Sprayberry High School - Cobb County School District

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Sprayberry High School - Cobb County School District
Class of
2019
Sprayberry
High School
FRESHMAN
REGISTRATION
HIGH SCHOOL PLANNING
GUIDE
1
CONTENTS
Contents ...................................................................................................................................................... 1
School Profile............................................................................................................................................... 4
Sprayberry High School Mission ...............................................................................................................................4
Sprayberry High School Resource Directory .................................................................................................. 5
Sprayberry At A Glance ................................................................................................................................ 6
Academic Programs ..................................................................................................................................... 7
High School Graduation Requirements ......................................................................................................... 8
Promotion/Retention ..............................................................................................................................................9
Registration Tips........................................................................................................................................ 10
Elective Offerings....................................................................................................................................... 11
English .................................................................................................................................................................. 12
Mathematics ......................................................................................................................................................... 12
Science ................................................................................................................................................................. 13
Social Studies ........................................................................................................................................................ 14
Foreign Language .................................................................................................................................................. 14
Career/Technology Education ................................................................................................................................ 15
Fine Arts ............................................................................................................................................................... 17
Health and Personal Fitness ................................................................................................................................... 19
Other Elective Options (Teacher Recommendation Only) ....................................................................................... 20
Accelerated Learning Program ............................................................................................................................... 20
Clubs and Activities.................................................................................................................................... 21
Academic Support...................................................................................................................................... 22
Creating A Successful Transition From Middle School To High School .......................................................... 23
Upcoming Events ....................................................................................................................................... 25
P L E A S E V I S I T O U R W E B S I T E F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M A T I O N : HT TP : / / W W W . C O B B K 1 2 . O R G / S P R A Y B E R R Y /
2
WELCOME
Welcome to Sprayberry High School, a 21st Century School, an AP Certified
Demonstration School and a 2011 National School of Excellence. We look forward to your
becoming a part of one of the best high schools in Cobb County. Our strong academic and
vocational programs, along with varied and worthwhile extracurricular activities, can
make your next four years among the most meaningful you will ever experience. Careful
planning is important. Select your courses after careful study and consideration by you
and your parents. The information which follows will be helpful to you in making your
course selections for the 2015-2016 school year.
All Sprayberry high school and middle school students register for both semesters
in the spring of the previous year. Please remember registration forms are a schedule
request. Every effort will be made to place your child in the classes that they request;
however, teacher allotments, availability, and student demand for classes may cause
conflict with schedule requests.
We look forward to meeting you and your parents at the 8th Grade Parent Night on
Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:00.
Sincerely,
Mr. John Kelly, Principal
Dr. Kerri McDougal, Assistant Principal
Professional School Counselors
Paula Ferguson  Christine Stewart
Rebecca Irwin  Brandy Brady
Sprayberry Counseling Department  770 578-3200
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SCHOOL PROFILE
Sprayberry High School, located in Marietta, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta, is a
comprehensive senior high school (grades 9-12) of approximately 1750. The
school opened in 1952 at a location on Cobb Parkway and then moved to its
current location at 2525 Sandy Plains Road in 1971. Sprayberry High School is
a microcosm of Cobb County in that it serves students from a variety of ethnic
groups, socio-economic levels, and academic abilities.
Sprayberry has been named a National School of Excellence and received
two Platinum Awards for highest percentage and greatest gains of students
meeting and exceeding standards. In 2014, Sprayberry was named as an AP
Merit school with at least 20 percent of the student population taking AP
exams and at least half of all AP exams earning scores of three (3) or higher.
Sprayberry was also named a 2014 AP Stem school for having students
testing in at least two AP math courses and two AP science courses in addition
to being named an AP STEM Achievement School for also having at least 40
percent of the exam scores on AP math and science exams earning scores of
three (3) or higher.
Sprayberry’s success has been measured by consistent scores on the SAT,
Georgia High School Graduation Test, and State End-of-Course Tests. For over
five years, our SAT and ACT composite scores have remained well above the
national average. Our students have consistently achieved above the state
average in all GHSGT subject areas, despite changing demographics and an
increase in special education enrollment. In 2014-2015, 97% of our students
passed the Writing portion of the GHSGT. We are proud of our academic
achievements at Sprayberry High School.
SPRAYBERRY HIGH SCHOOL MISSION
CREATING A CULTURE OF EXCELLENCE IN
ACADEMICS, ATHLETICS, THE ARTS, AND THE
COMMUNITY.
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SPRAYBERRY HIGH SCHOOL RESOURCE DIRECTORY
Position
Name
Extension
E-Mail
Principal
John Kelly
224
[email protected]
School Secretary
Sheila Towns
223
[email protected]
Front Office
Marilyn Fitzgerald
221
[email protected]
Attendance
Anita Eubanks
310
[email protected]
Counseling Office Main
Rachelle Denison
232
[email protected]
School Counselor A-D
Christine Stewart
233
[email protected]
School Counselor E-Kg
Paula Ferguson
229
[email protected]
School Counselor Kh-Rh
Brandy Brady
228
[email protected]
School Counselor Ri-Z
Rebecca Irwin
270
[email protected]
School Bookkeeper
Debbie Miller
225
[email protected]
Nurse
Peggy LoShaivo
289
[email protected]
School Social Worker
Jonathan Tabb
266
[email protected]
Assistant Principal
AP Coordinator
Leigh Graham
309
[email protected]
Assistant Principal
Athletic Director
Mark Giles
261
[email protected]
Assitant Principal
Joseph Sharp
336
[email protected]
Assistant Principal
Kerri McDougal
273
[email protected]
Assistant Principal
Richmond Parker
267
[email protected]
Media Specialist
Kelly Paynter
Jo Zarzeka
Amanda Graves
236
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Food Service
Phyllis Fountain
235
[email protected]
School Resource Officer
Brian Dyer
285
[email protected]
Latino Parent Facilitator
Vani Arcuragi
404-409-6102
[email protected]
PTSA President
Anita Hagins Jones
770-578-3200
http://sprayberryptsa.org
Special Education
Erin Smith
328
[email protected]
School Website
Richmond Parker
267
[email protected]
ParentVUE
Marilyn Fitzgerald
221
[email protected]
Financial Aid
FAFSA
GA College 411
see website
SAT Registration/Prep
see website
212-713-8000
www.CollegeBoard.com
ACT Registration/Prep
see website
319-337-1270
www.ACT.org
Hope Scholarship
see website
770-724-9000
www.gsfc.org/hope
1-800-4-FED-AID
www.fafsa.ed.gov
1-800-GO-TO-XAP
www.gacollege411.com
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SPRAYBERRY AT A GLANCE
School Colors:
Black and Gold
School Mascot:
Yellow Jacket
Lunch Period (3rd Block)
Class Schedule:
First Block
8:20 – 9:54
A
11:46 – 12:14
Second Block
10:00 – 11:40
B
12:17 – 12:45
Third Block
11:46 – 1:50
C
12:48 – 1:16
1:56 – 3:30
D
1:19 – 1:50
Fourth Block
Schedule Changes
Students will be given a change to verify and update their schedule requests. After that time,
no changes will be made. Please understand that it is not possible to honor requests for
specific teachers, lunch periods or class placement within the day. Elective choices cannot be
changed.
Special Student Services
The Special Student Services provides individualized support for students who are at risk of
not achieving to their greatest potential due to a documented disability. Our task is to
provide educational services that foster achievement of the whole child in the least
restrictive environment. Special services teachers, along with parents, should work closely
with the school counselor to select proper courses. If you have questions, call Erin Smith,
Department Chair, at 770-578-3200, Ext. 328.
Athletic Eligibility
For the fall semester, all first-year freshmen are eligible to participate in sports,
cheerleading, chorus, band, orchestra or drama, or to hold a class or club office, or be a
member of a club. However, in order to be able to participate in any sport or fine art
competition for the spring semester, students must pass 3 out of 4 courses in the fall. In order
to participate in athletic programs, all students must have a current physical on file in the
athletic office.
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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Sprayberry High School operates on a two semester system. Each semester is
approximately 18 weeks long. Credit is established in units. Students register
for A MINIMUM of eight classes each year which meet every day for
approximately 90 minutes and upon successful completion, carry one unit of
credit per class. All courses carry credit toward graduation. It is possible,
therefore, to earn four units per semester, or eight units per year. Unlike middle
school, the failure of any course results in no credit and must be repeated.
Each semester is independent of the other. Cobb County Board of Education
Policy IHA states:
“ONCE A STUDENT HAS RECEIVED CREDIT FOR A
COURSE, HE MAY NOT REPEAT THE COURSE FOR
ADDITIONAL CREDIT OR TO IMPROVE HIS GRADE.”
Elective courses are those you choose other than the courses specifically
referred to in “Graduation Requirements”. Additional Math, Science or English
courses may be considered electives. Other elective courses include Physical
Education, Art, Music, Business, Career/Technology, and gifted courses.
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HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
CLASS OF 2018
4 UNITS OF ENGLISH, INCLUDING:
• 1 unit of 9th Grade Literature and Composition
• 1 unit of American Literature and Composition
• 2 additional units
4 UNITS OF MATH, INCLUDING:
• 1 unit of Math I, GPS Algebra, CCGPS Coordinate Algebra, or its equivalent
• 1 unit of Math II, GPS Geometry, CCGPS Analytic Geometry, or its
equivalent
• 1 unit of Math III, GPS Advanced Algebra, CCGPS Advanced Algebra, or its
equivalent
• 1 additional core mathematics unit
4 UNITS OF SCIENCE, INCLUDING:
• 1 unit of Biology
• 1 unit of Physical Science or Physics
• 1 unit of Chemistry, Earth Systems, Environmental Science or AP/IB
course
• 1 unit of a 4th science (4th unit may be used to meet both the science and
elective requirement)
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3 UNITS OF SOCIAL STUDIES, INCLUDING:
• 1 unit of World History
• 1 unit of US History
• ½ unit of American Government
• ½ unit of Economics
1 UNIT OF HEALTH/PERSONAL FITNESS
7 UNITS OF ELECTIVES
• Among the 7 electives, students are encouraged to select 3 units in a
focused area of interest and at least 2 units of the same foreign language
for college-bound students.
23 total units required to graduate for all students
PROMOTION/RETENTION
10th Grade – 5 units; must include one full units each of state required or core
coursework in mathematics, science, and English Language Arts
11th Grade – 10 units; must include two full units each of state required or core
coursework in mathematics, science, and English Language Arts
12th Grade – 16 units
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REGISTRATION TIPS
Sprayberry High School is on a block schedule. There are four 90 minute periods in the school
day. Students can take 8 block courses in one academic year – 4 per semester. Each block class
is worth one credit and meets every day for one semester.
When planning the freshmen course schedule, students should select at least one course in
each of the 4 core academic areas:
1. ENGLISH
2. MATH
3. SOCIAL STUDIES
4. SCIENCE
Core Course placement decisions are made by middle school teachers and counselors with parent
input in March.
In addition to the minimum 4 core classes, students will need to select 4 additional blocks of
elective courses to complete their schedule. All students should select a minimum of 4 elective
alternates in case a course fills with upperclassmen, the class is not offered, or the course will
not fit with other course selections. Options include:
O
CAREER/TECH ELECTIVES
O
FINE ARTS
O
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
O
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES
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ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
The following electives are available for freshmen. There are additional classes available after the freshman year.
Audio & Video Technology Film
Band
Beginning Guitar
Chinese 1
Chinese 2
Chorus
French 1
French 2
French 3 Honors
Gifted Creative Writing
Gifted Film Studies
Gifted Mythology
Intro to Culinary Arts
Intro to Digital Technology
Intro to Drafting Design
Intro to Graphics and Design
Intro to Health Science
Intro to Lifetime Sports
Intro to Personal Care Services
Intro to Rec Games
Marketing
Music Appreciation
NJROTC Navy I
NJROTC Navy II
Orchestra
Spanish 1
Spanish 2
Spanish 3 Honors
Spanish for Native Spanish Speakers
Theatre Arts/Fundamentals I
Visual Arts Comprehensive
*Drawing and Paint
*Ceramics
Weight Training
*You must be in Visual Arts Comprehensive now to take Drawing and Paint and then
Ceramics.
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MORE DETAILED DESCRI PTIONS OF COURSE OFFERINGS
ENGLISH
4 E N G L IS H
CO U RS E S A RE R E Q U IR E D FO R H IG H S C H O O L G RA D U A TI O N .
L I TE R A TU RE / C O M PO S I TI O N
AND
A ME R ICA N
S TU D E N TS MU S T
L ITE RA TU RE .
T A KE A N D P A S S
9TH
Ninth Grade Lit/Comp is a college prep class which integrates composition, grammar, and literature. It
covers the writing process; the development of vocabulary, speaking, listening, and researching skills will
also be included.
Ninth Grade Lit/Comp Honors is an accelerated college prep course designed for the student who has a
serious interest in the interpretation of literature. It integrates writing, grammar and usage, speaking and
listening. It includes reading a variety of literary genres: short stories, novels, poetry, drama, and
nonfiction. It also emphasizes oral and written response to literature.
MATHEMATICS
4 MATH COURSES ARE REQUIRED FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION.
CCGPS Coordinate Algebra Support: The purpose of the Mathematics Support Class is to address the
needs of students who have traditionally struggled in mathematics by providing the additional time and
attention they need in order to successfully complete their regular grade-level mathematics course
without failing. CCGPS Coordinate Algebra Support is an elective class that should be taught concurrently
with a student’s regular CCGPS Coordinate Algebra class.
CCGPS Coordinate Algebra: The first in a sequence of three high school courses designed to ensure
career and college readiness. The course represents a discrete study of algebra with correlated statistics
applications and a bridge to the second course through coordinate geometric topics.
 Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems
 Interpret the structure of expressions
 Create equations that describe numbers or relationships
 Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning
 Solve equations and inequalities in one variable
 Solve systems of equations
 Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically
 Understand the concept of a function and use function notation
 Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of the context
 Analyze functions using different representations
 Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities
 Build new functions from existing functions
 Construct and compare linear and exponential models and solve problems
 Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model
 Experiment with transformations in the plane
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 Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically
 Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable
 Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables
Interpret linear models
CCGPS Honors Analytic Geometry contains all of the standards as the on-level course with a few
additional standards and more depth. The course is intended for students that complete Coordinate
Algebra in the 8th grade or excelled in Coordinate Algebra in the 9th grade.
Accelerated CCGPS Coordinate Algebra/Analytic Geometry A: This accelerated course consists of the
entire course of CCGPS Coordinate Algebra and the first ½ of CCGPS Analytic Geometry (A).
Accelerated CCGPS Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra: This accelerated course consists of the
second ½ of CCGPS Analytic Geometry (B) and the entire course of CCGPS Advanced Algebra.
SCIENCE
SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF FOUR UNITS IN SCIENCE IS REQUIRED FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION: ONE UNIT IN BIOLOGY, ONE UNIT
IN PHYSICS/PHYSICAL SCIENCE, ONE UNIT IN CHEMISTRY/EARTH SYSTEMS/ENVIRONMENTAL, AND ONE SCIENCE ELECTIVE.
Biology I is a recommended course in which the students will learn and understand biological functions
and systems on the cellular, genetic, evolutionary, systematic, and ecological levels. Students will also be
able to implement applications of biological processes to everyday situations. This course meets the
graduation requirement of 1 unit of biology.
Biology I Honors level courses are accelerated courses designed for students interested in pursuing
advanced sciences or careers in science, engineering, or medicine. Prerequisite: 8th grade Science with a
grade of 90-100; 8th grade Language Arts with a grade of 80-100, Concurrent enrollment in CCGPS
Algebra or higher level Math; ALL students from Gifted (Target) 8th grade science are eligible.
Earth Systems is designed to continue student investigations that began in K-8 Earth Science and Life
Science curricula and investigate the connections among Earth’s systems through Earth history. These
systems—the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere—interact through time to produce
the Earth’s landscapes, ecology, and resources. This course develops the explanations of phenomena
fundamental to the sciences of geology and physical geography, including the early history of the Earth,
plate tectonics, landform evolution, the Earth’s geologic record, weather and climate, and the history of
life on Earth. Instruction will focus on inquiry and development of scientific explanations, rather than
mere descriptions of phenomena. Case studies, laboratory exercises, maps, and data analysis will be
integrated into units. Special attention will be paid to topics of current interest (e.g., recent earthquakes,
tsunamis, global warming, price of resources) and to potential careers in the geosciences.
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SOCIAL STUDIES
THREE UNITS OF SOCIAL STUDIES ARE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION. 1 UNIT OF WORLD HISTORY, 1 UNIT OF U. S. HISTORY, ½ UNIT
OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND ½ UNIT OF ECONOMICS. ALTHOUGH NO SPECIFIC COURSE IN SOCIAL STUDIES IS REQUIRED IN THE
NINTH GRADE, ONE UNIT OF WORLD GEOGRAPHY IS RECOMMENDED PRIOR TO THE TENTH GRADE STUDY OF WORLD HISTORY.
World Geography: This course provides an overview of physical and cultural geography. Additionally,
an awareness of similarities and differences in human needs and behaviors is developed. Areas of study
are North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific Islands.
Pre-AP Social Studies (Fall Only): This course follows the Honors World Geography Curriculum and
incorporates the World History Curriculum, foundations to 1000 A.D. In addition, the course introduces
9th grade students to AP Social Studies skills, including writing and critical thinking. The purpose of the
course is to prepare Social Studies students for AP World History in the 10th grade and follow the College
Board’s concept for an Advanced Placement Pathway.
AP Human Geography (Spring Only): AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study
of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s
surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to analyze human social organization
and its environmental consequences. Examines methods and tools geographers use in their science and
practice. Follows the Advanced Placement Geography Curriculum. Prerequisite: Pre-AP Social Studies in
the Fall Semester.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
A MINIMUM OF TWO UNITS OF THE SAME HIGH SCHOOL FOREIGN LANGUAGE IS REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION TO THE GEORGIA
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM. FOR THOSE STUDENTS STRIVING TO EXCEED THE MINIMUM AND THOSE AIMING TO STUDY AT A MORE
SELECTIVE COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY, IT IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED THAT THEY TAKE THREE OR FOUR YEARS OF THE SAME
LANGUAGE.
Students who complete Level I of a language in Middle School may continue with Level II of that language or they may
choose to begin a new language that was not offered at their school. Chinese 1 and Portuguese 1are offered in the fall
and will continue with Level II in the spring. It is recommended that 9th grade students who did not take foreign
language in middle school delay language study until the sophomore year.
Level I courses are not appropriate for students already knowledgeable in that language. Any student with a prior
knowledge of a Foreign Language must be interviewed and assessed by the Sprayberry Foreign Language Staff.
Chinese I (Fall Only): Chinese I (Mandarin) is an introduction to the language and culture of China. The
course will enable the student to attain a beginner’s level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading,
and writing, with an emphasis on oral proficiency.
Chinese II (Spring Only): Chinese II (Mandarin) is designed to further develop listening, speaking,
reading and writing with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The student will acquire a basic command of
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key vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary for limited personal communication as well as an
appreciation of diversity in the Chinese-speaking world.
French I (Spring Only): French I is an introduction to the language and culture of France and other
French-speaking countries. The course will enable the student to attain a beginner’s level of proficiency
in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on oral proficiency.
French II (Fall Only): French II is designed to increase vocabulary acquisition in order to further develop
the four skills of listening, speaking, writing and reading with an increased emphasis on accuracy.
Student will continue to be exposed to the Francophone culture around the world. The Prerequisite for
registration in this course is successful completion of French I.
French III Honors (Spring Only): French III Honors is designed to further develop the student’s
communication skills and cultural appreciation of the French-speaking world. The student will be able to
participate in a variety of oral and written activities.
Spanish I (Spring Only): Spanish I is an introduction to the language and culture of Spanish-speaking
countries. The course will enable the student to attain a beginner’s level of proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on oral proficiency.
Spanish II (Fall Only): This course is designed to further develop the four skills of listening, speaking,
writing, and reading with an increased emphasis on accuracy. Students will continue to be exposed to
Hispanic Culture. The Prerequisite for this course is successful completion of Spanish I.
Spanish III Honors (Spring Only): Spanish III Honors is designed to further develop the student’s
communication skills and cultural appreciation of the Spanish-speaking world. The student will be able
to participate in a variety of oral and written activities.
Spanish for Native Spanish Speakers, Level 1 is designed for the Spanish Heritage Speaker and will
focus on advanced skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Essay development and novel
reading are integral to this course.
CAREER/TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
A total of three units of credit shall be required from the following areas: CTAE and/or Modern Language/Latin
and/or Fine Arts. Students are encouraged to select courses in a focused area of interest in order to complete a
pathway.
All technology programs are designed to prepare students for entry-level job skills or to prepare students who wish to
pursue additional education in a post-secondary vocational/technical school, college, or 4 year university. All
laboratories or shops are planned, organized and equipped to simulate the environment in which the student may
eventually work. These courses may fulfill elective credit for the high school diploma. Freshmen are allowed to take
one to three Career Tech courses. In the sophomore and subsequent years, students can continue in the same
Career/Tech area or select another course of study.
Audio & Video Technology Film will serve as the foundational course in the Audio & Video Technology
& Film pathway. The course prepares students for employment or entry into a postsecondary education
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program in the audio and video technology career field. Topics covered may Topics covered may include,
but are not limited to: terminology, safety, basic equipment, script writing, production teams, production
and programming, lighting, recording and editing, studio production, and professional ethics.
Introduction to Culinary Arts is designed to introduce students to fundamental food preparation terms,
concepts and methods in culinary arts, where laboratory practice will parallel class work. (This is the first
course within the Culinary Arts Career Pathway.)
Introduction to Digital Technology is the foundational course for Web & Digital Communications,
Programming, Advanced Programming, Information Support & Services, and Network Systems pathways.
This course is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world
as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in
hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab
with hands-on activities and project focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but
apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge
and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects
throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry.
Introduction to Drafting Design (Line Engineering) is an introductory course and a pre-requisite to all
other Engineering Design and Drawing courses. Emphasis is placed on safety, correct use of tools and
equipment, drafting media, sketching, lettering, linework dimensions, fundamentals of CAD, single and
multi-view drawings. (This is the first course for the Architectural Drawing and Design Pathway.)
Introduction to Graphics and Design is the first in a series of courses that prepares the student for
employment or entry into a postsecondary education program in the graphic communications career
field. Topics to be covered include: Introduction to Graphic Communications Careers, Digital File
Preparation, Press Operations, Measurement, Safety and First Aid, and Math for Printing. (This is the first
course for the Graphic Communications Career Pathway.)
Introduction to Health Science provides students with the initial exposure to healthcare science skills
in the areas of health, wellness, and preventive care. Medical terminology, microbiology, and basic life
support skills are emphasized. (This is the first course within the Healthcare Science Career Pathway.)
Introduction to Personal Care Services introduces both fundamental theory and practices of the
personal care professions including nail technicians, estheticians, barbers, and cosmetologists. Emphasis
will be placed on professional practices and safety. Areas addressed in this course include: state rules and
regulations, professional image, bacteriology, decontamination and infection control, chemistry
fundamentals, safety, Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance, and anatomy and physiology. Students
will experience basic hands on skills in each area to help them determine the pathway they are most
interested in pursuing. By completing courses in the personal care services pathways, students can
potentially earn credit toward the hours required by the Georgia State Board of Barbering and/or
Cosmetology or hours toward their license as an esthetician or nail technician.
Marketing Principles addresses the ways in which marketing satisfies consumer and organizational
needs and wants for products and services. Students develop an understanding of basic marketing
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concepts to marketing, distribution and logistics, marketing information management, product/service
planning, pricing mixes promotional strategies, and personal selling.
NJROTC Navy I: Students enrolled in NJROTC should register for both Level I and II so they are in
NJROTC all year. Cadet Field Manual includes the study of naval heritage, organization, sea power and
naval history from colonial times to the 1850s, the study of naval ship missions and organization, an
introduction to navigation and maritime geography, basic seamanship including rig and shipboard watch
procedures, military drill with rifles, and physical development. Navy leadership principles will be
applied to drills and unit organizational duties. An introduction to naval physical fitness and related
health topics are covered. Other unit topics include a study of officer and enlisted programs, military
drill, commands, and ceremonies. (This is the first course within the Navy Career Pathway.)
NJROTC Navy II: Introduction to NJROTC includes the study of nautical plotting, rules and regulations,
and aids to navigation, as well as the study of American maritime history from 1860 to the end of World
War I. It also introduces students to the organization used to conduct various operations and basic naval
communications. Other topics covered include naval career planning, leadership development,
oceanography, physical development, military drills, commands, the study of naval intelligence and
national security, shipboard evaluations, health and first aid, physical fitness, and military drill and
ceremonies. (This is the second course within the Navy Career Pathway.)
Visual Arts: Comprehensive introduces art history, criticism & studio production. It emphasizes the
ability to understand & use the elements of art & principles of design through a variety of media
processes and visual resources.
FINE ARTS
The Fine Arts program at Sprayberry includes courses in Art, Chorus, Drama, Orchestra, Band, and Music Theory.
Theatre Arts/Fundamentals I serves as prerequisite for other theatre/drama courses. Develops and
applies performance skills through basic vocal, physical and emotional exercises; includes improvisation
and scene study and related technical art forms.
Beginning Women’s Chorus provides opportunities for young women to develop performance skills in
all-female chorus singing. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical
and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and appreciation of music. Organizes
objectives for self-paced progress through all four levels. Stresses individual progress and group
experiences.
Men’s Ensemble provides opportunities for young men to develop performance skills in all-male chorus
singing. Covers performance and production, analysis and theoretical studies, historical and cultural
contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and appreciation of music. Organizes objectives
for self-paced progress through all four levels. Stresses individual progress and group experiences.
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Beginning Band I-IV (Concert Band) is a beginning band performance class that focuses on the basic
fundamentals of tone production, music reading, and performance. This is a performance ensemble for
qualified students. Emphasis is on learning ensemble skills and developing musical performance skills
while performing music selected from the Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA) grade 2 or 3
music list.
Intermediate Band I-IV (Symphonic I) is an intermediate band performance class for instrumentalists
that have previous experience. Students can read music and have an understanding of individual and
ensemble performance skills. This is a performing band for the more experienced students. Emphasis is
on perfecting the skills necessary to perform at an advanced level while performing music selected from
the GMEA grade 4 or 5 music list. Placement by audition.
Advanced Band I-IV (Symphonic II) is an advanced band performance class for instrumentalists that
have solid training in performance fundamentals. Students will deepen their understanding of individual
and ensemble performance skills through the performance of advanced literature. This is a performing
band for the most advanced and experienced students. Emphasis is on perfecting the skills necessary to
perform at an advanced level while performing music from the GMEA grade 6 music list. Placement by
audition.
Advanced Jazz I-IV is an advanced jazz band performance class for instrumentalists that have solid
training in jazz performance fundamentals. The instrumental jazz ensemble curriculum emphasizes
improvisation and styles of the jazz idiom. Content includes the study of blues scale patterns and
harmonic progressions innate in jazz music. Content also includes the study of the appropriate jazz
literature and rehearsal and performance techniques from the jazz idiom. Performance and rehearsals
both in and out of school may be required. Instrumentation of the jazz ensemble is at the discretion of the
jazz instructor. Placement by audition.
Beginning Orchestra I-IV (Concert Orchestra) is a beginning stringed instrument performance class that
focuses on the basic fundamentals of tone production, music reading, and performance. This is a basic
class open to any student with a minimum of two years experience on an orchestral instrument - violin,
viola, cello, bass. It is a review of basic skills necessary to perform on the high school level. This ensemble
will perform at Georgia Level III or IV, with emphasis on essential basic techniques. Students will learn
basic music theory. All freshmen orchestra students are placed in Concert orchestra and can advance
second semester.
Intermediate Orchestra I-IV (Philharmonic Orchestra) is an intermediate string instrument
performance class for instrumentalists that have previous experience. Students can read music and have
an understanding of individual and ensemble performance skills. The Philharmonic Orchestra will
perform at Georgia Level IV or V, with emphasis on more advanced techniques such as shifting to the
higher positions. Students will learn intermediate music theory. Recommendation by Middle School
director is required.
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Advanced Orchestra I-IV (Chamber Orchestra) is an advanced band performance class for
instrumentalists that have solid training in performance fundamentals. Students will deepen their
understanding of individual and ensemble performance skills through the performance of advanced
literature. Advanced orchestra is the highest level of orchestra available to students. It is for the advanced
and experienced player. Emphasis is on polishing musical skills necessary to perform standard orchestral
literature. Placement in this orchestra is by audition only. Music Appreciation I is a study of music
literature and styles that is intended to raise awareness of music fundamentals and the role of music in
our world. Introduces production and performance; covers terminology and idioms, elements of music,
perceptive listening and attitudes and appreciation. Stresses the ability to become a literate consumer
and the ability to speak and write about music.
Beginning Guitar I introduces basic guitar techniques. Covers performance and production, analysis and
theoretical studies, historical and cultural contributions and influences, creative aspects of music and
appreciation of music. Provides an individualized setting. Students will learn basic guitar performance
and note reading skills.
HEALTH AND PERSONAL FITNESS
HEALTH AND PERSONAL FITNESS ARE .5 CREDIT COURSES EACH AND ARE THE ONLY REQUIRED PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES. IT IS
RECOMMENDED THAT STUDENTS WAIT UNTIL THEIR SOPHOMORE YEAR TO TAKE HEALTH AND PERSONAL FITNESS. ALL OTHER
PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES ARE WILL FULFILL ELECTIVE COURSE REQUIREMENTS.
Introductory Lifetime Sports is designed to introduce students to three different lifetime sports with no
one sport less than 4 weeks and not more than 8 weeks. Those from which the selection is made include
the following: archery, badminton, bowling, golf, handball, pickelball, racquetball, table tennis, tennis, and
wall ball. Others may be substituted depending upon facilities and equipment. This course will offer
students the opportunity to learn the history, rules and regulations, etiquette, strategy and judgment, and
the basic motor skills of each selected activity.
Introductory Recreational Gamess is designed to introduce students to three different team sports,
with no one sport less than 4 weeks or longer than 8 weeks. Those from which the selection is made
include the following: basketball, gym hockey, soccer, speedball, flag football, ultimate Frisbee, team
handball, softball, and volleyball. Others may be substituted depending upon facilities and equipment.
This course will offer students the opportunity to learn the history, rules and regulations, etiquette,
strategy and judgment, and the basic motor skills of each selected activity.
Weight Training is designed to introduce students to a weight-training program that will promote overall body fitness. The student will be exposed to different types of weight equipment and methods of
training with weights. The student will also gain knowledge of the different types of exercises, correct
techniques of executing the various exercises, proper breathing, and the safety factors involved in
spotting.
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OTHER ELECTIVE OPTIONS (TEACHER RECOMMENDATION ONLY)
Read 180 provides fundamental skills development in all areas of English Language Arts using the Read
180 computer program and research model of instruction.
ACCELERATED LEARNING PROGRAM
The Accelerated Learning Program is open to any upcoming freshman who is currently eligible for the
Gifted Program. Courses are offered on a rotating schedule.
Enriched Creative Writing provides opportunities to improve proficiency with emphasis on fluency,
control, and style; emphasizes writing as a creative process with instruction in grammar, mechanics,
usage, and imaginative expression. Offers opportunities for independent writing assignments to examine
narrative, descriptive, persuasive, and expository modes of discourse. Includes literature study. May
include publication of written student works. Content, process, and product are differentiated for the
gifted student.
E. Literature/Film Studies introduces the major forms of fiction and nonfiction through film studies:
short story, folktale, drama, essay, biography, and novel. Emphasis is on evaluation of these forms
through application of the elements of literature (e.g., plot, characterization, etc.). Delivers composition
through an integrated language arts approach in response to literary and cinematographic analysis.
Themes, content, and pacing are appropriate for gifted students. ½ unit course offered on an alternating
yearly schedule.
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CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES
T HE F O L L O W I N G C L U B S A N D A C TI V I T I E S A R E N O T C O U R S E S TO E N R O L L I N ; Y O U MU ST S E E K M E M B E R SH I P TO
P A R TI C I P A T E I N T H E S E C L U B S A N D A C TI V I T I E S .
Academic Bowl
HOSA – Health Occupation Society of America
American Sign Language Club
International Thespian Society
Amnesty International
Key Club
Anchor Club
Knitting Knerds
Baseball
Leadership
Basketball
Lacrosse
Beta Club
Math Team
Cheerleading
Mock Trial
Cross Country
Model U.N.
Drama Club
National Honor Society
Environmental Club
Ping Pong Club
Family, Career and Community Leaders of America
Psychology Club
Fast Pitch Softball
SGA Student Government Association
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Spanish Club & Spanish Honor Society
Females of Faith
Soccer
Football
Swimming
Foreign Language Club
Sting
French Club & French Honor Society
Track
Future Business Leaders of America
Tennis
Future Educators of America
Tri-M Music Honor Society
Gay/Straight Alliance
Volleyball
Girls as Leaders in Schools (GALS)
Video Game Club
Golf
Wrestling
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ACADEMIC SUPPORT
Sprayberry High School offers a variety of programs to support student learning and academic
achievement. Parents and students are always encouraged to contact the Teacher, Advisor and/or School
Counselor to address specific concerns.
8th grade Parent Night
Advanced Curriculum Night
After School Tutorial Programs
Before School Tutorial Programs
Classroom Guidance Activities
College and Career Night
Computer Labs available before and after school
Grade Level Advisement Meetings
National Honor Society Tutorials
On-Line resources and tutorials
Response to Intervention (RTI)
School wide writing initiatives
Study Island
Study Skills and Reading courses for Struggling Students
USA Test Prep
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CREATING A SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION FROM MIDDLE SCHOOL TO HIGH
SCHOOL
STUDENTS SHOULD:
• Be aware that many students have anxiety about moving up to high school.
• Know common concerns include size of school, worries about older students,
worries about not having friends, block schedule, and not being able to find
classes.
• Know it is normal to have anxiety about these changes.
• Get Involved! Try different activities. Be ready to meet new people.
• Discuss your concerns with your friends, an adult, or an older sibling.
• Attend sports events, concerts, and plays at the high school before transitioning
to high school.
• Give it time! Do you remember how long it took before you really felt at home in
middle school? It may take some time to adjust to the change. Others may feel
comfortable sooner.
• Not be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand something.
• Consider using a study partner or study group and keep this group throughout
high school.
• Take careful notes in class and consider rewriting them at night. This will help
increase retention.
• Do your homework in a quiet area. Take frequent breaks when doing homework.
• Outline or take notes on textbook information.
• Learn strategies for stress reduction that works for you. Some ideas may be
exercising, walking, listening to music, talking to a friend, etc.
• Know good study habits pay off!
• Use an agenda book to help with organizational skills.
• Be prepared when you come to school.
• Take an active role in your education! Learn about what requirements are
needed for a diploma and be ready to study!
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PARENTS SHOULD:
• Take an active role in the choices that your student makes in eighth grade about
what classes to take in ninth grade.
• Get involved with your student’s teachers and attend school functions.
• Encourage your student to become involved in the school community.
• Understand that it may take your student several weeks or months to get used to
high school.
• Continue to encourage student responsibility and make good choices.
• Make sure you provide and update information about your child.
• Double check information on your child’s registration forms (i.e. current phone
numbers and address)
• Make sure immunization records are up to date.
• Check to make sure your child has their Georgia Certificate of ear, eye, and dental
on file.
• Provide all registration information and Proof of Residency should be kept in the
student’s permanent records.
• Provide any testing and/or course credit information to child’s school counselor.
• Review school calendar and website for important dates and review the Student
Handbook for information regarding certain policies such as dress code,
absentee, discipline, etc.
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UPCOMING EVENTS
8TH GRADE PARENT NIGHT
MARCH 3, 2015
6:00 P.M.
SPRAYBERRY
HIGH SCHOOL
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