Intro for incoming students

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Intro for incoming students
 Welcome to CEMS at
CBS
- and Denmark’s
wonderful capital
Copenhagen
Written by your CCC 2012/2013
1. Copenhagen Business School ................................................... 4
1.1 The campus..............................................................................4
1.2 Your student ID card...................................................................6
1.3 E-campus and CBS Learn ..............................................................6
2. Information and communication channels for CEMS ....................... 7
3. Activities during the semester ................................................. 7
3.1 Block Seminar ...........................................................................8
3.2 Nordic Forum ...........................................................................8
3.3 Christmas Dinner .......................................................................8
4. Getting started in Copenhagen ................................................. 8
4.1 Getting your residence permit and CPR-number ................................9
4.2 Accommodation ...................................................................... 10
4.3 Transportation ........................................................................ 11
4.4 Bank account .......................................................................... 14
4.5 Danish courses ........................................................................ 14
4.6 Where to go out - locations ........................................................ 14
4.7 Sights ................................................................................... 15
4.8 Traditions .............................................................................. 16
4.9 Food & drinks ......................................................................... 17
4.10 The Danes ............................................................................ 18
Dear CEMSies,
We would like to take the opportunity to welcome all of you to Copenhagen
Business School and the CEMS MIM program. We would like to share our
experiences, support you, and make the start for you here in Copenhagen a bit
easier.
This little booklet shall therefore give you essential information about CBS and
some of the things you might be concerned with in the beginning of your
Copenhagen time.
We wish you all the best, lots of fun and a good time in Copenhagen.
Your CEMS Club Copenhagen
1. Copenhagen Business School
1.1 The campus
CBS is concentrated in four locations: Solbjerg Plads, Kilen, Dalgas Have and
Porcelænshaven. With all CBS’ activities located centrally in Frederiksberg, all
departments are within convenient walking distance of each other or easily
accessible by the Metro linking Dalgas Have with the Solbjerg campus.
CBS’ main campus is Solbjerg Plads, located at the address by the same name just
by Frederiksberg Metro station. A map of the campus locations is shown below.
1) Name: Solbjerg Plads (SP)
Address: Solbjerg Plads 3, 2000 Frederiksberg
What you find there: main library, lecture rooms, canteen, group rooms,
bookstore, program offices, IT support, counseling offices, Nexus
2) Name: Kilen (K)
Address: Kilevej 14, 2000 Frederiksberg
What you find there: bookstore, program offices, IT support, counseling
offices, Nexus
3) Dalgas Have (DH)
Address: Dalgas Have 15, 2000 Frederiksberg
What you find there: library, lecture rooms, group rooms, canteen
4) Porcelænshaven (PH)
Address: Porcelænshaven 16, 18, 24 & 26, 2000 Frederiksberg
What you find there: 24 h library, work areas, International Office
You can find more map links here when following this link www.cbs.dk/en/AboutCBS-Campus/Find-CBS/Map.
1.2 Your student ID card
All students at CBS will need a new student ID card. The card has your personal
information on the front, which is name, student e‐mail address, CPR number,
date of expiration, library bar code and a photo of you. The first student ID card is
free, if you lose it you will have to pay a fee of DKK 100 to get a replacement.
The ID card is a multi‐functional chip card, which apart from being a student
card, also can be set up to be a library card for the CBS library, as well as a CBS
cash card, that can be used for printing and purchases in the canteen. It may also
be used as an admission card.
How to get your first student card:
1) Come down to one of the photo booths. One is located in the computer room on
the ground floor by the library at Solbjerg Plads and the other is in Dalgas Have
(East) on the ground floor.
2) Log on to the machines by entering your username and your password.
3) Please follow the instructions on the screen. If you like the picture please
approve it. The chosen picture will be automatically transferred and printed on
your new student card.
4) You can collect your new student card about one week after having your picture
taken. The card can be picked up at the information desk in front of the library at
Solbjerg Plads.
For further questions concerning the student ID card, please check at e-campus:
https://e-campus.dk/studium/studiekort
1.3 E-campus and CBS Learn
E-campus:
E‐Campus is the place where you, during the course of your studies, will find
information on your study program as well as on student life at CBS. It contains
important information about your program including grades, the student life at
CBS, special events, job opportunities as well as counseling and other services
offered by CBS. It also gives you access to your student mail and CBS Learn.
Try to get familiar with this side as soon as possible.
Remember that it is your responsibility to keep up with the study-specific
information on e-campus and in your student email. It may have unfortunate
consequences for you, if you miss any important information. So don’t forget to
check it once in a while J
CBS Learn:
CBS Learn provides access to all presentations, materials and information regarding
lectures and classes. Go to the website and log in with your username and your
password that you received from the IT department. If you have time, try to move
around and get familiar with the system.
2. Information and communication channels for CEMS
CEMS students are very active, both academic-wise, but also social-wise. It is a
must to be part of the Facebook group to keep track of all the information
concerning you as a CEMS student at CBS.
The group is called CEMS @ CBS, and the link is:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/207939452574686/. Join the group and we will
grant you access to it.
The CEMS Club Copenhagen has a Facebook site with the link: http://www.facebook.com/pages/CEMS-Club-Copenhagen/217582521595777. Like
the page and follow the news posted by the board about CEMS and the activities of
the club.
Lastly, the CEMS Club Copenhagen has a website with news about what the CEMS
Club Copenhagen is up to, upcoming events, information for current and potential
students, as well as information about CEMS in general. This page will act as an
alternative to cems.org, tailored to CEMS students at CBS. The link to the website
is: www.cemsclub.dk. At the moment, the site is down due to maintenance, but
we expect to be back online in August.
3. Activities during the semester
Here, a selected overview will be given of the upcoming events for the Fall term at
CBS. More details and more events will be posted during the semester as soon as
we know more exactly what will happen and when. So keep yourself updated on
our communication channels J
3.1 Block Seminar
This year’s block seminar is held from August 20-24 and centers on the topic of
“Corporate Social Responsibility: National, Global and Strategic Perspectives”. The
block seminar at CBS is also known as partly being an introduction week, where the
academic perspective will be supplemented with social events. On Sunday 19, the
week will start off with a Welcome Dinner, where also the CCC will welcome you
and introduce the board. We will get back to you with a more detailed plan for this
upcoming week soon.
3.2 Nordic Forum
The Nordic Forum is the major event in the Nordics arranged by Denmark, Sweden,
Norway, and Finland. This year, the forum will take place in Stockholm on 25-27
October, with 90 selected students getting the opportunity to prove their skills
during 3 full days of workshops/skills seminars and social activities. You will hear
more from that later on. But check it out on Facebook already, it is an amazing
opportunity to learn and network across countries.
3.3 Christmas Dinner
The Christmas Dinner is one annual event that students are looking forward to
every year. It is the time before many students leave for a semester at another
school, or where they go on winter vacation. Denmark has very special traditions
for how to celebrate the Christmas Dinner, including special food and of course
“Snaps” – a strong liquor J Look forward to this event, it will be amazing!
4. Getting started in Copenhagen
When you have recently moved to Copenhagen, a lot of other things besides the
studies are in your mind that you have to figure out and get in order. We would
like to touch upon some of the topics that you are concerned with in the beginning
to help you organize all the small things that will come up, such as getting your
CPR-number, housing, transportation, bank accounts, participation in Danish
courses, going out, and sights, followed by some words about the Danes as such J
4.1 Getting your residence permit and CPR-number
The CPR‐number is the Civil Registration Number, which is of great importance
for your life in Denmark. It is used in all aspects of life in Denmark, such as when in
contact with the health authorities, libraries, banks, etc. To be able to get this
number a residence permit is usually necessary.
How to get your residence permit:
All students living in Denmark for more than three months need a residence permit
(except for students from the Nordic Countries).
Non‐EU nationals must have applied for their residence permit before arriving in
Denmark. If you have not received your permit, please come and see us at the
International Office straight away.
Important: EU Nationals, who are staying in Københavns Kommune (the
Municipality of Copenhagen) and Frederiksberg Kommune (the Municipality of
Frederiksberg), should apply for the residence permit at The International Office,
where immigration officers will be present. Information about dates will be placed
on E‐campus! So again, check it regularly J
If, however, for some reason, you miss this opportunity, here is the address, where
you can get your permit:
Statsforvaltningen Hovedstaden
Borups Allé 177
2400 Copenhagen NV
Phone: +45 7256 7000
All EU nationals must bring the following for the residence permit application:
• Your passport or EU Identity Card,
• A copy of your letter of acceptance from CBS
• 2 passport‐sized photographs
It can take a couple of weeks before you receive the permit. It will either send to
you or you have to pick it up at the international office!
How to get your CPR-number:
When you have received your residence permit, you have to go to the municipality
of the area you live in. The municipality you live in determines which
“Borgerservice” Center you belong to. As soon as you have received your residence
permit you should go to the center, bringing your passport, your residence permit
and your rental agreement. You will also be asked to choose a doctor from a list of
doctors in your area. The CPR number will be sent to you after some weeks.
4.2 Accommodation
Generally, it can be very difficult to find accommodation in Copenhagen. The rent
is high and the rooms are small. The best way to find something is through
contacts, so if you already know somebody in Copenhagen, try to ask them if they
know of any rooms available. Otherwise, try to post your interest at the CEMS
Facebook group. CEMS students are leaving for exchange every semester, and most
of them are subletting apartments or rooms, so you might be lucky.
If that doesn’t work, don’t be discouraged. There are other options:
CBS has a department that can assist you in finding accommodation for your stay in
Copenhagen. The address and contact info is:
The Housing Department
CBS – The International Office
Dalgas Have 15, 2nd floor, west 2V022
DK-2000 Frederiksberg
Phone: +45 3815 3006 (reception)
E-mail: [email protected]
Opening Hours: Mon, Tues, Thurs: 10 - 12 and 13 - 15; Closed on
Wednesdays and Fridays
Moreover, at the CBS intranet, e-campus, there’s a site for renting of apartments,
which is very useful, and which also offers links to other sites.
The link is: https://e-campus.dk/cybercampus/koeb---salg, and you need to log in
with your CBS account to get access to the site.
Other useful links for housing:
•
HousingAnywhere:
o
www.housinganywhere.com
www.facebook.com/HousingAnywherecom
•
Lejebolig.dk
o
•
lejebolig.dk/boliger/lejligheder-i-koebenhavn.aspx
Boligportalen.dk
However, always be aware of fake deals and always keep reality in mind, when a
deal sounds too good to be true J
Generally, the geographical areas of Østerbro, Nørrebro, Vesterbro. Amager, Inner
Copenhagen, Valby, and Frederiksberg are attractive areas within biking distance
from CBS.
4.3 Transportation
Living in Copenhagen basically requires you to become a cyclist. With a total daily
amount of 1,3 million km covered each day, Copenhagen is the city of bicycles. If
you decide to use a bike as your number one transportation, check www.dba.dk, go
to the local bike shops or ask the students leaving Copenhagen.
But Copenhagen also has an efficient public transport system, which runs 24 hours
a day. You can use buses, S‐trains (local trains) or Metro. You can find maps on
every station or bus stops.
Buses
All busses in Copenhagen are yellow and
connect all the areas through a complex
system. Generally, you will always find a
bus in the inner part of the city, compared
to the suburb where you might have to
wait some time. Rush hour is from 07.00 –
09.00 and 15.00 – 17.30. In this period you
will find most departures as well, but it
can be tricky to have a bicycle with the
bus. Bus stops are easy to recognize, always marked with the number of the lines.
A-bus
Some busses are painted half red/yellow. This is the A-busses, which are bus lines
that leave every 5th minute. They stop on every corner, more or less, but they
keep running with very short interval.
S-bus
Other busses are painted half blue/yellow. These S-busses only stop at major bus
stops and runs fast through the city. Normally they only leave 3-4 times per hour.
S-trains
The
S-trains
connect
the
areas
of
Copenhagen and the upland in north, west
and south. They are recognizable by their
deep red color and the stations are always
marked with the big S-logo.
Metro
The metro of Copenhagen is quite new. The fully automatic trains run from the
eastern (The Airport) and western (Ørestaden) part of
Amager to the city, where the line passes Kings
Square, Nørreport (the traffic center of Copenhagen)
and Frederiksberg (where CBS is located) before it
ends in Vanløse. The two lines run every 4th minute.
The metro is very effective and without a doubt the
fastest means of transportation in Copenhagen.
Tickets
Even though there are busses, trains and metro, the ticket system is unified.
Meaning if you buy a ticket in the bus, it works as well in the train and metro.
When buying your ticket, you should be aware of the number of zones you are
travelling. The fare of a monthly pass or a single ticket namely depends on how
many zones you are going through, and you can use the same ticket on Metro,
buses and local trains and it lasts for one hour. The minimum amount of zones you
can buy is two zones, even if you travel within the same zone.
The public transportation works quite well, but it is expensive too. If you therefore
are going to travel almost daily and do not have a bike, you will find it cheapest to
buy a monthly bus/train/metro pass. You can buy monthly tickets or “klippekorts”
(engl. 10 strips card, costs DKK 145) to get around without stress. The “klippekort”
can be purchased in most kiosks, 7 ‐ elevens or simply at the ticket vending
machine at the stations (NOT in the trains or busses) and work for all types of
public transportation. For the monthly ticket you have to go to a shop, one is
located in the Frederiksberg Center across from Solbjerg Plads (have a passport
picture ready!).
A map over the zones for public transport can be seen at:
www.moviatrafik.dk/dinrejse/kort/zoneoversigt/Documents/Hovedstadsomraadet/
1.pdf
Info and map of the metro can be found at: http://intl.m.dk/#!/
If you want to move around by car, be aware that you know all the (for
international students sometimes very senseless) parking rules, because the fee for
wrong parking is horrendous.
Useful websites to find your way around:
http://www.rejseplanen.dk/
http://www.findvej.dk/
4.4 Bank account
Danske Bank and Nordea are the two biggest banks in Denmark. Opening a bank account there is for free and very easy. Check out their websites to get more information on their fees: Dankse Bank: http://www.danskebank.dk/en-dk/Pages/default.aspx
Nordea: http://www.nordea.dk/Nordeadk%2bin%2bbrief/11297.html
Small decision factor: There is a Nordea cash machine at CBS Solbjerg Plads! J
4.5 Danish courses
Usually, CBS offers you the opportunity to participate in a Danish course. You have
to sign up for it at www.cbs.dk if you wish to participate. It is a good way not only
to learn the language, but also to meet other international students that are in the
same situation as you.
Don’t be stressed if you are told that you can only participate if you have a Danish
CPR‐number. As described above, the CPR process can take a couple of weeks and
might not be there when the course starts. There will be a second beginning date
in the middle of the semester in case your CPR‐number wasn’t ready.
4.6 Where to go out - locations
You can go out any night in Copenhagen, but the busiest nights are Thursday,
Friday and Saturday. There are a wide variety of clubs and bars, and private
parties are also very popular. People don’t go to clubs in Copenhagen until around
midnight or 1 am, which means they don’t go home before 6 am!
Many clubs have an age limit of 21, so make sure to bring ID (especially for the
young-looking-onesJ).
A selection of examples is provided below:
“Café Nexus“
Address:
Solbjerg Plads CBS, Frederiksberg
Website:
http://www.cbs.dk/en/About-CBS-Campus/CampusFacilities/VirtualTour/Menu/Solbjerg-Plads/Café-Nexus
Café Nexus at Solbjerg Plads is a student café. Each week there is the Thursday
bar, and during the year theme parties and concerts are arranged. There is also
table football in the café and low prices on coffee and beverages.
“The Jane”
Address:
Gråbrødretorv, København K
Website:
‐
The Jane is a brand‐new nightclub, opened in March 2011. Taking the Emmy‐
award‐winning US TV‐show "Mad Men" as its inspiration, dressing up is definitely
the thing to do for at night at The Jane. There are a number of different bars with
differing musical styles, though jive and swing are all the rage in the cocktail bar.
“Francis Pony “
Address:
Klosterstræde 23, København K
Website:
http://www.francispony.dk/
Francis Pony is a student bar, but that doesn’t mean it’s slacking in terms of style.
It has a young yet mature crowd. The bar prices are average and it has 2 floors.
There’s no actual dance floor, which would be impossible since the place it pretty
packed. If you’re a student then it’s a great place to go and socialize. Free
entrance and optional wardrobe.
“Kødbyen“
Address:
Kødbyen, København V
Website:
http://www.koedbyen.kk.dk/english/the-white-meat-city-ofcopenhagen/
Kødbyen (alias The Meatcity) in Vesterbro is the place to open up all the new and
trendy establishments. Art galleries (V1 Bierggaard, Aunt T, etc.) and a wide range
of restaurants (BioMio, Fiskebar, Mother) can be found here.
The neighborhood is also known for its vibrant nightlife and clubs such as
„Karrierebar“, „Jolene“ and „Bakken“ lie side by side.
4.7 Sights
A very good city guide webpage is www.aok.dk/english, which gives you
information on everything going on in Copenhagen regarding restaurants, concerts,
nightlife, exhibitions etc.
Another good website is www.visitcopenhagen.com.
Some top attractions of Copenhagen, which we want to highlight here, are:
-
The Little Mermaid
-
Amalienborg Palace (residence of the royal family)
-
Christiania (a free town within the city)
-
Canal tour (takes you through the canals of Copenhagen passing top
attractions – very recommendable during the summer time with sunshine
and a cold beerJ)
-
Christiansborg Palace (houses the Danish Parliament, Supreme Court, and
Ministry of State)
-
Tivoli (an old amusement park in the center of Copenhagen)
-
Nyhavn (a lively restaurant/bar-packed street right by the canal in the
center of Copenhagen)
-
Strøget (the world’s longest pedestrian street filled with shops and cafes)
For small one-day or weekend trips, we want to highlight two attractions:
-
Louisiana
Museum
of
Modern
Art
(modern
museum
in
astounding
surroundings)
-
Mont’s Klint
http://www.cbs.dk/en/CBS-International/International-Students/Guides-forInternational-Students-at-CBS
4.8 Traditions
The holidays at Christmas and Easter are typical periods were the families are
gathering. For Christmas we celebrate on the 24th, where we eat, sing and open
presents. 1st and 2nd Christmas day (25th and 26th) are normally days, where
friends and families join for a traditional Christmas lunch. However, even before
Christmas in the beginning of December, many firms or friends meet for a lovely
(and largely) Christmas lunch. A similar lunch is repeated again in the time of
Easter.
Skt. Hans is a celebration of the longest day of the year, and is usually around June
20-25. The tradition attracts thousands of people to the beaches all over the
country, where large fires are illuminated with a witch on the top.
4.9 Food & drinks
We Danes love to eat and drink! Throughout history, Denmark has developed fast,
from a country of farmers to a knowledge society. So too has the traditional Danish
cuisine. Today, the average Dane eats very international food, but there are still
some classic dishes that always will be a part of our culture.
Frikadeller is the Danish way to make meatballs. They
are made of minced pork meat mixed with eggs, chopped
onions and milk. The meatballs are then shaped as a
small ball and fried in butter on a pan.
Rugbrød (or rye bread in English) is a very common thing
to eat for lunch. Normally, we add toppings for the bread
as ham, turkey, cheese and sausages. The bread is dark
and heavy, full with fibers and much healthier than
normal white bread.
Leverpostej is another classic dish. Actually, it is a kind
of liver pâté, but does not have the distinct taste of liver.
Normally, we add it on the rye bread with slices of
cucumber or - if it has to be luxury - fried bacon and
mushrooms.
Beer is and has always been a part of the Danish culture.
Many workmen still drink a beer for their lunch. In
weekends it is normal to meet for a beer at a café or bar
with your friends. The history of the beer goes back to
the Vikings, meaning the tradition of brewing beer in
Denmark is more than a thousand years old. Drinking a
beer in Denmark doesn’t necessarily mean you get drunk.
We enjoy the flavor and taste and through the last
decade many new breweries have seen the light. It has become popular to drink
specialties and not only our traditional beer.
The most familiar brands are Carlsberg, Tuborg, Ceres, Faxe and Harboe.
A visit at the old Carlsberg factory is possible. Entrance fee about 60 DKK.
4.10 The Danes
Coming to a new country is always an exciting experience and an opportunity to
meet new and interesting people. Being able “to mingle with the locals” is always
of great importance for every newcomer and definitely recommendable to get an
understanding for the culture in the country. Empty words that you have probably
heard a lot. But it is simply true. It is amazing how internationally minded the
Danish population is. This is extremely underlined by the fact that everybody is
able to speak English. So, no worries if you find it quite hard to get a grip on the
Danish language, you will be able to find your way around perfectly fine anyways.
Danes are also open-minded and interested and very helpful when you need
support. Equality is of great importance and we love to show our flag.
You will often stumble over the Danish word “hygge”, which basically means being
around friends in a nice and cozy atmosphere. “Hygge” is simply everything that is
easy, nice and brings fun. If that isn’t a good starting point to have a good time in
Copenhagen, I don’t know what else!

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