SUPERINTENDENT`S FORUM SEPTEMBER 1, 2015

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SUPERINTENDENT`S FORUM SEPTEMBER 1, 2015
 ORANGE BOARD OF EDUCATION SUPERINTENDENT’S FORUM SEPTEMBER 1, 2015 ORANGE BOARD OF EDUCATION 2014-­‐15 MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS The 2014-­‐2015 school year was one of landmark accomplishments. The district was cited for several major achievements and launched several first Tme iniTaTves, as follows: Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Orange High School Class of 2014-­‐15 Four-­‐Year GraduaTon 91% Rate is unofficially calculated to be $6.0 million •  OHS graduaTng class of 2015 received in scholarships; more than the prior four graduaTng classes combined •  OHS was recognized as one of 547districts in the U.S. and Canada to be placed on the College Boards 5th Annual AP District Honor Roll for significant gains in student access and success. •  OHS earned the disTncTon of being the only school in Essex County to be removed from the NJDOE watch list (Focus School) Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Completed 2-­‐year process for middle states accreditaTon, culminaTng with a visit from an 8-­‐member accreditaTon team. A final announcement is due in the fall of 2015 •  Completed district Strategic Plan 2014-­‐2021 with input from Orange Public Schools’ stakeholder groups, including parents, students, faculty, administraTon and staff, alumni, Board Members, and members of the community. More than 110 individuals parTcipated in the development of the Strategic Plan. •  Launched the Parent Academy at the beginning of the school year. The Academy promotes parent engagement by building a cadre of informed parents from each school. 40 parents parTcipated with 14 graduaTng Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Launched pediatric clinic at Oakwood Avenue Community School (with ribbon cudng ceremony). The pediatric clinic will be open during the school day to serve the children and their siblings. •  Entered contract to lease Marylawn of the Oranges (former Catholic School in South Orange) that will become Orange's STEM Academy •  Launched first district Adult School, which met weekly at Rosa Parks Community School and Orange Public Library, offering courses in Adult ESL, High School Proficiency preparaTon, meditaTon, ciTzenship, technology, parenTng skills and more. Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Recipient, through a collaboraTon with Montclair State University and other partners, of a $2.5 million federal grant (over 5 years) to support the Orange Community School IniTaTve. Rosa Parks and Oakwood Avenue Community Schools are serving as pilots in a bold plan to transform all of the district’s 10 schools into community schools by 2021. •  NoTfied in July 2015 that the district is the recipient of the Robert Woods Johnson FoundaTon New Jersey Health IniTaTve (NJHI) Grant for $200,000 (over four years) to help create launch a “Healthy Orange” •  NoTfied in July 2015 that the district is the recipient of the 21st Century Grant for $2.75 million (over 5 years) to assist in creaTng aierschool and out-­‐of-­‐school experiences for students Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Launched MicroSociety at Oakwood Avenue Community School and Forest Street School. This program transforms the school into a microcosm of a real world town. The governance (complete with an elected mayor and city council) and businesses for the town are run by the students. •  Opened an Ecology Center and Greenhouse at Forest Street School (with ribbon cudng ceremony). The facility serves as outdoor classrooms, to open the idea of a sustainable community. Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Devices for PARCC-­‐ Over $500,000 was spent on technology devices (Chromebooks) for PARCC implementaTon and authenTc classroom assessments •  Hour of Code -­‐ Students in every school in Orange parTcipated in the NaTonal Hour of Code. •  Bridge Winners: Park Ave. and Oakwood Ave in the Nevada InvitaTonal last Summer 2014 •  K-­‐4 Social Studies Curriculum and Textbook AdopTon ensures alignment to the CCSS Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  New ELA course offerings at OHS to address a wide variety of student interests and provide opTons for students. All courses fulfill the requirements of English III, English IV, and are standards based. –  Titles: •  Young Adult Literature •  Mythology •  Gothic Literature •  Outdoor/Adventure Literature •  Literature and Film Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  AddiTonal ELA elecTves to strengthen students’ ability to write for authenTc audiences: –  Tornado News –  Tornado News Staff Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Singapore Math AdopTon –  Singapore Math has been adopted in our K-­‐ 6th grade classroom. The program was designed to lay a strong founda=on that will enable students to be more successful in more rigorous, higher level mathema=cs courses. •  CCSS-­‐aligned Curriculum –  Our K-­‐12 curriculum has been completely redesigned to align to the demands of CCSS and to beDer address college and career readiness. Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Increased the number of students taking Algebra I in grade 8 –  Students are provided access to Algebra 1 in grade 8 through entry into our Summer Bridge Program. Since SY2013-­‐2014, we have doubled the number of students taking Algebra I in grade 8. •  AP, Honors, & Bridge Courses –  These courses are designed to enrich and more importantly, challenge our higher performing students across the district. There has been a consis=ng increase in the number of students enrolled in our honors, AP, and bridge programs. These students con=nue to demonstrate high levels of achievement. In the 2014-­‐15 school year, we increased the number of students scoring a passing score of 3 or beDer on the AP calculus. •  New High School Courses (Astronomy & PharmaceuTcal Science) –  New course op=ons such as astronomy and pharmaceu=cal science prepare our students for college and careers. Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Science & STEM Fairs •  Family Math Nights –  Family Math Night is a fun shared experience that promotes family involvement with math. It creates a sense of community, connects family engagement to student learning and builds strong family-­‐school partnerships. •  Updated all district Job DescripTons and placed them online Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves Student Recogni:on •  Forest St student was recognized as the naTonal top reader in Readorium. •  Speaking Contest Winner –  Xivandell Emmanuel, Orange High school graduaTng senior, winner of the Local Talk Community FoundaTon’s Public Speaking Contest. Awarded $5,000 scholarship •  1st Annual District Wide Publishing Party – June 18, 2015 – 6:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. –  Lincoln Avenue School –  Grades Pre-­‐K through 12 –  Spotlight and celebrate all student writers throughout the district –  Digital and print displays focusing of over 500 pieces of student wriTng were featured –  Select student authors in grades K-­‐12 read their work –  Over 200 parents and community members aqended Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves Student Recogni:on •  Tyrel Edwards, Orange High School Elected as Orange’s delegate for the Congress of Future Medical Leaders program •  One of our students from Forest Street School was slated the 2015 Na=onal Readorium Champion •  Rosa Parks MathemaTcs CompeTTon – 1st Place •  OHS Student won 1st place in the Local Talk Public Speaking Contest •  Oakwood and Park Ave School Bridge Teams placed in NaTonal CompeTTons •  Voices in Harmony are award winners in NaTonal CompeTTons •  Students aqending Scholars Academy have been winning in the Essex County Giied and Talented ConsorTum. Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Staff Recogni:on –  Dr. Latha Nair, Orange High School –  Dr. Brian Moshofsky, Orange High School •  Grant recipients of the NJIT’s 2015 Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program in collabora=on with the Engineering Research & Center for Structured Organic Par=culate Systems, and the Center for Pre College Programs Major Accomplishments and IniTaTves •  Hat City FesTval: In collaboraTon with Valley Arts, students parTcipated in this neighborhood celebraTon of the arts •  All students in grades 9-­‐11 took the PSAT, financed by the OBE •  Graphic Arts Course Expansion-­‐ AddiTonal Graphic Arts courses were available at OHS. The students published a cookbook—
recipes provided by staff members; recipes prepared by OHS Culinary students; photographs and layouts prepared by Graphic Arts students •  Culinary Club Catering-­‐OHS and CIAO Culinary Clubs catered OBE and school events, preparing and serving delicious spreads 2014-2015 Year
State Assessments and Data
in Review
Orange Board of Education
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In District Enrollment (Including Pre-­‐K) Enrollment 5700 5575 5600 5591 5500 5400 5300 5300 5200 5348 Enrollment 5146 5100 5000 4900 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 20 District (OHS/CIAO) 4 Year GraduaTon Rates Gradua:on Rate 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 79.6% 86.2% 90.6% 66.8% 58.3% GraduaTon Rate 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 21 OHS Banked ELA HSPA Scores 2015 GraduaTng Class 100% 90% 80% 92% 94% 81% 81% 70% 64% 60% 53% 2014 50% 40% 34% 34% 30% 20% 10% 0% Total Students Gen Ed Spe Ed LEP 2015 CIAO Banked ELA HSPA Scores 2015 GraduaTng Class 120% 100% 80% 100% 100% 88% 70% 2014 60% 2015 40% 20% 0% Total Students Gen Ed 0% 0% n/a n/a Spe Ed LEP OHS Banked Math HSPA Scores 2015 GraduaTng Class 80% 70% 60% 50% 75% 69% 60% 48% 2014 40% 2015 30% 20% 12% 10% 15% 18% 6% 0% Total Students Gen Ed Spe Ed LEP CIAO Banked Math HSPA Scores 2015 GraduaTng Class 70% 63% 60% 50% 50% 50% 50% 40% 2014 30% 2015 20% 10% 0% 0% Total Students Gen Ed 0% Spe Ed n/a LEP n/a All school districts in the State of New Jersey administered the new PARCC test in 2014-­‐15. Data results for the 2014-­‐15 administraTon of the new PARCC test are not available at this Tme. EsTmated Tme of release of test results by the State is January 2016. ORANGE BOARD OF EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN SUMMARY 2014-­‐2021 Orange Board of EducaTon Members Name
Title
Patricia A. Arthur
Jeffrey Wingfield
Abdul Shabazz Ashan:
E. Lydell Carter
Paula Desormes Marion Graves-­‐Jackson
Cris:na Mateo
President
Vice President
Board Member
Board Member
Board Member Board Member
Board Member
Ronald C. Lee, Superintendent Dr. Paula Howard, Deputy Superintendent Adekunle James, Business Administrator/Board Secretary Belinda Scott-­‐Smiley, Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent for Operations and Human Resources Kathryn P. Carter, Director of Language Arts and Testing Candace Goldstein, Director of Special Programs Shelly Harper, Director of Special Services Dr. Tina Powell, Director of Mathematics and Science Dr. Terri Russo, Director of Curriculum, Instruction, Professional Development, and Data Assessment The Orange Board of Education Vision and Mission Statement Vision "The Orange Public School District commits to provide a safe and caring environment where each student is expected to grow and succeed. We pledge to prepare all students with equitable opportunities for college and career readiness, leading to lifelong learning and responsible citizenship in a competitive global community." Mission •
The Orange Public School District in collaboration with all stakeholders is responsible for promoting the academic, social, emotional and personal success of all students. •
With a commitment to academic excellence, the district provides teachers, families, and administrators the tools needed for a ll students to reach their full potential. •
The district serves all students in our schools, acknowledging their unique backgrounds, cultural perspectives and learning s tyles. •
The district recognizes that curiosity, discipline, integrity, responsibility and r espect are necessary for success. •
The Orange Public School District cultivates a community of 21st century learners where students take ownership of the learning process, achieve high standards of excellence, and focus on academics. No Alibis, No Exceptions, No Excuses! On March 2, 2015 Orange Public Schools administrators, Board of EducaTon members, staff, parents, community members, and students came together to iniTate strategic planning. The first evening's topic focused on the strengths/
achievements, and challenges of the Orange Public Schools. The meeTng began with a welcome by Board of EducaTon President, Ms. Patricia Arthur. Mr. Ronald Lee, Superintendent, presented an excellent overview of the current “State of the District.” Facilitators Charlene Peterson and Al Annunziata, from New Jersey School Boards AssociaTon, introduced the strategic planning process and assisted throughout the process. Just over 110 parTcipants gathered in seven randomly assigned groups and one student group to idenTfy the strengths/achievements and challenges of the Orange Public Schools through brainstorming and the sharing of ideas. Aier discussion, each group came to a consensus on its Orange Public Schools Strategic Planning MeeTng #1 Outcomes Page 2 of 5 top 10 strengths/achievements and top 10 challenges and presented those to the full group of meeTng parTcipants. On March 30, 2015, Orange Township Public Schools administrators, Board of EducaTon members, staff, parents, students and community members came together to conTnue the strategic planning process. The second meeTng’s topic focused on creaTng a shared vision for the Orange Township Public Schools in the next five years. The meeTng began with an overview of the first meeTng – the idenTficaTon of district strengths/
accomplishments and challenges by facilitators Charlene Peterson and Robynn Meehan, from New Jersey School Boards AssociaTon (NJSBA). To begin the visioning process, parTcipants were asked to picture themselves, having been away from the district for 5 years, and returning to find the Orange Township Public Schools on the cover of TIME magazine, with the capTon “Schools that Succeed.” The parTcipants were asked to envision what was wriqen in the magazine arTcle that warranted such high recogniTon – what programs / services / curriculum / student outcomes / best pracTces / faciliTes would you expect to see in your schools that are succeeding? Approximately 85 parTcipants then gathered in seven randomly assigned groups to brainstorm what the district did to achieve this remarkable success. Aier discussion, each group came to a consensus on its shared visions and presented them to all the meeTng parTcipants. The session concluded with the idenTficaTon of common threads throughout the groups’ work and four broad goal areas for the next meeTng On April 27, 2015, Orange Township Public Schools administrators, Board of EducaTon members, staff, parents, students, and community members came together for the final public meeTng of the strategic planning process. The third meeTng’s topic focused on developing goal statements and objecTves in each of four areas: 21st Century Learning, Community Engagement and Outreach, Culture and Climate, and Finance and FaciliTes. Strengths and challenges were used from the March meeTng to create visions in each goal area. Between May 1 and May 6, the visions were translated into a strategic plan, aligned to Middle States System AccreditaTon Standards. The 2014-­‐2021 Orange Public Schools Strategic Plan includes the following:
Between May 1 and May 6, the visions were translated into a strategic plan, aligned to Middle States System AccreditaTon Standards. The 2014-­‐2021 Orange Public Schools Strategic Plan includes the following: •  AcTon Steps •  Middle States AccreditaTon Standards that address the steps Philosophy/Mission Governance and Leadership Planning for Growth and Improvement Finances FaciliTes System Climate and OrganizaTon Health and Safety EducaTonal Program Evidence of System EffecTveness Student Services Student Life and Student AcTviTes InformaTon Resources and Technology • 
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Person(s) responsible for ensuring that the acTon step is completed Timelines for implementaTon and compleTon Resources needed EvaluaTon, evidence, and indicators of aqainment Current status of the acTon steps This is a living document that will undergo revisions as emerging technologies and needs come to the forefront, based on conTnuous evaluaTon and analysis of the 2014-­‐2021 plan. Par:cipants in the Strategic Planning Process Community Members
OBE Members
Parents
Students
Faculty and Staff
Administrators
Amos, Nikki Charles, Natalie Charles, Tiffany Cooper, Karen CorbiZ, Elroy Desormes, Tony Dowd, Jennifer Eason, Tency Gaunt-­‐Butler, April Gibson, Donna Griffa, Arthur J. Harvest, Deborah Hathaway, William Holmes, Saronae Jones-­‐Vance, Janicea King, Robb Lee, EllioZ Morrisey, Patrick Puryear, Tom Velox, Gail Wallace, Luivana Walls, Kim Wenzel, Kelly
Arthur, Patricia Carter, Lydell Desormes, Paula Graves Jackson, Marion Mateo, CrisTna AshanT, Abdul Shabazz Wingfield, Jeffrey Armstrong, David BapTchon, M Douglas, Onika Francis, M Gilbert, Margaret Holmes, Dwight Jones, Tamika Marable, Eyesha Sapong, Amanda Wallace, Luciana
Azeez, Jahiem Bland, Rachel Canares, Brian DemarTni, Samantha Desanges, Stephanie Devone, Barry Dixon, Radalia Amar Donnelly, William Donnerstag, Kimberly Fraser, Charmaine Guenther, Annmarie D Jean-­‐BapTste, Ketsia Miller, Reginald Mir, Wendy Romain, Francesca Sacks, Laura W Stokes, April Tarver, Germaine Willis, Larry Abdelaziz, Mohammed
Agosto, Oliverto
Alcantara, Faith
Bauknight, Toni
Belton, Jason
Blanton, Jacquelyn
Burneq, Tia S
Carter, Kathryn P
Colon, Isabel
Chi Liu, Meng Li
Cooke, Yancisca
Crosta, Peter S
Cruz, Noel
Epps, Linda
Fossella, Samantha
Gaines, Dana
Gamble, Holly
Goldstein, Candace
Gray, Saundra R
Hackeq, Erika L
Hackeq, Myron A
Halstead, Carrie
Harper, Shelly
Hernandez, Adriana L
Howard, Paula
James, Adekunle O
Joseph-­‐Charles, Debra
Lebrun, Ross
Lee, Ronald C
Machuca, Karen
Malloy, Aretha
Maqhews, Stefanie
Morgan, Kalisha C
Murphy, Gerald
Onyesonwu, Caroline
Peterson, Dennis M
Pedt, Robert
Polexa, Fay
Powell, Tina
Pullins, Vernon
Ramirez, Daniel
Reid, Devonii
Russo, Mary Teresa
Smiley, Belinda D
Smith-­‐Carrington, Keisha
Stewart, Erica
White, Denise
Yearwood, Patrick
Erazo, Bertha Francis, Joron Garcia, Jade Halstead, Yanni Hayes, DeAndre Holmes, Ellioq Holmes, Erica Jobson, Celine Marable, Honor MarTnez-­‐Sibrian, Ruth Moore, Aaliyah Odunowo, Taiwo Sampong, Jasmine Sapong, Nana Smith, Keshima Urday, Nicole Victor, Sabrina Wallace, Jamelah Ware, Tracy Wood, Bria Orange Public Schools
Strategic Plan
OBJECTIVES AND ACTION STEPS
2014-­‐2021
21st Century Skills
Objec:ve 1: By the year 2021, Orange Public School students will achieve academic proficiency in 21st Century skills, readying them for college and career.
A.  100% of Orange high school students will graduate high school in four years. B.  There will be a 25% increase in the number of students scoring at or above the district’s standard for proficient (college ready (9-­‐12); on track for college and career (K-­‐8)) in MathemaTcs. C.  There will be a 25% increase in the number of students scoring at or above the district’s standard for proficient (college ready (9-­‐12); on track for college and career (K-­‐8)) in Science. D.  There will be a 25% increase in the number of students scoring at or above the district’s standard for proficient (college ready (9-­‐12); on track for college and career (K-­‐8)) in ELA.
E. 20% of the high school age populaTon will be enrolled in the STEM Academy.
A.  100% of Orange high school students will graduate high school in four years. •  Transcript review to ensure students are on track to graduate in 4 years •  Revise master schedule to ensure students are able to take courses in the correct progression and all courses are accessible to students. •  Revise CTE program for college and career readiness •  Establish a comprehensive guidance program •  Establish a Newcomers’ Academy grades 3-­‐7 •  Establish a Newcomers’ Program grades 8-­‐12 •  Ensure that the STAMP test is given to naTve language speakers •  Restructure the Life Skills program •  Increase assisTve technology usage •  Develop a Behavioral/TherapeuTc Program for at-­‐risk students •  Provide professional development in EffecTve School SoluTons, Universal Design for Learning, Co-­‐Teaching, DifferenTaTon, and addiTonal AP training •  ConTnue collaboraTon with Community Partners in Family Literacy Programs B. There will be a 25% increase in the number of students scoring at or above the district’s standard for proficient (college ready (9-­‐12); on track for college and career (K-­‐8)) in MathemaTcs. •  Anchor the district’s curriculum goals and objecTves for mathemaTcs to the Common Core State Standards • 
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Revise Unit Plans Devise district-­‐wide recommendaTons for grading and scoring Develop SGO exemplars aligned to recommended poryolio assessments Realign AP courses and increase student parTcipaTon in AP courses Introduce addiTonal 4th year mathemaTcs courses •  Response to IntervenTon (RtI) • 
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Provide Professional Development through PLCs Provide guidance for Tier II and Tier III intervenTons Implement screening for students to idenTfy those at risk for potenTal mathemaTcs difficulTes •  Revise school schedules to maximize student achievement • 
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Include Tier II intervenTon period Provide differenTated instrucTonal pathways (eg. Honors Algebra I, Algebra I, Agile Minds Algebra I) Reduce teacher course load to a maximum of two courses per teacher and focus the most experienced teachers with Tier II and Tier III teachers Redefine Credit Recovery Zero Period •  Professional Development • 
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Year-­‐long professional development plans in partnership with research-­‐based proven vendors Provide college-­‐level content mathemaTcs courses for teachers •  Assessments and Data Analysis • 
Develop a comprehensive system of creaTng authenTc assessments, analyzing data, and providing targeted support •  Increase Parent Workshops •  Explore emerging models of blended learning (integrate technology into core instrucTon) C. There will be a 25% increase in the number of students scoring at or above the district’s standard for proficient (college ready (9-­‐12); on track for college and career (K-­‐8)) in Science. • 
Align a rigorous and relevant curriculum to the Next Genera:on Science Standards and plan for implementa:on • 
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Develop and implement a plan to increase reading comprehension of scien:fic text • 
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Focus on formaTve assessments with feedback to student prior to administering summaTve assessments Develop and uTlize common assessments at all levels Collect and analyze assessment date to idenTfy trends and paqerns of individual and systemic performance and needs Provide professional development • 
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ConTnue implementaTon of Rising Readorium and Readorium Establish parental support to increase the use of Readorium at home Complete data analysis of the program and determine next steps Implement an integrated, streamlined assessment system to monitor student growth and inform instruc:on • 
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Develop system-­‐wide structures to support the 5 E’s model for science instrucTon Develop unit plans anchored in NGSS Develop a playorm to ensure easy access to resources related to science content, pedagogy, and curricula Develop and implement a system to provide addiTonal support for students demonstraTng need Explore addiTonal research-­‐based curriculum models Provide informaTonal text reading strategy techniques and wriTng techniques PD to address the CCSS Literacy Standards for History/Science/Technical Subjects. Use data to determine best methods of effecTve science instrucTon and best pracTces ConTnue to develop teacher leaders through WIPRO and Woodrow Wilson grants IniTate PLCs that focus on pedagogy and content Increase Parent Workshops Con:nue to inves:gate emerging technologies to increase academic achievement A.  There will be a 25% increase in the number of students scoring at or above the district’s standard for proficient (college ready (9-­‐12); on track for college and career (K-­‐8)) in ELA.
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Read 180 • 
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Curriculum • 
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Augment the ELA curricula to reflect the level of rigor necessary to address the CCSSS and Model Curriculum Frameworks ConTnue to monitor lesson plans and prove feedback to improve the delivery of literacy instrucTon Re-­‐energize focus on wriTng instrucTon across the curriculum Provide targeted support for at-­‐risk schools Increase speaking and listening objecTves, including Forensics and Debate Plan publishing parTes K-­‐12 Create curricula that includes balanced literacy Include assessment analysis in all plans Professional Development • 
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Support grades 4-­‐12 teachers in the implementaTon of the 45 minute model Ensure that students who are 1 or more levels below proficiency are receiving Read 180 Provide differenTated on-­‐going intenTonal coaching in best pracTces, text dependent quesTons, student discourse, close reading strategies, writers’ workshop and instrucTonal strategies to facilitate the acquisiTon of 21st century literacy skills Develop and support model classrooms ConTnue to conduct walkthroughs to analyze professional development needs VerTcal and horizontal arTculaTon across content areas for literacy support PLC development of true data analysis and acTon plans to address the needs of individual students as well as systemic needs Increase Parent Communica:on and Involvement • 
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Bi-­‐annual family literacy events Quarterly literacy newsleqers Links to ELA web resources for parents 20% of the high school age populaTon will be enrolled in the STEM Academy.
Create a STEM Academy for secondary students and post-­‐secondary students. •  Grades 9 and 10 will include core instrucTon. •  Grades 11 and 12 include personalized instrucTon for future specific courses and off-­‐site internships and ventures. •  Grades 13 and 14 will be taught in conjuncTon with a college/university, allowing student s to complete their Associates of Arts (AA) degree. Community Engagement and Outreach Objec:ve 2: By 2021, Orange Public Schools will increase community engagement and outreach as assessed by these indicators: A. Eight of the eleven district schools are full-­‐service community schools; the other three schools are building toward community school designaTon B. 75% of parents/families are acTvely involved in Orange Public Schools-­‐related community engagement/outreach programs and iniTaTves. C. 75% of students parTcipate in Orange Public Schools acTviTes that take place before or aier the regular school day or during the summer, winter or spring break Tmes. D. 100% growth in public and private investment in Orange Public Schools-­‐related community engagement/outreach programs and iniTaTves. A. Eight of the eleven district schools are full-­‐service community schools; the other three schools are building toward community school designaTon •  Present: Rosa Parks Community School and Oakwood Community School •  2015-­‐2021: Increase the number of elementary community schools, one per year B. 75% of parents/families are acTvely involved in Orange Public Schools-­‐related community engagement/outreach programs and iniTaTves. • 
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Strengthen PTO’s at each school ConTnue to implement the Parent Academy ConTnue to expand the Adult School, including ESL and high school equivalency programs Reconvene the Fathers’ Program C. 75% of students parTcipate in Orange Public Schools acTviTes that take place before or aier the regular school day or during the summer, winter or spring break Tmes. •  ConTnue to launch aier school programs •  ConTnue to secure AmeriCorps workers and adult volunteers for aier-­‐school programs •  ConTnue to secure college interns for aier-­‐school programs D. 100% growth in public and private investment in Orange Public Schools-­‐related community engagement/outreach programs and iniTaTves. •  Launch a Pediatric Health Clinic •  Connect the Community Schools to businesses, colleges/universiTes, foundaTons, nonprofits and local governments •  Plan and implement a comprehensive public relaTons strategy •  Plan and implement an Office of Community Engagement and Outreach •  Create and implement a Trust for Orange Public Schools (TOPS) FACILITIES AND FINANCE Objec:ve 3: By the year 2021, Orange Public Schools will seek and provide the resources necessary to create addi:onal instruc:on space that will allow for the restructuring of grades and expansion of program offerings, empowering all learners to achieve 21st century learning success. A. FaciliTes: Improve/Expand school faciliTes through construcTon, purchase and rehabilitaTon of buildings, grounds, and equipment B. Finance: Align the prioriTes of the budgeTng process and revenue sources to the strategic plan A. FaciliTes: Improve/Expand school faciliTes through construcTon, purchase and rehabilitaTon of buildings, grounds, and equipment •  Through the Long Range Facility Plan and the SDA, expand Cleveland Street School and Orange High School faciliTes •  Install new boilers •  Upgrade and install new digital security cameras •  With the approval of the OBE and Board of School EsTmates, secure a $3.7 million bond to address facility needs •  Contract and finalize lease of Marylawn of the Oranges building and grounds for new STEM Academy •  ConTnue to revise and implement the district’s Emergency Management Plan •  Upgrade playgrounds district-­‐wide •  Repoint and waterproof buildings •  Implement recycling program •  Upgrade Orange Preparatory Academy’s auditorium •  Upgrade paving of parking lots and tarmac surfaces •  Explore, develop, and implement the creaTon of a vocaTonal school to address career readiness B. Finance: Align the prioriTes of the budgeTng process and revenue sources to the strategic plan •  Secure $3.7 million bond to address district facility needs •  Complete the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the district’s finances each year •  Apply and receive ASBO InternaTonal’s CerTficate of Excellence in Financial ReporTng each year •  Follow all codes for bids and contracts •  Seek addiTonal grant funds, partnerships with foundaTons, colleges/universiTes, and foundaTons This was truly a collaboraTve effort between Orange Public Schools administrators, Board of EducaTon members, staff, parents, community members, and students. The assistance of the New Jersey School Boards AssociaTon is greatly appreciated. ORANGE BOARD OF EDUCATION 2015-­‐16 SUMMER INSTITUTES 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes •  World Languages: With a focus on Universal Design for Learning, acTviTes for learning centers grades K-­‐2 were developed. •  ESL/Bilingual: ESL and Bilingual teachers learned to create lessons using Universal Design for Learning. General EducaTon and ESL teachers completed a week of Sheltered English instrucTon to develop scaffolded lesson acTviTes. •  Social Studies K-­‐4: Teachers invesTgated the use of primary documents in the elementary grades. •  Summer Smackdown: The highlight of the summer, this professional development was cross curricular and teachers taught other teachers technology tools they have used in their classrooms. The learners then created projects for their students, using the tools taught. 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes This summer, the Office of Curriculum and InstrucTon... •  held the first CompeTTon PLCs designed to increase the enthusiasm for mathemaTcs and problem solving across the district. Stay tuned for the 2016 Game24-­‐, middle school mathemaTcs-­‐, and regional high school mathemaTcs tournaments!! •  Conducted the first Peer Tutoring PLC designed to help schools establish Peer Learning Environments within their respecTve schools!! •  Conducted, in partnership with insTtuTons such as Montclair State University, 50 days equaling 300 hours of professional development in Science!! • 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes •  Conducted, in partnership with insTtuTons such as Montclair State University, 47 days equaling 155 hours of professional development in MathemaTcs!! •  Conducted 44 days equaling 168 hours of professional development in STEM learning!! •  Sponsored the parTcipaTon of two (2) of our H.S. Science teachers in NJIT’s Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program—a 6-­‐week collaboraTve venture between the Engineering Research Center for Structured Organic ParTculate Systems (ERC-­‐SOPS) and the Center for Pre-­‐
College Programs. This program was geared towards developing teachers’ skills and knowledge of research and the subject of pharmaceuTcal engineering. 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes •  Writers Workshop – Grades 6-­‐9 – Karen Caine –  ParTcipants – 15 teachers •  Strategies and Structures: ConnecTng Assessment and InstrucTon – Jennifer Seravello –  ParTcipants – 15 teachers – Grades 3-­‐8 •  InternaTonal Center for Leadership in EducaTon Model Schools Conference – Read 180 Atlanta, Georgia –  ParTcipants – 2 teachers –  Build vision and leadership capacity system wide; Raise literacy achievement for struggling readers; Embrace rigor, relevance, and relaTonships; Create a school culture of success. 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes •  Children’s Literacy IniTaTve/CLI –  ParTcipants – 20 teachers -­‐ Grades K-­‐2 •  Summer InsTtute on the Teaching of Reading in Paramus, NJ –  ParTcipants – 25 Grades K-­‐5 •  InternaTonal Literacy AssociaTon in St. Louis, Missouri –  ParTcipants – 2 Administrators –  Over 300 ELA professional development workshop opportuniTes were provided. •  Conferring/Writers Workshop in District –  ParTcipants – 15 teachers 6-­‐8 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes •  Curriculum Enhancements and AuthenTc Assessment Development –  K-­‐5 – Preparing for districtwide balanced literacy implementaTon-­‐Shiiing mindsets and methods to teach literacy (Approximately 3,000 books) 2015-­‐16 Summer InsTtutes •  2015 Extended School Year Program –  The ESY (Special EducaTon Extended School Year Program) conducted an Open House, displaying specific ThemaTc Units of Study. Students worked throughout the summer to enhance skills in the core subject areas of: language arts, mathemaTcs, social-­‐studies and science. All units of study included the integraTon of technology: –  Traveling Using Google Earth –  Ocean PolluTon –  Summer Environment –  Oceans –  Plants –  Extreme Road Trips –  Recycling –  Cultural Heritage –  Ancient Egypt –  Poetry –  Rain Forest –  Simple Machines Student-­‐Centered Experiences This summer, Orange Public Schools joined forces with insTtuTons and business partners to broaden our student-­‐centered learning experiences. We: •  Operated the 1st RoboTcs Summer Camp; a 4 week experience offered to students in Grades 4-­‐12. Fiiy (50) students were taught engineering basics along with engineering design techniques through the construcTon of working robots. •  Launched the Young Explorers STEM Program at Heywood Avenue School in partnership with Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship Program at Montclair State University; a program for rising 6-­‐7th graders interested in engaging in hands-­‐on Science and STEM learning. Student-­‐Centered Experiences •  Sponsored the tuiTon for 36 high achieving students to parTcipate in NJIT Center for Pre-­‐College Programs 5-­‐week Summer STEM program. This program was geared towards developing each parTcipaTng student’s talents, and skills to succeed in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathemaTcs. •  Sent 5 our students to parTcipate in NJIT’s ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp (EMBHSSC). The camp is a highly compeTTve two-­‐week, academic residenTal program that emphasizes increasing students’ mathemaTcs and science knowledge and skills while introducing them to college life and sTmulaTng their interest in science and engineering as a potenTal career path. Student-­‐Centered Experiences •  Partnered with Knewton, a lead adapTve learning company that has developed a playorm to personalize educaTonal content. Of our teachers piloted the program this summer. On August 12th, select students from Orange Public Schools visited Knewton’s main headquarters in Manhaqan, NYC to visit Knewton’s faciliTes and to offer feedback on their new soiware. ORANGE BOARD OF EDUCATION 2015-­‐16 INITIATIVES 2015-­‐16 INITIATIVES •  All schools must establish a func:oning male and female mentoring groups for students in grades 4-­‐12 •  The district is seeking to expand and improve services to students and families to address emo:onal, behavioral, mental health and psychological issues •  The expansion of STEM programs, opportuni:es and experiences for students •  Expansion of the Communi:es Schools model to “The Prep” with services to OHS •  Developing an Annual Report about the district and mailing them to all residents of Orange. 2015-­‐16 INITIATIVES • 
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World Languages: With the excepTon of RPCS and LAS, elementary schools have one language, either French or Spanish, in grades 3-­‐7. Grades K-­‐2 will have world language acTviTes in their learning centers. ESL/Bilingual: A Newcomer’s Academy for grades 3-­‐7 has been created at Lincoln Avenue School for port-­‐of-­‐entry students. This is a program of gradual release. Students will learn the academic vocabulary and cultural skills for a more successful iniTal experience in an American school. Aier nine weeks, the students will mainstream into mathemaTcs with their peers. From that point forward, they will enter the mainstream based on language acquisiTon. OPA and OHS will have a separate Newcomers’ Program, both before and aier school. History Department: A new course offering, American Studies, examines the American experience through novels, poems, short stories, and drama through a historical eye, based on primary documents, newspapers, and newsreels. It is open to students in grades 11 and 12. Physical Educa:on/Health: A new course, Lifelong Fitness and Health, is offered to high school students. It fulfills the PE/Health requirement and is dedicated to promoTng skills and habits for healthy living. CTE: All curricula is being revised and partnerships are being developed to acquire state recogniTon. Students will graduate with cerTficaTons and/or college credit. VPA: All curricula is being revised. An extended partnership with NJPAC, through the Disney grant won by RPCS and M.A.N.Y, will enhance the performing arts students. 2015-­‐16 INITIATIVES •  New AdopTon of Math in Focus Program in grade 6 •  New AdopTon of Everyday Calendar Counts Program in Grades 3-­‐5 •  New AdopTon of HS Geometry Textbook •  New NGSS-­‐aligned curriculum units in grades K – 12 •  Improved alignment of all mathemaTcs curriculum units to the CCSS in MathemaTcs •  New Pilot of PARCC-­‐like technology enhanced items in grades 3 – 12 •  Newly revitalized Hydroponics Curriculum 2015-­‐16 INITIATIVES •  Establishment of Structured Peer Tutoring in our 4-­‐12 programs •  IntroducTon of Game 24 CompeTTons in grades 3-­‐7 •  IntroducTon of Middle School Math Olympics in grades 6 – 7 •  IntroducTon of Regional MathemaTcs CompeTTons in Grades 8 – 10 •  RoboTcs Teams established in Grades 4 – 12 in all schools •  Expanded applicaTons of the Project Lead the Way at Heywood and OHS 2015-­‐16 INITIATIVES •  University Level Courses established for all teachers in grades K -­‐ 12 •  K-­‐5 Focus: OperaTons in Algebraic Thinking and FracTons •  6-­‐7 Focus: ProporTonal Reasoning •  8 – 12 Focus: CCSSM Widely Acceptable Prerequisites for College and Career Readiness •  New Cohort of WIPRO Fellows Orange Academy Awards
4th Annual
September 2, 2015
Awards
and
Recognitions
National Board Teaching
Certification
Created for teachers, by teachers, National Board Certification is a
voluntary, performance based, peer review process that recognizes the
complex nature of teaching. To date, more than 100,000 teachers in all
50 states have achieved this highest mark of distinction in the
profession. National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) are having a
significant impact on student achievement. Research has shown that
the students of NBCTs outperform their peers in other classrooms.
National Board Teaching
Certification
At this :me the Orange Board of Educa:on would like to recognize and invite to the stage those individuals who received their Na:onal Teaching Board Cer:fica:on during the last school year. Doctorate Degree
A doctorate degree is the highest level of academic degree. At this :me the Orange Board of Educa:on would like to recognize and invite to the stage those individuals who earned their Doctorate Degree during the last school year. New Teacher Exemplar
This award recognizes new faculty members who’ve exhibited good pracTces in working to establish a strong community of learners guided by clear expectaTons. These individuals pracTce good classroom management and elicit posiTve classroom behaviors. They design and deliver effecTve lessons plans to maximize learning while creaTng and nurturing a posiTve learning environment. New Teacher Exemplar
Awardees
Roshawna Cooper Park Avenue ELA, Third Grade Joel Lempke OPA Global Studies MaZhew Perkins OHS Algebra II Parental Involvement Exemplar
This award recognizes individuals who played an integral role in assisTng with improving the involvement of parents as partners with the district. Parental Involvement Exemplar
Awardees
•  Rachel Bland •  Barry Devone •  Stephanie Desanges Oakwood RPCS Oakwood Community School Coordinator Community School Coordinator Family Liaison Mentorship
In addi:on to the academic sustenance of our students, there are those who also foster the personal and professional growth of young men and women by sharing their knowledge, problem-­‐solving skills and insight in helping the student mature and achieve their goals. Mentorship
Bernard Rawls Heywood LLD Teacher Paraprofessional Exemplar
Paraprofessionals Exemplars support our students and provide criTcal services in assisTng instrucTonal pracTces of the district. The Orange Board of EducaTon would like to applaud and recognize the contribuTons of staff who assist in moving the district toward the achievement of its mission and goals. Paraprofessional Exemplar
Danita Puryear Maryellen Berberich Andrea Lee Bronwyn Stewart Early Childhood Early Childhood Early Childhood Early Childhood Community Relations
The Orange Board of EducaTon values effecTve communicaTons and meaningful relaTonships between schools and the communiTes they serve. To recognize excellence in community relaTons, the District is recognizing an individual(s) or group for planning and execuTng exemplary school-­‐
community relaTons and programs. Community Rela:ons Awardee Brian Murdock Montclair State University Support Staff Exemplar
Support staff or those who support our students are members who perform criTcal services in assisTng in operaTonal or instrucTonal pracTces of the district. The Orange Board of EducaTon would like to applaud and recognize the contribuTons of staff who assist in moving the district toward the achievement of its mission and goals. Support Staff Exemplar
Awardees
Tya Marsh Human Resources Manager Joan Purkiss District Communica:ons Officer Technology Integration
•  The Orange Board of EducaTon would like to recognize those individuals who worked Trelessly to ensure that the technology in our district was ready for a Tmely and successful administraTon of the new PARCC test. Technology Integration
Awardees
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Rodney West William Grenger Lisa Spotswood Brown Jason Cordes Levar Nelson Fay Marchman CelesTne Onyeagocha Tia Burneq Linda Epps • 
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Ellen Raimondi Tyrina Vaughn Miriam MarTn Neurones Plaisimond Anthony St. Jean Omar Mitchell Linda Lloyd Denise Harlem Tera Phipps Bernice Budhu Naheelah Irving Best Practices
To recognize excellence in Best PracTces, the Orange Board of EducaTon is recognizing an individual(s) or group that best exemplifies best pracTces/
methods in the classroom. “Best pracTce is a teaching or instrucTonal method that has been demonstrated by research to be an effecTve learning tool.” Best Prac:ces Awardee(s) Karen Miola Oakwood Ave ELA Oakwood Ave ELA Doreen Cruz District CST Marcdaline Jean RPCS Larry Willis Math Hooman Behzadpour OHS Math Omar Mitchell Lincoln Ave Technology Coordinator Nina Hejer Lincoln Ave ESL Jane Siebert Rosa Parks Community School, CIAO, Scholars School Nurse Leadership
The Orange Board of EducaTon would like to recognize those individuals who are willing to meet the challenge of sharing their talents for the purpose of making posiTve change and/or leading their school/department in the undertaking of district iniTaTves. Leadership Awardees
Robert Pekt Oakwood Ave Principal Yancisca Cooke Forest St Principal Superintendent’s Award
“Leadership is a process by which a person influences others to accomplish an objecTve and directs an organizaTon in a way that makes it more cohesive and coherent.” In the Orange Public School District, we have examples of individuals who have exemplified these characterisTcs and acTons toward the achievement of our shared vision. Superintendent’s Award
Laura Sacks Belinda Smiley Dr. Tina Powell EllioZ Lee Nurse Assistant to the Superintendent for Human Resource Opera:ons Director of Math Consultant Forest Street School Group Award Math and Science Department Group Award OPA District District District Highest 2013-14 SGP
This award recognizes teaching staff members with the highest Student Growth PercenTle (SGP) in the district for 2013-­‐14 school year as determined by data received through the New Jersey Department of EducaTon’s NJSMART system. Highest SGP
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Jamiliah Rawls Wanda Dickson Samantha Lazewski Sheerene Brown Lisa Cantanzarite Maisha Jones April Stokes Elizabeth Tague • 
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Monique Walker Tyarra Hunter Marcdaline Jean Yolanda Moses Louise O’Shea TOP THREE (3) SCHOOLS
WITH THE HIGHEST
AVERAGE SGP FOR 2013-14
Top Three (3) Schools with the
Highest Average SGP for
2013-14
•  1. HEYWOOD AVE
•  2. FOREST
•  2. ROSA PARKS COMMUNITY SCHOOL
Innovation
The Orange Board of Educa:on would like to recognize staff members or programs that bring about change and expanded opportuni:es for our students through promo:ng innova:ve ini:a:ves that accelerate academic and ar:s:c achievement, environmental awareness and cultural and social responsibili:es. Innovation
Awardees
Early Childhood Department/Scholars’ Academy Forest Street School Oakwood Avenue School Outstanding
Achievement
This award is presented to an individual or group who implemented effec:ve change that had a significant impact on the lives of students as evident through improving student achievement and school environment/school climate. Outstanding
Achievement Awardee
ORANGE HIGH SCHOOL