing Instrument
Components
55%
1996 Sales By Product Type
Management
H. Patrick Thode
H. Douglas Barber, Ph.D.
Michael R. Fielding
David L. Lynch
Ian L. McWalter, Ph.D.
C. Timothy Zahavich
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Marketing and Sales
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Manufacturing Operations
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Products and Processes
Gennum produces analog arrays, linear ICs, and thick-film hybrid circuits using bipolar process technology. The
company has developed a DMOS process, though it has not put it into production, and CMOS designs are
contracted out for manufacture by external foundries.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Gennum Corporation
3435 Landmark Road
Burlington, Ontario L7M 1T4
Cleanroom size: 18,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 350
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: Linear ICs, ASICs, thick-film hybrid circuits
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-4µm
1-118
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Harris Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
H ARRIS S EMICONDUCTOR
Harris Semiconductor
2401 Palm Bay Road Northeast
Palm Bay, Florida 32905
Telephone: (407) 724-7000
Fax: (407) 729-5691
Web Site: www.semi.harris.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Harris Semiconductor • Brussels, Belgium
Telephone: (32) (2) 724-2111 • Fax: (32) (2) 724-2205
Asia-Pacific:
Harris Semiconductor China Ltd. • Shanghai, China
Telephone: (86) (21) 6247-7923 • Fax: (86) (21) 6247-7926
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
Net Income
Capital Expenditures
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
3,004
75
3,099
111
3,336
112
3,444
155
3,621
178
585
(20)
22
591
17
27
635
31
44
659
42
80
708
52
140
8,000
8,100
8,100
Employees
Company Overview and Strategy
Harris Semiconductor is one of the four major business sectors of Harris Corporation, a worldwide manufacturer of
electronic systems, semiconductors, communications products, and office systems with sales of over $3.6 billion
and more than 26,000 employees.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-119
Harris Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor
20%
Lanier Worldwide
31%
Communications
23%
Electronic Systems
26%
1996 Corporate Sales by Business Sector
Harris Semiconductor originated as the Microelectronics Division of Radiation, Inc. in 1962. It became Harris
Semiconductor in 1967 through the merger of Harris and Radiation. Then in 1988, Harris Semiconductor nearly
tripled in size through the acquisition of the General Electric Solid State semiconductor business.
Harris Semiconductor manufactures and markets advanced analog, digital, power, and mixed-signal integrated
circuits and discrete semiconductors for power, signal-processing, data-acquisition, and logic applications. Plans
for 1997 include a focus on its wireless communications and multimedia technologies. Products recently brought
to market in these areas include its Prism line of RF integrated devices for communications and a video
encoder/decoder chipset for multimedia applications.
Plans for 1997 also include decreasing emphasis on its military product business and maximizing its discrete
product sales.
Data Acquisition
8%
Intelligent Power
12%
Power
30%
Signal Processing
14%
Mixed-Signal
16%
Discretes
29%
Integrated Circuits
71%
Digital
20%
1996 Semiconductor Sales
by Application
1996 Semiconductor Sales
by Device Type
Below are applications served by Harris’ semiconductor products.
Automotive—multiplexing systems, antilock braking systems, engine controls, emission controls, engine knock
sensing, air bag systems, and entertainment systems. This is Harris' largest commercial end market.
Communications—wireless local area network (LAN) systems, cellular base stations, satellite communications
systems, set-top boxes, and PBX, central office, wireless local loop, and fiber-in-the-loop equipment.
1-120
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Harris Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Video/Multimedia—video and image processing systems, video teleconferencing, and multimedia systems. In
early 1997, the company released the first of many planned multimedia devices. The device was an HTSC/PAL
video encoder/decoder chipset. The device is designed for use in VCR-to-PC editing systems, PC video capture,
teleconferencing systems, DVD players, and digital VCRs. The device is manufactured by foundry partner, TSMC,
using 0.6µm technology.
Power and Load Control—motor controllers, disk drives, power supplies, distributed power systems, and power
switching.
Power Protection—surge suppression equipment, uninterruptible power supplies, house electrical panel
protection, and on-board electronic circuit protection.
Other Applications—test equipment, industrial controls, consumer electronics, medical imaging, computer
peripherals, hand-held portable equipment, and military and aerospace equipment.
Management
Harris Corporation
Phillip W. Farmer
Bryan R. Roub
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Harris Semiconductor Sector
John C. Garrett
F. Scott Moody
W. Russell Morcom
Dyer Matlock
Bill McLean
Carleton Smith
Ron Van Dell
Edward Verbeek
President
Vice President, Military and Aerospace Products Division
Vice President and GM, Semiconductor Products Division
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President (North America), Sales
Vice President (Asia), Sales
Vice President and GM, Worldwide Sales and Marketing
Vice President (Europe), Sales
Products and Processes
Harris offers a broad range of standard, semicustom, and custom ICs and discrete semiconductors, including
intelligent power devices, data acquisition and signal processing circuits, digital microprocessor, peripheral, and
logic ICs, as well as radiation-hardened circuits for spacecraft and satellite applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-121
Harris Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
MOS MEMORY
DRAM
✔
SRAM
Flash Memory
EPROM
ROM
EEPROM
✔
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
ANALOG
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
MOS LOGIC
✔
✔
✔
✔
Interface
Consumer/Automotive
Voltage Regulator/Reference
Data Conversion
Comparator
Other (Includes Telecom)
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
General Purpose Logic
Bipolar Memory
Gate Array
Standard Cell
Amplifier
General Purpose Logic
✔
Gate Array/Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
✔
✔
✔
✔
MPU
MCU
MPR
DSP
OTHER
✔
✔
✔
Full Custom IC
Discrete
Optoelectronic
Process technologies used by Harris Semiconductor include: CMOS, BiCMOS, power BiMOS, high-frequency
bipolar/power MOS, high-voltage bipolar/power MOS, complementary bipolar dielectric isolation (bonded wafer),
CMOS/SOI (silicon-on-insulator), CMOS/SOS (silicon-on-sapphire), and radiation hardening.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Harris supplements its internal semiconductor production capabilities with foundry agreements with external
semiconductor manufacturers. For example, the company uses foundries for the fabrication of triple-layer-metal
CMOS devices like signal processing ICs.
Harris Semiconductor (Ohio), Inc.
1700 Fostoria Road
Findlay, Ohio 45840
Telephone: (419) 423-0321
Cleanroom size: 57,500 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 15,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm
Processes: CMOS, bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Custom digital, linear, logic, and
mixed-signal ICs
Feature sizes: 1.2µm, 1.5µm, 2.0µm
1-122
Harris Semiconductor (Florida), Inc.
P.O. Box 883
Palm Bay, Florida 32905
Telephone: (407) 724-7000
Cleanroom size: 53,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer sizes: 3in, 100mm, 125mm
Processes: CMOS, PMOS, bipolar
Products: MPUs, SRAMs, linear and digital ICs,
discretes
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.0µm, 2.0µm, 4.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Harris Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Harris Semiconductor (Pennsylvania), Inc.
Crestwood Industrial Park
125 Crestwood Road
Mountaintop, Pennsylvania 18707-2189
Telephone: (717) 474-6761
Cleanroom size: 74,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm, 150mm
Processes: MOS, bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Discretes, hybrids, ASICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm, 2.0µm, 5.0µm
Harris Semiconductor (Pennsylvania), Inc.
Mountaintop, Pennsylvania
Cleanroom size: 25,000
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: MOS
Products: Discretes, smart power ICs
Feature size: 1.0µm
In early 1996, Harris began building a new IC assembly and test facility in Suzhou, China. The company expects
construction to be completed by summer of 1998. The new facility will assemble and test digital logic,
microperipheral, and analog and mixed-signal devices. Harris has existing semiconductor assembly factories in
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and Dundalk, Ireland.
Key Agreements
• In 4Q95, Harris announced a license agreement with DSP Group Inc. Harris licensed DSP Group’s Oak and
Pine DSP cores for use in devices for audio-band signal processing applications.
• Harris has a product agreement with Sony. Under the agreement, Harris expanded its line of 10-bit, 12-bit, and
14-bit data converters to include Sony’s 6-bit and 8-bit converters.
• Harris has a second-source agreement with Xilinx for radiation-hardened FPGAs.
• Harris formed an agreement with Noise Cancellation Technologies to develop and manufacture proprietary
chips for application of NCT's active noise reduction technology.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-123
Honeywell
North American Company Profiles
H ONEYWELL SSEC
Honeywell, Incorporated
Solid State Electronics Center (SSEC)
12001 Highway 55
Plymouth, Minnesota 55441
Telephone: (612) 954-2301
Fax: (612) 954-2504
Web Site: www.ssec.honeywell.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
IC Sales
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
6,223
247
5,963
322
6,057
279
6,731
334
7,312
403
53
45
45
58
60
500
523
550
Employees
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1885, Honeywell is an international company that provides control components, products, systems,
and services for the home and building, industrial, space and aviation, and defense and marine markets.
Other*
2%
Space and
Aviation Control
22%
Industrial Control
30%
Home and
Building Control
46%
*Includes sales from the SSEC
1996 Corporate Sales by Business Segment
1-124
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Honeywell
North American Company Profiles
Honeywell established its Solid State Electronics Center (SSEC) in 1965 to support the high technology
demands in the markets served by the parent company. This growing reliance on microelectronics led SSEC to
become a niche market manufacturer of specialized ICs and solid-state sensors.
Over the years, Honeywell SSEC has taken on numerous military contracts. Two of the more well known programs
are the Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) program and the Enhanced Modular Signal Processor (EMSP)
program. These programs helped position SSEC for its future in control, memory, and spaceborne applications.
The SSEC's mission is to develop and produce niche semiconductor technologies and products which are
focused in the market areas of sensors, radiation-hardened space components, and specialized ICs for its parent's
needs and select external markets. SSEC is the world’s leading supplier of SOI CMOS ICs for space and industrial
applications. Approximately 50 percent of the SSEC's IC production is sold to external customers.
Management
Michael R. Bonsignor
D. Larry Moore
Larry C. Welliver
Lou Del Monte
Bryan Johnson
Pravin Parekh
Jay Schrankher
Jim Becker
Peggy Kvam
Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Vice President, SSEC
Director, Business Management, SSEC
Director, Human Resources and Facilities, SSEC
Director, Operations, SSEC
Director, Quality and Information Systems, SSEC
Manager, Material Management, SSEC
Manager, ASIC Products, SSEC
Products and Processes
Honeywell SSEC's key business areas are outlined below.
Space components (for commercial, military space, and tactical and strategic missile applications).
• SRAMs
• ROMs (SOI and bulk)
• Gate arrays (SOI and bulk) with ultra low power options
• Bus interface products (1773 and 1553)
Sensors (for industrial control, automotive, medical, and aircraft applications).
• Precision pressure
• High-accuracy magnetic
High-temperature products (for oil service industry, industrial control, and gas turbine control
All SOI devices.
• Op amps
• Switches
• A/D converters and controllers
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
applications).
1-125
Honeywell
North American Company Profiles
About 90 percent of Honeywell's ICs are manufactured using CMOS or radiation-intensive CMOS (RICMOS™)
processes and 10 percent using an advanced bipolar process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Honeywell, Incorporated
Solid State Electronics Center
12001 Highway 55
Plymouth, Minnesota 55441
Cleanroom size: 16,750 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,250
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, bipolar
Products: Rad-hard memories, ASICs, analog ICs, digital ICs, sensors, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.5µm, 0.7µm, 0.8µm, 1.2µm, 0.3µm, 0.4µm, 4.5µm
Key Agreements
• Honeywell SSEC licensed Micron Technology's Softool known-good die technology. It plans to use the test
method to provide known-good die to the military and commercial markets, primarily for space applications.
1-126
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
HP
North American Company Profiles
HEWLETT-PACKARD (HP)
Hewlett-Packard Company
3000 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, California 94304-1112
Telephone: (415) 857-1501
Fax: (415) 857-5518
Web Site: www.hp.com
Captive IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Hewlett-Packard Company • Geneva, Switzerland
Telephone: (41) (21) 780-8111
Asia-Pacific:
Hewlett-Packard Company • Causeway Bay, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2599-7777
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends October 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor*
Sales
IC Sales
Internal Sales
External Sales
Discrete Sales**
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
16,410
549
20,317
1,177
24,991
1,599
31,519
2,433
38,420
2,586
745
400
350
50
345
880
475
410
65
405
1,085
585
540
45
500
1,250
655
615
40
595
1,420
740
705
35
680
*Calendar year
**Includes internal and external sales
Company Overview and Strategy
Hewlett-Packard (HP) is one of the world's leading designers and manufacturers of electronic, medical, analytical,
and computing instruments and systems. HP divides its business into five product categories: computer
products, electronic test and measurement instruments and systems, medical electronic equipment, analytical
instruments, and electronic components.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-127
HP
North American Company Profiles
Analytical
Instruments
2%
Medical
Electronics
4%
Test/
Measurement
Instruments
10%
Electronic
Components
2%
Asia
21%
U.S.
44%
Computers
82%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Product Group
Europe
35%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Geographic Region
Hewlett-Packard's Components Group is a leading supplier of microwave semiconductors and optoelectronic
devices for the fiber-optic, wireless and visual communications, computer equipment, industrial, and automotive
markets.
In 1992, HP completed the acquisition of Avantek, Inc. Through Avantek, HP gained a wider customer base in the
components market. Those Avantek products targeted for commercial markets became part of the
Communications Components Division. Those products whose main applications are defense-related make up
the Avantek subsidiary of the Components Group.
Also under the wings of Hewlett-Packard is HP Labs, which is one of the world's leading electronic research
centers.
Management
Lewis E. Platt
Richard W. Anderson
William F. Craven
Alan Marty
Frederic N. Schwettmann
Rich Sevcik
Neal Carney
Lance Mills
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and GM, Microwave and Communications Group
Vice President and GM, Components Group
Vice President and GM, Integrated Circuits Business Division
Vice President and GM, Circuit Technology Group
Vice President and GM, Systems Technology Group
Manager, Marketing, IC Business Division
Manager, Research and Development, IC Business Division
Products and Processes
HP's semiconductor products range from analog and high-speed digital ICs to RF, microwave, and optoelectronic
semiconductors. The company also offers motion control devices, solid-state relays, and millimeter-wave
components. In addition, HP manufactures RISC MPUs that are designed using what it calls Precision
Architecture-RISC (PA-RISC).
1-128
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
HP
North American Company Profiles
In early 1997, HP introduced the latest product from its PA-8000 RISC microprocessor family of 64-bit MPUs for
high-end systems—the 12-million transistor PA-8500. Claiming to be HP’s most powerful microprocessor, the PA8500 incorporates 1.5MB of memory on chip and was designed on a 0.25µm process. Target applications for the
device include Internet access, database access and management, computer-aided design and manufacturing
(CAD/CAM), and communications.
HP uses sophisticated semiconductor technologies based on silicon, GaAs, and InP materials.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In April 1997, Hewlett-Packard announced the development of a new joint venture foundry company with foundry
company, Chartered Semiconductor, and the Economic Development Board (EDB) of Singapore. This is the
second fab facility investment HP has made in Singapore.
The new venture, called Chartered Silicon Partners, will be located adjacent to Chartered’s exiting facilities in the
Woodlands Industrial Park in Singapore. Construction of a 200mm wafer manufacturing facility is expected to
begin in September 1997 with production beginning in mid-1999. HP will receive a specified amount of wafers
(0.35µm and 0.25µm ASICs) from the venture in exchange for its investment, while the remaining capacity will be
offered as part of Chartered’s usual foundry services. Chartered will hold the majority interest of the venture while
HP and the EDB will hold minority positions.
Hewlett-Packard
350 West Trimble Road
San Jose, California 95131-1008
Telephone: (408) 435-7400
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,100
Wafer sizes: 3in, 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, GaAs
Products: ASICs, optoelectronics, discretes
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-5.0µm
Hewlett-Packard
39201 Cherry Street
Newark, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 435-6765
Cleanroom size: 13,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,250
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: Analog ICs, RFICs
Hewlett-Packard
3404 East Harmony Road
Fort Collins, Colorado 80525
Telephone: (303) 229-3800
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,250
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Processes: CMOS, bipolar
Products: RFICs, microwave ICs, MPUs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-1.0µm
Hewlett-Packard
1050 Northeast Circle Boulevard
Corvalis, Oregon 97330
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,600
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, MPUs, MPRs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-129
HP
Hewlett-Packard
Santa Rosa, California
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 2in
Process: Bipolar
Products: Discretes
North American Company Profiles
Avantek, Inc.
Santa Clara, California
Cleanroom size: 17,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 225
Wafer size: 3in
Process: GaAs
Products: ICs and discretes
TECH Semiconductor Singapore Pte. Ltd.
P.O. Box 2093, SE 9040
990 Bendemeer Road
Singapore 1233
Telephone: (65) 298-1122
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,250
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
(Joint venture with Texas Instruments, the Economic Development
Board of Singapore, and Canon.)
Key Agreements
• AT&T Microelectronics (now Lucent Technologies) and Hewlett-Packard signed an agreement in early 1995 to
develop and dual-source fiber-optic transceivers for SONET/SDH and ATM applications.
• To promote and coordinate the use of its PA-RISC architecture, Hewlett-Packard formed PRO, the Precision
RISC Organization. Some of the founding members are Convex Computer, Hitachi, Oki, Hughes Aircraft, and
Mitsubishi. Other members include Sequoia Systems and Winbond Electronics.
• Although not a PRO member, Samsung has the right to manufacture PA-RISC ICs to sell on the merchant
market and use in its own workstations.
• HP formed an alliance with Analog Devices for the joint development of advanced mixed-signal processes
based on HP's submicron CMOS and BiCMOS technologies.
• Hewlett-Packard and Intel announced a wide ranging joint research and development alliance in 1994 under
which the partners are seeking to design a superior next-generation 64-bit microprocessor by 1999, a year later
than originally planned. The processor will be binary-compatible with both Intel x86 code and HP PA-RISC
code.
1-130
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Hughes Electronics
North American Company Profiles
H UGHES E LECTRONICS
Hughes Electronics Corporation
Delco Electronics Corporation
One Corporate Center
Kokomo, Indiana 46904-9005
Telephone: (317) 451-5700
Fax: (317) 451-5426
Web Site: www.delco.com
Hughes Aircraft Company
Microelectronics Division
500 Superior Avenue
Newport Beach, California 92663
Telephone: (714) 759-2411
Fax: (714) 759-2986
Web Site: www.hughes.com
Captive IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
Delco Electronics
Internal Sales
External Sales
Hughes Aircraft
Internal Sales
External Sales
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
12,297
(922)
13,518
922
14,099
1,049
14,772
1,108
15,918
1,151
341
205
195
10
136
81
55
350
220
205
15
130
72
58
360
235
215
20
125
64
61
340
240
215
25
100
45
55
330
250
215
35
80
30
50
Company Overview and Strategy
Hughes Electronics Corporation (HE), known as GM Hughes Electronics Corporation prior to March 1995, is a
subsidiary of General Motors Corporation.
HE's principal operating organizations are Delco Electronics
Corporation and Hughes Aircraft Company. Its other business units are Hughes Telecommunications and Space
Company, DirecTV, Inc., and Hughes Network Systems, Inc.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-131
Hughes Electronics
North American Company Profiles
Other
1%
Telecommunications
and Space
26%
Aerospace and
Defense Systems
40%
Automotive
Electronics
33%
1996 Corporate Sales by Business Segment
Delco Electronics (DE) is a world leader in the development, manufacture, and marketing of vehicle and driver
systems for the global automotive market, and Hughes Aircraft, acquired by GM in 1985, is a world leader in
aerospace, defense electronics, and information systems.
Delco Electronics, alone, is the third largest captive IC manufacturer. Its fabrication facilities produce about 40
percent of its semiconductor needs. The company produces advanced ICs that perform a variety of functions,
such as deciphering radio frequency signals for audio systems, controlling the release of an airbag, suspension
system control, and fuel, electrical, and ignition management. Some of its new technologies include night vision
systems, collision avoidance systems, navigation systems, keyless start systems, tire pressure warning systems,
and reconfigurable LCD head-up displays.
Hughes Aircraft continues to restructure its business to adapt to severe cuts in U.S. defense spending. The
company intends to maintain its leadership in key defense markets, while at the same time, explore new
marketplaces and exploit new technologies. Some commercial ventures the company is involved in include:
digital cellular communications systems, advanced acoustic technologies, light projection systems, digital signal
compression, character recognition, and airport integration systems.
In January 1997, GM and Hughes Electronics announced a series of strategic transactions designed to
strengthen the position of GM in two key areas—telecommunications and space, and automotive electronics. GM
has a definitive agreement with Raytheon to spin off Hughes Aircraft from Hughes Electronics and then merge the
operation into Raytheon. Separately, Delco Electronics will be transferred from Hughes Electronics to GM’s Delphi
Automotive Systems. Both of these transactions are expected to take place in 3Q97.
Management
C. Michael Armstrong
Michael J. Burns
John C. Weaver
1-132
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hughes Electronics Corporation
Executive Vice President, Hughes Electronics Corporation;
General Manager, Delco Electronics Corporation
Senior Vice President, Hughes Electronics Corporation;
President, Hughes Aircraft Company
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Hughes Electronics
Products and Processes
IC Delco, DE's automotive semiconductor unit, designs and manufactures custom analog and digital ICs for
specific automotive applications such as anti-lock brake systems, engine controllers, suspension control systems,
communications, and instrumentation. IC Delco also produces silicon-based electronic sensors.
Among the semiconductor devices Hughes Aircraft designs and manufactures are ASICs, memory devices,
microcomponents, rad-hard circuits, monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), and millimeter-wave devices
using a variety of process technologies including CMOS, BiCMOS, GaAs, and InP.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Delco Electronics Corporation
IC Delco Business Unit
700 East Firmin Street
Kokomo, Indiana 46902-2340
Cleanroom size: 125,000 square feet (3 fabs)
Capacity (wafers/week): 12,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm
Processes: NMOS, CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: MPUs, MCUs, ASICs, logic and
linear ICs, discretes
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-2.0µm
Hughes Aircraft Company
Microelectronics Division
500 Superior Avenue
Newport Beach, California 92663-3627
Telephone: (714) 759-2411
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,600
Wafer sizes: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, SOS, CryoCMOS
Products: ASICs, memories, MCUs, LCD drivers,
linear ICs, rad-hard ICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 1.25µm-5.0µm
Hughes Aircraft Company
Hughes Communications Products
3100 Lomita Boulevard
Torrance, California 90509
Telephone: (310) 517-6880
Fax: (310) 517-6883
Capacity (wafers/week): 250
Wafer size: 3in
Processes: GaAs, InP
Products: MMICs, MM-wave devices, discretes
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-0.5µm
Hughes Microelectronics Europa, Ltd.
Fullerton Road
Queensway Industrial Estate
Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland KY7-5PY
Telephone: (44) (1592) 754-311
Fax: (44) (1592) 610-186
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,600
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, MOS
Products: ASICs, memories, custom ICs
Feature size: 3.0µm
Key Agreements
•
Delco Electronics and Texas Instruments jointly developed a new methodology, called Prism, that is claimed to
cut the high cost and long lead time of taking complex mixed-technology designs from concept to silicon.
Prism is being used by DE to produce configurable 16-bit microcontrollers for GM cars.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-133
IBM Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
IBM MICROELECTRONICS
IBM Microelectronics
1580 Route 52, Building 504
Hopewell Junction, New York 12533
Telephone: (914) 894-2121
Fax: (914) 894-6891
Web Site: www.chips.ibm.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
IBM Microelectronics Europe • Geneva, Switzerland
Telephone: (41) (22) 918-4600 • Fax: (41) (22) 918-4650
Asia-Pacific:
IBM Singapore Pte., Ltd., Microelectronics • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 320-1000 • Fax: (65) 227-8721
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate (IBM Corp.)
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
Internal Sales
External Sales
Capital Expenditures
Employees (IBM Microelectronics)
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
64,523
(4,965)
62,716
(8,101)
64,052
3,021
71,940
4,178
75,947
5,429
3,775
3,725
50
3,885
3,510
375
4,575
3,605
970
650
5,705
4,020
1,685
1,000
5,100
3,550
1,550
1,500
22,000
Company Overview and Strategy
International Business Machines (IBM) was founded by Thomas J. Watson in 1924. Since then, IBM has grown
into one of the world's largest corporations that sells in over 140 countries. IBM develops, manufactures, and sells
advanced information processing products, including computers and microelectronics technology, software,
networking systems, and information technology-related services.
1-134
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
IBM Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
Finance and Other
5%
OEM Hardware*
4%
Maintenance
9%
Software
17%
Services
21%
Latin America
9%
Information
Technology
Products
44%
Asia-Pacific
19%
North America
39%
Europe/
Middle East/Africa
33%
*Includes external sales of semiconductors.
1996 Corporate Sales by
Product/Service Group
1996 Corporate Sales by
Geographic Region
The Microelectronics Division of IBM develops, manufactures, and markets a wide range of integrated
microelectronic products and technologies. Products and services range from semiconductor design and
fabrication to fully assembled and tested functional assemblies.
Prior to 1992, IBM Microelectronics supplied its products and services exclusively to one customer—IBM
Corporation. Spurred by both a comprehensive restructuring of IBM into independent business units and the
high cost of developing advanced semiconductor technologies, IBM Microelectronics launched a worldwide
microelectronics merchant market effort in 1992 by offering to sell virtually every product and service in its
technology portfolio. Its products and services are targeted at manufacturers of computers, communications, and
consumer electronics systems.
IBM Microelectronics’ strategic products are its PowerPC RISC microprocessors and embedded controllers, x86
microprocessors, memory ICs, ASICs, and leading-edge packaging services. Other important microelectronic
products include analog and mixed-signal ICs, digital signal processors, and graphics chips. By combining several
of its chips to form system solutions, IBM is seeking to strengthen its presence in the data processing, consumer
electronics, and communications markets.
To bolster its technological leadership, IBM has entered into several major alliances. Examples of these alliances
are Toshiba, Siemens, and Motorola in process technology, the PowerPC microprocessor alliance with Motorola
and Apple Computer, and work in the area of X-ray lithography with Lucent Technologies, Motorola, and
Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-135
IBM Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
Management
IBM Corporation
Louis V. Gerstner, Jr.
J. Thomas Bouchard
Nicholas M. Donofrio
J. Bruce Harreld
Paul M. Horn
Ned C. Lautenbach
Lawrence R. Ricciardi
Robert M. Stephenson
G. Richard Thoman
John M. Thompson
David B. Kalis
Abby F. Kohnstamm
IBM Microelectronics Division
Michael J. Attardo
Orest Bilous
James K. Picciano
John C. Gleason
John Kelly
Peter Draheim
Stanley J. Grubel
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Human Resources
Senior Vice President and Group Executive, Server Group
Senior Vice President, Strategy
Senior Vice President, Research
Senior Vice President and Group Executive, Sales and Service
Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Senior Vice President and Group Executive, Personal Systems and
Technology Group
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President and Group Executive, Software Group
Vice President, Communications
Vice President, Corporate Marketing
General Manager, IBM Microelectronics Division
General Manager, Manufacturing and Process Development
General Manager, Applications and Solutions Development
Vice President and Assistant GM, Worldwide Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Strategy and Technology
Chief Executive Officer, SubMicron Semiconductor Technologies GmbH
Chief Executive Officer, MiCRUS
Products and Processes
IBM Microelectronics offers the following products:
Memory Products
• 4M, 16M, and 64M DRAMs (standard and low power versions). The company announced in April 1997 that it
was halting production of 4M DRAMs to make more room for ASIC production.
• 16M and 64M synchronous DRAMs (SDRAMs).
• 8M and 16M synchronous graphics RAMs (SGRAMs).
• 4M enhanced DRAMs (EDRAMs) through its partnership with Enhanced Memory Systems Inc.
• 4M VRAMs.
• 1M and 4M high-performance CMOS synchronous SRAMs (250MHz and 225MHz, respectively).
1-136
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profile
IBM Microelectronics
ASIC Products
• CMOS digital ASICs—gate arrays and standard cells with gate counts ranging from 50,000 to 3.2 million gates
(max.). IBM’s system cores include PowerPC and x86 MPUs, DSPs, peripheral circuits, I/O circuits, USB
devices, audio/video/graphics components, and communications interfaces.
• Bipolar analog and mixed-signal ASICs.
• CMOS analog and mixed-signal ASICs.
• BiCMOS analog and mixed-signal ASICs.
• High-performance BiCMOS analog and mixed-signal ASICs.
• IBM abandoned its FPGA development and production program in 1996.
Microprocessors and Controllers
• 6x86, 5x86C, 486 DX4, and 486 DX2 microprocessors (the 5x86C and 6x86 are designed by Cyrix).
• PowerPC™ 600 Series 32-bit and 64-bit RISC microprocessors (clock speeds of up to 250MHz).
• PowerPC™ 400 Series 32-bit RISC embedded controllers.
• MC196 16-bit microcontrollers (compatible with Intel’s MCS-96 16-bit architecture).
• Mwave™ digital signal processor (DSP) products for multimedia and communications applications.
Communications, Networking, Interface, and Graphics Products
• PCI core logic chipsets and PCI-to-PCI bridge chips.
• Firewire (IEEE 1394) high-speed (200Mbps) serial bus transceiver chips.
• High-end RGB series of palette digital-to-analog converters for 2D and 3D graphics.
• Adaptive Lossless Data Compression (ALDC) ICs and MPEG-2 digital video encoders and decoders.
• High-performance ATM, Ethernet, and Token Ring networking chips and ASIC cores (made available to the
merchant market in 3Q96).
• Silicon-germanium-based wireless communications and data-conversion devices.
• Infrared transceivers and communications controllers.
Other Products and Services
• Semiconductor contract manufacturing services for advanced ICs. Process technologies offered through
IBM’s foundry services include the CMOS 5S1 0.5µm process, the CMOS 5SF 0.35µm SPQM process, and
the CMOS 6SF 0.25µm SPQM process, which will be available for volume production in 2Q98.
• Deep-UV photoresists.
• Semiconductor test equipment.
• Semiconductor packaging services for single or multiple chip applications.
• Printed circuit boards and cards.
• PCMCIA infrared wireless and data/fax modem products and solid state file storage products.
IBM has developed and uses some of the industry's most advanced CMOS processing technologies including the
following: 0.35µm, 0.5µm, and 0.6µm CMOS with up to five layers of metal. The company unveiled its 0.25µm
CMOS 6S process technology in mid-1996. While digital CMOS is the company's principal technology, various
other processes are used, including bipolar, analog CMOS, BiCMOS, complementary BiCMOS, and silicongermanium (SiGe).
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-137
IBM Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
IBM Microelectronics
East Fishkill Facility
1580 Route 52
Hopewell Junction, New York 12533
Telephone: (914) 894-5647
Cleanroom size: 230,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 16,750
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, SiGe
Products: Logic ICs, linear ICs, mixed-signal ICs,
memories, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-0.8µm
(IBM's ASTC—Advanced Semiconductor
Technology Center is located here)
IBM Microelectronics
1000 River Street
Essex Junction, Vermont 05452
Telephone: (802) 769-0111
Capacity (wafers/week): 15,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: DRAMs, SRAMs, logic ICs, mixed-signal ICs,
linear ICs, ASICs, MPUs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-1.0µm
IBM Microelectronics
Thomas J. Watson Research Center
Route 134
Yorktown Heights, New York 10598
Telephone: (914) 945-3000
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,500
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: CMOS
Products: R&D
Feature size: 0.25µm
IBM United Kingdom Labs Ltd.
Hursley Park
North Winchester
Hampshire SO21 2JN
England
United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (962) 84-4433
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: Bipolar, MOS
Products: R&D
IBM France
224 Bd. John Kennedy
P.O. Box 58
F-91102 Corbeil Essones-Cedex
France
Telephone: (33) (1) 60-88-51-51
Cleanroom size: 390,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,750
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, MCUs, ASICs, DRAMs, SRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.8µm
IBM/Siemens
Corbeil-Essonnes Cedex
France
Cleanroom size: 116,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs (logic ICs in future)
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.5µm
1-138
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
IBM Microelectronics
IBM Duetschland GmbH
Werk Singdelfingen
Postfach 266
Singdelfingen, Germany
Telephone: (49) 7031-910
Capacity (wafers/week): 18,750
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 200mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS
Products: DRAMs, SRAMs, ASICs, DSPs, MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-2.0µm
IBM Japan Ltd.
800 Ohaza Ichimayake, Yasu-Machi
Yasu-gun, Shiga-ken 520-23, Japan
Telephone: (81) (755) 88-2511
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, DSPs, ASICs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm
(DRAM production discontinued here in 1996.)
MiCRUS
1580 Route 52
Hopewell Junction, New York 12533
Telephone: (914) 892-2121
Capacity (wafers/week): 9,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, MPRs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.6µm
(Joint venture with Cirrus Logic.
See Key Agreements.)
SubMicron Semiconductor Technologies GmbH (SMST)
Schoenaicherstrasse 220
Boeblingen Hulb, Germany
Cleanroom size: 107,640 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, logic ICs
Feature size: 0.65µm
(Joint venture with Philips. The partners plan
to upgrade the fab to handle 0.5µm line
widths. See Key Agreements.)
Dominion Semiconductor LLC
9600 Godwin Drive
Manassas, Virginia 22110
Telephone: (703) 367-3280
Fax: (703) 367-3271
Cleanroom size: 90,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature size: 0.35µm
(Joint venture with Toshiba. Scheduled to begin
production in early 1998. See Key Agreements.)
Key Agreements
• In mid-1996, IBM announced an agreement with Mitsubishi that allows the Japanese company to sell IBM
PowerPC embedded controller chips under the Mitsubishi brand name.
• IBM and Synopsys announced a six-year R&D agreement in February 1996 to jointly develop tools and
methodologies for designing complex ICs with as many as 10 million gates.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-139
IBM Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
• IBM licensed the Rambus ASIC Cell (RAC) high-bandwidth interface technology in early 1996 from Rambus to
use in its SystemCore ASIC megacell library.
• IBM granted licensing rights to Exponential Technology, Inc. to develop and market a new ultra-highperformance BiCMOS microprocessor based on the PowerPC architecture.
Volume shipments of
Exponential’s MPU are expected to begin in early 1997.
•
In late 1995, IBM and Toshiba began building a new 64M DRAM plant at the site of a closed IBM fab in
Manassas, Virginia. IBM and Toshiba will each own 50 percent of the facility, which will operate under the name
Dominion Semiconductor. First silicon is expected from the fab in late 1997 with production beginning in
1998.
• Ramtron signed a manufacturing agreement with IBM in May 1995 for EDRAM production. Under the
agreement, IBM is serving as a foundry for the production of Ramtron-subsidiary Enhanced Memory Systems'
EDRAMs, and IBM has a non-exclusive license to sell the devices.
• In 1994, Philips agreed with IBM Microelectronics to form a joint venture to manufacture ICs at IBM's fab facility in
Boeblingen Hulb, Germany. Philips holds 51 percent and IBM 49 percent of the new company, called
SubMicron Semiconductor Technologies GmbH (SMST). SMST is supplying products solely to IBM and
Philips, manufacturing DRAMs for IBM and logic ICs for Philips. Separately, Philips acquired the rights to IBM’s
16M DRAM technology for embedded applications. Embedded DRAM products will also be produced by
SMST.
• IBM and Cirrus Logic formed a joint manufacturing venture called MiCRUS in 1994. MiCRUS fabricates wafers
for both companies in a former IBM plant in East Fishkill, New York. IBM and Cirrus Logic own 52 percent and 48
percent of MiCRUS, respectively. For the time being, the agreement does not include product and/or
technology exchange.
• S3 Incorporated signed an agreement with IBM for the production of S3's graphics accelerators at IBM's fab in
Essex Junction, Vermont.
• The PowerPC RISC architecture has been, and continues to be, codeveloped by IBM, Motorola, and Apple
Computer. The trio of companies are also working on combining the PowerPC technology with an open
hardware platform supporting a range of operating systems.
• IBM is jointly developing with Siemens and Toshiba, 0.25µm technology for shrink-version 64M DRAMs and
256M DRAMs. Additionally, in 3Q96, Toshiba, IBM, and Siemens agreed to jointly develop system-on-a-chip
devices. As part of a separate agreement, Siemens and IBM are jointly producing 16M DRAMs in CorbeilEssonnes, France.
• Toshiba licensed the PowerPC microprocessor technology from IBM Microelectronics. Although Toshiba was
not given the right to sell PowerPC MPUs on the merchant market, it does have the right to develop and
manufacture its own derivatives of the processor. For now, IBM will produce the MPUs for Toshiba.
1-140
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
IBM Microelectronics
• IBM and Cyrix announced a five-year agreement in early 1994 calling for IBM to manufacture Cyrix's 486, 5x86,
and 6x86 MPUs. The two companies equally share the output of the Cyrix-designed chips.
• IBM and Analog Devices announced in late 1993 plans to jointly design, produce, and market mixed-signal and
RF chips based on IBM's silicon-germanium (SiGe) process technology. In 1996, Hughes Electronics joined
IBM in a program to develop SiGe chips for commercial communications applications.
• IBM is working with Motorola, Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems, and Lucent Technologies to establish a
manufacturing infrastructure for X-ray lithography. The team hopes to have a manufacturing capability by the
end of 1997.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-141
IC Works
North American Company Profiles
IC WORKS
IC Works, Inc.
3725 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134-1700
Telephone: (408) 922-0202
Fax: (408) 922-0833
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Employees
1994
21
1995
26
1996
41
1997
47
125
150
200
250
Company Overview and Strategy
IC Works was established in June 1992 when it acquired the San Jose fabrication facility, process technology, and
engineering and manufacturing staff of Samsung Semiconductor, the U.S. business of Korea’s Samsung.
As an independent company, IC Works designs, manufactures, and markets mixed-signal products using its
design and in-house facility, and provides quick-turn, submicron foundry services to selected mixed-signal
semiconductor companies.
IC Works operates three complementary mixed-signal businesses—clock products, wireless communications
products, and submicron foundry services.
Management
Ilbok Lee, Ph.D.
John Hagedorn
John Kelly
Richard Miller
Chen Wang
1-142
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Fab Operations
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Engineering
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
IC Works
Products and Processes
IC Works' product and services include high-performance clock generator ICs, wireless communication circuits,
and foundry services. New products for the computer and data communications markets are being developed.
Foundry Services
IC Works’ in-house foundry provides special services to mixed-signal semiconductor companies for the
development, prototyping, and early production of new products.
Clock Products
IC Works offers a wide range of high performance phase-locked-loop (PLL)-based clock ICs for system
manufacturers in a variety of markets. The main applications within the clock market include PC motherboards,
communications, mass storage, multimedia, and workstations. Products include clock buffers and single and
dual PLL clocks.
Wireless Communications
Utilizing its PLL and BiCMOS process technologies, IC Works is developing RF solutions for the wireless
marketplace, focusing on data communications. This product strategy includes development of component
level functional block products and ASSPs.
As part of the buyout, Samsung licensed IC Works to use its scaleable submicron CMOS and BiCMOS process
technologies. Currently, the majority of IC Works’ production wafer output is processed to 0.7µm design rules with
a migration to 0.6µm under way. Future plans include development of finer geometry processes down to 0.35µm.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
IC Works, Inc.
3725 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134-1700
Cleanroom size: 15,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,200 (expanding)
Wafer size: 125mm (upgrading to 150mm)
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Mixed-signal ICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.5µm, 0.7µm (0.35µm under development)
IC Works is in the process of expanding its fab capacity with financial support from its fab partners, which include
Sierra Semiconductor and TelCom Semiconductor Inc. The $50 million expansion, which includes moving from
125mm to 150mm wafers, is scheduled to be completed in 1997.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-143
IC Works
North American Company Profiles
Key Agreements
•
In 1996, IC Works and Motorola announced a second-source agreement for the development and manufacture
of CMOS and BiCMOS-based mixed-signal timing circuits. Motorola will contribute high-performance timing
solutions targeted at workstations, servers, and network applications, while IC Works will provide “clock”
solutions targeting personal computers and peripheral applications.
•
IC Works has a foundry agreement with TelCom Semiconductor. Under the agreement, TelCom will invest $10
million in equipment and the expansion of IC Works’ submicron wafer fabrication facility, in return for wafer
capacity. The agreement covers a five-year period which is expected to begin in late 1997.
1-144
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
ICS
North American Company Profiles
INTEGRATED C IRCUIT S YSTEMS (ICS)
Integrated Circuit Systems, Inc.
2435 Boulevard of the Generals
P.O. Box 968
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania 19482-0968
Telephone: (610) 630-5300
Fax: (610) 630-5399
Web Site: www.icst.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
37
4
7
1993
78
11
9
1994
94
12
10
1995
104
5
11
1996
100
4
12
224
314
336
219
206
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1976, Integrated Circuit Systems (ICS), designs, develops, and markets mixed-signal integrated
circuits primarily for data communications, clock, and multimedia applications. The company also provides custom
application specific ICs (ASICs) for the consumer, medical, telecommunications, and aerospace industries.
ICS’s primary focus is to combine its innovation, market position, and competency in mixed-signal and phase
locked-loop technology to capitalize on the trend convergence of computer, communications, and consumer
applications, especially in the LAN/WAN communications marketplace.
For most of its formative years ICS concentrated on supplying its mixed-signal technology in custom ASIC designs
for OEMs. In the late 1980’s, ICS began to develop proprietary standard products. ICS entered the frequency
timing generator (FTG) business in 1989 with a pioneering FTG for video clocks.
In 1992, ICS completed the acquisition of the Avasem Corporation, the leader in motherboard clocks. Together,
ICS and Avasem offer a breadth of clock products unequaled by any other company.
In April 1995, ICS purchased a majority interest in ARK Logic Inc., a Santa Clara, California-based developer of
graphical user interface (GUI) accelerator devices. ARK Logic's graphics controller technology was merged with
ICS's audio and mixed-signal RAMDAC and video clock generator technologies to provide complete PC
multimedia solutions.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-145
ICS
North American Company Profiles
In 1995, ICS introduced a line of high-performance transceiver chips designed for international use in the latest
network systems. These devices work in local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs), including
the newest technologies such as Sonet/SDH fiber optic systems, asynchronous transfer mode (ATM)
copper/fiber systems, and fast Ethernet systems.
In December 1996, ICS sold its subsidiary, Turtle Beach Systems Inc., in an effort to focus on its core businesses.
In a separate move, ICS sold its battery charge controller business.
Multimedia/
ARK Logic
13%
ASICs
17%
Clock ICs
49%
Turtle Beach
21%
1996 Sales by Product Group
Sales outside of the United States, primarily to the Pacific Rim, reached approximately 48 percent of total sales in
1996.
Management
Henry I. Boreen
Stavro Prodromou
Hock E. Tan
Gregory J. Richmond
William H. Weir
Ronald J. Wenger
Edward Christiansen
John Klein
Allan Havemose
Chairman and Interim Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Finance and Administration,
Chief Financial Officer, and Chief Operating Officer
Vice President, FTG Business Group (San Jose, CA)
Vice President, Data Communications Business Group
Vice President, Sales
Director, Operations
Director, Custom Products
President, ARK Logic, Inc.
Products and Processes
ICS's products are outlined below. The products are designed and produced using CMOS processing
technologies ranging from 0.35µm to 3.0µm.
Data Communications Products
• Fast Ethernet LAN
• ATM
• Sonet/SDH
1-146
Multimedia Audio Products
• Music synthesizers
• Audio codecs (coders and decoders)
• Software for wavetable music synthesis
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
ICS
North American Company Profiles
Clock Products
• Motherboard timing generators
• Video timing generators
• Graphics timing for workstations
• Special-purpose FTGs for Pentium Pro and
PowerPC microprocessors and chipsets
ARK Logic
• GUI controller chips and software drivers
• Multimedia accelerators
Custom ICs
• Mixed-signal ICs for a broad range of applications
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
All of ICS's wafers are currently manufactured by outside foundries, two of which meet a substantial majority of the
company's wafer needs. ICS’s foundry partners include AMI and Chartered Semiconductor.
Key Agreements
• During fiscal year 1996, ICS established an agreement with Chartered Semiconductor to secure a minimum
wafer supply from Chartered covering a five year period.
• ICS acquired a 51 percent interest in ARK Logic, Inc. in 3Q95. ICS plans to combine its audio design specialty
with ARK’s video graphics expertise to develop a chip that handles 3D graphics, VGA control, and audio and
video processing. ICS may purchase the remaining 49 percent of ARK Logic.
• In October 1992, ICS entered into an alliance with American Microsystems Inc. under which ICS secured wafer
processing capacity through the year 2000.
• ICS licensed DSP Group’s Pine digital signal processing and TrueSpeech voice compression technologies for
use in its next-generation audio components.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-147
ICT
North American Company Profiles
ICT
ICT Inc.
2123 Ringwood Avenue
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 434-0678
Fax: (408) 434-0688
Web Site: www.ictpld.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
ICT Inc., founded in November 1991, designs, manufactures, and markets programmable logic devices (PLDs) for
a variety of applications such as PCs, telecommunications, industrial, medical, and consumer electronics. The
company was originally established in 1983 by International CMOS Technology.
ICT is organized into two divisions: the Programmable Logic Division (PLD) and the Personal Computer Products
Division (PCPD). The PLD designs, develops, and markets user-programmable integrated circuits specializing in
programmable logic devices (PLDs). The PCPD designs and markets PC core logic chipsets and peripheral
controller products.
Management
David Sears, Ph.D.
Edward D. Barnett
Volker Cathrein
Donald E. Robinson
Beverly Schirl
Chairman and acting Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Chief Financial Officer and Secretary
Vice President, Special Products
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
ICT's programmable logic product line consists of two families of CMOS PLDs—PEEL (Programmable Electrically
Erasable Logic) Devices and PEEL Arrays—in addition to supporting development tools. PEEL Devices are
simple PLDs designed as replacements for standard 20-pin and 24-pin PAL/GAL devices with speed grades
ranging from 5ns to 25ns. PEEL Arrays are complex PLDs (CPLDs) that combine a non-segmented PLA with
FPGA-like logic cells with wide single-level delays as fast as 9ns/15ns (internal/external). PEEL Arrays are used for
combinatorial logic, with clocking frequencies running up to 80MHz for sequential functions.
1-148
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
ICT
North American Company Profiles
PEEL Devices
PEEL 16V8
PEEL 18CV8
PEEL 20V8
PEEL 22CV8
PEEL 22CV10A
PEEL 22CV10AZ
PEEL 22LV10AZ
PEEL 22V10
PEEL Arrays
PA7024
PA7128
PA7140
ICT's PLDs are designed and manufactured using proprietary 0.8µm CMOS EEPROM technology.
The company's PC product line consists of Pentium and 486 portable and desktop core logic chipsets,
programmable peripheral interface ICs, and peripheral controller ICs.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
As with other fabless IC suppliers, ICT utilizes external fabrication and assembly facilities. ICT wafers are currently
fabricated by two companies: Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing of Singapore and Rohm Co. of Japan.
Assembly and test work is handled by multiple vendors in the Philippines, Thailand, and Taiwan.
Key Agreements
• ICT has a license agreement with AMD involving PLD products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-149
IDT
North American Company Profiles
INTEGRATED D EVICE T ECHNOLOGY (IDT)
Integrated Device Technology, Inc.
2972 Stender Way
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 727-6116
Fax: (408) 727-8043
Web Site: www.idt.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Integrated Device Technology–Nippon–K.K. • Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3221-9821 • Fax: (81) (3) 3221-9824
Europe:
Integrated Device Technology, Ltd. • Leatherhead, Surrey, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1372) 363339 • Fax: (44) (1372) 378851
Asia-Pacific:
Integrated Device Technology, Asia, Ltd. • Tsimshatsui, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2736-0122 • Fax: (852) 2375-2677
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1993
236
5
54
28
1994
330
40
64
38
1995
422
78
78
95
1996
680
120
133
287
1997
537
(42)
151
201
Employees
2,414
2,615
2,965
3,875
4,380
Company Overview and Strategy
Integrated Device Technology, Inc. (IDT), founded in 1980, designs, manufactures, and markets highperformance integrated circuits and modules that are used in products serving its targeted markets segments:
personal computing (desktop and portable PCs), distributed computing systems, communications equipment,
and office automation. IDT enhances its customers’ ability to optimize the cost and performance of their
microprocessor-based systems by providing innovative solutions based on four product groups: high-speed
SRAMs; communications products including FIFOs, multi-port memories and ATM products; high-performance
logic products; and RISC microprocessors.
In an effort to diversify its products and reduce its reliance on one particular market, IDT is moving towards other
growth areas of SRAMs such as the communications market.
1-150
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
IDT
North American Company Profiles
RISC MPUs
12%
Logic
Products
20%
Communications
Products
36%
SRAMs
32%
Fiscal 1997 Sales by Product Group
Office
Automation
7%
Distributed
Computing
10%
Other
10%
Personal
Computing
22%
Data
Communications
28%
Telecom
23%
Fiscal 1997 Sales by End-Use Market
Japan
13%
Europe
17%
Asia
7%
United States
63%
Fiscal 1997 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
D. John Carey
Leonard C. Perham
Ray Famham
Stuart Bardach
Charles R. Clark
William B. Cortelyou
Dave Côté
Randy Frederick
Robin H. Hodge
Jimmy Lee
Daniel L. Lewis
Chuen-Der Lien
John R. Mick
Daniel R. Morris
Tom North
Bob Phillips
Robert Proebsting
Christopher P. Schott
William D. Snyder
Jerry Taylor
Thomas B. Wroblewski
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Quality
Vice President, Subsystems Products/SRAM Products
Vice President, Wafer Operations
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Logic Products
Vice President, Assembly and Test
Vice President, FIFO Products
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President, Applications Engineering
Vice President, ATM Products
Vice President, DRAM Products
Vice President, Worldwide Manufacturing
Vice President, Advanced Design Concepts
Vice President, Specialty Memory Products
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Memory Products
Vice President, Human Resources
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-151
IDT
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
IDT produces SRAMs, logic products, communications products, and RISC microprocessors. These products are
designed and manufactured using proprietary advanced submicron CMOS and BiCMOS process technologies,
including the company's CMOS VIII 0.5µm process and its next-generation 0.35µm process. IDT's product groups
are outlined below.
SRAMs
• Fast CMOS asynchronous SRAMs with 16K to 1M densities and access times as fast as 10ns; 4M density
devices will be available in 1998.
• Fast CMOS ZBT™ synchronous SRAMs that optimize system performance in applications that frequently turn
the data bus around between reads and writes. Available in 1M density with 4M density devices that will
support clock speeds up to 133MHz planned for 1998.
• Fast CMOS synchronous pipelined burst SRAMs (PBSRAMs) in 1M to 2M densities with clock speeds up to
100MHz to support zero wait state performance in cache applications.
• BiCMOS cache tag SRAMs for Pentium and PowerPC processors with high speed address-to-match times up
to 8ns.
• Ultra low-power CMOS SRAMs in 1M density with competitive standby and active supply current specifications.
• High-speed industry-standard and custom CMOS SRAM modules.
Communications Memory Products
• High-speed CMOS multi-port SRAMs in densities from 8K to 512K with both synchronous and asynchronous
interfaces.
• High-density CMOS first-in, first-out memories (FIFOs) in synchronous unidirectional or bidirectional and
asynchronous unidirectional or bidirectional versions, covering depths from 64K to 64K bytes and widths from
4 to 36 bits.
• Low-cost Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) 25 to 155 Mbps segmentation and reassembly (SAR) controllers
and physical layer (PHY) transceivers for use in network interface cards.
Logic Products
• High-speed FCT CMOS logic devices.
• High-speed 3.3V CMOS FCT logic devices.
• Low skew clock drivers.
• High-speed error detection and correction devices.
• Zero delay bus switch devices.
RISC Microprocessors
• R3000- and R4000-based 32-bit microprocessors, as well as the fourth generation R4700 and R5000 Orion
64-bit microprocessors.
• RISC subsystems.
1-152
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
IDT
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Integrated Device Technology
1566 Moffett Street
Salinas, California 93905
Fab 2
Cleanroom size: 24,000 square feet (Class 3)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,050
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: SRAMs, FIFOs, MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.8µm
Integrated Device Technology
2670 Seeley Road
San Jose, California 95134
Telephone: (408) 944-0114
Fab 3
Cleanroom size: 24,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,050
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: SRAMs, FIFOs, RISC MPUs, logic ICs, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.8µm
Integrated Device Technology
Hillsboro, Oregon
Fab 4
Cleanroom size: 48,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,875 (3,000 when fully outfitted)
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
(Began operations in 1Q96)
Key Agreements
• IDT gained the right to make, market, and distribute multi-banked DRAM (MDRAM) memory architecture
through a licensing agreement with MoSys Inc. The agreement also serves to expand the existing foundry
agreement between the two companies. IDT plans to introduce a 9M MDRAM chip in mid-1997, using 0.35µm
process technology at its Hillsboro facility. IDT is a minority investor in MoSys, Inc.
• IDT codesigned its Mips-based Orion 64-bit RISC microprocessor with its partner, Quantum Effect Design.
• IDT signed an alternate source agreement with Texas Instruments for logic products. TI and IDT are also jointly
developing FIFO memory devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-153
IMI
North American Company Profiles
INTERNATIONAL M ICROCIRCUITS (IMI)
International Microcircuits Inc.
525 Los Coches Street
Milpitas, California 95035-5423
Telephone: (408) 263-6300
Fax: (408) 263-6571
Web Site: www.imicorp.com
IC Manufacturer
Employees
80
Company Overview and Strategy
International Microcircuits Inc. (IMI) was formed in 1972 to manufacture high quality chrome photomasks. In the
early 1990's IMI began developing niche application-specific standard products (ASSPs), building on its years of
experience in ASICs. The company has a particular strength in the area of frequency synthesis using phaselocked loop (PLL) techniques.
IMI has positioned itself as a leading supplier of clock circuits and is focusing its efforts on the consumer,
computer, and wireless communications markets. The company is expanding its frequency timing generator
technology to include other markets such as high-speed modems, digital video disks (DVDs), and printer
applications. In the area of wireless communications, IMI is developing integrated solutions for the ISM and DECT
wireless communications applications.
Export sales accounted for almost 80 percent of total revenue in fiscal 1996.
Japan
7%
Europe
4%
North America
21%
Asia
68%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1-154
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
IMI
North American Company Profiles
Management
Frank Deverse
Ilhan Refioglu
Orhan Tozun
Ed Walsh
George Gary
Rick Reifer
Kazuo Tomari
Larry Zuckerman
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and acting Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Manufacturing
Director, Computer Products
Director, Marketing and Sales
Drector, Wireless Communications and New Business Development
Director, Wireless Communications
Products and Processes
IMI's products are focused on two major applications: frequency synthesis for telecommunications and clock
generation for digital systems. These products include clock generation devices for PC motherboards (including
those based on the latest CISC and RISC processors) and PLLs and phase detectors for cellular phones, cordless
phones, satellite receivers, and cable TV boxes. IMI is also a pioneer in the integration of spread spectrum
technology for reducing EMI.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
To supplement its own wafer production capacity, IMI has foundry agreements with IBM, GMT Microelectronics,
and Seiko.
International Microcircuits Inc.
525 Los Coches Street
Milpitas, California 95035-5423
Cleanroom size: 2,000 square feet (Class 10)
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASSPs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.8µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-155
IMP
North American Company Profiles
IMP
IMP, Inc.
2830 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134-2108
Telephone: (408) 432-9100
Fax: (408) 434-0335
Web Site: www.impweb.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1993
56
(2)
10
2
1994
48
0.4
9
5
1995
60
1
9
5
1996
77
5
10
7
1997
65
(12)
10
n/a
324
340
400
425
200
Company Overview and Strategy
IMP was founded in 1981 as International Microelectronic Products, but changed its name to IMP, Inc. in 1993.
Originally in the custom IC business, IMP began marketing its silicon foundry in 1987 and exited the custom IC
business in 1990 with the introduction of its first standard product. IMP is a supplier of high-integration and
programmable, analog and mixed-signal ICs and wafer manufacturing services to the computer, communications,
and control markets. The company is a technology leader in analog signal processing and programmable analog
design techniques.
IMP is comprised of two business groups, the Application-Specific Standard Products group and the CustomerSpecific Products group (wafer foundry). The company's ASSP group designs, manufacturers, and markets a
proprietary line of value-added ICs for tape and disk drive manufacturers. The CSP group provides a wide range of
CMOS IC manufacturing processes (specializing in mixed-signal) to companies in the computer and computer
peripherals markets, as well as to fabless semiconductor companies and IMP's own ASSP group. Value-added
processes include 0.8µm CMOS, EECMOS, 3-volt, and BiCMOS.
1-156
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
IMP
North American Company Profiles
ASSP
48%
Europe and
Pacific Basin
30%
CSP
52%
1997 Sales by Product Group
North America
70%
1997 Sales by Geographic Region
To address the need for wafer capacity by small fabless startup companies, IMP announced the establishment of
its Silicon Venture Partners (SVP) program in May 1995. Under the SVP program, IMP provides access to wafer
fabrication capabilities to fabless semiconductor startups. This includes absorbing some of the expenses of
developing and producing a new IC in exchange for product, marketing, and/or technology rights, a share of
future profits, or other compensation.
Management
David A. Laws
George Rassam
Russ Almand
Tarsaim Batra
Robert J. Crossley
Jerry L. DaBell
Moiz B. Khambaty, Ph.D.
Gregory Koskowich
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President, Administration
Vice President, Product Planning
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, Product Development
Products and Processes
Application-Specific Standard Products
• High-frequency programmable filters for tape and disk drives.
• Read channel ICs with both 3V and 5V operation for tape and disk drives.
• Electrically programmable analog circuits (EPAC™)—Analog counterparts to digital FPGAs that are designed
for signal conditioning applications in the sensor, instrumentation, and industrial control markets. The
EPACs are based on IMP's mixed-signal 1.2µm EECMOS process.
Customer-Specific Products—IMP provides specialized or value-added foundry services. The firm is capable of
running multiple processes in the same fab.
• CMOS Analog Processes: For analog and mixed-signal applications in mass storage products, fax modems,
local area networks, cellular phones, and computers.
• EECMOS Process: Suitable for customization or personalization of customer designed circuits through onchip electrical programming.
• High-Voltage Processes: Allows a chip to be designed with some sections functioning up to 18 volts and
other sections at the typical 5 volts.
• 3-volt Processes: To be used with circuits designed for portable system applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-157
IMP
North American Company Profiles
IMP's process technologies include: 0.8µm double-poly/double-metal CMOS, 1.0µm single- and doublepoly/double-metal CMOS, 1.2µm low-voltage and high-voltage CMOS, 1.2µm double-poly/double-metal
BiCMOS, and 1.2µm double-poly/double-metal EECMOS.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
IMP, Inc.
2830 North First Street
San Jose, California 95134
Cleanroom size: 16,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, EECMOS
Products: ASSPs, ROMs, foundry services
Feature sizes: CMOS: 0.8µm, 1.0µm, 1.2µm, 2.0µm, 3.0µm, 5.0µm
BiCMOS: 1.2µm
EECMOS: 1.2µm
Key Agreements
• In July 1995, IMP signed a five-year foundry agreement with Rockwell Semiconductor Systems for the
fabrication of Rockwell’s mixed-signal modem ICs.
• IMP joined with Zilog and Allegro MicroSystems in a marketing alliance. The team is marketing what they call a
ZIA disk drive chipset, with ZIA standing for Zilog, IMP, and Allegro. IMP's contribution to the ZIA chipset are the
read channel ICs and ROMs.
• In 1992, IMP signed a technology and distribution agreement with Asahi Kasei Microsystems (AKM) covering
ASSPs.
• IMP has a design and process technology transfer agreement with South African Microelectronic Systems
(SAMES). SAMES purchased the rights to IMP's 1.2µm and 2.0µm mixed-signal process technologies and has
been qualified as a second source for IMP’s high-volume manufacturing processes.
1-158
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Infinite Technology
North American Company Profiles
INFINITE T ECHNOLOGY
Infinite Technology Corporation
2425 North Central Expressway, Suite 323
Richardson, Texas 75080
Telephone: (972) 437-7800
Fax: (972) 437-7810
Web Site: www.infinite-tech.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
30
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1991, Infinite Technology Corporation (ITC) is involved in the research, design, development, and
marketing of high-performance reconfigurable function and application specific semiconductor products and
technology. It also provides design support and design services.
ITC has developed a field-programmable, in-system reconfigurable architecture that efficiently addresses the
need for high performance arithmetic datapath functionality required to accelerate data stream algorithms for image
processing in video editing, digital still cameras, broadcast video, pattern recognition, medical instrumentation,
and virtual reality. Other applications for the company’s products include robotics, communications, satellites, data
storage, and military equipment.
Management
Tim Smith
Lavelle Gibson
Art Berger
Glen Haas, Jr.
George Landers
Mark R. Smith
Robert L. (Les) Veal
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Business Services
Manager, Business Development
Products and Processes
ITC’s products and services include: reconfigurable arithmetic datapath (RAD™) IC products, which are essentially
reconfigurable DSPs; technology license agreements for programmable logic, reconfigurable arithmetic datapath,
and digital signal processing architectures; ASIC design services, including custom macrocell development; and
software development services.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-159
Infinite Technology
North American Company Profiles
ITC’s RAD5A4 device features four 100MHz 16-bit MacroSequencer processors, a built-in dual PLA, and five data
buses. The company believes the RAD5A4 offers concurrent parallel processing performance (up to 3.2 billion
operations per second) for less than the cost of a single-chip DSP.
The company’s ASIC design services cover custom development of ICs and design cell libraries specializing in
digital, analog, and mixed-signal devices, as well as memories. Design libraries include a range of custom I/Os
(including SCSI and PCI), dense RAMs, PLLs, oscillators, and high-speed multipliers.
The company also offers its Cheetah high-performance hard datapath core for complex system-level ASICs. The
Cheetah datapath generator core required no synthesis, is software configurable, and can be integrated with
popular microprocessor cores. The Cheetah core can also be used to design custom RAD ICs.
ITC’s architecture features single-poly, double-level-metal 0.5µm or 0.6µm CMOS technology. A 0.35µm process
is under development.
Infinite Technology also functions as the U.S. representative for Nippon Precision Circuits and has a close
relationship with the Japanese company involving technology and design.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
ITC’s RAD devices are manufactured by TSMC through Nippon Precision Circuits.
1-160
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Integrated Silicon Solution
North American Company Profiles
INTEGRATED S ILICON S OLUTION (ISSI)
Integrated Silicon Solution Inc.
2231 Lawson Lane
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 588-0800
Fax: (408) 588-0806
Web Site: www.issiusa.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
ISSI Europe • Planegg, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 899-30193 • Fax: (49) (89) 899-0399
Asia-Pacific:
ISSI Taiwan • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 397-9070 • Fax: (886) (2) 394-4024
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
29
1
3
Employees
1993
53
6
6
1994
61
5
9
1995
123
30
15
1996
132
1
21
190
228
311
385
Company Overview and Strategy
Integrated Silicon Solution, Inc. (ISSI), founded in 1988, designs and markets high-performance SRAM and nonvolatile memory ICs. The company’s initial development efforts were focused on high-performance SRAMs for
cache memory applications and introduced its first SRAM products in 1990. ISSI has since expanded its product
offering to include high-speed EPROMs, serial EEPROMs, and flash memory devices, and has expanded its
markets to include networking applications, telecommunications, office automation, instrumentation, and
consumer markets.
To date, SRAM sales have accounted for substantially all of ISSI's product sales. In an effort to reduce its
dependency on the memory market, ISSI entered the microcontroller market in early 1997 with the introduction of
a microcontroller family.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-161
Integrated Silicon Solution
Telecom
2%
Disk Drives
5%
North American Company Profiles
Japan
3%
Other
8%
Networks
10%
Distributors
13%
Modem
40%
Computers
22%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
Europe
10%
Asia/Other
11%
Taiwan
24%
United States
52%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Jimmy S.M. Lee
Gary L. Fischer
Kong-Yeu Han
Mo Bandali
Robert G. Cushman
Thomas Doczy
Robert Shen
Paul Song
John Unger
Chung Wang
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Finance and Administration,
and Chief Financial Officer
Executive Vice President and General Manager, ISSI-Taiwan
Vice President, Test and Product Engineering
Vice President, Corporate Marketing
Vice President, Memory Marketing Business Unit
Vice President, Corporate Planning
Vice President, Design Engineering
Vice President, Quality Assurance
Vice President, Technology
Products and Processes
ISSI designs and markets a family of high-performance SRAMs, as well as several families of non-volatile memory
products, such as high-speed, high-density EPROMs, serial EEPROMs, and flash memories. In early 1997, ISSI
introduced the first products in a new family of microcontrollers with integrated non-volatile memory.
SRAM Products
• 5V SRAMs in 64K, 256K, 512K, and 1M density levels with access speeds as low as 10ns.
• 3.3V SRAMs in 256K, 512K, and 1M density levels with access speeds as low as 12ns.
• 3.3V 1M and 2M synchronous SRAMs with access speeds as low as 4ns for Pentium and PowerPC cache
applications.
EPROM Products
• 5V EPROMs in 256K, 512K, and 1M density levels with access speeds of 30ns to 90ns.
• 3.3V EPROMs in 512K and 1M density levels with 90ns access times.
• 2.4V voice EPROMs with embedded speech algorithm technology.
1-162
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Integrated Silicon Solution
EEPROM Products
• 3.3V and 5V serial EEPROMs in 1K, 2K, and 4K density levels.
Flash Memory Products
• 1M Intel-compatible bulk-erase flash memories. The company plans to introduce a 2M bulk-erase and 1M, 2M,
and 4M boot block flash chips in 1996.
Microcontroller Products
• The company offers variations on the industry-standard 8051 and 8031 8-bit MCUs with embedded ROM. A
flash version, as well as 16-bit and 32-bit parts, are planned for introduction in 3Q97.
Other Products
• ISSI entered the voice-chip market in 1996 with the introduction of a one-time programmable (OTP) voice chip.
The device features ADPCM compression and pop noise reduction and is the first in a planned product line of
OTP voice devices.
ISSI develops its advanced CMOS process technology in collaboration with its Asian manufacturing partners.
Through these alliances, ISSI has jointly developed and taken into production six generations of CMOS memory
technology with 1.2µm, 1.0µm, 0.8µm, 0.6µm, 0.5µm, and 0.35µm feature sizes. The company currently has
several development programs with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), including a program
based on a 0.35µm design for advanced SRAM applications and a 0.5µm design for a high-speed flash memory
product. ISSI is currently in the process of developing 0.3µm and 0.25µm SRAM processes.
The company also has collaborative programs with Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) in Singapore
for 0.5µm SRAM process technology and with Belling Semiconductor in China for EEPROM design and process
technology.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
ISSI’s principal manufacturing partner is TSMC, with whom it also jointly develops process technology. Since
1993, ISSI has also used Chartered as a foundry for some SRAM and flash products.
In addition to securing capacity with independent foundries, ISSI has invested in several joint venture
agreements, further guaranteeing capacity. In June 1996, ISSI entered into a joint venture with TSMC, along with
Altera, Analog Devices, and other investors, to create a wafer fabrication facility, called WaferTech LLC, to be
located in Camas, Washington. ISSI also has a similar agreement with United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC),
located in Taiwan, for additional supply of wafers. (see Key Agreements below).
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-163
Integrated Silicon Solution
North American Company Profiles
Key Agreements
• In July 1996, ISSI signed a manufacturing and joint venture agreement with TSMC, along with other investors.
The agreement calls for ISSI to receive a minimum wafer capacity from TSMC in return for a four percent equity
stake in the new venture. Construction of WaferTech LLC began in June 1996 with production expected to
start in 2Q98 (see separate profile of TSMC).
• In early 1996, ISSI announced an agreement with Intel. ISSI licensed flash-related patents from Intel and will
pay royalty fees to Intel for the revenues generated from certain flash-based products.
• In fiscal 1995, ISSI and UMC signed a manufacturing and joint venture agreement. Under terms of the
agreement, ISSI agreed to invest $30 million for an equity stake in a joint manufacturing venture (UICC) that will
provide ISSI with an additional supply of wafers beginning in 2H97.
1-164
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Intel
North American Company Profiles
INTEL
Intel Corporation
Robert Noyce Building
2200 Mission College Boulevard
P.O. Box 58119
Santa Clara, California 95052-8119
Telephone: (408) 765-8080
Fax: (408) 765-1821
Web Site: www.intel.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Intel Corporation (UK) Ltd. • Swindon, Wiltshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1793) 403-000
Japan:
Intel K.K. • Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, Japan
Telephone: (81) (289) 47-8522
Asia-Pacific:
Intel Semiconductor Ltd. • Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2844-4555
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
IC Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
5,844
4,950
1,067
780
1,228
1993
8,782
7,550
2,295
970
1,933
1994
11,521
9,850
2,285
1,111
2,441
1995
16,202
13,590
3,566
1,296
3,550
1996
20,847
17,870
5,157
1,808
3,024
25,800
29,500
32,600
41,600
48,500
Company Overview and Strategy
Intel Corporation was established in 1968 to pursue the potential of integrating large numbers of transistors into
silicon chips. The company created the first DRAM, the first EPROM, and the first microprocessor, revolutionizing
the electronics industry by making possible small and powerful computing systems. Intel originally flourished as a
MOS memory supplier. However, in 1985 Intel abandoned the DRAM business, in favor of microprocessors.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-165
Intel
North American Company Profiles
Today, Intel is by far the world's leading supplier of MOS microprocessors. The company's other principal products
are microprocessor-related board-level products, core-logic chipsets, embedded processors and microcontrollers,
flash memory devices, network and communications products, and conferencing products. Its IC products are
sold to manufacturers of computer systems and peripherals, automotive equipment, industrial systems, and
telecommunications products.
Systems/
Other
15%
Flash Memories
5%
Japan
12%
Asia-Pacific
18%
Microcomponents
80%
1996 Sales by Product Group
North America
42%
Europe
28%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Thanks to strong demand for its microprocessors, Intel grew to become the world's largest semiconductor
manufacturer in 1993. Part of Intel's strategy to maintaining momentum and supporting demand for its products is
heavy reinvesting with its profits. Since 1991, Intel has invested more in new plants and equipment each year
than any other semiconductor company in the world. The company expects to expend approximately $4.5 billion
for capital additions in 1997.
Intel believes that communications and multimedia will be decisive areas for the PC industry in the next decade.
For this reason, the company continues to introduce new hardware and software products for local area network
(LAN) management and personal computer conferencing systems. Intel is also pushing its MMX™ media
enhancement technology, which the company says speeds up the execution of multimedia-related functions by
routing compute-intensive code to the central processor, rather than through dedicated silicon. The first
processors to use the MMX instruction set were introduced in January 1997. Intel’s other chips are expected to
gain MMX capability in 1997.
Due to the growth of Pentium microprocessor-based systems, Intel has become a major supplier of core-logic
chipsets. The company’s Intel430 PCIset products, designed for desktop and mobile Pentium processors, were
the first chipsets to support the Universal Serial Bus (USB) high-performance bus architecture.
In flash memories, Intel has dominated the market essentially from the beginning. However, its share of the market
has dropped from 75 percent or more in the early 1990’s to about 44 percent in 1996 as several other players
have aggressively pursued the market.
1-166
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Intel
North American Company Profiles
Over the past couple of years Intel has stepped up its strategy of investing in other companies, typically startups,
to help facilitate new application software content and hardware. The company investments number in the
“hundreds,” and are not limited to chip companies. Companies in which it has recently invested include I/O chip
specialist Standard Microsystems Corp.; Avid Technology Inc., which makes digital content-creation products;
Case Technology, a Denmark-based company that makes Fast Ethernet products; and Xircom Inc., a PC-Card
modem vendor.
Management
Gordon E. Moore
Andrew S. Grove
Craig R. Barrett
Frank C. Gill
Paul S. Otellini
Gerhard H. Parker
Leslie L. Vadasz
Ronald J. Whittier
Albert Y.C. Yu
Michael A. Aymar
Andy D. Bryant
Louis J. Burns
Dennis L. Carter
Sunlin Chou
Richard A. DeLateur
F. Thomas Dunlap, Jr.
Carlene M. Ellis
Patrick P. Gelsinger
Hans G. Geyer
Thomas L. Hogue
Harold E. Hughes, Jr.
James W. Jarrett
Robert T. Jenkins
Patrick S. Jones
D. Craig Kinnie
Michael C. Maibach
Edward A. Masi
Avram C. Miller
John H.F. Miner
Patricia Murray
Stephen P. Nachtsheim
Robert H. Perlman
Ronald J. Smith
Arvind Sodhani
Michael R. Splinter
Chairman Emeritus
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Executive Vice President and GM, Internet and Communications Group
Executive Vice President and Director, Sales and Marketing Group
Executive Vice President and GM, Technology and Manufacturing Group
Senior Vice President and Director, Corporate Business Development
Senior Vice President and GM, Content Group
Senior Vice President and GM, Microprocessor Products Group
Vice President and GM, Desktop Products Division
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and Director, Information Technology
Vice President and Director, Sales and Marketing Group
Vice President and Director, Components Technology Development
Vice President, Finance, Intel Architecture Group
Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
Vice President and Director, Information Technology
Vice President and GM, Desktop Products Group
Vice President and GM, European Operations
Vice President and Director, Materials
Vice President and Director, Planning and Logistics
President, Intel PRC Corporation
Vice President and Director, Corporate Licensing
Vice President, Finance, and Corporate Controller
Vice President and Assistant GM, Internet and Communications Group
Vice President, Government Affairs
Vice President, Enterprise Server Group
Vice President and Director, Business Development
Vice President and GM, Enterprise Server Group
Vice President and Director, Human Resources
Vice President and GM, Mobile/Handheld Products Group
Vice President, Finance and Director, Tax, Customs, and Licensing
Vice President and GM, Computing Enhancement Group
Vice President and Treasurer
Vice President and Assistant GM, Technology and Manufacturing Group
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-167
Intel
North American Company Profiles
Microprocessor Products Group
Michael J. Fister
Vice President and General Manager, Microprocessor Division 6
Dov Frohman
Vice President and General Manager, Israel Operations
David Perlmutter
Vice President and General Manager, Israel Development Center
Stephen L. Smith
Vice President and General Manager, Santa Clara Processor Division
Robert P. Colwell
Director, IA-32 Architecture
John H. Crawford
Director, Microprocessor Architecture
Paul D. Madland
Director, Circuit Technology
Frederick J. Pollack
Director, Measurement, Architecture, and Planning
Uri C. Weiser
Director, Israel Development Center, Architecture
Robert B. Wirt
Director, Microcomputer Labs
Internet and Communications Group
Mark A. Christensen
Vice President and General Manager, Network Products Division
Kirby A. Dyess
Vice President and Director, New Business Development
Edward D. Ekstrom
Vice President and General Manager, Systems Management Division
James B. Johnson
Vice President and General Manager, Internet Services Operation
Steven D. McGeady
Vice President and Director, Strategy
Kevin C. Kahn
Director, Communications Infrastructure Lab
Technology and Manufacturing Group
Frank Alvarez
Vice President and General Manager, Strategic Components Manufacturing
Robert J. Baker
Vice President and GM, Microprocessor Components Manufacturing
Luther G. Disney
Vice President and Director, Corporate Services
Youssef A. El-Mansy
Vice President and Director, Portland Technology Development
Robert M. Jecmen
Vice President and Director, California Technology and Manufacturing
Bruce H. Leising
Vice President and General Manager, Peripheral Components Manufacturing
David B. Marsing
Vice President and General Manager, Assembly/Test Manufacturing
Frank A. McCabe
Vice President and General Manager, Ireland Operations
Boon Chye Ooi
Vice President and General Manager, Systems Manufacturing
Jacob A. Peña, Jr.
Vice President and General Manager, Philippine Operations
John F. Slusser
Vice President and Director, Corporate Quality Network
William M. Siu
Vice President and Director, Assembly Technology Development
Kenneth M. Thompson
Vice President and GM, Technology Manufacturing Engineering
Keith L. Thomson
Vice President and Manager, Oregon Site
Gregory E. Atwood
Director, Flash Memory Architecture
Mark T. Bohr
Director, Process Architecture and Integration
Paolo A. Gargini
Director, Technology Strategy
Eugene S. Meieran
Director, Manufacturing Strategic Support
Leo D. Yau
Director, Innovative Technology Models
Ian A. Young
Director, Advanced Circuit and Technology Integration
1-168
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Intel
Desktop Products Group
John E. Davies
Vice President and Director, Consumer Desktop Marketing
William A. Swope
Vice President and Director, Business Desktop Marketing
James H. Yasso
Vice President and General Manager, Reseller Products Division
Richard L. Coulson
Director, I/O Architecture
Peter D. MacWilliams
Director, Platform Architecture
Computing Enhancement Group
William O. Howe
Vice President and General Manager, Memory Components Division
William B. Pohlman
Vice President and General Manager, Central Logic Engineering
Sales and Marketing Group
Edwin G. Bauer
Vice President and Director, Americas Sales and Marketing
Nobuyuki Denda
Vice President and Executive Vice President, Japan Operations
Sean M. Maloney
Vice President and General Manager, Asia-Pacific Operations
Ikuo Nishioka
Vice President and President, Japan Operations
Pamela L. Pollace
Vice President and Director, Worldwide Press Relations
Earl L. Whetstone
Vice President and General Manager, European Operations
Ellen R. Konar
Director, Corporate Strategic Marketing
Content Group
Claude M. Leglise
Vice President and Director, Entertainment/Education Developer Relations
Products and Processes
Intel's principal products are microprocessors, core logic chipsets based on the PCI bus, embedded processors
and microcontrollers, flash memory chips, computer modules and boards, network and communications products,
personal conferencing products, and scalable parallel processing computers. Some of these products are
described in more detail below.
• Microprocessors—Intel's 32-bit microprocessors include the fifth-generation Pentium family and the sixthgeneration Pentium Pro family. The company significantly expanded its Pentium family in 1996, introducing
new versions operating at 150, 166, and 200MHz. The 120 and 133MHz versions of the Pentium have
become the company’s entry-level processors. In January 1997, Intel introduced versions of the Pentium
incorporating MMX media enhancement technology, which is said to significantly enhance media-rich and
communications applications. Also in early 1997, the company introduced the Intel Mobile Module, an
integrated Pentium-based module that plugs into a mobile system’s motherboard. The Mobile Module is
thought to be the kick off of Intel’s planned sales shift from processors to processor modules.
The Pentium Pro, which is available in 150MHz, 166MHz, 180MHz, and 200MHz speed grades, makes use of
RISC-like techniques that Intel has chosen to call "dynamic execution.” To date, the Pentium Pro has been
designed primarily into servers and workstations. In early 1997, Intel named its new Pentium Pro processor with
MMX technology the Pentium II processor. Initially, the Pentium II will be targeted at business desktop PC
applications.
Intel’s microprocessor products also include OverDrive processors, a family of upgrade MPUs. OverDrive
processors allow users to upgrade their Intel486 or older Pentium processors to newer versions of the Pentium
(120MHz to 166MHz). A Pentium MMX version will be introduced in 1997.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-169
Intel
North American Company Profiles
Intel announced in early 1996 that it would phase out its commercial-grade 486SX2 and DX processor lines by
the end of 1997. The company will continue to offer 486SX, DX2, and DX4 MPUs, as well as its new ultra-lowpower 486SX, but only for embedded applications.
• Chipsets—Based on the Peripheral Components Interconnect (PCI) bus, Intel’s core-logic chipsets include the
Intel430 PCIset family for desktop and mobile Pentium microprocessors and the Intel440 and 450 PCIset
families for the Pentium Pro microprocessors.
• Embedded Processors and Microcontrollers—This product group includes the company's i960 family of 32-bit
RISC processors, the embedded Intel386 and Intel486 processor families, the 16-bit 80C186 processor family,
8-bit MCS 51 and MCS 251 microcontrollers, and 16-bit MCS 96 microcontrollers. These products are targeted
at a variety of applications, such as automobile engine and braking systems, hard disk drives, laser printers,
input/output control modules, cellular phones, home appliances, factory automation control products,
commercial and military avionics, and medical instrumentation.
On December 24, 1997, Intel will stop taking orders for mil-spec versions of its i960 MPU and i860 DSP
products. Intel has said it is exiting the market for military ICs because parts for the commercial market are far
more lucrative than mil-spec parts. Other military-grade products to be discontinued include SRAMs, EPROMs,
flash memories, and x86 and Pentium processors.
• Flash Memory Chips—Intel continues to be the largest flash memory producer. In early 1996, Intel announced
that it was scaling back production of low-density (256K and 512K) flash parts to open up capacity for higher
density devices. The company provides a broad line of flash memory devices, with densities ranging from 1M
to 32M. Included are the 2.7V High-Integration Boot Block flash devices (1M to 8M) that are targeted at wireless
communications applications; the High Performance Fast Flash devices (16M) that have either a synchronous
burst-read interface or a DRAM system read interface; the High Value FlashFile™ Memory products (8M to 32M)
that are partitioned into independently erasable 64K blocks, making them optimal for partial code updates or file
storage applications; and the first-generation bulk erase flash memories (1M and 2M) that were designed for
EPROM-type replacement applications.
In April 1997, Intel introduced its newest family of flash memories—the Smart3 Advanced Boot Block family of
devices. The new flash architecture, in conjunction with a new software program called Flash Data Integrator
(FDI), allows for the storage of both code and data on a single flash IC. Intel expects the Smart3 flash chips will
eliminate the need for EEPROMs in cellular phone applications.
Intel uses advanced CMOS and BiCMOS process technologies in the manufacture of its integrated circuits. In
1996, most of Intel’s IC products were manufactured using 0.35µm and 0.4µm process technologies. During
1997, the company will migrate its microprocessor production to the 0.25µm level. At 0.25µm, the company
believes it will be able to surpass the 400MHz mark for its MPU speeds. Some of Intel’s products are still
manufactured with 0.6µm, 0.8µm, and 1.0µm process technologies.
1-170
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Intel
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Intel Corporation
Ronler Acres
Hillsboro, Oregon 97007
Telephone: (503) 681-8080
Fab D1B
Cleanroom size: 70,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000 (6,250 in 1998)
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.18µm, 0.25µm
Intel Corporation
3601 Juliet Lane
Santa Clara, California 95050
Telephone: (408) 496-9023
Fab D2
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: MPUs, flash memories, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-0.8µm
Intel Corporation
2111 Northeast 25th Avenue
Aloha, Oregon 97124
Telephone: (503) 681-8080
Fab 5 (former Fab D1 R&D fab)
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS
Products: Logic and memory ICs, MPUs, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm, 1.0µm
Intel Corporation
5000 West Chandler Boulevard
Chandler, Arizona 85226-3699
Telephone: (602) 554-8080
Fab 6
Cleanroom size: 35,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,375
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS
Products: MPUs, MCUs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.0µm
Intel Corporation
4100 Sara Road SE
Rio Rancho, New Mexico 87124
Telephone: (505) 893-7000
Fab 7
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 8,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.4µm, 0.6µm, 0.8µm
Intel Israel, Ltd.
Jerusalem, Israel
Fab 8
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, MCUs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm-1.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-171
Intel
North American Company Profiles
Intel Corporation
4100 Sara Road SE
Rio Rancho, New Mexico 87124
Telephone: (505) 893-7000
Fab 9
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.4µm, 0.6µm
Intel Ireland, Ltd.
Collinstown Industrial Park
Leixlip, County Kildare, Ireland
Telephone: (353) (1) 707-7000
Fab 10
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: BiCMOS
Products: MPUs
Feature size: 0.6µm
Intel Corporation
4100 Sara Road SE
Rio Rancho, New Mexico
Telephone: (505) 893-7000
Fab 11
Cleanroom size: 185,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: BiCMOS, CMOS
Products: MPUs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.6µm
Intel Corporation
Chandler, Arizona
Fab 12
Cleanroom size: 160,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 12,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: MPUs
Feature size: 0.35µm (0.25µm capable)
Intel Ireland, Ltd.
Collinstown Industrial Park
Leixlip, County Kildare, Ireland
Telephone: (353) (1) 707-7000
Fab 14 (Startup in 1998)
Cleanroom size: 75,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: MPUs
Feature size: 0.25µm (0.18µm capable)
Intel Corporation
3585 Southwest 98th Avenue
Aloha, Oregon 97007
Telephone: (503) 681-8080
Fab 15 (former D1A R&D fab)
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,225
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.6µm
Intel Corporation
Fort Worth, Texas
Fab 16 (Startup in 1999)
Cleanroom size: 75,000 square feet
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.18µm, 0.25µm
Intel Israel, Ltd.
Kiryat Gat, Israel
Fab 18 (Startup in 1998)
Cleanroom size: 86,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.4µm
1-172
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Intel
The majority of Intel’s semiconductor assembly and testing takes place at the company’s facilities in Penang,
Malaysia, and Manila, the Philippines. Some assembly and testing is performed in the U.S. In addition, the
company is building new assembly and test factories in Shanghai, China, and San Jose, Costa Rica, both
scheduled for completion in 1998.
Key Agreements
• Moving to ensure itself a steady supply of high-density DRAMs, Intel in early 1997 purchased an equity stake in
Samsung’s new $1.3 billion fab in Austin, Texas. The fab is expected to begin production of 64M DRAMs in
late 1997 or early 1998. Separately, Intel has made a move to back Rambus Technology in the development of
very-high bandwidth Direct Rambus DRAMs. Intel has been given the option to purchase $10 million worth of
Rambus stock after the technology for Direct RDRAMs, which will link directly to Intel’s chipsets, is developed.
• Integrated Silicon Solution Inc. (ISSI) licensed flash memory-related patents from Intel in early 1996.
• Intel and AMD signed a five-year patent cross-licensing agreement near the end of 1995 giving the two
companies rights to use each other’s MPU-related patents and certain copyrights—excluding microprocessor
code. AMD agreed not to use Intel microcode beyond the 486 MPU generation.
• In October 1995, Intel and flash memory card maker SanDisk agreed to cross-license the full inventory of their
respective flash memory patent portfolios. The deal does not include a physical exchange of technology.
• Micron signed a cross-licensing agreement with Intel in 1995 covering flash memory ICs, making Micron a true
alternate source for Intel’s flash devices.
• Intel and Hewlett-Packard announced a wide ranging joint research and development alliance in 1994 under
which the partners are seeking to design a superior next-generation 64-bit microprocessor by 1999, a year later
than originally planned. The processor will be binary-compatible with both Intel x86 code and HP PA-RISC
code. As part of a separate agreement made in November 1996, Intel and HP are codeveloping computer
encryption chips for use in PCMCIA cards.
• In 1992, Intel and Sharp signed an agreement to develop their flash memory business jointly. Sharp is currently
shipping Intel's 32M and smaller flash devices on an OEM basis, and the two firms have developed parts that
Sharp markets under its own brand name. In 1995, Sharp was able to expand into the lucrative U.S. market
after its initial licensing agreement with Intel, which restricted it to the flash market in Japan, expired.
• Intel and Philips extended a patent cross-license agreement they made in 1977 to include all of each other's
semiconductor devices except certain proprietary Intel MPUs and Philips video products. The agreement is
now valid until the year 2000.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-173
Interdesign
North American Company Profiles
INTERDESIGN
Interdesign Custom Arrays Corporation
525 Del Ray Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94086-3515
Telephone: (408) 749-1166
Fax: (408) 749-1718
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1984, Interdesign is a member of the ELEX Group of companies headquartered in Belgium. Through
its association with ELEX, Interdesign offers mixed-signal CMOS custom and standard cell ASICs in addition to its
own MM and MV bipolar arrays.
The ELEX Group also has a wafer foundry, X-FAB, located in Germany with technologies that include N-well and Pwell CMOS, vertical DMOS, MOS analog to 40V, and micro sensors. Foundry services are available to U.S.
semiconductor and sensor companies, through Interdesign acting as an interface between the foundry and the
customers.
"Interdesign" has been registered as a trademark and the company has commenced doing business as
Interdesign.
Management
Robert W. Townley
William H. Hass
President
Vice President, Finance
Products and Processes
Interdesign supplies mixed-signal CMOS ASICs, both custom and standard cell.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Interdesign occupies an 8,000-square-foot facility devoted to assembly, test, and engineering.
1-174
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
International Rectifier
North American Company Profiles
INTERNATIONAL R ECTIFIER (IR)
International Rectifier Corporation
233 Kansas Street
El Segundo, California 90245
Telephone: (310) 322-3331
Fax: (310) 322-3332
Web Site: www.irf.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
International Rectifier Far East Co., Ltd. • Toshima-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3983-0641 • Fax: (81) (3) 3983-0642
Europe:
International Rectifier Company (Great Britain) Ltd. • Oxted, Surrey, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1883) 713215 • Fax: (44) (1883) 714234
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
IC Sales*
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
265
15
9
9
35
1993
282
17
(3)
14
17
1994
329
22
16
16
25
1995
429
29
39
20
107
1996
577
40
66
27
112
Employees
3,000
2,700
3,100
3,310
3,915
*Calendar year
Company Overview and Strategy
International Rectifier (IR) was founded in 1947 and is today a major worldwide manufacturer of power
semiconductors with applications in the automotive, consumer electronics, computer/peripheral, industrial,
lighting, telecommunications, and government/space markets.
The company's growth products recently have been HEXFET® power MOSFETs, insulated gate bipolar transistors
(IGBTs), control ICs, and high-performance diodes. In control ICs, new development efforts concentrate on
devices tailored to specific applications. New control ICs are tuned to specific power levels, features, and circuit
topologies in motor control, lighting, and power supply applications. During 1996, IR’s focus was in the area of
“solution” products that combine multiple components and technologies to benefit the customers’ overall circuit
size, cost, and performance.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-175
International Rectifier
North American Company Profiles
Asia
26%
North America
46%
Europe
28%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Eric Lidow
Alexander Lidow
Derek B. Lidow
Robert J. Mueller
Michael P. McGee
Chairman and Founder
Chief Executive Officer
Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, External Affairs and Business Development
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Products and Processes
IR manufactures power semiconductors, including HEXFET power MOSFETs, IGBTs, high-voltage control ICs,
diodes, rectifiers, thyristors, and standard and custom power modules.
IR’s high-voltage control ICs combine power MOSFETs with analog and digital control circuitry on a single chip.
They are used in a wide variety of power supply, motor, and lighting control applications, including motor controls,
solenoid drivers, welding equipment, telecom switches, computer peripherals, instrumentation and test
equipment, electronic lighting ballasts, and compact fluorescent light bulbs.
In late 1995, IR introduced its next-generation manufacturing technology, a four-step mask, low-voltage process
called Gen5. By the end of fiscal 1996, IR had over 200 Gen5 HEXFET devices in volume production.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
International Rectifier
(HEXFET America)
41915 Business Park Drive
Temecula, California 92390
Telephone: (714) 676-7500
Cleanroom size: 45,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 13,100
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BCDMOS
Products: Discretes, power ICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-5.0µm
1-176
International Rectifier
233 Kansas Street
El Segundo, California 90245
Telephone: (310) 322-3331
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,250
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, BCDMOS
Products: Discretes, power ICs
Feature size: 5.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
International Rectifier
International Rectifier Italiana, S.p.A.
Via Privata Liguria 49
10071 Borgoro, Turin, Italy
Telephone: (39) (11) 470-14-84
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,250
Wafer size: 100mm
Products: Discretes
Key Agreements
• International Rectifier signed a cross-licensing and alternate-source agreement with Motorola covering power
ICs and power discretes.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-177
ISD
North American Company Profiles
INFORMATION S TORAGE D EVICES (ISD)
Information Storage Devices, Inc.
2045 Hamilton Avenue
San Jose, California 95125
Telephone: (408) 369-2400
Fax: (408) 369-2422
Web Site: www.isd.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
5
(3)
1
Employees
1993
23
—
2
1994
39
4
3
1995
55
6
7
1996
41
(9)
12
70
122
134
Company Overview and Strategy
Information Storage Devices, Inc. (ISD), designs, develops, and markets integrated circuits for voice recording and
playback using the company’s proprietary ChipCorder™ storage technology. The company’s ChipCorder
products are targeted at the consumer, communications, and industrial market segments.
In 1991, ISD introduced its first commercially available products—non-volatile chips that store analog signals in
analog form. From its inception in December 1987, ISD's charter has been to develop such devices for storage of
voice, music, and other forms of analog information on a single chip.
In early 1997, ISD purchased National’s CompactSpeech processor product line. The purchase enables ISD to
add long duration record and playback chips to its ChipCorder product line. The CompactSpeech product line
includes a family of RISC-based speech processors that feature advanced DSP technology designed for voice
applications in the communications market.
ISD's storage technology is adaptable to a variety of small form factor applications, such as hand-held products,
alarms, answering machines, cellular phones, greeting cards, and implantable medical devices. The firm's original
chips were capable of storing up to 20 seconds of information. However, ISD’s newest devices are able to store
up to four minutes of information. The company has received twelve patents with several others pending. ISD
became a public company in February 1995.
1-178
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
ISD
North American Company Profiles
Industrial
7%
Europe
11%
Consumer
21%
Communications
72%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
United States
35%
Asia
54%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
David L. Angel
Eric J. Ochiltree
James Brennan
Michael Geilhufe
Paul Ross Hayden
Carl R. Palmer
Felix J. Rosengarten
Al Woodhull
Karin Bootsma
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Vice President, Technology and Development
Vice President, Quality and Reliability
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing
Managing Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
ISD's ChipCorder™ products are solid-state memory devices based on flash technology that store analog signals
in a multilevel format. The company currently offers six product families incorporating its ChipCoder technology.
All of the company’s ChipCoder products feature an on-chip oscillator, microphone preamplifier, automatic gain
control, anti-aliasing filter, smoothing filter, and speaker amplifier. The devices are being built using 0.8µm CMOS
technology.
Its most recent product family, the 33000 series is based on the company’s multilevel storage methodology that
stores 256 distinct voltage levels in each memory cell. The series operates at 3 volts and extends voice storage
capacity up to four minutes, making it possible to have an answering machine built into a digital or analog cellular
phone.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
ISD currently has foundry agreements with Rohm, Sanyo, and Samsung.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-179
IXYS
North American Company Profiles
IXYS
IXYS Corporation
3540 Bassett Street
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 435-1900
Fax: (408) 435-0670
Web Site: www.ixys.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
IXYS Corporation designs, develops, and markets a broad spectrum of power semiconductors, integrated circuits,
and modules for the global power market. IXYS products are incorporated into various industrial, commercial, and
military systems.
Founded in 1983, IXYS has been an innovator in power MOS semiconductor products and technologies since its
inception. However, it has differentiated itself by focusing on the higher voltage and higher power end of the
MOSFET and IGBT spectrum. The company's strategy is to provide cost-effective systems solutions for its target
markets. To that end, it provides several lines of low-cost chipsets for various applications.
In April 1989, IXYS acquired the Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) power semiconductor operation in Lampertheim,
Germany. Now called IXYS Semiconductor GmbH, the firm is recognized for pioneering direct copper bonding-toceramic packaging technology and provides IXYS with a strong foothold in the European market.
Management
Nathan Zommer, Ph.D.
Peter Ingram
Arnold Agbayani
Rich Fassler
President and Chief Executive Officer
Managing Director, IXYS Semiconductor GmbH
Vice President, Finance
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Products and Processes
The IGBT discrete and IGBT module product lines are the company's flagship products. They are targeted at the
AC motor drive market first and at electric vehicles for the long-term market.
1-180
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
IXYS
IXYS's key product lines include:
Modules
• IGBT modules
• High current thyristor and rectifier modules
• Rectifier bridges
• Custom (customer-specific) power modules
Discretes
• Ultra-fast and short circuit-rated IGBTs
• MegaMOSFET™ devices
• HiPer FET™ power MOSFETs
• High-voltage BiMOSFET™ devices
• Ultra-fast recovery epitaxial diodes (FREDs)
• High-current rectifiers and switching current regulators
• High-power thyristors and rectifiers
Smart Power ICs
• High-voltage current regulators
• Half-bridge (high side/low side) smart power ICs
• Pulse width modulation controllers
Direct Copper Bond (DCB) Ceramic Substrates
For the design of its products, IXYS uses a proprietary HDMOS (high performance DMOS) technology, which is
compatible with standard bulk CMOS.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
The company’s semiconductor products are fabricated in external wafer fabrication facilities through technology
and foundry relationships with a number of semiconductor companies throughout the world.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-181
Lansdale Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
L ANSDALE S EMICONDUCTOR
Lansdale Semiconductor, Inc.
2502 West Huntington Drive
Tempe, Arizona 85282
Telephone: (602) 438-0123
Fax: (602) 438-0138
Web Site: ssi.syspac.com/~lansdale
IC Manufacturer
Employees
50
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1964, Lansdale Semiconductor is a semiconductor life cycle extender dedicated to manufacturing
past and present technologies as long as the market requires them. The privately-held company is a strategic
resource for critical military programs, telecommunications systems, and semiconductor OEMs wishing to offer
their products longer than the normal lifecycle dictates.
The company purchases lines as they are discontinued by large semiconductor companies such as Intel,
Signetics, Harris, National, and Motorola. It actively seeks new product licenses from semiconductor
manufacturers as part of its niche strategy and supports OEM semiconductor companies by manufacturing wafers
on a foundry basis to extend their product lifecycles.
Military weapons systems typically operate for approximately 25 years while the commercial lifecycle of a
semiconductor chip is about seven years. Lansdale manufactures and supports these products on a continuing
basis making it possible to extend the lifecycles of the system and its products.
Management
R. Dale Lillard
Owner and President
Products and Processes
Lansdale's current product lines (about 2,600 parts) include NMOS 8-bit MPUs and bipolar general purpose logic,
MPU, SRAM, PROM, and linear ICs, as well as bipolar full custom devices.
1-182
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Lansdale Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Original Manufacturer
AMD
Raytheon
Signetics
Motorola
Harris
National
Intel
Product Line
Digital Bipolar ICs
DTL 200 Series ICs
DTL, TTL ICs, 54LS, 82S, 54S, 54H, LSI, 8X
SUHL ICs, 5400 TTL, 3000 TTL, 900 DTE, RTL, Linear
0512 Bipolar PROMs, 7600 Bipolar PROMs/Diode Matrices
PMOS ICs
8080A and peripherals, 828x Peripherals
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Lansdale Semiconductor, Inc.
2502 West Huntington Drive
Tempe, Arizona 85282
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet (Class 100)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 3in
Processes: Bipolar, LS, Linear, TTL
Products: Foundry service, bipolar ICs
Feature size: 3µm, two-layer metal
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-183
Lattice Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
L ATTICE S EMICONDUCTOR
Lattice Semiconductor Corporation
5555 Northeast Moore Court
Hillsboro, Oregon 97124-6421
Telephone: (503) 681-0118
Fax: (503) 681-0347
Web Site: www.latticesemi.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Lattice Semiconductor K.K. • Taito-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5820-3533 • Fax: (81) (3) 5820-3531
Europe:
Lattice Semiconductor Ltd. • Waybridge, Surrey, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1932) 831180 • Fax: (44) (1932) 831181
Asia-Pacific:
Lattice Semiconductor Asia, Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2319-2929 • Fax: (852) 2319-2750
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1993
103
17
17
1994
126
22
21
1995
144
27
23
1996
198
42
27
1997
204
45
28
352
394
438
450
500
Company Overview and Strategy
Lattice Semiconductor, founded in 1983, is a leader in the design, development, and marketing of high-density
and low-density programmable logic devices (PLDs) and related software development systems. Its proprietary
Generic Array Logic (GAL®), pLSI®, and ispLSI® devices are sold worldwide, primarily to OEMs in the fields of
communications, industrial control, and military systems. In 1992, the company pioneered the development of a
family of in-system programmable products called Lattice ISP. Lattice ISP products give customers the ability to
program a PLD without removing it from the circuit board, subsequently increasing the PLD’s flexibility. ISP
products have emerged as the de facto standard in the high density PLD market.
1-184
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Lattice Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Lattice's strategy is to offer a full line of high-performance in-system programmable devices based on innovative
architectures. The company supports its products with sophisticated logic development tools providing high
functionality at low cost that can be easily adopted and fully integrated with common third-party CAE development
systems.
International sales represented 48 percent of the company’s total sales in fiscal 1996.
Management
Cyrus Y. Tsui
Steven A. Laub
Steven A. Skaggs
Jonathan K. Yu
Martin R. Baker
Randy D. Baker
Albert L. Chan
Stephen M. Donovan
Paul T. Kollar
Rodney F. Sloss
Kenneth K. Yu
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, and Secretary
Corporate Vice President, Business Development
Vice President and General Counsel
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President, California Product Development
Vice President, International Sales
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Finance
Vice President and Managing Director, Lattice Asia
Products and Processes
Lattice entered the high-density complex PLD (CPLD) market in 1992 and currently offers four families of ispLSI®
products. The ispLSI 1000E family incorporates familiar GAL-like logic building blocks and offers performance up
to 125MHz (7.5ns) and densities of 2,000 to 8,000 gates. The ispLSI 2000 family provides speeds of up to
180MHz (5.0ns) and 3.3V and 5V operating voltages. The ispLSI 3000 family offers densities of 7,000 to 14,000
gates, while retaining performance up to 125MHz (7.5ns). The ispLSI 6000 family extends the company’s CPLD
density range to 25,000 gates and enables integration of complete logic subsystems. The family utilizes an
innovative cell-based architecture that combines a general-purpose high-density CPLD with memory and other
function specific circuit blocks.
Lattice offers one of the industry’s high performance and broadest line of low density CMOS PLDs. The company
sells the industry standard GAL16V8, GAL20V8, GAL22V10, GAL20RA10, and GAL20XV10 architectures in a
variety of speed grades (as fast as 3.5ns), with 5V or 3.3V signal compatibility. Lattice also offers several
proprietary architectures, the GAL26CV12, GAL18V10, GAL16VP8, GAL20VP8, and GAL6001/2, each of which
is optimized for specific applications. In 1994, the company extended its GAL line by introducing the
ispGAL22V10, bringing the advantages of in-system programmability to the low density market.
In April 1997, Lattice unveiled its ispGDX™ product family designed primarily for routing applications. According to
the company there is no control logic on the chips, allowing them to operate faster than conventional PLDs. The
family includes four devices with 64, 80, 120, and 160 programmable I/Os, with input-to-output delays of 5ns,
clock-to-output delays of 5ns, and operating frequencies of 111MHz.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-185
Lattice Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Lattice also offers its ispGDS™ (Generic Digital Switch) family of in-system programmable switching matrices
targeted at mechanical dip switch replacement and connectivity applications.
The company's products are based on a proprietary EECMOS process technology, called UltraMOS®. The current
mainstream processes, UltraMOS V (0.65µm) and UltraMOS VI (0.5µm) are advanced double-metal CMOS
technologies.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Most Lattice Semiconductor products are produced by Seiko Epson in Japan. In 1994, Lattice advanced to Seiko
Epson $42 million for the expansion of Seiko’s submicron wafer fab in Sakata, Japan. The investment will provide
Lattice with additional submicron manufacturing capacity through 1997. The foundry relationship between Lattice
and Seiko Epson was further strengthened in early 1997. As part of their latest agreement, Lattice agreed to
invest up to $150 million in Seiko Epson’s Sakata, Japan, wafer fab facility in exchange for a production line
dedicated to Lattice.
Lattice added Taiwan’s United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC) as a foundry partner in 1995. In October 1995,
Lattice said it would invest $60 million over a two and a half year period for a 10 percent equity stake in one of
UMC’s joint-venture fabs that will come on-line in mid-1997. Additionally, UMC agreed to provide Lattice with
interim wafer capacity from one of its existing fabs.
In December 1996, Lattice secured additional future capacity by signing a foundry and technology development
agreement with Taiwan-based Holtek Microelectronics (see Key Agreements below).
Key Agreements
•
Lattice signed a foundry and technology agreement with Holtek Microelectronics in December 1996. Under
the agreement, Lattice will make an equity investment in Holtek’s 200mm wafer facility that is currently under
construction in Taiwan. In return, Holtek will provide Lattice with foundry capacity from the facility, which is
expected to be operational by January 1998. Additionally, Holtek plans to develop non-volatile memory
products for Lattice.
•
Lattice entered into a joint venture with UMC and other US-based fabless IC companies. Lattice will invest $60
million to gain a 10 percent equity stake in a new joint-venture wafer fab UMC is building in Taiwan. The joint
venture fab, called United Integrated Circuits Corporation (UICC), was expected to begin production in mid1997.
•
In 1994, Lattice signed a production agreement with Seiko Epson. As part of the agreement, Lattice advanced
Seiko $42 million to finance additional submicron wafer capacity at its fab in Sakata, Japan. In 1995, Lattice
invested an additional $2 million for the development of submicron process technology. In early 1997, Lattice
signed an agreement to advance up to $150 million to Seiko Epson, in return for a dedicated production line in
Seiko Epson’s Sakata wafer fab that was expected to begin production in mid-1997.
•
Lattice has a cross-licensing agreement with AMD under which patents for AMD's PALs have been exchanged
for Lattice's GAL patents.
1-186
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Level One Communications
North American Company Profiles
L EVEL O NE C OMMUNICATIONS
Level One Communications Inc.
9750 Goethe Road
Sacramento, California 95827
Telephone: (916) 855-5000
Fax: (916) 854-1101
Web Site: www.level1.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
14
2
3
1993
26
4
6
1994
47
8
10
1995
78
10
17
1996
112
13
22
70
139
221
300
408
Company Overview and Strategy
Level One Communications, Inc., founded in 1985, is a leading supplier of silicon connectivity solutions for
complex mixed-signal communications and networking applications. The company name “Level One” refers to
the company’s initial focus on the physical layer, “layer one”, of the seven layer network model developed by the
International Standards Organization (ISO).
The company specializes in the development of ASSPs and custom derivatives, such as transceivers, repeaters,
and related devices used in two key areas of the telecommunications and data communications industry: interface
solutions for digital transmission systems; and local and wide area networking (LAN/WAN) solutions, including
Ethernet LAN, datacom, and digital modems. Most of Level One’s ICs feature complex functions incorporated on
a single silicon chip for applications formerly requiring multiple chips.
In June 1995, the company acquired San Francisco Telecom, which operates as a wholly owned subsidiary and
develops products for the Sonet/SDH, wireless, and cable modem communications markets. In 4Q96, Level One
acquired Silicon Design Experts Inc. (SDE) to accelerate its development of Gigabit Ethernet and xDSL products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-187
Level One Communications
North American Company Profiles
Management
Robert D. Pepper, Ph.D.
J. Francois Crepin
John Kehoe
Daniel S. Koellen
Manuel Yuen
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Business Development
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Quality and Reliability Assurance
Vice President, Operations
Products and Processes
Level One’s semiconductor products include T1/E1 transceivers, receivers, repeaters, and clock adapters; digital
subscriber line (DSL) chipsets; PDM multiplexers; and Ethernet transceivers and repeaters.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Level One utilizes several foundries in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East for the fabrication of its ICs, but does all
its chip testing in-house.
Key Agreements
•
In 1995, Level One entered into a technology agreement with Maker Communications Inc. for the
development of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) products.
1-188
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Linear Systems
North American Company Profiles
L INEAR S YSTEMS
Linear Integrated Systems, Inc.
4042 Clipper Court
Fremont, California 94538
Telephone: (510) 490-9160
Fax: (510) 353-0261
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
Linear Integrated Systems (LIS), a.k.a. Linear Systems, was formed in 1987 with the goal of establishing a market
niche by taking advantage of refractory-metal interconnect technology. Most firms have stayed away from
refractory metals and instead prefer to use CVD and silicon-gate technologies.
Linear Systems specializes in developing integrated circuits for applications in systems where obsolete devices or
processes are no longer available or require upgrading. Existing IC products include operational amplifiers,
voltage references, and multiplexers. Besides proprietary products, Linear Systems also supplies a broad range
of second source and obsolete devices manufactured to customer's requirements.
In addition to semiconductor design and custom manufacturing services, state-of-the-art precision thin-film
services are also offered.
Management
John H. Hall
Don Howland
Paul Norton
President
Manager, Eastern U.S. Marketing
Manager, Western U.S. Marketing
Products and Processes
Linear Systems’ proprietary product line includes bipolar linear ICs (e.g., amplifiers, voltage references,
multiplexers) and discretes, as well as full custom bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS ICs.
Using CMOS, bipolar, and dielectric isolation processes, Linear Systems offers a family of second-source products
including multiplexers, monolithic dual N-channel JFETs, monolithic dual PNPs and NPNs, switches, and
amplifiers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-189
Linear Technology
North American Company Profiles
L INEAR T ECHNOLOGY
Linear Technology Corporation
1630 McCarthy Boulevard
Milpitas, California 95035-7487
Telephone: (408) 432-1900
Fax: (408) 434-0507
Web Site: www.linear-tech.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Linear Technology K.K. • Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3267-7891 • Fax: (81) (3) 3267-8570
Europe:
Linear Technology SARL • Chantenay Malabry, France
Telephone: (33) (1) 41-07-95-55 • Fax: (33) (1) 46-31-46-13
Asia-Pacific:
Linear Technology Pte., Ltd. • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 753-2692 • Fax: (65) 754-4133
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
119
25
12
10
1993
151
36
10
8
1994
201
57
9
16
1995
265
85
9
22
1996
378
134
8
70
800
870
1,000
1,350
1,650
Company Overview and Strategy
Linear Technology Corporation (LTC) was founded in 1981 to design, manufacture, and market a broad line of
high-performance standard linear integrated circuits. Its devices monitor, condition, amplify, or transform
continuous analog signals associated with such physical properties as temperature, pressure, weight, position,
light, sound, or speed.
The company targets its product and marketing efforts toward the high-performance segments of the linear circuit
market. Applications for its products include telecommunications; notebook and desktop computers;
video/multimedia; computer peripherals; cellular telephones; industrial, automotive and process controls; network
and factory automation products; and satellites.
1-190
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Linear Technology
North American Company Profiles
Other
13%
Japan
16%
U.S.
48%
Europe
23%
1996 Sales By Geographic Region
Management
Robert H. Swanson, Jr.
Paul Chantalat
Paul Coghlan
Timothy D. Cox
Clive B. Davies, Ph.D.
Robert C. Dobkin
Sean T. Hurley
Louis Di Nardo
Hans J. Zapf
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Quality, Reliability, and Service
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, North American Sales
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Vice President, Design and Engineering
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, International Sales
Products and Processes
Linear Technology products include: operational, instrumentation, and audio amplifiers; voltage regulators, power
management devices, references, comparators, and data converters; switched-capacitor filters; communications
interface circuits; single-chip data acquisition sub-systems; pulse width modulators; and sample-and-hold devices.
The company markets approximately 5,000 finished part types, of which more than 80 percent are proprietary.
Linear Technology uses a variety of process technologies in the design and fabrication of its chips, including
standard bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS, and complementary bipolar, as well as thin-film and laser trimming technologies.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Linear Technology Corporation
1630 McCarthy Boulevard
Milpitas, California 95035-7487
Fabs 1 and 2
Cleanroom size: 170,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,500
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: Linear ICs
Feature sizes: 2.0µm-3.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Linear Technology Corporation
Camas, Washington
Fab 3
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, bipolar
Products: Linear ICs
Feature sizes: ≤2.0µm
(Began production in early 1997.)
1-191
Linfinity Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
L INFINITY M ICROELECTRONICS
Linfinity Microelectronics Inc.
11861 Western Avenue
Garden Grove, California 92641-2119
Telephone: (714) 898-8121
Fax: (714) 898-2781
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
69
2
88
6
98
7
103
10
106
7
Semiconductor
Sales
Capital Expenditures
27
1
31
2
39
2
40
5
38
5
Company Overview and Strategy
Linfinity Microelectronics Inc. (LMI) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Symmetricom, Inc. (formerly Silicon General,
Inc.). It was founded in 1968 as Silicon General Semiconductors and adopted its current name in 1993. LMI
designs, manufactures, and markets linear bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS integrated circuits for industrial,
commercial, automotive, and military applications. Linfinity's special area of expertise is in power management with
an emphasis on mixed-signal technology. Sales from power supply products, represented over 50 percent of
total sales in fiscal 1996.
The company is expanding the value-added products and services it currently provides for power supply systems,
while adding product lines to serve new areas such as signal conditioning and motion control systems. The
company currently offers about 400 standard products.
Management
James Peterson
Ralph Brandi
Shufan Chan
Mark Granahan
James Hartman
1-192
President (acting)
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Development
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Manufacturing
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Linfinity Microelectronics
Products and Processes
Linfinity's products generally address four main markets: power supply systems, motion control, analog signal
conditioning, and data communications.
Power Supply
Linfinity is a leading supplier of a wide variety of power management products, including pulse width
modulators (PWMs), voltage regulators, supervisory circuits, and power factor conversion chips. Typical
applications for these products include desktop and portable computers, portable communications
equipment, video monitors, automotive entertainment, HVAC products, satellites, and lighting. The new
product focus in this area includes controllers, linear regulators, DC-DC converters, FET drivers, and voltage
supervisors.
Motion Control
Linfinity makes two kinds of motion control integrated circuits: one that controls the spin motor in computer
disk drives and another that controls the position of the read-write head. The new product focus in this area
includes sensorless spindle controllers, voice coil controllers, and brushless DC motor controllers.
Analog Signal Conditioning
Linfinity's signal conditioning circuits include operational amplifiers, comparators, and voltage references.
Typical applications include instrumentation, industrial controls, telecommunications, and audio equipment.
Data Communications
A relatively new product area for Linfinity, the company’s data communications ICs include small computer
systems interface products and high speed, parallel communications buses, which permit high data transfer
rates between computers and various peripheral devices.
Linfinity uses a wide range of process technologies that address linear and mixed-signal product requirements.
Bipolar
Two main process flows are available in this technology. Option A provides a rugged, high-voltage (60V),
high-power process for applications such as off-line power supplies and motor drivers. Option B provides a
high-performance, low-voltage (20V) process for applications in high-speed, low-noise signal conditioning
equipment.
CMOS
Exhibiting all the characteristics of a good analog CMOS process it provides 18V MOS transistors coupled with
high density 3.0µm feature sizes for optimal packing density. Limited logic capability is available at this feature
size.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-193
Linfinity Microelectronics
North American Company Profiles
BiCMOS
The BiCMOS process combines the Option B bipolar and CMOS processes into a single flow. The process is
idealized for mixed-signal applications requiring excellent analog performance in conjunction with logic
capability. A double-level metal option is available for optimum packing density. Applications include power
supply controllers and high-performance disk drive motor controllers.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Linfinity Microelectronics Inc.
11861 Western Avenue
Garden Grove, California 92641
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,700
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Linear ICs, ASICs
Feature size: 3.0µm
1-194
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Logic Devices
North American Company Profiles
L OGIC D EVICES
Logic Devices Incorporated
1320 Orleans Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Telephone: (408) 542-5400
Fax: (408) 542-0080
Web Site: www.logicdevices.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Logic Devices Incorporated • Warminster, Wiltshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1985) 218699
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
12
0.1
1
1993
13
0.3
1
1994
13
1
1
1995
17
1
1
1996
13
1
1
61
49
44
49
58
Company Overview and Strategy
Logic Devices Incorporated was founded in 1983. It develops and markets high-performance digital integrated
circuits for applications requiring high operating speeds and low operating power. Such applications include
computers, workstations, video image processing, medical instrumentation, telecommunications, and military
signal processing.
Logic Devices was founded as a supplier of building-block DSPs, but later entered the growing 1989 SRAM
market. It was driven from the SRAM market in 1992 due to cost and quality problems with its then supplier of
SRAM wafers. Sales of the company’s SRAM products rebounded in 1994 and 1995, but then suffered price
erosion during 1996. SRAM products fell from representing 45 percent of the company’s sales in 1995 to 14
percent in 1996. While the company plans to remain a player in fast SRAMs and other niche SRAM markets, it has
also placed a greater emphasis on DSP devices, which grew to represent 86 percent of sales in 1996, up from 55
percent in 1995.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-195
Logic Devices
North American Company Profiles
SRAMs
14%
Europe
19%
DSP Devices
86%
Far East
8%
North America
73%
1996 Sales by Device Type
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
In April 1995, Logic Devices acquired Star Semiconductor, which developed the Sproc programmable digital
signal processor architecture. The Sproc architecture enables multiple processors to efficiently share data via a
common memory array, resulting in high processing throughput.
Research efforts during 1997 will focus on DSP circuits to address broadcast, studio, and audio and video image
processing applications, and new products utilizing the company’s SRAM technology.
Management
Howard L. Farkas
William J. Volz
Todd J. Ashford
Anthony G. Bell
William L. Jackson
Chairman
President
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, Manufacturing
Products and Processes
High-speed, low-power CMOS SRAMs and DSP circuits are Logic Devices' principal product lines. Its DSPs
primarily target video editing, broadcast special effects, and studio production applications, where lossless
manipulation of very high bandwidth data is required. The company also offers specialty memories, register
products, and high-performance CMOS SCSI controllers.
Ultrafast SRAM
16K family
64K family
256K family
1M family
Fast Logic
Pipeline registers
Register files
Shadow registers
Computational
Multipliers
Multiplier-accumulators
Filters
Arithmetic logic units
Digital correlators
Barrel shifters
Interface
SCSI bus controllers
1-196
Specialty Memory
Cache-tag memories
Resettable memories
Cache-data memories
FIFOs
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Logic Devices
The company's chips are produced using 0.5µm, 0.8µm, and 1.0µm CMOS technologies, and a sub-half-micron
CMOS process is expected to be implemented in 1997.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Logic Devices has teamed with three foundry partners to manufacture its products: Oki in Japan, TSMC in Taiwan,
and Zentrum Mikroelektronik Dresden (ZMD) in Germany.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-197
LSI Computer Systems
North American Company Profiles
LSI COMPUTER S YSTEMS
LSI Computer Systems, Inc.
1235 Walt Whitman Road
Melville, New York 11747-3086
Telephone: (516) 271-0400
Fax: (516) 271-0405
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
LSI Computer Systems, Inc. (LSI/CSI) began operations in 1969 and is thought to be the world’s first “fabless”
semiconductor company. The privately held company utilizes a broad array of LSI process technologies in the
design of full custom and standard ICs for products in applications ranging from consumer and industrial to military
and aerospace.
LSI Computer Systems is recognized as one of the leading suppliers of lighting control ICs and full custom ICs,
and was the first company to develop and market ICs for brushless DC motors.
Management
Al Musto
Chief Executive Officer
Products and Processes
LSI Computer Systems supplies both standard and full custom ICs. Its standard ICs include programmable digital
delay timers, CMOS dividers, incremental encoder interface chips, counters, melody generators, lighting control
ICs, AC and brushless DC motor controllers, LCD drivers, telephone line switch controllers, programmable digital
lock circuits, and PIR detection circuits.
The company’s analog and digital full custom IC service is called Extra-Custom. The use of several external mask
and wafer foundries that offer a broad range of process technologies makes the Extra-Custom service flexible in
meeting the needs of a variety of applications and provides automatic second-sourcing of product. LSI Computer
Systems custom designs every detail of each Extra-Custom IC thereby providing protection of the customer’s
proprietary product techniques.
1-198
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
LSI Logic
North American Company Profiles
LSI LOGIC
LSI Logic Corporation
1551 McCarthy Boulevard
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 433-8000
Fax: (408) 433-7715
Web Site: www.lsilogic.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
LSI Logic K.K. • Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5463-7811 • Fax: (81) (3) 5463-7825
Europe:
LSI Logic Europe, Ltd. • Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1344) 426544 • Fax: (44) (1344) 481039
Asia-Pacific:
LSI Logic Hong Kong, Ltd. • Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2405-8600 • Fax: (852) 2412-7820
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
617
(110)
79
143
1993
719
54
79
88
1994
902
109
99
166
1995
1,268
238
124
233
1996
1,239
147
184
362
Employees
3,400
3,370
3,750
3,750
3,910
Company Overview and Strategy
LSI Logic is a leading designer and manufacturer of high-performance ASICs and related products and services.
Founded in 1981, the company uses advanced process technology and design methodology to design and
develop highly complex ASICs and other integrated circuits. Customers of LSI Logic are primarily original
equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the electronic data processing, consumer electronics, telecommunications,
and certain office automation industries. Within these industries, the company emphasizes digital video, digital
broadcasting, networking and wireless communications, desktop and personal computing, and office automation
applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-199
LSI Logic
North American Company Profiles
Pacific Rim
4%
ASIC Design and Services
6%
Europe
17%
Japan
21%
Component Products
94%
1996 Sales by Business
North America
58%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
As process technology becomes more sophisticated, allowing greater density and increased functionality, the
"system-on-a-chip" is becoming the foundation of LSI Logic's business. In fact, the company has trade marked
the term “The System on a Chip Company™.” Its product libraries, including its CoreWare® libraries, combined with
its deep submicron process technologies provide the company with the ability to combine microprocessor
"engines", logic blocks (including industry standard functions, protocols, and interfaces), and memory with a
customer’s proprietary logic on a single chip.
LSI Logic’s CoreWare technology is at the center of its shift toward more consumer and communications products.
In 1996, these two segments accounted for 60 percent of the company’s revenue, versus 44 percent in 1995.
New industry-standard cores added to the CoreWare library in 1996 included those for the GSM wireless market,
Internet and Intranet applications, satellite set-top boxes, networking, and DVD products. In 1H97, the company
entered the cable modem market with the introduction of its Cablestream™ QAM Receiver core.
Other
6%
Communications
28%
Computers
34%
Consumer
32%
1996 Sales by End-Use Application
1-200
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
LSI Logic
North American Company Profiles
Management
Wilfred J. Corrigan
Moshe N. Gavrielov
Cyril F. Hannon
W. Richard Marz
R. Douglas Norby
Joseph M. Zelayeta
Maniam B. Alagaratnam
Elias J. Antoun
Ronald K. Bell
Jean-Louis Bories
John P. Daane
John J. D’Errico
Simon P. Dolan
Bruce L. Entin
Donald J. Esses
Amnon Fisher
Jeffrey L. Hilbert
James W. Hively
Charles E. Laughlin
Theodore Leno
Bryon Look
R. Gregory Miller
Pierre Nadeau
Willsie H. Nelson
David E. Sanders
Richard D. Schinella
Chiaki Terada
Frank Tornaghi
Shubha S. Tuljapurkar
Lewis C. Wallbridge
Edward K. Wan
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, LSI Logic Products
Executive Vice President, Worldwide Operations
Executive Vice President, Geographic Markets
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President, Research and Development, and General Manager,
U.S. Wafer Fab Operations
Vice President, Product Development
Vice President and President, LSI Logic K.K.
Vice President and General Manager, Computer and Advanced Architecture
Vice President, ASIC Technology
Vice President and General Manager, Communication Products
Vice President and General Manager, Pan Asia
Vice President, Strategic Marketing
Vice President, Worldwide Customer Marketing, Geographic Markets
Vice President, U.S. Manufacturing
Vice President and General Manager, Consumer Products
Vice President, Worldwide Customer Engineering, Geographic Markets
Vice President, ASIC Product Development
Vice President and General Manager, LSI Logic Japan Semiconductor, Inc.
Vice President, Assembly and Test Operations
Vice President, Corporate Development
Vice President, Corporate Controller
Vice President and General Manager, LSI Logic Europe Ltd.
Vice President, Logistics
Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
Vice President, Wafer Process R&D and Santa Clara Operations
Vice President, Industrial Engineering
Vice President, North America Sales
Vice President, Business and Personal Systems
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, North America Engineering
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-201
LSI Logic
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
LSI Logic's broad product line includes high-performance gate array, cell-based, and embedded array ASICs with
up to five million gates. The company's CoreWare library contains cells and cores based on industry-standard
functions, interfaces, and protocols. Example cores from the CoreWare library include Ethernet controllers, the
ATMizer™ II segmentation and reassembly engine, and the GigaBlaze G10™ SeriaLink 1.25-gigabit/second
transceiver for communications applications; PCI and USB bus interfaces and Fibre Channel protocol circuits for
computer applications; MPEG-2 and DVD decoders for digital video applications; and a GSM baseband processor
for GSM mobile phones. In addition, cores such as these may be combined with LSI Logic’s MiniRISC™ family of
Mips-based RISC microprocessor cores, including the TinyRISC™ 16-/32-bit compressed-code MPU, and/or
special-purpose memory circuits to realize system-level applications on a single chip.
In addition, LSI Logic offers a family of application-specific standard product (ASSP) high-speed digital signal and
image processing devices that handle many common digital signal processing functions. Some of the ASSPs
designed by LSI Logic are included in the company’s CoreWare library. The company also sells stand-alone
SPARC- and Mips-based RISC microprocessors.
The company has developed and uses advanced CMOS technologies to manufacture its IC products. Its G10™
0.35µm (0.25µm, Leff) 3-volt CMOS process, introduced in 1995, allows for up to 49 million transistors (or up to five
million usable gates) on a single chip. In early 1997, LSI Logic formally announced its next-generation G11™
process technology featuring a 0.25µm (0.18µm, Leff) gate length, providing up to 64 million transistors (or up to
8.1 million usable gates) and allowing greater density and increased functionality on a single chip. Devices in the
G11 ASIC family will operate on 1.8V, 2.5V, or 3.3V, and consume one-fourth of the power of the G10 devices.
Initial production of G11 ASICs is due to begin in 4Q97.
In a significant step to increase yields and allow for greater chip customization, LSI Logic during 1996 installed
chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) equipment in its Japanese fabrication facilities. In addition, the company
started using flip-chip interconnect package technology for its most complex chips.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Most of LSI Logic's wafers are manufactured by its Japanese subsidiary, LSI Logic Japan Semiconductor, Inc.,
(JSI) which prior to January 1995 was jointly owned by LSI Logic (55 percent) and Kawasaki Steel Corporation (45
percent). LSI Logic is now the sole owner of JSI, as a result of the purchase of Kawasaki Steel's interest.
LSI Logic also obtains wafers from Chartered Semiconductor in Singapore. In 1995, LSI Logic made a $20 million
equity investment in Chartered, in exchange for guaranteed wafer capacity for products based on 0.6µm
technology and smaller for a period of 10 years.
1-202
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
LSI Logic
North American Company Profiles
In 1996, the company closed its aging fab in Milpitas, California, and delayed by six months the launch of its new
200mm wafer fab under construction in Gresham, Oregon. The Gresham facility is now scheduled to begin
production at the beginning of 1998.
LSI Logic Corporation
3115 Alfred Street
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 433-6666
Capacity (wafers/week): 250
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: R&D, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-0.5µm
LSI Logic Corporation
Gresham, Oregon
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.35µm
(Operations to begin in 1Q98.)
LSI Logic Japan Semiconductor, Inc.
(formerly known as Nihon Semiconductor)
10 Kitahara, Tsukuba-shi
Ibaraki-ken 300-32, Japan
Telephone: (81) (298) 64-7229
Fax: (81) (298) 64-33362
Fabs I and II
Cleanroom size: 50,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: ASICs, MPUs, MPRs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-1.0µm
Key Agreements
• In early 1997, LSI Logic licensed the ARM 32-bit RISC microprocessor core of Advanced RISC Machines.
• In 3Q96, LSI Logic and Mips Technologies, Inc. extended and expanded the scope of the architecture license
that allows LSI Logic to produce Mips-based RISC microprocessors and microprocessor cores. The new
license will expire in the year 2004.
• LSI Logic joined Mentor Graphics to form a 10-year alliance that couples Mentor’s open design tools within LSI
Logic’s submicron design and manufacturing environment to ensure “right-first-time” ASICs.
• The company formed a five-year alliance with Argonaut Software to develop a family of 3D graphics
accelerators. Incorporating LSI’s system-on-a-chip, the companies will develop upgradeable 3D graphics cores
for LSI’s ASIC library.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-203
LSI Logic
North American Company Profiles
• LSI Logic entered into an agreement with InterDigital Communications Corporation that calls for LSI Logic to
develop and produce custom chips for InterDigital to use in Personal Communications Services (PCS)
handsets and Wireless Local Loop equipment. The cores that LSI Logic will use in the design are based on the
company’s G10 0.35µm process technology.
• LSI Logic established a joint development agreement with Sanyo Electric to design the core of an HDTV
system.
• LSI Logic signed an agreement with Philips to collaborate on developing video compression ICs for HDTV
applications.
1-204
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Lucent Technologies
North American Company Profiles
L UCENT T ECHNOLOGIES
Lucent Technologies Inc.
Microelectronics Group
Two Oak Way
Berkeley Heights, New Jersey 07922-2727
Telephone: (800) 372-2447
Web Site: www.lucent.com/micro
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Lucent Technologies, Microelectronics Group • Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5421-1600 • Fax: (81) (3) 5421-1700
Europe:
Lucent Technologies, Microelectronics Group • Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1344) 865900 • Fax: (44) (1344) 865990
Asia-Pacific:
Lucent Technologies, Microelectronics Group • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 778-8833 • Fax: (65) 777-7495
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales (Lucent Technologies)
Net Income
Semiconductor**
Sales
Capital Expenditures
Employees (Microelectronics)
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
17,312*
(3,778)*
17,734*
482*
19,765*
(867)*
20,258
553
23,286
1,054
1,018
105
1,186
143
1,463
170
1,836
259
2,312
498
20,000
20,000
18,500
18,000
18,000
*Data for fiscal years ended December 31. In 1996, the fiscal year was changed to start in October.
**Calendar year
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-205
Lucent Technologies
North American Company Profiles
Company Overview and Strategy
Lucent Technologies Microelectronics Group (formerly AT&T Microelectronics) designs and manufactures
advanced integrated circuits, power systems, and optoelectronic components. Its product line is built upon
strengths in digital signal processing, networked computing, and communications technologies. The company's
products are used in applications such as personal computers/multimedia systems, local-area networks (LANs),
cellular base stations, TV set-top boxes, telephones, and answering machines. It is a leader in digital signal
processors (DSPs), cell-based ASICs, video conferencing ICs, and telecommunication power systems.
AT&T Corporation’s restructuring began with an announcement on September 20, 1995, to separate the $80
billion corporation into three independent companies:
AT&T Corporation (communications), Lucent
Technologies (systems and technology), and NCR Corporation (business computing).
The company name, Lucent, was chosen for its meaning “marked by clarity” or “glowing with light” to distinguish
itself from AT&T. Lucent Technologies is made up of five business groups: Network Systems, Business
Communications Systems, Microelectronics, Consumer Products, and Bell Laboratories.
Consumer
6%
Microelectronics
10%
Other
3%
Communications
Systems
24%
Network Systems
57%
1996 Sales by Product Group
Lucent’s semiconductor roots stretch back to the late 1940's, when Bell Labs, the research and development arm
of Lucent Technologies, was credited with the invention of the transistor. Bell Labs was given the Nobel Prize for
its invention in 1956. After nearly three decades of supplying its parent with chips, AT&T Microelectronics, as it
was then known, decided to offer its products on the merchant market. Today, only about 15 to 20 percent of the
company’s output goes to Lucent customers, versus about 70 percent in 1990.
Lucent Technologies’ Microelectronics Products business can be divided into three product groups: integrated
circuits for use in communications and computing products and systems; energy systems, electronic power
supplies, and associated magnetic components for the telecommunications and electronic data processing
industries; and optoelectronic products for the telecommunications, cable television, and network computing
markets. The company sold its interconnect products, Paradyne subsidiary, and custom manufacturing systems
businesses in 1996.
1-206
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Lucent Technologies
North American Company Profiles
Much of Lucent’s recent growth in sales of Microelectronic Products have been due to higher sales of DSPs and
ASICs to OEMs, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. International revenues represented approximately half of
the Microelectronic Products Group’s sales in fiscal 1996.
Consumer
6%
Japan
6%
Asia-Pacific
18%
Data Processing
38%
Communications
56%
1996 Semiconductor Sales by
End-Use Market
Europe
26%
North America
50%
1996 Semiconductor Sales by
Geographic Region
Management
Lucent Technologies
Henry B. Schacht
Richard A. McGinn
Curtis J. Crawford
William T. O’Shea
Patricia F. Russo
Daniel C. Stanzione
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
President, Microelectronics Group
President, Bell Laboratories
President, Business Communications Systems
President, Network Systems and Bell Laboratories
Lucent Technologies Microelectronics Group
Curtis J. Crawford
President
John T. Dickson
Vice President, Integrated Circuits
Kenneth W. Dorushka
Vice President, Sales
Peter R. McCarthy
Vice President, Sales Development and Operations
Peter T. Panousis, Ph.D.
Vice President, Silicon Manufacturing and Development,
and President, Cirent Semiconductor
John V. Pilitsis
Vice President, Optoelectronics
William R. Spivey
Vice President, Systems and Components
Jay A. Walters
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Power Systems
Products and Processes
Lucent utilizes CMOS, BiCMOS, and bipolar processes in the manufacture of its integrated circuits. The following
are Lucent’s primary semiconductor products: 16-bit and 32-bit DSPs (including modem DSPs), ASICs (digital and
mixed-signal standard cells, gate arrays), FPGAs, MPEG-2 digital TV devices, and communication ICs (e.g.,
network interface ICs, transceivers, and line card ICs).
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-207
Lucent Technologies
North American Company Profiles
Recent new product unveilings have included the new ORCA 3 series of FPGAs that will carry the ORCA™ family
into 0.25µm processes and 320,000 vendor-defined gates, a 56-Kbps modem chipset, and a DSP with 120MIPS
performance (claimed to be the first to exceed 100MIPS).
The company also provides bipolar IC foundry services to outside companies. The Bipolar Foundry utilizes two
industry leading advanced complementary bipolar process technologies, called CBIC-U2 and CBIC-V2.
MOS MEMORY
DRAM
SRAM
Flash Memory
ANALOG
✔
✔
✔
Interface
Consumer/Automotive
EPROM
Voltage Regulator/Reference
ROM
Data Conversion
EEPROM
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
✔
✔
MOS LOGIC
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array
✔
✔
✔
Amplifier
Standard Cell
Comparator
Other (Includes Telecom)
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
✔
✔
✔
Bipolar Memory
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array/Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
MPU
MCU
OTHER
✔
MPR
✔
DSP
Full Custom IC
Discrete
✔
Optoelectronic
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Lucent Technologies Inc.
Allentown Works
555 Union Boulevard
Allentown, Pennsylvania 18103
Telephone: (610) 712-6011
Cleanroom size: 80,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 15,000
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 150mm
Processes: NMOS, CMOS, bipolar
Products: Linear and logic ICs, DSPs, ASICs,
FPGAs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-2.5µm
1-208
Lucent Technologies Inc.
Reading Works
P.O. Box 13396
Reading, Pennsylvania 19612
Telephone: (610) 939-7011
Cleanroom size: 70,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm (2in for optoelectronics)
Processes: Bipolar, HVCMOS, BCDMOS
Products: Linear ICs, optoelectronics,
foundry services
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-3.5µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Lucent Technologies
North American Company Profiles
Lucent Technologies Inc.
Orlando Plant
9333 South John Young Parkway
Orlando, Florida 32819
Telephone: (407) 345-6000
Cleanroom size: 35,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 8,250
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, FPGAs, DSPs, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-1.25µm
Lucent Technologies Microelectronica S.A.
Poligono Industrial de Tres Cantos
S/N (Zona Oeste), 28770 Colmenar Viejo
Madrid, Spain
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, FPGAs, communications ICs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.45µm, 0.9µm, 1.25µm
Lucent Technologies Inc.
Optoelectronics Center
9901 Hamilton Boulevard
Breiningsville, Pennsylvania 18031-9359
Telephone: (610) 391-2000
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet
Wafer size: 2in
Process: LPMDCVD
Products: Optoelectronics
Feature sizes: 0.1µm-5.0µm
Cirent Semiconductor
9333 South John Young Parkway
Orlando, Florida 32819
Telephone: (407) 345-6000
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, MPRs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
(Joint venture with Cirrus Logic.
See Key Agreements.)
Key Agreements
• In April 1997, Lucent announced it had licensed Advanced RISC Machines’ high-performance, low-power RISC
microprocessor core technology (ARM7TDMI) for integration with Lucent’s ASIC library.
• Lucent and Mitsubishi established an alliance in mid-1996 to jointly develop a set of ICs that together will
perform all of the functions needed for next-generation HDTV sets for the U.S. market. The first samples of the
chipset are expected to become available in early 1998.
• In October 1995, Lucent signed an agreement with Cirrus Logic to form a $600 million joint manufacturing
venture in Orlando, Florida. The new company, called Cirent Semiconductor, is 60 percent owned by Lucent
and 40 percent by Cirrus. Production began in early 1997, beginning with a 0.35µm process (with plans to
move to 0.25µm in the future). Lucent and Cirrus equally share Cirent’s output.
• Lucent signed an agreement with Hewlett-Packard in 1995 to develop and dual-source fiber-optic transceivers
for SONET/SDH and ATM applications.
• Lucent (then AT&T Microelectronics) struck an agreement with Standard Microsystems Corp. (SMC) in 1994
under which SMC agreed to buy equipment for installation in Lucent's fab in Spain in return for a guaranteed
portion of the fab output for a period of five years.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-209
Lucent Technologies
North American Company Profiles
• Lucent is working with IBM, Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems, and Motorola to establish a manufacturing
infrastructure for x-ray lithography. The team hopes to have a manufacturing capability by the end of 1997.
• Lucent has been collaborating with NEC on the development of advanced CMOS process technologies since
1991. The team completed development of a 0.25µm process flow in early 1997 and are currently working on a
successor 0.18µm program, which is targeted for completion in 1999.
• Lucent has several agreements with TriQuint Semiconductor involving the development, manufacture, and
marketing of GaAs ICs for high-performance wireless and telecommunications systems. As part of the deal,
Lucent discontinued its production of GaAs wafers and now relies on TriQuint for the manufacture of its GaAs
wafers. The two companies are developing an epitaxial process based on Lucent's GaAs intellectual property.
• Lucent is teamed with Sandia National Laboratories to develop new lithography patterning technologies for the
production of high-density ICs with geometries below 0.2µm.
1-210
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Maxim Integrated Products
North American Company Profiles
M AXIM INTEGRATED P RODUCTS
Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.
120 San Gabriel Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94086
Telephone: (408) 737-7600
Fax: (408) 737-7194
Web Site: www.maximic.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Maxim Japan Co., Ltd. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3232-6141
Europe:
Maxim Integrated Products (UK), Ltd. • United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1734) 303388
Asia-Pacific:
Maxim Integrated Products Inc. • Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2376-3000
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
87
14
13
4
1993
110
17
16
13
1994
154
24
13
22
1995
250
39
42
36
1996
422
123
48
75
554
638
1,016
1,552
1,987
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1983, Maxim Integrated Products is a leading designer, developer, and manufacturer of linear and
mixed-signal integrated circuits. Maxim's products are the interface between the real, analog world and the world
of digital processing. They detect, measure, amplify, and convert real world signals, such as temperature,
pressure, or sound, into the digital signals necessary for computer processing. Its circuits are used in a wide
variety of microprocessor-based equipment, including PCs and peripherals, test equipment, handheld products,
wireless communicators, and video displays. The company also provides a range of high-frequency design
processes and capabilities that can be used in custom design.
Maxim’s main objective is to actively develop and market both proprietary and industry standard analog integrated
circuits that meet the increasing quality standards demanded by customers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-211
Maxim Integrated Products
North American Company Profiles
In mid-1994, Maxim acquired substantially all of the assets of the Tektronix's Integrated Circuits Operation in
Beaverton, Oregon, for about $22 million. The acquisition provided Maxim with additional wafer production
capacity, leading-edge high-frequency bipolar technologies that have broadened the firm's presence in the
wireless and optic communications markets, as well as in high-speed data acquisition, RF signal processing, and
video products.
United States
43%
Europe and
Pacific Rim
57%
1996 Sales By Geographic Region
Management
Jack F. Gifford
Frederick G. Beck
Ziya G. Boyacigiller
Michael J. Byrd
Stephen R. Combs, Ph.D.
Tunc Doluca
Dave J. Fullager
Anthony C. Gilbert
Kenneth J. Huening
William N. Levin
Robert F. Scheer
Richard E. Slater
Vijay Ullal
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Marketing and Sales
Vice President
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, and Secretary
Vice President
Vice President
Vice President, Wafer Operations
Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer
Vice President
Products and Processes
Maxim Integrated Products offers a broad range of linear and mixed-signal ICs, including data converters, interface
circuits, microprocessor supervisory circuits, operational amplifiers, power control circuits, timers and counters,
display circuits, multiplexers and switches, battery chargers, voltage detectors, filters, comparators, and voltage
reference circuits.
1-212
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Maxim Integrated Products
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
During fiscal year 1996, Maxim converted over half of its wafer fabrication capacity from 100mm to 150mm wafers.
To supplements its own IC production capacity, Maxim has foundry agreements with independent foundry
companies.
Maxim Integrated Products
430 West Maude Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94086
Telephone: (408) 746-2650
Cleanroom size: 15,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs
Feature sizes: 1.2µm-3.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Maxim Integrated Products
14320 Southwest Jenkins
Beaverton, Oregon 97005
Telephone: (503) 641-3737
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: Mixed-signal ICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-2.0µm
(purchased from Tektronix in mid-1994)
1-213
Micrel Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
M ICREL S EMICONDUCTOR
Micrel Semiconductor, Inc.
1849 Fortune Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 944-0800
Fax: (408) 944-0970
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
18
1
2
1993
19
1
3
1994
36
3
4
1995
53
7
6
1996
66
9
9
150
160
180
345
400
Company Overview and Strategy
Micrel Semiconductor, founded in 1978, designs, develops, and manufactures a range of high-performance
analog ICs targeting the communications, computer, and industrial markets. In 1982, Micrel acquired an IC
fabrication facility in Sunnyvale, California, from Siemens Components and began acting as a silicon foundry. This
led to the company's development of semicustom and standard linear smart power ICs. In early 1993, Micrel
moved its headquarters and manufacturing operations from Sunnyvale to San Jose. The new fab, formerly owned
by Seeq Technology, tripled Micrel's fab capacity.
The company’s products are divided into three key areas: standard ICs, custom ICs, and foundry services. In
1996, the majority of the company’s revenues were from sales of standard products. The company’s standard
products have grown from representing 14 percent of total revenues in 1992 to 66 percent in 1996. Micrel
currently offers over 800 standard products.
Custom ICs/
Foundry Services
34%
Standard ICs
66%
1996 Sales by Product
1-214
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Micrel Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
In addition to standard products, the company manufactures custom analog and mixed-signal circuits and provides
wafer foundry services for customers who produce electronic systems for communications, consumer, and military
applications.
Military/Other
7%
Consumer
8%
Europe
11%
Telecom
14%
Computer
42%
Asia
30%
North America
59%
Industrial
29%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Micrel is focusing its efforts on the design and marketing of its high-performance analog power ICs to become a
strong force in portable computing, desktop computing, communications, and automotive and aviation
electronics. Future plans include a continued transition toward standard products, while maintaining its presence
in the custom IC and foundry business.
Management
Raymond D. Zinn
George T. Anderl
Robert J. Barker
John D. Husher
Warren H. Muller
Larry R. Sample
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Fabrication Division
Vice President, Test Operations
Vice President, Design
Products and Processes
Micrel supplies both standard and custom products. The company's key standard product lines include highcurrent low-side power MOSFET drivers, high-side power MOSFET drivers, low dropout (LDO) linear regulators,
high-efficiency switching regulators, PCMCIA power control matrices, power latched drivers, display drivers, Pchannel MOSFETs, and open drain power switches. Micrel also continues to offer the use of its fabrication
facilities as a foundry source.
Micrel uses and offers a full range of processes: CMOS, DMOS, bipolar, BiCMOS, and BCDMOS. The company’s
fab is capable of handling metal-gate, silicon-gate, double-metal and double-poly architectures with feature sizes
down to 1.0µm.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-215
Micrel Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Micrel Semiconductor, Inc.
1849 Fortune Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Cleanroom size: 24,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 100mm (moving to 150mm)
Processes: CMOS, bipolar, DMOS, BiCMOS/DMOS, BCD
Products: Linear ICs, custom ICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-2.0µm
1-216
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Micro Linear
North American Company Profiles
M ICRO L INEAR
Micro Linear Corporation
2092 Concourse Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 433-5200
Fax: (408) 432-0295
Web Site: www.microlinear.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditure
Employees
1992
37
3
7
1993
34
—
8
1994
42
3
9
1995
57
11
10
1996
54
7
11
210
210
225
251
251
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1983, Micro Linear designs, develops, and markets analog and mixed-signal ICs for a broad range
of applications within the communications, computer, and industrial markets. Such applications include local-area
networks (LANs), mass storage, personal computers, notebook computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs),
voice-band telecommunications, data acquisition, motor control, and power management.
Micro Linear targets high growth applications that require substantial analog and mixed signal content. Using its
designs, the company integrates electronic subsystems or several analog building block circuits into a single
circuit or chipset. Current development projects include the development of new standard and semi-standard
products
In 1991, Micro Linear implemented a strategy to diversify its business and lessen its dependence on the hard disk
drive industry. As a result, hard disk drive product sales in 1996 represented only six percent of total revenues,
compared to 81 percent in 1990. Micro Linear expects that sales of hard disk products will continue to represent
less than 10 percent of total revenues.
International sales represented approximately 38 percent of total revenues in 1996.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-217
Micro Linear
North American Company Profiles
Other ICs
37%
Computer
Networking ICs
57%
Hard
Disk Drive ICs
6%
1996 Sales by Device Type
Management
Arthur B. Stabenow
Robert Whelton
Carlos A. Laber
Chris A. Ladas
Marty Levy
Ray A. Reed
J. Philip Russell
Paul E. Standish
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Business Development
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Marketing and Applications
Products and Processes
Micro Linear provides second-source products and proprietary standard products as well as semi-standard parts
and ASICs using bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS processes, with a particular emphasis placed on its 1.5µm BiCMOS
technology. Its product offerings are broken down by market application below.
Mass storage (HDD, MOD, and tape):
Pulse detectors
Read/write amplifiers
Motor, servo controllers
Servo demodulators
Read channel
SCSI terminators
Clock generators
Data separators
Frequency synthesizers
Trajectory generators
Voice coil drivers
Filters
Buffers
LANs:
Data quantizer
Transceivers for MPR, FOIRL
Transceivers for AUI/FDDI
Transceivers for ATM
Fiberoptic LED drivers
Voiceband telecommunications:
Gain/attenuators
Tone detectors
Sine-wave generators
Equalizers
Dual filters
1-218
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Micro Linear
North American Company Profiles
Power and motion control:
Motor controllers
Power factor correctors
Battery—DC/DC converters
PWM controllers
Synchronized power supply chips
Resonant controllers
Phase modulation controllers
LCD backlight IC
Data conversion:
12-bit ADCs
10-bit ADCs
8-bit ADCs
8-bit DACs
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Micro Linear utilizes wafer foundries for the production of its ICs.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-219
Micro Networks
North American Company Profiles
M ICRO N ETWORKS
Micro Networks Corporation
Microelectronics Business Unit
324 Clark Street
Worcester, Massachusetts 01606
Telephone: (508) 852-5400
Fax: (508) 853-8296
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
Micro Networks Corporation designs and manufactures custom and semi-custom data acquisition products, clock
oscillators, application-specific ICs (ASICs), and custom hybrid microcircuits for worldwide high reliability
aerospace/defense, industrial, and commercial applications.
MNC was established in 1969 as a hybrid producer and quickly became a dominant player in data conversion
products. A second product line, frequency control products, was added in 1991. Micro Networks also designs
and manufactures custom microelectronics products including thick- and thin-film substrates, hybrids, and
multichip modules. Typical applications for its custom microelectronics products are avionics, imaging, portable
satellite terminals, military electronics equipment and submarine communications receivers.
In September 1996, MNC acquired the assets of GTE Microelectronics from GTE Corporation, one of the world's
largest suppliers of communications systems, equipment, and services for commercial and government/defense
applications. GTE Microelectronics was an organization within the Communications Systems Division of GTE
Government Systems, one of GTE Corporation's two operating groups. With the assets of GTE Micro, MNC
expanded its monolithic capabilities and its custom microelectronics product line to include capabilities in ASIC
design, manufacture, and test. With regard to ASICs, MNC specializes in the conversion of ASIC designs and the
manufacture of secure ASIC products.
Approximately 60 percent of MNC’s sales, which are forecast to be about $15 million for 1997, are from militaryrelated products. Commercial-related products make up the remaining 40 percent.
Management
Debbie Cremin
John Condon
1-220
Director, Microelectronics Business Unit
Sales Manager, Custom Microelectronics Business Unit
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Micro Networks
Products and Processes
Micro Networks’ custom microelectronics products include ASICs, FPGAs, multichip modules, and hybrid circuits.
The company specializes in rapid prototyping, small production runs, custom packaging, and conversion of
hybrids to ASICs.
The companies’ ASIC offerings include a variety of standard cell and gate array technologies down to submicron
CMOS, BiCMOS, and bipolar for digital, analog, and mixed-signal circuits.
Micro Networks also provides custom test services for test development and production of analog, digital, and
mixed-signal circuits including temperature testing, characteristics, and qualification.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
For the production of its ICs, MNC works with a number of wafer foundries including National Semiconductor,
Symbios Logic, and Mitel Semiconductor.
Key Agreements
•
As part of the acquisition of GTE Microelectronics in September 1996, MNC established an alliance with GTE
Government Systems that calls for MNC to supply GTE Government Systems with custom ASICs, which were
previously supplied by GTE Micro.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-221
Microchip Technology
North American Company Profiles
M ICROCHIP T ECHNOLOGY
Microchip Technology Inc.
2355 West Chandler Boulevard
Chandler, Arizona 85224-6199
Telephone: (602) 786-7200
Fax: (602) 899-9210
Web Site: www.microchip.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Microchip Technology International Inc. • Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
Telephone: (81) (45) 471-6166 • Fax: (81) (45) 471-6122
Europe:
Arizona Microchip Technology Ltd. • Bourne End, Buckinghamshire, England
Telephone: (44) (1628) 851077 • Fax: (44) (1628) 850259
Asia-Pacific:
Microchip Technology, Inc. • Kwai Fong, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2401-1200 • Fax: (852) 2401-3431
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1993
89
4
9
3
1994
139
19
14
35
1995
208
36
21
71
1996
286
52
27
115
1997
334
57
32
n/a
Employees
1,070
1,260
1,430
1,665
1,900
Company Overview and Strategy
Microchip Technology was organized in 1989 by a group of venture capital investors to acquire General Instrument
Corporation's Microelectronics division, which was established in 1960. Since the acquisition, Microchip
Technology has shifted its focus from commodity memory and logic products to embedded control system
products.
The company is now a leading manufacturer of highly integrated, field-programmable RISC microcontrollers,
complementary ASSPs, and related specialty memory products for high-volume embedded control applications.
Microchip sells its products to a broad and diverse customer base in the consumer, automotive, communications,
office automation, and industrial markets.
1-222
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Microchip Technology
North American Company Profiles
Commodity Memories
and Logic Products
7%
EEPROMs and
Specialty EPROMs
34%
Microcontrollers
and associated
development systems
59%
1996 Sales by Product Category
Other
(primarily Asia,
Europe, and Japan)
65%
United States
35%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Microchip's embedded control products (microcontrollers, serial and parallel EEPROMs, and high-speed and lowpower EPROMs) represented 93 percent of total product sales in fiscal 1996 compared to only eight percent of
total product sales in fiscal 1990. The remaining 7 percent in fiscal 1996 was represented by the company’s
commodity memory and logic products.
In 1995, Microchip acquired the “KeeLoq” hopping code and secure smart card technology and patents
developed by Nanoteq of South Africa. The $10 million acquisition also provided Microchip with worldwide
marketing rights to the technology. New products have been, and continue to be, developed that combine the
KeeLoq and smart card technology with Microchip’s 8-bit MCUs and serial EEPROMs for enhanced security
applications in wireless/remote controlled systems.
Management
Steve Sanghi
Timothy B. Billington
Frederick J. Bruwer
C. Philip Chapman
Steve Drehobl
Harold R. Fischer
Lanny Fleesas
Franc C. Guerrini
Michael J. Jones
Adrian Kuzdas
David S. Lambert
Robert A. Lanford
Mitchell R. Little
Robert J. Lloyd
Sumit K. Mitra
John F. Oatley
Gordon W. Parnell
George P. Rigg
Richard J. Simoncic
Howard C. Teeter
Ernest M. Villicaña
William Yang
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing Operations
Vice President, Secure Data Products
Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, and Secretary
Vice President, ASIC Products Division
Vice President, Far East Sales
Vice President, Worldwide Distribution Sales
Vice President, Europe Sales
Vice President, Human Resources and Information Systems
Vice President, Advanced Microcontroller and Technology Products
Vice President, Process Development and Manufacturing Engineering
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Standard Microcontroller and ASSP Division
Vice President, Facilities Management
Vice President, Systems and Applications
Vice President, Manufacturing Operations-Pacific Rim
Vice President, Controller, and Treasurer
Vice President, Advanced Microcontroller and Technology Division
Vice President, Memory and Specialty Products Division
Vice President, Americas Sales
Vice President, Advanced Microcontroller and Technology Division Marketing
Vice President, Finance-Pacific Rim
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-223
Microchip Technology
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
During the 1970's and 1980's, a high-volume ROM and EPROM business was then-General Instrument's primary
revenue generator. Since then, however, Microchip has placed designs derived from microcontrollers at the
forefront of its strategy, and has limited nonvolatile offerings to specialty areas such as serial EEPROMs. Although
commodity EPROM shipments will continue to decrease as a percentage of total sales, the company intends to
manage EPROM production levels to maintain optimal manufacturing capacity utilization.
Microchip's integrated circuit products are outlined below.
technology with lithography dimensions down to 0.7µm.
These products are based on CMOS process
Microcontroller Products
• PIC16/17 8-bit microcontrollers that combine a high-performance RISC processor with one-time-programmable
(OTP) EPROM technology or reprogrammable EEPROM or flash memory technology. Current PIC16/17
microcontroller product families include advanced features such as sophisticated timers, embedded A/D
converters, extended instruction/data memory, inter-processor communication (I2C/Microwire/SPI™ bus ports
and USARTs), and ROM, RAM, EPROM, EEPROM, and flash memories. Some of Microchip’s MCUs operate
from power supplies as low as 2.0V.
• In 1996, Microchip unveiled the industry’s first 8-pin MCU family of devices—the PIC12. The PIC12 packs the
8-bit high-speed RISC architecture of the PIC16/17 families into the smallest footprint microcontroller. The
MCU also integrates a 10-bit A/D converter without increasing the pin count.
Application-Specific Standard Products (combinations of PIC16/17 MCU architecture, non-volatile memory, and
selected application-specific software technologies)
• TrueGauge™ intelligent battery capacity monitoring and charge controller IC.
• Mouse and trackball controller IC for all Apple Computer- and IBM PC-compatible formats.
• Energy management controller IC for reducing power consumption of AC induction motors.
• Cost effective PICSEE PIC16/17 MCUs with 1K of on-chip serial EEPROM for applications such as automotive
security, keyless entry, remote control, telecommunications, and data acquisition.
QuickASIC™ Products
• In 1996, Microchip acquired quick-turn ASIC specialist ASIC Technical Solutions, Inc. Through the acquisition,
Microchip now offers the QuickASIC family, which replace standard FPGAs and CPLDs with a lower-cost maskprogrammed gate array ASICs. The QuickASIC business includes what the company calls a Zero-NRE™
program. Microchip is developing the technology to allow the combination of the company’s PIC16/17 MCU
core with configurable gate arrays, thereby providing a wider range of flexibility, power ranges, and custom
functionality.
EEPROM Products
• Serial CMOS EEPROMs with densities ranging from 1K to 64K and featuring data transfer rates up to 1MHz and
a 10 million erase/write cycle endurance. The company’s serial EEPROMs are offered with a wide operating
voltage range (1.8V to 6.0V). Microchip also developed the world’s first 64K smart serial EEPROM.
• Parallel CMOS EEPROMs available in 4K, 16K, and 64K densities with 10,000 to 100,000 erase/write cycles
(typ).
1-224
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Microchip Technology
EPROM Products
• Standard CMOS EPROMs with densities ranging from 64K to 512K.
• Low-voltage (as low as 3.0V) CMOS EPROMs with densities ranging from 64K to 512K.
• High-speed 256K CMOS EPROMs with access times as fast as 55ns.
Secure Data Products
• KeeLoq family of secure data products. The encoder and decoder devices, which feature Microchip’s
patented KeeLoq code hopping technology, are suitable for remote keyless entry, logical/physical access
control systems, alarm and immobilizer systems, garage door openers, and home security systems.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Microchip plans to install a 200mm wafer pilot line in its Fab 2 facility in 1997, and will completely convert the fab
over to 200mm wafers over time. Construction of the company’s Fab 3, 200mm wafer fab is expected to begin in
1998.
Microchip Technology Inc.
2355 West Chandler Boulevard
Chandler, Arizona 85224
Fab 1
Cleanroom size: 24,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,500
Wafer sizes: 125mm, 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MCUs, EEPROMs, EPROMs, ASSPs
Feature sizes: 0.7µm-1.5µm
Microchip Technology Inc.
1200 South 52nd Street
Tempe, Arizona 85281
Fab 2
Cleanroom size: 25,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 8,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MCUs, EEPROMs, ASSPs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.7µm-0.9µm
Microchip’s IC products are assembled and tested primarily at a subsidiary in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and by a thirdparty contractor in Bangkok, Thailand. Other third-party assembly and test suppliers used by Microchip are located
in the Philippines and other Asian countries.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-225
Micron Technology
North American Company Profiles
M ICRON T ECHNOLOGY
Micron Technology, Inc.
8000 South Federal Way
P.O. Box 6
Boise, Idaho 83707-0006
Telephone: (208) 368-4000
Fax: (208) 368-4435
Web Site: www.micron.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Micron Technology Japan, K.K. • Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3436-5666 • Fax: (81) (3) 3436-1444
Europe:
Micron Europe, Ltd. • Crowthorne, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1344) 750750 • Fax: (44) (1344) 750710
Asia-Pacific:
Micron Semiconductor Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd. • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 841-4066 • Fax: (65) 841-4166
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends August 31
Sales
IC Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
506
455
7
48
102
1993
828
737
104
57
163
1994
1,629
1,368
401
83
377
1995
2,953
2,287
844
129
961
1996
3,654
2,210
594
192
1,699
Employees
4,300
4,900
5,400
8,080
9,900
Company Overview and Strategy
Micron Technology, Inc. (MTI) was founded in 1978 as a semiconductor design consulting firm. In 1981, the
company opened its first fabrication facility, and in late 1982, entered the memory market with a 64K DRAM, which
had a significantly smaller die size than competing products.
Today, Micron is a leading developer and manufacturer of DRAMs, very fast SRAMs, flash memories, and other
semiconductor memory components, as well as personal computer systems, RF identification chips and systems,
and complex printed circuit board assemblies. Its memory products continue to feature some of the smallest die
sizes in the industry.
1-226
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Micron Technology
North American Company Profiles
MTI is comprised of several operating companies. Among them are Micron Semiconductor Products, Inc., which is
responsible for the sales and support of MTI’s semiconductor products; Micron Electronics, Inc., which develops,
manufactures, markets, and supports PC systems, workstations, and custom-manufactured printed circuit boards;
Micron Display Technology, Inc., which develops and manufactures small-area field emission displays (FEDs);
Micron Communications, Inc., which develops and manufactures a line of MicroStamp™ remote intelligent
communications (RIC) products; Micron Quantum Devices, Inc., which designs, develops, and markets flash
memory IC products and systems; and Micron Construction, Inc., which provides customized construction
services for customers in the microelectronics, industrial, commercial, and institutional industries.
Japan
2%
SRAMs
2%
Asia Pacific
9%
Other
10%
PCs
31%
Other
5%
DRAMs/
Specialty DRAMs
57%
1996 Corporate Sales by Product Type
Europe
10%
North America
74%
1996 Corporate Sales by Geographic Region
MTI’s customers are primarily computer and computer peripheral manufacturers. Other customers represent the
consumer electronics, CAD/CAM, telecommunications, office automation, data processing, and graphics display
industries.
Management
Steven R. Appleton
Donald D. Baldwin
Kipp A. Bedard
Eugene H. Cloud
Robert M. Donnelly
D. Mark Durcan
Jay L. Hawkins
Edward J. Heitzeberg
Leo B. Jurica
Roderic W. Lewis
James E. O’Toole
Nancy M. Self
Steven L. Stout
W. G. Stover, Jr.
Mark E. Tuttle
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Corporate Affairs
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Memory Products
Vice President, Process Research and Development
Vice President, Manufacturing Administration and Back End
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Lehi Operations
Vice President, Legal Affairs, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary
Vice President, Product Development
Vice President, Administration
Vice President, Facilities
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-227
Micron Technology
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
Micron's semiconductor product strategy is focused on the design, development, and manufacture of memory
products, primarily DRAMs, for standard and custom memory applications. In recent years, the company has been
applying its core semiconductor technology in other areas, such as RFID products and flat panel displays, in order
to diversify its business.
Standard and Specialty DRAMs
• 4M, 16M, and 64M standard DRAMs—fast page, extended data-out (EDO), and burst EDO modes.
• 16M synchronous DRAMs (SDRAMs)—offered in speed grades of 12ns/83MHz or 10ns/100MHz.
• 4M EDO DRAMs for graphics applications—x16 configuration and access times as low as 40ns.
• 8M synchronous graphics RAMs (SGRAMs)—x32 configuration, with speed grades of 15ns/66MHz,
12ns/83MHz, and 10ns/100MHz.
• DRAMs are also offered in bare-die form or module form.
Synchronous SRAMs
• 1M and 2M flow-through or pipelined burst SRAMs—the flow-through devices support bus frequencies up to
67MHz and the pipelined devices up to 125MHz.
• SRAMs are also offered in bare-die form or module form.
Flash Memories
• 2M, 4M, and 8M NOR-type boot block flash memories using Intel-licensed SmartVoltage technology.
• 8M and 16M NOR-type sector erase flash memories using Intel-licensed SmartVoltage technology.
• Micron introduced a line of solid-state flash memory cards in 2H96.
Communications ICs
• The MicroStamp Engine™ is a single-chip device that integrates an 8-bit microcontroller, 256 bytes of SRAM,
and a microwave radio to produce a stamp size remote intelligent communications (RIC) product. The
MicroStamp unit can be encoded with information and attached to almost any object. The stored data can then
be retrieved or modified remotely at distances of 10-20 feet.
Micron’s semiconductor products are based on CMOS process technology, with the majority of chip designs at the
0.43µm and 0.35µm geometry levels. The company’s research and development efforts are focused on shrink
versions of its 16M DRAMs, 64M synchronous DRAMs, and a move from 0.35µm to 0.25µm and 0.18µm process
technologies. Other development efforts are devoted to 64M, 256M, and 1G DRAMs, and the design of new
flash memory and RIC products.
1-228
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Micron Technology
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Micron recently completed the conversion of its 150mm wafer lines (Fabs I/II and III) to 200mm wafers.
Furthermore, in mid-1995, the company began construction of a new $2.5 billion 200mm wafer fab complex in
Lehi, Utah. However, Micron announced in early 1996 that it would complete only the shell of the fab, and hold off
on outfitting and equipping the facility until market conditions warrant. When completed, the new plant will be
capable of processing 10,000 wafers per week, utilizing 0.25µm technology.
Micron Technology, Inc.
8000 South Federal Way
Boise, Idaho 83707-0006
Fab I/II
Cleanroom size: 32,400 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, SRAMs, RFID ICs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.7µm
Micron Technology, Inc.
8000 South Federal Way
Boise, Idaho 83707-0006
Fab III
Cleanroom size: 32,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, SRAMs, flash memories
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.43µm
Micron Technology, Inc.
8000 South Federal Way
Boise, Idaho 83707-0006
Fab IV
Capacity (wafers/week): 700
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Memory R&D
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.35µm
Micron’s ICs are tested and assembled at its own facilities located at the site of its headquarters and fabs in Boise,
Idaho.
Key Agreements
• Micron, Motorola, and AMD joined together with DuPont Photomasks Inc. (DPI) in 1996 to form a technology
venture, called DPI Reticle Technology Center, to develop advanced mask technology and provide pilot line
fabrication of leading-edge reticles.
• Micron signed a cross-licensing agreement with Intel in 1995 covering flash memory ICs, making Micron a true
alternate source for Intel’s flash devices.
• Micron announced in 1992 a memorandum of understanding with NEC on the mutual OEM sales of each
other's semiconductor memory products.
• Micron has made a number of agreements to license its known-good die (KGD) technology. Licensees include
Honeywell SSEC, Chip Supply, nChip, and Cybex Technologies.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-229
Mitel Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
M ITEL S EMICONDUCTOR
Mitel Semiconductor
360 Legget Drive
P.O. Box 13089
Kanata, Ontario
Canada K2K 1X3
Telephone: (613) 592-2122
Fax: (613) 592-4784
Web Site: www.semicon.mitel.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
North America:
Mitel Semiconductor • Mt. Dora, Florida
Telephone: (352) 383-8877 • Fax: (352) 383-8822
Financial History ($M, Canadian)
Sales*
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
45
8
1993
69
6
1994
80
7
1995
110
9
1996
197
17
529
552
564
633
1,061
*External sales only. Mitel Semiconductor also supplies ICs and hybrids to its parent Mitel Corporation.
Company Overview and Strategy
Mitel Semiconductor, founded in 1976, designs, manufactures, and markets ICs, hybrids, and optoelectronic
components. It supplies analog and digital telecommunications ICs, thick-film hybrids, and board-level products to
designers of products such as PBXs, EDs, MUXs, and computer/telephony systems. These products are used in
telecommunications, data communications, video, aerospace, industrial, instrumentation, and medical
applications. Mitel Semiconductor also offers a high-quality custom wafer fabrication service.
In March 1996, Mitel Semiconductor acquired Swedish semiconductor manufacturer ABB Hafo.
1-230
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Mitel Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Thermal Print Heads
1%
Hybrids
11%
Opto
11%
Canada
5%
Wafers
9%
Japan
8%
ROW
18%
ICs
68%
1996 Sales by Product Category
Europe
35%
United States
34%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
John Millard
Kirk Mandy
President and Chief Executive Officer, Mitel Corporation
Vice President and General Manager, Semiconductor Division
Products and Processes
Mitel Semiconductor's product line includes analog and digital switches; DTMF and caller-ID devices; subscriber
line circuits (SLICs); telephone-set, ISDN, and line interface devices; and broadband ISDN primary rate and ATM
products. Mitel Semiconductor also offers a custom wafer foundry service.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Mitel Semiconductor is in the process of upgrading its Bromont fabrication facility to 150mm wafers. Additional
100mm capacity is also being added to the Järfälla facility in Sweden.
Mitel Semiconductor
18 Airport Boulevard
Bromont, Quebec, Canada J0E 1L0
Telephone: (514) 534-2321
Fax: (514) 534-3201
Cleanroom size: 18,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,700
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, double poly/triple metal,
CCD, metal gate
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.2µm, 1.5µm, 2.0µm,
3.0µm, 4.0µm, 5.0µm, 9.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Mitel Semiconductor AB
Bruttovägen 1, P.O. Box 520
S-175 26 Järfälla, Sweden
Telephone: (46) (8) 580 24500
Fax: (46) (8) 580 20190
Cleanroom size: 13,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 750
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, DMOS, SOS
Feature sizes: 1.25µm, 1.5µm, 2.0µm, 3.0µm
1-231
Mosaic Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
M OSAIC S EMICONDUCTOR
Mosaic Semiconductor, Inc.
7420 Carroll Road, Suite 300
San Diego, California 92121-9727
Telephone: (619) 271-4565
Fax: (619) 271-6058
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
25
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1988, Mosaic Semiconductor is a supplier of high reliability memory components and subsystems for
military, aerospace, industrial, and medical markets. Mosaic's customers are mainly in the U.S. and Canada.
European customers are serviced by the England-based operation, HMP.
Management
David Armstrong
Anthony Swaddle
Jaime Conde
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and General Manager
Manager, North American Sales
Products and Processes
Mosaic’s memory products include EPROM, EEPROM, flash and SRAM in 8, 16, and 32-bit widths, and are
available in both ceramic and hi-rel plastic packages. Screening levels available range from commercial to MIL-STD
883C screen.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Mosaic's ICs are currently manufactured by various North American and off-shore semiconductor manufacturers.
The company maintains an assembly, test, and package design facility in San Diego.
1-232
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
MOSAID Technologies
North American Company Profiles
MOSAID TECHNOLOGIES
MOSAID Technologies Incorporated
P.O. Box 13579
Kanata, Ontario
Canada K2K 1X6
Telephone: (613) 836-3134
Fax: (613) 831-0796
Web Site: www.mosaid.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends April 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
7
(1)
2
1993
10
2
2
1994
15
3
3
1995
24
4
5
1996
38
8
7
61
58
74
93
132
Company Overview and Strategy
MOSAID Technologies was founded in 1975 to provide MOS memory design and consulting services. Today, the
company is a recognized leader in the design of memory chips and a leading supplier of engineering memory test
systems. The company operates from two divisions: the Semiconductor Division, which designs advanced
memory chips for both standard memory and application-specific memory (ASM) requirements, and the Systems
Division, which designs, manufactures, markets, and services memory test systems focused primarily on
engineering testing requirements. Approximately 93 percent of MOSAID's sales revenue is generated outside of
Canada.
Taiwan
11%
Other
11%
North America
21%
Japan
34%
Korea
23%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-233
MOSAID Technologies
North American Company Profiles
Management
Richard C. Foss, Ph.D.
George J.J. Cwynar
Robert C. Albrow
Richard D. Broadway
G. Glenn Evans
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Strategic and Technical Development
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and General Manager, Systems Division
Products and Processes
MOSAID has experience in nine generations of DRAM designs, from 4K to 256M. Some recent memory chip
designs include: a 143MHz, four-bank, 64M SDRAM supporting x4, x8, and x16 configurations, a highperformance 16M synchronous DRAM supporting data transfer rates of up to 200Mbps, a low-voltage 16M DRAM
upgrading the capabilities of portable computers, a low-voltage word-wide 4M DRAM, and a low-power SRAM.
Macrocell designs intended for use as blocks within ASICs include high-speed pipelined SRAMs and DACs for
RAMDAC function, high-performance embedded DRAM, and HDRAM™ (high-density DRAM)—MOSAID’s
proprietary DRAM technology for single poly logic processes. A yield enhancement vehicle closely integrated
with MOSAID’s engineering testers is also available.
Key Agreements
• MOSAID announced in February 1997 that its HDRAM embedded memory technology would be ported to
TSMC’s 0.35µm logic process.
• MOSAID signed a distribution agreement with Synopsys Inc. in February 1997 for the integration of the
company’s HDRAM technology into Synopsys’ cell-based array technology.
• MOSAID is involved in the SLDRAM Consortium (formerly the SyncLink Consortium). Its role is to examine the
feasibility, chip architecture, and bus interface of the new SLDRAM standard, as well as provide the
demonstration design.
• MOSAID announced a cooperative development agreement with Oki Electric Company in July 1996, for the
development of an advanced 16M SDRAM and a 64M Outer Data Inner Control SDRAM.
• In November 1995, MOSAID acquired 12 percent of Edge Semiconductor Inc, a designer and supplier of ICs
for the automatic test equipment (ATE) market, based in San Diego, California.
• In 1994, MOSAID teamed up with Symbionics Ltd., Standard Microsystems Corp., and three venture capital
firms to form the joint venture company Accelerix, which is developing a single-chip graphics accelerator.
1-234
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
M OTOROLA
Motorola, Inc.
Semiconductor Products Sector (SPS)
3102 North 56th Street
Phoenix, Arizona 85018
Telephone: (602) 952-3000
Fax: (602) 952-6100
Web Site: motserv.indirect.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Motorola, European Semiconductor Group • Geneva, Switzerland
Telephone: (41) (22) 7991-1111 • Fax: (41) (22) 7341-086
Asia-Pacific:
Motorola Silicon Harbor Centre • Tai Po, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2666-8333 • Fax: (852) 2666-6123
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
IC Sales
Discrete Sales
Capital Expenditures
Employees (SPS)
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
13,303
453
16,963
1,022
22,245
1,560
27,037
1,781
27,973
1,154
4,470
3,606
864
666
5,800
4,825
975
1,120
6,960
5,600
1,360
1,640
8,540
6,850
1,690
2,530
7,858
6,379
1,479
1,400
41,000
44,000
46,000
52,000
52,000
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1928, Motorola's first products were battery eliminators and private label radio sets. Shortly after
WWII Motorola entered the television and semiconductor businesses. Today, Motorola, Inc. (based in
Schaumburg, Illinois) supplies a wide range of electronic products, including cellular telephones, semiconductors,
two-way radios, paging and data communications products, defense and space electronics, computers, and other
electronic components, modules, and systems for automotive, industrial, transportation, navigation,
communication, energy systems, consumer, and lighting markets.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-235
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
Other
11%
Land Mobile
13%
General Systems
37%
Messaging,
Information,
and Media
13%
Semiconductor
26%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Product Group/Sector
In 1949, Motorola set up a solid-state research laboratory in Phoenix, Arizona, and then established its
semiconductor products sector in 1954. The company has since continued to be one of the world’s largest
producers of semiconductors. It offers one of the industry's broadest portfolios of semiconductor products,
including high-performance microprocessors and microcontrollers, digital signal processors, memories, mixedsignal components, programmable logic devices, advanced CMOS ASICs, customizable standard products, RF
and microwave devices, sensors, optoelectronics, and discretes. Applications for these products are primarily in
the communications, computer, and industrial markets, but also in the automotive and consumer markets.
Consumer
10%
Automotive
15%
Industrial
17%
Communications
34%
Computing
24%
1996 Semiconductor Sales by
End-Use Market (est)
Asia/Pacific
18%
Japan
8%
Europe
23%
Americas
51%
1996 Semiconductor Sales by
Geographic Region
Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector (SPS) is organized into five product groups:
Communications and Advanced Consumer Technology Group (based in Austin, Texas)
Advanced Digital Consumer Division
Wireless Division
Imaging and Storage Division
Wireline Division
Communications, Power, and Signal Technologies Group (based in Phoenix, Arizona)
RF Semiconductor Division
Power Products Division
Sensor Products Division
Optoelectronic and Signal Products Division
1-236
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
Logic and Analog Technologies Group (based in Phoenix, Arizona)
Analog IC Division
Logic IC Division
Microcontroller Technologies Group (based in Austin, Texas)
Advanced Microcontroller Division
Motorola Segments Division
CISC Automotive and Industrial Division
Custom Microcontroller Solutions Division
CISC Consumer, Communications, and Smartcard Division
Microprocessor and Memory Technologies Group (based in Austin, Texas)
RISC Microprocessor Division
Dynamic Memory Products Division
Fast Static RAM Division
It is estimated that Motorola SPS sells approximately 20 percent of its semiconductor output to other Motorola
groups and sectors.
Management
Motorola, Inc.
Gary L. Tooker
Christopher B. Galvin
Robert L. Growney
Carl F. Koenemann
Chairman
Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector
Hector Ruiz
President and General Manager
Bertrand Cambou
Senior Vice President and Director, Technology
Larry L. Gartin
Senior Vice President and Director, Finance
Gary M. Johnson
Senior Vice President and GM, Service, Panning, and Logistics
Paul J. Shimp
Senior Vice President and Director, Quality and Support Operations
Fred Shlapak
Senior Vice President and GM, Communications and Advanced
Consumer Technologies Group
C.D. Tam
Senior Vice President and GM, Microcontroller Technologies Group
Barry Waite
Senior Vice President and GM, Microprocessor and Memory
Technologies Group
Pete Bingham
Vice President and GM, Wireline IC Division
Jim George
Vice President and GM, Imaging and Storage Division
Steve Hanson
Vice President and GM, European Semiconductor Group
Bill Seiferth
Vice President and GM, Communications, Power, and Signal
Technologies Group
George Turner
Vice President and GM, Logic and Analog Technologies Group
Peter Gill
Vice President and Director, Manufacturing Technology
Brian Hilton
Vice President and Director, World Marketing
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-237
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
L.J. Reed
Bud Broeker
Carlos Genardini
Thomas Gunter
Greg White
Brian Wilkie
Vice President and Director, Application Specific IC Division
Corporate Vice President and GM, Dynamic Memory Products Division
Corporate Vice President and GM, Asia-Pacific Semiconductor Group
Corporate Vice President and GM, RISC Microprocessor Division
Corporate Vice President and GM, Custom Microcontroller Solutions Division
Corporate Vice President and GM, Advanced Microcontroller Division
Products and Processes
MOS MEMORY
✔
✔
✔
ANALOG
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
DRAM
SRAM
Flash Memory
EPROM
ROM
EEPROM
✔
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
MOS LOGIC
✔
✔
Interface
Consumer/Automotive
Voltage Regulator/Reference
Data Conversion
Comparator
Other (Includes Telecom)
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
✔
✔
✔
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array
Standard Cell
✔
✔
Amplifier
Bipolar Memory
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array/Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
✔
✔
✔
✔
MPU
OTHER
MCU
Full Custom IC
✔
✔
MPR
DSP
Discrete
Optoelectronic
Digital Bipolar
7%
MOS Memory
10%
Analog
13%
MOS Logic
15%
MOS Micro
36%
Discrete/Opto
19%
1996 Semiconductor Sales by
Device Type
1-238
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Motorola
Provided below are details concerning Motorola’s semiconductor products.
Analog ICs
Motorola offers an extensive line of linear ICs, including amplifiers and comparators, power supply circuits, power
and motor control devices, voltage references, data converters, interface circuits, communications circuits,
consumer electronics ICs, automotive ICs, and other special purpose linear ICs like RF circuits. These devices are
manufactured using bipolar or MOS technology. In early 1997, the company introduced a 1.0V rail-to-rail dual op
amp.
Application-Specific ICs (ASICs)
Motorola’s ASIC products include CMOS, bipolar, and BiCMOS gate arrays and FPGAs. Its most advanced digital
gate arrays (M5C Series) are based on three-layer-metal 0.45µm (Leff) CMOS process technology, which allows for
up to 557,000 available gates and 556 I/Os.
The company’s programmable logic products include its Motorola Programmable Arrays (MPAs), which are SRAMbased fine-grain FPGAs. Based on technology from U.K.-based Pilkington Microelectronics, which Motorola
acquired in March 1997, the MPA devices are built using a 0.6µm triple-level-metal CMOS process and are
available with gate densities ranging from 8,000 to 22,000 gates. Motorola and Pilkington have had a working
relationship since 1992 (see Key Agreements).
Customizable Standard Products (CSPs)
The company launched its Customizable Standard Product (CSP) program in June 1995, following two years of
development. Motorola currently offers CSPs for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) local and wide area network
applications in its MC92000 Series.
Discretes, Optoelectronics, and Sensors
These products include a variety of bipolar and MOS transistors, diodes, RF and microwave devices, thyristors,
optoelectronics, pressure and temperature sensors, fiber optic devices, and power modules.
Logic ICs
From the beginning, Motorola has been a leader in the market for digital logic devices. Its product line includes a
broad range of bipolar MECL (Motorola emitter-coupled logic), MECL10K, MECL10KH, MECL III, ECLinPS (ECL in
picoseconds), ECLinPS Lite, low-power TTL, and fast TTL logic IC families, as well as CMOS high-speed, lowvoltage, and metal-gate logic IC families.
Memory ICs
Motorola manufactures and markets dynamic and fast static RAMs, including processor-specific SRAMs,
synchronous SRAMs, and BurstRAM devices. Its fast SRAMs are based on 0.8µm to 0.4µm BiCMOS and highperformance CMOS technologies with access times as low as 4.5ns and operating frequencies greater than
200MHz.
The company’s DRAMs include 4M and 16M parts designed using 0.6µm and 0.5µm high-performance CMOS
technologies. 64M DRAMs will be available in late 1997.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-239
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
In late 1996, Motorola added flash memory products to its portfolio through an alliance with Mitsubishi (see Key
Agreements). The first MobileFlash product to be offered by Motorola was an 8M 3.3V-only boot-block DINOR
flash memory device for portable and handheld equipment applications.
Microcontrollers and Digital Signal Processors
Motorola offers one of the most comprehensive selections of high-performance single-chip microcontrollers,
ranging from industry-standard 8-bit controllers to state-of-the-art 16-bit and 32-bit modular controllers.
The company’s 68HC05 and 68HC08 families of 8-bit MCUs are part of the Motorola Customer Specific IC (CSIC)
program, which is targeted for high-volume projects that require the cost-efficiency of standard devices, but have
requirements that cannot be met by “off-the-shelf” components.
Motorola’s 16-bit MCUs include the 68HC11 controller family and the 68HC16 modular controller family. Its 32-bit
MCUs include the 6833x controller family and the PowerPC-based MPC5xx controller family.
Motorola’s digital signal processor products include the 56100 and 56800 families of 16-bit general-purpose
DSPs, the 56000, 56300, and 56800 families of 24-bit general-purpose DSPs, and the 96002 family of 32-bit
general-purpose floating-point DSPs. The company is working to regain a dominant position in the merchant
digital signal processor market by developing new DSPs for the personal and wireless communications
applications.
Microprocessors and Embedded Processors
Motorola manufactures and markets high-performance microprocessors for computer applications and embedded
processors for a variety of applications, including communications, imaging, office peripherals, multimedia
systems, games, and industrial controls.
The PowerPC RISC microprocessor family has replaced the 680x0 family of CISC MPUs as Motorola’s mainstream
processors for computer applications. However, the 680x0 MPUs still have a strong presence in the market for
embedded processors.
•
PowerPC 601 Microprocessor—The first member of the PowerPC family, the 2.8-million-transistor 32-bit 601 is
designed for application in desktop computers. The newest 100MHz version (601v) is based on a 0.5µm
(0.25µm Leff) CMOS process.
•
PowerPC 602 Microprocessor—The 1-million-transistor 32-bit 602 is intended for use in portable and small
form factor equipment, such as PDAs.
•
PowerPC 603/603e Microprocessors—The 32-bit 603 is a 1.6-million-transistor high-performance RISC MPU
with integrated power management features for the notebook and energy-sensitive desktop PC markets. In
4Q96, Motorola (and its partner IBM) introduced 225MHz and 240MHz versions of the 603e, and set a goal of
reaching 300MHz by the end of 1997.
•
PowerPC 604/604e Microprocessors—The 32-bit 604 and 604e processors are targeted at mainstream
desktop PC and server applications. The 604e is expected to surpass its current 200MHz clock rate to
eventually exceed 300MHz.
1-240
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
•
PowerPC 620 Microprocessor—The 620 is the first 64-bit implementation of the PowerPC RISC architecture. It
is intended for use in server and high-end workstation computers. The 133MHz 620 is based on a four-levelmetal 0.5µm CMOS process and has about 7 million transistors.
•
PowerPC G3 Series—The new G3 Series are the initial products in a line of next-generation PowerPCs. Based
on enhanced 603, 604, and 620 processor cores, the G3 processors are expected to deliver about twice the
performance of the earlier PowerPC chips. Initially the G3 PowerPCs will be built using a 0.35µm CMOS
process and will move, during 1997, to a 0.25µm process, giving the processors on-chip speed of 300MHz to
400MHz. The G4 Series, expected to be in systems in 1999, will feature a completely new microarchitecture
for the PowerPC and will take the product line to the 0.18µm process level.
Motorola’s embedded processor products include: the 680x0 family, the ColdFire (MCF51xx and MCF52xx)
processors, the Embedded PowerPC (MPC8xx and MPC6xx) processors, the FlexCore products, the 683xx
family of integrated microprocessors, data communications controllers and peripherals, and physical interface
products. Motorola is attempting to drive the ColdFire line into emerging applications areas such as DVD and CDROM players, cable modems, HDTV, and digital cameras.
Mixed-Signal ICs
The company’s mixed-signal ICs are targeted at applications including wireless and wireline communications,
multimedia systems, automotive equipment, and control networks.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Motorola has several fab facility projects underway, including the construction of a new 200mm wafer fab (MOS 17)
in Tianjin, China, where CMOS and BiCMOS ICs will be produced. Other projects include the construction of a
new fab facility (MOS 19) near Richmond, Virginia, for the production of PowerPC chips; and an expansion of the
Nippon Motorola fab in Aizu, Japan. In addition, Motorola and Siemens are building a jointly owned DRAM plant in
Richmond, Virginia. Construction of the joint venture, which goes by the name White Oak Semiconductor, began
in 1996, with initial production of 64M parts scheduled to start in 1998.
Motorola, Ltd.
Colvilles Road
Kelvin Estate, East Kilbride
Glasgow G75 0TG, Scotland
United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (35) 52-39101
MOS 1
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 11,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, HMOS
Products: MCUs, linear and logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.2µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Motorola, Inc.
3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78721
Telephone: (512) 928-6000
MOS 2
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Logic ICs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 1.2µm-2.0µm
1-241
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
Motorola, Inc.
3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78721
Telephone: (512) 928-6000
MOS 3
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 12,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, MOS
Products: MCUs
Feature size: 1.2µm
Motorola, Inc.
5005 East McDowell Road
Phoenix, Arizona 85008
Telephone: (602) 244-6900
MOS 4
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: MOS
Products: Power MOS discretes
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-5.0µm
Motorola, Inc.
2200 West Broadway Road
Mesa, Arizona 85202
Telephone: (602) 962-2011
MOS 5
Cleanroom size: 48,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, MOS, bipolar
Products: MCUs, logic, linear, and digital ICs
Feature size: 1.0µm
Motorola, Inc.
2200 West Broadway Road
Mesa, Arizona 85202
Telephone: (602) 962-2011
MOS 6
Cleanroom size: 150,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS,
Products: SRAMs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-1.2µm
Nippon Motorola, Ltd.
Aizu Facility
1 Oyagi, Kofune
Shiokawa-machi, Yama-gun
Fukushima-ken 969-35, Japan
Telephone: (81) (241) 27-2231
MOS 7
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MCUs, logic and smart power ICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm, 1.2µm
(This fab is being upgraded to produce logic ICs
with 0.5µm to 0.65µm feature sizes on 200mm
wafers. Operations are planned to start in 1999.)
Motorola, Inc.
3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78721
Telephone: (512) 928-6000
MOS 8
Cleanroom size: 100,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MCUs, MPUs, SRAMs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.7µm-1.5µm
1-242
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
Motorola, Ltd.
Colvilles Road
Kelvin Estate, East Kilbride
Glasgow G75 0TG, Scotland, UK
Telephone: (44) (35) 52-39101
MOS 9
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: MPUs, MCUs, DSPs, SRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm, 0.65µm, 0.8µm, 1.0µm
Motorola, Inc.
8105 Irvine Center Drive
Irvine, California 92718
Telephone: (714) 932-5000
MOS 10
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DSPs, linear ICs
Feature size: 0.65µm
(Acquired from Western Digital)
Motorola, Inc.
6501 William Canon Drive West
Austin, Texas 78735-8598
Telephone: (512) 891-2000
MOS 11
Cleanroom size: 70,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: MCUs, MPUs, SRAMs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.8µm
Motorola, Inc.
1300 North Alma School Road
Chandler, Arizona 85224
Telephone: (602) 814-4691
MOS 12
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MCUs, DSPs, linear ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.65µm
Motorola, Inc.
3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard
Austin, Texas 78721
Telephone: (512) 928-6000
MOS 13
Cleanroom size: 45,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs, SRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.5µm (0.25µm capable)
Motorola, Inc.
3026 Cornwallis Road
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709
Telephone: (919) 549-3100
MOS 15
Cleanroom size: 29,800 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MCUs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.0µm
(Acquired from Harris Semiconductor)
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-243
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
Motorola, Ltd.
Headrig Road
South Queensferry
West Lothian EH 30 9SH, Scotland
MOS 16
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: BiCMOS, CMOS
Products: MPUs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.75µm
(Acquired from Digital Equipment Corporation)
Motorola
XiQing, Tianjin, China
MOS 17
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: MCUs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.0µm
(Scheduled to begin production in 1998)
Motorola, Inc.
West Creek, Virginia
MOS 19
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.25µm
(Currently on hold. Construction may start in
late 1997 or early 1998.)
Motorola, Inc.
Development
5005 East McDowell Road
Phoenix, Arizona 85008
Center for Integrated Systems (formerly COM 1)
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Communications ICs, MCUs, DSPs
Feature size: 0.65µm
Motorola, Inc.
2200 West Broadway Road
Mesa, Arizona 85202
Telephone: (602) 962-2011
BP 1
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Linear and smart power ICs
Feature size: 3.0µm
Motorola, Inc.
2200 West Broadway Road
Mesa, Arizona 85202
Telephone: (602) 962-2011
BP 2
Cleanroom size: 80,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Linear ICs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-2.0µm
Motorola, Inc.
2200 West Broadway Road
Mesa, Arizona 85202
Telephone: (602) 962-2011
BP 3
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS`
Products: ASICs, logic and linear ICs
Feature size: 1.0µm
Motorola Semiconducteurs
126 Avenue du General Eisenhower
Le Mirail BP 1029
31023 Toulouse Cedex, France
Telephone: (33) (5) 61-41-11-88
BP 4/Bipolar Power Fab
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 100mm (moving to 150mm in 1995)
Processes: Bipolar, MOS
Products: Linear, smart power, RF ICs, discretes/opto
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-3.0µm
1-244
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Motorola, Inc.
5005 East McDowell Road
Phoenix, Arizona 85008
Telephone: (602) 244-6900
RF Power and Rectifier Fabs
Cleanroom size: 80,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 18,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm
Processes: Bipolar, GaAs
Products: Discretes, RF MMICs, optoelectronics
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-10.0µm
Motorola
Tohoku Semiconductor Corporation
Izumi-ku, Sendai-shi,
Miyagi Prefecture, Japan
Capacity (wafers/week): 13,750
Wafer sizes: 150mm, 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, SRAMs, MPUs, MCUs, MPRs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.8µm
(Joint venture with Toshiba.)
White Oak Semiconductor
White Oak Technology Park
Richmond, Virginia
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.35µm
(Joint venture with Siemens. Currently under
construction. Operations are planned to begin
in the spring of 1998.)
Key Agreements
• Motorola licensed the SRAM-based FPGA technology of Pilkington Microelectronics Ltd. (PMeL) of the United
Kingdom in 1992. Motorola's first FPGAs were announced in 1995. In late 1995, Motorola also licensed
Pilkington’s field programmable analog array (FPAA) technology. In March 1997, Motorola acquired the PMeL
business from Pilkington plc., a world leader in glass products. PMeL was absorbed into Motorola’s
Programmable Logic division and was renamed the Motorola Programmable Technology Center (MPTC).
• Micron, Motorola, and AMD joined together with DuPont Photomasks Inc. (DPI) in 1996 to form a technology
venture, called DPI Reticle Technology Center, to develop advanced mask technology and provide pilot line
fabrication of leading-edge reticles.
• Motorola, Toshiba, and Fairchild Semiconductor announced in early 1997 they would jointly develop nextgeneration high-speed CMOS logic ICs. The three companies will work to develop 2.5V and 3.3V devices with
a propagation delay time of 2ns.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-245
Motorola
North American Company Profiles
• Motorola and Mitsubishi announced a couple of joint cooperation agreements in 1996. In October, Motorola
agreed to exchange its 32-bit ColdFire RISC and 68EC000 embedded MPU technologies for Mitsubishi’s
M32R microprocessor with embedded DRAM technology. In December, the two companies agreed to jointly
market MobileFlash™ memory devices based on the DINOR flash technology developed by Mitsubishi.
Motorola and Mitsubishi have said that their alliance in flash memories may be expanded in the future to include
a joint venture fab dedicated to the manufacture of flash chips.
• In mid-1996, Motorola signed a nonexclusive agreement with Hewlett-Packard’s IC Business Division to license
Motorola’s 68000, 68020, and 68030 microcontrollers, as well as the ColdFire RISC microprocessor cores.
• In early 1996, Motorola and IC Works entered into an agreement under which IC Works became an authorized
second source of selected Motorola CMOS and BiCMOS mixed-signal timing circuits. Moreover, the two
companies will work together to broaden their existing lines with complementary timing-circuit devices.
• International Rectifier signed a cross-licensing and alternate-source agreement with Motorola in early 1995
covering power ICs and power discretes.
• Motorola and IBM are jointly developing, producing, and marketing the PowerPC family of RISC
microprocessors (Apple Computer also plays a part in the design of the MPUs).
• Motorola and Cherry Semiconductor have an agreement to develop mixed-signal ASICs for the automotive
market.
• Motorola has an RFID product agreement with Matsushita and ferroelectric memory pioneer Symetrix Corp.
Motorola's subsidiary Indala Corp. agreed to jointly produce a family of read/write RFID chips with Matsushita
incorporating Symetrix's ferroelectric memory technology (Matsushita has an equity stake in Symetrix and has
the right to relicense its technology).
• Motorola is working with IBM, Lockheed Martin Federal Systems, and Lucent Technologies to establish a
manufacturing infrastructure for X-ray lithography. The team hopes to have a manufacturing capability by the
end of 1997.
1-246
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
National Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
N ATIONAL S EMICONDUCTOR
National Semiconductor Corporation
2900 Semiconductor Drive
P.O. Box 58090
Santa Clara, California 95052-8090
Telephone: (408) 721-5000
Fax: (408) 739-9803
Web Site: www.national.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
National Semiconductor Ltd. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (43) 299-2308 • Fax: (81) (43) 299-2408
Europe:
National Semiconductor GmbH • Fürstenfeldbruck, Germany
Telephone: (49) (180) 532-7832 • Fax: (49) (180) 530-8586
Asia-Pacific:
National Semiconductor HK Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2737-1600 • Fax: (852) 2736-9960
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends May 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
1,718
(120)
208
189
1993
2,014
130
229
235
1994
2,295
264
256
271
1995
2,374
264
283
479
1996
2,623
185
361
628
27,200
23,400
22,300
22,400
20,300
Company Overview and Strategy
National Semiconductor was established in Danbury, Connecticut, as a manufacturer of transistors in 1959. In
1967, the company moved to Santa Clara, California, where it began producing proprietary ICs.
National has since remained a leading supplier of analog and mixed-signal semiconductor products. The company
focuses on four strategic markets: communications, personal systems, industrial, and consumer. System
applications within these four markets include computers and computer peripherals, cellular phones, fax
machines, local and wide area networks, telecommunications equipment, automotive electronics, industrial
controls, and military and aerospace products. National is also a leader in power management solutions.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-247
National Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
At the beginning of fiscal 1997, National reorganized into four operating divisions: the Analog Division, the
Communications and Consumer Division, the Personal Systems Division, and the Fairchild Semiconductor
Division. In March 1997, as part of its effort to focus on systems solutions, National divested itself of its Fairchild
Semiconductor business, which consisted of National’s family logic, non-volatile memory, and discrete
semiconductor product lines. The high-volume, manufacturing intensive business model of Fairchild differs
significantly from National’s business of providing highly integrated system chip solutions for specific applications.
For fiscal 1996, the Fairchild product lines represented approximately $600 million of the consolidated revenues
of the two companies.
Non-Volatile Memory
6%
CMOS Logic
7%
Bipolar Logic
7%
Discretes
7%
Analog and
Mixed-Signal
Digital and Other
60%
13%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Japan
10%
Europe
24%
Americas
42%
Southeast Asia
24%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Brian Halla
Kamal Aggarwal
Patrick J. Brockett
Donald Macleod
Michael Bereziuk
John M. Clark III
Douglas M. McBurnie
Gobi Padmanabhan
Edgar R. Parker
Robert M. Penn
Richard L. Sanquini
Roland Anderson
Michael D. Burger
Gordon C. Chilton
David S. Dahmen
Rich Freeman
Tatsuo Ishihara
Keith M. Kolerus
Mark Levi
Robert B. Mahoney
Prem Nath
Richard A. Wilson
1-248
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Central Technology and Manufacturing
Executive Vice President, International Sales and Marketing
Executive Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President and GM, Personal Systems Division
Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
Senior Vice President and GM, Communications and Consumer Division
Senior Vice President, Process Technology
Senior Vice President, Quality and Reliability
Senior Vice President and GM, Analog Division
Senior Vice President, Strategic Business and Technology
Vice President, European Division
Vice President and GM, Southeast Asia Division
Vice President, Asia Pacific Operations
Vice President and Treasurer
Vice President, Worldwide Wafer Fab Operations
Vice President, Japan Division
Vice President, Americas Division
Vice President, Corporate Marketing and Communications
Vice President and Controller
Vice President and President, Mediamatics Inc.
Vice President, Human Resources
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
National Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
MOS MEMORY
DRAM
SRAM
Flash Memory
EPROM
ROM
EEPROM
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
ANALOG
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
MOS LOGIC
Interface
Consumer/Automotive
Voltage Regulator/Reference
Data Conversion
Comparator
Other (Includes Telecom)
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
General Purpose Logic
✔
✔
Amplifier
Bipolar Memory
Gate Array
General Purpose Logic
Standard Cell
Gate Array/Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
✔
✔
✔
MPU
MCU
OTHER
✔
Full Custom IC
MPR
Discrete
DSP
Optoelectronic
Analog Products
Analog products and technology has been one of National’s core competencies since its inception. The company
continues to be a leader in the analog IC industry. Its analog products include operational amplifiers and buffers,
power management circuits, data acquisition circuits, voltage regulators and references, motor control ICs, audio
ICs, custom linear ASICs (CLASICs), and other general and special purpose linear devices.
Comlinear Corporation, acquired by National in 1995, operates as a separate business unit within the Analog
Division. Fort Collins, Colorado-based Comlinear is a supplier of high-frequency amplifiers, current-feedback
devices, analog-to-digital converters, and other analog signal processing circuits.
Communications Products
National is one of the world’s leading suppliers of LAN Ethernet and Fast Ethernet controller chipsets. The
company also offers FDDI circuits.
For telecommunications applications, National offers ATM, ISDN, and Sonet/SDH families of networking devices,
as well as single-chip Digital European Cordless Telephone (DECT) radio transceivers. In 1996, National’s
Comlinear business unit released a new family of serial digital video chipsets for transmitting high-speed video
signals through cable networks.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-249
National Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
For wireless communications applications, National offers its line of PLLatinum™ RF chips. In 1996, National
introduced its Fast IR product family of wireless data communications chips using fast infrared technology.
Personal Systems Products
National’s personal systems products consist of peripheral function devices that work in tandem with the host
microprocessor in desktop and notebook computer systems. These products include its family of Super I/O™
products that consolidate many dependent functions on the motherboard, high-performance disk drive ICs, bus
interface circuits (including USB types), data transmission chips, display drivers, clocks and clock support circuits,
DRAM management ICs, and UARTs. National added low-power system logic ICs to its product portfolio in 1996
when it acquired PicoPower Technology from Cirrus Logic.
Consumer Products
National’s IC products for consumer applications include audio control circuits, audio noise reduction devices, and
audio amplifiers. The company’s Boomer™ series of single-chip CMOS audio amplifiers is used in wireless
telephones and multimedia computers, as well as CD players, video players, and VCRs.
In March 1997, National acquired Mediamatics Inc., an MPEG audio/video decoder firm, for approximately $100
million. Mediamatics is operating as a wholly owned subsidiary based in Fremont, California. The two companies
are working to incorporate National’s tuner, demodulator, A/D and D/A conversion, and other technologies with
Mediamatics’ software and hardware MPEG audio/video and Dolby AC-3 audio products to create new products, or
cores, for the consumer electronics market.
Also in early 1997, National sold to ISD its CompactSpeech line of RISC-based speech processors for voice
applications in products such as answering machines and cordless phones.
Embedded Technologies Products
This product line includes 4-bit, 8-bit (COP8 Family), and 16-bit microcontrollers and 16-bit and 32-bit
microprocessors (including its NS486 embedded processor). National is also a licensee of the Advanced RISC
Machines ARM 32-bit processor core.
Military and Aerospace Products
National is the second largest supplier of military/aerospace-related semiconductors. It is driving advances in
avionics, telecommunications, cryptography, navigation systems, and displays.
National Semiconductor's primary process technology, M2CMOS, is built around a core double-level-metal CMOS
process. To this core, modules are added to provide a third level of metallization for analog, EEPROM, and
BiCMOS applications. Optimized for analog and mixed-signal applications, the M2CMOS process is used by the
majority of the communications and computing group product lines. A wide range of design rules (down to
0.55µm) are supported by the M2CMOS process. Plans are to further shrink the process to 0.35µm by the end of
1997.
1-250
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
National Semiconductor
In addition to its family of M2CMOS processes, National also utilizes a high-performance core VLSI bipolar process
named ASPECT, which stands for Advanced Poly Emitter-Coupled Technology. ASPECT and its BiCMOS
module, ABiC, are used for high-performance gate arrays, customer-owned designs, and wireless
communications. ASPECT has been scaled from 2.0µm to 0.8µm and will be replaced with BiCMOS at 0.5µm and
beyond. The current versions of ASPECT and ABiC offer up to four-layers of metallization in addition to a level
zero local interconnect.
A variety of analog processes are used to produce a broad line of linear products. Notable process technologies
are VIP, a high speed complementary bipolar process for operational amplifiers, LB, a medium voltage automotive
market oriented process, LMDMOS, a high power mixed-signal process, and LFAST and LCMOS, which are used
for CLASICs.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
National is installing a 200mm wafer line at its fab in Maine for the fabrication of ICs with 0.35µm geometries. The
new $830 million facility will include 40,000 square feet of Class 1 cleanroom and is scheduled to be ready for
production in 4Q97.
National Semiconductor Corp.
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, California 95012
Telephone: (408) 721-5000
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Linear ICs, ASICs, R&D
Feature sizes: 0.55µm-0.8µm
National Semiconductor Corp.
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, California 95012
Telephone: (408) 721-5000
Cleanroom size: 20,000 square feet
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: R&D
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
National Semiconductor Corp.
1111 West Bardin Road
Arlington, Texas 76017
Telephone: (817) 468-6400
Fab 1
Cleanroom size: 33,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Logic ICs, EEPROMs, EPROMs,
microcomponents, ASICs
Feature size: 1.0µm
National Semiconductor Corp.
1111 West Bardin Road
Arlington, Texas 76017
Telephone: (817) 468-6400
Fab 2
Cleanroom size: 72,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 9,850
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Logic, linear, and mixed-signal ICs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.65µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-251
National Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
National Semiconductor Corp.
333 Western Avenue
South Portland, Maine 04106
Telephone: (207) 775-8100
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet
Wafer size: 200mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Linear and mixed-signal ICs
Feature size: 0.35µm
(Operations to begin in 4Q97)
National Semiconductor (UK) Ltd.
Earnhill Road, Larkfield Industrial Estate
Greenock PA16 OEQ, Scotland, UK
Telephone: (44) (1475) 633733
Fab 1
Cleanroom size: 40,300 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: Logic and linear ICs
Feature sizes: 1.2µm-5.0µm
National Semiconductor (UK) Ltd.
Earnhill Road, Larkfield Industrial Estate
Greenock PA16 OEQ, Scotland, UK
Telephone: (44) (1475) 633733
Fab 2
Cleanroom size: 18,400 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS
Products: Linear ICs
Feature sizes: 1.2µm-2.0µm
National Semiconductor (UK) Ltd.
Earnhill Road, Larkfield Industrial Estate
Greenock PA16 OEQ, Scotland, UK
Telephone: (44) (1475) 633733
Fab 3
Cleanroom size: 30,100 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Linear and logic ICs, MCUs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-1.2µm
Some of National’s IC products continue to be produced at the fabs now owned by Fairchild Semiconductor and
vice versa.
National’s semiconductor assembly and test plants are located in Toa Payoh, Singapore, and Malacca, Malaysia.
Key Agreements
• National and Fairchild remain closely linked through a long-term agreement to make the transition as smooth as
possible. The two companies also share and swap fab capacity.
• In early 1996, National joined up with the Belgian research firm IMEC to develop process technology for the
0.25µm and 0.18µm generations.
• National signed a three-year agreement in mid-1995 with Tower Semiconductor Ltd. under which Tower was to
increase its wafer production commitment to National. Tower’s fab in Israel was originally owned by National,
which retains a 3.5 percent interest in the foundry.
• In November 1994, National formed a long-term alliance with Synaptics Inc. to jointly develop computer controls
based on human senses (sight, touch, and sound).
1-252
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
National Semiconductor
• National formed an alliance with 8x8 Inc. (formerly Integrated Information Technology) in 1993. The partners are
developing embedded processor, video, and data compression technologies.
• National entered a resale and joint-development agreement with NEC for Ethernet ICs in 1993.
• National entered a cooperative relationship with Matsushita, including joint development and manufacturing
(1992).
• National signed a 10-year semiconductor patent cross-licensing agreement with Hitachi in 1991.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-253
Oak Technology
North American Company Profiles
O AK TECHNOLOGY
Oak Technology Inc.
139 Kifer Court
Sunnyvale, California 94086
Telephone: (408) 737-0888
Fax: (408) 737-3838
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Oak Technology, K.K. • Musashino-shi, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (422) 56-3761
Asia-Pacific:
Oak Technology, Taiwan • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 784-9123
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
43
(3)
Employees
1993
30
(5)
5
1994
46
4
6
1995
111
21
15
1996
248
37
31
225
370
Company Overview and Strategy
Oak Technology Inc. designs, develops, and markets high-performance integrated semiconductors and related
software solutions for OEMs worldwide who serve the multimedia PC, digital video consumer electronics, and
digital office equipment markets. The company targets these markets through five core technologies: optical
storage, video/graphics (2D and 3D), MPEG imaging, audio/communications, and digital imaging.
Founded in 1987, Oak’s initial product offerings were PC graphics chips. In 1988, the company expanded into
Super VGA graphics controllers and grew to become a unit volume leader in the SVGA market segment between
1989 and 1991. Furthermore, Oak developed the first commercially available CD-ROM controller in 1990 and
pioneered the development of an IDE/ATAPI (integrated drive electronics/AT attachment packet interface) CDROM controller in 1993. With the IDE/ATAPI established as an interface standard for CD-ROM drives, Oak is one
of the largest merchant suppliers of CD-ROM controllers.
1-254
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Oak Technology
North American Company Profiles
In October 1995, Oak Technology acquired Pixel Magic, a leader in image processing technology. Pixel Magic’s
strengths in compression and image enhancement technology are expected to play a key role in the new
generation of digital office equipment.
Other
9%
CD-ROM Controllers
91%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Oak plans to continue designing and developing new CD-ROM controllers, while moving aggressively into new
markets to diversify its business. Oak plans to continue development of optical storage technology to address the
CD-R (Recordable), CD-RW (ReWritable), and DVD-ROM markets. Oak’s other product developments include
MPEG video decoders, such as the company’s MPEG-2/Dolby Digital decoder for DVD players.
Virtually all of Oak’s revenues in 1996 were from international sales, principally in Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan.
Management
David D. Tsang
Sidney Faulkner
Kenji Fujimoto
Aydin Koc
Abel Lo
Ben T. Taniguchi
Mou Hsin Yang , Ph.D.
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Oak Technology; General Manager, Oak Technology, K.K.
Vice President, Optical Storage Business Unit
Vice President, Oak Technology; General Manager, Oak Technology, Taiwan
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Operations
Products and Processes
Oak’s products include CD-ROM controllers, MPEG video decoders, video compression/expansion processors
(VCEPs), 64-bit multimedia video/graphics accelerators, and 16-bit digital audio controllers.
Recent product announcements include the OTI-975 CD-R/CD-RW controller for CD-R/CD-RW drives, the OTI64217 Eon™ 64-bit DirectX accelerator for video/graphics applications, and an audio/communications accelerator
called the OTI-611 TelAudio 3D™.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-255
Oak Technology
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Oak Technology is a fabless IC supplier. The company's devices are produced by wafer foundry companies.
In 1995, Oak Technology entered into several long-term agreements with TSMC and Chartered Semiconductor,
securing additional wafer capacity through 2001. Also in 1995, the company entered into agreement with UMC to
form, along with other investors, a separate Taiwanese company called United Integrated Circuits Corporation
(UICC), for the manufacture of ICs. Oak agreed to invest approximately $60 million for a 10 percent equity position
in UICC. UICC began manufacturing 200mm wafers in mid-1997.
1-256
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
OPTi
North American Company Profiles
OPTI
OPTi Inc.
888 Tasman Drive
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 486-8000
Fax: (408) 486-8001
Web Site: www.opti.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
OPTi Japan K.K. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5454-0178 • Fax: (81) (3) 5454-0168
Europe:
OPTi Inc. • Oxon, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1869) 369161
Asia-Pacific:
OPTi Inc. • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 325-8520 • Fax: (886) (2) 325-6520
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
98
9
6
1993
85
9
7
Employees
1994
134
15
9
1995
164
11
11
1996
119
(14)
14
220
224
210
Company Overview and Strategy
OPTi Inc. was spun out from Chips and Technologies in 1989 to focus on developing and supplying core logic
chipsets to the personal computer industry. The company’s products are divided into three core areas within the
PC industry: notebook products, desktop products, and multimedia products. In addition to its core logic
chipsets, OPTi supplies peripheral and multimedia chipsets as well as custom ICs for audio/telephone, power
management, graphics/video, and storage control applications. The company’s chipsets provide in one or a few
semiconductor devices the core logic functions of a PC as well as the multimedia-related functions.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-257
OPTi
North American Company Profiles
OPTi’s core logic chipset sales shifted in 1996. In 1995, its core logic chipset sales were largely made up of
desktop logic chipsets. However, due to Intel’s aggressive moves to gain marketshare in the desktop core logic
market, OPTi shifted to notebook logic chipsets, which represented 59 percent of core logic chipset revenues in
1996, up from 14 percent in 1995.
Europe/Other
6%
North America
14%
Audio/
Graphics Chips
29%
Core Logic Chipsets
71%
1996 Sales by Product Type
Far East
80%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Jerry Chang
Stephen Dukker
David Zacarias
Patrick Ang
Jun-Wei Chen
Richard D’Sa
George Fang
Steve Wu
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Multimedia Products
Vice President, Foundry and Technology Services
Vice President, North America and Europe Sales
Vice President, Asia-Pacific Sales
Vice President, Mobile Products
Products and Processes
OPTI’s product offering includes multimedia and peripheral chipsets, core logic chipsets, and audio controllers, as
well as custom ICs.
The initial member of its Viper family of Pentium-class chipsets was unveiled in 1994. The second member of the
family, the Viper-N, is designed for Pentium PCI-based portable computers, and the third member, the Viper-M, is
a multimedia-enhanced chipset for Pentium PCI-based desktop computers. In addition to the Pentium, the Viper
products will support compatible AMD and Cyrix microprocessors.
In the first part of 1997, OPTi introduced two 64-bit single-chip core logic devices, the Vendetta for Pentium
desktop computers and the Firestar for Pentium notebook computers. The Vendetta is the first core logic product
to incorporate SoundBlaster audio functionality for higher integration and lower cost solutions, and features
auxiliary 66MHz PCI for support of Intel’s new accelerated graphics port architecture. Vendetta features an array of
control and monitoring options and can be scaled to work in entry level to high-end workstations and servers.
Firestar combines high performance features with space saving design capabilities and power management for
mobile and embedded applications.
1-258
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
OPTi
In addition to Vendetta and Firestar, OPTi introduced the Discovery chipset for Pentium Pro-based desktop
systems. The chipset is a 64-bit core logic product that features an integrated PCI and unified memory
architecture.
In 1993, OPTi began to broaden its product line to include peripheral chips. In the fourth quarter of that year, the
company acquired MediaChips Inc., a designer of audio chips. Through the MediaChips acquisition, OPTi began
supplying 16-bit audio controller ICs featuring an on-chip sigma-delta audio codec/mixer. That move was followed
by an entrance into the graphics chip market with an LCD controller for notebook computers in early 1994. Its
other peripheral ICs include IDE disk drive controllers and bus-interface bridge chips.
The process technologies used by OPTi in the design and manufacture of its semiconductors include 0.6µm and
0.8µm CMOS.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Fabless OPTi has three principal foundry partners, IBM Microelectronics, Ricoh, and UMC. The company also
uses, to a certain extent, Chartered Semiconductor, TSMC, Samsung, Winbond, and Toshiba for the fabrication of
its wafers.
In 1995, OPTi signed a manufacturing and foundry venture agreement with United Microelectronics Corporation
(UMC). Under the agreement, OPTi agreed to make a $30 million equity investment in UMC’s joint venture IC
foundry, called United Integrated Circuits Corporation (UICC), located in Taiwan. The fab began producing 200mm
wafers in mid-1997.
Key Agreements
•
In July 1996, OPTi licensed its super VGA LCD controller to NEC Electronics who planned to integrate the
device into embedded applications such as handheld terminals and PDAs.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-259
Orbit Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
O RBIT S EMICONDUCTOR
Orbit Semiconductor, Inc.
116 Java Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Telephone: (408) 744-1800
Fax: (408) 747-1263
Web Site: www.orbitsemi.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Orbit Europe • Surrey, England
Telephone: (44) (1932) 346288 • Fax: (44) (1932) 347110
Asia-Pacific:
DII Group • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 298-0866 • Fax: (65) 298-3689
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
1992
1993
Corporate (DII Group)
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
Employees (Orbit)
1994
1995
1996
258
9
397
23
459
10
25
34
50
62
64
120
154
184
278
400
Company Overview and Strategy
Orbit Semiconductor specializes in semiconductor design, manufacturing, and engineering support services that
allow system designers to manage application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) development, production,
scheduling, and inventory control. In August 1996, Orbit Semiconductor was acquired by DII Group, Inc., who
serves as a global network of companies that provide design, manufacturing, product development, and support
services to the electronics industry. Orbit operates as a wholly-owned subsidiary of DII Group.
Orbit's customers include companies that design various electronic systems and products for application in the
medical, communications, consumer, aerospace and military, computers and peripherals, and other industries.
1-260
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Orbit Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Asia-Pacific
8%
PCs
2%
Other
15%
Consumer
Products
6%
Military
10%
MPRs
13%
Medical
24%
Communications
16%
Industrial
14%
1996 Corporate Sales by
End-Use Market
Europe
14%
North America
78%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Geographic Region
In October 1992, Orbit introduced its Encore! program that converts FPGAs and other IC designs into Orbit digital
gate arrays for more cost-effective solutions or accelerated delivery. Orbit also offers a mixed-signal (analog/digital)
design service that provides rapid development of custom mixed-signal ASICs. A shared wafer-processing
program, Foresight, is provided for cost-effective prototyping of mixed-signal ASICs. In addition, Orbit offers
contract manufacturing programs including hi-rel manufacturing, a low-cost prototyping service, and charge
coupled device (CCD) fabrication.
Management
DII Group
Ronald R. Budacz
Carl R. Vertuca, Jr.
C.Y. Cheong
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and Managing Director, Asia-Pacific
Orbit Semiconductor
Gary P. Kennedy
Steve Kam
Richard B. Kash
Joseph K. Wai
Edward Rodriguez
Fernando A. Bettencourt
Brian Gillings
George W. Lewicki
Betty Y. Newkirk
President and Chief Executive Officer, Orbit Semiconductor
Executive Vice President, Technology and Chief Technology Officer
Executive Vice President, Mixed-Signal Design
Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, and Secretary
Group Vice President, Sales, Marketing, Engineering, and Customer Service
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Software Engineering
Vice President, Foundry Business Unit and Customer Service
Products and Processes
Orbit's manufacturing services include several IC fabrication programs. The most popular program, Encore!, is a
service that converts netlists for gate arrays or FPGAs into Orbit gate arrays with 270 to 37,000 usable gates. The
resulting circuits are functionally equivalent, but lower in price. Another program, Foresight, supports multiproject, multi-technology runs and reduces NRE charges. Subscribers of Foresight's processes see lower costs
because they share space on masks and wafers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-261
Orbit Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Both Encore! and Foresight users have access to all of Orbit's processes. They include: 1.0µm and 1.2µm N-well
and P-well CMOS processes with various options such as a second poly layer for capacitors and gates, NPN
bipolar transistors with high or low collector resistances, classical EEPROM, imaging buried channel CCDs with an
oxide nitride gate insulator to maintain low leakage on large arrays, and conventional N-channel and P-channel
transistors to allow on-chip digital logic.
Orbit offers additional programs based on its independent manufacturing capabilities. Its low-volume
manufacturing programs include a "High Reliability Manufacturing Program" in support of medical companies and
military contractors and a low-cost prototyping service, typically used by fabless semiconductor companies.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In late 1996, Orbit purchased Paradigm’s 0.6µm, 150mm wafer production facility for $20 million. Orbit plans to
move all existing property from its Sunnyvale facility to the San Jose fab by the end of 1997.
Orbit also maintains a relationship with Chartered Semiconductor to supplement its wafer production capabilities.
Orbit Semiconductor, Inc.
169 Java Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Cleanroom size: 12,500 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,400
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, CCD
Products: ASICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.0µm, 1.2µm, 2.0µm
(Will be closed by end of 1997)
1-262
Orbit Semiconductor, Inc.
71 Vista Montana
San Jose, California 95134
Cleanroom size: 18,000 square feet
Capacity (wafer/week): 1,250
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm (0.5µm in future)
(Purchased from Paradigm in 1996)
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Paradigm Technology
North American Company Profiles
P ARADIGM T ECHNOLOGY
Paradigm Technology, Inc.
694 Tasman Drive
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 954-0500
Fax: (408) 954-8913
Web Site: www.prdm.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992*
15
(9)
1
1993*
25
(18)
2
1994*
32
(4)
1
1995
52
5
5
1996
36
(36)
6
140
190
205
244
85
*Data for fiscal years ended March 31. In 1994, the company changed its fiscal year ending date to the end of
December. For the period April 1 to December 31, 1994, Paradigm’s sales totaled $26 million and net income was
$11 million.
Company Overview and Strategy
Paradigm Technology designs and markets high-speed, high-density SRAMs and SRAM modules. Target
markets for its SRAM products include telecommunications, networks, workstations, high-performance PCs,
advanced modems, and complex military/aerospace systems. The company focuses on the high-performance,
10ns and faster, segment of the SRAM industry. In 1996, 10ns and faster SRAMs accounted for approximately 36
percent of the company’s sales.
When established in 1987, Paradigm Technology initially focused on the development of high-speed 256K and
1M SRAMs. In 1989, the company opened a wafer fabrication facility in San Jose, California. Costs associated
with operating the fab and developing its technology, coupled with a less than optimal sales mix, drove the
company to bankruptcy in 1994. The majority of Paradigm’s high-performance SRAM products were being sold
into lower margin commodity markets. As part of the restructuring in 1994, Paradigm’s new management team
adopted a strategy of focusing on emerging markets for higher performance asynchronous and synchronous
SRAMs and specialty products. With the help of investments from Singapore-based AMCA Limited and National
Semiconductor, the company emerged with record sales in the quarter ended September 1994. Unfortunately,
the weakness in the SRAM market that began in late 1995 has had an adverse effect on Paradigm’s revenues.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-263
Paradigm Technology
North American Company Profiles
In 2Q96, Paradigm made a move to expand its product line beyond SRAMs by acquiring startup NewLogic
Corporation, a developer of logic designs with large memory arrays. However, in early 1997, the NewLogic
operation was closed down so that Paradigm could focus on its core SRAM products and markets. In November
1996, Paradigm adopted a fabless supplier strategy by selling its fab to Orbit Semiconductor, thereby gaining
greater flexibility and lowering it fixed costs. Orbit purchased Paradigm’s fab, which was newly converted from
125mm to 150mm wafers, for $20 million.
Approximately 25 percent of Paradigm’s sales in 1996 were attributable to sales outside the U.S., primarily in Asia
and Europe.
Management
Michael Gulett
James H. Boswell
David G. Campbell
Dennis McDonald
Richard Morley
Philip Siu
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Engineering
Products and Processes
Paradigm Technology’s products include high-performance 256K, 1M, and 4M asynchronous SRAMs, 100MHz
FIFO buffer-memory chips, high-speed processor-specific synchronous burst SRAMs, pipelined burst SRAMs,
and high-speed cache RAM modules. Paradigm’s most recent product announcements include a 256K CMOS
SRAM featuring an access time of 7ns.
The proprietary technology of Paradigm involves a 0.6µm dual-well CMOS process consisting of two polysilicon
layers and two metal layers, with three of the four layers fully configurable. The company has also developed a
0.35µm process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In November 1996, Paradigm sold its wafer manufacturing facility to Orbit Semiconductor and therefore, now
operates as a fabless IC supplier. Paradigm has established foundry agreements with Orbit and Atmel in the U.S.,
NKK Corporation in Japan, and UMC in Taiwan.
Key Agreements
• In November 1996, Paradigm sold its wafer fab facility to Orbit Semiconductor for $20 million. After the
purchasing agreement was complete, the two companies entered into an agreement that calls for Paradigm to
receive a supply of wafers from Orbit over a specified timeperiod.
1-264
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Paradigm Technology
• Paradigm and Atmel signed a five-year manufacturing, product, and technology agreement in May 1995.
Terms of the agreement include guaranteed wafer supply from Atmel to Paradigm for a five year period.
Moreover, Paradigm transferred its 0.6µm SRAM process to Atmel, and the two companies are jointly
developing 0.5µm and 0.4µm technologies. Atmel also purchased a significant equity interest in Paradigm.
• Paradigm has an extensive relationship with Japan's NKK Corporation. NKK holds a 10 percent stake in
Paradigm as well as a technology and product license for 256K and 1M SRAMs and FIFOs. The two companies
worked together to codevelop the latest 4M technology. Paradigm also has access to NKK's state-of-the-art
200mm wafer fabrication facility in Japan.
• Paradigm has a strategic alliance with National Semiconductor that provides National exclusive marketing and
sales rights to Paradigm’s products for military and aerospace applications. National also made an equity
investment in Paradigm.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-265
Peregrine Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
P EREGRINE S EMICONDUCTOR
Peregrine Semiconductor Corporation
6175 Nancy Ridge Drive
San Diego, California 92121
Telephone: (619) 455-0660
Fax: (619) 455-0770
Web Site: www.peregrine-semi.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
25
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1990, Peregrine Semiconductor develops and markets high-performance commercial integrated
circuits based on its patented UTSi™ (ultra thin silicon) process. Initially, Peregrine focused on developing the
UTSi process and today, through joint research and product development, uses this proprietary technology to
develop high-performance products targeted at specific applications such as wireless communications, portable
computing, and high-speed memory.
Management
Ronald E. Reedy, Ph.D.
James S. Cable
Bill Peavey
David R. Staab
Milt Mills
Jon Siann
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Technology and Operations
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering and Design
Director ,Sales
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
Peregrine products include the Microcommunicator™ family of frequency synthesizers, which are capable of
operating at frequencies as high as 2.5GHz. This family of communications products provides integrated solutions
to wireless system design problems in applications such as satellites, cellular and cordless telephones, and cable
and direct broadcast satellite televisions. Other products produced by Peregrine include a Xilinx-compatible
FPGA, a 64K SRAM, and other various microwave devices. Peregrine’s UTSi FPGA chip was developed in
cooperation with Xilinx. Peregrine has a license to manufacture and market 3V UTSi versions of Xilinx’s XE3000
family.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
The company's devices are currently produced by Asahi Kasei Microsystems in Japan.
1-266
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Peregrine Semiconductor
Key Agreements
• In January 1996, Peregrine signed a six-year fab agreement with Asahi Kasei Microsystems Co. (AKM) of
Japan. AKM will provide wafer fabrication to Peregrine in exchange for process technologies. The two
companies are also negotiating a joint development agreement for future products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-267
Pericom Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
P ERICOM S EMICONDUCTOR
Pericom Semiconductor Corporation
2380 Bering Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 435-0800
Fax: (408) 435-1100
Web Site: www.pericom.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Pericom • Bridport, Corset, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1308) 458986
Asia-Pacific:
Pericom Technology (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. • Shanghai, China
Telephone: (86) (21) 6485-0576 • Fax: (86) (21) 6485-2181
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Employees
1992
0.5
1993
6
1994
19
1995
23
1996
41
26
40
50
100
122
Company Overview and Strategy
Pericom Semiconductor, founded in 1990, designs and markets ultra fast digital and mixed-signal CMOS and
BiCMOS ICs that provide solutions to bottlenecks in high-performance computing and communications systems.
The company's first products were high-performance cache SRAMs. However, its current product line includes
CMOS 5V and 3V logic clock generators and drivers, networking ICs, and application-specific switching devices.
Pericom's 3V, 5V, and 3V/5V products are applicable in computing, data communications, and networking
systems.
Founded originally as Pioneer Semiconductor, the company changed its name to Pericom Semiconductor in
1993 to avoid becoming confused with a number of other technology companies with "Pioneer" in their names.
1-268
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Pericom Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Management
Alex Hui
Patrick Brennan
John Chi-Hung Hui, Ph.D.
Hank O'Hara
Michael Yen
Van Lewing
Dan Wark
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Applications and Systems Engineering
Director, Marketing
Director, Operations
Products and Processes
Employing proprietary 0.8µm and 0.6µm CMOS and BiCMOS technologies, Pericom provides advanced logic,
clock, and mixed-signal products.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
High-speed FCT bus interface logic chips with propagation delays as low as 3.2ns
High-speed clock distribution series, including PLL implementation for high clock rates
Fast switching, low impedance bus switches and true analog switches
Wide architecture 16-bit FCT logic families
Low voltage 3.3V, high-performance 8- and 16-bit FCT, LPT, LCX, and ALVCH logic families
Frequency synthesizer ICs that provide several PLL generated output frequencies for PCs, modems, and laser
printers
Networking products for Token Ring, 100VG, and Fast Ethernet
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Pericom has foundry relationships with Austria Mikro Systeme, Chartered Semiconductor, New Japan Radio, and
TSMC.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-269
Power Integrations
North American Company Profiles
P OWER INTEGRATIONS
Power Integrations Inc.
477 North Mathilda Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94086
Telephone: (408) 523-9200
Fax: (408) 523-9300
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
90
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Power Integrations, Inc. • Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Japan
Telephone: (81) (45) 471-1021 • Fax: (81) (45) 471-3717
Europe:
Power Integrations Europe Ltd. • Windsor, Bershire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1753) 622-208 • Fax: (44) (1753) 622-209
Company Overview and Strategy
Power Integrations, founded in 1988, is a privately held company focused on the power conversion market. The
company designs, develops, and markets integrated circuits that combine low-voltage analog and digital control
capability with high-voltage power output devices in monolithic form.
The company's technology is used to build innovative high-voltage products for the power supply, battery
charging, telecommunications, motor control, and lighting markets.
Management
Howard Earhart
Balu Balakrishnan
Vladimir Rumennik, Ph.D.
Dan Selleck
Robert Staples
Clifford Walker
Shyam Dujari
1-270
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Marketing and Engineering
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Finance and Administration
Vice President, Corporate Development
Director, Marketing
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Power Integrations
Products and Processes
Power Integrations utilizes a standard CMOS process and adds one implant to generate high voltage MOSFETs
integrated into power supply and interface products. The process is capable of combining 1,200V N-channel
MOSFETs, 700V P-channel MOSFETs, and 400V L-IGBTs with 5-15V CMOS and bipolar logic devices.
TOPSwitch®-II is the newest family of products for power conversion applications. In addition to integration
benefits of the high voltage process technology, this family also has patented circuit and system design
innovations.
The company's power supply IC product line is targeted at the needs of portable and small form-factor products
such as portable computers, camcorders, cellular telephones, PBX line cards, and feature phones. The highvoltage outputs of Power Integrations' power supply circuits provide universal input voltage (85-256 VAC)
capability. The high-frequency switching capability and low system component count enables low-cost, small
form-factor power supply/chargers to be realized. The power supply ICs cover universal input voltage applications
from 1 watts to 90 watts (1 watts to 50 watts from 100 VAC). A one-watt buck converter for non-isolated ISDN
applications is also available.
Its interface IC products are designed for use in energy-efficient, variable-speed electric motors for appliances
such as room air conditioners. The high-voltage capability of these products provides cost-effective level shifting
capability and control for those 110/220 VAC applications. The latest product is the INT 100 half-bridge MOSFET
driver, providing 800-volt level shifting and control for electric motors in the 50W to 3kW power range.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Foundry relationships with Panasonic Semiconductor group of Matsushita and Oki Electric have been established
for wafer fabrication utilizing Power Integrations' proprietary process.
Key Agreements
• Power Integrations granted Matsushita access to its technology and products for internal consumption
worldwide, and for non-exclusive distribution of the products in Japan and other selected geographical areas in
return for providing foundry support.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-271
QLogic
North American Company Profiles
QL OGIC
QLogic Corporation
3545 Harbor Boulevard
Costa Mesa, California 92626
Telephone: (714) 438-2200
Fax: (714) 668-5008
Web Site: www.qlc.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1993
52
6
9
Employees
1994
45
(5)
9
1995
58
2
8
1996
54
1
7
1997
70
6
10
130
161
145
190
Company Overview and Strategy
QLogic Corporation develops and markets a full line of host and peripheral I/O controller chips and host adapter
cards used to connect hard disk drives, optical storage devices, CD-ROMs, and other peripherals to computer
systems. In addition, the company develops small computer system interface (SCSI) target and disk controller
chips used in peripherals and host computers themselves.
QLogic was originally known as Emulex Micro Devices (EMD), a subsidiary of Emulex Corporation. In 1993, the
subsidiary changed its name to QLogic and became a publicly-held company in February of 1994.
To position itself as a major supplier of computer and peripheral controllers, the company is expanding its SCSI
technology. QLogic is devoted to providing its customers with products that optimize the transfer and
management of data between computer systems and peripheral devices, by developing IC chips, host adapters
boards, and software that combine a range of features and technologies.
In 1996, 55 percent of revenues were to foreign customers, primarily in the Pacific Rim region.
1-272
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
QLogic
North American Company Profiles
Management
Gary E. Liebl
H.K. Desai
Thomas R. Anderson
Mark Edwards
Larry Fortmuller
David Tovey
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales and Corporate Marketing
Vice President and GM, Computer Systems Group
Vice President and GM, Peripheral Products Group
Products and Processes
QLogic’s semiconductor product families include:
•
The FAS (Fast Architecture SCSI) Family of fast and wide SCSI controller ICs for host and peripheral
applications.
•
The ESP (Enhanced SCSI Processor) Family of SCSI controller ICs based on the industry standard advanced
SCSI core.
•
The TEC (Triple Embedded Disk Controller) Family of 8-bit and 16-bit wide SCSI HDD controllers.
•
The ISP (Intelligent SCSI Processor) Family of fast and wide, bus master host adapter ICs for 32-bit interfaces.
QLogic is working with Apple Computer to develop a new version of its high performance Fast!SCSI IQ PCI card
for the Power Macintosh platform.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
The company relies on outside vendors for the manufacturing of its semiconductor and circuit board products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-273
Quality Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Q UALITY S EMICONDUCTOR
Quality Semiconductor, Inc.
851 Martin Avenue
Santa Clara, California 95050-2903
Telephone: (408) 450-8000
Fax: (408) 496-0773
Web Site: www.qualitysemi.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Quality Semiconductor, Inc. • Hampshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1420) 563333 • Fax: (44) (1420) 561142
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
18
(5)
1993
28
3
1994
37
3
5
1
1995
46
5
6
2
1996
45
(1)
7
7
100
160
160
160
197
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1989, Quality Semiconductor, Inc. (QSI) is a provider of high-performance logic devices and
networking and logic-intensive memory semiconductor products. Quality's strategy is to go after existing areas
with higher performance parts, then create new niches that can be developed. The company targets systems
manufacturers principally in the networking, personal computer and workstation, and communications industries,
but also sells devices for military and high-reliability applications.
In early 1996, Quality Semiconductor purchased AWA MicroElectronics, Pty. Ltd. (now Quality Semiconductor
Australia) from AWA Limited, acquiring AWA’s fab facility, foundry business, and design center in Australia. During
1996, QSI upgraded the facility from 1.5µm to 0.8µm process technologies. The new subsidiary continues to
provide foundry services to AWA and its existing foundry customers. AWA Limited retains some ownership in the
new subsidiary and is jointly developing new products and technologies with Quality Semiconductor.
1-274
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Quality Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Europe
5%
Australia
4%
Far East
34%
United States
57%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Quality Semiconductor Inc.
Chun P. Chiu
R. Paul Gupta
Edward J. Bradley, Jr.
Albert R. Enamait
Farzin Firoozmand
Jacob H.V. Foraker
Gilbert C. Jones
Stephen H. Vonderach
Chairman and Chief Technical Officer
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Networking Products
Vice President, Logic and Memory
Vice President, Marketing Operations
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Quality Semiconductor Australia
Phil Cavanagh
President
Andy Brawley
Manager, Operations
Andrew Greatbach
Manager, Marketing
Clive Potter
Manager, Engineering
Products and Processes
Quality Semiconductor produces high-performance 5V and 3.3V CMOS FCT logic devices, high-speed digital
logic switches, clock management circuits, fast FIFOs, analog devices, JTAG devices, and advanced networking
products. Sales of interface logic devices account for a significant majority of the company’s net product
revenues.
Networking Products—QSI offers advanced CMOS Fast Ethernet transceivers for access equipment and LAN
applications, as well as a 4:1 ATM multiplexer/demultiplexer with on-chip FIFO buffering for ATM switch fabric
and transmission applications.
Specialty Memory Products—QSI’s memory products include a variety of asynchronous and synchronous FIFOs,
as well as dual-port and shared-port RAMs.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-275
Quality Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Logic Products—QSI offers a variety of standard 3.3V and 5V FCT logic devices in 8-, 16-, and 32-bit
configurations, as well as a new line of LCX logic devices for mixed-voltage applications.
Clock Management Devices—These products include high-performance 3.3V and 5V devices with low skew, low
jitter, and low EMI-noise characteristics.
QuickSwitch® Products—The QuickSwitch product line was invented to meet the requirement for zero
propagation delay multiplexing and switching functions in high-performance computing and networking
systems.
QuickScan™ Products—These are derived from QSI’s QuickSwitch product line and add JTAG boundary scan
capabilities.
Analog Switch Devices—This is a new family of devices designed for advanced high-performance video, audio,
and networking applications.
All of QSI’s products are manufactured using advanced CMOS process technologies with geometries ranging
from 0.8µm to 1.5µm. A 0.6µm CMOS process is under development.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In addition to using its newly acquired fabrication facility in Australia, QSI has foundry partners from which it
receives fabricated wafers. Its current foundry partners include Seiko Instruments, Ricoh, Yamaha, and TSMC. In
1996, approximately 85 percent of QSI’s wafers were manufactured by Seiko and Ricoh.
Quality Semiconductor Australia, Pty, Ltd. (QSA)
8 Australia Avenue
Homebush, NSW, 2140
Australia
Telephone: (61) (2) 763-4105
Fax: (61) (2) 746-1501
Cleanroom size: 5,000 square-feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,250
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Logic and memory ICs, ASICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.0µm, 1.2µm, 1.5µm (0.6µm in development)
Key Agreements
• Quality is developing new products and technologies through a strategic alliance with AWA Limited.
• Quality formed a second-source and product development alliance with Sharp Corporation in April 1995 that
covers a variety of specialty memory products for advanced networking, multimedia data communications, and
high-performance I/O subsystem applications.
1-276
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
QuickLogic
North American Company Profiles
Q UICK L OGIC
QuickLogic Corporation
1277 Orleans Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089-1138
Telephone: (408) 990-4000
Fax: (408) 990-4040
Web Site: www.quicklogic.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
QuickLogic Corporation • London, England
Telephone: (44) (181) 563-7624 • Fax: (44) (181) 563-0489
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1994
7
1995
15
1996
30
40
90
115
Company Overview and Strategy
QuickLogic was founded in 1988 by the inventors of the programmable array logic (PAL) device. Today, the
privately-held company designs and sells high density CMOS field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) featuring
high speeds and low power consumption, along with high productivity design software.
QuickLogic’s FPGAs compete with conventional high density programmable local devices and gate arrays in
applications such as graphics processing, high-speed memory control, video and image processing, DSP support
logic, and data acquisition.
QuickLogic has indicated that it may announce its initial public offering sometime during 1997, depending on
market conditions. Currently, international sales represent about 40 percent of QuickLogic’s total sales, and the
company is working to increase that number.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-277
QuickLogic
North American Company Profiles
Management
Irwin B. Federman
E. Thomas Hart
John Birkner
Andrew Chan
H.T. Chua
Richard Johnson
Vincent McCord
Philip Ong
Ronald Zimmerman
Edward Smith
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, CAE
Vice President, Product Development
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Human Relations
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
QuickLogic's programmable ASIC (pASIC) devices are implemented in a submicron CMOS process and deliver
high speeds and low power consumption. All of the company's existing devices are offered in both 5V and 3.3V
power supply versions. They are based on QuickLogic's proprietary metal layer, amorphous silicon ViaLink®
antifuse programming element technology that offers high speeds and high densities (up to 20,000 usable
gates). QuickLogic also supplies a comprehensive set of CAE development tools, operating on PCs and popular
workstation platforms. An open architecture approach allows popular third-party tools to interface to the
company's development environment.
pASIC 1 FPGA Family—Consists of four parts in densities ranging from 1,000 usable gates to 8,000 usable gates
(96 to 768 logic cells) and I/O pin counts ranging from 64 pins to 180 pins. The pASIC 1 devices are based on
high-speed, low-power, two-layer-metal 0.65µm CMOS process technology.
pASIC 2 FPGA Family—Consists of seven parts in densities ranging from 3,000 usable gates to 20,000 usable
gates (192 to 1,440 logic cells) and I/O pin counts ranging from 120 pins to 336 pins. The pASIC 2 devices are
based on high-speed, low-power, three-layer-metal 0.65µm CMOS process technology.
Future product development includes a hybrid PLD device that will combine FPGA and ASIC functionality. The
company plans to introduce this new product family during 1997.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
QuickLogic does not fabricate its own ICs, it has a manufacturing and technology agreement with Cypress
Semiconductor. However, QuickLogic does perform all FPGA product testing for both companies. To
supplement the capacity it receives from Cypress, QuickLogic established a foundry agreement with TSMC in
1996 (see Key Agreements).
1-278
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
QuickLogic
Key Agreements
• In February 1997, Cypress and QuickLogic announced the cancellation of a previous joint-develop, licensing,
and foundry agreement for high-performance FPGA products and released plans for establishing a new
foundry alliance. As part of a new five-year agreement, Cypress will no longer market and sell antifuse FPGA
products, but will continue to serve as a foundry for QuickLogic’s FPGAs. In addition, QuickLogic agreed to
purchase all of Cypress’s existing FPGA inventory. Cypress holds a stake of less than 10 percent in
QuickLogic.
• In late 1996, QuickLogic established a foundry agreement with Taiwan foundry, TSMC. The two companies will
work together to integrate QuickLogic’s antifuse technology into TSMC’s 0.35µm process technology.
Originally, the agreement called for using 0.5µm technology, however, a decision was later announced to
bypass 0.5µm and move directly to a 0.35µm process. The agreement also allows QuickLogic to move from
150mm to 200mm wafers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-279
Ramtron
North American Company Profiles
R AMTRON
Ramtron International Corporation
1850 Ramtron Drive
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80921
Telephone: (719) 481-7000
Fax: (719) 481-9170
Web Site: www.csn.net/ramtron
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Ramtron K.K. • Yokohama, Japan
Telephone: (81) (45) 473-9372 • Fax: (81) (45) 473-9373
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
1
(23)
15
3
1993
7
(27)
19
3
1994
20
(20)
16
2
1995
29
(2)
11
1
1996
31
(6)
13
1
129
140
121
88
105
Company Overview and Strategy
Ramtron was established in 1984 to produce non-volatile memory products by combining the unique
characteristics of ferroelectric materials with conventional integrated circuitry. The company was the first to
manufacture ferroelectric memory devices. It holds 89 U.S. and international patents covering its proprietary
technologies and products and more than 90 are pending.
Ramtron's principal business focus is directed toward the development of the commercial manufacture of
ferroelectric RAMs (FRAMs). The company sites benefits of FRAMs as having fast write times, high write
endurance, non-volatile retention, small form factors, and minimal power consumption. Applications for FRAM
devices include consumer electronics, business machines, communications equipment, test instruments,
industrial controls, and medical equipment.
Besides ferroelectric RAMs, Ramtron is also involved in the development and sale of very high speed DRAMs the
company calls enhanced-DRAMs (EDRAMs), that are based on standard volatile DRAM technology. In 1995,
Ramtron spun off its EDRAM business into a wholly owned subsidiary called Enhanced Memory Systems, Inc.,
(EMS) which has the sole responsibility of developing EDRAMs.
1-280
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Ramtron
North American Company Profiles
FRAMs*
11%
EDRAMs*
89%
License and
Development
Fees
43%
Semiconductor
Devices
57%
*Includes license and development fee revenues.
1996 Sales by Device Type
1996 Sales by Business Segment
EDRAMs have been demonstrated to provide SRAM performance with DRAM density in a product that
approaches DRAM pricing. A large portion of the company’s EDRAM business is targeted at replacement of fast
(≤15ns) SRAMs in high-performance systems. As such, EDRAMs applications include a wide variety of the
highest performing systems such as personal computer motherboards, accelerator boards, multiprocessor
systems, disk controllers, embedded computer modules, digital signal processing systems, and video graphic
systems.
Ramtron's business strategy is to manufacture its own products, to license its products on a contract basis to other
companies, and to license its proprietary technologies to a limited number of IC manufacturers in exchange for
royalties and access to advanced manufacturing capabilities. The company has forged alliances with IBM
Microelectronics, Fujitsu, Hitachi, Rohm, Toshiba, Nippon Steel Semiconductor, Samsung, and SGS-Thomson.
International sales represented 21 percent of sales in 1996.
Management
L. David Sikes
Greg B. Jones
Richard L. Mohr
Elliot M. Philofsky, Ph.D.
Donald G. Carrigan
Craig Rhodine
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President and Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
General Manager, Enhanced Memory Systems, Inc.
Products and Processes
Ramtron first demonstrated a working 256bit FRAM prototype in 1987 and in 1993, began commercial sales of 4K
FRAMs. Commercial 16K and prototype 64K devices were introduced in 1994. Production of 256K FRAMs
started in the second half of 1995. Ramtron is pursuing the development, through its strategic alliance partners,
of new high-density (1M and above) FRAM products. Ramtron's FRAM products are pin compatible with many
serial and parallel EEPROMs on the market.
The nonvolatile storage element in Ramtron's FRAMs is a capacitor constructed from two metal electrodes with a
thin-film ferroelectric material between the transistor and metallization layers of an industry standard CMOS
manufacturing process.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-281
Ramtron
North American Company Profiles
In addition to nonvolatile memories, Ramtron has identified other products in which ferroelectric technology may
be integrated, including microcontrollers, programmable logic devices (PLDs), and radio frequency identification
devices (RFIDs). Ramtron's joint venture affiliate, Racom ID Systems, Inc., is engaged in the development of
ferroelectric RFID chips and systems.
Enhanced Memory Systems' enhanced-DRAM (EDRAM) products were developed in cooperation with United
Memories Inc. (UMI) and Nippon Steel Semiconductor (then NMB Semiconductor). Colorado Springs-based UMI
was formed by Ramtron and NMB in 1990 (see Key Agreements). The EDRAMs are fabricated at Nippon Steel
Semiconductor's fab facility in Japan.
During 1996, EMS began development of a 133MHz, 16M enhanced synchronous DRAM (ESDRAM) based on
the company’s EDRAM technology. Sample shipments of the device are expected to begin in late 1997. In early
1997, EMS introduced the Enhanced 10ns family of EDRAMs that features upgraded performance speeds up to
10ns. The 10ns family is manufactured by IBM using 0.6µm process technology.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Ramtron International Corporation
1850 Ramtron Drive
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80921
Cleanroom size: 11,500 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,625
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: Ferroelectric CMOS and standard CMOS
Products: Specialty memory ICs
Feature size: 1.0µm
Ramtron's wafers are also manufactured by Rohm, Nippon Steel Semiconductor, IBM Microelectronics, and Hitachi
(see Key Agreements).
Key Agreements
• In February 1997, Ramtron established a relationship with SGS-Thomson that will cover FRAM production. The
agreement calls for SGS-Thomson to provide CMOS wafers to Ramtron, who will return the wafers to ST as
finished 64K FRAMs. The two companies may extend this relationship in the future to include joint foundry or
technology licensing agreements.
• Ramtron signed a non-exclusive licensing agreement with Samsung. Under the agreement, Ramtron licensed
its FRAM technology to Samsung in exchange for certain licensing and royalty considerations.
• Ramtron signed a manufacturing agreement with IBM Microelectronics in May 1995 for EDRAM production.
Under the agreement, IBM is serving as a foundry for the production of Enhanced Memory Systems' EDRAMs,
and IBM has a non-exclusive license to sell the devices. The first products manufactured by IBM became
available in October 1996.
1-282
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Ramtron
• Ramtron added Fujitsu to the list of companies with which it maintains joint design and licensing deals for
ferroelectric memories. The two firms are developing a 1M FRAM device, and in June 1996, Fujitsu completed
a feasibility study for 16M FRAMs. In August 1996, the agreement was amended allowing Fujitsu to use FRAM
technology in the development and manufacture of embedded memory FRAM products.
• In late 1994, Ramtron signed a cross-licensing deal with ferroelectric memory competitor, Symetrix, also located
in Colorado Springs. Both companies are jointly developing a 3-volt 16K FRAM based on Symetrix's Y-1
ferroelectric material technology. In addition, Ramtron's ferroelectric technology is now licensable by Symetrix
to its strategic partners, which include Motorola and Matsushita, and Ramtron may license Symetrix's
technology to its partners. The deal also called for Ramtron to purchase half of Symetrix for about $6 million.
• Ramtron and Rohm signed a joint manufacturing, development, and marketing deal in 1993 giving Rohm
access to Ramtron's line of FRAM products. Under the agreement, Rohm is supplying Ramtron with wafers and
is selling completed devices in Japan under both logos. In addition, joint development of new ferroelectricbased circuits, including microcontrollers and custom products will take place. Volume production of FRAM
memories by Rohm is expected to begin in the second half of 1997.
• A joint program to integrate Ramtron's ferroelectric technology with Hitachi's DRAM manufacturing process was
established in 1992. In early 1994, Hitachi indicated it was satisfied with its pilot program of testing and
packaging midrange density FRAMs. As a result, Hitachi is working with Ramtron to design and develop 256K,
1M, and 4M FRAMs. Volume production of the 256K FRAM is expected to begin in the second half of 1997.
Ramtron also agreed to license all its non-standard and standard FRAM products to Hitachi. Ramtron will rely on
Hitachi as a foundry for the devices since its own fab is not capable of the feature sizes required for the larger
memories.
• Toshiba agreed to jointly develop and second-source Ramtron’s FRAMs in densities of 256K and above.
• In 1988, Ramtron and NMB Semiconductor (now Nippon Steel Semiconductor) entered into a product
development and license agreement for conventional 1M and 4M DRAMs. Then, in 1990, the two companies
established United Memories, Inc. (UMI) to design and develop advanced memory devices (not involving
Ramtron's ferroelectric technology) for both companies. In 1995, Ramtron sold all its remaining interest in UMI
to Nippon Steel. Now, Nippon Steel manufactures and sells 4M EDRAM products to Enhanced Memory
Systems for resale to EMS’s customers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-283
Raytheon
North American Company Profiles
R AYTHEON
Raytheon Company
141 Spring Street
Lexington, Massachusetts 02173
Telephone: (617) 862-6600
Web Site: www.raytheon.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor
Sales
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
9,122
635
9,334
693
10,098
597
11,804
793
12,331
761
105
105
110
110
115
Employees
1,700
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1922 as the American Appliance Company, the company adopted the Raytheon name in 1925. Early
expertise was in the field of radio tubes and missile guidance. In 1964, Raytheon launched a diversification
program to broaden its business base by adding commercial operations.
Today, Raytheon consists of four major business segments: electronics, engineering and construction, aircraft
products, and major appliances. Approximately 60 percent of its sales are from commercial customers and 40
percent from government and defense electronics customers.
Major
Appliances
12%
Aircraft
Products
19%
Electronics
44%
Engineering
and Construction
25%
1996 Corporate Sales by Business Segment
1-284
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Raytheon
North American Company Profiles
In electronics, Raytheon’s principal business is the design, manufacture, and servicing of advanced electronic
devices, equipment, and systems for governmental and commercial markets. The company is seeking to greatly
enhance its defense electronics business through the acquisition of the Defense Systems and Electronic
business of Texas Instruments and the Hughes Aircraft business of Hughes Electronics. Both of the transactions
are expected to be completed in 3Q97. Once Raytheon, TI DS&E, and Hughes Aircraft are combined,
Raytheon’s revenues with be on the order of $21 billion, more than $13 billion of which will be in defense
electronics.
Raytheon’s commercial electronics business consists of Raytheon Marine Company, a supplier of marine-related
electronics and systems; Raytheon Semiconductor, which specializes in the design and manufacture of
multimedia video circuits and analog ICs; Raytheon Microelectronics, which produces GaAs ICs for wireless
communications and satellite applications; Seiscor Technologies, Inc., a supplier of telephone transmission
equipment; and Switchcraft, Inc., a supplier of a wide range of electronic components.
Raytheon Semiconductor is made up of three business units. The Multimedia Business Unit, based in San Diego,
California, is a leading designer and manufacturer of high-performance digital and mixed-signal ICs for computer
graphics, multimedia, imaging, and communications applications. The Analog Business Unit, based in Mountain
View, California, provides a wide range of analog and mixed-signal IC products for PC, broadcast video, automatic
test equipment (ATE), and set-top box applications. The High Speed Communications Business Unit offers ICs
for Fast Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and Fibre Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) applications. More than 90 percent of
Raytheon Semiconductor’s devices are sold to commercial customers.
Management
Dennis J. Picard
Peter R. D’Angelo
Christoph L. Hoffmann
William H. Swanson
Philip W. Cheney
Shi-Chuan Lee
James V. DiLorenzo
Arthur J. Hoage
Peter F. Bejarano
Scott Keller
Les Welborn
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Executive Vice President, Law and Corporate Affairs
Executive Vice President and GM, Raytheon Electronic Systems
Vice President and Group Executive, Raytheon Electronics
President, Raytheon Semiconductor
General Manager, Advanced Device Center, Raytheon Microelectronics
Manager, Manufacturing Services, Raytheon Semiconductor
Director, VLSI Products, Raytheon Semiconductor
Director, Linear and Mature Products, Raytheon Semiconductor
Director, Worldwide Sales, Raytheon Semiconductor
Products and Processes
Raytheon Semiconductor's products are focused primarily on video/multimedia, ATE and instrumentation, PC,
and communications applications. They include analog audio, video, and special function circuits; analog-to-digital
and digital-to-analog converters; DC/DC converters; ATE pin electronics drivers; digital video decoders, encoders,
and genlocks; imaging and video processors and filters; line regulators and references; memory and storage
products; operational amplifiers; standard PROMs and power-switched SPROMs; transceivers; and voltage
regulator modules. Raytheon Semiconductor also offers IC design, test, and manufacturing foundry services.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-285
Raytheon
North American Company Profiles
Technologies used in the manufacture of Raytheon Semiconductor’s IC products include CMOS processes, a
complementary BiCMOS process, a 5GHz high-speed complementary bipolar process, and a wide range of bipolar
processes (up to 32V). Submicron CMOS process capabilities are obtained from contract foundry suppliers.
Raytheon Microelectronics manufactures a wide range of RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave GaAs ICs, including
cellular/PCS circuits, digital broadcast satellite (DBS) devices, and wideband circuits. Raytheon Microelectronics
also offers custom MMIC solutions and foundry services. There are five standard GaAs processes offered through
its foundry services program, a 0.25µm power PHEMT process, a 0.25µm LN PHEMT process, a 0.5µm E/D
MESFET process, a 0.5µm LN MESFET process, and a 0.5µm power MESFET process.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Raytheon Semiconductor
350 Ellis Street
Mountain View, California 94039
Telephone: (415) 966-7784
Cleanroom size: 23,300 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Linear, logic, ASICs, discretes, foundry
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-5.0µm
Raytheon Semiconductor
Hartwell Road
Bedford, Massachusetts 01730
Telephone: (617) 274-5000
Cleanroom size: 12,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: NMOS, CMOS, bipolar
Products: Logic and custom ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.0µm
Raytheon Microelectronics
Advanced Device Center
350 Lowell Street
West Andover, Massachusetts 01810
Telephone: (508) 470-5000
Cleanroom size: 17,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 360
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: GaAs
Products: MMICs, discretes, foundry
Feature sizes: 0.25µm-0.5µm
Raytheon Electronic Systems
350 Lowell Street
West Andover, Massachusetts 01810
Telephone: (508) 475-5000
Cleanroom size: 17,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 875
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: NMOS, CMOS, bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Logic, custom, and linear ICs
Feature size: 0.9µm
Through the acquisitions of the defense electronics businesses of TI and Hughes Electronics, Raytheon may gain
control of the following IC fabs: a TI GaAs MMIC fab in Dallas, Texas, a Hughes silicon IC fab in Newport Beach,
California, a Hughes GaAs MMIC fab in Torrance, California, and a Hughes silicon IC fab in Scotland.
1-286
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Rochester Electronics
North American Company Profiles
R OCHESTER E LECTRONICS
Rochester Electronics Inc.
10 Malcolm Hoyt Drive
Newburyport, Massachusetts 01950
Telephone: (508) 462-9332
Fax: (508) 462-9512
Web Site: www.rocelec.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Rochester Electronics, Ltd. • Luton, Bedfordshire, England
Telephone: (44) (1582) 488680 • Fax: (44) (1582) 488681
Company Overview and Strategy
Rochester Electronics was established in 1981 to supply discontinued semiconductors. Rochester offers entire
discontinued lines, both commercial and military, from manufacturers that reduce support for old parts to rationalize
scarce manufacturing and service resources. Increased military cutbacks have also led chip makers to reduce their
support for military parts as they shift to more commercial offerings.
Rochester handles discontinued lines from companies such as AMD, National, Texas Instruments, Harris, Intel,
AT&T/Lucent, and Raytheon.
Management
Curt Gerrish
President
Products and Processes
Rochester has more than 450 million devices in stock, some over 20 years old. Its product lines include SRAMs,
DRAMs, VRAMs, PROMs, logic chips, and linear devices. The company also stocks unfinished wafers and original
mask sets.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Rochester uses more than 30 foundries to manufacture its product lines.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-287
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
North American Company Profiles
R OCKWELL S EMICONDUCTOR S YSTEMS
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Rockwell International Corporation
4311 Jamboree Road
P.O. Box C
Newport Beach, California 92658-8902
Telephone: (714) 221-4600
Fax: (714) 221-6544
Web Site: www.nb.rockwell.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Rockwell International Japan Co., Ltd., Semiconductor Systems • Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5371-1520 • Fax: (81) (3) 5371-1501
Europe:
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems SARL • Valbonne, Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France
Telephone: (33) (4) 93-00-33-35 • Fax: (33) (4) 93-00-33-03
Asia-Pacific:
Rockwell International Hong Kong, Ltd., Semiconductor Systems • Wanchai, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2827-0181 • Fax: (852) 2827-6488
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Corporate*
Sales
Net Income
Semiconductor Systems
Sales
Capital Expenditures
Employees
(Semiconductor Systems)
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
5,856
483
6,204
562
7,029
634
9,065
742
10,373
726
431
530
691
151
875
175
1,593
414
1,695
4,000
4,500
*Restated to reflect continuing operations. Rockwell sold its Graphics Systems and Aerospace and Defense
Businesses in 1996.
1-288
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
North American Company Profiles
Company Overview and Strategy
Rockwell International Corporation was incorporated in 1928 and is engaged in the research, development, and
manufacture of diversified products, including industrial automation equipment and systems, avionics products
and systems and related communications technologies primarily for commercial and military aircraft and defense
electronics systems, system-level semiconductor chipsets for personal communication electronics markets, and
automotive components and systems.
Avionics and Communications
14%
Semiconductor
Systems
16%
Electronics
40%
Automotive
30%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Business Segment
In 1996, Rockwell made several acquisitions and divestitures to sharpen its business focus. Its divestitures
included the sale of its Graphics Systems business to Stonington Partners in October 1996 and the December
1996 sale of its Aerospace and Defense business to Boeing for $3.2 billion. Meanwhile, Rockwell’s acquisitions
were focused on gaining semiconductor technologies. In September 1996, the company acquired Brooktree
Corporation, a supplier of high-performance chipsets for computer graphics, multimedia, imaging, and
communications applications for $278 million, and then in December 1996 acquired the Wireless Semiconductor
Products group of the Cirrus Logic subsidiary Pacific Communications Sciences Inc. (PCSI) for $18.1 million and
certain graphics and multimedia technology assets of Weitek Corporation. As a result of these transactions,
Rockwell is now predominantly an electronics company with 70 percent of 1996 sales coming from its electronics
business compared to in 1984 when 63 percent of the company’s sales were aerospace- and defense-related.
The transformation of Rockwell has continued into 1997. In April 1997, the company acquired the Hi-Media
broadband communications chipset business of ComStream Corporation for approximately $50 million. By the
end of September 1997, Rockwell plans to spin-off of its Automotive business into a separate, publicly-traded
company.
Meanwhile, Rockwell’s sales outside the U.S. have grown to 43 percent of total sales in 1996 compared to 13
percent in 1984.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-289
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
North American Company Profiles
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems is the fastest-growing business segment of Rockwell and comprises the
Multimedia Communications Division (MCD), the Wireless Communications Division (WCD), the Network Access
Division (NAD), and the Digital Infotainment Division. The MCD is the world’s leading supplier of facsimile and PC
modem devices. The WCD offers semiconductor systems for advanced cordless telephony and Global
Positioning Systems (GPS) receiver engines and is developing products and technologies to address the
Personal Communications Services (PCS) and wireless packet data markets. NAD offers a broad line of highbandwidth communications and networking devices. The Digital Infotainment Division focuses on products for the
digital consumer electronics information and entertainment markets.
Management
Rockwell International Corporation
Donald R. Beall
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Don H. Davis, Jr.
President and Chief Operating Officer
W. Michael Barnes
Senior Vice President, Finance, and Chief Planning Officer
William J. Calise, Jr.
Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
William D. Fletcher
Senior Vice President, Technology and Business Development
Robert H. Murphy
Senior Vice President, Organization and Human Resources
Earl S. Washington
Senior Vice President, Communications
Lee H. Cramer
Vice President and Treasurer
Lawrence J. Komatz
Vice President and Controller
Thomas A. Madden
Vice President, Corporate Development
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Dwight W. Decker, Ph.D.
President
A.C. D’Augustine
Vice President and General Manager, Digital Infotainment Division
Raouf Halim
Vice President and General Manager, Network Access Division
Vijay Parikh
Vice President and General Manager, Multimedia Communications Division
Vijay Parikh (acting)
Vice President and General Manager, Wireless Communications Division
Products and Processes
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems specializes in system-level semiconductor solutions. The company has a
history of leadership in the development and application of mixed-signal technologies. Rockwell introduced the
first modem to the worldwide communications market in 1995 and has since played a key role in helping the
industry turn those original three-board modems into today’s low-cost single-chip devices. The company is the
world’s leading supplier of advanced voice, fax, and data modem products, with a 70 percent share of the total
modem marketplace. Rockwell claims that its installed base of data modems is more than 150 million and that over
80 percent of all fax machines use its fax-modem digital signal processors and chipsets.
Rockwell believes its core competencies in IC design include digital signal processing (DSP) architectures and
algorithms, submicron CMOS technology, application-specific IC (ASIC) design, interconnect technology,
embedded memory, mixed-signal integration, and radio frequency (RF) technology. The company’s product
portfolio is organized around five product platforms: personal computing products; digital infotainment
appliances; wireless devices for cordless phones, cellular/PCS handsets, and Global Positioning Systems (GPS);
personal imaging systems; and network access equipment.
1-290
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Personal Computing Products
Through its Multimedia Communications Division, Rockwell serves the PC market with its fax, data, and integrated
data/fax/voice modem devices with transmission speeds of up to 56Kbps. In September 1996, Rockwell was the
first company to announce 56Kbps modem technology. Through the acquisition of Brooktree, Rockwell
expanded its product portfolio to include video encoding and decoding products, creating a complete offering of
multimedia and connectivity products for desktop PCs, notebook PCs, and PDAs.
Digital Infotainment Products
Rockwell’s Digital Infotainment Division was formed in April 1997. Much of the products from this division stem
from Rockwell’s Brooktree, Weitek, and ComStream Hi-Media acquisitions. The products include video
decoders/encoders and other graphics and video ICs; broadband wireless and cable demodulation products and
tuners; WaverArtist PC audio system devices, WaveStream™ software synthesizers, and the EndlessWave™
unlimited-capacity wavetable synthesis sampling engine; and the MediaPacket™ silicon architecture and
TrueView™ video display technology for advanced multimedia applications.
Wireless Communications Products
Rockwell’s Wireless Communications Division focuses on chips, chipsets, and modules for spread-spectrum
digital cordless telephones, GPS receivers, and cellular/PCS handsets. These products are supported by a wide
variety of semiconductor processes, including advanced CMOS (used for digital and mixed-signal devices), a new
silicon bipolar process for RF applications, and an HBT (heterojunction bipolar transistor) GaAs process for wireless
power amplifiers. Rockwell is developing pager-chipset solutions for personal Air Communications Technology
(pACT), a narrowband two-way messaging system.
Personal Imaging Products
At the core of Rockwell’s personal imaging platform offering is its Advanced FAX ENGINE™ family, a highly
integrated technology featuring a digital answering machine coupled with fax functions such as modem, fax
protocols, and compression/decompression, as well as scanner and printer interfaces.
Network Access Products
Formed in April 1997, the Network Access Division is focused on the underlying infrastructure tying together all of
the company’s other strategic product platforms. The Brooktree acquisition brought Rockwell a broad family of
high-speed digital data communications products spanning the company’s existing Central Site modems and
Brooktree’s HDSL and other T1/E1 products, and packet-switched products for ATM and SMDS (switched multimegabit data services).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In August 1995, Rockwell purchased the United Technologies Microelectronics Center (UTMC) wafer fab facility in
Colorado Springs, Colorado. The company plans to invest up to $1.3 billion to build a 450,000 square-foot fab
facility at this site to produce 7,500 wafers per week. Construction of Phase I, which began in March 1996, will
include a 65,000 square-foot, Class 1 cleanroom. The exterior shell will be completed in 1998, but Rockwell has
decided to hold off on starting volume production until late 1999. The company has cited the attractive cost and
availability of external resources as the reason for the delay.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-291
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
North American Company Profiles
In early 1994, the company executed an agreement to acquire additional 200mm wafer capacity through a minority
equity investment in Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing, Ltd., of Singapore. Under the agreement,
Rockwell is guaranteed capacity in Chartered’s $1.3 billion Fab 2 facility in Singapore.
In early 1996, Rockwell and Submicron Technology announced a long-term technology transfer and wafer supply
agreement. Rockwell agreed to transfer its 0.5µm and 0.35µm CMOS process technologies in return for
guaranteed wafer capacity (up to 25 percent) at Submicron Technology’s new $1.2 billion, 200mm fab facility
located near Bangkok, Thailand. Operations at the Thai fab are scheduled to begin in 1998.
Rockwell’s long-term wafer capacity target calls for a mix of about 70 percent in-house and 30 percent outsourced.
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Digital Communications Division
4311 Jamboree Road
Newport Beach, California 92660
Fab 4
Cleanroom size: 15,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,750
Wafer size: 125mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPRs, MPUs, DSPs, ASICs,
memory ICs, linear ICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-2.0µm
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Digital Communications Division
4311 Jamboree Road
Newport Beach, California 92660
Fabs 5 and 6
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPRs, DSPs,
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.65µm
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
1575 Garden of the Gods Road
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907-3486
Fab 7
Cleanroom size: 25,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/month): 750
Wafer size: 125mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Linear ICs, ASICs, MPRs, MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm, 1.0µm
(Purchased from UTMC in 1995)
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
1575 Garden of the Gods Road
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907-3486
Fab 8
Cleanroom size: 65,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/month): 3,750
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: MPRs, MPUs, DSPs, ASICs
Feature size: 0.35µm
(Operations to start in late 1999)
1-292
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Microelectronic Technology Center
2427 West Hillcrest Drive
Newbury Park, California 91320
Telephone: (805) 375-1256
Capacity (wafers/week): 400
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: HBT, MESFET GaAs
Products: ASICs, receivers, power amps,
high-speed digital circuits
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-2.0µm
Key Agreements
• In early 1997, Rockwell licensed the ARM810 and the ARM7TDMI “Thumb” 32-bit RISC microprocessor core
technologies of Advanced RISC Machines Ltd., as well as a core to be developed in the future. Rockwell will
integrate the cores into a variety of communications products.
• In 4Q96, Rockwell and Lucent Technologies jointly announced plans to make the two companies’ 56Kbps
modem products interoperable.
• In July 1995, Rockwell signed a five-year foundry agreement with IMP, Inc. for the wafer fabrication of CMOS
mixed-signal ICs.
• Rockwell is teamed with McCaw Cellular Communications to develop and provide a Cellular Digital Packet Data
(CDPD) chipset that enables portable PCs to send digital data over cellular phone networks.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-293
Ross Technology
North American Company Profiles
R OSS T ECHNOLOGY
Ross Technology
5316 Highway 290 West
Austin, Texas 78735
Telephone: (512) 349-3108
Fax: (512) 349-3101
Web Site: www.ross.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Ross Europe • La Hulpe, Belgium
Telephone: (32) (2) 652-1014 • Fax: (32) (2) 652-1062
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1995
39
(11)
13
1996
101
18
16
1997
100
n/a
n/a
75
175
235
Company Overview and Strategy
Ross Technology is an independent wholly owned subsidiary of Fujitsu Ltd., which acquired the firm from Cypress
Semiconductor in mid-1993 for about $22 million. In November 1995, Ross completed its initial public offering,
reducing Fujitsu’s share to 60 percent. A minority position in Ross is also held by Sun Microsystems (five percent).
Originally established in 1988, Ross is involved in the design, development, and marketing of advanced RISC
microprocessors based on the SPARC architecture pioneered by Sun Microsystems. Besides SPARC
microprocessors, Ross also offers a complete line of high-end motherboards and systems through its Ross
Microcomputer business unit, which was established in February 1996.
1-294
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Ross Technology
North American Company Profiles
Other OEM
17%
Sun Microsystems
45%
CPU Upgrade
19 %
Fujitsu
19%
1996 Sales by Customer
Management
Fred T. May
Frank A Baffi
Carter Godwin
John Rasco
Francis A. “Kit” Webster
Chairman and Acting Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Chief Accounting Officer and Controller
Vice President, Marketing
Chief Financial Officer
Products and Processes
Ross Technology's current family of RISC microprocessors include the 32-bit Colorado™ 2, 3, and 4
hyperSPARC™ lines. The superscaler, superpipelined hyperSPARC processors are based on a 0.4µm triplelevel-metal CMOS process and deliver performance of up to 200MHz. The company continues to develop its
next-generation Viper microprocessor technology.
To support its hyperSPARC microprocessors, Ross also offers core logic chipsets.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
The company's devices are manufactured by Fujitsu.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-295
S-MOS Systems
North American Company Profiles
S-MOS SYSTEMS
S-MOS Systems, Inc.
150 River Oaks Parkway
San Jose, California 95134
Telephone: (408) 922-0200
Fax: (408) 922-0238
Web Site: www.smos.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1992
152
1993
137
1994
135
1995
190
1996
210
210
210
220
210
215
Company Overview and Strategy
S-MOS Systems Inc., established in 1983, designs, develops, and markets a full line of very-low-power and lowvoltage (2V) advanced CMOS integrated circuits for a variety of market applications including desktop, notebook,
and palmtop computers, handheld instrumentation, data and telecommunications, and mobile and portable
communications devices. The company is divided into four key business units: Semiconductor Contract
Manufacturing, Standard Products, ASICs, and Card Products. The company provides silicon foundry services
through its Japanese affiliate, Seiko Epson Corporation.
Card Products
2%
ASIC
20%
Standard
Products
21%
Semiconductor
Contract
Manufacturing
57%
1996 Sales by Business Unit
1-296
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
S-MOS Systems
North American Company Profiles
Management
Tadakatsu Hayashi
Tom Endicott
Eiichi Suda
Kai P. Yiu
Ian R. Mackintosh
Takami Takeuchi
Dan Beck
Dev Chakravarty
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Product Creation
Vice President, Advanced Systems Division
Executive Director, ASIC Business Unit
Executive Director, Finance
Director, Marketing Communications
Manager, ASIC Marketing
Products and Processes
Standard Products Business Unit
Memories—SRAMs, mask ROMs, EEPROMs
Controllers—VGA-LCD controllers, 3D graphics accelerators
Drivers—LCD drivers
Microcontrollers—low-power 4-bit and 8-bit microcontrollers
ASIC Business Unit
Gate Arrays
—SLA40000 Series: 0.45µm CMOS process with two or three layers of metal, 13K to
288K raw gates, and 128 to 400 available I/Os.
—SLA30000 Series: 0.6µm CMOS process with two or three layers of metal, 18K to
216K raw gates, and 128 to 376 available I/Os.
—SLA20000 Series: 0.65µm CMOS process with two and three layers of metals, 12K to
200K raw gates, and 64 to 368 available I/Os.
—SLA9000F Series: 0.6µm CMOS process, 3K to 44K raw gates, and 80 to 256 I/Os.
—SLA9000 Series: 1.0µm CMOS process with two layers of metals, 4K to
36K raw gates, and 82 to 240 available I/Os.
—SLA100X Series: 2.0µm CMOS process with two layers of metals, 1K to
8K raw gates, and 78 to 178 available I/Os.
Standard Cells
—SSC5000 Series: 0.8µm CMOS process, 7K to 107K raw gates, and 112 to 432
available I/Os.
—SCC2500 Series: 1.6µm CMOS process, 300 to 16K raw gates, and 44 to 256 I/Os.
—SCC2000 Series: 2.0µm CMOS process, 250 to 11K raw gates, and 40 to 192 I/Os.
Embedded Arrays
—SSL20000-1: RAM-DAC embedded array for PC video and graphics applications.
—SSL20000-2: LAN/Ethernet embedded array for LAN controller applications.
—SSL20000-3: RAM/ROM embedded array for pager, cellular phone, and PDA applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-297
S-MOS Systems
North American Company Profiles
Card Products Business Unit
Subsystem design and assembly
Contract Manufacturing Services
Foundry, test, and packaging services through Japanese affiliate Seiko Epson.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Design, engineering, and marketing of S-MOS's products are handled at its San Jose headquarters.
Manufacturing is done at Seiko Epson's fabrication facility in Fujimi, Nagano Prefecture, Japan.
1-298
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
S3
North American Company Profiles
S3
S3 Incorporated
2801 Mission College Boulevard
Santa Clara, California 95052-8058
Telephone: (408) 588-8000
Fax: (408) 980-5444
Web Site: www.s3.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
S3 Japan K.K. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3345-7360 • Fax: (81) (3) 3345-7390
Asia-Pacific:
S3 Taiwan • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 757-6768 • Fax: (886) (2) 757-6880
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
Employees
1992
31
4
5
—
1993
113
19
12
—
1994
140
6
18
—
1995
316
35
42
36
1996
465
48
63
93
68
141
230
444
678
Company Overview and Strategy
S3 Incorporated, founded in 1989, pioneered graphics acceleration in 1991 when it introduced the industry’s first
single-chip graphics accelerator, significantly improving the performance of personal computers. The 16-bit
accelerator was followed by 32-bit and 64-bit families in 1992 and 1993, respectively. In addition, S3 delivered the
first integrated 2D and 3D graphics and video accelerator designed for the mainstream PC market.
As multimedia continues to become pervasive in PCs, S3 has leveraged its expertise to accelerate 3D graphics
and video, offer optimized UMA (Unified Memory Architecture) and MPEG solutions, and introduce new products,
such as an audio signal processor.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-299
S3
North American Company Profiles
Beginning in 1997, S3 plans to bring greater technology differentiation to the PC by exploiting the best of the
consumer electronics proprietary technologies, such as compression, communications, high-quality video and
audio, and life-like 3D graphics. In addition, the company intends to further extend the capabilities of its 2D, 3D,
and audio accelerators into new markets and technologies emerging from consumer electronics and the Internet.
United States
39%
Asia/Europe/ROW
61%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Diosdado “Dado” P. Banatao
Terry N. Holdt
Gary Johnson
G. “Ven” Venkatesh
Harry L. Dickinson
Paul G. Franklin
Dale Lindly
Neal D. Margulis
Ronald T. Yara
Edwin DeSouza
Cecilia Hayes
Wei-Chan Hsu
Michael P. Nell
Greg Paley
Werner Stahel
Chairman
Vice Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Graphics and Audio Communications
Senior Vice President, Sales
Senior Vice President, Operations
Controller and acting Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President, Research and Technology
Senior Vice President, Strategic Marketing
Vice President and General Manager, Networking
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Analog Technology
Vice President, Business Development
Vice President, Central Software Engineering Operations
Vice President, Central Engineering
Products and Processes
S3 offers a variety of 32-bit and 64-bit graphics and multimedia accelerator ICs, as well as supporting software
drivers. In 1995 and 1996, the company significantly expanded its product offerings from 2D graphics
acceleration to video acceleration, MPEG decoding, audio processing, 3D acceleration, and mobile multimedia
acceleration. S3’s IC products are listed below.
1-300
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
S3
Products for home PC applications
• Trio32™ and Trio64™ DRAM-based integrated mixed-signal graphics accelerators for cost-sensitive users.
• Trio64V+™ 64-bit, DRAM-based, multimedia accelerator with high-end video and graphics capabilities.
• Trio64UV+™ 64-bit, UMA-based, video-enable graphics accelerator. Optimized for next-generation Pentium
processor designs.
• ViRGE™ and ViRGE/VX™ 64-bit graphics and video accelerators, which integrate 3D rendering, 2D GUI, and
video acceleration with a RAMDAC and clock synthesizer on a single chip.
• Sonic/AD™ CD-quality, programmable, sigma-delta audio DAC. S3’s first audio product.
• SonicVibes™ PCI-based audio processor that integrates the capabilities of a “sound card on a chip.”
• Scenic/MX2™ MPEG-1 audio/video decoder. Connects to the Trio64V+ multimedia accelerator.
Products for desktop PC applications
• Vision864™ and Vision964™ graphics and video accelerators. The DRAM-based Vision864 enables 64-bit
performance in midrange PCs, while the VRAM-based Vision964 is targeted for power users that need higher
resolutions, color depths, and refresh rates.
• Vision868™ and Vision968™ 64-bit multimedia accelerators with an integrated video playback engine. The
Vision868 is DRAM-based and the Vision968 is VRAM-based.
• Trio32 and Trio64 graphics accelerators (see above).
• Trio64V+ multimedia accelerator (see above).
• Trio64V2™ graphics and multimedia accelerator that brings high-quality hardware assisted video playback to
the mainstream business desktop PC. The Trio64V2 provides an upgrade path to synchronous memory
technologies for even higher performance.
• ViRGE/DX/GX™ 3D-enabled multimedia accelerators based on the S3d™ architecture, which significantly
increases the performance of S3’s 3D platform. The ViRGE/DX is DRAM-based and the ViRGE/GX is
SDRAM/SGRAM-based.
• Plato/PX™ Integrated Platform Accelerator™. Based on a shared memory architecture (SMA), the Plato/PX
integrates a PC’s system controller and multimedia accelerator onto a single chip, eliminating the need for a
separate graphics subsystem.
• Scenic/MX2 MPEG-1 decoder (see above).
• Sonic/AD programmable audio DAC (see above).
Products for mobile PC applications
• Aurora64V+™ 64-bit multimedia accelerator. The Aurora64V+ provides notebook computer users with
desktop-equivalent graphics performance and multimedia capability, as well as the industry’s first dual display
support.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
The majority of S3's silicon products are currently manufactured by IBM Microelectronics, Hewlett-Packard, TSMC,
and UMC. In 1995, S3 entered into a partnership with UMC and Alliance Semiconductor to establish a new jointly
owned wafer foundry company in Taiwan called United Semiconductor Corporation (USC). S3 enjoys 20 percent
ownership in USC, which began processing 200mm wafers in 3Q96. S3 has the right to purchase up to about 31
percent of the USC fab’s output. See UMC’s profile for data on USC’s fab facility.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-301
Seeq Technology
North American Company Profiles
S EEQ T ECHNOLOGY
Seeq Technology, Inc.
47200 Bayside Parkway
Fremont, California 94538
Telephone: (510) 226-7400
Fax: (510) 657-2837
Web Site: www.seeq.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
37
(11)
5
1993
33
(4)
3
1994
21
(8)
3
1995
23
1
3
1996
31
3
3
190
161
67
67
74
Company Overview and Strategy
Seeq Technology was established in 1981 to develop, produce, and market EEPROMs. Over the years the
company has undergone a series of transitions that has created a company that is today much different than it was
founded to be. Seeq began developing Ethernet products in 1982 and adopted a strategy to have its products
manufactured by outside foundries in 1989. As a result of the foundry alliances that were established, the
company shut down its wafer fab facility in 1992 and thus became a fabless IC supplier. In early 1994, the
company abandoned the market it had itself created by selling its EEPROM business to competitor Atmel
Corporation for $10 million. Additionally, the company's Ethernet adapter board product line was discontinued in
early 1994.
Seeq now focuses exclusively on local area network (LAN) communication devices and subsystems. These
products are targeted at system manufacturers in the personal computer, workstation, printer, networking, and
telecommunications markets. Fast Ethernet devices accounted for 31 percent of total revenues in 1996.
1-302
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Seeq Technology
North American Company Profiles
Europe
6%
Asia-Pacific
19%
U.S.
75%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Alan V. Gregory
Phillip J. Salsbury, Ph.D.
Stephen Dreyer
Walter B. Gebaur
Barry Gray
Robert O. Hersh
Philip A. Ortiz
Albert Schadlick
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Manufacturing
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Eastern Sales
Products and Processes
Seeq supplies Ethernet data communication controllers, encoder/decoders, coaxial and unshielded twisted pair
cable CMOS transceivers, and networking modules. The company also sells media signaling ICs for the highspeed ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) LAN market. Its products are designed using proprietary digital and
mixed-signal CMOS processes, including submicron technologies (0.8µm and 0.6µm).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Seeq has established several agreements with wafer-based and ASIC-based foundry suppliers. Its volume wafer
processing partners are AMI, Hualon Microelectronics Corporation (HMC), Ricoh, and Rohm. VLSI Technology
and Samsung are used for turn-key manufacturing using either a standard cell or a gate array approach.
Key Agreements
• In 1995, Seeq re-established its foundry relationship with HMC for the manufacture of its mixed-signal products
with an agreement that guarantees foundry services through July 1998. Seeq is also sharing resources with
HMC to co-develop new generations of analog circuits for Ethernet data communications products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-303
Semtech
North American Company Profiles
S EMTECH
Semtech Corporation
652 Mitchell Road
Newbury Park, California 91320
Telephone: (805) 498-2111
Fax: (805) 499-5487
Web Site: www.semtech.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends January 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1993
20
0.4
1
Employees
1994
21
1
1
1995
36
2
2
1
1996
62
7
3
4
1997
65
8
4
4
340
372
500
505
Company Overview and Strategy
Semtech Corporation, incorporated in 1960, manufactures and markets a wide variety of semiconductor products
focused at both commercial and military applications. Initially, Semtech only supplied semiconductor devices to
the military and aerospace industries. However, in 1990, Semtech began its migration into commercial markets
with the acquisition of Lambda Electronics. This equipped Semtech with an IC fab facility in Corpus Christi, Texas.
In 1992, the company acquired Modupower Inc., a supplier of solid state modules, further moving Semtech into
the commercial marketplace. In late 1995, Semtech acquired ECI Semiconductor, an analog semiconductor
manufacturer located in Santa Clara, California. From ECI, Semtech gained new process technology, additional
wafer fab capacity, and ECI’s foundry customer base.
Today, Semtech’s primary focus is on the personal computer and telecommunications markets, though it still
maintains a presence in the military and aerospace markets. In fiscal 1997, military and aerospace revenues
accounted for 14 percent of total revenues, down from 40 percent in 1995.
1-304
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Semtech
North American Company Profiles
Communications
8%
Military and
Aerospace
14%
European
13%
Far East
33%
North America
54%
1997 Sales by Geographic Region
Foundry
15%
Computer
41%
Industrial
22%
1997 Sales by End-Use Market
Management
John D. Poe
Raymond E. Bregar
David I. Anderson
David G. Franz, Jr.
Jean Claude Zambelli
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Corporate Operations
Vice President, IC Design and Development
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Products and Processes
Semtech offers a wide range of integrated circuits and discrete devices including transient voltage suppressors,
linear and switching voltage regulators, DC-to-DC power modules, rectifiers, high voltage monolithic ceramic
capacitors, and modular assemblies.
Through its acquisition of ECI Semiconductor, Semtech now offers linear and mixed-signal CMOS arrays, linear
bipolar arrays, standard analog circuits, and RF discretes, in addition to offering foundry services.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Semtech Corpus Cristi
121 International Boulevard
Corpus Christi, Texas 78406
Telephone: (512) 289-0403
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: Linear ICs
Feature size: 3.0µm
Semtech Santa Clara (formerly ECI Semiconductor)
975 Comstock Street
Santa Clara, California 95054
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm
Processes: CMOS, bipolar
Products: ASICs, linear ICs, discretes, foundry
Feature sizes: 3.0µm, 4.0µm, 5.0µm
Semtech Corporation
652 Mitchell Road
Newbury Park, California 91320
Telephone: (805) 498-2111
Products: Discretes
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-305
Sensory
North American Company Profiles
S ENSORY
Sensory, Inc.
521 East Weddell Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Telephone: (408) 744-9000
Fax: (408) 744-1299
Web Site: www.sensoryinc.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
29
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1994, Sensory, Inc. is a privately held company that designs and markets high-quality low-cost ICs that
perform speech recognition, speaker verification, speech and music synthesis, audio record/playback, and
general purpose product control for consumer electronic applications, including telecommunications devices,
interactive toys, home appliances, personal electronics, and security devices.
Management
Todd Mozer
Mark Frankel
Robert Savoie
Keith Kitami
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Technology
Director, Marketing
Products and Processes
Sensory’s current products include the Interactive Speech™ line of integrated circuits (ICs). This family of chips is
designed to “bring life to products” through Sensory’s speech and audio technologies. The Interactive Speech
single-chip ICs utilize neural network technology to deliver high-quality low-cost speech recognition and speaker
verification solutions to telecommunications and consumer electronic products.
Other services offered by Sensory include product specification, vocabulary development for recognition and
synthesis, circuit board design, application programming, product design consulting, and custom ICs.
Sensory’s complete product line is produced using a 0.6µm CMOS process technology.
1-306
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Sierra Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
S IERRA S EMICONDUCTOR
Sierra Semiconductor Corporation
2222 Qume Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 434-9300
Fax: (408) 894-0218
Web Site: www.pmc-sierra.com/sierra_semi_site
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
PMC-Sierra, Inc. • Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1925) 651122 • Fax: (44) (1925) 650033
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
92
12
13
1993
83
(13)
15
1994
105
(9)
16
1995
189
1
23
1996
188
(51)
28
322
295
335
480
500
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1984, Sierra Semiconductor and its wholly owned subsidiary, PMC-Sierra, Inc., develop and market
high-performance semiconductor system solutions for advanced communications applications. The company
participates in the broadband communications infrastructure and local area networking segments of the
communications industry with its product lines of ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode), T1/E1, DS3/E3, and
Sonet/SDH ICs and subsystems developed and marketed by PMC-Sierra. Sierra also offers products for
multimedia personal computers, such as highly integrated data and voice communications devices and
graphics/imaging products.
In August 1996, the company announced its decision to exit the PC modem chipset business and put the product
line up for sale in an effort to focus on its networking and infrastructure semiconductor business. Also part of this
effort was the acquisition of the Ethernet switching technology and assets of Bit, Inc., a small, fabless firm in
Beaverton, Oregon. Bit was folded into PMC-Sierra and operates as a new product group focused on Ethernet
applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-307
Sierra Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Burnaby, British Columbia-based PMC-Sierra was originally established in 1992 as Pacific Microelectronics Centre,
a spinoff of MPR Teltech Ltd., the research arm of the British Columbia phone company. The spinoff was
supported by a significant investment from Sierra for 61 percent of PMC’s stock. PMC was then fully acquired by
Sierra in the third quarter of 1994 and subsequently renamed PMC-Sierra.
International sales accounted for over 50 percent of Sierra’s total revenues in 1996.
Management
James V. Diller
Glenn C. Jones
George D. Antenucci
Naresh K. Batra
Alden J. Chauvin, Jr.
Victor Godbole
Raman K. Rao
Marc E. Robinson
Robert L. Bailey
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President and General Manager, Multimedia Products
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Strategic Planning and System Engineering
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Technology Development and Quality
President and Chief Executive Officer, PMC-Sierra, Inc.
Products and Processes
Sierra's semiconductor product offerings include WAN and LAN chipsets and subsystems; audio, voice synthesis,
and voice recognition circuits; and graphics and imaging products. Much of the company’s development efforts
are focused on ATM and related products.
Sierra uses what it calls a "Triple Technology" process that uses its competencies in analog, digital, and EEPROM
technologies to provide complex IC system solutions.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Sierra Semiconductor is a fabless IC operation, with the majority of its wafers (as much as 60 percent) being
manufactured by Chartered Semiconductor. In 1987, the company formed Chartered Semiconductor as a faband-test joint venture with Singapore Technologies Industrial Corporation Pte. Ltd. Sierra originally held a minority
interest in the venture and licensed Chartered Semiconductor to use its manufacturing processes and test
technologies. In 1993, Singapore Technologies purchased all of the shares held by Sierra.
Sierra also uses Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), LG Semicon, and IC Works for the fabrication
of its wafers.
1-308
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Signal Processing Technologies
North American Company Profiles
S IGNAL P ROCESSING T ECHNOLOGIES (SPT)
Signal Processing Technologies, Inc.
4755 Forge Road
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907
Telephone: (719) 528-2300
Fax: (719) 528-2370
Web Site: www.spt.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
100
Company Overview and Strategy
Signal Processing Technologies (SPT) is a supplier of high-performance data conversion and signal conditioning
integrated circuits. It was formed in 1983 as a business unit of Honeywell's semiconductor group. SPT was then
acquired in 1989 by a group of private investors and an employee team and was established as a separate
corporation. In June 1990, the company became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Japan's Toko, Inc., a worldwide
supplier of electronic components and integrated circuits.
Management
Ben Takada
Richard Mintle
Alfi Moscovici
Mike Ruebenson
General Manager
Director, Sales and Marketing
Director, Engineering
Director, Finance and Administration
Products and Processes
SPT offers a portfolio of products that includes high-speed comparators and A/D and D/A converters. The
company's primary focus is on developing proprietary, high-performance signal conditioning and data conversion
products. It has received funding from its parent to develop new analog products designed for a variety of
commercial, industrial, and military applications.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Toko acts as the foundry for SPT. In late 1992, SPT purchased a former Digital Equipment Corp. R&D facility,
which more than doubled the company's engineering and test area. The facility includes a 10,000 square-foot
space that SPT may convert into a Class 10 or Class 1 fab in the future.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-309
Siliconix
North American Company Profiles
S ILICONIX
Siliconix Incorporated
(Member of TEMIC Semiconductors)
2201 Laurelwood Road
Santa Clara, California 95056-0951
Telephone: (408) 988-8000
Fax: (408) 970-3950
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
IC Sales
Discrete Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
155
43
112
5
8
13
1993
171
36
135
7
13
18
1994
197
34
163
11
16
25
1995
250
64
186
24
19
28
1996
269
65
204
26
21
40
Employees
1,202
1,211
1,172
1,269
1,228
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1962, Siliconix designs, manufactures, and markets ICs and discrete components for switching, motor
control, and power management in computers, automotive, instrumentation, and telecommunications
applications. AEG Capital Corporation became a majority shareholder of the company in December 1990,
increasing its ownership from 38 percent to 80 percent of the company's outstanding stock. In July 1992,
Siliconix was joined with Telefunken Semiconductors, Matra MHS, and Dialog Semiconductor to form the
semiconductor division of TEMIC, the microelectronics group of Daimler-Benz AG, a German automotive,
electronics, and aerospace conglomerate.
In 1996, Siliconix restructured its business to better reach its target markets. Power MOS, Power IC, and Signal
Processing product units were created with profit and loss responsibilities for their respective product lines. The
Power MOS and Signal Processing units report jointly to Siliconix and the Discrete Components Division of TEMIC
Semiconductors. The Power IC unit reports jointly to Siliconix and the Integrated Circuits Division of TEMIC
Semiconductors.
1-310
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Siliconix
North American Company Profiles
Japan
19%
Asia Pacific
21%
North America
33%
Europe
27%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Richard J. Kulle
King Owyang
Jürgen F. Biehn
Michael Gingrass
Rod Graham
G. Thomas Simmons
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Technology and Silicon Operations
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Environmental and Plant Services
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Strategic Marketing and Business Development
Products and Processes
Siliconix's power transistors and integrated circuits are mainly used for power management and motion control in
computers, hard disk drives, automobiles, and communications systems. The company's analog switches, analog
multiplexers, and low-power transistors are used to sense, switch, and route signals in video, multimedia,
instrumentation, and test equipment in both industrial and hi-rel environments.
In 1996, sales of power MOSFETs, the company’s fastest growing product group, and power ICs accounted for
about 74 percent of total sales. Siliconix expects this percentage to increase as the company continues its push
into the high-end disk drive market.
Analog Switch and
Low-Power Discretes
26%
Power MOSFETs
and Power ICs
74%
1996 Sales by Product Type
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-311
Siliconix
North American Company Profiles
Siliconix provides products and technologies that directly answer the market's demand for smaller, more efficient,
and more cost-effective components. The company's Lite Foot™ discrete power transistors are the industry's
most compact solution for motion control in hard disk drives and for load management in portable computers.
These miniaturized products can be mounted directly on the printed circuit board, and are the first such power
devices small enough to fit in a PCMCIA card. The company's Little Foot® line has been designed into telecom
systems, automotive air bag triggers, and numerous other applications where space-savings and efficiency are at a
premium. In early 1997, Siliconix announced a family of specialized power MOSFETs as part of its Little Foot
product line. The devices are designed to work with most low-voltage pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers.
Each of the five new devices is designed to handle a different power level, and thus each targets a different
application.
Siliconix's power integrated circuits combine the functions of two or more discrete transistors on one chip. A family
of high-frequency switchmode regulator and controller ICs designed for use with Lite Foot or Little Foot discretes
offers the optimal level of integration for DC-to-DC conversion in battery-operated equipment, including laptop
and notebook computers. For data storage customers the company offers highly integrated chips for voice coil
and spindle motor control. Other IC products include power interface devices for computers equipped with dual
battery packs or PCMCIA slots, power ICs for bus control in automobiles, and analog switches and multiplexers for
use in signal switching and routing in electronic instruments and industrial equipment.
Siliconix utilizes CMOS, DMOS, BiCMOS, and BiC/DMOS (BCDMOS) technologies in the manufacture of its IC
and discrete products. The company's power ICs are manufactured using its proprietary self-isolated BCDMOS
technologies, which include the BCD15 process for producing power ICs operating from 2.5V to 15V and the
BCD60 process for producing power ICs operating up to 60V.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Siliconix Incorporated
2201 Laurelwood Road
Santa Clara, California 95056
Fab 2 (Will be closed in 1997)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, DMOS, BiCMOS, BCDMOS
Products: Linear and power ICs, discretes
Feature size: 3.0µm
1-312
Siliconix Incorporated
2201 Laurelwood Road
Santa Clara, California 95056
Fab 3
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, DMOS, BiCMOS, BCDMOS
Products: Power ICs and discretes
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-1.5µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Siliconix
Siliconix/TEMIC
Itzehoe, Germany
Cleanroom size: 44,000 square feet (Class 1)
Wafer sizes: 150mm, 200mm
Processes: PowerMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Discretes
Siliconix also uses a foundry in Taiwan for the production of some of its cost-sensitive analog switch and low-power
discrete product lines.
High-volume assembly and product testing is handled at the company's facilities in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, a joint
venture in Shanghai, China, called Simconix, and at subcontractors in the Philippines, India, Taiwan, and China. A
limited amount of assembly and product test is performed in Santa Clara.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-313
Simtek
North American Company Profiles
S IMTEK
Simtek Corporation
1465 Kelly Johnson Boulevard
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80920
Telephone: (719) 531-9444
Fax: (719) 531-9481
Web Site: www.csn.net/simtek
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Employees
1992
0.5
(6)
3
1993
3
(6)
2
1994
1
(4)
2
1995
2
(3)
1
1996
5
0.1
1
25
32
25
17
17
Company Overview and Strategy
Simtek Corporation has designed, developed, and marketed non-volatile semiconductor memory products since
it commenced business operations in 1987. Its concentration has been on the design and development of fast
nvSRAMs (non-volatile SRAMs) and associated products and technologies.
Simtek's products are aimed at avionics subsystems, portable computers and instruments, medical
instrumentation, navigation aids, robotics, telecommunications systems, and other high performance applications.
Military product sales represented 36 percent of total sales in 1996.
North America
47%
International
53%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1-314
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Simtek
North American Company Profiles
Management
Richard L. Petritz
Jack Maxcy
Albert S. Weiner
Sheldon A. Taylor
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Production
Vice President, Engineering
Director
Products and Processes
Simtek's nvSRAM product family includes 4K, 16K, 64K, and 256K devices with access speeds ranging from
25ns to 45ns. The nvSRAMs utilize a unique patented memory cell technology called Novcel, which integrates
fast SRAM and EEPROM elements in each cell. In late 1993, Simtek introduced its AutoStore™ nvSRAMs, which
automatically detect power loss and transfer data from SRAM into EEPROM.
Simtek uses an advanced implementation of silicon-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (SNOS) technology in the
design of its products. The company's Novcel technology is compatible with basic CMOS technology, allowing
nvSRAM memory cells to be incorporated with other system level semiconductor products.
Simtek’s products are based on 1.2µm and 0.8µm process technologies. In 1996, products based on 1.2µm
process technology represented 68 percent of sales, while products based on 0.8µm process technology made
up the remaining 32 percent.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Simtek has foundry agreements with Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) of Singapore and Zentrum
Mikroelektronik Dresden of Germany for the manufacture of its wafers.
Key Agreements
• Simtek signed an agreement with Zentrum Mikroelektronik Dresden (ZMD) in mid-1994 to install its 1.2µm
process in ZMD's fab in Germany and to jointly develop 0.8µm process technology. The agreement was later
modified to bypass the installation of 1.2µm technology and instead install 0.8µm technology. ZMD also
received a license to sell Simtek's 64K and 256K nvSRAMs built in the 0.8µm process.
In 1995, the two companies expanded their relationship to include the joint development of additional
nvSRAMs using the 0.8µm process. ZMD agreed to finance the development in exchange for shares in
Simtek. In the second quarter of 1996, ZMD began supplying Simtek with 64K finished units based on 0.8µm
process technology. ZMD is the largest shareholder of Simtek, owning 30 percent.
• Simtek entered into a manufacturing and development agreement with Chartered Semiconductor
Manufacturing (CSM) in 1992 for 64K through 1M nvSRAMs. CSM will provide Simtek with wafers at least
through 3Q97.
• Simtek established an agreement in 1989 with GEC Plessey Semiconductors under which GEC Plessey has
the right to incorporate Simtek's non-volatile memory technology into its ASICs. In 1990, the agreement was
extended to grant GEC Plessey a worldwide license to manufacture and market Simtek's nvSRAM devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-315
Single Chip Systems
North American Company Profiles
S INGLE C HIP S YSTEMS
Single Chip Systems Corporation
10905 Technology Place
San Diego, California 92127
Telephone: (619) 485-9196
Fax: (619) 485-0561
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
Single Chip Systems (formerly Instant Circuit Corporation) was established in 1992 to design and sell electrically
programmable integrated circuits that employ patented antifuse technology. Specifically, Single Chip Systems is
developing IC products for the radio frequency identification (RF/ID) market. The company also assembles its ICs
into electronic ID tags. The company has not yet sold ICs of its own, but has produced test wafers.
Management
Bruce B. Roesner, Ph.D.
Jacob Jacobson
Gregory A. Bohdan
Chairman and Chief Technical Officer
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Products and Processes
The company's first product is an electronic ID tag and scanner system that offers a significant increase in
performance and decrease in cost compared to existing systems.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Single Chip Systems' ICs are manufactured at independent foundries.
1-316
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Sipex
North American Company Profiles
S IPEX
Sipex Corporation
22 Linnell Circle
Billerica, Massachusetts 01821
Telephone: (508) 667-8700
Fax: (508) 667-8310
Web Site: www.sipex.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Nippon Sipex Corporation • Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3254-5822 • Fax: (81) (3) 3254-5824
Europe:
Sipex SARL • Rungis Cedex, France
Telephone: (33) (1) 4687-8336 • Fax: (33) (1) 4560-0784
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
29
(8)
2
1993
28
(4)
2
1
Employees
1994
23
(5)
3
1
1995
30
(2)
4
1
1996
23
4
5
2
220
247
Company Overview and Strategy
Sipex Corporation is a leading designer and manufacturer of high-performance, high valued-added analog
integrated circuits.
The company is focused on three market areas:
data communications and
telecommunications; battery powered/portable products; and industrial controls/instrumentation. Sipex serves
these market sectors with three primary product lines: interface circuits, low power application-specific analog
circuits, and data converter products. The company pioneered the design, development, and manufacture of
electroluminescent lamp (EL) driver circuits.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-317
Sipex
North American Company Profiles
Sipex was established in 1965 under the name Hybrid Systems Inc. and until the late 1980’s focused on the
design and manufacture of data conversion products utilizing hybrid technology, primarily for the military market.
The company merged with DataLinear Corporation in 1986 and then with Dielectric Semiconductor Inc. in 1987, at
which time the company name was changed to Sipex Corporation. Then in 1988, the company acquired Barvon
BiCMOS Technology, Inc., a designer and manufacturer of custom and standard monolithic products for
commercial markets. The development of new standard hybrid products was discontinued in 1989, and while the
company continues to support the military markets with existing hybrid products, its focus today is on commercial
products.
Military
20%
Commercial
80%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
International sales account for approximately 42 percent of the company’s net sales in 1996.
Management
James E. Donegan
Frank R. DiPietro
Raymond W.B. Chow
Sanford Cohen
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President
Senior Vice President, Technology
Products and Processes
Sipex offers both standard and custom products. The standard products include interface (line drivers/receivers),
electroluminescent lamp driver circuits, data conversion products, and other linear products, while the custom
products include full-custom monolithic ICs and custom multichip products. The company also provides
dielectrically isolated silicon substrates to a broad spectrum of semiconductor manufacturers.
For interface products, Sipex offers a full line of products, including low-power single interface products
supporting RS-232 and RS-485 standards and programmable multi-mode serial interface transceivers allowing
single chips to communicate in up to eight different standards. These products are fabricated in a high-voltage
BiCMOS process technology and specialize in low-power 5V-only operation.
The low-power application-specific products utilize a proprietary dielectrically isolated (DI) BiCMOS process
technology that allows both very low voltages (1V) and very high voltages (100V) to be used simultaneously on
the same IC. The company’s EL driver circuits are based on this specialized process.
For data converter products, Sipex specializes in high-accuracy 12-bit A/D and D/A converters.
1-318
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Sipex
The broad base of semiconductor processes and technologies used by Sipex enable it to design products
optimized for each application. Sipex focuses on leveraging its specialized dielectrically isolated BiCMOS
technology, which the company believes is particularly well suited to the low-power, low-voltage requirements of
battery powered/portable products.
The company utilizes its own fabrication facility for producing 3.0µm to 5.0µm dielectrically isolated complementary
bipolar and BiCMOS linear devices, and has strategic foundry relationships for producing 0.8µm to 4.0µm
BiCMOS and CMOS linear devices.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
As already mentioned, the company’s own wafer fabrication facility produces products utilizing the company’s DI
complementary bipolar and BiCMOS processes. The company’s BiCMOS and CMOS products are manufactured
using fully processed wafers supplied primarily by UMC, Orbit Semiconductor, and Calogic Corporation.
Sipex Corporation
491 Fairview Way
Milpitas, California 95035
Telephone: (408) 945-9080
Fax: (408) 946-6191
Capacity (wafers/week): 500
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Linear ICs
Feature sizes: 3.0µm-5.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-319
Space Electronics
North American Company Profiles
S PACE E LECTRONICS (SEI)
Space Electronics, Inc.
4031 Sorrento Valley Boulevard
San Diego, California 92121-1404
Telephone: (619) 452-4167
Fax: (619) 452-5499
Web Site: www.newspace.com/spaceelec
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M)
Sales
1995
4
1996
10
Company Overview and Strategy
Space Electronics, Inc. (SEI) was established in 1992 as a spin-off of Science Applications International
Corporation (SAIC) Microelectronics Technology Center. The focus of Space Electronics is to address the niche
market of spacecraft microcircuits. The company’s proprietary Rad-Pak™, Rad-Coat™, and LPT™ technologies
enable off-the-shelf commercial microelectronic components to survive the typical radiation levels encountered in
space.
Management
Robert Czajkowski
David J. Strobel
Paul Blevins
David Czajkowski
Edward Li
Stuart Shanken
Chief Executive Officer
President
Chief Financial Officer
Manager, Marketing
Manager, Sales
Manager, Products
Products and Processes
Space Electronics' products and services include power MOSFETs, A/D and D/A converters, FPGAs, logic ICs,
interface ICs, memory (EEPROMs, DRAMs, SRAMs, flash memories, and FIFOs), processors, and coprocessors.
For demanding imaging requirements, Space Electronics provides high performance Megatek® 2D graphics
accelerator cards in “S” bus and VME bus configurations.
1-320
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
SST
North American Company Profiles
S ILICON S TORAGE T ECHNOLOGY (SST)
Silicon Storage Technology, Inc.
1171 Sonora Court
Sunnyvale, California 94086
Telephone: (408) 735-9110
Fax: (408) 735-9036
Web Site: www.ssti.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Silicon Storage Technology Asia • Yokohama, Japan
Telephone: (81) (45) 471-1851 • Fax: (81) (45) 471-3285
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
1*
1
1
1993
4*
0.2
2
Employees
1994
4
(5)
3
1995
40
6
4
1996
93
12
7
143
*Primarily license revenues
Company Overview and Strategy
Silicon Storage Technology (SST) was founded in 1989 and is a supplier of non-volatile memories, specifically
flash memory devices. The company currently offers medium density devices ranging from 512K to 4M, for a
range of applications in the computer, communications, multimedia, and video game markets.
Product development at SST is focused on developing new memory products featuring higher densities, such as
16M and 32M flash memories, for use in digital cameras, memory cards, and digital cellular phones. For the
company’s higher density products, the company is also developing advanced process technologies.
SST made its initial public offering in November 1995.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-321
SST
North American Company Profiles
Other
27%
U.S.
14%
Taiwan
39%
Japan
20%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Bing Yeh
Thomas A. Freeze
Yaw-Wen Hu
Isao Nojima
Michael J. Praisner
David Sweetman
Amy Yuen
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Vice President, Technology Development and Wafer Manufacturing
Vice President, Memory Design and Product Engineering
Vice President, Finance and Administration, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Quality and Customer Support
Vice President, Operations
Products and Processes
Page Mode Flash Memories—
512K Page Mode Flash Memory—2.7V-, 3V-, and 5V-only
1M Page Mode Flash Memory—2.7V-, 3V-, and 5V-only
2M Page Mode Flash Memory—2.7V-, 3V-, and 5V-only
Page Erase, Byte Program Flash Memories
4M SuperFlash Flash Memory—2.7V-, 3V-, and 5V-only
4M PCMCIA Interface Flash Memory—3V- and 5V-only
The company’s products are designed and manufactured using the company proprietary SuperFlash™ CMOS
technology.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
SST is a fabless company, therefore, its uses independent foundry companies for the manufacturing of its
devices. The company’s primary foundry partners are Sanyo and Winbond, but SST also has foundry and
licensing agreements with TSMC and Seiko Epson.
1-322
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
SST
Key Agreements
•
In February 1997, SST signed an agreement with foundry partner TSMC for the production of its 2M products.
As part of the agreement, SST licensed its SuperFlash technology to TSMC in exchange for manufactured
wafers.
•
In 1996, SST licensed its SuperFlash technology to Seiko Epson and established a foundry agreement for
production capacity.
•
SST established a foundry agreement with Sanyo that provides wafer production capacity to SST through
2009. SST has a similar agreement with Winbond that expires in 2008.
•
SST licensed Rockwell the right to use its technology to produce and market 0.8µm embedded modem chips.
The company has similar agreements with ISD and Analog Devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-323
Standard Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
S TANDARD M ICROSYSTEMS (SMC)
Standard Microsystems Corporation
Component Products Division
80 Arkay Drive
Hauppauge, New York 11788-9725
Telephone: (516) 435-6000
Fax: (516) 271-6004
Web Site: www.smc.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Toyo Microsystems Corporation (SMC Subsidiary) • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5721-2271 • Fax: (81) (3) 5721-2270
Europe:
Standard Microsystems GmbH • Munich, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 92861170 • Fax: (49) (89) 92861190
Asia-Pacific:
Standard Microsystems Corporation • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 578-7118 • Fax: (886) (2) 579-1737
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends February 28
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
251
16
323
20
379
24
342
12
354
(21)
Semiconductor
Sales
25
57
117
139
179
Company Overview and Strategy
Standard Microsystems Corporation (SMC) is comprised of two complementary business divisions: Component
Products and System Products. The System Products Division designs, produces, and markets hardware and
software products for the PC local area network (LAN) market. The Component Products Division develops,
manufactures, and markets VLSI microperipheral circuits. Its products are sold chiefly in the PC market for
input/output and network control applications, and in industrial and transportation markets for network control
applications.
1-324
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Standard Microsystems
SMC was strictly a chip manufacturer when it was founded in 1971. Then, in the early 1980's, the System
Products Division was created and in 1991, Western Digital's LAN Products Division was acquired. The company's
networking business grew to represent as much as 90 percent of total revenues (fiscal 1993). However, demand
for the Component Products Division’s products has been strong over the past few years, boosting its share of
total revenues to 50 percent in fiscal 1997.
To further its advancement into the chipset market, the Component Products Division announced the acquisition
of EFAR Microsystems, Inc. in early 1996. Technologies obtained from the acquisition include the UltraCore™ PCI
PC systems logic chipset for 64-bit microprocessors and the UltraCache™ PCI core logic chipset with integrated
cache memory. The UltraCore was developed in cooperation with MoSys Inc. EFAR now operates as a separate
business unit called the Personal Computer Systems Logic Business Unit within the Component Products
Division of SMC.
In early 1997, SMC made its move toward the application specific memory (ASM) market by purchasing a 20
percent equity stake in Ontario, Canada-based Accelerix. As part of the agreement, SMC gained rights to market,
second-source, and enhance technology developed by Accelerix. SMC plans to combine its skills with those of
other companies associated with Accelerix to pursue the PC semiconductor market with “system-on-a-chip”
devices that employ ASM technology.
Management
Standard Microsystems Corporation
Paul Richman
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Eric M. Nowling
Acting Chief Financial Officer
Arthur Sidorsky
Executive Vice President, Component Products Division
Lance Murrah
Senior Vice President and General Manager, System Products Division
Reginald R. Maton, Jr.
Vice President and Chief Information Officer
SMC’s Component Products Division
John E. Burgess
Vice President, Sales
Douglas L. Finke
Vice President and GM, Wafer Foundry Business Unit
Lawrence H. Goldstein
Vice President, Engineering
R. Hollingsworth
Vice President, Marketing
Peter Ju
Vice President, Personal Computer Systems Logic Business Unit
Di Ma
Vice President, Component Products Operations
Products and Processes
SMC's IC product and service offerings include the following:
• Personal computer I/O devices that perform many of the basic input/output functions required in every PC,
including floppy disk control, IDE hard disk interface, parallel port control, and serial port control. Included is a
family of Super I/O devices that integrate all of the above functions on a single IC. The Super I/O family includes
other new products such as a single-chip PCI-to-IDE hard disk interface.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-325
Standard Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
• Highly integrated single-chip Ethernet products such as an IC that incorporates an encoder/decoder, 10Base-T
transceiver, AT bus interface, and memory management unit (MMU) on a single chip.
• ARCNET LAN devices for use in PCs and in industrial networking environments.
• Foundry services for customers desiring wafer fabrication capacity for 1.6µm geometries and above or for
specialized semiconductor processing requirements that require unique thin film expertise. In early 1997, SMC
announced plans to fully convert its fab to a foundry for the production of micro-electro-mechanical systems
(MEMS), which are tiny systems such as sensors, motors, and valves used in a variety of applications. SMC has
been producing MEMS for several years.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
SMC utilizes a mix of internal and external wafer fabrication sources to manufacture its products. Its more mature
products are produced at its fab in New York, while newer products, utilizing 0.6µm and 0.5µm technologies are
produced by external wafer foundries in the U.S., Europe, and Asia. SMC’s core-logic products (acquired with
EFAR) are built by TSMC in Taiwan.
In 1995, SMC made a $12 million investment in Lucent Technologies’ Madrid fab and a $20 million investment in
Chartered Semiconductor to enhance its external wafer supply (see Key Agreements).
Standard Microsystems Corporation
Component Products Division
35 Marcus Boulevard
Hauppauge, New York 11788
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,500
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, MOS
Products: LAN ICs, disk controllers,
discretes, foundry services
Feature sizes: 1.6µm-3.0µm
(This fab is being fully converted to
a dedicated MEMS foundry.)
Key Agreements
• SMC and Intel agreed to work together to integrate new semiconductor I/O chips into selected Intel PC
motherboard designs through the end of 1997. SMC will provide Intel with the I/O devices, which have been
specifically designed to work with Intel’s newer microprocessors and core logic chipsets. Intel holds a 10
percent equity interest in SMC.
1-326
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Standard Microsystems
• In 1995, SMC made a $20 million investment in Singapore-based foundry Chartered Semiconductor
Manufacturing (CSM) in return for guaranteed capacity from CSM's new 200mm wafer fab that came on-line in
2H95.
• SMC struck a foundry deal with Lucent Technologies in 1994 under which SMC agreed to boost the capacity of
Lucent's fab facility in Madrid, Spain, in return for a guaranteed portion of the fab output over a five-year period.
The new equipment has the capability to produce devices with 0.9µm to 0.45µm feature sizes. SMC received
its first wafers in 1996.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-327
Supertex
North American Company Profiles
S UPERTEX
Supertex, Inc.
1235 Bordeaux Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Telephone: (408) 744-0100
Fax: (408) 734-5247
Web Site: www.supertex.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1993
24
2
4
1
1994
26
3
4
1
1995
32
5
4
2
1996
43
7
6
5
1997
49
9
5
n/a
240
235
265
274
280
Company Overview and Strategy
Established in 1976, Supertex is a niche-oriented company that designs, develops, manufactures, and markets
high voltage semiconductor products utilizing advanced DMOS and HVCMOS process technologies. Supertex
merged CMOS and DMOS processes creating its proprietary HVCMOS® technology. The company originally
conducted business as a foundry. However, starting in fiscal 1990, and through fiscal 1992, the company's
foundry business was phased out as sales of proprietary products steadily increased.
Supertex's proprietary products are sold to electronic equipment manufacturers in the computer,
telecommunications, instrumentation, defense, medical, and consumer products industries. More specifically,
Supertex's products are targeted at applications in ultrasound imaging and medical electronics, flat panel displays,
non-impact printers and plotters, telecommunications, and high-reliability military and commercial aerospace
systems.
Europe and
Far East
44%
United States
56%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1-328
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Supertex
North American Company Profiles
Management
Henry C. Pao, Ph.D.
Richard E. Siegel
Benedict C.K. Choy
Michael V. Bond
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President
Senior Vice President, Technology Development and IC Products
Vice President, DMOS Products
Products and Processes
Supertex has developed advanced technologies using CMOS and DMOS (Double-diffused MOS) processes. It
pioneered the merging of CMOS and DMOS processes into its proprietary HVCMOS® (high-voltage CMOS)
technology. This process allows for the combination of the high speed and low power logic circuit of CMOS and
the high voltage output drive of DMOS on the same chip, thus creating the high voltage IC, or HVIC. Supertex
intends to maintain a leadership position in the HVIC segment of the semiconductor industry.
•
The DMOS product line includes depletion-mode and low-threshold enhancement-mode transistors and
arrays.
•
The CMOS products encompass a range of offerings from microprocessor supervisory ICs to encoder/decoder
and smoke detector chips.
•
There are three distinct categories of HVIC products available, digital products, analog products, and BiCMOS
products.
•
The digital product family includes driver/interface ICs for flat panel displays and non-impact printers and
plotters.
•
The analog product family includes high voltage analog switches and multiplexers, which are used in the
medical ultrasound imaging industry, and pulse width modulators (PWMs).
•
The BiCMOS product family consists of DC/DC converters and power supply ICs.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Supertex, Inc.
1225 Bordeaux Drive
Sunnyvale, California 94088-3607
Cleanroom size: 13,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,500
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: CMOS, DMOS, HVCMOS, BiCMOS
Products: High-voltage ICs, discretes
Feature size: 3.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-329
Supertex
North American Company Profiles
Key Agreements
• Supertex made an agreement with Texas Instruments in 1991 that provided TI the rights to use Supertex's
HVCMOS process technologies in return for license fees and royalties, as well as access to TI's foundry and
assembly services.
• Supertex has received funding from the U.S. Government's ARPA agency to research and develop dielectricisolation (DI) technology. The goal of the project is to further raise the voltage and operating speed of ICs.
1-330
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Symbios Logic
North American Company Profiles
S YMBIOS L OGIC
Symbios Logic Inc.
2001 Danfield Court
Fort Collins, Colorado 80525-2998
Telephone: (970) 226-9550
Fax: (970) 226-9660
Web Site: www.symbios.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Symbios Logic • Munich, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 547470-0 • Fax: (49) (89) 547470-39
Asia-Pacific:
Symbios Logic • Singapore
Telephone: (65) 337-6323
Financial History ($M)
Sales
1992
228
Employees
1993
274
1994
354
1995
520
1996
600
1,950
2,010
2,200
2,300
Company Overview and Strategy
Symbios Logic was established in February 1995 when Hyundai completed the purchase of the NCR
Microelectronic Products Division from AT&T Global Information Solutions Co., a wholly owned subsidiary of AT&T
Corporation. Originally established in 1996, NCR Microelectronic Products Division was acquired as part of NCR
Corporation in 1991 by AT&T Corporation (NCR Corporation was later named AT&T Global Information Solutions).
Hyundai renamed the division Symbios Logic, Symbios being a derivative from the word symbiosis, meaning a
mutually beneficial relationship.
Symbios Logic, now a wholly owned, independently operated subsidiary of Hyundai Electronics America,
manufactures semicustom ICs including cell-based ASICs and gate arrays, as well as a family of application-specific
standard products (ASSPs). Its cell library includes extensive analog functions for cell-based mixed-signal ASICs
and complex standard function macrocells (cores) for embedded SCSI, Ethernet, disk drive electronics, and serial
communications. Symbios Logic is a leader in bus interface technology, offering high-performance applicationspecific SCSI (including an extensive family of PCI-SCSI I/O controllers), Ethernet parts, and RAID subsystems and
controllers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-331
Symbios Logic
North American Company Profiles
Several firsts claimed by the company include the first SCSI protocol chip, the first OEM RAID chipset, and the first
FibreChannel RAID Controller board. The company believes it holds 33 percent of the worldwide SCSI chip
market, and 15 percent of the worldwide market for disk and tape drive electronics.
Management
H. Gene Patterson (acting)
C.S. Chung
Jeff Dumas
Dan Ellsworth
Glenn Gainley
Tom Lagatta
Al Lofthus
Tim McCarthy
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Global Planning and Coordination,
and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, Business Units
Vice President, World Sales
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Manufacturing
Products and Processes
Symbios Logic is comprised of five business groups: Client/Server, OEM RAID, MetaStor, Drive Electronics, and
ASIC Solutions. Listed below are the major products of each business group.
Client/Server Products
• Client and server I/O products including SCSI devices.
• Communications products including LAN communications devices.
• SCSI host adapter boards.
OEM RAID
• RAID-related products including RAID/disk array controller boards, I/O adapter boards, and OEM storage
subsystems.
MetaStor
• Storage related products including RAID/disk array subsystems and tape arrays.
Drive Electronics
• Disk, tape, and CD-ROM drive electronic products, including data controllers, servo subsystems, and
peripheral interfaces.
ASIC Solutions
• ASIC products include CMOS cell-based ASICs, both digital and mixed-signal, CMOS gate arrays, and complex
SYMCore™ core-related products. In November 1996, Symbios unveiled its 0.35µm, five-layer-metal, onemillion-gate, cell-based ASIC family. The company’s cell and core libraries support a wide range of ASIC
applications, including set-top boxes, cellular phones, PCs, workstations, telecommunications, LAN and
wireless communications, and electronic data processing. Submicron mixed-signal CMOS ASICs account for
more than one-third of Symbios’ cell-based ASIC sales.
1-332
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Symbios Logic
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Symbios Logic Inc.
2001 Danfield Court
Fort Collins, Colorado 80525
Telephone: (970) 223-5100
Cleanroom size: 24,500 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,300
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs, logic ICs, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.7µm-2.0µm
Symbios Logic Inc.
1635 Aeroplaza Drive
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80916
Telephone: (719) 596-5795
Cleanroom size: 24,500 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-2.0µm
Approximately 20 percent of Symbios Logic’s IC products are manufactured by Hyundai.
Key Agreements
• Symbios Logic Inc. formed an alliance with Hyundai Electronics Industries (HEI) and Compass Design
Automation to develop a new deep sub-micron 0.35µm five-layer metal CMOS technology. The program was
successfully completed in early 1997. The partnership will likely be extended to the 0.25µm level.
• In 1995, Symbios licensed Advanced RISC Machines Ltd.’s “Thumb” 32-bit RISC processor core for use in I/O
channel controllers and other intelligent peripheral products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-333
Synergy Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
S YNERGY S EMICONDUCTOR
Synergy Semiconductor Corporation
3450 Central Expressway
Santa Clara, California 95051
Telephone: (408) 730-1313
Fax: (408) 737-0831
Web Site: www.synergysemi.com
IC Manufacturer
Financial History ($M)
Sales
1993
14
Employees
1994
19
1995
26
1996
30
110
175
180
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1987, Synergy Semiconductor Corporation designs, develops, manufactures, and markets highperformance digital and mixed-signal integrated circuits using bipolar and BiCMOS processes. Synergy’s
products include precision time-clock generators for computers and workstations, and communications circuits for
local and wide area networks. Synergy’s products employ proprietary design and process technology, resulting in
high-performance ICs. The company’s products are designed by an internal design team, and built in the
company’s in-house wafer fabrication facility.
Management
Thomas D. Mino
T. Olin Nichols
George W. Brown
Tom Lauer
Larry J. Pollock
Luke Smith
E. Marshall Wilder
Thomas S. Wong
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, New Business Development
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Quality and Administration
Vice President, Engineering
Products and Processes
Synergy supplies high-speed ICs to a range of systems vendors of public network equipment, such as
multiplexers and digital access cross-connect systems (DACS); LAN and WAN private network equipment, such as
adapter cards and hubs; high-performance workstations and superservers; and automatic test equipment (ATE).
1-334
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Synergy Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Synergy’s products encompass three families: the ECLinPS and Super300K family of ultra-high-speed ECL logic
products, the ClockWorks family of clock generation and distribution devices, and the SuperCOM family of optical
fiber transceivers, copper wire transceivers, and clock recovery devices. Synergy recently introduced a family of
network and communication products for Fast Ethernet, FDDI, ATM, SONET, and SDH applications utilizing its
proprietary bipolar ASSET™ (All Spacer Separated Element Transistor) technology.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Synergy Semiconductor
3450 Central Expressway
Santa Clara, California 95051
Telephone: (408) 730-1313
Cleanroom size: 7,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 500
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Transceivers, SRAMs, logic products,
clock control circuits, FIFOs, translators
Feature sizes: 1.2µm, 1.5µm (bipolar);
1.0µm (BiCMOS);
submicron in development
System Microelectronic Innovation GmbH (SMI)
Wildbahn, Markendorf
O-15203 Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
Telephone: (49) 335-46-2200
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,400 (10,500 max.)
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Logic, memory, and linear ICs, ASICs
Feature sizes: ≥1.2µm
(Joint venture between Synergy and the German
government. Synergy holds a 49 percent stake.)
Wafer probing and packaged product test capabilities are performed in-house.
Key Agreements
•
In April 1995, Synergy entered into a technology license agreement with Linear Technology Corporation.
Under the agreement, Synergy gave LTC the right to use the its bipolar ASSET technology to develop noncompetitive products.
•
In March of 1993, Synergy entered into a agreement with the German government to form System
Microelectronic Innovation (SMI). This is a joint venture which is currently 49 percent owned by Synergy and 51
percent owned by the German government. As part of this agreement, Synergy transferred its ASSET
technology to SMI, enabling it to produce Synergy's family of ECL SRAMs, logic ICs, clock control circuits,
translators, and semicustom products and market them throughout Europe.
•
Synergy entered into a comprehensive strategic alliance with Toshiba Corporation in November 1990. The
alliance covers foundry, joint R&D and manufacturing, technology licensing, and an equity investment in
Synergy by Toshiba. Under terms of the manufacturing agreement, Toshiba is providing Synergy with the use
of a high-volume (150mm, submicron) IC fabrication line, which is running Synergy's high-performance ASSET
and BiCMOS technologies. This fab allows Synergy to produce its current SRAM and logic products, as well as
future products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-335
TelCom Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
T EL C OM S EMICONDUCTOR
TelCom Semiconductor, Inc.
1300 Terra Bella Avenue
P.O. Box 7267
Mountain View, California 94039-7267
Telephone: (415) 968-9252
Fax: (415) 967-1590
Web SIte: www.telcom-semi.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
TelCom Semiconductor GmbH • Martinsried, Germany
Telephone: (49) (89) 89-56-500 • Fax: (49) (89) 89-56-5002
Asia-Pacific:
TelCom Semiconductor H.K. Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2324-0122 • Fax: (852) 2354-9957
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1994
25
1
1
2
1995
39
4
3
4
1996
38
(1)
4
1
125
236
296
Company Overview and Strategy
TelCom Semiconductor emerged in December 1993 as a result of a management-led buy-out of Teledyne
Industries' Teledyne Components division. The operation's history stretches back to 1960 when Teledyne
Industries began Amelco Semiconductor, one of Silicon Valley's first semiconductor firms. In 1970, Amelco
merged with Continental Devices to form Teledyne Semiconductor. That company was then combined with three
other Teledyne divisions – Philbrick, Crystalonics, and TAC – in 1990 to form Teledyne Components. Prior to the
formation of TelCom, Teledyne Components' management shut down parts of the company – Philbrick and TAC –
and sold the Crystalonics line. TelCom made its initial public offering in July 1995.
Today, TelCom Semiconductor is building on Teledyne's strengths in analog and mixed-signal technology to
develop standard ICs for high-volume consumer and commercial markets. TelCom's future growth strategy
centers on the acquisition of mixed-signal technologies addressing the portable computing, communications, and
instrumentation markets. The company has also said it will target energy management products.
1-336
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
TelCom Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Europe
25%
Asia
38%
U.S.
37%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Phillip M. Drayer
Edward D. Mitchell
R. Michael O'Malley
Gary P. Pinelli
Ali Tasdighi
Allan I. Resnick
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Engineering and Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, Chief Operating Manager, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, New Product Development
Director, Operations
Products and Processes
TelCom's main products are divided into three areas of focus:
• Mixed-signal ICs: includes A/D converters, V/F and F/V converters, and voltage references.
• Power management ICs: includes MOSFET power drivers, PWM controllers, DC/DC converters, switching
regulators, CMOS voltage detectors, microprocessor supervisor circuits, and charge pumps.
• Smart sensors: includes solid-state thermal management and battery management control ICs.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
TelCom Semiconductor, Inc.
1300 Terra Bella Avenue
Mountain View, California 94039
Cleanroom size: 9,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: Silicon- and metal-gate CMOS, BiCMOS,
CMOS/DMOS, DMOS, bipolar
Feature size: 3.0µm
Key Agreements
•
TelCom established a foundry agreement with IC Works (San Jose, CA) in November 1995. Under the
agreement, TelCom agreed to invest $10 million in equipment and the expansion of IC Works submicron wafer
fabrication facility, in return for wafer capacity. The agreement covers a five-year period, which is expected to
begin in late 1997.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-337
Texas Instruments
North American Company Profiles
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (TI)
Texas Instruments Incorporated
Semiconductor Group
P.O. Box 655303
Dallas, Texas 75265
Telephone: (214) 995-2011
Fax: (214) 997-5250
Web Site: www.ti.com/sc
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Texas Instruments Japan Ltd. • Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3457-0972 • Fax: (81) (3) 3457-1259 • Web Site: www.tij.co.jp
Europe:
Texas Instruments France S.A. • Saulnier, Velizy-Villacoublay Cedex, France
Telephone: (33) (1) 30-70-11-65 • Fax: (33) (1) 30-70-10-32
Asia-Pacific:
Texas Instruments Taiwan Ltd. • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 377-1450 • Fax: (886) (2) 377-2718
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Corporate
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Semiconductor
Sales
IC Sales
Discrete Sales
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
7,440
247
8,523
472
8,608*
691
578
11,409*
1,088
842
9,940
63
1,181
3,080
3,000
80
315
4,100
4,040
60
525
5,550
5,500
50
860
7,850
7,800
50
1,170
6,750
6,700
50
1,840
60,577
59,048
56,333
59,574
59,927
*Changed to reflect discontinued operations.
1-338
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Texas Instruments
North American Company Profiles
Company Overview and Strategy
Texas Instruments (TI) is one of the leading high-technology companies in the U.S. and one of the top ten
semiconductor manufacturers in the world. It was founded in 1930 as Geophysical Service to provide geophysical
exploration services to the petroleum industry using reflection seismographs. In 1946, the company formally
added electronic systems manufacturing to its operations, and in 1951, adopted its current name. Today, TI's
products include semiconductors, consumer electronics products, electrical controls, and metallurgical materials.
In 1996, TI sold its printed circuit board contract manufacturing operation to Solectron Corp. TI also sold its mobile
computing business to Acer Group, its printer business to Genicom Corp., and signed a definitive agreement to
sell its defense systems and electronics business to Raytheon Company. In April 1997, TI sold its software
business to Sterling Software Inc.
In mid-1996, TI acquired Silicon Systems, Inc., a company whose expertise is in mixed-signal/analog circuits.
Tustin, California-based Silicon Systems is operating as a wholly owned subsidiary of TI.
Other
1%
Metallurgical Materials
2%
Europe
21%
Digital Products
17%
North America
45%
Components
81%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Business Segment
East Asia
33%
1996 Corporate Sales by
Geographic Region
Texas Instruments’ business is based principally on its broad semiconductor technology and application of that
technology to selected electronic end equipment markets. The company’s participation in semiconductors dates
back to the emergence of the industry in the early 1950’s. It began the research and development of
semiconductor devices in 1952. Two years later, the company commercialized the transistor and in 1958,
invented the integrated circuit.
Although the company is a leading producer of DRAMs, much of its semiconductor emphasis is focused on
differentiated products like digital signal processors (DSPs), microcomponents, and mixed-signal interface
devices. Such products represented approximately 65 percent of the company’s semiconductor revenues in
1996. TI is the world’s leading supplier of DSPs and the second largest supplier of analog/mixed-signal ICs. The
company's bipolar business, meanwhile, is shifting to advanced system logic, with new differentiated products for
emerging markets in computers, consumer electronics, and telecommunications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-339
Texas Instruments
North American Company Profiles
The majority (about 75 percent) of the DRAMs TI sells are sourced from the joint venture companies in which it
holds a majority interest, including TI-Acer in Taiwan, KTI Semiconductor in Japan, TECH Semiconductor in
Singapore, and TwinStar Semiconductor Inc. in Texas. In addition, TI announced a new joint venture with the
Italian government to construct a fab facility in Italy for the manufacture of flash memories and another with Anam
Industrial Co. to build DSPs at a new fab in South Korea. To date, TI and its partners have invested more than $3
billion in capital expenditures in the joint ventures. See the Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities and Key
Agreements sections below for more information on these ventures.
Management
James R. Adams
William P. (Pat) Weber
Thomas J. Engibous
David D. Martin
Richard K. Templeton
Richard J. Agnich
William A. Aylesworth
Kevin McGarity
John Scarisbrick
Del Whitaker
Rick Goerner
Mike Hames
Chairman
Vice Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President and President, Semiconductor Group
Senior Vice President, Secretary, and General Counsel
Senior Vice President, Treasurer, and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President, Semiconductor Group and Manager, Worldwide
Semiconductor Group Marketing
Senior Vice President, Semiconductor Group and Manager, Worldwide
Application Specific Products
Senior Vice President, Semiconductor Group and Manager, Worldwide
Mixed-Signal and Logic Products
Vice President, Semiconductor Group and President, Silicon Systems
Vice President, Semiconductor Group and Manager, Worldwide
DSP Products
Products and Processes
TI's principal semiconductor products include DSPs, CISC and RISC microprocessors and controllers, graphics
ICs, networking chips, ASICs, memory ICs, and mixed-signal devices. Details concerning these products are
provided below.
Processors
Digital Signal Processors—TI offers a variety of general-purpose DSP chips, including nine generations of
dedicated and programmable 16-bit fixed-point and 32-bit floating-point DSPs; customizable and applicationspecific DSPs; and the highest performance DSP on the market—the TMS326C6x at 1,600 MIPS/200MHz, 10
times the MIPS performance of any DSP on the market at the time of this writing. The ‘C6x DSP is based on a verylong instruction word (VLIW) architecture and a five-layer-metal, 0.25µm CMOS process technology. By the end
of 1998, TI plans to move the processor to a 0.18µm process that is expected to yield 2,000 MIPS/250MHz
performance.
1-340
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Texas Instruments
Microcontrollers—TI offers an expanding family of ROM, one-time programmable, and UV-erasable 8-bit
microcontrollers for applications in automotive, communications, computer, consumer electronics, and industrial
equipment. The company’s next-generation 8-bit and 16-bit MCUs offer higher integration levels by utilizing TI’s
Prism process for reconfigurable MCU libraries.
LAN Products—This group of products includes media access controllers, switches, communications processors,
and physical layer interface devices.
Mixed-Signal and Analog Devices
TI offers a wide range of mixed-signal and standard analog semiconductor products, including power supply
products, 1394 devices, Universal Serial Bus (USB) products, fiber channel serial buses, amplifiers, comparators,
data converters, RAMDACs, telecommunications ICs, power ICs, sensor signal processors, hard disk drive ICs,
speech processors, digital tapeless answering devices (DTADs), and CCDs. Several of these products are
available in low-voltage (3V) versions.
Advanced System Logic Devices
This family of products includes a full spectrum of devices in a variety of process technologies, including CMOS,
bipolar, and BiCMOS. TI has second-source agreements with Philips Semiconductors and Hitachi for Advanced
BiCMOS Technology (ABT) logic devices as well as for low-voltage logic chips.
Memory ICs
TI’s extensive line of memory ICs includes a broad family of DRAMs (16M and 64M), synchronous DRAMs
(SDRAMs), flash memories (512K to 4M), and FIFOs.
In non-volatile memory, TI has shifted its focus from EPROMs to flash memories. The company plans to build on its
strength in DRAM technology to expand its capability in high-density flash products. Development plans for future
new high-density products are being evaluated using 0.12µm-0.15µm technology derived from 1G DRAM
technology.
Application-Specific ICs (ASICs)
TI was the third largest North American ASIC vendor in 1996. Its application-specific IC products include highspeed bipolar and CMOS PLDs and CMOS and BiCMOS gate arrays, embedded arrays, and standard cells. The
company’s most advanced ASICs are manufactured with a four-level-metal 0.35µm CMOS process, enabling
designs of up to 1.7 million gates. In May 1996, TI announced its 0.18µm TImeline technology and was the first to
offer the capability to place 125 million transistors on a single chip.
Texas Instruments sold its antifuse FPGA business to Actel Corporation in 1995. TI had been a licensed second
source of Actel's FPGAs since 1988.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-341
Texas Instruments
North American Company Profiles
MOS MEMORY
✔
DRAM
SRAM
✔
✔
Flash Memory
EPROM
ROM
EEPROM
✔
Other (Including Non-Volatile RAM)
ANALOG
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
MOS LOGIC
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array
Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Amplifier
Interface
Consumer/Automotive
Voltage Regulator/Reference
Data Conversion
Comparator
Other (Includes Telecom)
DIGITAL BIPOLAR
✔
✔
✔
✔
Other Special Purpose Logic
Bipolar Memory
General Purpose Logic
Gate Array/Standard Cell
Field Programmable Logic
Other Special Purpose Logic
✔
MPU/MCU/MPR
MOS MICROCOMPONENT
✔
✔
✔
✔
MPU
OTHER
MCU
MPR
DSP
Full Custom IC
✔
✔
Discrete
Optoelectronic
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Texas Instruments has several major wafer fab projects underway. At the company’s main campus in Dallas, Texas,
$2 billion is being spent to put up a new DSP production facility (DMOS-6) and an R&D development fab (R&D-1).
Both are expected to begin production by the end of 1997. The R&D-1 facility will be used for work on 0.18µm
and 0.12µm device generations and for the company’s development of 300mm wafer technology.
In early 1997, TI announced that it had signed an agreement with the Italian government to build a second
fabrication facility and an R&D center in Avezzano, Italy. The $1.2 billion fab will have the capability to process ICs
on 300mm wafers, with geometries of 0.28µm and below, when operations start in 1999. Current plans call for the
production of flash memories and DRAMs at the facility.
As mentioned earlier, a great deal of fab activity continues to take place at each of TI’s joint venture companies. In
1996, KTI completed an expansion of its fab that doubled the facility’s wafer capacity. TI-Acer completed
construction of its second fab in early 1997. TwinStar began production in mid-1996 at its first fab. And, TECH
Semiconductor is building its second wafer fab, which will have a capacity of 10,000 200mm wafers per week and
is expected to be ready for production in 1998.
1-342
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Texas Instruments
In April 1997, Texas Instruments pulled out of a $1.4 billion Thailand joint DRAM venture with Charn Uswachoke,
founder and CEO of Alphatec. Under the deal two companies were to be formed: Alpha-TI Semiconductor, a $1.2
billion 16M and 64M DRAM fab; and Alpha Memory, a $200 million assembly and test facility. Reasons cited for TI’s
withdrawal include weakness in the DRAM market and a poor Thai economy. Construction of both facility shells
has been completed, but no capital equipment orders were ever placed.
Texas Instruments
13500 North Central Expressway
Dallas, Texas 75243
Telephone: (214) 995-2001
DMOS 4
Cleanroom size: 50,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 21,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, EPROMs, logic ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.8µm
Texas Instruments
13500 North Central Expressway
Dallas, Texas 75243
Telephone: (214) 995-2001
DMOS 5
Cleanroom size: 35,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DSPs, MPUs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.5µm
Texas Instruments
13500 North Central Expressway
Dallas, Texas 75243
Telephone: (214) 995-2001
DMOS 6
Cleanroom size: 118,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.25µm, 0.35µm
(Operations scheduled to begin in late 1997)
Texas Instruments
13500 North Central Expressway
Dallas, Texas 75243
Telephone: (214) 995-2001
R&D 1
Cleanroom size: 51,000 square feet
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: R&D
Feature sizes: 0.12µm-0.25µm
(Operations scheduled to begin in late 1997)
Texas Instruments
13500 North Central Expressway
Dallas, Texas 75243
Telephone: (214) 995-2001
DFAB
Cleanroom size: 60,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,375
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 150mm
Processes: Bipolar, MOS, GaAs
Products: Analog and memory ICs, discretes
Feature size: 0.8µm
Texas Instruments
13500 North Central Expressway
Dallas, Texas 75243
Telephone: (214) 995-2001
DP1
Cleanroom size: 17,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: GaAs
Products: Analog and digital ICs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-2.8µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-343
Texas Instruments
North American Company Profiles
Texas Instruments
2301 North University
Lubbock, Texas 79415
Telephone: (806) 741-2000
LMOS Fab
Cleanroom size: 45,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 8,600
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, NMOS
Products: EPROMs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-2.0µm
Texas Instruments
Highway 75 South
Sherman, Texas 70590
Telephone: (214) 868-5980
SFAB
Cleanroom size: 50,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Process: Bipolar
Products: Logic ICs, MPRs
Feature size: 2.0µm
Texas Instruments
32201 Southwest Freeway
Stafford, Texas 77477
Telephone: (281) 274-2000
HFAB
Cleanroom size: 27,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 8,600
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, NMOS
Products: EPROMs, ASICs
Feature sizes: 0.8µm-2.0µm
Texas Instruments Japan Ltd.
18-36, Minami 3-chome
Hatagoya-shi, Saitama Prefecture 334
Japan
Telephone: (81) (48) 282-2211
HATO Fab
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,000
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, NMOS
Products: Logic ICs, ASICs
Feature size: 1.0µm
Texas Instruments Japan Ltd.
2355 Kihara Miho-Mura
Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki Prefecture
Miho 300-04, Japan
Telephone: (81) (29) 885-3311
MIHO 5
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,750
Wafer size: 125mm
Processes: CMOS, MOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs, MCUs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.0µm
Texas Instruments Japan Ltd.
2355 Kihara Miho-Mura
Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki Prefecture
Miho 300-04, Japan
Telephone: (81) (29) 885-3311
MIHO 6
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,250
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, MPUs,
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.5µm
1-344
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Texas Instruments
Texas Instruments Japan Ltd.
4260 Aza-Takao
Oaza-Kawasaki
Hiji-Machi, Hayami-gun
Oita Prefecture 979-15, Japan
Telephone: (81) (97) 772-111
HIJI Fab
Capacity (wafers/week): 4,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS, bipolar
Products: Logic and analog ICs, DRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-1.0µm
Texas Instruments Italia S.p.A.
Via Antonio Pacinotti 5/7
Nucleo Industriale
I-67051 Avezzano, Italy
Telephone: (39) 863-4321
AMOS 1
Cleanroom size: 45,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 150mm (plans for 200mm conversion)
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature size: 0.8µm
(Joint venture with the Italian government.)
Texas Instruments Italia S.p.A.
Via Antonio Pacinotti 5/7
Nucleo Industriale
I-67051 Avezzano, Italy
Telephone: (39) 863-4321
AMOS 2
Capacity (wafers/week): 7000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature size: 0.5µm
(Joint venture with the Italian government.)
Texas Instruments Italia S.p.A.
Via Antonio Pacinotti 5/7
Nucleo Industriale
I-67051 Avezzano, Italy
Telephone: (39) 863-4321
AMOS 3
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,650
Wafer size: 300mm
Process: CMOS
Products: Flash memories, DRAMs
Feature size: 0.28µm
(Joint venture with the Italian government.
Operations scheduled to begin in 1999.)
Texas Instruments Deutschland GmbH
Haggertystrasse 1
Freising, Germany
Telephone: (49) 816-1801
FFAB
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Logic and analog ICs, ASSPs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm-0.8µm
Silicon Systems, Inc. (subsidiary of TI)
2300 Delaware Avenue
Santa Cruz, California 95060
Cleanroom size: 52,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,500
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: Bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: Mixed-signal ICs
Feature sizes: 1.0µm-3.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-345
Texas Instruments
North American Company Profiles
KTI Semiconductor Ltd.
189-1 Hirano-cho
Nishiwaki City
Hyogo Prefecture 677, Japan
Cleanroom size: 48,400 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,250
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs, ASICs, MPUs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.8µm
(Joint venture with Kobe Steel)
TI-Acer Incorporated
4F, Industry East 9th Road
Science-Based Industrial Park
Hsinchu, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (3) 5785112
Fax: (886) (3) 5782038
Fab 1 and Fab 2
Cleanroom size: 97,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer sizes: 150mm, 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm-0.8µm
TECH Semiconductor Singapore Pte Ltd.
P.O. Box 2093, SE 9040
990 Bendemeer Road
Singapore 1233
Telephone: (65) 298-1122
Fab 1
Cleanroom size: 40,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 6,250
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm
(Joint venture with the Economic Development
Board of Singapore, Canon, and HP.)
TECH Semiconductor Singapore Pte Ltd.
P.O. Box 2093, SE 9040
990 Bendemeer Road
Singapore 1233
Telephone: (65) 298-1122
Fab 2
Capacity (wafers/week): 10,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature size: 0.25µm
(Joint venture with the Economic Development
Board of Singapore, Canon, and HP. Operations
scheduled to begin in 1998.)
TwinStar Semiconductor Inc.
500 West Penner Road
Richardson, Texas 75080
Telephone: (214) 994-5800
Cleanroom size: 48,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: DRAMs
Feature size: 0.35µm
(Joint venture with Hitachi. Began production
in mid-1996.)
1-346
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Texas Instruments
Key Agreements
• It was announced in early 1997 that Hitachi, Mitsubishi, and Texas Instruments will co-develop the cell
architecture for a 1G DRAM as well as the process technology needed to manufacture it. Hitachi has a longstanding relationship with TI to jointly develop and produce DRAMs.
• TI formed an alliance with Anam Industrial Co. in South Korea calling for Anam to build an IC fabrication facility in
Korea and TI to provide technical support during construction of the fab and supply the 0.35µm CMOS
manufacturing technology. TI will receive, in return, a guaranteed portion of the wafer capacity for the
production of DSPs. Operations at the fab are expected to begin in the first half of 1998.
• Samsung, Oki, Fujitsu, and Matsushita renewed their semiconductor patent cross-licensing agreement with TI
that expired the end of 1995 by signing a 10-year deal that extends through 2005. TI has similar existing
licensing agreements with LG Semicon, Micron, Hyundai, Mitsubishi, and Toshiba.
• TI is collaborating with IMEC of Leuven, Belgium, on the research of advanced lithography processes to
achieve 0.18µm capabilities for manufacturing 1-gigabit-class semiconductors.
• Texas Instruments and Ericsson have a long-standing alliance in which TI has provided the Swedish company
with its leading edge process technologies for wireless communications.
• Hitachi joined with Texas Instruments for 16M, 64M, and 256M DRAM development and production. The
partners have built a joint 16M and 64M DRAM manufacturing facility in Texas. The $500 million factory, called
TwinStar Semiconductor Inc., began producing 16M DRAMs in July 1996 and production of 64M parts is
expected to start in 1997. The output is shared equally between Hitachi and TI.
• TI, Philips, and Hitachi formed a pact in 1993 covering joint development and alternate sourcing of FutureBus
and BiCMOS logic IC products.
• Samsung reached an agreement with Texas Instruments in 1993 to jointly improve and operate TI’s test and
assembly plant in Portugal. Each company operates separate, dedicated lines.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-347
TLSI
North American Company Profiles
TLSI
TLSI, Incorporated
815 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale, New York 11735
Telephone: (516) 755-7005
Fax: (516) 755-7626
Fabless IC Supplier
Company Overview and Strategy
TLSI designs and markets analog, digital, and mixed-signal ICs for the automotive, telecommunications, industrial
process control, security, home appliance, and military/aerospace markets. TLSI was formed as a division of
Telephonics Corp. in 1977 to provide Telephonics with ICs needed for its military and commercial airline
communication systems. Today, TLSI remains a wholly owned subsidiary of Telephonics and provides ICs to the
general marketplace.
Management
Mort Pullman
R. Hartig
Jerry Powder
President
Vice President, Business Management
Director, Sales
Products and Processes
TLSI offers a wide range of solutions in the area of full custom MOS, cell-based, and gate array configurations.
Broken down into categories, these alternatives include the following:
Full Custom:
Includes transistor-level designs.
Standard Cell Library:
Characterized functions with auto place-and-route using standard height and variable width cells.
Standard Cell Library with Custom Interconnect:
Characterized functions with Calma operator place-and-route using standard height and variable width cells.
Minimum Area Cell Libraries with Custom Interconnect:
Custom interconnect with minimum sized cells to reduce die area and development time/cost for highervolume requirements where a full custom configuration may not be required.
Analog and Digital Functions Combined on the Same Chip:
Maximizes system integration and minimizes printed circuit board area.
When design its chips, TLSI selects any of the following process technologies that best fits the customer’s
specific application: 1.5µm to 3µm CMOS, 1.5µm BiCMOS, or bipolar.
1-348
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
TranSwitch
North American Company Profiles
T RAN S WITCH
TranSwitch Corporation
8 Progress Drive
Shelton, Connecticut 06484
Telephone: (203) 929-8810
Fax: (203) 926-9453
Web Site: www.transwitch.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
100
Company Overview and Strategy
TranSwitch Corporation designs, develops, and markets highly integrated digital and mixed-signal semiconductor
products for broadband telecommunications and data communications applications.
The company’s product line includes very large scale integration (VLSI) devices that serve four markets:
worldwide public telephone networks, local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), and cable television
(CATV) systems.
Management
Santanu Das, Ph.D.
Michael F. Stauff
William G. Bartholomay
John Haynes
Mike McCoy
Frank Middleton
Robert G. Pico
Kandaswamy Thangamuthu
Daniel C. Upp
Jitender K. Vij
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Controller
Vice President, PLM Transmission Products
Vice President, Business Development
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President, Systems Engineering
Products and Processes
TranSwitch’s IC devices include asynchronous (PDH), synchronous (Sonet/SDH), and asynchronous transfer
mode (ATM) communications circuits.
The asynchronous products include line interface,
multiplexer/demultiplexer, framer, and data communications devices. The synchronous product line includes line
termination, overhead processor, mapper, and multiplexer/demultiplexer devices. The ATM products include
physical layer, ATM layer, and ATM adaptation layer devices that implement a variety of public and private switching
and multiplexing products.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-349
Trident Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
T RIDENT M ICROSYSTEMS
Trident Microsystems, Inc.
189 North Bernardo Avenue
Mountain View, California 94043-5203
Telephone: (415) 691-9211
Fax: (415) 691-9260
Web Site: www.tridentmicro.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Asia-Pacific:
Trident Far East Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2756-9666
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends June 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
Employees
1992
67
12
6
—
1993
78
10
7
—
1994
69
1
10
—
1995
107
8
13
—
1996
168
17
18
14
115
130
150
268
308
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1987, Trident Microsystems designs, develops, and markets very large scale integrated circuit
graphical user interface (GUI) accelerators, graphics controllers, and multimedia video processors targeting the
mainstream PC desktop, notebook, and multimedia markets.
Trident’s initial product offerings began with SVGA controllers in 1989 and moved toward mixed-signal controllers
in 1993. The year 1994 marked a year of transition for Trident that included its entrance into the GUI accelerator
market. Although its revenues declined in 1994, the transition to the GUI accelerator market proved successful in
the following years. Another shift in Trident’s market strategy occurred during this timeperiod. In 1994, 95
percent of Trident’s sales came from non-OEMs. In a strategic move, Trident began targeting the OEM market and
currently derives about 40 percent of its sales from OEMs such as IBM, Hewlett-Packard, NEC, and Philips.
1-350
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Trident Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
Trident’s product line includes a complete line of 32-bit and 64-bit integrated circuits, video accelerators, and
multimedia video processing chips that provide cost-effective easy-to-use graphics solutions based on advanced
technology. Trident was among the first to deliver chips for the new Unified Memory Architecture (UMA), which
reduces system memory costs by efficiently using existing PC memory for the graphics frame buffer. Additionally,
several of Trident’s GUI and video acceleration products include the company’s proprietary TrueVideo algorithm,
the first technology to deliver horizontal/vertical interpolation and diagonal edge recovery for clearer, sharper fullmotion images.
Future product development will focus on products in the high-end of the graphics market as well as the PC
notebook market. In early 1997, Trident began sampling its first 3D notebook device.
Notebook
Products
15%
Other
19%
North America
22%
GUI Accelerator
Desktop Products
66%
1996 Sales by Product Group
Asia-Pacific
78%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Frank C. Lin
Jung-Herng Chang, Ph.D.
Richard E. Hegberg
Peter Jen
James T. Lindstrom
Amir Mashkoori
Richard Silverman
Richard F. Hass
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Asia Operations
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Marketing
Director, Marketing Communications
Products and Processes
Trident designs its products using 1.0µm, 0.8µm, and 0.6µm CMOS process technologies. The company's
product line includes: 3D and MPEG ICs, advanced mixed-signal GUI accelerators, high-performance SVGA
controllers, multimedia video processing devices, and LCD/CRT controllers.
In 1Q97, Trident introduced two 3D graphics controllers dubbed the 3DImage™ 975 and 3DImage™ 975DVD.
Both devices are designed for 3D applications and feature 3D and 2D graphics acceleration, TV output
technology, VGA imaging, and high-quality video. The 3DImage 975DVD also provides DVD playback functions
for use with MMX-enabled Pentium 166MHz and higher MPUs.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-351
Trident Microsystems
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Trident uses a fabless manufacturing strategy where it meets its manufacturing needs by using foundries. Prior to
1996, Trident received the majority of its wafer capacity from TSMC. In 1996, in an effort to decrease its
dependence upon one foundry supplier, Trident secured additional capacity through foundry agreements with
UMC and Winbond in Taiwan, and Samsung in Korea. In its agreement with UMC, Trident has purchased an equity
interest in UICC, a UMC joint venture fab facility located in Taiwan. The facility was expected to begin production in
mid-1997.
Key Agreements
• In May 1996, Trident and Samsung announced a long-term partnership. Samsung will provide manufacturing
capacity to Trident in exchange for mixed-signal ASIC designs. In late 1996, the two companies announced
the joint development of a next-generation notebook multimedia accelerator that will feature Samsung’s
embedded SDRAM.
• In August 1995, Trident entered into a joint venture agreement with UMC. Under the agreement, Trident
agreed to invest $60 million for a 10 percent equity interest in a new 200mm fab facility, called United Integrated
Circuits Corporation (UICC). Production at the new facility, located in Taiwan, was expected to begin in mid1997.
• In June 1995, Trident expanded its relationship with TSMC by signing a five-year foundry agreement. Under
the agreement, Trident will purchase a certain number of wafers each year from TSMC through 1999.
1-352
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
TriQuint Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
T RI Q UINT S EMICONDUCTOR
TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc.
2300 NE Brookwood Parkway
Hillsboro, Oregon 97124
Telephone: (503) 615-9000
Fax: (503) 615-8900
Web Site: www.triquint.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Giga A/S • Skovlunde, Denmark
Telephone: (45) (44) 92-61-00 • Fax: (45) (44) 92-59-00
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
29
1
7
1
1993
33
1
9
1
1994
30
(10)
10
1
1995
46
3
9
1
1996
60
6
11
4
190
195
222
285
361
Company Overview and Strategy
TriQuint Semiconductor designs, develops, manufactures, and markets a broad range of high-performance
analog and mixed-signal gallium-arsenide (GaAs) ICs for the wireless communications, telecommunications, and
computing markets. TriQuint's mission is to commercialize GaAs ICs for communications and computing. The
company’s continued focus is on achieving new designs and introducing new products in all three market areas.
In 1996, TriQuint expanded its product offerings to include GaAs foundry services.
Computing
17%
Telecommunications
34%
Wireless
Communications
49%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
International
30%
United States
70%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1-353
TriQuint Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
TriQuint's origin can be traced back to 1978, when researchers at Tektronix Laboratories began investigating
GaAs IC technology. Established as a majority-owned subsidiary in 1985, TriQuint Semiconductor was charged
with developing application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for high-performance microwave, linear, and digital
systems.
TriQuint became independent from Tektronix in 1991 when it completed a successful merger with GigaBit Logic
and Gazelle Microcircuits to form a new privately-held TriQuint. In 1993, TriQuint became a public company.
Management
Steven J. Sharp
Edward C.V. Winn
Gordon Cumming, Ph.D.
Bruce R. Fournier
Joseph I. Martin
Donald Mohn
David Pye
Ron Ruebusch
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President, Finance and Administration,
Chief Financial Officer, and Secretary
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Corporate Development
Vice President and General Manager, Telecommunications and Computing
Vice President, Manufacturing Operations
Vice President and General Manager, Wireless Communications
Products and Processes
TriQuint Semiconductor's standard and customer-specific products are structured into three end-market groups:
wireless communications, telecommunications, and computing.
Wireless Communications—Standard products for this market are used as building blocks for multipurpose
applications in radio frequency (RF) and microwave systems. These systems include personal communications
networks, cellular telephones, satellite communications and navigation equipment, and wireless computer
networks. In 1996, TriQuint continued to add devices to its relatively new family of high-power RF amplifier ICs for
the voice and data wireless communications market.
Telecommunications—Most the company's telecommunications ICs are customer-specific, but its does offer some
standard products, such as Sonet and SDH multiplexers/demultiplexers and transceivers, ATM framers, and highperformance crosspoint switches.
Computing—Standard products for this market are concentrated on solving system timing and data
communications performance bottlenecks in high-performance PCs, workstations, servers, and storage systems.
The company utilizes its proprietary GaAs technology for the production of its ICs. Its GaAs process features
0.5µm to 0.7µm geometries, 4.0µm metal pitch, and a cutoff frequency of up to 21GHz.
TriQuint’s services include GaAs IC design, wafer fabrication, test engineering, package engineering, assembly,
and testing.
1-354
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
TriQuint Semiconductor
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc.
2300 NE Brookwood Parkway
Hillsboro, Oregon 97124
Cleanroom size: 16,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: GaAs
Products: ASICs, standard components, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.5µm-0.7µm
In early 1997, TriQuint moved into its new GaAs semiconductor manufacturing facility and office complex in
Hillsboro, Oregon. The 165,000 square-foot site houses all of the company’s manufacturing, engineering,
marketing, and administrative functions that were located in Beaverton, Oregon, with 45,000 square-feet used for
the manufacturing facility.
Key Agreements
• In April 1996, TriQuint and Philips announced a wafer sourcing agreement. Under the pact, Philips will develop
GaAs ICs for TriQuint to produce according to Philips’ specifications. Assembly and test will be done by Philips
at a facility in Limeil, France.
• In August 1993, TriQuint and AT&T Microelectronics (now Lucent Technologies) announced a set of
agreements involving the development, manufacture, and marketing of GaAs ICs for high-performance wireless
and telecommunications systems. As part of the deal, Lucent discontinued its production of GaAs wafers and
is instead relying on TriQuint for the manufacture of its GaAs wafers. Lucent also became a minority stockholder
in TriQuint. Lucent increased its stake in TriQuint to 8.2 percent in early 1995.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-355
Tseng Labs
North American Company Profiles
TSENG LABS
Tseng Labs, Inc.
6 Terry Drive
Newtown, Pennsylvania 18940
Telephone: (215) 968-0502
Fax: (215) 860-7713
Web Site: www.tseng.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
75
14
1
1993
76
11
1
Employees
1994
79
9
2
1995
37
1
3
1996
26
(14)
15
50
95
96
Company Overview and Strategy
Tseng Labs has designed and supplied integrated circuits and board-level enhancement products for graphics
and video applications since 1983, its founding year. The company's graphics and multimedia accelerator
products work in conjunction with a PC’s microprocessor to enhance its overall performance by transferring the
graphics and video functions from the MPU to the accelerator chip.
Until 1996, the company had mainly focused on the development of 2D graphics accelerators. However, in late
1996, the company shifted its research and development efforts away from 2D products and toward the 3D
graphics market.
International
43%
U.S.
57%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
1-356
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Tseng Labs
North American Company Profiles
Management
Jack Tseng
John J. Gibbons
David Kwok Ping Hui
James E. Bauer
Mark H. Karsch
Barbara J. Hawkins
Thomas D. Snodgrass
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Executive Vice President, Technology Officer
Senior Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Senior Vice President, Finance and Administration, and
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer
Vice President, Product Development
Products and Processes
The first product in the company's line of graphics accelerators, the ET4000/W32, was introduced late in 1992 and
became one of the industry's more successful SVGA controllers. Two additional products were introduced in
1993—the W32i and the W32p. The W32i upgraded the W32 system with a more powerful graphics accelerator
and added a new 32-bit interleaved memory controller. The W32p further enhanced graphics acceleration and
added support for both local bus and the PCI bus architecture.
In November 1994, Tseng Labs introduced its VIPeR f/x advanced video image processor for multimedia systems.
The VIPeR f/x enables full screen, accelerated playback of .AV1 and .MPG video files as well as simultaneous
capture and display of full motion, 30 frames-per-second video.
Tseng began shipping its ET6000, the first in a family of next generation graphics controller products, in 1996. It is
an advanced 128-bit graphics and multimedia engine that integrates a 2D graphics accelerator, a high quality
video processor, an interface to the new high-bandwidth Multibank DRAM (MDRAM) from MoSys, Inc., and a PCI
bus interface. Optimized for Windows 95 graphics performance, the ET6000 is designed to offer high resolution
and color without system degradation. To complement the ET6000, Tseng also introduced the VPR6000, a
video image processor, and the MPG9920, an MPEG decoder with built-in scaling capabilities. In November 1996,
the company announced its plans for the ET6300 family of 3D graphics accelerators based on its ET6000
accelerator.
The company’s current products are based on CMOS process technology with line geometries as small as 0.6µm.
Most of its new products are manufactured using an advanced three- or four-layer metal process and are expected
to use 0.35µm process technology in the near future.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Tseng currently has foundry agreements with Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing in Singapore, Tower
Semiconductor in Israel, and Winbond Electronics in Taiwan.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-357
Tundra Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
T UNDRA S EMICONDUCTOR
Tundra Semiconductor Corporation
603 March Road
Ontario, Canada K2K 2M5
Telephone: (613) 592-0714
Fax: (613) 592-1320
Web Site: www.tundra.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
60
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
North America:
Tundra Semiconductor Corporation • San Jose, California
Telephone: (408) 258-3600 • Fax: (408) 258-3659
Company Overview and Strategy
Located in Canada, Tundra semiconductor is a privately-held company that designs, develops, and markets PCI
and VME bus-bridging components. Tundra was established originally as Newbridge Microsystems, a division of
Newbridge Networks Corporation, a leader in local and wide area networking and communications equipment, but
became an independent company in December 1995. As an affiliate of Newbridge Networks, Tundra has access
to advanced infrastructure resources while operating as an independent corporation.
Tundra’s product strategy is to focus on the niche market of bus-bridging ICs, which control the flow of data
between different bus architectures used in computer systems. The company also designs and markets a broad
line of industry standard encryption components for data security in communications networks. To address the
office equipment, consumer electronics, and automotive markets, Tundra offers a line of Intel-compatible 8-bit
microperipheral (MPR) devices.
Management
Adam Chowenaniec
Jim Roche
Michael Krause
Norm Paquette
Ed Hacker
Dave Lisk
Richard O’Connor
1-358
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President and General Manager
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Finance
Director, Sales
Director, Operations
Director, Marketing and Business Development
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Tundra Semiconductor
Products and Processes
Tundra offers a family of embedded PCI bus bridges, VMEbus bridges, encryption components, and standard 8bit microperipheral ICs.
PCI Bus Bridges
QSpan™— PCI interface for Motorola embedded processors (e.g., 68K, PowerPC)
Eighty-X™—PCI interface solution for Texas Instruments’ line of TMS320C8x digital signal processors
VMEbus Bridges
Universe™—VME-to-PCI bus bridge
SCV64™—High-performance VME64-to-local bus bridge
Trooper™ II—Slave only, low-cost VMEbus-to-local bus bridge
Data Security Products
Wide array of encryption chips based on the Data Encryption Standard (DES). These products are designed for a
broad range of networking and communications systems such as cable modems, ATMs, fax machines, and
satellite base solutions.
8000 Microperipheral Series
Six industry standard 8-bit MPRs that support the Intel x86 microprocessor family.
Key Agreements
•
Tundra has strategic technology partnerships with Motorola, Texas Instruments, and Cadence Design
Systems.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-359
Unitrode
North American Company Profiles
U NITRODE
Unitrode Corporation
7 Continental Boulevard
Merrimack, New Hampshire 03054-0399
Telephone: (603) 424-2410
Fax: (603) 424-3460
Web Site: www.unitrode.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Unitrode (U.K.) Limited • London, England
Telephone: (44) (181) 3181431 • Fax: (44) (181) 3182548
Asia-Pacific:
Unitrode Electronics Asia Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2722-1101 • Fax: (852) 2369-7596
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends January 31*
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1993
50
6
4
1994
65
9
6
1995
87
12
9
16
1996
116
18
15
12
1997
134
21
18
18
300
425
514
620
562
*Results excluding disposed operations.
Company Overview and Strategy
Unitrode Corporation was founded in 1960 as a manufacturer of electronic components and subsystems. In
1994, the company divested its two remaining non-strategic businesses, Powercube Corporation and Micro
Networks Division, leaving only its IC business, which was established in 1981. Unitrode is now focused entirely
on the design and manufacture of high-performance analog/linear integrated circuits. The company's ICs are used
in a variety of applications for power management and as interface devices. For the most part, the chips are used
to control switching power supplies and small electronic motors, or as high-speed interface and communication
circuits between various pieces of electronic equipment.
Unitrode's customers are primarily in the EDP/computer and telecommunications markets, but also in the industrial
control and instrumentation, defense/aerospace, automotive, and consumer markets. The company plans to
focus its new product development efforts on the communications and industrial markets.
In fiscal 1997, about 70 percent of the company's integrated circuit sales were to international customers.
1-360
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Unitrode
North American Company Profiles
Automotive/Military
8%
Interface
26%
Communications
13%
Power
Management
40%
Motor Control
34%
1997 Sales by Product Type
Industrial
19%
Computer/Office
60%
1997 Sales by End-Use Market
Management
Robert L. Gable
Edward H. Browder
Cosmo S. Trapani
Allan R. Campbell
S. Kelley MacDonald
Patrick Moquin
Frederick J. Myers
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Vice President, Corporate Communications
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, International Sales
Products and Processes
Unitrode's product offering is comprised of analog ICs for power supply control, motor control, lighting, power
driving, power quality, and power factoring, as well as for high-speed and high-power interface applications. Most
of the products are based upon proprietary designs utilizing enhanced bipolar, BiCMOS, and BCDMOS
semiconductor technologies and are considered application-specific standard products (ASSPs).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In mid-1997, the company expected to complete the first phase of construction of a new 150mm BiCMOS wafer
facility. The facility is expected to begin production in fiscal year 1999.
Unitrode Corporation
7 Continental Boulevard
Merrimack, New Hampshire 03054
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,000
Wafer size: 100mm
Processes: Bipolar, BiCMOS, BCDMOS
Feature sizes: 1.5µm-5.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-361
Unitrode
North American Company Profiles
Unitrode has agreements with four foundries to supply additional wafers, as required. In January 1995, the
company signed an agreement with GMT Microelectronics Corporation (former Commodore Semiconductor fab in
Norristown, Pennsylvania) for additional wafer capacity. Under the agreement, Unitrode made a $2 million equity
investment in GMT, in return for up to 30 percent of GMT's capacity. In February 1996, the company made an
additional $1.5 million investment in GMT which entitles the company to favorable pricing on certain products.
During fiscal year 1997, Unitrode received less than 20 percent of its output from outside foundries.
Key Agreements
• Unitrode entered into an alliance with Irvine Sensors. Under the agreement, Unitrode became a licensee and
exclusive second-source for Irvine Sensors’ wireless infrared communication ICs.
• Unitrode entered into an agreement with GMT Microelectronics Corporation in early 1995 to supply wafers to
Unitrode. As part of the agreement, Unitrode invested $2 million in GMT. The company made an additional
investment of $1.5 million in GMT which entitles the company to favorable pricing on certain products.
• Unitrode agreed with Toko Inc. (Japan) in 1993 to jointly develop power-control ICs. The deal also calls for the
cross-licensing and alternate sourcing of select proprietary products.
1-362
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Universal Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
U NIVERSAL S EMICONDUCTOR
Universal Semiconductor, Inc.
1925 Zanker Road
San Jose, California 95112
Telephone: (408) 436-1906
Fax: (408) 436-1125
IC Manufacturer
Employees
30
Company Overview and Strategy
Universal Semiconductor was established in 1978 to serve as a CMOS foundry offering design and manufacturing
of customers' custom/semicustom devices, gate arrays (digital and mixed-signal), dielectrically isolated (DI) highvoltage ICs, linear arrays, and DMOS FETs.
Management
Vic Hejmadi
Tony Telesca
President and Chief Executive Officer
Director, Marketing and Sales
Products and Processes
Universal Semiconductor uses CMOS processing for all devices and offers gate arrays with up to 2,400 gates,
mixed-signal gate arrays (18V breakdown), and 300V and 500V dielectrically isolated high-voltage ICs, as well as
radiation-hardened devices.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Universal Semiconductor, Inc.
1925 Zanker Road
San Jose, California 95112
Cleanroom size: 9,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,500
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, linear devices, discretes, foundry services
Feature sizes: 1.5µm, 2.0µm, 3.0µm, 4.0µm, 5.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-363
UTMC Microelectronic Systems
North American Company Profiles
UTMC MICROELECTRONIC S YSTEMS
UTMC Microelectronic Systems
4350 Centennial Boulevard
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907
Telephone: (719) 594-8000
Fax: (719) 594-8032
Web Site: www.utmc.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1992
20
1993
27
1994
30
1995
30
1996
38
350
300
300
180
170
Company Overview and Strategy
UTMC Microelectronic Systems is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. (UTC), a $23 billion Hartford,
Connecticut-based provider of high technology products to the aerospace, building systems, and automotive
industries throughout the world.
Established in 1980, UTMC serves government and commercial aerospace, commercial property and residential
housing, and automotive manufacturing customers. It was originally established to assist other UTC divisions with
the integration of custom and semicustom microelectronics into their systems. In 1985, UTMC began supplying
semicustom and military-standard VLSI circuits to external companies in the aerospace and defense industries.
Today, the majority of UTMC’s business is with external companies. The company also engages in governmentand customer-funded R&D.
Up to about mid-1995, UTMC manufactured its IC products in its own fab in Colorado Springs. However, the
company took on a fabless strategy with the sale of its fab to Rockwell Semiconductor. UTMC reportedly sold the
fab because it could not be operated economically. It was underutilized due to the fact that the company sells only
a small number of wafers with relatively high value. In addition, UTMC felt that by adopting a fabless strategy, it
would be able to move to 0.8µm and smaller geometries more quickly while not incurring the large capital costs
associated with a submicron fab.
In 1996, UTMC underwent another strategic change. UTMC combined its IC business with the former Commercial
Aircraft Electronics (CAE) division of Hamilton Standard, moved into a former Hamilton Standard facility, and
changed its name to UTMC Microelectronic Systems. The newly acquired 104,000 square-foot facility houses the
company’s research and development, engineering, IC assembly, test, sales and marketing, as well as the newly
acquired circuit card assembly operation. The circuit card operation is a high-mix low-volume operation focusing
on high reliability for the aerospace market.
1-364
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
UTMC Microelectronic Systems
North American Company Profiles
Management
Charles "Nick" H. Ide
Mike Dansby
Chuck Gregory
Dwight Deem
Dick Ahlquist
President
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Business Development and Engineering
Director, Sales and Marketing
Manager, ASIC Product Marketing
Products and Processes
UTMC offers semicustom and military-standard products. Its semicustom products include CMOS gate arrays with
densities from 3,400 to 200,000 usable gates, CMOS cell-based ASICs, and radiation-hardened antifuse
programmable logic arrays. The process used for the gate arrays and standard cells is a JAN-qualified lowtemperature double- or triple-metal rad-hard process with 0.8µm and 1.0µm geometries.
The company also offers a large selection of radiation-hardened monolithic, ASD/ENASC-certified MIL-STD-1553
products. These include bus interface and control devices, bipolar bus transceivers, 16-bit RISC MPUs and 8-bit
MCUs in both rad-hard and non-rad-hard versions, mask ROMs, PROMs, dual-port RAMs, SRAMs of up to 256K
density, and CMOS PLD and MSI logic devices.
Radiation-hardened products accounted for about 50 percent of UTMC’s IC sales in 1996.
From its newly acquired circuit card assembly and test division, UTMC offers circuit board assembly and test
services for low volume production runs of complex board requirements. Typical applications are commercial and
military aircraft and environmental controls.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
UTMC sold its fabrication facility to Rockwell Semiconductor in mid-1995. As part of the deal, Rockwell will supply
UTMC with wafers through 1997 as it makes the transition to a fabless operation. In March 1996, UTMC
announced a foundry deal with Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems to obtain production capacity for rad-hard
products from Lockheed-Martin’s fab in Manassas, Virginia (see Key Agreements). Other foundries are expected
to be added in 1997 to support new semicustom and standard products with 0.6µm and 0.5µm geometries.
Key Agreements
•
UTMC established a three-year foundry supply deal with Lockheed-Martin Federal Systems in March 1996.
The deal makes Lockheed-Martin UTMC’s main foundry for rad-hard CMOS devices.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-365
Vadem
North American Company Profiles
V ADEM
Vadem Ltd.
1960 Zanker Road
San Jose, California 95112
Telephone: (408) 467-2100
Fax: (408) 467-2199
Web Site: www.vadem.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
45
Company Overview and Strategy
Vadem was established in 1983 as a design house specializing in technologies for the portable computer industry
that was emerging at the time. The name Vadem is a derivative of the Latin word, vade mecum—meaning
“something that one carries around.”
Vadem’s first project was the development of hardware/firmware emulation technology to help PC makers resolve
compatibility issues raised by the use of low-power CMOS devices. Another early project was the development of
one of the world’s first laptop computers, a design that was sold to Zenith who would go on to become the first to
bring a laptop into full volume production. Vadem also designed what was called a PCRadio, which was a portable
system emphasizing communications rather than computing power.
In 1987, Vadem announced the development of its first IC for portable systems, a chipset for the 186 PC
generation. By 1992, the company had developed a full line of chips for portable computing, including a
notebook power management unit that was later sold by Intel as the 82347, a single-chip LCD VGA controller (VG660), and a single-chip DOS-compatible computer (VG-230) for low-cost handheld systems.
Today, Vadem is building upon its established portable design experience to become a leading designer and
marketer of ICs and related software for subnotebook-size computers and personal communications products
such as handheld data collection terminals, cellular telephones, and personal organizers.
1-366
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Vadem
North American Company Profiles
Management
Chikok Shing
John Zhao
Gary Rhea
Ahmet Alpdemir
Henry Fung
John C. Kamps
Siu-Kuen Tsang
Norman Farquhar
Phil Mitchell
Geoff Teng
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Sales
Director, ASIC Development
Manager, Software
Manager, Single-Chip PC Products
Manager, PCMCIA Products
Products and Processes
Vadem's IC products include display controllers, microprocessors, PCMCIA host adapters, and PC card controllers
for portable systems. Vadem’s product offerings also include software, firmware, and development tools. Some
of these products are described below.
• VG-330—a 32MHz x86-compatible processor for handheld systems. This highly integrated processor
incorporates an MPU core and core logic, memory and power management, a memory controller, a PCMCIA
controller, a VGA LCD controller, a serial port with HP IR capability, an AT-style bus controller, and a serial
keypad interface or scanned keyboard matrix. The device is designed for 3.3V operation.
• VG-469—a 208-pin PCMCIA card controller that is register- and software-compatible with Intel's i82365SL
controller ICs. The part provides a migration path for current 5V devices, emerging 3.3V, and future lowervoltage systems and is compatible with PCMCIA 2.1 ExCA (Exchangable Card Architecture) extension,
Microsoft's Plug-and-Play ISA version 1.0a, and PC Card DMA operation.
• VG-660—claimed to be the industry's first LCD VGA controller.
enhanced features and VGA compatibility.
It supports small flat panel displays with
Future products will include highly integrated Mips-based RISC processors.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Vadem's primary foundry sources are NEC in Japan and Samsung in Korea. Atmel, Symbios Logic, and VLSI
Technology are used to a lesser extent.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-367
Vantis
North American Company Profiles
V ANTIS
Vantis Corporation
920 DeGuigne
P.O. Box 3755
Sunnyvale, California 94088
Telephone: (408) 732-0555
Fax: (408) 774-7216
Web Site: www.vantis.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Advanced Micro Devices (UK) Ltd. • Firmley, England, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1276) 803100 • Fax: (44) (1276) 803102
Japan:
Advanced Micro Devices • Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3346-7570 • Fax: (81) (3) 3342-7606
Asia-Pacific:
Advanced Micro Devices Far East Ltd. • Kowloon, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2956-5322 • Fax: (852) 2956-0588
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
1994
187
Employees
1995
256
1996
248
300
Company Overview and Strategy
Vantis Corporation was spun off from AMD in 1997 to form a wholly-owned programmable logic subsidiary of AMD.
The company’s roots in programmable logic devices (PLDs) date back to 1978 when Monolithic Memories, Inc.
announced the development of the PAL® device. MMI merged with AMD in 1987. Today, Vantis is the dominant
supplier of simple PLDs and the world’s third largest supplier of all PLDs.
There are six basic areas addressed by Vantis’ PLDs: high-speed PAL devices, universal PAL devices, industrystandard PAL devices, low-power PAL devices, asynchronous PAL devices, and high-density PLDs. Much of
Vantis’ emphasis is being placed on the company’s mid- to high-density MACH PLD products.
1-368
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Vantis
North American Company Profiles
Vantis’ roadmap calls for CPLDs with up to 1,000 macrocells by 1998 and CPLDs with high-density macrocells and
integrated cores by 1999. The company will utilize AMD’s core library including its digital signal processing, PCI,
and microprocessor cores. In mid-1997, Vantis plans to introduce its first FPGA product in the 30,000-gate range
and then move into the 250,000-gate range by the year 2000. Also by 2000, Vantis wants to become an
independent, publicly held company.
Management
Richard Previte
Richard H. Forte
Frank Barone
David Chavoustie
Al F. Frugaletti
Andy Robin
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Vice President, Worldwide Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Sales, North American and Worldwide Distribution
Vice President, Marketing
Products and Processes
For high-performance applications in the networking, telecommunications, computing, and industrial markets,
Vantis offers its MACH families of high-density EECMOS PLDs. There are five MACH families, each addressing a
specific market need and all include features such as guaranteed fixed timing, PCI compliancy, power
management, and 3.3V options. The MACH 5, MACH Superset, and MACH Performance Plus CPLDs come with
JTAG in-system programming (ISP) support for no additional cost.
•
MACH 1 and 2 Families—These families (including the MACH Performance Plus CPLD products) consist
primarily of synchronous devices for synchronous subsystem applications like memory controllers and
peripheral controllers and an asynchronous device for applications having asynchronous inputs and for
collecting random glue logic. Characteristics include 900 to 3,600 PLD gates, 44 to 84 pins, and 32 to 128
macrocells.
•
MACH 3 and 4 Families—These MACH Superset CPLDs provide approximately three times the density (up to
10,000 PLD gates), two times the number of macrocells (up to 256), and two times the amount of I/O (up to 208
pins) of the original MACH 1 and 2 families.
•
MACH 5 Family—This is Vantis’ newest CPLD product family with speeds as fast as 7.5ns at 512 macrocells.
The MACH 5 devices feature a new hierarchical switch-matrix architecture that allows shorter design times.
While a 0.35µm (effective gate length) CMOS process is currently used to manufacture the MACH 5 PLDs, a
0.25µm six-layer-metal process is under development and expected to be implemented by 2000.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-369
Vantis
North American Company Profiles
Vantis also offers one of the industry’s widest variety of PAL devices.
•
•
•
•
•
High-Speed PALs—Electronically erasable (EE) CMOS and bipolar PALs with delay times as low as 5ns and
4.5ns, respectively.
Universal PALs—EECMOS PALs with user-programmable output logic macrocells.
Industry-Standard PALs—Bipolar TTL PALs in a variety of speed and power grades.
Low-Power PALs—Zero-power CMOS PALs for portable or battery-operated systems (stand-by current of less
than 15µA) and quarter-power CMOS PALs that can cut system power consumption 50 percent by replacing
equivalent CMOS PALs.
Asynchronous PALs—CMOS PALs that are optimized for asynchronous and bus interface applications.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
All of the company’s products are manufactured in AMD’s wafer fabrication facilities in Austin, Texas, on processes
dedicated to programmable logic. AMD’s Fab 25, where much of Vantis’ devices are manufactured, is a 200mm
fab with 0.35µm line geometries.
1-370
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Vitesse Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
V ITESSE S EMICONDUCTOR
Vitesse Semiconductor Corporation
741 Calle Plano
Camarillo, California 93012
Telephone: (805) 388-3700
Fax: (805) 987-5896
Web Site: www.vitesse.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Europe:
Vitesse Semiconductor Corp. • Morainvilliers, France
Telephone: (33) (1) 3975-6310 • Fax: (33) (1) 3975-2062
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends September 30
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
37
1
9
3
1993
26
(19)
10
6
1994
36
(4)
9
2
1995
43
2
9
3
1996
66
13
11
11
300
238
201
235
320
Company Overview and Strategy
Vitesse Semiconductor, founded in 1984, is a leader in the design, development, manufacturing, and marketing
of digital gallium arsenide (GaAs) ICs suitable for commercial, industrial, and military customers. The company's
custom, semicustom, and standard products are used in a wide variety of industries including telecommunications,
data communications, computers, defense and aerospace systems, automatic test equipment (ATE), and
instrumentation.
Government
11%
Computers
4%
ATE
24%
Other
1%
Communications
60%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-371
Vitesse Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
Vitesse's mission is to be the dominant supplier of the highest performance IC solutions for communications and
ATE applications. As the communications market shifts from wire to optical channels, and computers undergo a
shift from large proprietary central processors to open distributed processors, Vitesse is positioning itself to
provide leading high-performance digital, analog, and mixed-signal IC solutions.
ROW
2%
Foundry
6%
Standard
Products
36%
Japan
12%
ASIC Products
58%
1996 Sales by Product
Europe
10%
North America
76%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
James A. Cole
Louis R. Tomasetta
Ian Burrows
Robert Cutter
Ira Deyhimy
Chris F. Gardner
Eugene F. Hovanec
James Mikkelson
Michael Millhollan
Robert Nunn
Neil Rappaport
Ram Venkataraman
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Fab Operations
Vice President and General Manager, Colorado Springs
Vice President, Product Development
Vice President and General Manager, ATE Products
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Technology Development
Vice President and General Manager, Standard Products
Vice President and General Manager, ASIC Products
Vice President, Sales
Vice President, Quality
Products and Processes
Vitesse's products are fabricated using its proprietary H-GaAs™ (high integration gallium arsenide) process
technology. The current generation is the five-level metal, 0.5µm H-GaAs IV process, capable of integration levels
of over one million transistors. ASIC design and simulation is supported on industry standard tools from Mentor,
Cadence, Viewlogic, Synopsys, and Teradyne.
Vitesse's standard products include telecommunications and data communications ICs. Its communications
products address the high-speed data transmission marketplace. Most are designed to be compatible with the
Sonet (synchronous optical network), ATM, and Fibre Channel standards. The operating frequency of these
devices is from 155MHz to 10GHz and they are aimed at providing physical layer solutions for copper or fiber optics
communication lines.
1-372
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Vitesse Semiconductor
Vitesse's gate array product line consists of five families: GLX, FX, Viper, SCFX, and Fury™. Aimed at the
communication, ATE/instrumental, and computer markets, GLX arrays are suited to switching networks, serial links,
high-speed data bus transfers, DSP functions, and critical timing blocks. GLX utilizes a sea-of-gates architecture
and can be powered from either a single or dual power supply, depending on I/O requirements. These gate arrays
can accommodate virtually any digital application requiring up to 175,000 gates. The FX series provides solutions
in super minicomputers, high-end workstations, telecommunications systems, and high-performance
ATE/instrumentation. The Viper family provides solutions in computer peripherals, medical instrumentation, and
communications. The SCFX family is targeted at telecommunications and data communications applications,
offering maximum operating frequencies beyond 3GHz. The Fury series addresses the conventional silicon ECL
user.
In early 1997, Vitesse introduced its first family of GaAs standard cell arrays targeting telecommunications and
high-speed switching applications. Dubbed the SLX line, the family consists of five devices with gate densities
ranging from 10K to 220K gates while operating from a single 3.3V power supply. The SLX family is based on a
0.4µm four-layer metal HGaAs-IV process and utilizes a standard cell architecture.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In late 1996, Vitesse began construction of what it claims will be the first 150mm GaAs VLSI fabrication facility in the
industry. The 100,000 square-foot facility will support manufacturing and test, as well as a design center for
research and development. Initial production is expected to begin in late 1998.
Vitesse Semiconductor
741 Calle Plano
Camarillo, California 93012
Cleanroom size: 5,500 square feet (Class 10)
6,500 square feet (Class 100)
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,700
Wafer size: 100mm
Process: H-GaAs E/D MESFET
Products: Gate arrays, telecom and datacom
devices, microperipherals, foundry services
Feature sizes: 0.4µm, 0.5µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Vitesse Semiconductor
4323 ArrowsWest Drive
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80907
Cleanroom size: 10,000 square feet (Class 1)
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: H-GaAs E/D MESFET
Products: Gate arrays, telecom and datacom
devices, microperipherals, foundry services
1-373
Vivid Semiconductor
North American Company Profiles
V IVID S EMICONDUCTOR
Vivid Semiconductor, Inc.
7400 West Detroit Street
Suite 100
Chandler, Arizona 85226
Telephone: (602) 961-3200
Fax: (602) 961-1135
Web Site: www.vividsemi.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Employees
35
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Asia-Pacific:
Vivid Semiconductor Korea Inc. • Seoul, Korea
Telephone: (82) (2) 522-3175 • Fax: (82) (2) 552-3177
Company Overview and Strategy
Vivid Semiconductor was formed in 1993 to design and market mixed-signal and analog integrated circuits for
applications requiring high voltage operation at a low cost. Currently, the company is focused on providing drive
electronics to manufacturers of flat panel displays (FPDs).
Using patented extended voltage-range CMOS technology, Vivid has developed technology that allows
designers to build enhanced performance flat panel displays with 24-bit color and full-motion video. The key to
this technology is that it can be fabricated on standard CMOS processes. Vivid’s process technology can be
applied not only to FPDs but also to a broad range of other markets, from automotive to telecommunications,
where extended voltage-range CMOS can make a difference in product capability, power consumption, cost, and
reliability.
Management
Alex Erhart
Dan Clarke
Gerry Harder
Tim Vatuone
Ed Fullman
1-374
President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Marketing and Sales
Vice President, Operations
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Director, Marketing
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Vivid Semiconductor
Products and Processes
Vivid Semiconductor offers three families of direct drive flat panel display column drivers—CRT replacement
products, low power notebook TFT display products, and MLS/AA STN display products. Vivid’s direct drive LCD
column drivers are available for a wide range of panel resolutions from VGA to UXGA.
Vivid’s column drivers are based on its patented "Dual Range" design architecture, which allows high-voltage
devices to be achieved on standard, low-voltage CMOS processes. For example 10V operation on a 0.8µm
process and 7V operation on a 0.5µm process can be easily achieved, and higher voltages are possible.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Unlike leading edge microprocessors and memories, Vivid’s silicon requirements can be fabricated in plants that
are three process generations old. Vivid’s wafer processing, packaging, and testing functions are contracted to
well-established manufacturers.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-375
VLSI Technology
North American Company Profiles
VLSI TECHNOLOGY
VLSI Technology, Inc.
1109 McKay Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 434-3100
Fax: (408) 263-2511
Web Site: www.vlsi.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
VLSI Technology, Inc. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5454-3800 • Fax: (81) (3) 5454-3801
Europe:
VLSI Technology, Inc. • Palaiseau Cedex, France
Telephone: (33) (1) 69-19-71-00 • Fax: Fax: (33) (1) 69-19-71-01
Asia-Pacific:
VLSI Technology, Inc. • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 719-5466 • Fax: (886) (2) 718-3204
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
429
(32)
50
40
1993
516
16
65
72
1994
587
32
79
94
1995
720
46
90
204
1996
717
(50)
105
245
Employees
2,379
2,659
2,728
2,986
2,948
Company Overview and Strategy
VLSI Technology is a leader in the design, manufacture, and sale of complex high-performance ASICs and
ASSPs. Founded in 1979, the company has been a pioneer in the cell-based ASIC business. VLSI targets highgrowth markets in which it has built expertise and can use its library of proprietary cells and FSB™ functional
system blocks to assist customers in designing products and bringing them to market rapidly. The company's
subsidiary, Compass Design Automation, Inc., supplies software and design libraries to the broad commercial
ASIC and electronic design automation (EDA) marketplaces. Design services include system definition, complete
logic and circuit design, and test program generation.
1-376
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
VLSI Technology
North American Company Profiles
VLSI’s integrated circuit business is organized in a “market-focused” structure. Its three main groups are
Computing Products, Communications Products, and Consumer Digital Entertainment Products.
Other
Consumer 7%
Digital
Entertainment
26%
Communications
34%
Computing
33%
1996 Sales by Product Group
Japan/
Asia-Pacific
18%
Europe
29%
United States
53%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
The Computing Product group offers devices for the computer market, including high-end computing applications
such as graphics workstations and high-end storage systems. Sales from this product group declined from
representing 46 percent of total revenues in 1995 to 15 percent in 1996 due to Intel’s strengthened dominance
in the core logic business and a decrease in sales for Apple Computer architecture systems. The Computing
Products group is shifting its focus away from standard core logic chipsets and toward custom products for highend applications.
The Communications Products groups offers devices for wireless and network communications applications.
Within the communications area, the company continues to develop technologies supporting GSM, PHS, and
DECT standards. VLSI is also developing products targeting CDMA digital cellular applications. In 1Q96, VLSI
created a European subsidiary called Creative Systems Solutions. Based in Munich, Germany, Creative Systems
Solutions will focus on the wireless data communications marketplace.
The Consumer Digital Entertainment Products group supplies devices for secure communications and home
entertainment applications such as interactive television, satellite and cable technology, and electronic video
game systems. Data encryption is one key area of focus due to increased security concerns as products become
more advanced.
Future product development will include a focus on the wireless, networking, set-top box, and advanced
computing markets.
Management
Alfred J. Stein
Richard M. Beyer
Thierry Laurent
Paul McLellan
John C. Batty
Balakrishnan S. Iyer
Ted Malanczuk
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
President and Chief Operating Officer
Senior Vice President and GM, Communications Product Group
Senior Vice President and President, Compass Design Automation, Inc.
Vice President and Treasurer
Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Operations
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-377
VLSI Technology
North American Company Profiles
Products and Processes
Using advanced design capabilities, a vast cell library of predefined cells, and advanced manufacturing processes,
VLSI Technology offers highly customized, highly integrated standard cell, embedded array (FlexArray), and gate
array ASICs and ASSPs for applications such as computers, wireless communications equipment, electronic
games, and digital set-top boxes.
The VLSI Cell Library provides an extensive and growing variety of predesigned and characterized cells,
macrocells, and large functional system blocks. The company’s specialized system blocks include: UART, parallel
port, SCC, SCSI, PCMCIA, PCI, SSA, Fibre Channel, and graphics functions for computing applications; T1/E1,
Sonet/SDH, and ATM functions for network communications applications; GSM/DCS, DECT, CT2, PHS, CDPD,
and Ruby II functions for wireless communications applications; and digital demodulation, forward error correction
(FEC), MPEG-2 video and MPEG audio, microcontroller, and transport for digital entertainment applications.
VLSI’s cell library also includes general-purpose system blocks such as 32-bit ARM RISC processor cores, data
encryption devices, and programmable DSP cores.
In a second attempt to penetrate the data security market, VLSI has developed the GhostRider security chip for
PCI-based computers, modems, web-browsers, and set-top boxes. The device is designed to protect the
electronic transfer of intellectual property by integrating an on-chip RISC processor with encryption/decryption
engine-functional system blocks.
In April 1997, VLSI introduced a gigabit MAC controller device, the VNS67500. The device is available as a
standard product, operating at 3.3V, or may be embedded in a submicron CMOS ASIC. The device is designed
for high-speed networking applications.
VLSI manufactures its ASICs and ASSPs in CMOS technology with geometries ranging from 0.35µm to 0.6µm
and with up to five layers of interconnect metal. In April 1997, VLSI introduced its 0.25µm (drawn) and 0.2µm
(drawn) standard-cell ASIC families, dubbed the VSC9 and VSC10 lines. Each family will have six layers of metal, a
density of up to 18 million raw (14 million usable) gates, and utilize the company’s trench architecture. Volume
production of the VSC9 family, which will not include gate arrays, is expected to begin in late 1997, followed by the
VSC10 family in 1Q98.
Through its subsidiary, Compass Design Automation, VLSI provides IC design software (design tools and libraries)
to a broad range of system and semiconductor customers.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
In previous years, VLSI Technology enhanced its manufacturing capacity through wafer manufacturing
relationships, primarily with Chartered Semiconductor. However, by the end of 1996, VLSI shifted substantially all
its wafer manufacturing to its own facilities.
1-378
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
VLSI Technology
During 1996, VLSI completed the majority of its expansion plans of its San Antonio fab, including the conversion
to 0.6µm and smaller processes. In late 1996, VLSI announced plans to close its San Jose facility, citing its
technology limitations as a contributing factor in the decision. The company expects to close the San Jose facility
by the end of 1997.
Addressing future capacity needs beyond 1997, VLSI signed a memorandum of understanding with the
Malaysian Government that covers a site in Malaysia. However, VLSI indicated that it has no plans to construct a
new facility before 2000.
VLSI Technology, Inc.
1109 McKay Drive
San Jose, California 95131
Telephone: (408) 434-3000
Fab 1
Cleanroom size: 47,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 3,400
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm, 1.0µm
(Will be closed by the end of 1997.)
VLSI Technology, Inc.
9641 Westover Hills Boulevard
San Antonio, Texas 78251
Telephone: (210) 522-7000
Fab 2
Cleanroom size: 50,000 square feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,400
Wafer size: 150mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASICs, ASSPs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm, 0.5µm, 0.6µm
VLSI subcontracts all of its IC packaging and approximately half of its final test needs. Its in-house final test
functions are performed at its factories in California and Tempe, Arizona.
Key Agreements
• In November 1996, VLSI signed a memorandum of understanding with the Government of Malaysia. The
memo covers the construction of a 200mm wafer fabrication facility in Malaysia. To date, the company has not
announced any decision or timeframe for the facility.
• VLSI entered into an agreement with Digital Semiconductor that covers the design and manufacture of system
logic devices. The devices are for use in future Alpha-based systems.
• VLSI and Hitachi renewed and expanded their 1988 standard cell and process technology exchange
agreement. The new pact added gate array technology, and the two companies will develop compatible gate
array families. In July 1996, Hitachi licensed its SuperH-3 RISC MPU core to VLSI, who plans to offer it as a CPU
core in ASICs and ASSPs for applications such as handheld computing devices, navigation systems, digital
entertainment, and multimedia peripherals.
• The DSP Group licensed its Pine™ digital signal processing core technology and its TrueSpeech™ speech
compression technology to VLSI Technology in 1994. The new technologies were added to VLSI's FSB
library for design in wireless communications applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-379
VLSI Technology
North American Company Profiles
• In late 1994, VLSI licensed Santa Clara, California-based Mediametrics Inc.'s MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 video
decompression technology, supporting the company's drive into the set-top box and direct broadcast satellite
markets.
• VLSI announced its intention to jointly develop and market fuzzy logic-based ASIC technology for chip design
and development capabilities with Togai InfraLogic, Inc. of Irvine, California.
• In February 1994, VLSI and Advanced RISC Machines, Ltd. renewed their agreement to expand market
opportunities for the ARM 32-bit architecture in embedded control and portable applications.
1-380
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
VTC
North American Company Profiles
VTC
VTC Inc.
2800 East Old Shakopee Road
Bloomington, Minnesota 55425-1350
Telephone: (612) 853-5100
Fax: (612) 853-3355
Web Site: www.vtc.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
VTC Japan • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3389-6016
Europe:
VTC Deutschland • Germany
Telephone: (49) (8071) 95304
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1992
50
1993
75
1994
108
1995
166
1996
178
300
375
480
540
600
Company Overview and Strategy
VTC was founded in 1984 to design and manufacture VHSIC products for government markets. Within the first
year, VTC acquired Control Data Corporation's microcircuits division (a captive chip manufacturing operation for
CDC's disk drive business that had operated since 1969). VTC was privately held, but Control Data was a major
investor.
Control Data purchased all of VTC in 1987, making it a wholly-owned subsidiary. In 1988, the two original founders
left CDC and the company was put up for sale. In October 1990, CDC sold the bipolar portion to a management
buyout led by VTC's current CEO, Larry Jodsaas. Before the end of the year, CDC also sold the CMOS fab to
Cypress.
Today, VTC's strategy is to offer quality, high-performance ICs to the data storage (disk and optical drive) industry.
The company's revenues come from bipolar read/write preamplifiers and channel electronics found in disk drives
worldwide.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-381
VTC
North American Company Profiles
Management
Larry Jodsaas
Cliff Boler
John Doyle
Dan Griffith
Greg Peterson
Robert Rousseau
Ed Schnable
President and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Engineering
Vice President, Quality
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Manufacturing
Products and Processes
VTC offers a broad line of read/write preamplifier standard products and channel ASICs for use in rigid disk drives.
Processes used by the company are complementary bipolar (CBP), ECL, and BiCMOS (called PolarMOS).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
VTC Inc.
2800 East Old Shakopee Road
Bloomington, Minnesota 55425-1350
Cleanroom size: 32,000 square feet
Capacity (wafers/week): 5,000
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: Bipolar, complementary bipolar, BiCMOS
Products: Standard and ASIC read/write preamplifiers, servo preamplifiers, and channel electronics
Feature sizes: 1.2µm, 2.0µm, 3.0µm
1-382
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
WSI
North American Company Profiles
WSI
WSI, Inc.
47280 Kato Road
Fremont, California 94538
Telephone: (510) 656-5400
Fax: (510) 657-5916
Web site: www.wsipsd.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Financial History ($M)
Sales
Employees
1992
28
1993
27
1994
28
1995
38
1996
44
137
125
125
125
100
Company Overview and Strategy
WSI, Inc. (formerly WaferScale Integration, Inc.) was founded in 1983 as a supplier of high-performance
programmable ICs. It serves embedded system designers who need to achieve higher system performance,
reduce system size and power consumption, shorten product development cycles to achieve faster market entry,
and reduce manufacturing costs. It offers field-programmable microcontroller peripherals as well as highperformance non-volatile EPROM products.
Management
Michael Callahan
Boaz Eitan
Yoram Cedar
Howard Gopen
Robert Hoard
Reza Kazerdunian
Carl Mills
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, New Business Development
Vice President, Operations
Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Vice President, Research and Development
Vice President, Finance
Products and Processes
WSI supplies several families of programmable microcontroller peripherals as well as a broad line of high
performance non-volatile PROM and EPROM devices. These products are based on the company's patented
self-aligned split-gate CMOS EPROM technology. WSI's fast EPROMs are available in densities ranging from 16K
to 1M. The programmable peripherals integrate EPROM, SRAM, PLD, and user-configurable logic.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-383
WSI
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
WSI does not have its own fabrication facility. It has foundry agreements with Sharp, National Semiconductor, AMI,
SGS-Thomson, and Tower Semiconductor.
Key Agreements
• In January 1997, WSI signed a long-term technology exchange and foundry agreement with Tower
Semiconductor. Under the agreement, the two companies will jointly develop manufacturing process
technologies such as WSI’s AMG EPROM architecture using Tower’s 0.6µm technology. The agreement also
guarantees WSI access to Tower’s wafer capacity.
• National took a 10 percent stake in WSI as part of a five-year foundry and technology exchange agreement.
• WSI formed an alliance with American Microsystems to jointly develop mask-programmable versions of WSI's
line of microcontroller peripherals. AMI is manufacturing the parts and the companies are marketing them
separately.
1-384
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Xicor
North American Company Profiles
X ICOR
Xicor, Inc.
1511 Buckeye Drive
Milpitas, California 95035-7493
Telephone: (408) 432-8888
Fax: (408) 432-0640
Web Site: www.xicor.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Xicor Japan K.K • Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3225-2004 • Fax: (81) (3) 3225-2319
Europe:
Xicor Ltd. • Witney, Oxford, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1993) 700544 • Fax: (44) (1993) 700533
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
Employees
1992
93
(30)
22
6
1993
104
(6)
13
2
1994
104
2
14
5
1995
114
10
15
9
1996
124
14
15
25
840
800
691
641
680
Company Overview and Strategy
Xicor, Inc., founded in 1978, designs and manufactures a broad line of non-volatile in-the-system programmable
semiconductor ICs. In-the-system programmability enables telecommunications, consumer, computer, industrial,
automotive, and military products to adapt to changing software and operating environments, and to be
personalized by the user. Many of Xicor’s products consume little power and operate well from a battery powered
source, making them well suited for hand-held and portable applications.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-385
Xicor
North American Company Profiles
Consumer
25%
Telecom
25%
Industrial, Military, PCs, Peripherals
& Transportation
& Networking
25%
25%
1996 Sales by End-Use Market
Japan
14%
ROW
11%
Europe
23%
United States
52%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Xicor emphasizes the development of proprietary products that incorporate its programmable technology,
enabling customers to rapidly bring to market products with improved features, efficiency and maintainability. In
1995, Xicor introduced its first SerialFlash™ memory product family, which operates from low voltage power
sources. Xicor is a leading supplier of EEPROM memory products and EEPOT™ digitally controlled
potentiometers.
Management
Raphael Klein
Joseph Drori
Bruce Gray
Geraldine N. Hench
Klaus G. Hendig
Timothy D. Kanemoto
Dennis E. Krueger
Madga M. Madriz
Bruce W. Mattern
William H. Owen III
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President, Products Design, Engineering, Quality, and Reliability
Vice President, Wafer Operations
Vice President and Corporate Controller
Vice President, Finance and Administration
Vice President, Product Operations
Vice President, North America Sales
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Technology Development and Intellectual Properties
Products and Processes
Xicor offers serial EEPROMs in 128-bit to 128K densities, parallel EEPROMs in 16K to 1M densities, Serial Flash
memories in 8K to 128K densities, Secure SerialFlash devices for data security applications, NOVRAMs
(nonvolatile SRAMs), NOVRAMs with Autostore™ power-loss data protection, EEPOT™ digitally controlled
potentiometers, EEPROMs that interface directly with microcontrollers or microprocessor bus-based systems, and
memory subsystems.
Xicor is also a licensee of the Pine 16-bit fixed-point DSP core and related development tools from DSP Group.
The firm is developing products that integrate the Pine DSP core with its EEPROM technology.
1-386
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Xicor
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Xicor, Inc.
1511 Buckeye Drive
Milpitas, California 95035-7493
Capacity (wafers/week): 1,250
Wafer size: 150mm
Processes: CMOS, NMOS
Products: EEPROM-based ICs and chipsets
Feature sizes: 0.6µm-1.0µm
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-387
Xilinx
North American Company Profiles
X ILINX
Xilinx, Inc.
2100 Logic Drive
San Jose, California 95124-3400
Telephone: (408) 559-7778
Fax: (408) 559-7114
Web Site: www.xilinx.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Xilinx K.K. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 3297-9191
Europe:
Xilinx Ltd. • Surrey, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1932) 349401
Asia-Pacific:
Xilinx Asia-Pacific Ltd. • Kwai Fong, Hong Kong
Telephone: (852) 2424-5200
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends March 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Foundry Fab Investment
Employees
1993
178
27
24
—
1994
256
41
34
—
1995
355
59
45
—
1996
561
102
65
34
1997
568
110
71
35
544
689
868
1,201
1,500
Company Overview and Strategy
Founded in 1984, Xilinx is the leading supplier of CMOS programmable logic devices (PLDs) and related
development system software. The company’s PLD product lines include field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)
and complex PLDs (CPLDs). Xilinx is credited with the invention of the FPGA and brought the first such device to
market in 1985. The company also markets HardWire™ devices, which are mask-programmed ICs functionally
equivalent to programmed FPGAs.
Xilinx has remained the world’s largest supplier of FPGAs from the beginning and became the largest supplier of
PLDs in general in 1994. The company ships its PLDs and related development system software to electronic
equipment manufacturers in the data processing, telecommunications, networking, industrial control and
instrumentation, and military markets.
1-388
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Xilinx
North American Company Profiles
CPLDs
Hardwire 2%
5%
System
Software
3%
EPROMs
5%
Asia-Pacific
12%
Europe
23%
FPGAs
85%
1996 Sales by Product Category
North America
65%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Xilinx expanded its presence in the PLD market through the 1992 acquisition of Plus Logic, Inc., a company
involved in electrically programmable logic devices (EPLDs). In April 1995, Xilinx acquired NeoCAD, Inc., a private
FPGA design software producer. NeoCAD’s software technology was integrated into Xilinx’s development system
software.
Xilinx continues to focus its product strategy on setting new standards for lower complexity CPLDs while
maintaining a leadership position in the FPGA market, addressing high volume applications with its HardWire
products, and providing support for all product families with user-friendly software.
In mid-1996, the company announced its decision to withdraw from the antifuse FPGA market and discontinue its
XC8100 family of one-time-programmable antifuse devices. The company claimed the decision was based on the
strong market acceptance of its SRAM- and flash-based devices. Research and development efforts previously
focused on antifuse devices will be redirected toward its core FPGAs and CPLDs.
Later in 1996, Xilinx announced the formation of the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Business Unit. The primary
focus of the DSP Business Unit is to integrate DSPs into the company’s FPGAs. Xilinx plans to develop the tool
kits, cores, and software integration for the FPGA-based DSPs, which Xilinx claims will operate 10 times faster than
normal FPGAs.
Management
Bernard V. Vonderschmitt
Willem P. Roelandts
R. Scott Brown
Gordon M. Steel
William S. Carter
Lee D. Farrell
Charles A. Fox
Steve Hayes
Robert C. Hinckley
Nicholas Kucharewski
C. Frank Myers
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales
Senior Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and Chief Technical Officer
Vice President, Program Management
Vice President and GM, Hardwire Business Unit
Vice President, North American Sales
Vice President, Strategic Plans and Programs, and Secretary
Vice President, CPLD Division
Vice President, Operations
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-389
Xilinx
Dennis L. Segers
Richard W. Sevcik
Sandra L. Sully
Christine C. Taylor
Roland Triffaux
Sandeep Vij
Evert A. Wolsheimer
Roman Iwanczuk
Scott Lewis
North American Company Profiles
Vice President, FPGA Product Development
Vice President, Software
Vice President and Chief Information Officer
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President, European Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Marketing
Vice President and GM CPLD Business Unit
Director, DSP Business Unit
Director, CPLD Marketing
Products and Processes
Xilinx’s product line consists of FPGAs, HardWire Array products, EPROMs for external storage of FPGA
configuration programs, and CPLDs. All of its products are manufactured using CMOS technology, with the most
advanced chips utilizing a 0.35µm, three-layer-metal process. A 0.25µm, five-layer-metal process is expected to
be implemented in 2H97.
FPGA Products
XC2000 family—Being discontinued.
XC3000 family—General-purpose architecture with usable gate densities ranging from 1,500 to 7,500 gates. The
older XC3000-70 and XC3000A products are being discontinued.
XC4000 family—The company’s most successful FPGA architecture. The family consists of 13 SRAM-based
members ranging in density from 3,000 to 85,000 logic gates. The older XC4000A and
XC4000H sub-families are being discontinued. At the high end, Xilinx offers the XC4000EX
and XC4000XL sub-families. Introduced in early 1997, the XC4000XL series features highperformance 3.3V operation through the use of a 0.35µm CMOS process. Devices with up to
125,000 usable gates are expected to sample in mid-1997 (the XC4000XZ series).
XC5200 family—With a process-optimized architecture, the XC5200 parts are the first FPGAs specifically
developed as a cost effective, high volume production alternative to gate arrays.
XC6200 family—Sea-of-gates FPGAs designed for reconfigurable coprocessing applications within the
embedded controller market. Introduced in August 1996, the XC6200 family consists of
devices ranging in density from 9,000 to 100,000 gates.
XC8100 family—Discontinued line of one-time programmable antifuse-based FPGAs.
HardWire Array Products
The company’s hardwire process converts a Xilinx FPGA into a HardWire mask-programmed array offering quick
time-to-market and a reduction in cost. For every Xilinx FPGA family, there is a corresponding hardwire family. In
1997, Xilinx expanded its HardWire product offerings with the addition of a PCI+ conversion device featuring full
PCI compliance and up to 10,000 gates of customer specific logic.
1-390
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Xilinx
CPLD Products
XC7000 family—High performance CPLDs with 400 to 3,800 usable gates and aimed at PAL replacement and
logic integration applications.
XC9500 family—Volume production of these flash memory-based CPLDs began in January 1997. The XC9500
devices features in-system programmability with more than 10,000 program/erase cycles, 36 to
576 macrocells with 800 to 12,800 usable gates, and pin-to-pin delays as low as 5ns. Xilinx
expects to migrate the family from a 5V 0.6µm process to a 3.3V 0.5µm process in 1997.
The company’s newest generation of XACTstep™ CAE software is based on the NeoCAD core technologies and
provides all the implementation technology required to design with Xilinx logic devices, including module
generation, design optimization and mapping, placement and routing, timing analysis, and program file
generation.
In mid-1996, Xilinx introduced its LogiCore™ solutions, which are high-level functions that a designer can
integrate into FPGA designs. The first LogiCore product was a PCI interface for FPGAs, the PCI LogiCore™. In
early 1997, the company announced a plan to broaden its core library through a partnership network program
called AllianceCore. Xilinx and its third-party core partners (about 14 at the time of this writing) will work together to
develop products based on the cores in order to ensure that the designs work in silicon and are properly tested.
The first products will be for USB peripherals and PCMCIA cards (available in 2H97).
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Xilinx does not fabricate its own ICs, but has foundry agreements with Seiko Epson, Yamaha, IC Works, and UMC.
In early 1994, Xilinx provided its foundry partner Seiko Epson with $42 million to help fund a wafer fab Seiko
Epson built in Sakata, Japan. In December 1996, Xilinx announced its plans to invest up to $300 million in a new
semiconductor manufacturing facility that is currently being constructed by Seiko Epson. The agreement calls for
Xilinx to make incremental advanced payments in return for a specified number of wafers through 2002.
Production at the facility, which is located in Sakata, Japan, is expected to begin in early 1998.
Key Agreements
• Xilinx has a second-source agreement with Harris Semiconductor for rad-hard FPGAs.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-391
Zilog
North American Company Profiles
Z ILOG
Zilog, Inc.
210 East Hacienda Avenue
Campbell, California 95008-6600
Telephone: (408) 370-8000
Fax: (408) 370-8056
Web Site: www.zilog.com
IC Manufacturer
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Japan:
Zilog, Inc. • Tokyo, Japan
Telephone: (81) (3) 5272-0230
Europe:
Zilog, Inc. • Maidenhead, United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) (1628) 392-00
Asia-Pacific:
Zilog, Inc. • Taipei, Taiwan
Telephone: (886) (2) 741-3125
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
Capital Expenditures
1992
146
16
16
27
1993
203
27
21
40
1994
223
35
23
69
1995
265
43
25
791
1996
298
30
31
117
Employees
1,400
1,500
1,500
1,575
1,650
Company Overview and Strategy
Zilog was founded in 1974 and became a wholly owned subsidiary of Exxon by 1980. In 1985, the company
rechartered its course to focus on application-specific market segments. In 1989, Zilog's management,
employees, and a venture capitalist purchased the company from Exxon. Zilog became a public company in
February 1991.
Today, Zilog is a leader in the development, design, and manufacture of application specific standard products
(ASSPs) for the consumer electronics, data communications, and computer peripheral markets. The company
utilizes its Superintegration™ design methodology to combine cores and cells from its extensive library of
microprocessors and controllers, DSPs, and memory and logic circuits.
1-392
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Zilog
North American Company Profiles
ROW
5%
Europe
9%
Far East
42%
United States
44%
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Zilog maintains its strategy of addressing the needs of specific applications by utilizing its proprietary core and cell
designs, which are optimized for particular applications, to design and develop new products within its target
markets. During 1996, Zilog introduced 48 new products, 37 for the consumer product controller market, eight for
the computer peripheral controller market, and three for the datacommunications market.
Management
Edgar A. Sack
Michael J. Bradshaw
Thomas C. Carson
Sally M. Baumwell
Robert E. Collins
James J. Magill
Richard L. Moore
Richard R. Pickard
Alan Secor
Tom Willey
Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Operations
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales, and Strategic
Marketing Manager, Wireless and Memory Business Unit
Vice President, Human Resources
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President and General Manager, Data Communications
Vice President, Technology
Vice President, General Counsel
Vice President, Consumer/Peripherals
Vice President, Wireless Division
Products and Processes
Zilog's core library includes 8-bit microcontrollers, 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit microprocessors, 16-bit digital signal
processors, serial communications controllers, and peripheral circuits. These cores are available as stand-alone
devices or may be combined in Superintegration products. The company’s cell library consists of logic and
memory circuits that are generally combined in Superintegration products.
The Superintegration library and diverse product portfolio of over 800 items serve three distinct markets: data
communications, consumer products, and intelligent peripherals.
• For data communications applications, Zilog offers ASSPs based on its Z80 microprocessor family and
serial communications controllers. These ASSPs are optimized for Ethernet routers, bridges, data
switches, modems, terminals, printers, workstations, local area networks, and wide area networks. The
company holds a leadership position in general purpose, multiprotocol controllers for the LAN and WAN
markets.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-393
Zilog
North American Company Profiles
• Based on the Z8® 8-bit microcontroller, Zilog offers a family of controllers for use in consumer electronics
products such as cellular phones, audiovisual equipment, automobiles, telephone answering machines,
household appliances, battery chargers, garage door openers, security systems, set-top boxes, interactive
TVs, and infrared remote controls.
• Zilog is an innovator in the addition of intelligence to computer peripheral chips using its line of Z80® 8-bit,
Z180® 16-bit, and Z380® 32-bit microprocessors, and peripheral circuits. Adding intelligence to computer
peripherals frees the central processor from micro-management tasks and upgrades the performance of
the system. Common peripherals are printers, keyboards, monitors, pointing devices, hard disk and floppy
disk controllers, modems, and PCMCIA bus interface products.
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
Zilog, Inc.
2601 11th Avenue, North Extension
Nampa, Idaho 83651
Telephone: (208) 466-4551
Fax: (208) 467-9765
Modules I and II
Cleanroom size: 77,000 square feet (Class 10)
Capacity (wafers/week): 7,000
Wafer sizes: 100mm, 125mm
Processes: NMOS, CMOS, BiCMOS
Products: ASSPs, MCUs, MPUs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.6µm, 0.8µm, 1.0µm, 1.2µm
Zilog, Inc.
1401 North King Road
Nampa, Idaho 83651
Module III
Cleanroom size: 30,000 square-feet (Class 1)
Capacity (wafers/week): 2,500
Wafer size: 200mm
Process: CMOS
Products: ASSPs, MCUs, MPUs, DSPs
Feature sizes: 0.35µm 0.6µm, 0.8µm
Assembly and test operations are performed in company-owned facilities in Manila and Carmona, the Philippines.
Contracts with outside IC fabricators Kawasaki Steel in Japan and Thesys Microelectronics in Germany, and with
assembly houses in Malaysia, Indonesia, and China are back-up sources to the company's own operations.
Key Agreements
• Zilog teamed up with Analog Devices, Inc. (ADI) in early 1997, to jointly develop a new reference design for
cordless telephones. Zilog agreed to supply DSP-based software and ADI agreed to supply RF technology to
design a chipset for 900MHz spread spectrum cordless telephones. Production of the chipset/reference
design is expected to take place in the second half of 1997.
• Zilog signed an agreement with United Kingdom-based MSU Corporation to jointly develop and manufacture
chipsets targeting the low-cost TV Internet set-top applications. As part of the agreement, MSU transferred its
internet service processor core to Zilog.
• Zilog licensed graphicTV (GTV) technology from TV graphics startup, Telecruz Technology, in a plan to
develop ICs for television with high definition graphics. Zilog will integrate the GTV architecture into its Z90700
family of TV controllers.
1-394
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
Zilog
• Zilog purchased a license in 1995 for the design and manufacture of ASSPs using Aspec Technology's highdensity array and embedded array technologies.
• Zilog joined with Allegro MicroSystems and IMP in a marketing alliance. The team is marketing what they call a
ZIA disk drive chipset—ZIA standing for Zilog, IMP, and Allegro.
• Oak Technology and Zilog extended a joint-development and cross-license agreement to develop integrated
circuits for mass storage applications.
• Zilog has an agreement (formed in 1993) with Kawasaki Steel under which Zilog is licensed to manufacture,
use, and sell the Kawasaki KC80™, an enhanced high-performance version of the Z80™ 8-bit microprocessor.
Additionally, the companies are developing new Superintegration products that use the KC80 core.
• Zilog and Catalyst entered into a cross-licensing agreement in 1993 under which Zilog gained access to
Catalyst's flash technology and Catalyst gained the right to develop products using Zilog's Z8 one-timeprogrammable (OTP) microcontroller family. The two companies then expanded their alliance to jointly develop
flash memories.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-395
Zoran
North American Company Profiles
Z ORAN
Zoran Corporation
2041 Mission College Boulevard, Suite 255
Santa Clara, California 95054
Telephone: (408) 986-1314
Fax: (408) 986-1240
Web Site: www.zoran.com
Fabless IC Supplier
Regional Headquarters/Representative Locations
Asia:
Zoran Microelectronics Ltd. • Haifa, Israel
Telephone: (972) (4) 854-5777 • Fax: (972) (4) 855-1550
Financial History ($M), Fiscal Year Ends December 31
Sales
Net Income
R&D Expenditures
1992
7
(3)
5
Employees
1993
5
(8)
5
1994
8
(5)
4
1995
23
1
6
1996
44
2
9
75
135
Company Overview and Strategy
Zoran Corporation, first incorporated in 1981, and reincorporated in 1986, develops and markets integrated
circuits and software for digital video and audio compression and decompression applications. The company’s ICs
are used in a wide variety of products, such as professional and consumer video editing systems, PC-based and
stand-alone video CD systems, DVD players, digital audio systems, filmless digital cameras, and printers/scanners.
Prior to 1991, Zoran derived the substantial majority of its revenues from digital filter processors (DFPs) and vector
signal processors (VSPs), which are DSP-based ICs used for image enhancement and processing, principally in
military, industrial, and medical applications. In 1989, the company repositioned its business to utilize its expertise
in DSP technology to develop and market video and audio compression circuits. In mid-1994, Zoran discontinued
DFP and VSP product lines.
Zoran has a strong core expertise in DSP technology, including digital filtering and frequency domain processing.
Its strategy centers on building partnerships with innovative marketing and manufacturing companies and
targeting high-volume, high-performance applications, such as multimedia computing and consumer video and
audio systems.
1-396
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
Zoran
North American Company Profiles
In October 1996, Zoran entered the software compression market through its acquisition of CompCore
Multimedia, Inc., a leading provider of digital audio and video MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 decoding technologies and
products. The acquisition has broadened Zoran’s product offering to include MPEG cores and software
compression products particularly for the PC-based DVD market.
MPEG-1
9%
Other
4%
Software
14%
JPEG
39%
United States
26%
Pacific Rim
43%
Europe
31%
Audio
34%
1996 Sales by Product Category
1996 Sales by Geographic Region
Management
Uzia Galill
Levy Gerzberg, Ph.D.
George Haber
Ami Kraft
Paul Goldberg
Isaac Shenberg
Meir Tsadik
Sorin Cismas
Alexander Sinar
Chairman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President
Vice President, Finance, and Chief Financial Officer
Vice President, Business Solutions
Vice President, Sales and Marketing
Vice President, Research and Development, and Chief Operating Officer
Chief Scientist
Director, Manufacturing
Products and Processes
Zoran’s IC products include JPEG codecs, MPEG video decoders, Dolby AC-3 and MPEG audio decoders, and
PCI multimedia controllers. The company is the leading supplier of JPEG ICs and support devices for the
consumer and PC markets.
Additionally, Zoran is the leading supplier of Dolby Digital (AC-3) devices. Its third-generation Dolby AC-3/MPEG-2
digital audio processors was introduced in late 1996. The ZR38600 processor uses only 75 percent of the
processors power for audio decoding, leaving the remaining 25 percent available for product differentiation. The
device is targeted at home theater, DVD, and consumer multimedia applications.
Most of Zoran’s devices are fabricated using 0.6µm and 0.8µm CMOS technologies.
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-397
Zoran
North American Company Profiles
Semiconductor Fabrication Facilities
For the fabrication of its wafers, Zoran has foundry agreements with Fujifilm Microdevices, Motorola, TSMC, and
Tower Semiconductor.
Key Agreements
• In late 1996, Zoran announced an agreement with Toshiba which stated that Toshiba would use Zoran’s Dolby
digital two-channel AC-3/MPEG audio processor in a DVD chipset.
• In 1995, Zoran signed a four-year agreement with Tower Semiconductor under which Tower will supply
specified quantities of wafers to Zoran.
• Siemens and Zoran announced in 1995 they would collaborate on the development and marketing of
multimedia ICs for PC and consumer electronics applications.
• Dolby Laboratories formed a long-term joint technology partnership with Zoran in August 1992. The
partnership involves the development of low-cost ICs for multi-channel digital audio for motion-picture
soundtracks and consumer media.
• Zoran has the marketing rights to JPEG chips produced by the company’s Japanese partner, Fujifilm.
1-398
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
North American Company Profiles
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION
1-399
North American Company Profiles
1-400
INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ENGINEERING CORPORATION