Agenda - American Chemical Society

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Agenda - American Chemical Society
www.acs.org
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
Council Agenda
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
8:00 AM
Grand Ballroom B
Hilton San Francisco Union Square Hotel
San Francisco, California
American Chemical Society
COUNCIL, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
8:00 A.M., August 13, 2014
Hilton San Francisco Union Square Hotel, Grand Ballroom B
San Francisco, California
AGENDA
ITEM
I.
RESOLUTION HONORING DECEASED COUNCILORS
II.
APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF MEETING OF MARCH 19, 2014 (attached) ............................ 4-17
III.
NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS
A. Election to Committee on Committees (attached) ............................................................. 18-25
(1) Introduction of candidates for Committee on Committees (oral)
B. Election to Council Policy Committee (attached) ............................................................... 26-33
(1) Introduction of candidates for Council Policy Committee (oral)
C. Election to Committee on Nominations and Elections (attached) ...................................... 34-43
(1) Introduction of candidates for Committee on Nominations
and Elections (oral)
D. Request for suggestions for 2016 Elected Committees (attached) ................................... 44-47
E. Ballot counts, previous elections (attached) ............................................................................. 48
FOR
COUNCIL
ACTION
PAGES
IV.
REPORTS OF OFFICERS
A. President (attached and oral) ................................................................................................... 49
B. President-Elect (attached and oral) .......................................................................................... 50
C. Immediate Past President (attached and oral) ................................................................... 51-52
D. Chair of Board of Directors (attached and oral) ....................................................................... 53
(1) Minutes of the March 14-16 and
Report from the June 2014 Board meetings (attached) ........................................ 54-58
E. Executive Director (attached and oral) ............................................................................... 59-60
(1) Report of the Governing Board for Publishing (attached) ........................................... 61
®
(2) Report of the Governing Board for the ACS Green Chemistry Institute (attached)62-63
V.
REPORTS OF ELECTED COMMITTEES OF THE COUNCIL
A. Council Policy Committee
(1) Minutes of March 18, 2014 meeting (attached) ..................................................... 64-68
(2) Oral report on current activities - Vice-Chair
B. Committee on Committees (attached) ..................................................................................... 69
(1) Oral report on current activities
FOR COUNCIL
(2) Recommendations for continuation of selected committees (oral)
ACTION
(3) Recognition of service (attached and oral) ............................................................ 70-72
C. Committee on Nominations and Elections (attached) .............................................................. 73
(1) Oral report on current activities
VI.
REPORTS OF SOCIETY COMMITTEES AND COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE
A. Committee on Budget and Finance (attached) ........................................................................ 74
(1) Oral report on current activities
B. Committee on Education (attached)................................................................................... 75-76
(1) Oral report on current activities
C. Committee on Science (joint with Board) (attached) ................................................................ 77
(1) Oral report on current activities
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(continued)
2
PAGES
ITEM
VII.
REPORTS OF COUNCIL STANDING COMMITTEES
A. Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs (attached) ........................................... 78-79
(1) Oral report on current activities
FOR COUNCIL
(2) Approval of the “Professional Employment Guidelines” (attached)........................ 80-87
ACTION
B. Committee on Meetings and Expositions (attached) ............................................................... 88
(1) Oral report on current activities
C. Committee on Divisional Activities (attached) .......................................................................... 89
(1) Oral report on current activities
D. Committee on Local Section Activities (attached) .................................................................... 90
(1) Oral report on current activities
FOR COUNCIL
(2) Approval of the change in a Local Section territory (attached)............................... 91-92
ACTION
E. Committee on Membership Affairs (attached) ................................................................... 93-94
(1) Oral report on current activities
F. Committee on Constitution and Bylaws (attached) .................................................................. 95
(1) Oral report on current activities
VIII.
REPORTS OF OTHER COMMITTEES
A. Analytical Reagents (attached) ................................................................................................ 96
B. Chemical Safety (joint with Board) (attached) .................................................................... 97-98
C. Chemistry and Public Affairs (joint with Board) (attached and oral) ................................. 99-100
D. Chemists with Disabilities (joint with Board) (attached) ......................................................... 101
E. Community Activities (joint with Board) (attached) ................................................................. 102
F. Environmental Improvement (joint with Board) (attached and oral) ....................................... 103
G. Ethics (attached and oral) .............................................................................................. 104-105
H. International Activities (joint with Board) (attached and oral) ......................................... 106-107
FOR COUNCIL
(1) Petition to charter one new International Chemical Sciences Chapter ...................... 108
ACTION
I. Nomenclature, Terminology, and Symbols (attached) ........................................................... 109
J. Patents and Related Matters (joint with Board) (attached) .................................................... 110
K. Professional Training (joint with Board) (attached and oral) .................................................. 111
L. Project SEED (attached and oral) .......................................................................................... 112
M. Public Relations and Communications (joint with Board) (attached and oral) ....................... 113
N. Publications (joint with Board) (attached) ............................................................................... 114
O. Senior Chemists (joint with Board) (attached and oral).......................................................... 115
P. Technician Affairs (attached and oral) ................................................................................... 116
Q. Women Chemists (joint with Board) (attached and oral) ....................................................... 117
R. Younger Chemists (joint with Board) (attached and oral) ...................................................... 118
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IX.
OLD BUSINESS
X.
NEW BUSINESS
A. Resolutions
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Council Minutes
DRAFT
MINUTES
COUNCIL
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
March 19, 2014
Dallas, Texas
The Council of the American Chemical Society met in Dallas, Texas, on March 19, 2014, beginning at 8:00 a.m.
Tom J. Barton, President of the Society and of the Council, presided. The following Councilors, Alternate
Councilors, and accredited representatives were present:
Ex-Officio: John E. Adams, Tom J. Barton, George M. Bodner, Ronald Breslow, Bruce E. Bursten, William F.
Carroll, Jr., Charles P. Casey, Bonnie A. Charpentier, Pat N. Confalone, Helen M. Free, Thomas R. Gilbert, Ned
D. Heindel, Rigoberto Hernandez, Catherine T. Hunt, Nancy B. Jackson, Madeleine Jacobs, Valerie J. Kuck,
Thomas H. Lane, Flint H. Lewis, Ingrid Montes, E. Ann Nalley, Attila E. Pavlath, Eli M. Pearce, Dorothy J.
Phillips, Elsa Reichmanis, Barbara A. Sawrey, Diane Grob Schmidt, Kathleen M. Schulz, Bassam Z. Shakhashiri,
Edel Wasserman, Marinda Li Wu.
Bylaw: Judith H. Cohen, Catherine C. Fenselau, Sara J. Risch.
Divisions: Agricultural & Food Chemistry, Michael Appell, John W. Finley, Michael J. Morello, Agnes M.
Rimando. Agrochemicals, Rodney M. Bennett, Jeanette M. Van Emon. Analytical Chemistry, Michelle V.
Buchanan, M. Bonner Denton, Roland F. Hirsch, Donna Nelson*. Biochemical Technology, Arindam Bose, Kurt
A. Brorson*, Theresa A. Good, Sharon P. Shoemaker. Biological Chemistry, Christine S. Chow, Thomas J.
Magliery, Nicole S. Sampson. Business Development & Management, Janet L. Bryant, Michael Hurrey.
Carbohydrate Chemistry, Derek Horton, John R. Vercellotti. Cellulose and Renewable Materials, Kevin J.
Edgar. Chemical Education, Renée S. Cole, Sally B. Mitchell*, Ellen J. Yezierski. Chemical Health & Safety,
Robert H. Hill, Jr., Russell W. Phifer. Chemical Information, Helen Anne Lawlor, Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks.
Chemical Toxicology, Steven E. Rokita*. Chemistry & The Law, James C. Carver, Alan M. Ehrlich. Colloid &
Surface Chemistry, Eric M. Furst, Tina M. Nenoff, Maria M. Santore. Computers in Chemistry, Emilio X.
Esposito, Peter C. Jurs, Ralph A. Wheeler. Energy & Fuels, Archibald C. Buchanan, III, Martin L. Gorbaty, Lisa
Houston, Umit S. Ozkan*. Environmental Chemistry, V. Dean Adams, Dionysios D. Dionysiou*, Alan W.
Elzerman, Martha J.M. Wells. Fluorine Chemistry, David A. Dixon. Geochemistry, R. Lee Penn. History of
Chemistry, Roger A. Egolf, Mary Virginia Orna. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Spiro D. Alexandratos,
Melanie J. Lesko, Mary K. Moore, Connie J. Murphy*. Inorganic Chemistry, Debbie Crans**, James K.
McCusker, Silvia Ronco, Sheila R. Smith*. Medicinal Chemistry, Jane V. Aldrich, John Butera*, William J.
Greenlee. Nuclear Chemistry & Technology, Silvia S. Jurisson, Graham F. Peaslee. Organic Chemistry, Huw
M.L. Davies, P. Andrew Evans, Scott R. Gilbertson, Cynthia A. Maryanoff. Physical Chemistry, Michael R.
Berman, Ellen B. Stechel, Steven E. Wheeler*, Angela K. Wilson. Polymer Chemistry, Frank D. Blum, William
H. Daly, Mary Ann Meador, John Pochan. Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering, Benny D. Freeman,
David J. Lohse, Theodore Provder*, Dean C. Webster. Professional Relations, Lynne P. Greenblatt, R. Daniel
Libby. Rubber, John M. Long. Small Chemical Businesses, Sharon V. Vercellotti.
Local Sections: Akron, James E. Duddey, Daryl L. Stein. Alabama, Tracy P. Hamilton. Ames, Malika JeffriesEl. Auburn, Edward J. Parish*. Baton Rouge, Bryan K. Franklin. Binghamton, Wayne E. Jones, Jr.
Brazosport, Carolyn Ribes. California, G. Bryan Balazs, Michael T.H. Cheng, Sheila Kanodia, Lee H. Latimer,
Alex M. Madonik, Eileen M. Nottoli, Elaine S. Yamaguchi. California Los Padres, Albert C. Censullo.
Carolina-Piedmont, Matthew K. Chan, Daniel Rabinovich. Central Arizona, Richard C. Bauer. Central
*Alternate Councilor
**Temporary Substitute Councilor
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Council Minutes
Arkansas, Martin D. Perry. Central Massachusetts, Christopher Masi. Central New Mexico, Donivan R.
Porterfield. Central North Carolina, Robert A. Yokley. Central Ohio Valley, Gary D. Anderson. Central
Pennsylvania, Lori S. Van Der Sluys. Central Texas, Diane M. Kneeland, Barry J. Streusand. Central Utah,
Jennifer B. Nielson. Central Wisconsin, C. Marvin Lang. Chattanooga, Verrill M. Norwood, III. Chemical
Society of Washington, Joseph M. Antonucci, Elise A. Brown, Regina J. Cody, Michael P. Doyle, John M.
Malin, Kim M. Morehouse, Jason E. Schaff, Robert J. Wiacek, Jennifer Young Tanir. Chicago, Cherlynlavaughn
Bradley, Charles E. Cannon, David S. Crumrine, Kenneth P. Fivizzani, Herbert S. Golinkin, Fran K. Kravitz,
Margaret Stowell Levenberg*, Milt Levenberg, Inessa Miller, Susan M. Shih. Cincinnati, Bruce S. Ault,
Kathleen Gibboney, Roger A. Parker. Cleveland, David W. Ball, Dwight W. Chasar. Coastal Georgia, Will E.
Lynch. Colorado, Sandra J. Bonetti, David L. Dillon, Connie Gabel, Michael D. Mosher, Susan M. Schelble.
Columbus, Donald C. Songstad, Virginia H. Songstad, Jeffrey B. Trent*. Connecticut Valley, Ronald D. Archer,
Kevin M. Shea, Julianne M.D. Smist, Frank J. Torre, Ronald J. Wikholm. Cornell, Thomas A. McCarrick.
Corning, Roger F. Bartholomew. Dallas-Fort Worth, Mary E. Anderson, Linda D. Schultz, E. Thomas Strom.
Dayton, Steven Trohalaki. Decatur-Springfield, Harry Elston**. Delaware, Tiffany N. Hoerter, Martha G.
Hollomon, Nora S. Radu*, Margaret J. Schooler. Detroit, Mark A. Benvenuto, James M. Landis, Jr., Walter O.
Siegl. East Central Illinois, Ellen A. Keiter. East Tennessee, Alan A. Hazari. East Texas, Michael Sheets.
Eastern New York, Mary K. Carroll, Warren D. Hull, Jr. Eastern North Carolina, Satinder Ahuja. Erie,
Adrienne M. Gilbert. Florida, Béla S. Buslig, Carmen V. Gauthier. Georgia, Lissa Dulany, David S. Gottfried,
Donald G. Hicks*, Terence E. Say. Greater Houston, Simon G. Bott, Carolyn A. Burnley, Amber S. Hinkle,
Mamie W. Moy, David M. Singleton, Kerry K. Spilker. Green Mountain, Willem R. Leenstra. Hampton Roads,
Lisa S. Webb. Hawaii, T. Blake Vance, Jr. Heart O’Texas, Darrell G. Watson. Huron Valley, Ellene T. Contis,
Harriet Lindsay. Idaho, Joshua J. Pak. Illinois Heartland, Gregory M. Ferrence. Illinois-Iowa, Richard G.
Rogers. Indiana, Dawn A. Brooks, David Mitchell, Robert A. Pribush. Indiana-Kentucky Border, Jeffery W.
Seyler. Inland Northwest, Jeffrey A. Rahn. Kalamazoo, Lydia E.M. Hines. Kanawha Valley, Madan M.
Bhasin. Kansas City, William G. Gutheil, Eckhard Hellmuth. Kansas State University, Yasmin Patell**.
Kentucky Lake, Charles M. Baldwin. Lake Superior, Donald K. Harriss. Lehigh Valley, Pamela D. Kistler,
Carol B. Libby. Lexington, Mark Blankenbuehler. Louisiana, Alvin F. Bopp. Louisville, James F. Tatera.
Maine, Mitchell R.M. Bruce. Mark Twain, Dawood Afzal. Maryland, Merle I. Eiss, Dana Ferraris, Jan E.
Kolakowski, Paul J. Smith, Stephanie Watson. Michigan State University, Susanne M. Lewis*. Middle Georgia,
Robert J. Hargrove. Mid-Hudson, George W. Ruger. Midland, Bob A. Howell, Tina M. Leaym. Milwaukee,
Kevin W. Glaeske, Joseph J. Piatt. Minnesota, Marilyn D. Duerst, Lynn G. Hartshorn, Sarah M. Mullins, Danae
R. Quirk-Dorr, Wayne C. Wolsey. Mississippi, G. Reid Bishop. Mobile, Lesli W. Bordas. Mojave Desert, Peter
Zarras. Mo-Kan-Ok, The Tri-State, Khamis S. Siam. Montana, Kyle S. Strode. Nashville, Judith M. IriarteGross, Ruth Ann Woodall. Nebraska, James M. Takacs. New Haven, Olivier Nicaise, Gerald J. Putterman. New
York, Donald D. Clarke*, Ronald P. D’Amelia, Brian R. Gibney, Neil D. Jespersen, Hiroko I. Karan, Joan A.
Laredo-Liddell, Anne T. O’Brien, Patricia A. Redden, Frank Romano. North Carolina, James L. Chao, Alvin L.
Crumbliss, Melissa A. Pasquinelli, Laura S. Sremaniak, Alan E. Tonelli*. North Jersey, Jeannette E. Brown,
Amber F. Charlebois, Jacqueline A. Erickson, Stan S. Hall, Elizabeth M. Howson, Diane Krone, Fangbiao Li*,
Michael M. Miller, Joseph A. Potenza, Monica R. Sekharan, William H. Suits, Jefferson W. Tilley*. Northeast
Georgia, Susan D. Richardson. Northeast Tennessee, John Engelman, II. Northeast Wisconsin, Martin D.
Rudd. Northeastern, Michaeline F. Chen, Mukund S. Chorghade*, Catherine E. Costello, Michael P. Filosa,
Patrick M. Gordon, Morton Z. Hoffman, Christine H. Jaworek-Lopes*, Katherine L. Lee, Doris I. Lewis, Robert
L. Lichter, Kenneth C. Mattes, Jackie J. O’Neil, Norton P. Peet*, Mary J. Shultz, Michael Singer, Ruth E. Tanner.
Northeastern Ohio, Sarah S. Preston*. Northern New York, Richard Partch**. Northern Oklahoma, Joe D.
Allison*. Northern West Virginia, Harry Finklea**. Northwest Central Ohio, Hafed A. Bascal*. Northwest
Louisiana, Brian A. Salvatore. Oklahoma, Allen W. Apblett. Ole Miss, Jason E. Ritchie. Omaha, Richard B.
Lomneth. Orange County, Robert S. Cohen, Rabin D. Lai, Sanda P. Sun. Oregon, Richard L. Nafshun.
Orlando, Darlene K. Slattery. Ozark, Eric Bosch. Panhandle Plains, Mary E. Graff. Penn-Ohio Border, Doris
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Council Minutes
L. Zimmerman. Pensacola, Allan M. Ford. Permian Basin, Kathryn Louie. Philadelphia, Anthony W.
Addison, Georgia Arbuckle-Keil, Melissa B. Cichowicz, Deborah H. Cook, Judith N. Currano, Ella L. Davis,
Anne S. DeMasi, Rick Ewing, Mark A. Forman, Kathryn A. Lysko, James K. Murray, Jr., Kathleen T. Shaginaw.
Pittsburgh, Richard S. Danchik, Joseph D. Jolson*, Vincent M. Mautino. Portland, Angela Hoffman, Marcie J.
Merritt*. Princeton, Louise M. Lawter. Puerto Rico, Néstor M. Carballeira, Agnes Dubey. Puget Sound, Gary
D. Christian, Gregory L. Milligan, Mark Wicholas, Neal A. Yakelis*. Purdue, Suzanne C. Bart. Red River
Valley, William R. Shay*. Rhode Island, Peter J. Bonk. Richland, Richard A. Hermens. Rio Grande Valley,
Keith H. Pannell. Rochester, D. Richard Cobb, Richard W. Hartmann. Rock River, Dennis N. Kevill. SabineNeches, John A. Whittle. Sacramento, Janan M. Hayes. St. Louis, Lisa M. Balbes, Lawrence Barton, Donna G.
Friedman, Alexa B. Serfis. Salt Lake, Thomas G. Richmond, Peter J. Stang. San Antonio, Larry C. Grona. San
Diego, Thomas R. Beattie, Hui Cai, Desiree Grubisha, John G. Palmer, J. Kenneth Poggenburg, Jr., David M.
Wallace. San Gorgonio, J. Ernest Simpson, Laurie Starkey*. San Joaquin Valley, Melissa L. Golden. Santa
Clara Valley, Abigail Kennedy, George J. Lechner, David R. Parker*, Sally B. Peters, Peter F. Rusch, Herbert B.
Silber, Ean Warren. Savannah River, Christopher J. Bannochie. Sierra Nevada, Ana de Bettencourt-Dias.
Sioux Valley, Jetty L. Duffy-Matzner. Snake River, Don L. Warner. South Carolina, William H. Breazeale, Jr.,
Scott R. Goode. South Florida, Milagros Delgado, George H. Fisher. South Jersey, Guenter Niessen. South
Plains, Bruce R. Whittlesey*. South Texas, Thomas R. Hays. Southeastern Pennsylvania, Gregory P. Foy.
Southern Arizona, Steven L. Brown. Southern California, Rita R. Boggs, Thomas R. LeBon, Virgil J. Lee,
Sofia Pappatheodorou*, Eleanor D. Siebert, Barbara P. Sitzman. Southern Illinois, Rachel Morgan Theall.
Southern Nevada, John Gerlach**. Southwest Georgia, Subhash C. Goel. Susquehanna Valley, Dee Ann
Casteel. Tampa Bay, Marie Bourgeois, Thomas A. Jackman. Texas A&M, David E. Bergbreiter. Toledo,
Brenda K. Snyder*. Trenton, Bruce S. Burnham, Benny C. Chan. University of Missouri, Justin R. Walensky.
Upper Ohio Valley, Kevin Pate. Upper Peninsula, Martin Thompson. Virginia, Kristine S. Smetana, Ann M.
Sullivan, Linette M. Watkins. Virginia Blue Ridge, W. Gary Hollis, Jr. Wabash Valley, Edward A. Mottel.
Wakarusa Valley, Joseph A. Heppert. Washington-Idaho Border, Richard V. Williams. Western Carolinas,
Lucy P. Eubanks, George L. Heard. Western Connecticut, Edward J. Caliguri*, L. Kraig Steffen. Western
Maryland, Don B. Weser. Western Michigan, Mark A. Thomson. Wichita, D. Paul Rillema. Wichita FallsDuncan, Keith R. Vitense. Wilson Dam, Michael B. Moeller. Wisconsin, Martha L. Casey, Ieva L. Reich.
Wyoming, John O. Hoberg.
Nonvoting Councilors: Brian A. Bernstein, Karl S. Booksh, Susan B. Butts, H.N. Cheng, Denise L. Creech,
Mary M. Kirchhoff, A. Maureen Rouhi.
Noncouncilors: Elizabeth P. Beckham, Peter K. Dorhout, Brian J. Dougherty, Alicia E. Harris, David E.
Harwell, John C. Katz, William A. Lester, Jr., Christopher K. Ober, Christi Pearson, Barbara F. Polansky, Henry
F. Schaefer, David T. Smorodin, Simanco R. Staley, Frank E. Walworth, Marleen G. Weidner.
The preceding list of attendees at the Council meeting includes the following: 31 Ex- Officio Councilors; 3
Bylaw Councilors; 83 Division Councilors (71 elected, 11 alternate, 1 temporary); 328 Local Section Councilors
(297 elected, 26 alternate, 5 temporary); 7 Nonvoting Councilors; and 15 Noncouncilors (staff and others).
Approximately 55 observers were in attendance.
Resolution
The Council ADOPTED the following resolution as presented by Council Policy Committee (CPC) Vice-Chair
Alan M. Ehrlich:
1. BE IT RESOLVED That the Council of the American Chemical Society commemorate the passing of the
following Councilors, remembering them with respect and affection, and extending sincerest condolences to their
families in their bereavement:
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Council Minutes
•
Dr. Albert W. Burgstahler, Professor Emeritus of chemistry at the University of Kansas, and
Councilor for the University of Kansas Section from 1965-1968.
•
Dr. Malcolm Renfrew, Professor Emeritus of chemistry at the University of Idaho, and Councilor
for the Division of Paint, Plastics and Printing Ink Chemistry 1949-50; Division of Chemical
Marketing and Economics 1960-61; and Washington-Idaho Border Section from 1970-1989.
•
Dr. Lucile E. Decker, former Senior Associate Editor in the Biochemistry Department at
Chemical Abstracts Service, and Councilor for the Columbus Section from 1977-1979, 19851987, and 1991-1996.
•
Dr. Paul H. Terry, retired research chemist for the United States Government, and Councilor for
the Chemical Society of Washington Section from 1982-1993 and 1997-2008.
Councilors observed a moment of silence following the presentation of the preceding resolution.
Approval of Minutes
2. VOTED to approve, as distributed, the minutes of the meeting of September 11, 2013.
Report of Interim Action, Council Policy Committee
3. VOTED to receive the report of an interim action of the Council Policy Committee (CPC).
Election of Elected Committees
D. Richard Cobb, chair, Committee on Nominations and Elections (N&E), introduced the following nominees
for selection as candidates for President-Elect 2015, and candidates for election to the Board of Directors.
4. In accordance with the provisions of Bylaw III, Sec. 3, b, (1), (b), N&E presented the following nominees for
selection as candidates for President-Elect 2015: Peter K. Dorhout, William A. Lester, Jr., Christopher K. Ober,
and Henry F. Schaefer III. After each nominee spoke to Council, the Council selected by electronic ballot Peter
K. Dorhout and William A. Lester, Jr. as candidates for President-Elect 2015.
Mr. Cobb introduced the candidates for the Board of Directors, chosen by voting Councilors in District III and
District VI for the election to be conducted this fall for the term 2014-2016: District III, Pat N. Confalone and
Anne S. DeMasi; and District VI, Paul W. Jagodzinski and Lee H. Latimer.
Mr. Cobb then announced the following candidates for Director-at-Large on the Board of Directors: Dawn A.
Brooks, William F. Carroll, Jr., Barbara A. Sawrey, and Ellen B. Stechel. The two successful candidates will fill
2015-2017 terms.
Reports of Society Officers
President Tom Barton reported that in his first month as President he visited Thailand, where in addition to
delivering a scientific lecture at the Pure and Applied Chemistry International Conference (PACCON), he held
discussions with some members of ACS’s Thailand International Chemical Sciences Chapter. He also visited
Malaysia and took part in an all-day ACS BOOST Program (Building Opportunity Out of Science &
Technology). Earlier this year, he also travelled to the Rio Piedras campus of the University of Puerto Rico for
their first ACS on Campus event, which was a big success.
Dr. Barton announced that this summer he will attend the IUPAC International Conference on Green Chemistry in
South Africa, and in preparation for this event, he will be trained for several days at the Green Chemistry Summer
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Council Minutes
School in Golden, Colorado. This has led him to think about ways to introduce students to green chemistry and to
the idea of presenting students with actual or imagined industrial processes and asking them to produce alternative
processes. His intention is to obtain these problems from our membership and to use C&EN, chemistry blogs, and
cash rewards to gain submissions.
Finally, Dr. Barton said he has received correspondence from many people from industry who expressed the view
that the ACS didn’t have enough to offer them. This is an issue of serious concern, and he and President-Elect
Diane Schmidt will be organizing one or more sessions with concerned industrial members to listen to their
concerns, and to resolve issues, as best as possible. They will use a jointly authored Comment in C&EN, blogs,
and contacts with Councilors to get the word out for suggestions.
President-Elect Diane Grob Schmidt stated that it is an honor to be entrusted with the office of president, and
pledged to execute her responsibilities in a way that brings additional luster to the world’s largest scientific
society. She identified three major areas of focus during her years in the presidential succession: helping to
change the conversation in the media and the public around chemicals and the chemical industry; issues related to
the education of our youth, especially those expressed through the new American Association of Chemistry
Teachers (AACT), which ACS is launching later this year; and working with ACS committees, local sections, and
technical divisions along with ACS staff, including Membership & Scientific Advancement staff, to help increase
awareness of the value of ACS to industrial scientists.
Dr. Schmidt also announced a presidential symposium at the Boston national meeting in 2015 that will highlight
the importance of education at multiple levels - formal, informal, and international.
Immediate Past President Marinda Li Wu reported that she continues to receive invitations to visit members in
the U.S. and overseas, and continues work on “Partners for Progress and Prosperity” initiatives. Last fall, she
hosted with the Office of International Activities a summit meeting for current ACS International Chemical
Sciences Chapters to share best practices. This spring, an ACS Symposium Series book based on the work of the
ACS Presidential Task Force “Vision 2025” was released.
Dr. Wu recently returned from a trip to India where she visited universities, institutes, companies, and
government officials of the science and technology communities. She said there is much interest in the ACS pilot
program for discounted dues for members from India, and in furthering collaborations with ACS with a proposed
International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Mumbai.
Finally, she announced there will be a symposium at the 2014 fall national meeting in San Francisco on “Women
Leaders from the Global Chemistry Enterprise.” She is also soliciting and has received positive feedback on a
new “Partners for Progress and Prosperity” Award for Regional Meetings involving ACS’s local sections,
divisions, and international chemical sciences chapters, and other organizations.
Board Chair William F. Carroll, Jr., thanked all members of Council who participated in the Open Board
Meeting on Sunday, March 16. Board members continue to be pleased by the turnout and quality of these
discussions.
The ACS Board of Directors considered a number of key strategic issues and responded with several actions. It
approved a Society nomination for the National Medal of Science and approved several recommendations from its
Committee on Executive Compensation. The compensation of the Society’s executive staff receives regular
review from the Board. As part of this process, goals for 2014 were reviewed and discussed. The working group
on Society Program Portfolio Management briefed the Board on its activities. The group is charged with
delivering a process for evaluating Society programs in the divisions of Membership & Scientific Advancement,
Education, and the Office of the Secretary and General Counsel (Office of Public Affairs) for the purpose of
understanding the full portfolio of ACS activities.
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The Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer and her direct reports updated the Board on ACS finances
and financial trends, the launch of the recently approved AACT, and the activities and plans of Chemical
Abstracts Service (CAS) and the ACS Publications Division. Specifically, CAS has a new strategic plan created
by CAS President Manuel Guzman and his team.
In other business, the Board approved a resolution congratulating Robert Massie on his retirement at the end
March for 21 years of successful leadership of CAS. The Board also expressed its gratitude and thanks to
Madeleine Jacobs, Executive Director and CEO, who on March 6 announced her plan to retire at the end of the
year. The Board has begun a discussion of the process and logistics of identifying and hiring her successor, and
expects to have a process in place and ready for execution by the June 2014 Board meeting. As a part of that
process, Dr. Carroll will soon be contacting members of Council for their input on a draft position and the
proposed process.
Executive Director and CEO Madeleine Jacobs focused her report on opportunities and strategies for growth
for ACS in two areas: membership and scientific publishing. The thread connecting these two areas is an
expanded global presence for the Society. ACS membership should reflect where chemists are employed and that
chemical scientists are conducting interdisciplinary research and solving global problems throughout the world.
Ms. Jacobs said that we can and must attract industrial members by offering excellent programs that meet their
needs and those of their employers. Although 24,000 of our 161,000 members live outside the U.S., we can do
more to attract international scientists to join our Society. Many parts of ACS are working on programs to reach
out to these two constituencies. Last year, ACS on Campus programs were held at 20 non-U.S. universities with
ACS resources, journals, and research tools. The new virtual ACS International Center is rich with content and
has heavy visitor traffic.
In the area of scientific publishing, the diversity of chemistry and increasing research output is well reflected in
our growing portfolio of 44 journals, with more than 83 million articles disseminated online worldwide in 2013.
Nearly 70 percent of the more than 39,000 articles were contributed by authors from abroad. CAS databases,
which are underpinned by SciFinder and STN, also reflect growing numbers of new molecules, reactions, and
patents created by scientists from outside the U.S.
On behalf of the Board of Directors, staff in 2013 undertook an in-depth study focusing on countries in the socalled BRICKS nations - Brazil, Russia, India, China, Korea, and South Africa - as well as emerging economies.
The study identified growth opportunities in membership and scientific publishing and provided
recommendations for action, which the ACS Board of Directors adopted in December. Staff is working with
governance on a multi-year implementation plan.
Reports of Elected Committees
Council Policy Committee (CPC)
Alan M. Ehrlich, committee vice chair, reported that CPC hosted two orientation programs – a webinar in
February (39 attendees) and a session at this meeting (67 attendees) – for new Councilors and Alternate
Councilors to provide information about ACS governance, roles and responsibilities of Councilors, and how to get
involved with committees. The mentoring program established for new Councilors needs volunteers from among
experienced Councilors.
CPC considered a number of recommendations from its subcommittees and task forces and responded with
several actions.
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With the advice and consent of N&E, CPC approved guidelines for how a committee can request from CPC the
use of a Council meeting to collect data through informal surveys conducted by the audience response system
(aka ‘‘clickers”).
On the recommendation of the Task Force to Review Councilor Travel Reimbursement Policy, CPC approved an
increase in the base reimbursement and inflation escalator and will forward this to B&F for consideration and
recommendation to the Board of Directors.
CPC approved the recommendations from the N&E-CPC Joint Task Force on Election Timelines and Procedures
to slightly revise procedures for national elections; in particular, to shorten some timelines and to give potential
petition candidates access to ACS communications earlier in the process if they inform ACS that they are
circulating petitions. None of the changes adopted require Bylaws changes.
The Task Force on Councilor/Member Duties and Conduct is continuing work on Bylaws authorizing removal of
Councilors and Alternate Councilors from office for neglect of duties; procedures under discussion include that a
Local Section or Division would recommend such removal to Council, a committee of Council, or specifically to
CPC for consideration of appropriate action. The procedures must provide for due process. The task force is also
continuing work on revising the Bylaw for expelling members from ACS for “conduct that in any way tends to
injure the Society or affect adversely its reputation, or which is contrary to or destructive of its objects” (Article
IV, Sec. 3). The intent is to streamline an unwieldy procedure, not in expectation of any need to discipline
members.
CPC voted to support the following action items for this meeting: a proposal from the Committee on Committees
(ConC) that the Committees on Chemical Safety (CCS), on Chemistry and Public Affairs (CCPA) and on
Minority Affairs (CMA) be continued subject to concurrence by the Board of Directors; the revision of the
formula to distribute division funding as proposed by the Committee on Divisional Activities (DAC); the
absorption of the territory of the former Monmouth Local Section by the North Jersey Local Section as
recommended by the Committee on Local Section Activities (LSAC); the recommendation by the Committee on
Budget and Finance (B&F) that the membership dues be increased for 2015 to $158 from the current $154; and
the establishment of ACS Chemical Sciences International Chapters in Malaysia and South Korea, as proposed by
the Committee on International Activities (IAC). CPC voted to authorize the Special Discussion topic for this
meeting “What can ACS do to increase the quality of science education in grades K-12?”
Committee on Committees (ConC)
Dawn A. Brooks, committee chair, reported that ConC conducted its annual New Chairs Training Session in
Dallas, Texas, January 24-26, 2014, as part of the ACS Leadership Institute; ConC is developing its
recommendations for 2015 committee chairs, members, associates, and consultant appointments for consideration
by the President-Elect and Chair of the Board; and performance reviews for CCS, CCPA, and CMA are complete
and are on the Council agenda for action.
5. VOTED, on the recommendation of the Committee on Committees (ConC), and subject to concurrence by the
Board of Directors, that the Committee on Chemical Safety (CCS), the Committee on Chemistry and Public
Affairs (CCPA) and the Committee on Minority Affairs (CMA) be continued.
Councilors were reminded to complete their online evaluation preference forms for 2015 for the period April 7 –
June 9, 2014, at www.yellowbook.acs.org.
Nominations and Elections (N&E)
D. Richard Cobb, committee chair, reported the results of the morning’s elections to the Council Elected
Committees (see item 4). All candidates, including the two elected by Council today and any other petition
candidates certified by the July 15 deadline, will be placed on the ballot this fall.
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N&E has reviewed the distribution of member population within the six electoral districts to assure that the
districts have equitable representation, that is, the year-end member population of each electoral district must be
within 10 percent of the average number of members residing in each district. The December 31, 2013 year-end
report was not in compliance, but with the new redistricting that went into effect January 1, 2014, we should be in
compliance by year-end 2014.
The committee developed slates of potential candidates for the CPC and ConC for 2015-2017 terms. The names
of the candidates will appear in the San Francisco fall Council agenda.
The Task Force on Campaign Services and the Joint N&E/CPC Task Force on Election Timelines both continue
to consider improvements to the election process so that nominees and candidates are served more effectively.
Reports of Society Committees and the Committee on Science
Budget and Finance (B&F)
Bonnie A. Charpentier, committee chair, reported that for 2013, ACS generated a Net from Operations of $15.1
million, which was $2.0 million favorable to the budget. This represents the Society’s tenth consecutive year of
positive operating results. Total revenue was $490.5 million, which was $8.8 million (or 1.8 percent) lower than
budget, and essentially flat when compared with 2012. The result was largely attributable to cost containment
measures throughout the ACS. Unrestricted Net Assets rebounded in 2013, rising to $207 million, and more than
doubling from the 2012 level.
Dr. Charpentier presented information on the 2015 fully escalated dues calculation, and also a comparison of ACS
dues amounts with those of other scientific societies, wherein ACS falls in the middle in terms of cost and likely
will remain there in 2015. The committee voted to recommend to Council that member dues for 2015 be set at the
fully escalated rate.
6. VOTED, on the recommendation of the Committee on Budget and Finance (B&F), with the concurrence of the
Council Policy Committee (CPC), that the member dues for 2015 be set at the fully escalated rate of $158.
Education (SOCED)
Charles Baldwin, committee vice-chair, reported that SOCED approved a pilot program to form ACS
International Student Chapters; received an overview of and update on the American Association of Chemistry
Teachers (AACT), which will serve K-12 teachers of chemistry with resources, networking, and professional
development; and voted to establish a new ChemLuminary Award for Outstanding U.S. National Chemistry
Olympiad programs, to begin in 2015.
SOCED also received an update from staff in the Office of Public Affairs on activities related to federal and state
science education policy. The committee discussed three expiring policy statements that address the teaching of
evolution, the importance of hands-on laboratory activities, and visa restrictions. SOCED supports continuing the
evolution statement without change, subject to Board approval. SOCED appointed working groups to revise the
policy statements on hands-on activities and visa restrictions. The policy statement on visa restrictions will be
revised in collaboration with IAC.
Science (ComSci)
Barry Streusand on behalf of the chair, Katherine C. Glasgow, reported on three important areas: identifying and
promoting efforts at the frontiers of science, recommending eminent chemists for prestigious awards outside of
ACS, and developing public policies to advance science in society.
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ComSci identified advanced materials and the chemistry of clean and renewable energy as multidisciplinary areas
that hold great promise for fostering innovation and opportunities for chemistry-related scientists worldwide. The
committee will work with technical divisions and other groups to develop special forums at the 2015 and 2016
national meetings and supporting the multidisciplinary program for future meetings.
ComSci also will continue to hold broad forums of eminent scientists and young investigator awardees to help
illuminate emerging frontiers in science. This will include a young investigator awardee forum scheduled for the
San Francisco national meeting in August.
The ACS Board of Directors has approved ComSci’s recommendations for the annual Presidential National
Medal of Science, and for the Grand Prix Award in France.
The ComSci-led policy statement on forensic science adopted just last year has gained recent traction in both the
U.S. House and Senate. The committee recently assumed a lead role for the development of a new policy
statement on responsible fracking in collaboration with other ACS committees; and is also lending expertise
toward policy statements on visa and immigration policy, sustainability, scientific integrity, federal R&D, and a
competitive U.S. business climate for innovation and jobs.
Special Discussion Item
The Council engaged in a special discussion on “What can ACS do to increase the quality of science education in
grades K-12?” In his introductory remarks, Dr. Barton stated that his concerns are not so much directed toward
convincing more students to pursue chemistry as a career, but that he is more interested and concerned on the
level of science knowledge of the entire population of the country. For decades there have been enough task
forces, summit meetings, and blue ribbon commissions on this subject, but far too little has actually occurred as a
result. We live in a terribly complex, technological world today which no one has any hope of understanding
without scientific knowledge, and all students, regardless of their professional aspirations, need a solid K-12
science education. He invited Councilors to share their thoughts on what they perceive to be problems that need
to be addressed, and offered several factors that impact the quality of science education in secondary schools in
the U.S.: students, politics, state control of education, length of school year, teachers’ unions, interscholastic
sports, and parents.
Following the presentation, nearly 40 Councilors offered comments on this focused topic made several
suggestions. Dr. Barton concluded the discussion by informing Council that a summary would be sent to all ACS
Council-related committees. They would be encouraged to consider and evaluate which proposed ideas would
have the most promise, and work toward their implementation.
Reports of Standing Committees
Membership Affairs (MAC)
James M. Landis, committee chair, reported that MAC continues to focus on new efforts to recruit and retain
members. The trend in 2014 is positive year-to-date, and the committee is optimistic for the year overall. Last
year, several MAC-approved tests were conducted under the Bylaw provisions, and there was discussion of two
additional tests at this meeting. The first was international pricing strategies, specifically India, which addresses
the income disparity between chemists in India and the U.S. and will allow for a $52 full Member dues rate. This
introductory test for 2014 was extended to include new and renewing members in India for three years. MAC also
voted unanimously to request that staff develop proposals for tests of group membership models in collaboration
with Chemical Abstracts Service and the ACS Publications Division.
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The committee discussed the existing ACS member expulsion policy and member code of conduct, and agreed
that ACS should have an enforceable expulsion policy that protects ACS and all members. The chair will work
with CPC on this issue.
Three new affinity partners that will provide benefits for our members were added: Lenovo Computers, Budget
Truck Rental, and Office Max.
Finally, Councilors were invited to participate in the Member-Get-A-Member program and Local Sections were
encouraged to be active in the 2014 President’s Challenge.
Economic and Professional Affairs (CEPA)
Louise Lawter, committee chair, reported that the new one-stop online shop, “ACS Career Navigator”, was
officially launched at this meeting, and brings together ACS’s leadership development, professional education,
career services, and market intelligence resources under one unified brand. Enhancements will continue to be
introduced through year end.
The ACS Career Fair and the Virtual Career Fair at this meeting featured 32 workshops and hundreds of mock
interviews and resume reviews.
Findings from the ACS 2013 New Graduate Survey have been compiled and reveal some troubling news. Overall
unemployment among new graduates rose from 12.6 percent in 2012 to 14.9 percent in 2013. This is primarily
due to the high unemployment among the recent Bachelors.
The highest paid graduates are employed full-time in Development and Design with a median salary of $62,000
followed closely by Professional Services at $56,000 and Management at $45,000.
The median salary of inexperienced Bachelors is down slightly from 2012, moving from $40,000 to $39,560 in
2013. Salaries for inexperienced Ph.D.s are down from a median of $80,000 in 2012 to $75,750 in 2013.
For the second year in a row the gender wage gap between inexperienced full-time permanent workers got
smaller; males made $44,000 in 2013 while females made a median of $40,000. In 2012, this gap was $6,000,
and in 2011 the gap was $8,000.
These findings indicate that new graduates must be at the top of our priority list for employment assistance in
2014.
In the fall, CEPA will ask Council approval for the newest revision of the ACS Professional Employment
Guidelines.
Meetings and Expositions (M&E)
Will E. Lynch, chair, reported that 10,050 papers were accepted for the 247th National Meeting in Dallas, TX.
The total attendance to date for this meeting was 13,680. The Exposition had 376 booths with 246 exhibiting
companies. This meeting saw the launch of the new ACS Mobile Application that members can use to find
meeting information while on site. Initial reports indicate a very favorable reaction to this new attendee benefit;
at the Dallas meeting there were more than 6,000 downloads made by attendees.
M&E has recommended to the ACS Board of Directors that San Francisco be designated as the site for the fall
national meetings in 2023 and 2026, and the spring meeting in 2029. This block of meetings was approved to
strengthen the ACS position when negotiating the convention center lease. If this pilot program with San
Francisco proves a benefit to the Society, M&E anticipates expanding this block scheduling to additional Tier 1
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cities. The committee also recommended the spring 2023 and 2024 national meetings be sited in Indianapolis and
New Orleans, respectively. M&E is also considering reinstating Chicago as a future national meeting site pending
more investigation.
The committee received an update on the replacement of PACS, which is the current abstract submittal system.
The new system is on target to be launched in August 2014 for the spring 2015 Denver national meeting.
Lastly, M&E voted to eliminate the author index in the hard copy program book beginning with the spring 2015
meeting in Denver.
Divisional Activities (DAC)
Michael J. Morello, committee chair, reported that as required by the Bylaws, DAC voted to recommend to
Council a revised formula for allocating dues funds to the divisions, effective with the allocations for 2014
division performance: an increase in the base allotment to 15 percent from 12.5 percent, and a decrease in the total
programming allotment to 62.5 percent from 65 percent. The intent is to provide smaller divisions with more
funding to produce 1-2 additional sessions each year.
7. VOTED to postpone the implementation of the revised formula for allocating dues funds by one year, to 2015.
8. VOTED, on the recommendation of the Committee on Divisional Activities (DAC), with the concurrence of
the Council Policy Committee (CPC), to approve the revised formula for allocating dues funds to the divisions,
effective with allocations for 2015 division performance.
DAC voted to fund 16 Innovative Project Grants (IPG) totaling $84,000. The committee will consider another set
of IPG proposals at the San Francisco national meeting; the deadline for that round of submissions is July 1, 2014.
The committee updated its process for acting on division name change requests. The document will be posted on
the DAC website no later than April 1, and is also available upon request.
DAC is partnering with the IAC to catalog the divisions’ best practices to engage international scientists. This is
part of our efforts to support the Society as it develops a strategy to increase international collaboration.
The Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group, operating as a DAC subcommittee, proposed the following 2017
national meeting themes to the divisions for their consideration: “Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems
and Processes” (spring, San Francisco) and “Chemistry's Impact on the Global Economy”(fall, Washington, DC).
Local Section Activities (LSAC)
Martin D. Rudd, committee chair, recognized the following sections for their anniversaries in 2014: 50th – South
Plains; 75th – Baton Rouge, Green Mountain, Illinois Heartland, Memphis, Penn-York, Sioux Valley, and Texas
A&M; and 100th – Maryland.
Local section annual reports for 2013 have been completed by 154 of 186 sections. LSAC awarded 19 Innovative
Project Grants totaling $40, 475, and to date has given five mini-grants of $300 each to local sections that
attended the 2014 Leadership Institute to partner with neighboring sections to host an activity that would bring
value to all members in a specific geographic region. The committee is also developing a funding opportunity that
will encourage local sections to host activities and events that will promote the new ACCT and other chemistryrelated K-12 educational resources.
LSAC will initiate the process to dissolve the Ocean County Section as a result of the group’s failure to meet the
criteria to remain an active section.
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LSAC approved the petition for the North Jersey Section to include the area of the former Monmouth County
Section in their territory, effective immediately.
9. VOTED, on the recommendation of the Committee on Local Section Activities (LSAC), with the concurrence
of the Council Policy Committee (CPC), that the North Jersey Section include the territory of the former
Monmouth County Section, effective immediately.
Constitution and Bylaws (C&B)
Donna Friedman, committee chair, reported that last year C&B certified 16 bylaws, the fourth largest number of
bylaws certified in any previous year. Since the beginning of this year, C&B certified six bylaws. Since the 2013
fall meeting in Indianapolis, C&B has submitted detailed bylaw reviews to eight local sections and one division.
C&B has a new optional process for expedited bylaw reviews, offering limited customization but faster
turnaround than the current three-month’s time. A recent request took less than one month from date of request to
date of completion.
C&B has also created a new, easier way for local sections and divisions to prepare bylaw revisions for C&B
review; these proposed bylaws are not as restrictive as those permitted through the expedited process. The unit
must first indicate its desire to update its bylaws. C&B would then offer to create a first draft of proposed bylaw
changes for consideration by the unit. Alternatively, the unit may still prepare its own draft changes for C&B
review. Councilors were asked to inform their local section or division officers to contact [email protected] for
information on how to update bylaws.
There will be no petitions for action in San Francisco, unless an urgent action petition is received.
New petitions to amend the Constitution or Bylaws must be received by the Executive Director by April 23 to be
included in the Council agenda for consideration at the fall 2014 meeting in San Francisco. We encourage you to
send your draft petition to C&B at least a month before the deadline, so that C&B can give initial input. Note that
petition guidelines are in Bulletin 5, which is available on the web: www.acs.org/bulletin5.
Reports of Other and Joint Board-Council Committees
Chemical Safety (CCS)
Robert H. Hill, Jr., committee chair, reported that CCS is forming the Task Force on Safety Education
Guidelines. The goal of this task force is to provide guidance for the safety topics and areas that should be taught
to secondary, undergraduate, and graduate students, and the competencies that should be attained at various levels
of chemistry education.
CCS published its first-ever Safety Alert concerning the Rainbow Demonstration in Chemical & Engineering
News on March 17, 2014. The use of this demonstration has continued to seriously injure students from flash fires
in separate incidents over many years extending back to at least 2002. We ask that the use of this demonstration
be discontinued, and the committee urged Councilors to pass on the message to their own local science and
university teachers to stop using this demonstration. Alternative methods are provided on the CCS website.
Chemists with Disabilities (CWD)
Karl Booksh, committee chair, reported that in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology’s
National Technical Institute for the Deaf, CWD has updated and digitized the committee’s publication, Teaching
Chemistry to Students with Disabilities. This new format should be accessible by the end of April 2014 and linked
to the CWD website.
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Merck has graciously volunteered to support a CWD Travel Award for two to three students with disabilities per
year to present their research at ACS national meetings.
In San Francisco, the committee will be rolling out traveling posters that highlight scientists with disabilities and
their accomplishments. CWD anticipates 12 posters in all; the first three will be Thomas Edison, Joseph Priestley,
and Sir Humphrey Davy.
CWD acknowledged and thanked the Executive Director and staff for forming an accessibility working group.
The group is focusing on addressing the accessibility of ACS media. Among other activities, this working group
is drafting an accessibility statement for the Society, promoting captioning of presentations and videos, and
collecting data to better understand the needs of ACS members.
Community Activities (CCA)
George L. Heard, committee chair, announced that copies of Celebrating Chemistry, a product of the ACS
Department of Volunteer Support in conjunction with CCA, were placed on the chairs at Council. This issue is in
advance of Chemists Celebrate Earth Day (CCED), the theme of which is “The Wonders of Water”, exploring the
unique properties of water that are crucial for life and a cleaner environment. Local Sections can order up to three
boxes (750 copies) of this publication, which contains safety-vetted articles and activities that are appropriate for
fourth through sixth grade students. The publication is also available in Spanish. More information can be found
on the newly-redesigned CCED webpage at www.acs.org/earthday.
CCA held a strategic planning retreat in November and developed a new vision and mission, which were adopted
at this meeting. The vision of CCA is “Improving the public understanding and appreciation of chemistry through
excellence in outreach”, and the mission is “Supporting ACS members and volunteers by facilitating safe, fun and
effective community outreach”.
During this meeting, the committee also voted on a theme title for CCED 2015, “Climate Science: More than Just
a Weather Report”.
The outreach event at this national meeting was held at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. Fortyfive volunteers from student groups and members of CCA presented eight tables of hands-on activities, reaching
an estimated 400 members of the public.
Local Section Councilors were asked to ensure their section has a member of the Society appointed as CCED and
National Chemistry Week coordinator.
International Activities (IAC)
H. N. Cheng, committee chair, reported that last fall in Indianapolis, IAC held a retreat with all committee
members, associates, and staff, and identified six high-priority and high-impact activities for 2014 and beyond:
build an international younger chemists network; provide continuing support for student exchanges and programs;
continue to help with scientific mobility issues; continue to interact and collaborate with sister chemical societies;
continue to support developing countries; and increase awareness of chemistry in the world.
The committee received, reviewed and approved five-year reports from the international chapters in Hong Kong,
Hungary, and Saudi Arabia. In addition, IAC heard a report on the outcome of joint conference organized by the
ACS Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry and ACS Thailand International Chemical Sciences Chapter.
This was the first-ever joint ACS technical division and international chapter event and was a notable success.
IAC received two applications to establish International Chemical Sciences Chapters in South Korea and
Malaysia, respectively. Geographically, the newly proposed chapters are in the fast-growing Asia Pacific region.
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Both applications have strong local champions and the strong support of their national chemical societies. The
committee supports these applications and recommends that Council approve the establishment of ACS
International Chemical Sciences Chapters in South Korea and Malaysia.
10. VOTED, on the recommendation of the Committee on International Activities (IAC), with the concurrence of
the Council Policy Committee (CPC) and subject to approval by the ACS Board of Directors, to establish an
International Chemical Sciences Chapter in South Korea.
11. VOTED, on the recommendation of the Committee on International Activities (IAC), with the concurrence of
the Council Policy Committee (CPC) and subject to approval by the ACS Board of Directors, to establish an
International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Malaysia.
Minority Affairs (CMA)
Al Ribes, committee chair, reported that at this meeting CMA organized a symposium in partnership with the
Division of Energy and Fuels titled, “Fracking and its Impact on our Energy, Security, and the Environment”, and
co-sponsored a symposium on “Women Chemists of Color in Government”.
CMA is organizing a symposium for San Francisco, featuring former awardees of the Stanley C. Israel Award,
which recognizes those who have advanced diversity in the chemical sciences. CMA will also co-sponsor a fullday symposium titled, “Advancing the Chemical Sciences through Diversity in Participation”, honoring Dr.
Rigoberto Hernandez, the 2014 Recipient of the ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into
Careers in the Chemical Sciences.
The CMA has formed a task force charged with identifying sponsors to finance eligible minority student travel to
ACS national meetings.
Finally, the ACS Scholars program is celebrating its 20th Anniversary in 2015. This flagship program of ACS’s
outreach to minorities has enabled 1,400 students to achieve university degrees in the chemical sciences. Thirtyfour are in faculty positions at research universities, 187 have completed a PhD and another 188 are pursuing one.
Fifteen have obtained a law degree and are practicing patent law, and 22 are teaching high school chemical
science. Well over half are employed by major corporations. Additionally, there are 11 entrepreneurs who have
started research, analytical, data, or tutoring companies.
During the Scholar’s 20th anniversary next year, CMA will celebrate their accomplishments as well as highlight
the success of this program.
New Business
Resolutions
The Council adopted the following resolution:
BE IT RESOLVED That the Council of the American Chemical Society express to the officers and members of
the Dallas-Fort Worth Local Section, host section for the 247th national meeting, the sincere appreciation of the
Council and of the entire Society for the cordial hospitality extended to all registrants at this meeting; and that the
Council convey special thanks to the divisional program chairs and symposium organizers responsible for the
outstanding technical sessions, as well as headquarters staff, for the planning and execution that have assured the
success of the 247th national meeting.
There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 11:40 a.m.
Flint H. Lewis
Secretary
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Election to ConC
ELECTION TO
COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES
Action Requested. The Committee on Nominations and Elections has selected the following slate of
candidates for membership on the Committee on Committees, effective January 1, 2015:
Spiro D. Alexandratos
Mark A. Benvenuto
Mitchell R. M. Bruce
Judith N. Currano
Jetty L. Duffy-Matzner
Kathleen Gibboney
Helen A. (Bonnie) Lawlor
Zaida Morales-Martinez
Robert A. Pribush
Patricia A. Redden
The Council must elect five individuals. The five candidates receiving the highest numbers of votes will be
declared elected for the 2015-2017 term. All the candidates have indicated their willingness to serve if elected.
Biographies of the candidates are summarized at the end of the item.
Supplementary Information:
Description of Duties and Desired Characteristics for Members of the
Committee on Committees (ConC)
The Committee on Committees (ConC) has key responsibilities to assist and advise on appointments of chairs and
members of Council-related bodies, along with evaluating and making recommendations concerning
responsibilities and size of committees.
To succeed in these activities, ConC elected members should have a combination of qualities, including extensive
familiarity with ACS committees and a broad network within the Society and the chemical profession. Members
of ConC must be a Councilor.
Candidates are expected to have available time and energy during and between National meetings to serve as a
Liaison to two committees (for observation, talent recruitment, succession planning, leadership development and
coaching) along with ConC closed sessions.
The candidate's personal qualities should include strong written and oral communication skills, respect for
confidentiality, and diplomacy.
At the spring national meeting, ConC meets on Monday and Tuesday from 1:30 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. During the
fall national meeting, ConC has three sessions: Monday, from 1:30 noon until 6:00 p.m.; Tuesday, from 1:30 p.m.
until 5:00 p.m.; and on Wednesday, (immediately following Council) 1:00 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. A reception and
dinner takes place at a restaurant from 7:00 p.m. until 9:30 p.m.
Members of ConC must be voting Councilors.
Those members of the Committee of Committees whose terms end on December 31, 2014 are:
Spiro Alexandratos, Industrial & Engineering Chemistry (New York Section)
Judith Currano, Philadelphia Section
Bonnie Lawlor, Chemical Information (Philadelphia Section)
Zaida C. Morales-Martinez, South Florida Section
Sara J. Risch, Agricultural & Food Chemistry (Chicago Section)
Sara J. Risch is ineligible for reelection.
The present members of the Committee on Committees who will continue on that body are:
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Election to ConC
2013-2015
G. Bryan Balazs, California Section
Christopher J. Bannochie, Savannah River Section
Dawn A. Brooks, Indiana Section
Michelle V. Buchanan, Analytical Chemistry (East Tennessee Section)
Alan B. Cooper, North Jersey Section
2014-2016
Janet Bryant, Business Development &Management (Richland Section)
Dee Ann Casteel, Susquehanna Valley Section
Amber S. Hinkle, Greater Houston Section
Wayne E. Jones, Jr., Binghamton Section
V. Michael Mautino, Pittsburgh Section
_______________________________________________________
ALEXANDRATOS, SPIRO D. Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry (New York Section). Hunter
College of the City University of New York, New York.
Academic Record: Manhattan College, B.S. 1973; University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D. 1977
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2009; Fulbright Scholar, 2010-11, L’Ecole des Mines, France; Sigma Xi, Outstanding
Alumnus Award, 2006; Phi Beta Kappa, Certificate of Merit, 1993.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Hunter College of the City University of New York, Professor of
Chemistry, 2001 to date; University of Tennessee, Paul & Wilma Ziegler Professor of Chemistry, 200001.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Committees, 2013-14; Committee on Chemical Abstracts
Service, 2006-11, Chair, 2010-11; Committee on Science, Division Representative, 2009-11; ACS Task
Force Chair, Society Committee on Publications, 1994-95; Associate Editor, Industrial & Engineering
Chemistry Research, 1996 to date.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1977. Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry: Councilor,
2008-15; Alternate Councilor, 1993-95; Chair, 1994; Chair-Elect, 1993; Program Committee, 1990-95.
Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry, Separation Science Subdivision: Chair, 1991; ChairElect, 1990; Executive Committee, 1989 to date; Program Committee, 1987 to date. East Tennessee
Section: Treasurer, 1987-88.
Related Activities: Gordon Research Conference on Reactive Polymers, Ion Exchangers & Adsorbents, Chair,
1997; Co-Chair, 1995. Editorial Advisory Boards: Separations Science and Technology, 1996 to date;
Reactive & Functional Polymers, 1995 to date; Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange, 1988 to date; 124
refereed publications, including ten patents.
***************************************
BENVENUTO, MARK A. Detroit Section. University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Michigan.
Academic Record: Virginia Military Institute, B.S., 1983; University of Virginia, Ph.D., 1992.
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Honors: Salute to Excellence, Detroit Section, ACS 2012; Distinguished Service Award, Detroit Section, ACS,
2004; University of Detroit Mercy, Science Teacher of the Year, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2005,
2013; Michigan Science Teachers Association, College Science Teacher of the Year 2003; U.S. Army
Commendation Medal, 1987; U.S. Army Overseas Ribbon 1987; U.S. Army Parachutist Award 1984.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): University of Detroit Mercy, 2001 to date, Professor 2006 to date,
Associate Professor, 1999-2006, Department Chair 2001 to date.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Constitution and Bylaws, 2009-14, Committee Associate,
2008; Committee on Nomenclature, Terminology and Symbols 2004-15, Committee Associate, 2002-03;
Committee on Education, Task Force on Undergraduate Programming, 2004-06.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1988. Detroit Section: Councilor, 2008-14, 2001- 03; Chair,
2006-07; Chair-Elect, 2005-06. Central Regional Meeting: Chair, 2013-14; General Chair, 2011-12.
Chicago National Meeting, Chair, 2007.
Member: National Education Association; National Science Teachers Association; Michigan Science Teachers
Association; Michigan College Chemistry Teachers Association; Project Kaleidoscope; Council for
Chemical Research; Royal Society of Chemistry. ACS Divisions: Chemical Education; Chemical
Toxicology; Environmental; and Inorganic.
Related Activities: Council for Chemical Research Board of Governors, 2007-09; Michigan College Chemistry
Teachers Association, Treasurer, 2002 to date; Boy Scouts of America, Chemistry Merit Badge
Counselor, 1994 to date.
***************************************
BRUCE, MITCHELL R.M. Maine Section. University of Maine, Orono, Maine.
Academic Record: Antioch College, B.S., 1979; Columbia University, M.A., 1981; Ph.D., 1985.
Honors: Sigma Xi.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): University of Maine, Associate Professor, 1993 to date.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings & Expositions, 2014, Committee Associate;
Committee on Local Section Activities, 2010-13, Chair, 2013, Committee Associate, 2006-07; Council
Policy Committee, (Nonvoting), 2013; Committee on Planning, 2013; Committee on Project SEED,
1997-05, Chair, 2004-05, Committee Associate, 1996; Committee on Publications, Committee Associate,
1992-94.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1983. Maine Section: Councilor, 1991-2014.
Member: National Association for Research in Science Teaching. ACS Divisions: Chemical Education; and
Inorganic Chemistry.
Related Activities: Founding member, University of Maine, Research in STEM Education (RiSE) Center (since
2003); University of Maine, Assistant Professor, 1987-93; University of North Carolina, Postdoc Fellow,
1985-87; Charles F. Kettering Laboratory, Research Associate, 1977-80; published 57 journal articles and
three patents.
***************************************
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CURRANO, JUDITH N. Philadelphia Section. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: University of Rochester, B.A., 1998; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, M.S., 1999.
Honors: ACS Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry, 1997; University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign
Latzer Fellow, 1998-99; University of Rochester, Xerox Scholar, 1994-98; University of Rochester Carl
A. Whiteman, Jr. Teaching Award, 1998; Pfizer Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in
Synthetic Chemistry, 1997.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): University of Pennsylvania, Head, Chemistry Library, 1999 to date,
Interim Bibliographer for Mathematics & Physics, 2007-09.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Committees, 2013-14; Committee on Chemical Abstracts
Service, 2008-13, Committee Associate, 2007.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1999. Philadelphia Section: Councilor, 2009-14; Alternate
Councilor, 2005-08. Chemical Information Division: Chair, 2014; Chair-Elect, 2013; Secretary, 2008-09;
Executive Committee, 2013 to date, 2008-09; Education Committee, 2001-12; Consultant, 2007-08;
2003-04; Communications and Publications Committee, 2009-12. Chemical Information Bulletin: Editor,
2011-12. Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting: Abstract/Program Book Chair, 2007.
Member: Special Libraries Association. ACS Division: Chemical Information.
Related Activities: Special Libraries Association Chemistry Division: Professional Development Chair, 200208; Membership Chair, 2007-10; Liaison to ACS CINF, 2014 to date. Sessions co-organized at ACS
National Meetings: “It Takes Two to Tango: Chemistry Librarians Partnering with Publishers and
Researchers to Advance the Chemical Sciences – A Symposium Honoring Dana Roth,” 248th ACS
National Meeting, 2014; “Legal, Patent, and Digital Rights Management in Publishing,” 244th ACS
National Meeting, 2012; “Sustainable Chemical Information Education through Faculty and Librarian
Partnerships,” 239th ACS National Meeting, 2010. Session co-organized at Biennial Conference on
Chemical Education: “Before and After Lab: Training Students in ‘Non-Chemical’ Research Skills,”
2012. Previous employment: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Graduate Assistant, 1998-99.
Board Memberships: Board of Trustees, Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, 2014-date; ACS
Publications Academic Roundtable, 2014 to date; RSC Publications Library Advisory Board, 2011 to
date; ACS Publications Library Advisory Board, 2002-10; CAS Academic Advisory Group, 2004-10.
Publications: 1 edited book, 2 book chapters, 2 symposium series papers (in press), 3 journal articles, 2
encyclopedia chapters, 13 papers presented at ACS National Meetings.
***************************************
DUFFY-MATZNER, JETTY L. Sioux Valley Section. Augustana College, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
Academic Record: Boise State University, B.S., 1987; University of California, Davis, Ph.D., 1993.
Honors: Salutes to Excellence Award, ACS, 2004; Vernon and Mildred Niebuhr Faculty Excellence Award for
Teaching, Augustana College, 2011; GenCorp/Aero-jet Blue-sky Technical Achievement Award, 1993;
University of California, Davis, Chancellor’s Teacher Fellow, 1991-92; American Institute of Chemists
Student Research and Recognition Foundation Awardee, 1986.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Augustana College, Associate Professor, 1999 to date; Binghamton
University, State University of New York, Visiting Professor, 2010-11.
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Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2013-14, Committee Associate,
2011-12; Committee on Local Section Activities, 2004-10; Advisory Board for Speaker Service, Speaker,
2002-09, Chair, 2005-09.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1992. Sioux Valley Section: Councilor, 2003-16; Chair, 2011,
2001-03; Chair-Elect, 2000; Webmaster, 2006-14; National Chemistry Week Coordinator, 2001-11;
Chemists Celebrate Earth Day Coordinator, 2004-14; Faculty mentor for Student Affiliates (Members)
ACS, 2000-12. Midwest Regional Board: Board of Directors, 2003-14; Awards Committee, Chair, 200814.
Member: Graduate Women in Science. ACS Divisions: Organic; and Chemical Education.
Related Activities: MAPS (Meetings Abstracts Programming Systems) Advisory Group ACS, 2014; Steering
Committee for ACS Regional & National Meeting Registration & Planning, 2013-14; Working Group,
ACS Policies Affecting Streaming & Recording of National Meetings, 2012-13; Diagnostic of
Undergraduate Chemistry Knowledge (DUCK) Committee for the ACS Examinations Institute, Division
of Chemical Education, 2013, 2011; First Term Organic Chemistry Examination Committee for the ACS
Examinations Institute, Division of Chemical Education, 2010, 2006; General Chemistry Examination
Committee for the ACS Examinations Institute, Division of Chemical Education, 2006; Moderator for
11th Boe Forum Event (Center of Western Studies, SD) with Vice President Al Gore, 2007; Keynote
Speaker Convocation Ceremony, Augustana College, 2011; Panelist for proposed National Underground
Science Lab, Lead, South Dakota, 2001; State University of New York, Cortland, Lecturer, 1998-99;
University of California, Davis (UCD), Lecturer, 1994-97; KNECT/UCD, Research Chemist, 1994-96;
GenCorp/Aerojet, Sacramento, California, Senior Chemist, 1992-94; State of Idaho Department of Health
and Welfare, Forensic Section, Research Associate, 1986-87; Research Assistant, Boise State University;
Department of Idaho, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, 1985-87. Author of 9 journal publications, 1 patent, 2 book
chapters, 41 published research abstracts, and editor for ACS Symposium Text (1108) in the fields of
heterocyclic organic synthesis and chemical education.
***************************************
GIBBONEY, KATHLEEN Cincinnati Section. Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Academic Record: B.S. Chemistry, Saint Mary’s College, 1973; M.S. Chemistry, University of Denver, 1978;
MBA Finance, Xavier University, 1985.
Honors: Distinguished Service Award, Cincinnati Section, ACS, 2000.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Xavier University, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry, 2010 to date;
Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Supervisor Compound Repository, 1997-2006; Procter & Gamble,
Paper Division, Analytical Lab Supervisor, 2006-09.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Local Section Activities, 2001-07, Committee Associate, 200001; Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2009-14, Committee Associate, 2008.
Service in ACS in Offices: Member ACS since 1975. Cincinnati Section: Councilor, 1999-2016; Chair, 1992-93;
Chair-Elect, 1991-92; Vice-Chair, 1988-89; Treasurer, 1987-88; PR Chair, 1993-98; National Chemistry
Week Chair, 1990-94; CRMACS Arrangements Chair, 1992 & 2000.
***************************************
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LAWLOR, HELEN (Bonnie) A. Division of Chemical Information (Philadelphia Section). (Retired) National
Federation of Abstracting and Information Services (NFAIS), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: Chestnut Hill College, B.S., 1966; St. Joseph's University, M.S., 1976; University of
Pennsylvania, Wharton School, M.B.A., 1989.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2013; Meritorius Service Award, Division of Chemical Information, ACS, 2006; NFAIS
Honorary Fellow, 2014; Alpha Epsilon Sigma; National Federation of Abstracting and Information
Services Memorial Award, 1998; American Society for Information Science Achievement Award, 1996.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Retired, 2014, National Federation of Advanced Information
Services (NFAIS), Executive Director, 2002-14; Chescot Publishing Incorporated, President/CEO 1998-02;
UMI Incorporated, General Manager, Academic and Public Library Division, 1996-98.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Committees, 2012-14; Council Policy Committee (Voting),
2006-11; (Nonvoting), 1997-99; Committee on Nominations and Elections, 2000-05, Vice-Chair, 2003,
Secretary, 2001; Committee on Divisional Activities, 1994-99, Chair, 1997-99; Committee on Copyrights,
1990-98, Chair, 1993-95, Committee Associate, 1989; Committee on Committees, Task Force on
Publications/Copyrights Inter-Committee Relationship, 1999; Advisory Board for Industry Relations, 199799; Board Task Force on Technical Programming, 1998; Program Coordination Conference Committee,
1997-98; ACS Books Advisory Board, 1991-94; Representative, American Association for the
Advancement of Science, Section T, 1985-86.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1972. Division of Chemical Information: Councilor, 1992-2015;
Chair, 1989; Chair-Elect, 1988; Secretary-Treasurer, 1984-87; Corresponding Secretary, 1982; Archivist
2006-date; Publications Committee Chair, 1990-95; Editor, Chemical Bulletin, 1977-83.
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science; Chemical Structure Association Trust, Board
of Trustees; LYRASIS, Board of Trustees; Philospher’s Information Center, Board of Trustees. ACS
Division: Chemical Information.
Related Activities: Chemical Structure Association Trust, Board Member, 1990 to date; Information Industry
Association, Board Member, 1997-98; American Society for Information Science, Board Member, 199698, Chair, Program Advisory Board, 1998 to date; Chair, Delaware Valley Chapter, 1994; Secretary
1992-94; Chair of Technical Program Committee for 1995 Conference; National Federation of
Abstracting and Information Services, President, 1989; Chair, Information Policy and Copyright
Committee, 1991 to date; Chair, Annual Program Conference, 1988; Editorial Advisory Board, Annual
NFAIS Yearbook, 1990-94; Editorial Advisory Board, The International Journal of Electronic
Publishing, 1993-96; Editorial Advisory Board, TERI Information Digest of Energy, 1991-95; Chemical
Notation Association, President, 1980; Secretary, 1976-79; American Institute of Chemists, Secretary,
Philadelphia Chapter, 1981-82. Executive Vice President, Database Publishing, Institute for Scientific
Information 1989 – 1995.
***************************************
MORALES-MARTINEZ, ZAIDA C.
Miami, Florida.
South Florida Section. (Retired) Florida International University,
Academic Record: University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, B.S., 1957; The Pennsylvania State University, M.S.,
1962.
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Election to ConC
Honors: Award for Volunteer Service to the American Chemical Society, 2011; ACS 2004 Award for
Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences; ACS 2002, Women
Chemists Committee Southeast Regional Award for Fostering Diversity in the Chemical Sciences;
Florida International University: Excellence in Teaching Award, 1985, Outstanding Service, 1991,
Excellence in Advising Award, 1994, FIU President Affirmative Action Award, 1993 and Distinguished
Service Medallion Award for Extraordinary Service, 2002.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Retired, Florida International University, Chemistry Emeritus
Professor, 2003 to date; Senior Chemistry Lecturer and Coordinator of Pre-Medical Advising and Science
Recruitment and Retention, 1994–03; Consultant, ACS Scholars Program Mentoring, 1999 to date.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Committees, 2012-14; Membership Affairs Committee, 200411; International Affairs Committee, 2004-05; Younger Chemists Committee, Consultant, 2004-05;
Committee on Minority Affairs, 1993-2000; Committee on Education, 1992-2000, Committee Associate,
1990-91; Committee on Project SEED, 1989-94; Task Force of Undergraduate Programming at National
Meetings, 1999-04; Organizing Committee of the Pan-American Conference in Puerto Rico, 2000; ACS
Program Review Advisory Group (PRAG), 2005–09; Selection Committees for the ACS National
Awards, 2004 to date; Faculty Advisors Review Panel for SAACS Awards, 1999-05; Program Chair,
Undergraduate Programming at the 223rd National Meeting, Orlando, Florida 2002; President Al
Heininger’s “Task Force on Minorities in the Chemical Sciences”, 1989-90.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1963. South Florida Section: Councilor, 2004-15, 1992-99;
Education Chair, 1992 to date. Florida Section: Councilor, 1987-92.
Member: AISES; AAUW; SACNAS; NOBCChE; Iota Sigma Pi; Phi Eta Mu; Golden Key National Honor
Society. ACS Divisions: Chemical Education; and Professional Relations.
Related Activities: Advisor, Co-advisor and consultant/mentor for Florida International University Student
Affiliates Chapters, 1986 to date; Various Review Panels for NSF and DOE proposals, 1986-95; Review
Panel for Graduate Education for Minorities (GEM) Fellowships, 2005-12.
***************************************
PRIBUSH, ROBERT A. Indiana Section. Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Academic Record: University of Delaware, B.S., 1968; University of Massachusetts, Ph.D., 1972.
Honors: Award for Volunteer Service to the American Chemical Society, 2014; ACS Fellow, 2013; Indiana
Section Service Award, 2013; Phi Kappa Phi, Chapter President, 1989-98; Lilly Foundation Open Faculty
Fellow, 1992; Holcomb Research Institute Fellow, 1983.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Butler University, Professor, 1986 to date; Department Head, 1999-01.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2012-15; Committee on
Nominations and Elections, 2009-11; Council Policy Committee, 2005; Committee on Publications,
2008-11, Committee Associate, 2006-07; Committee on Membership Affairs, 2004-05, 1993-96,
Committee Associate, 2003, 1992; Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs, 1997-02; Board of
Trustees, Group Insurance Plans for ACS Members, ex-officio, 1993-96; Younger Chemists Committee,
1976-81; Chair, 1978-80; Professional Programs Planning and Coordinating Committee (PROPPACC),
1978-80; C&EN Editorial Board, 2010-11; Program Review Advisory Group, 2006; Advisory Board,
Office of Cooperative Education, 1978-86; SCIQUEST Task Force, 1980-82.
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Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1969. Indiana Section: Councilor 1991-2016; Alternate
Councilor, 1982-90; Chair, 1980; Chair-Elect, 1979; Education Committee, 1986-92, 1982, 1975-79,
2009 to date, Chair, 1986-92, 1979, 2009 to date; Chemistry Olympiad Co-Chair, 2009 to date; Program
Committee Chair, 1982, 1977; Executive Committee, 1976 to date. 2013 Indianapolis National Meeting
Lead Team, 2013-14; Central Regional Meeting: Symposium Chair, 2011. Central Regional Meeting:
Program Chair, 2004. Joint Central-Great Lakes Regional Meeting: Symposium Chair, 1991. Division
of Chemical Education: Examinations Institute, General Chemistry Laboratory Assessment Exam, 20092012; Diagnostic Test of Undergraduate Chemical Knowledge Exam Committee, Chair, 2006; Inorganic
Chemistry Exam Committee, 2000; Chair, 2000-02; General Chemistry Exam Committee, 1991-96;
Chair, 1994-96; ChemEd 83 Advisory Board, Chair 1981-83.
Member: Indiana Science Olympiad Board of Directors, 1993-2012, Treasurer, 1999-2012; National Science
Teachers Association; Indiana Academy of Science. ACS Division: Chemical Education.
Related Activities: Holcomb Research Institute Biotic Resources, Program Associate, 1985-90; University of
Southern California, Postdoctoral Fellow, 1972-74; Wolf Technical Services, Technical
Consultant/Expert Witness, 1977 to date; Butler University, Acting Associate Dean of Liberal Arts and
Sciences, 1990-92; Associate Professor, 1979-86; Assistant Professor, 1974-79; textbook and textbook
supplement consulting editor and author.
***************************************
REDDEN, PATRICIA A. New York Section. St. Peter’s University, Jersey City, New Jersey.
Academic Record: Cabrini College, B.S., 1962; Fordham University, Ph.D., 1968.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2011; CHAS Fellow, 2001; Outstanding Service Award, New York Section, ACS, 1993;
Tillmans-Skolnik Award, Division of Chemical Health and Safety, ACS, 1991; Distinguished Service
Award, Rockland Chemical Society, 1993; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Alpha Sigma Nu; Beta Beta Beta;
Gamma Sigma Epsilon.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): St. Peter’s University, Professor, 1980 to date; Department Chair,
1978-2013; Associate Professor, 1973-80; Assistant Professor, 1968-73.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Chemical Safety, 2006-14, 1985-93; Committee Associate,
2003-05, 1984; Committee on Environmental Improvement, 2000-02, Committee Associate, 1997-99;
Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs, Committee Associate, 1994; Committee on Economic and
Professional Affairs, 1995-96.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1965. New York Section: Councilor, 2011-16, 2006-08, 1983-04;
Alternate Councilor, 2010, 1992; Past Chair, 1994; Chair, 1993; Chair-Elect, 1992; Board of Directors,
1983 to date. Hudson-Bergen Subsection: Chair, 1981; Chair-Elect, 1980; Treasurer 1986-91; Board of
Directors, 1977-2010. Chemical Health & Safety Division: Chair, 1988-89; Chair-Elect, 1987-88;
Program Chair, 1986-88; Board of Directors, Member-at-Large 1985-90. ACS Divisions: Chemical
Education; and Chemical Health & Safety.
Related Activities: University College, Cork, Ireland, Research Associate, 1972-73.
***************************************
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Page 1 of ITEM III, B
Election to CPC
ELECTION TO
COUNCIL POLICY COMMITTEE
Action Requested: The Committee on Nominations and Elections has selected the following slate of
candidates for membership on the Council Policy Committee:
Lawrence Barton
Dwight W. Chasar
Lynne P. Greenblatt
Martha G. Hollomon
Peter C. Jurs
Pamela D. Kistler
Doris I. Lewis
Christopher Masi
Andrea Twiss-Brooks
Linette M. Watkins
The Council must elect five individuals: The four candidates receiving the highest numbers of votes will be
declared elected for the 2015-2017 term, and the candidate receiving the fifth highest vote will be declared elected
for the remainder of the 2014-2016 term. All the candidates have indicated their willingness to serve if elected.
Biographies of the candidates are presented in summary form at the end of this item.
Supplementary Information.
Description of Duties and Desired Characteristics for Members of the
Council Policy Committee (CPC)
The Council Policy Committee (CPC) serves as the Executive Committee of the Council. The committee and
three Subcommittees are responsible for several specific items including:
•
•
•
•
creating the slate of candidates for N&E;
ensuring activities at Council, including items for action, are conducted in line with our Constitution &
Bylaws, and preparing the Council President for potential challenges;
conduct long range planning for Council, aligned with the ACS strategic plan and its implementation;
recommending to Council positions on amendments to the Constitution & Bylaws.
To succeed in these activities, members are expected to understand the role of the Council in serving ACS, the
responsibilities of a Councilor and the governance structure. They should also have a broad network across ACS.
CPC meets Tuesday mornings (approximately 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.); the CPC subcommittees meet on Monday
morning. Members of a subcommittee may be asked to participate in the New Councilor Orientation (currently
held on Saturday afternoon at the Spring meeting). Subcommittees and Task Force Groups have meetings via
conference calls between national meetings.
Members of CPC must be voting Councilors.
Those members of the Council Policy Committee whose terms end on December 31, 2014, are as follows:
Lawrence Barton, St. Louis Section
Peter C. Jurs, Computers in Chemistry (Central Pennsylvania Section)
Mamie W. Moy, Greater Houston Section
Eleanor D. Siebert, Southern California Section
Mamie W. Moy and Eleanor D. Siebert are ineligible for reelection.
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The present members of the Council Policy Committee who continue on that body are:
2013- 2015
Frank D. Blum, Polymer Chemistry (Oklahoma Section)
Mary K. Carroll, Eastern New York Section
Lee H. Latimer, California Section
Carolyn Ribes, Brazosport Section
2014 - 2016
Harmon B. Abrahamson, Red River Valley Section
Judith H. Cohen, Bylaw
Alan M. Ehrlich, Chemistry & the Law (Chemical Society of Washington Section)
Angela K. Wilson, Physical Chemistry (Dallas –Fort Worth Section)
_______________________________________________________
BARTON, LAWRENCE St. Louis Section. University of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri.
Academic Record: Liverpool University, B.Sc., 1960; M.S., 1961; Ph. D., 1964.
Honors: St. Louis Section, ACS, Distinguished Service Award, 1999; St. Louis Award, 1991; Boron in the
Americas Award for Distinguished Achievements in Boron Science, 2004; University of Missouri-St.
Louis, Outstanding Service Award, 2002; Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Service, 2000; Alumni
Association Special Recognition Award, 1998; Potts Medalist, Liverpool University Chemical Society,
1992; University of Missouri-St. Louis, Alumni Association Faculty Service Award, 1990; Senior
Research Fellowship, Explosives Research and Development Establishment, Waltham Abbey, Essex,
England 1970-71; Goodlass Wall Fellowship, Liverpool University, 1961-64.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): University of Missouri-St. Louis, Professor Emeritus 2007 to date;
Professor of Chemistry, 1986-07; Acting Director, Center for Molecular Electronics, 1999-06; Chair,
Faculty Senate and University Assembly, 2000-02; Chair, Chemistry Department, 1980-98.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, Committee Associate 2011;
Committee on Committees, 2005-10; Committee on Local Section Activities, 1998-04; Committee on
Membership Affairs, 1992-97, Committee Associate, 1991.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1966. St. Louis Section: Councilor, 1990-2015; Alternate Councilor,
1987-89, 1979-81; Chair, 1980; Chair-Elect, 1979; Section Historian, 2000 to date; High School Career
Day Organizer, 2000, 1993-98; Board of Directors, 1993-2015, 1981-89, 1977-79; Steering Committee
Member, 1996-98, 1980-81, Chair, 1979; Midwest Award Jury, 1992-03, 1983-89; St. Louis Award
Symposium Chair, 1983; Nominations Committee Chair, 1979; St. Louis Award Jury, 1978, 1977, 1975;
Continuing Education Committee, 1972-74. Midwest Regional Meeting: Liaison to National 2011;
Exposition Chair, 2000; Symposium Chair, Rings, Cages and Clusters of the Main Group Elements,
1979.
Member: Royal Society of Chemistry, Chemistry and Physics on Stamps Study Unit. ACS Divisions: History of
Chemistry; and Inorganic Chemistry.
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Related Activities: President, St. Louis Research Council, 1994-95; 1983-85; Council for Chemical Research,
Member Site Organizing Committee, Annual Meeting, 1997, 1988, Awards Committee Member, 199697; Vice-President, University of Missouri-St. Louis Chapter, American Association of University
Professors, 1980-81; Ohio State University, Visiting Associate Professor, 1977-78; Washington
University, Visiting Professor, 1976; Member, National Organizing Committee, Boron-USA (BUSA)
Workshops; Co-host Boron in the Americas XI, 2008, St. Louis, MO; Member, Chemical Industrial
Laboratory Technician, Advisory Committee, St. Louis School District, 1989-90; Research Interests,
synthesis, structure, and chemistry of borane and metallaborane cage compounds, organometallic
chemistry. Author or co-author of 110 publications.
***************************************
CHASAR, DWIGHT W. Cleveland Section. (Retired) Emerald Performance Materials, Brecksville, Ohio.
Academic Record: University of Pittsburgh, B.S., 1964; Case Western Reserve University, Ph.D., 1968.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2010; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Theta Kappa; Goodrich Technical Recognition Award, 1983;
National Science Foundation College Teacher Summer Fellowship, 1973; National Science Foundation
Fellowship, 1965.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Retired, 2007 to date; Emerald Performance Materials, Technical
Fellow, 2006-07; Lubrizol Corporation, Research and Development Fellow, 2004-06; Noveon, Research
and Development Fellow, 2001-04.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Science, Committee Associate 2013-14; Committee on
Nominations and Elections, 2010-12, 2009, Vice-Chair, 2011-12; Council Policy Committee (Voting),
2007-08, (Nonvoting), 2005-06; Committee on Divisional Activities, 2001-06, Chair, 2005-06;
Committee on Constitution and Bylaws, 1995-00; Committee on Local Section Activities, 1989-94,
Committee Associate, 1988; Committee on Patents and Related Matters, 1985-87; Committee on
Planning, 2005-06; Governance Review Task Force on Disciplinary Organization, 2005-06.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS (Emeritus) since 1965. Cleveland Section: Councilor, 1987-14;
Alternate Councilor, 1986, 1981; Chair, 1982; Chair-Elect and Program Chair, 1981; Treasurer, 1979-80;
ISOTOPICS Editor, 1976-78; National Chemistry Week Committee, 1991; Archives Committee, 19892014; Morley Award Jury, 1986-91; Nominating Committee Chair, 1983; Budget Committee, 1979-80.
Central Regional Meeting: Program Co-Chair, 1985. Rubber Division: Editorial Board, Rubber Reviews
and Rubber Chemistry and Technology, 2002-10.
Member: ACS Divisions: Organic Chemistry; and Rubber Chemistry (emeritus).
Related Activities: Technical Consultant 2007-11; Zoning Commission, Sagamore Hills Township, 1977 to
date, Chair, 1994-04, 1983-86; BFGoodrich, 1974-01; 40 publications, one book chapter in the Vanderbilt
Rubber Handbook, and holds 24 patents.
***************************************
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GREENBLATT, LYNNE P. Division of Professional Relations (Princeton Section). Phare View Concepts
Incorporated, New Brunswick, Canada.
Academic Record: Rutgers University, B.A., 1973.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2011.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Phare View Concepts Inc., Principal, 2010 to date; Pfizer, Principal
Research Scientist, 2010; Wyeth Research, Principal Research Scientist, 1984-2010; Wyeth Labs,
Manager, 1973-84.
Service in ACS National Offices: Board of Trustees, Group Insurance Plans for ACS Members, 2013-15;
Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs, Committee Associate, 2011-14; Committee on Economic
and Professional Affairs, 2005-10, Chair, 2010, Committee Associate, 2004; Council Policy Committee,
ex officio (Nonvoting), 2010; Leadership Advisory Board, 2013-14.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1991. Professional Relations Division: Councilor, 2013-15;
Member-at-Large, Executive Committee, 2007-10. Princeton Section: Councilor, 2003-11; Editor, 19942002.
Related Activities: “Leading Change” leadership course, Facilitator at ACS National Meetings and Leadership
Institute, 2007-14.
***************************************
HOLLOMON, MARTHA G. Delaware Section. Widener University, Chester, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: Virginia Tech, B.S., Chemistry 1983; North Carolina State University, M.S., Textile
Chemistry 1993, Ph.D., Organic Chemistry 1998.
Honors: Tillmans-Skolnik Award, Delaware Section ACS, 2000; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Professional
Development Award, Research Triangle Institute, RTP, NC, 1990.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Widener University, Adjunct Assistant Professor, 2009 to date;
Delaware Technical and Community College, Adjunct Instructor, 2012 to date; Hercules Incorporated,
Senior Staff Scientist, 2001-09, Senior Research Chemist, 1998-01.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2013-14, Committee Associate,
2011-12; Committee on Local Section Activities, 2005-10, Committee Associate, 2004; Committee on
Public Relations and Communications, LSAC Liaison, 2006-10; ACS Board-Presidential Task Force on
Society Services and Associated Dues Pricing Models 2010.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1984. Delaware Section: Councilor, 2004-15; Immediate Past
Chair 2003; Chair, 2002; Chair-Elect, 2001. Middle Atlantic Regional Board: Chair, 2012 to date;
Secretary, 2007-11; 41st Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting, Wilmington, DE, General Chair, 2010.
Member: Delaware Academy of Chemical Sciences, 2006 to date, Secretary 2009 to date; Alpha Chi Sigma,
Gamma Omicron. ACS Divisions: Organic Chemistry; and Polymer Chemistry.
Related Activities: Sustainability Engagement Event (SEE) Participant 2010; North Carolina University,
Graduate, Research Assistant, 1993-98, Graduate Teaching Assistant, 1994-97; Research Triangle
Institute, Chemist III.
***************************************
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Page 5 of ITEM III, B
Election to CPC
JURS, PETER C. Division of Computers in Chemistry (Central Pennsylvania Section). Pennsylvania State
University, University Park, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: Stanford University, B.S., 1965; University of Washington, Ph.D., 1969.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2009; ACS Award for Computers in Chemistry, 1990; Presidential Award for Excellence
in Academic Integration, Penn State, 1998; Barbara and Dean Martin Lecturer, University of South
Florida, 2000; Archer Lecture in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry, Renssalear Polytechnic University,
2001; American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow, 1987; Merck Award for Faculty
Development, 1970.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Pennsylvania State University, Emeritus Professor, 2005 to date;
Professor, 1978-05; Assistant Head for Undergraduate Education, 1995-04; Acting Department Head
1998-99.
Service in ACS National Offices: Council Policy Committee, 2011-14; Committee on Nominations and
Elections, 2006-11; Committee on Publications, 1997-04, Committee Associate, 2005-08; Society
Committee on Publications, 1991-97; Society Committee on Chemical Abstracts Service, 1982-90;
Committee on Membership Affairs, Committee Associate, 1979; Advisory Board, Journal of Chemical
Information and Modeling, 2005-07; Advisory Board, Journal of Chemical Information and Computer
Science, 2004, 1977-85; Advisory Board, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 1994-98; Advisory Board,
Analytical Chemistry, 1988-90.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1965. Division of Computers in Chemistry: Councilor, 1997-2015,
1979-93; Alternate Councilor 1994-96. Central Pennsylvania Section: Secretary, 1971.
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow. ACS Divisions:
Chemistry; Chemical Education; Computers in Chemistry; and Professional Relations.
Analytical
Related Activities: Editorial Advisory Board, Chemical & Engineering News, 2000-04; Consultant to: Los
Alamos National Laboratory; Molecular Design, Ltd.; W.R. Grace; Beilstein Institute; Chemical
Manufacturers Association; Chair, Organizing Committee, 3rd Symposium on Computer-Enhanced
Analytical Spectroscopy, Snowbird, Utah, June, 1990; Gordon Research Conference on Computer Aided
Drug Design, Chair, July 2005, Program Chair, July 2003; National Science Foundation, Program
Director, Chemical Analysis, 1983-84; Analytica Chimica Acta, Editorial Board, 1977-88; ChemTracts,
Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Contributing Scholar; Member-at-Large, Section Committee on
Chemistry of the AAAS, 1999-03; supervised 57 graduate chemistry degrees; co-author of general
chemistry textbook Chemistry: The Molecular Science, 4th Edition, Brooks/Cole; approximately 270
research publications.
***************************************
KISTLER, PAMELA D. Lehigh Valley Section. Cedar Crest College, Allentown, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: Muhlenberg College, B.S., 1975; Pennsylvania State University, M.S., 1982; Ph.D., 1988.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Cedar Crest College, Professor, 2006 to date, Chemical and Physical
Sciences Department, Chair, 2001-12, Associate Professor, 1996-06, Assistant Professor, 1989-96.
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Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Membership Affairs, 2000-06, Committee Associate, 2012-14,
1998-99, Consultant, 2007; Committee on Public Relations and Communication, 2007-08; Board of
Trustees, Group Insurance Plans for ACS Members, (ex officio), 2002-06.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1975. Lehigh Valley Section: Councilor, 1997-14; Secretary,
1995-96; Treasurer, 1993-94.
Member: League of Women Voters; League of Women Voters of Northampton County, Treasurer, 1996-07,
Membership Chair, 2008 to date; League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania, Board of Directors, 2007 to
date. ACS Division: Chemical Education.
Related Activities: Cedar Crest College Academic Policies and Standards Committee, Founding Chair, 2013-14;
Northampton County Council, Open Space Advisory Board, 2005 to date.
***************************************
LEWIS, DORIS I. Northeastern Section. Suffolk University, Newton, Massachusetts.
Academic Record: Duke University, B.S., 1965; Tufts University, Ph.D., 1972.
Honors: E. Anne Nalley Northeast Regional Volunteer Service Award, ACS, 2013; Henry A. Hill Outstanding
Service Award, Northeastern Section, ACS, 2011, and to the Profession of Chemistry, 2012; JFY Networks
Achievement Award, 1998 for service on Environmental Technology Advisory Board; Sigma Xi; NewTV
(Newton Cable TV) Red Carpet Award for “Bubbles and Beakers” video 2008.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Suffolk University Professor Emerita 2014; Professor, 1986-2014.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Public Relations and Communications, 2013-14, Committee
Associate, 2012; Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs, 2003-11, Committee Associate, 2001-02;
Committee on Local Section Activities, Committee Associate, 1997.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1966. Northeastern Section: Councilor, 1994-2014; Alternate
Councilor, 1991-93; Chair, 2000; Government Affairs Chair, 2005-14; Norris Award Committee, 2010 to
date; Chair, 2013; Founder and Chair, Phyllis A. Brauner Memorial Lecture Committee, 2002 to date;
National Chemistry Week Committee, 2000 to date; Nominating Committee, 2001-13, Chair, 2013, 2003,
2001; Board of Publications, 1995-97, Chair, 1997; National Meeting Committee 1998,1990; NESACS
Student Affiliate Coordinator, 1978-90; Continuing Education Committee, 1979-81; Suffolk University,
ACS Student Affiliate Chapter Adviser, 1977-2013; Summerthing, Chair, 2009 to date (Fenway Park Red
Sox events).
Related Activities: Science, Engineering, and Technology Congressional Visits Day, participant, 2014; ACS
Legislative Summit on Capitol Hill, 2002-10; ACS Legislative Action Network, 1991 to date; ACS
Legislative Action Honor Roll 2004, 2003; ACS National Science Funding Network, 1993-2004; Suffolk
University Biochemistry-Forensic Science Advisory Board, 2002-12; Suffolk University Summer Forensic
Science Institute in collaboration with the Boston Police Crime Laboratory, Founder and Coordinator,
2002-06; Environmental Technology Advisory Board (member), JFY Networks, 1994-2012.
***************************************
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Election to CPC
MASI, CHRISTOPHER Central Massachusetts Section. Westfield State University, Westfield, Massachusetts.
Academic Record: College of the Holy Cross, A.B., 1990; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Ph.D., 2003.
Professional Positions (past ten years): Westfield State University, Associate Professor, 2008-14, Assistant
Professor, Westfield State University, 2002-08.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2012-15, Committee Associate,
2009-11.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1996. Central Massachusetts Section: Councilor, 2008-14; Alternate
Councilor, 2006-07; Chair, 2013-14, 2008-09; Chair-Elect, 2012, 2007. Northeast Regional Meeting:
38th NERM, Board, General Chair, 2010; Secretary, 2009-14.
Related Activities: Abstract Replacement Advisory Group Volunteer, Beta Tester “INDY app,” Beta Tester
“DALLAS app”.
***************************************
TWISS-BROOKS, ANDREA B. Chicago Section. University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
Academic Record: Texas Christian University, B.S., 1982; Cornell University, M.S., 1985; University of North
Texas, M.S., Library Science, 1990.
Honors: ACS Division of Chemical Information Meritorious Service Award, 2007.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): University of Chicago, Science Libraries Division, Co-Director, 2006
to date; John Crerar Library, Chemistry Librarian, 1993-06.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Nominations and Elections, 2009-14, Vice Chair, 2014;
Committee on Chemical Abstracts Service 2003-08, Chair, 2004-06, Committee Associate, 2002;
Community Activities, 2007-09, Committee Associate, 2006; Taskforce on Third Party Web
Collaborations, ACS Governing Board for Publishing, 2005-06.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1996. Chemical Information Division: Councilor, 2006-14; Chair,
2001; Program Committee, 2006-2008; Awards Committee, 2007-11 (Asst. Chair, 2011); Bylaws and
Procedures Manual Committee, Chair, 2003-06. Committee on Community Activities: Evaluation and
Technology Subcommittee, Co-Chair, 2007-08.
Member: Geoscience Information Society. ACS Divisions: Chemical Education; and Chemical Information.
Related Activities: Geoscience Information Society, Secretary, 2007-08; Royal Society of Chemistry Publishing
Library Advisory Board, 2010-11; American Library Association’s Resources for College Libraries,
Geology section co-editor, 2006 to date; National Federation of Abstracting and Information Services
(NFAIS), Conference Planning Committee, 2006-07; GDCh (German Chemical Society) Computers in
Chemistry group/ACS Division of Chemical Information collaboration steering committee, 2005 to date;
editorial committee XCITR instructional materials repository, 2010 to date; Chemical Information
Instructor feature editor, Journal of Chemical Education, 2002-10; Academic Library Advisory
Committee, Chemical Abstracts Service, 2002-10; Symposium organizer at ACS National Meetings,
1999 to date; Library Advisory Group, ACS Publications Division, 1998-10; Cornell University, Editorial
Associate, Accounts of Chemical Research, 1986-88; Cornell University, Wiley/NBS Spectral Database,
Database Project Manager, 1985-86.
***************************************
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WATKINS, LINETTE M. Virginia Section. James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia.
Academic Record: Trinity University, B.S., Biochemistry, 1989; University of Notre Dame, Ph.D.,
Biochemistry, 1996.
Honors: Bio Scientific Corporation, Sabbatical Research Fellow, 2012-13; Mariel Muir Faculty Award for
Excellence in Mentoring, 2011; NSF Senior Discovery Corps Fellow, 2006-07; University of TexasAustin Research Faculty Fellow, 2003-05; Texas State University Presidential Award for Excellence in
Service, 2003; Reilly Graduate Fellowship, University of Notre Dame, 1992; Clare Booth Luce
Fellowship, University of Notre Dame, 1989-92.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): James Madison University, Professor and Department Head, 2014 to
date; Southwest Texas State University (renamed Texas State University), Associate Professor, 2003-14,
Assistant Professor, 1997-03.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, Committee Associate, 2013;
Committee on Minority Affairs, 2000-08, Chair, 2006-08, Committee Associate, 1999; Working Group
on Two Year College Guidelines, 2005-09; Committee on Community Activities, 2004-06, National
Chemistry Week (NCW) Task Force, 2001-03.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1992. Virginia Section: Councilor, 2014. Central Texas Section:
Councilor, 2012-13; Alternate Councilor, 2006-12; Chair, 2003-04, Chair-Elect, 2003; Subcommittee
Chair, 2003-14. Southwest Regional Meeting Board: Co-Chair, 2012; Chair-Elect, 2011. Southwest
Regional Meeting: General chair, 2011. Professional Relations Division: Alternate Councilor, 2006-15;
Member at Large, 2003-05; Chair, Minority Affairs Subdivision, Chair, 2010-12.
Member: Council on Undergraduate Research; Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans
in Science. ACS Divisions: Biological Chemistry; Chemical Education; and Professional Relations.
Related Activities: Council on Undergraduate Research Workshop Facilitator and Campus consultant, 2008-10;
Symposium chair at National and Regional Meetings, 2005 to date; National Science Foundation Panel
Reviewer, 2000 to date; Core collaborator on Biochemistry Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning
(POGIL) project, 2006 to date; Texas A&M University, Postdoctoral Research Associate 1995-97.
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Page 1 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
ELECTION TO
COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS
Action Requested: The Council Policy Committee has selected the following slate of candidates for
membership on the Committee on Nominations and Elections:
Anthony W. Addison
John W. Finley
Lydia E. M. Hines
Roland F. Hirsch
Robert L. Lichter
Mamie W. Moy
Anne T. O’Brien
Eleanor D. Siebert
Herbert B. Silber
Ralph A. Wheeler
The Council must elect five individuals: The five candidates receiving the highest numbers of votes will be
declared elected for the 2015-2017 term. All the candidates have indicated their willingness to serve if elected.
Biographies of the candidates are presented in summary form at the end of this item.
Supplementary Information.
Description of Duties and Desired Characteristics for Members of the
Committee on Nominations and Elections (N&E)
The Committee on Nominations and Elections (N&E) receives suggestions and petitions for President-Elect,
District Director, and Director-at-Large. The committee then ranks and prepares a list of nominees and/or
candidates for these offices. N&E supervises Society elections, conducts elections in Council; and serves as
an election appeals board for local section and division elections. N&E members also:
•
•
•
•
run the Town Hall Meetings for President-Elect nominees and Director-at-Large candidates
participate in the testing of Council voting “clickers”
take on an active role during the Council Meeting. In that sense, members are also expected to be
present at 6:30 a.m. on Wednesday morning of a National Meeting to help prepare for the Council
meeting, and
represent N&E at the various Councilor Caucuses during a National Meeting.
To succeed in these activities, members need to have extensive experience in ACS governance, a strong ACS
network and be available to attend all national meetings. The candidate’s personal qualities must include
integrity and strong ethical character, respect for confidentiality, and the ability to work well in a team
environment.
During every ACS National Meeting, the Nominations & Election Committee:
•
•
•
•
•
•
meets Sunday afternoons (approximately 12 p.m – 4 p.m.)
continues to meet on Mondays (approximately 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.)
runs the Town Hall Meetings that run from 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. on Sunday evenings
has representatives attend their appropriate Councilor Caucuses on Sunday from
6 p.m. – 7 p.m. and/or on Tuesdays from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
tests Council voting “clickers” from approximately 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. on Tuesday, and
begins their Council activities at 6:30 a.m. on Wednesday.
Members of N&E must be voting Councilors.
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Those members of the Committee on Nominations and Elections whose terms end on December 31, 2014, are as
follows:
W.H. (Jack) Breazeale, Jr., South Carolina Section
Catherine C. Fenselau, Analytical Chemistry (Chemical Society of Washington Section)
Lydia E.M. Hines, Kalamazoo Section
Anne T. O’Brien, New York Section
Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks, Chemical Information (Chicago Section)
W.H. (Jack) Breazeale, Catherine C. Fenselau, and Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks are ineligible for reelection.
The present members of the Committee on Nominations and Elections who continue on that body are:
2013-2015
Cherlynlavaugh Bradley, Chicago Section
Milagros Delgado, South Florida Section
Carol B. Libby, Lehigh Valley Section
Les McQuire, North Jersey Section
Donivan R. Porterfield, Central New Mexico Section
2014-2016
Lisa M. Balbes, St. Louis Section
Jeannette E. Brown, North Jersey Section
Martha L. Casey, Wisconsin Section
D. Richard Cobb, Rochester Section
Lissa Dulany, Georgia Section
_______________________________________________________
ADDISON, ANTHONY W. Philadelphia Section. Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: University of New South Wales, B.Sc. (Hons-I, Applied Chemistry), 1968; University of
Kent at Canterbury, Ph.D. (Chemistry), 1971.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2012; ACS Philadelphia Section Ullyot Award for Meritorious Service, 1999; Fellow,
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2008; Le Conférencier: la Convention Intercantonale Romande
d’Enseignement du 3e Cycle en Chimie, Switzerland, 1990; Christian & Mary Lindback Award for
Distinguished Teaching, 1987; The John van Geuns Fonds Lecturer, Universiteit van Amsterdam, 1985;
Elected Honorary Member of Phi Eta Sigma, 1982; Australian Commonwealth Scholar, 1964-67.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Professor of Chemistry, Drexel University, 1991 to date.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2010-15, Committee Associate,
2008-09; ACS National Award Committee, 2007-09.
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Election to N&E
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1974. Philadelphia Section: Councilor, 2003-15; Alternate
Councilor, 1998-02, 1990-96; Chair, 1988-89, 1986; Chair-Elect and Program Chair, 1988; Awards
Committee, 2006-08; Communications Committee, 1979 to date. Middle Atlantic Regions: Program CoChair, 39th Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting 2007, Section Liaison to MARM Board 2013 to date,
Board Member 2005 to date; Awards Committee, 2013-14, 2010; Program Chair, 30th Middle Atlantic
Regional Meeting, 1996.
Member: Royal Society of Chemistry; Chemical Institute of Canada/Canadian Society for Chemistry; IES - the
International EPR (ESR) Society. ACS Division: Inorganic Chemistry.
Related Activities: Support volunteer to ALAW - Autism Living & Working, 2003 to date; Co-author of seven
editions of General Chemistry Lab Manual; Hirsch Index h= 37; Erdös number= 5, Google i99= 12; Lead
Author of the most highly-cited inorganic paper published by the RSC since 1901; second author of
Bioinorganic Chemistry book (Wiley, 2014). 113 published papers; 122 abstracts/conference proceedings;
4 book chapters.
***************************************
FINLEY, JOHN W. Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry (Baton Rouge Section). Louisiana State
University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
Academic Record: LeMoyne College, B.S., 1964; Cornell University, Ph.D., 1969.
Honors: Fellow, Agriculture and Food Chemistry Division, ACS, 1990; Institute of Food Technologists, Fellow
2008; Outstanding Alumni, Michigan State University, 2007; Kraft Foods, Kraft Fellow, 1999-04; Phi
Kappa Phi 1968; Sigma X 1970.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Professor and Chair of Food Science, Louisiana State University,
2007 to date; A.M. Todd Company, Chief Technical Officer, 2004-07; Kraft Foods, 1999-04.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Science, 2008-14, Committee Associate, 2006-07; Committee
on Meetings and Expositions, 2009; Committee on Divisional Activities, 2000-05, Committee Associate,
1998-99; Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group, 2009-14, Chair, 2013; Associate Editor, Journal of
Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 1995 to date; Kavli Young Scientist Selection Committee 2012-14.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1969. Agriculture and Food Chemistry Division: Councilor, 199716, Chair, 1988, Chair-Elect and Program Chair, 1987, Vice-Chair, 1986, Secretary-Treasurer, 1980.
Biotechnology Secretariat: Secretariat, 1990-11; Secretary General, 2005-11; Theme Co-organizer
“Chemistry in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease” 2010; Organized Hot Topic Symposium on the
Gulf Oil Spill, 2010.
Member: American Society of Nutrition; Association of Official Analytical Chemists; Institute of Food
Technologists. ACS Division: Agricultural & Food Chemistry.
Related Activities: Institute of Food Technologists, Board of Directors 2008-11; Nabisco Incorporated, Group
Director, 1983-86; University of Iowa, Director, 1982-83; Ralston Purina Company, Scientist, 1981-82;
U.S.D.A., Western Regional Research Center, Research Chemist 1970-81. U.S. Pharmacopia Advisory
Board for food ingredients and additives.
***************************************
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Election to N&E
HINES, LYDIA E.M., Kalamazoo Section. Western Michigan University (Part-time), Kalamazoo, Michigan.
Academic Record: Aurora College, B.S., 1967; University of Illinois, M.S., 1969; Ph.D., 1971.
Honors: ACS Kalamazoo Local Section, 2014 Volunteer of the Year Award; E. Ann Nalley Great Lakes Region
Award for Volunteer Service, ACS, 2011; Distinguished Service Award, Kalamazoo Section, ACS, 1990;
Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Phi; Distinguished Service Award from Kalamazoo Chamber of Commerce
Business-Education Connection for Science in Schools, 1998-2000; Nominee for STAR (Volunteer)
Award, Kalamazoo, 1992; Accolade in Kalamazoo Gazette for Science Teaching (Free Lance), 1991;
National Science Foundation Fellow, 1969-71; "Outstanding Young Women of America", 1973.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Western Michigan University, Chemistry Faculty (part-time), 200614; Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Chemistry Faculty (part-time), 2004-08.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Nominations and Elections, 2012-14, 1993-98, Secretary, 1995;
Committee on Constitution and Bylaws, 2004-11; Committee on Community Activities, 2005-11;
Committee on Committees, 1999-04; Committee on Copyrights, 1985-93, Chair, 1990-92; Women
Chemists Committee, 1982-87, Committee Associate, 1981; Canvassing Committee, Garvan Medal,
1982-87; Editor, Women Chemists, 1984-87.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1967. Kalamazoo Section: Councilor, 1984-2014; Alternate
Councilor 1978-83; Chair, 1981; Chair-Elect and Program Chair, 1980; Publicity Committee Chair, 198614; National Chemistry Day/Week Coordinator, 1987-2014; Museum Chemistry Day Organizer, 19872014; Chemists Celebrate Earth Day Coordinator, 2004-12; Pre-high school Science Education
Coordinator, 1988-01; Awards Committee, 1991-14, Chair, 2008-14, 1992; Chemistry Promotion
Committee Chair, 1991-01. Great Lakes Regional Meeting: General Chair, 1984; Steering Committee,
1984-14. Indiana-Kentucky Border Section: Publicity Committee Chair, 1974-75.
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science. ACS Division: Chemical Information.
Related Activities: Southwest Michigan Math/Science Alliance, Charter Member and Coordinating Committee,
1990-92; Speaker and Workshop Leader at Teachers' and Children's Librarians' Conferences, 1990-92;
Reviewer, WONDER SCIENCE, ACS, 1989-98; Active Volunteer Presenter of Hands-On Science
Lessons (Preschool Through 6th Grade), 1986-01.
***************************************
HIRSCH, ROLAND F. Division of Analytical Chemistry (North Jersey Section). U.S. Department of Energy,
Germantown, Maryland.
Academic Record: Oberlin College, B.A., 1961; University of Michigan, M.S., 1963; Ph.D., 1965.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2011; Distinguished Service Award in the Advancement of Analytical Chemistry, ACS
Division of Analytical Chemistry, 2000; Honorary Fellow, The Library of America, 2010; Sigma Xi.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Program Manager,
1991 to date; Acting Director, Biological Systems Science Division, 2008.
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Page 5 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Chemists with Disabilities, 2012-14; Committee on
Committees, 2008-10; Committee on Science, Committee Associate, 2005-07; Committee on Divisional
Activities, 1999-04, Committee Associate, 1998; Committee on Publications, Committee Associate,
1996-97; Committee on International Activities, 1984-92, Chair, 1990-92, Committee Associate, 198183; Committee on Nominations and Elections, 1985-87, Secretary, 1986-87; Committee on Meetings and
Expositions, 1978-84; Program Coordination Conference Advisor, 1983-96; Advisory Board, Analytical
Chemistry, 1987-88, 1983-85; Advisory Board, ACS Books, 1985-88.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1966. Division of Analytical Chemistry: Councilor, 1995-2015;
Alternate Councilor, 1992-94; Chair, 1987-88; Chair-Elect, 1986-87; Secretary, 1980-83; Division
Website Editor, 1995 to date; Financial Planning Committee Chair, 1989-90; Nominations Committee
Chair, 1989-90; Awards Committee Chair, 1987-88. ByLaw Councilor, 1987. North Jersey Section:
Councilor, 1976-86, 1972-74; Alternate Councilor, 1987-89; Chair, 1979; Chair-Elect and Program Chair,
1978; Nominations Committee Chair, 1981; Hospitality Committee Chair, 1971-74; Analytical Topical
Group Chair, 1970.
Member: American Physical Society; Society for Applied Spectroscopy; Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry.
ACS Divisions: Analytical Chemistry; Chemical Education; Chemical Information; Geochemistry; and
Organic Chemistry.
Related Activities: Member, National Research Resources Advisory Committee (National Institutes of Health)
(1991–2011); Interagency Working Group on Neutron Science (Office of Science & Technology Policy)
(2000-02); Manager, American student delegation to Annual Meeting of Nobel Laureates, Lindau,
Germany (2000-08).
***************************************
LICHTER, ROBERT L.
Massachusetts.
Northeastern Section. Merrimack Consultants, LLC, Great Barrington,
Academic Record: Harvard University, A.B. cum laude, 1962; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D., 1967.
Honors: ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences, 2010;
ACS Fellow, 2009; Fellow, Association for Women in Science, 2004; Fellow, American Association for
the Advancement of Science, 1995; Sigma Xi; American Council on Education Leadership Training
Fellowship, 1983; National Science Foundation Science Faculty Professional Development Award, 1981;
National Research Council Travel Awards, 1975, 1977
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Principal and Co-founder, Merrimack Consultants, LLC, 2002 to
date.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Minority Affairs, 1999-06, Committee Associate, 1997-98,
Committee on Budget and Finance, 2006-14, Vice Chair, 2011, 2009, Committee Associate, 2005,
Advisory Committee, 2008-13, 2006; Committee on Science, 1997-02, Committee Associate, 1996,
Consultant, 2003; Program Review Advisory Group, 2008-12; Advisory Board, Chemical & Engineering
News, 1998-06; Chair, Board ad hoc Implementation Project on Minorities in Academia, 2003-06; ACS
Graduate Education Advisory Board, 2002-06; ACS Development Advisory Board, 2008-14; Canvassing
Committee, ACS Award for Research in an Undergraduate Institution, 1997-99, Chair, 1999; Percy Julian
Task Force, 2006-09.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1962. Northeastern Section: Councilor, 2008-16. Georgia
Section: Chair, 2005, Chair-Elect, 2004. North Jersey Section: Analytical NMR Topical Group, Chair,
1982-83.
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Page 6 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association for Women in Science. ACS
Divisions: Organic Chemistry; and Chemical Education.
Related Activities: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Section on Chemistry, Secretary,
2004-08, Retiring Chair, 2002-03, Chair, 2001-02, Chair-Elect, 2000-01, Secretary, 2004-09; Sigma Xi,
Public Understanding of Science Committee, 2004-05; Gordon Research Conference on Innovations in
College Chemistry Teaching, Chair, January 2001, Vice Chair, June 1999; National Research Council
Chemical Sciences Roundtable, 1996-2000, Steering Committee, 1996-99; member, NSF Committee on
Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering, 2003-06, Chair, 2005, Vice-Chair, 2004; member, NSF
Advisory Committee on GPRA Performance Assessment, 2006-08; member, NSF Advisory Committee on
Environmental Research and Education, 2003-06; Concepts in Magnetic Resonance, Editor, 1989-94;
Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, editorial board, 1983-87; NSF Senior Scientist Consultant, 2009;
Executive Director, The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., 1989-02; State University of New
York at Stony Brook, Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Studies, 1986-89; Research Corporation,
Program Officer, 1983-86; Hunter College of the City University of New York, Chemistry Department,
Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, 1970-83, Department Chair, 1977-82; California
Institute of Technology, Research Associate, 1968-70.
***************************************
MOY, MAMIE W. Greater Houston Section. University of Houston, Houston, Texas.
Academic Record: University of Texas, B.A., 1950; University of Houston, M.S., 1952.
Honors: Shirley B. Radding Award, 2013; ACS Fellow, 2011; Encouraging Women into Careers in the Chemical
Sciences Award, ACS, 2011; Helen M. Free Award in Public Outreach, ACS, 2004; Southeastern Texas
Section, ACS, Award, 1988; Recognition 101, Women of Distinction in Texas, American Association of
University Women, 2008; National Science Teachers Association, Distinguished Service to Science
Education Award, 2003; Phi Kappa Phi; Iota Sigma Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): University of Houston, Emerita Professor, 2012 to date, Professor,
1990-2012, Associate Chair, 1982-92; Associate Professor, 1978-90.
Service in ACS National Offices: Council Policy Committee, 2009-14; Committee on Committees, 2003-08;
Committee on Nominations and Elections, 1997-02, Vice-Chair, 2001-02; Committee on Minority Affairs,
1993-2000; Committee on Membership Affairs, 1992-97, Committee Associate, 1990-91; Women
Chemists Committee, Committee Associate, 1983-84.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1967. Greater Houston Section: Councilor, 1989-2015, 1982-83;
Alternate Councilor, 1984, 1981; Chair, 1985; Chair-Elect, 1984; National Chemistry Week Co-Chair,
1995-2000; Education Committee Chair, 2001-04; Director, 1981-85. Southwest Regional Meeting: Board
Chair, 2007, Co-Chair, 2005-06; Publicity Chair, 1986; Awards Chair, Chemical Education Program
Organizer, 1996. Chemical Education Division: Hospitality Committee Chair, 1999-01.
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science; National Science Teachers Association; Alpha
Chi Sigma. ACS Division: Chemical Education.
Related Activities: Joint Subcommittee on Diversity 2006-09; ConC Sub-Committee on Industrial Chemists
Pipeline 2003-08, Chair, 2006-08; Engineering, Scientific and Technology Council of Houston, VicePresident, 1997-04; Educational Outreach Chair, 1995-04; Robert A. Welch Foundation, Summer Scholar
Program, Coordinator, 1988-10; Houston Museum of Natural Science, Advisor, Welch Hall of Chemistry,
1995-2010.
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Page 7 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
O'BRIEN, ANNE T. New York Section. (Wyeth, Retired) Consultant, Tarrytown, New York.
Academic Record: Marymount College, B.S., 1957; Fordham University, Ph.D., 1964.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2013; Outstanding Service Award, New York Section, ACS, 1994; Outstanding Scientist,
Westchester County, 2001; Fellowships: University California, Berkeley, University California, San
Francisco, Oregon State University, University Oklahoma, North Dakota State University, University of
Vermont; Wyeth-Ayerst Teamwork Award, 2000; Sigma Xi; Iota Sigma Pi.
Professional Positions (for past ten years): Information Consultant, July 2002 to date; Retired, Wyeth (formerly
American Cyanamid, AHP), Manager, Library Services, 1992-02.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Nominations and Elections, 2012-14; Board of Directors,
District I, 2001-09; Councilor, ex officio, 2001-09; Governing Board, Green Chemistry Institute, 2007-09,
Advisor 2010-11; Board Executive Committee, 2005-06; Board Committee on Professional and Member
Relations, 2003-05, Chair, 2003-05; Board Committee on Public Affairs and Public Relations, 2004-08,
2001-02; Board Committee on Grants and Awards, 2006-09, 2001-03; Budget & Finance, 2003-11; Board
Committee on Planning, 2005-06, 1997-99; Council Policy Committee 1994-2000, Vice-Chair, 1997-2000;
Committee on Chemical Abstracts Service 2004-05, Consultant 2006-10; Awards Review Committee
2010-11; Electronic Dissemination of Meeting Content, 2008-10; Web Strategy Initiative 2007-11;
Program Review Advisory Group, 2006-09; Committee on Economic Status, 1988-93, Chair, 1991-93;
Committee on Professional Relations, 1990-93; Professional Programs Planning and Coordinating
Committee (PROPPACC), 1991-93; Committee on Constitution and Bylaws, Committee Associate, 198687; Board Task Force on Program Review, 2005-06; Board Task Force on Percy Julian, 2004-07, Chair
2004-07; Board Hurricane Task Force, 2005; Board Task Force on Board Goals, 2005-08; Board Task
Force on Campaign Conduct, 2002-04; Board Task Force on Meeting Finances, 2002-04; Board Task
Force on Employment Problems of Chemists, 1995; Council Policy Committee Task Force on Councilor
Travel Reimbursement, 1994-96; Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs, Task Force on Federal
Policy Agenda, 1994-96; ad hoc Board Task Force on Strategic Expense Management System, 2002-05.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1961. New York Section: Councilor, 2010-15, 1985-2001;
Alternate Councilor, 1984; Chair, 1986; Chair-Elect and Program Chair, 1985; Program Review Committee
Chair, 1994 to date; Government Affairs Committee, 2012 to date; Long Range Planning Committee, 198613, Chair, 1986, 2010-13; Information Technology Committee, 2000-11, Chair 2008 to date; History
Committee, 2000 to date; Nichols Medal Jury, 1986-91; Public Relations Committee Co-Chair, 1990;
Program Review Chair, 1987 to date; Finance Committee Chair, 1986-87; Nominating Committee Chair,
1987, 1985; Metrochem Committee, 1987; Fundraising Committee, 1987; Education Committee, 1980-84.
Westchester Subsection: Secretary, 1968-70.
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science; American Association of University
Professors. ACS Divisions: Chemical Information; Medicinal Chemistry; Professional Relations; Business
Development and Management; and Small Chemical Businesses.
Related Activities: Chemical Heritage Foundation Heritage Council (ACS Appointee), 2010-15; ACS
Leadership Development System Facilitator, 2010 to date; Wyeth (formerly American Cyanamid), Medical
Research Division, Group Leader, 1986-92; Principal Research Chemist, 1987-92; Senior Research
Chemist, 1976-86; University of Waterloo, Associate Professor, 1973-76; Marymount College, Associate
Professor, 1962-72.
***************************************
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Page 8 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
SIEBERT, ELEANOR D. Southern California Section. (Retired) Mount St. Mary’s College, Los Angeles,
California.
Academic Record: Duke University, B.A., 1963; University of California, Los Angeles, Ph.D., 1969.
Honors: Agnes Ann Green Distinguished Service Award, Southern California Section, ACS, 1994; Society for
College Science Teachers and Kendall/Hunt Publishers, Outstanding Undergraduate Science Teacher
Award, 2001; Sigma Xi; Delta Epsilon Sigma, 1997; Who’s Who in America’s Teachers; American Men
and Women of Science.
Professional Positions (for past 10 years): Mount St. Mary’s College, Professor Emerita (awarded 2013);
Provost and Academic Vice President, 2005-13; Professor of Chemistry, 1974-2005; Chair, Department
of Physical Sciences and Mathematics, 1983-05; Interim Graduate Dean, 2004-05.
Service in ACS National Offices: Council Policy Committee, 2009-14; Committee on Meetings and
Expositions, Committee Associate, 2007; Committee on Committees, 2002-06; Committee on Public
Relations and Communications, 1997-01, Chair, 1999-01, Committee Associate, 1996.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1976. Southern California Section: Councilor, 1995-2015;
Alternate Councilor 1993-94; Chair, 1994; Chair-Elect and Program Chair, 1993; Chemistry and Public
Relations, Chair, 2002-04; National Chemistry Week Chair, 2001; Education Committee Chair, 1987;
Long-Range Planning Chair, 1995; Newsletter Editor, 1988-91. Western Regional Meeting: Chair, 1993;
Publicity, 2011, 2003.
Member: American Association for the Advancement of Science; Sigma Xi; National Science Teachers
Association; Society for College Science Teachers. ACS Division: Chemical Education.
Related Activities: Project Manager and contributor, 2014 Report on the Status of Women and Girls in California
(Mount St. Mary’s College); IHE Collaborative of LA Compact, Steering Committee, 2010-13; Western
Association of Schools and Colleges, Senior Commission, 2004-10; WASC Association of Community
Colleges and Junior Colleges Commission, 2011-14; AAAS Education Division (Sec. Q), Nominations
and Elections, 2005-07; Advanced Placement Chemistry, Chief Reader and Test Development Committee
Consultant, 2004-09; Visiting faculty, University of Southern California, 1989-90; National Science
Teachers Association, Board of Directors, 1997-99, 1991-93, College Division Director, 1997-99; Society
for College Science Teachers, President, 1991-93; Los Angeles Math/Science Interchange, Board of
Directors, 1996 to date; Principal Investigator NIH-MARC Grant, 1991-01; AAC&U SENCER Grant,
2004; Teacher, Westlake School for Girls, 1971-73; Acting Assistant Professor UCLA, 1969-71;
Research chemist, Allied Chemical Corporation, 1963-65; Textbook author, 1982; co-editor and
contributor to three books on higher education science teaching, 1997-04.
***************************************
SILBER, HERBERT B. Santa Clara Valley Section. San Jose State University, San Jose, California.
Academic Record: Lehigh University, B.S., 1964; M.S., 1966; University of California, Davis, Ph.D., 1967;
Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, Postdoc, 1967-68; University of Maryland, Postdoc,
1968-69.
Honors: California State University Wang Family Excellence Award as the Outstanding California State
University Faculty Member in Mathematics, Computer Science, Engineering and Science, 2002; 1998
Presidential Award for Mentoring Underrepresented Students in Science and Engineering from the White
House; San Jose State University, College of Science, Dean’s Award, 1992, and Outstanding Professor,
1990-91; Phi Kappa Phi.
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Page 9 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
Professional Positions (for past 10 years): San Jose State University, Professor, 1986 to date; Associate Dean
for Minority Programs and Research, 2008 to date; Acting Associate Dean (50% time) 2010.
Service in ACS National Offices: Membership Affairs Committee 2010-15; Committee on Nominations and
Elections 2007-09; Committee on Meetings and Expositions, 2006-07; Committee Associate, 2005;
Committee on Committees, 1999-04; Committee on Minority Affairs, 1998, Consultant, 1999-2008,
Committee Associate, 1995-97; Committee on Project SEED, 1993-98, Chair, 1995-97, Committee
Associate, 1992.
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1963. Santa Clara Valley Section: Councilor, 1996-16; Alternate
Councilor, 1991-93, 1987-89; Chair, 1998; Chair-Elect, 1997; Treasurer, 2005-09; Awards Committee,
Chair, 1989-92; Long Range Planning Committee Chair, 1992-95; Safety Committee Chair 1986-87. San
Antonio Section: Chair, 1985; Chair-Elect, 1994; Secretary, 1983. Southwest Regional Meeting:
Secretary-Treasurer, 1980-85. ACS Scholars Selection Committee, 1998-10; ACS Scholars
Evaluation/Review Committee, 1999-08.
Member: Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS). ACS
Division: Nuclear Chemistry and Technology.
Related Activities: National Institute of Health, Minority Access to Research Careers Program Director, San
Jose State University 1988 to date; National Institutes of Health Minority Biomedical Research Support
(MBRS) SCORE Program Director 2007 to date; San Jose State University Mathematics, Engineering,
Science Achievement (MESA) Principal Investigator 2010 to date; San Jose State University Site Director
for the American Chemical Society/Department of Energy Nuclear Summer School, 1998 to date; CoEditor, Proceedings of the Rare Earth Research Conferences, 1979-2006; Rare Earth Research
Conferences, Inc., Board of Directors 1977-79, 1981-2006, Chair of the Board, 1991-94, Program Chair,
19th Conference (Lexington, KY 1991), General Chair, 20th Conference (Monterey, CA 1993); over 100
publications, mostly with undergraduates; co-editor of a chemistry encyclopedia for K-14.
***************************************
WHEELER, RALPH A. Division of Computers in Chemistry, (Pittsburgh Section). Duquesne University,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Academic Record: Harvey Mudd College, B.S, 1982; Cornell University, Ph.D., 1988.
Honors: ACS Fellow, 2010; ACS Computers in Chemistry Division Outstanding Service Awards, 2009, 2004;
President’s Associates Presidential Professor, University of Oklahoma, 2003-10; Regents’ Award for
Superior Research, University of Oklahoma, 2002; Junior Faculty Research Fellowships, University of
Oklahoma, 1993, 1990-91; National Institutes of Health National Research Service Award, 1989;
National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship (declined), 1987. Sigma Xi Honorary Research
Society, 1982; ARCS Foundation Scholarship, 1981-82; National Merit Scholarship, 1978-82; National
Society of Professional Engineers Scholarship, 1978-80.
Professional Positions (past ten years): Duquesne University, Professor and Department Chair, Department of
Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2010 to date; Presidential Professor, Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, 2003-10.
Service in ACS National Offices: Committee on Science, 2013-14, Committee Associate, 2011-12.
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Page 10 of ITEM III, C
Election to N&E
Service in ACS Offices: Member ACS since 1982. Division of Computers in Chemistry: Councilor, 2009-14,
Past-Chair, 2008, Chair, 2007, Chair-Elect, 2006, Alternate Councilor, 2004-06, Program Chair, 2000-04.
Member: Council for Chemical Research. ACS Divisions: Computers in Chemistry; and Physical Chemistry.
Related Activities: Council for Chemical Research (CCR) Governing Board, 2014, Chair, (CCR) Advocacy Task
Force, 2014; Editor, Annual Reports in Computational Chemistry, 2008 to date, Co-Editor, 2006-08;
Editorial Board Member, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modeling (publication of the Molecular
Graphics Society and the ACS COMP Division), 1998 to date; University of Oklahoma’s faculty
representative to Federal Demonstration Partnership to streamline grant application and reporting
requirements, 2002-10; published 75 journal articles, cited more than 2600 times.
***************************************
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Page 1 of ITEM III, D
Suggestions for 2016
Elected Committees
REQUEST FOR SUGGESTIONS FOR 2016 ELECTED COMMITTEES
A Reminder
At the Council meeting in San Francisco, California, Councilors will elect members to the Committee on
Committees, Council Policy Committee, and Committee on Nominations and Elections to fill 2015-2017 terms.
The process to select nominees for 2016-2018 terms will begin almost immediately. The Committee on
Nominations and Elections therefore asks each Councilor to examine the following list of elected committee
positions with terms ending on December 31, 2015, and the list of the other members of these committees.
Names of individuals suggested for nomination should be inserted on the form on page 47. This form may be left
on the registration table as you leave the Council meeting or emailed to the Chair of the Committee: Mr. D.
Richard Cobb, [email protected]
COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES
Members of the Committee on Committees (ConC) whose terms end on December 31, 2015, are:
G. Bryan Balazs, California Section
Christopher J. Bannochie, Savannah River Section
Dawn A. Brooks, Indiana Section
Michelle V. Buchanan, Analytical Chemistry (East Tennessee Section)
Alan B. Cooper, North Jersey Section
G. Bryan Balazs and Dawn A. Brooks are ineligible for reelection.
The other elected members serving on the Committee on Committees are:
Term ending December 31, 2016
Janet Bryant, Business Development &Management (Richland Section)
Dee Ann Casteel, Susquehanna Valley Section
Amber S. Hinkle, Greater Houston Section
Wayne E. Jones, Jr., Binghamton Section
V. Michael Mautino, Pittsburgh Section
Term ending December 31, 2014
Spiro Alexandratos, Industrial & Engineering Chemistry (New York Section)
Judith Currano, Philadelphia Section
Bonnie Lawlor, Chemical Information (Philadelphia Section)
Zaida C. Morales-Martinez, South Florida Section
Sara J. Risch, Agricultural & Food Chemistry (Chicago Section)
ConC nominees for 2015-2017 terms are listed in the agenda for the Council meeting in San Francisco, California
under "Election to Committee on Committees." Names of those elected will be announced at that meeting. Sara
J. Risch is ineligible for reelection.
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Page 2 of ITEM III, D
Suggestions for 2016
Elected Committees
COUNCIL POLICY COMMITTEE
Members of the Council Policy Committee whose terms end on December 31, 2015, are as follows:
Frank D. Blum, Polymer Chemistry (Oklahoma Section)
Mary K. Carroll, Eastern New York Section
Lee H. Latimer, California Section
Carolyn Ribes, Brazosport Section
Carolyn Ribes is ineligible for reelection.
The other elected members serving on the Council Policy Committee are as follows:
Term ending December 31, 2016
Harmon B. Abrahamson, Red River Valley Section
Judith H. Cohen, Philadelphia Section
Alan M. Ehrlich, Chemistry & the Law (Chemical Society of Washington Section)
Angela K. Wilson, Physical Chemistry (Dallas –Fort Worth Section)
Term ending December 31, 2014
Lawrence Barton, St. Louis Section
Peter C. Jurs, Computers in Chemistry (Central Pennsylvania Section)
Mamie W. Moy, Greater Houston Section
Eleanor D. Siebert, Southern California Section
CPC nominees for the 2015-2017 term are listed in the agenda for the Council meeting in San Francisco,
California under "Election to Council Policy Committee." Names of those elected will be announced at that
meeting. Mamie W. Moy and Eleanor D. Siebert are ineligible for reelection.
COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS
The duties of the Council Policy Committee include "Nominating voting Councilors for membership on the
Committee on Nominations and Elections..." Therefore, suggestions for candidates to serve on N&E will be
forwarded to the CPC Subcommittee on Nominations for consideration.
Those members of the Committee on Nominations and Elections whose terms end on December 31, 2015, are as
follows:
Cherlynlavaugh Bradley, Chicago Section
Milagros Delgado, South Florida Section
Carol B. Libby, Lehigh Valley Section
Les McQuire, North Jersey Section
Donivan R. Porterfield, Central New Mexico Section
Milagros Delgado is ineligible for reelection.
The other elected members serving on the Committee on Nominations and Elections are:
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Page 3 of ITEM III, D
Suggestions for 2016
Elected Committees
Term ending December 31, 2016
Lisa M. Balbes, St. Louis Section
Jeannette E. Brown, North Jersey Section
Martha L. Casey, Wisconsin Section
D. Richard Cobb, Rochester Section
Lissa Dulany, Georgia Section
Term ending December 31, 2014
W.H. (Jack) Breazeale, Jr., South Carolina Section
Catherine C. Fenselau, Analytical Chemistry (Chemical Society of Washington Section)
Lydia E.M. Hines, Kalamazoo Section
Anne T. O’Brien, New York Section
Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks, Chemical Information (Chicago Section)
N&E nominees for the 2015-2017 term are listed in the Council agenda for the Council meeting in San Francisco,
California, under "Election to Committee on Nominations and Elections." Names of those elected will be
announced at that meeting. W.H. (Jack) Breazeale, Jr., Catherine C. Fenselau, and Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks are
ineligible for reelection.
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Page 4 of ITEM III, D
Suggestions for 2016 Elected Committees
Mr. D. Richard Cobb
[email protected]
Dear Mr. Cobb:
I propose the following Councilors for consideration by the Committee on Nominations and Elections and the
Council Policy Committee:
(Please Print)
COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES (Councilors only)
Councilor Name______________________________________________________________________
Local Section or Division Affiliation______________________________________________________
Councilor Name______________________________________________________________________
Local Section or Division Affiliation______________________________________________________
COUNCIL POLICY COMMITTEE (Councilors only)
Councilor Name______________________________________________________________________
Local Section or Division Affiliation______________________________________________________
Councilor Name______________________________________________________________________
Local Section or Division Affiliation______________________________________________________
COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS (Councilors only)
Councilor Name______________________________________________________________________
Local Section or Division Affiliation______________________________________________________
Councilor Name______________________________________________________________________
Local Section or Division Affiliation______________________________________________________
Sincerely,
(name)
(local section or division affiliation)
This form must be received by Mr. Cobb no later than October 31, 2014
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ITEM III, E
Ballot Counts
BALLOT COUNTS, PREVIOUS ELECTIONS
The Committee on Nominations and Elections regularly reports in the Council agenda the numerical
results of balloting from elections at the previous meeting. The following tabulations give the numerical
results of the balloting at the March 19, 2014, meeting of the Council for selection of candidates for
2015 President-Elect. Also reported are the results of mail ballots (March 5, 2014) for the selection of
candidates for Director from District III and for Director from District VI for 2015-2017 terms.
Nominees selected as the candidates are identified by an asterisk.
2015 PRESIDENT-ELECT
*Peter K. Dorhout
*William A. Lester
Christopher K. Ober
Henry F. Schaefer III
341
180
133
157
DIRECTOR, DISTRICT III
Dee Ann Casteel
*Pat N. Confalone
*Anne S. DeMasi
Kathryn E. Uhrich
16
31
21
18
DIRECTOR, DISTRICT VI
Allison A. Campbell
*Paul W. Jagodzinski
*Lee H. Latimer
Eleanor Siebert
*
Individuals nominated
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13
ITEM IV, A
President’s Report
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT
I am kicking off the ACS Fall National Meeting by inviting children and families out to the ACS Public Outreach
Event at the Children’s Creativity Museum on Saturday, August 9 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. With the theme of
“Exploring Our World Through Chemistry,” attendees can learn more about the fascinating world of chemistry
through hands-on, age-appropriate activities.
My first Presidential symposium, entitled “‘Fracking’– Where are we and where are we going” will take place on
Monday, August 11. This symposium will cover the environmental implications and the science behind hydraulic
fracturing, as well as potential impacts on drinking water and results of methane emissions during fracturing.
The other Presidential symposium on Tuesday, August 12, covers the chemistry behind “Photocatalytic
Conversion of Water to Hydrogen and Oxygen.” Organized by Dan Nocera, this three-part symposium will cover
Solar Photovoltaics, Solar Storage and have presentations by Emerging Energy Scholars.
I encourage you to attend the Kavli lectures on Monday, August 11, at the Moscone Center. The first is The
Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture given by Ali Khademhosseini, Associate Professor at
Harvard-MIT's Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard
Medical School as well as an Associate Faculty at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. His
lecture on developing micro- and nanoscale technologies to control cellular behavior is from 4:00 – 5:00 PM.
Following shortly afterwards from 5:30 to 6:30 PM is The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture, by Joan
Brennecke, Keating-Crawford Professor within the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and
Director of the Center for Sustainable Energy at Notre Dame. Dr. Brennecke’s lecture will focus on ‘How Ionic
Liquids Can Contribute to Global Stewardship.’
Details of presidential events and other recommended symposia can be found at www.acs.org/sanfran2014 and in
the on-site program.
Tom Barton
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ITEM IV, B
President- Elect’s Report
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT-ELECT
It is a genuine pleasure to serve as President-Elect of the American Chemical Society, my professional home
throughout my career. I want to thank the Council, ACS staff, and members for their valuable advice, suggestions
and passionate engagement. I ask for your continuing advice and help in advancing the goals of ACS.
I will focus here on the American Association of Chemistry Teachers [AACT], a recently approved ACS
initiative. I am proud that ACS has taken the steps to create the AACT to provide a professional home for K-12
teachers of chemistry.
Until now, chemistry has been the only scientific discipline in the U.S. without a national teachers’ organization.
Only 35 percent of high school chemistry teachers have both a bachelor’s degree and certification in chemistry.
Now ACS will provide teachers, especially those who may not feel adequately prepared to teach chemistry,
resources and support.
AACT, which began accepting membership applications prior to the San Francisco meeting, will fully launch the
first week in September. This new organization will:
•
•
•
Serve as a trusted source of curricular and pedagogical resources for K–12 chemistry;
Provide opportunities for chemistry teachers to network with one another and the broader ACS
community, both virtually and in person; and
Disseminate effective K-12 teaching and learning practices.
AACT is targeted toward K-12 teachers of chemistry and physical science, but will be open to anyone with an
interest in pre-college chemistry education. AACT members will not, as such, be ACS members, though a
number of ACS members, including my Board colleague George Bodner, have already expressed their interest in
being a member of both ACS and AACT.
What will AACT members receive for their $50 membership? They will have access to customized curricular
resources, a peer-reviewed periodical, professional development opportunities, a subscription to ChemMatters
magazine, and venues for virtual and face-to-face networking. This ability to connect with other teachers is
critically important, particularly as many teachers of chemistry work in isolation – as the only chemistry, or
science, teacher in their school.
What can you do to support chemistry teachers? I am committed to the success of the AACT, and encourage you
to reach out to your children’s and grandchildren’s chemistry teachers, as well as those in your local schools, and
encourage them to participate in AACT. K-12 teachers of chemistry educate the scientists and citizens of
tomorrow; AACT gives us an opportunity to strengthen our commitment to them.
A fuller discussion of my initiatives will be presented in my oral report to Council. Initiatives for Denver include
a focus on these topics: Nanotechnology-Delivering the Promise; Leadership Development as a Strategic
Advantage; and Chemistry without Borders.
Diane Grob Schmidt
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Page 1 of ITEM IV, C
Past President’s Report
REPORT OF THE IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Since our last meeting in Dallas, I have continued to work hard for our members. I’m still traveling most of the
time, accepting invitations to speak for local sections, universities, conferences and sister chemistry societies
overseas. A common theme for my remarks and presentations has been how we can all continue to “Partner for
Progress and Prosperity.”
The Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP) invited me to give a lecture on the important topic of
“Diversity in Science” where I shared a presentation on “Partners for Progress and Prosperity: Celebrating
Diversity Together!” with leaders of many other scientific societies at their annual spring meeting in Washington,
DC.
I have also been invited as a keynote speaker to share my personal and professional story for two Gender Equity
symposia in Japan, a Tech Trek program of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to
encourage young intermediate school girls to pursue STEM fields, as well as other conferences related to our local
sections, technical divisions, and the 2014 NORM regional meeting in Missoula, Montana.
I have always promoted diversity and inclusivity. That is one of the topics of my second ACS Symposium Book
which I have been working hard on this spring with my co-editors, H.N. Cheng and Sadiq Shah. The book is called
“Careers, Entrepreneurship, and Diversity: Challenges and Opportunities of the Global Chemistry Enterprise.” It
consists of 25 chapters based on my presidential symposia from the ACS national meeting last fall in Indianapolis.
The first ACS Symposium Book, called “Vision 2025: How to Succeed in the Global Chemistry Enterprise,” is
based on my presidential symposia from the national ACS meeting last spring in New Orleans. It is available
online at pubs.acs.org/isbn/9780841229389 with 22 chapters that can be downloaded as part of your ACS member
benefit of 25 free downloads per year. Hard copies should be available at our ACS national meeting in San
Francisco.
I have also been working hard sharing presentations on the new P3 (Partners for Progress and Prosperity) Award.
The P3 Award will recognize exemplary partnerships, as I reported in Dallas. I have received positive feedback
and comments from various local sections, regional meeting Board chairs, M&E, LSAC, DAC, IAC and plan to
give more presentations on the P3 Award in San Francisco to stakeholder groups. The first global P3 Award may
be awarded in San Francisco at the International Activities reception.
International collaboration was identified as an opportunity area for ACS through both Environmental Scan trends
and my presidential Task Force: “Vision 2025: Helping ACS Members Thrive in the Global Chemistry
Enterprise.” Thanks to a working group of both IAC and DAC members, all 32 Technical Divisions were
surveyed and we learned there is already extensive international collaboration occurring in various Technical
Divisions. 18 out of the 32 Technical Divisions responded indicating that half of the responding divisions already
engage international scientists in the U.S. or abroad while another third plan to engage international scientists in
the next three years. The IAC-DAC working group plans to continue to partner to further support international
outreach and share best practices. I will share their findings with the ACS Board in San Francisco.
At our last meeting in Dallas, I mentioned the need for securing more funding to support the international WCC
symposium on “Women Leaders of the Global Chemistry Enterprise” at this San Francisco meeting. I am happy
to report successful fundraising for this worthy cause. I want to gratefully acknowledge financial support from
ACS Publications, Chemical Abstracts Services, ACS CEO, Membership & Scientific Advancement, Wu-Xi App
Tec, PROF (Division of Professional Relations), IAC (International Activities Committee) through a Global
Innovation Grant, and the California Section Women Chemists Committee. I also want to thank a number of
cosponsors: ACS President Tom Barton, the Women Chemists Committee as the lead sponsor and organizer, IAC,
PROF, and HIST (Division of History of Chemistry). I was happy to learn that IEEE recently held a very
successful similar conference in San Francisco on International Women Leaders, also supported by many sponsors.
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Page 2 of ITEM IV, C
Past President’s Report
With the San Francisco meeting in my home area, I have been working with my local California Section on
several projects. One project involves a poster display for a Bay Area Science Hall of Fame featuring innovation
and technology from hundreds of chemistry related patents from local industry, government labs, and universities.
The other project involves production of a video by the Office of Public Affairs on “Voices of Science from the
Bay Area” featuring local scientists. Both projects are aimed to deliver the message to the general public on the
tremendous value that chemistry contributes to society. I chaired the California Section during its 100th
anniversary and am proud of the long history of wonderful Bay Area science, including many Nobel laureates, 8
ACS Presidents, 6 National Historic Chemical Landmarks, and much more. I hope you get a chance to view
some of the posters in the Hilton San Francisco Union Square Hotel. Our hope is that similar efforts can help
improve the public perception of chemistry.
I will continue to share my message of how we can all work together as “Partners for Progress and Prosperity” to
advance the chemistry enterprise wherever I go.
Marinda Li Wu
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ITEM IV, D
Chair’s Report
REPORT OF THE CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
This is my last written report to Council as Chair of the Board. On both a personal and professional note, I would
like to express my thanks to my Board colleagues, ACS members and staff who have supported the Board over
the past three years, and use this report to highlight some of our common achievements in that period
•
Although we have ‘American’ in our name, groundbreaking research and innovations are occurring all
over the world. Over the past three years we have accepted new International Chapters, signed alliances
with other chemical societies and increasingly tailored our products and services to chemistry
professionals outside of the US.
•
We established an important new national award – the Kathryn C. Hach Award for Entrepreneurial
Success - recognizing those chemists who not only have a great idea, but work to bring it to market to
enable positive impact on people’s lives. I hope we get a strong, steady stream of nominees for many
years to come.
•
The Senior Chemists Task Force became the Joint Board-Council Committee on Senior Chemists, thus
tapping into a resource of seasoned, experienced chemists that are tasked with mentoring, providing
professional advice, and guiding younger generations to successful careers. In many years to come, when
I become a senior, I plan to join the committee.
•
A lingering theme throughout all my years with ACS has been encouraging our members to speak
eloquently and passionately about their work. Having Alan Alda talk to more than 500 attendees about
communicating science to the public was a highlight of the Indianapolis meeting. His message of not
dumbing down the science, but speaking clearly, and in layman’s terms is a lesson we can all use to
engage our peers about the transforming power of chemistry.
•
We instituted some valuable new member benefits, particularly 25 free downloads of articles from ACS
Publications and 25 free tasks in Sci-Finder, with more available at a preferred price for members. I
realize that most members have access to the literature at work; but for those like me who do not, this is a
real positive.
•
During my tenure on the Board, no action taken has been as significant as the establishment of the
American Association of Chemistry Teachers. Launching this September, AACT is intended to become
the professional home for precollege chemistry teachers and a connection to ACS resources. As there are
over 30,000 teachers of chemistry in high school - only 35% of whom have a both a degree in chemistry
and a teaching certification – AACT is poised to provide meaningful opportunities in the lives of high
school chemistry teachers.
•
With the retirement of Bob Massie, the Board conducted a rigorous search, and found a very capable new
President for CAS in Manny Guzman. I look forward to seeing him succeed for many years with his
remarkable staff out in Columbus.
•
And speaking of searches, the Board is currently in the midst of seeking a replacement for Madeleine
Jacobs. I have had the pleasure of working with Madeleine for many years now, and consider her not only
a strong executive, but also a friend. I asked Council at our last meeting in Dallas to give me advice and
thoughts on the new Executive Director, and I thank and appreciate all of you who reached out to me.
Your voices were all heard.
Councilors, your dedication to our Society and chemistry has allowed us all to achieve many significant
accomplishments. Thank you again for your engagement and your friendship.
William F. Carroll, Jr.
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MINUTES
REGULAR SESSION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Dallas, Texas
March 16, 2014
The Board of Directors of the American Chemical Society met in Dallas, Texas, on March 16, 2014,
beginning at 12:00 p.m. William F. Carroll, Jr., Chair, presided. Other Directors present for all or part of the
meeting were: John E. Adams, Tom J. Barton, George M. Bodner, Bonnie A. Charpentier, Pat N. Confalone,
Thomas R. Gilbert, Rigoberto Hernandez, Madeleine Jacobs, Valerie J. Kuck, Ingrid Montes, Dorothy J. Phillips,
Barbara A. Sawrey, Diane G. Schmidt, Kathleen M. Schulz, and Marinda Li Wu. Present by invitation for all or
parts of the meeting were: Brian A. Bernstein, Brian D. Crawford, Denise L. Creech, Manuel Guzman, Mary
Kirchhoff, Martha K. Lester, Flint H. Lewis, Robert J. Massie, Robert H. Rich, Glenn S. Ruskin, Ronald E.
Siatkowski, David T. Smorodin, John R. Sullivan, Frank E. Walworth, and Marleen G. Weidner. More than three
hundred observers were present at various times during the meeting.
Call to Order and Report from Executive Session
William F. Carroll, Jr., Chair, opened the meeting by recalling that the regular session of the 2013 fall
national meeting in Indianapolis featured American actor, director, and author Alan Alda, who spoke on “Helping
the Public Get Beyond a Blind Date with Science”. At that same meeting, ACS presented Mr. Alda with the ACS
Award for Public Service. He is this year’s recipient of the James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for
Interpreting Chemistry for the Public. Dr. Carroll then introduced a videotaped message from Mr. Alda, who
expressed his gratitude to the Society for the Grady-Stack award.
Dr. Carroll then summarized the key Board actions and discussion points from its executive session,
March 14-15:
•
•
•
•
•
On the recommendation of the Committee on Grants and Awards, the Board approved a Society
nomination for the National Medal of Science, which is bestowed by the President of the United States
upon individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement
of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering,
mathematics and physics.
The Board received an extensive briefing and approved several recommendations from its Committee on
Executive Compensation. The compensation of the Society’s executive staff receives regular review from
the Board.
The working group on Society Program Portfolio Management briefed the Board on its activities. The
group is charged with delivering a process for portfolio management of Society programs in the divisions
of Membership and Scientific Advancement, Education, and the Office of the Secretary and General
Counsel (Office of Public Affairs).
The Board held a discussion on operational issues relating to virtual versus face-to-face committee
meetings, the appropriate detail and format of information presented to the Board and committee
members, and the proper length of committee meetings.
The Executive Director/CEO and her direct reports updated the Board on ACS financial trends and nearterm outlook; plans for the launch of the recently approved American Association of Chemistry Teachers;
and the activities and plans of CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) and the ACS Publications Division. As
a follow-up to the Publications report, the Board approved three journal editor re-appointments. The
Board also approved one appointment to the ACS Green Chemistry Institute® Governing Board and one
reappointment to the ACS Governing Board for Publishing.
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The Board also:
• Expressed its gratitude and thanks to Madeleine Jacobs, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer,
who on March 6 announced her plan to retire at the end of the year. The Board then began a discussion of
the process and logistics of identifying and hiring her successor.
• Received reports from the Presidential Succession on their current and planned activities for the
remainder of 2014 and 2015.
• Approved a resolution congratulating Robert J. Massie on his retirement at the end of this month for more
than twenty-one years of successful leadership of the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS). Dr. Carroll then
acknowledged the presence of Mr. Massie at this meeting.
Open Forum
Dr. Carroll opened the forum by summarizing what the Board heard in response to two questions asked at
the previous open forum, conducted in April 2013: “What one thing would you like from ACS that you don’t get
now?” and “What one thing do you get from another organization that you wish you got from the ACS?” He
reviewed highlights of suggestions from that discussion which were taken back for discussion and consideration
by governance committees and staff for follow up.
Following the review, Dr. Carroll introduced the discussion question for this meeting by stating that ACS
has a robust offering of products and service available in a variety of areas for its members and other practitioners
of chemistry. He announced that this forum is designed to hear responses from our members to the question,
“What is the one best thing that you like that ACS does, and why?” The floor was then opened for response.
More than 30 attendees offered comments on what they liked, including career activities; professional
development; the “Webinar in a Box” program; educational activities, especially those for two-year college
students; international activities, especially those modeled on Festival de Química; research papers and poster
sessions at meetings; ACS Project SEED; International Chemical Sciences Chapters; reduced dues for
undergraduates; standardization in the curriculum and requirements for the ACS chemistry degree; regional
meetings, with increasing emphasis on shared activities by and for local sections; career profiles; and community
outreach and education. At the conclusion of the discussion, Dr. Carroll thanked participants for the success of
another filled-to-capacity forum.
Reports of Officers
President
ACS President Tom Barton urged those present to attend his two major presidential symposia at this
meeting. The first, “Engaging Chemistry Departments in the Preparation of Chemistry Teachers”, features
pioneers who have partnered chemistry departments and education departments to design and establish university
programs for the training of the chemistry teachers of the future. The second, “Benefits of Chemistry in Our
Lives”, features former presidents of the ACS who will emphasize the chemist’s constant duty to educate people
of the incredible value and importance of chemistry in their lives. Dr. Barton expressed hope that with these talks
made available after the meeting, local section members can access them and easily construct “Importance of
Chemistry” talks for their use.
President-Elect
ACS President-Elect Diane G. Schmidt focused her remarks on the recently approved American
Association of Chemistry Teachers (AACT), created to provide a professional home for K-12 teachers of
chemistry. Until now, chemistry has been the only scientific discipline in the U.S. without a national teachers
organization, and only 35% of high school chemistry teachers have both a bachelor’s degree and certification in
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chemistry. AACT will serve as a trusted source of curricular and pedagogical resources for K–12 chemistry
instruction, provide opportunities for chemistry teachers to network with one another and the broader ACS
community, and disseminate effective teaching and learning practices at the K–12 level. Dr. Schmidt encouraged
members to reach out to their children’s and grandchildren’s chemistry teachers, as well as those in their local
schools, and encourage them to participate in AACT.
Immediate Past President
ACS Immediate Past President Marinda Li Wu gave an update on activities in support of her presidential
theme “Partners for Progress and Prosperity”, including her presidential task force “Vision 2025: Helping ACS
Members Thrive in the Global Chemistry Enterprise”, ACS symposium books, C&EN comments, domestic and
international outreach, and advocacy support. She announced a symposium on “Women Leaders of the Global
Chemistry Enterprise” for the fall 2014 national meeting and noted that it is in need of financial sponsors. She
concluded by describing her new Partners for Progress and Prosperity (P3) Award, which will recognize
successful and exemplary partnerships resulting in impactful outcomes between industry, academia, government,
small business and other domestic or overseas entities, and outlined the award’s purpose and funding, eligible
award categories, and selection process.
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 12:59 p.m.
Flint H. Lewis
Secretary
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BOARD CHAIR’S REPORT
OF THE EXECUTIVE SESSION
ACTIONS AND DISCUSSION ITEMS
JUNE 2014
At this meeting, the ACS Board of Directors considered a number of key strategic issues and responded with
several actions.
The Board’s Committees
•
The Board of Directors received reports from its Committee on Grants and Awards (G&A), Professional and
Member Relations (P&MR), the Committee on Pensions and Investments, and the Joint Board-Council
Committees on Publications and International Activities.
•
The Committee on Grants and Awards announced the recipients of the 2015 Priestley Medal (Jacqueline K.
Barton), the 2015 Award for Volunteer Service to the ACS (Cynthia K. Larive), and the 2015 Charles
Lathrop Parsons Award (Paul H. L. Walter). On the recommendation of G&A, the Board VOTED to
approve a Society nominee for the Othmer Gold Medal, the establishment of a new ACS award, and
financial options for several ACS awards.
•
On the recommendation of the Committee on Professional and Member Relations, the Board VOTED to
support a focused strategy for the ACS Network that emphasizes the secure exchange of information and
ideas within ACS groups and that supports the operations of those groups.
•
On the recommendation of the Committee on Pensions and Investments, the Board VOTED to approve an
amendment to the ACS Defined Benefit Retirement Plan to provide a time limited window for a lump sum
distribution offer for terminated vested participants and certain alternate payees and deferred beneficiaries.
•
On the recommendation of the Joint Board-Council Committee on International Activities, following 5-year
reviews, the Board VOTED to approve the continuation of the Hong Kong, Hungarian, and Saudi Arabian
International Chemical Sciences Chapters.
•
On the recommendation of the Joint Board-Council Committee on Publications, the Board VOTED to
approve the appointment of new Editors-in-Chief for three ACS journals.
The Executive Director/CEO Report
•
The Executive Director/CEO and her direct reports updated the Board on the following: the major
challenges, opportunities and projects which the Society is addressing this year and recent updates since the
spring meeting; and the activities of Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), the ACS Publications Division, the
Society’s Treasurer, and the Society’s General Counsel.
Other Society Business
•
The Board VOTED to approve actions arising from the spring Council meeting: locations for ACS National
Meetings in 2023 (spring: Indianapolis/fall: San Francisco), 2024 (spring: New Orleans), 2026 (fall: San
Francisco), and 2029 (spring: San Francisco); and continuation of three Joint Board Council Committees on
Chemical Safety, Chemistry and Public Affairs, and Minority Affairs; and to ratify Board interim actions.
•
The Board received an update from its Oversight Group on Society Program Portfolio Management and
heard reports from the Presidential Succession on their current and planned activities for the remainder of
2014 and for 2015.
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•
As part of its ongoing commitment to consider the most important strategic issues facing the Society, the
Board held a lively discussion on the questions “As information becomes more individualized, how does
ACS embrace this transformation and develop tools designed for its audience?” and “What is the strategy to
deliver service tailored to individuals?”
Executive Director and CEO Search
•
The Board reviewed the proposed search process, timeline, and position description for the Executive
Director and CEO position, and VOTED to select an executive search firm to provide professional services in
support of its campaign to source, recruit and hire a qualified successor to its current Executive Director and
CEO.
William F. Carroll, Jr.
Chair, ACS Board of Directors
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REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The San Francisco meeting is shaping up to be a successful one with approximately 12,000-13,000 attendees
expected. ACS President Tom Barton has an exciting program planned, and 29 ACS technical divisions and nine
committees are providing an array of cutting-edge research symposia around the theme “Chemistry and Global
Stewardship.” More than 11,000 papers and posters will be presented.
In this report, I am providing a few updates since we met in Dallas. In June, the 18th annual Green Chemistry and
Engineering Conference, organized by the ACS Green Chemistry Institute® attracted 420 people (report attached).
I am also pleased to report that we will be launching the American Association of Chemistry Teachers (AACT)
this fall. Be sure to stop by the ACS booth 624 in the Exposition to learn more about AACT and to pick up
information on how you can give a gift of AACT membership to your favorite teachers of chemistry! The
Governing Board for Publishing (report attached) approved the establishment of two new journals, tentatively
titled ACS Infectious Disease Research and Therapeutics and ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, and we
are expecting to announce the names of the editors-in-chief for these exciting new interdisciplinary journals at the
national meeting. In addition, we have made progress on recruiting a new Editor-in-Chief for Chemical &
Engineering News to replace Maureen Rouhi, who accepted a position in the ACS Publications Division focusing
on editorial and business development in Asia. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) has been energized by the new
strategic plan developed by CAS President Manuel Guzman and his leadership team.
On the global front, we have a multi-pronged effort underway to position ACS appropriately in countries and
regions of increasing importance to the future of the chemistry enterprise, taking into account the full span of
ACS activities—from publications to education. Our goal this year has been to continue to enhance our presence
in China, following the establishment of a small office in Beijing. Through the auspices of the Membership
Affairs Committee, the Membership and Scientific Advancement Division has been conducting recruitment
campaigns in India, with some early success reported. We also have a group exploring opportunities in Latin
America.
In other activities, the Petroleum Research Fund completed its first comprehensive survey of grantees. The
survey results reinforced the importance of PRF grants—between 94% and 96% of respondents agreed or strongly
agreed that receiving a PRF grant increased their opportunities to publish, present, and advance their research as
well as to advance their career. At Ph.D.-granting institutions, 84% of grantees agreed or strongly agreed that the
PRF grant helped them get tenure.
As the chief administrator of ACS staff, I have also focused on enhancing staff development and training. This
year, we rolled out additional intensive training for managers and professional development courses for all staff.
In June, ACS Staff Liaisons attended a training retreat to enhance their performance for the committees they
serve. We also recently concluded the fourth ACS employee survey since 2004. We were pleased to see an
increase in the engagement of employees across the organization. Our goal with all these activities is to have a
world-class staff and managers and to provide outstanding service to our members and institutional customers.
I will have additional updates and some announcements to make in San Francisco, which is my 21st consecutive
national meeting and the last national meeting I will attend in my capacity as ACS Executive Director and Chief
Executive Officer. This will be an even busier meeting than usual for me! I am co-hosting a reception for our
generous ACS donors on Sunday afternoon and will serve as a co-host with President Barton at the Heroes of
Chemistry Awards on Sunday night, where we will honor teams of scientists at five companies whose products
have contributed to “Improving people’s lives through the transforming power of chemistry.” Bill Carroll, chair of
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the ACS Board of Directors, and I will co-host the Board-Staff reception on Monday night following the
increasingly popular Kavli lectures. On Monday, I’m speaking at the Committee on Minority Affairs luncheon on
the value of the ACS Scholars Program, which celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2015. Four past and current ACS
Scholars are joining me for a panel discussion on what the program has meant to their personal and professional
lives. On Tuesday morning at the Senior Chemists Committee, I look forward to recognizing ACS Legacy
Leaders—those members who have made bequests to ACS in their wills. At noon, I’m speaking at the Women
Chemists Committee on “Mentoring—and Paying It Forward” with a panel of four individuals whom I’ve had the
opportunity and privilege to mentor. Later that day, I’m speaking at the symposium organized by Immediate Past
President Marinda Wu on “Women Leaders of the Global Chemistry Enterprise” on lessons learned during my
career.
ACS has been a critical part of my 45-year career and I look forward to serving the Society as a volunteer and
dedicated member after I move on to the next chapter of my life at the end of the year. ACS Councilors have
contributed immensely to the warm place that ACS occupies in my heart. I look forward to seeing you in San
Francisco and for many years to come.
Madeleine Jacobs
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Executive Director’s Report
REPORT OF THE GOVERNING BOARD FOR PUBLISHING
TO ACS COUNCIL
The following is a brief summary of the February and May 2014 meetings of the Governing Board for
Publishing. Executive management of CAS and ACS Publications reported that overall financial and missionobjectives were on track to achieve goals set for 2014. Following are other highlights from the meetings.
CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service)
CAS President Manuel Guzman provided an overview of CAS’s highlights and accomplishments for the first
four months of 2014. Included in his presentation was an update of the new CAS Strategic Plan for growth and a
summary of the state of the CAS technology environment. Mr. Guzman along with selected members of the CAS
Leadership Team provided a status report on the CAS Strategic Plan. The CAS Leadership Team is following a
change model as they communicate and execute the new strategies. Multiple communication channels have been
utilized including Town Halls, a monthly staff newsletter to share strategy and business information, monthly
management meetings as well as all-staff meetings, and manager change training. Two all-staff communication
events were held in April, including a successful CAS Business Update Meeting where more than 900 staff
participated. A first-ever briefing was held for remote staff via a WebEx.
ACS Publications
Dr. Brian Crawford, Division President, reported on the Division’s operational highlights for the first quarter of
2014. The Division has made good progress against objectives tied to new product development within ACS
Journals and C&EN and pursuit of the ACS Publications Division Open Access strategy. The Division’s overall
financial performance in Q1 2014 was strong, despite weakness in advertising revenue sales performance. The
Governing Board for Publishing was also presented with summary updates about the growth of manuscript
submissions, article publications, web usage, and institutional revenues from subscriptions to the Society’s
journals. Collaborations between ACS Publications and CAS were discussed. Journal subscription prices for
2015 were approved.
Madeleine Jacobs, Chair
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REPORT OF THE GOVERNING BOARD FOR THE ACS GREEN CHEMISTRY INSTITUTE®
TO ACS COUNCIL
Listed below are highlights of action items completed by the ACS Green Chemistry Institute® (ACS GCI) since its
last report to Council in fall 2013.
•
18th Annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference (GC&E): The conference was held on June 1719, 2014, at the North Bethesda Marriott in Bethesda, MD. There were 30 technical sessions, 18 sponsors,
and 15 exhibitors. Keynote speakers included: Dr. Seth Coe-Sullivan, Founder and Chief Technology
Officer, QD Vision; Dr. Richard Blackburn, Professor, the University of Leeds and Head, Sustainable
Materials Research Group; and Dr. Eric J. Beckman, George M. Bevier Professor of Engineering, University
of Pittsburgh and Co-Director, Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation. Conference Chairs included: Dr.
James E. Hutchison, Professor, Organic, Organometallic, Materials Chemistry, and Founding Director,
ONAMI Safer Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Initiative, University of Oregon; John Frazier Sr.,
Director of Chemical Innovation, Nike, Inc.; and Dr. Tina Bahadori, National Program Director, Chemical
Safety for Sustainability Research Program, U.S. EPA. The conference attracted 420 conference registrants.
Other highlighted events at the conference included:
o
o
o
o
o
•
Webinar Broadcast: The “Endangered Elements: Critical Materials in the Supply Chain” webinar
was held to engage a global audience with a panel discussion. Panel members included: Dr. Rod
Eggert, Colorado School of Mines; Dr. Paul Chirik, Princeton University; Dr. Avtar Matharu,
University of York and Dr. David Constable, Director, ACS GCI. The webinar had 600 participants.
Student Workshop: A National Science Foundation sponsored student workshop was hosted in
conjunction with the 2014 GC&E conference. There were over 50 participants, including 27 NSF
Travel Grant Recipients. The workshop was co-facilitated by Dr. Marty Mulvihill, Executive
Director of the Berkeley Center for Green Chemistry; Dr. Marie Bourgeois, Professor, University of
South Florida; Dr. Douglas Raynie, Professor, South Dakota State University; and Dr. David
Constable. This was a full-day interactive workshop where attendees learned and practiced how to
evaluate the impact of chemicals and syntheses and assess their research with synthetic, analytical,
and process experts.
Green Business Plan Competition: The competition was a forum for early-stage companies to pitch
their business plan that incorporated green chemistry and engineering in the initial stages of the
business life cycle. SioTeX was the grand prize winner.
ACS Careers Workshop: Facilitated by Jodi Wesemann, this interactive workshop provided
attendees with the opportunity to excel their professional development and obtain important tools for
job seeking.
Awards: Heather Buckley and Florence Chardon, both from the University of California, Berkeley,
were recognized as the recipients of the 2014 Kenneth G. Hancock Memorial Award. Dr. Jennifer
Dodson, Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was recognized as the
2014 Joseph Breen Memorial Fellowship winner.
Communications:
o
Website: A complete renovation of the ACS GCI section of acs.org was undertaken which improves
layout, navigation, and content. Expanded content on green chemistry includes a new section on
research and innovation that features curated articles, webinars, and tools for topics relevant to green
chemistry and engineering. Integration of relevant news and research from C&EN, ACS Journals, and
The Nexus blog is a feature on many of the new pages.
o
Webinar: “From Waste to Wealth,” with Dr. James Clark of the University of York and his
colleagues, was held with 500 people were in attendance.
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o
o
•
Video for Earth Day: The video featured inspiring sustainable chemistry outreach ideas edited from
interviews conducted by ACS GCI staff with undergraduate students at the ACS National Meeting in
Dallas. The video was a collaboration with ACS’s Office of Public Affairs and the ACS Education
Division.
ACS National Meeting Outreach: At the booth, staff communicated what green chemistry is and
what ACS GCI offers to hundreds of people. A total of 357 attendees asked to be added to the The
Nexus mailing list. More than 100 were engaged in the “What’s Your Green Chemistry?TM”
campaign.
The ACS GCI Industrial Roundtables: Highlighted activities include:
o Formulators’ Roundtable
 A meeting was held on April 7, 2014, with a follow up meeting on June 18, 2014, to
primarily address the US EPA Design for the Environment (DfE) fragrance standard in
addition to updates on other projects. Clive Davies and several colleagues from the EPA DfE
Program was the guest speaker.
 Tom Burns of Novozymes North America Inc. gave an invited talk on behalf of the ACS GCI
Formulators’ Roundtable at the 105th American Oil Chemists Society (AOCS) Annual
Meeting & Expo, May 4-7, 2014, San Antonio.
o Pharmaceutical Roundtable
 A meeting was hosted by Sanofi, on April 1-2, 2014, in Paris, France. The meeting addressed
multiple topics and included a discussion about potential collaboration opportunities with the
Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Chem 21 Working Group, an organization funded by
the EU and pharmaceutical companies. Cubist Pharmaceuticals was accepted as a new
member.
 Dr. John Tucker, Amgen, was elected as the next co-chair by the ACS GCI Pharmaceutical
Roundtable membership.
 Announced funding for a new research grant, “2014 ACS GCI PR Research Grant for Iron
Catalysis.” The Roundtable expects to award $100,000 for a 1-2 year R&D program to
address the Roundtable’s initiatives in iron catalysis. The deadline for proposals is August
22, 2014.
 Dr. Neil Garg completed his ACS GCI Pharmaceutical Roundtable funded project entitled,
“Development of Green Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions.”
 Professor Meike Niggemann of Aachen University is completing her lectures as part of the
ACS GCI Pharmaceutical Roundtable Lecture Tour. Dr. Niggemann has been giving lectures
at 10 of the 15 Roundtable companies which have directly benefitted approximately 300
participants.
o Chemical Manufacturer’s Roundtable
 A meeting was held on May 29, 2014, to discuss project updates, organization of technical
sessions, and reception at the 2014 GC&E Conference, and development of marketing
materials. Also, Paul Williams (Co-Chair) of Arizona Chemical will step down from his
current role. The nomination period is now open for potential candidates.
o Hydraulic Fracturing Industrial Roundtable:
 The business plan and membership agreement was finalized and approved.
 Preliminary goals to address the strategic priorities were discussed.
Kent Voorhees, Chair
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CPC Minutes
DRAFT
MINUTES
COUNCIL POLICY COMMITTEE
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
Dallas, Texas
March 18, 2014
The Council Policy Committee (CPC) of the American Chemical Society met in Dallas, Texas, on March 18,
2014, beginning at 8:00 a.m. Chair Tom J. Barton presided. Other voting members present were: Lawrence
Barton, Frank D. Blum, Mary K. Carroll, Judith H. Cohen, Alan M. Ehrlich, Madeleine Jacobs, Peter C. Jurs, Lee
H. Latimer, Mamie W. Moy, Carolyn Ribes, Diane Grob Schmidt, Eleanor D. Siebert, Angela K. Wilson, and
Marinda Li Wu. Flint H. Lewis served as Secretary.
The following chairs of Society, Elected, and Standing Committees of the Council, all non-voting members of the
Council Policy Committee, attended all or portions of the meeting: Dawn A. Brooks, Bonnie A. Charpentier,
Richard D. Cobb, Donna G. Friedman, James M. Landis, Louise M. Lawter, Michael J. Morello, and Martin D.
Rudd. Present by invitation for all or part of the meeting were: William F. Carroll and Frank E. Walworth.
Several Councilors, ACS staff, and others were present as observers at various times during the meeting.
Report of the Subcommittee on Nominations
1. VOTED, in accordance with Bylaw III, Sec. 3,b,(3), that the Council Policy Committee approve the list of
potential candidates, as presented by the Subcommittee on Nominations, for election to 2015-2017 terms on the
Committee on Nominations and Elections.
2. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee authorize the chair of the Subcommittee on Nominations to
amend the approved list of candidates for election to the Committee on Nominations and Elections, in
consultation with the chairs of the Committee on Nominations and Elections and the Committee on Committees
to avoid duplications in the candidate lists for the Council Policy Committee, the Committee on Committees, and
the Committee on Nominations and Elections.
Approval of Minutes
3. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee approve the minutes of the September 10, 2013, meeting of the
committee.
Report of Interim Action of the Council Policy Committee
4. CPC 1-2013. VOTED to elect Dr. Alan M. Ehrlich as Vice Chair of the Council Policy Committee for 2014.
Reports of Committee Chairs and Society Officers
The Council Policy Committee divided into four subgroups for the purpose of reviewing the proposed oral reports
to Council of officers and committee chairs. The subgroups met from 8:15 to 9:15 a.m.; Mamie W. Moy (for
Tom Barton), Marinda Li Wu, Diane Grob Schmidt, and Alan M. Ehrlich served as chairs of the subgroups.
Upon reconvening at 9:30 a.m., the committee received reports from the chairs of the subgroups, with the reports
emphasizing items for which Council action would be required on March 19. In the subgroups, reports were
presented by the officers and by the chairs of the Elected Committees on Committees and on Nominations and
Elections; the Society Committees on Budget and Finance and on Education; the Standing Committees on
Constitution and Bylaws, Divisional Activities, Economic and Professional Affairs, Local Section Activities,
Meetings and Expositions, and Membership Affairs; and the Joint Board-Council Committees on Chemical
Safety, Chemists with Disabilities, International Activities, and Minority Affairs; including reports on progress
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and recommendations resulting from their work during their sessions held in Dallas, Texas, prior to the CPC
meeting. By individual actions, CPC concurred in certain recommendations to be made to Council by the
committees. These appear below and, as appropriate, in the record of the March 19 Council meeting. All
references in these minutes to actions and reports relate to the March 19, 2014 meeting of the Council.
5. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee authorize the use of projected graphics as part of the reports to
Council by the Committees on Budget and Finance, Chemical Safety, Chemists with Disabilities, Committees,
Constitution and Bylaws, Divisional Activities, Economic and Professional Affairs, International Activities, Local
Section Activities, Meetings and Expositions, and Nominations and Elections.
6. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee authorize the use of projected graphics as part of the reports to
Council by the President and the President-Elect.
7. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee authorizes additional time for the reports to Council by the
Executive Director and the Committee on Membership Affairs.
8. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee authorizes the following committees to place items on the seats at
the Council meeting: Committee on Community Activities (brochures on celebrating chemistry) and the
Committee on Chemical Safety (C&EN comment).
9. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee concur with the Committee on Budget and Finance’s
recommendation to Council that the 2015 dues be set at the fully escalated rate of $158.
10. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee concur with the Committee on International Activities’
recommendations that Council approve the establishment of International Chemical Sciences Chapters in
Malaysia and South Korea.
11. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee concur with the Committee on Local Section Activities’
recommendation that Council approve the petition of the North Jersey Local Section to change its territory to
include the area of the former Monmouth County Local Section.
Report of the Council Policy Committee Vice-Chair
Vice-Chair Alan Ehrlich summarized the activities of several CPC subcommittees and task forces, including the
Subcommittee on Constitution & Bylaws, the Subcommittee on Long-Range Planning, the Task Force on
Councilor and Member Duties and responsibilities, the Task Force to Review the Councilor Travel
Reimbursement Policy, the Task Force on Guidelines on Surveys and Straw Polls, the Joint N&E-CPC Task
Force on Election Timelines.
Dr. Ehrlich also reported that CPC continues to encourage Councilor participation in the ACS Network and keeps
Councilors informed of CPC and Council-related activities through the Councilor Bulletin. As Vice-Chair, he
represents CPC on the Board Planning Committee, which engages a variety of ACS stakeholders in the planning
and Environmental Scan processes. The Environmental Scan effort involves presentations to nearly 20 ACS
committees at or near in time to this meeting, and at least seven more are planned for the San Francisco meeting.
12. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee authorizes the ACS President to present to Council with projected
graphics on the special discussion subject, “What can ACS do to increase the quality of science education in
grades K-12?” and limits the discussion following the presentation to thirty (30) minutes, with no Councilor
speaking for more than one minute; and no motions being in order during consideration of this agenda item at the
Council meeting.
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Reports of Subcommittees and Task Forces
A. Report of the Subcommittee on Constitution and Bylaws
On behalf of subcommittee chair Harmon B. Abrahamson, Eleanor D. Siebert reported that the subcommittee had
discussed the interpretation of local section and division bylaw language on ballot distribution, and that the
subcommittee’s name should be changed to avoid confusion with the Committee on Constitution & Bylaws. ACS
Secretary Flint Lewis was asked to review the founding charter of the subcommittee to see if there was information
there relevant to its original name.
B. Report of the Subcommittee on Long-Range Planning
Subcommittee chair Carolyn Ribes reported on the following actions by the subcommittee: It held a pre-orientation
webinar on February 3 to inform new Councilors and Alternate Councilors, in advance of the New Councilor
Orientation, about their role in governance, the strategic goals of the Society, and what to expect at their first ACS
National Meeting as a Councilor. Thirty-nine of the newly elected leaders participated in the webinar and there were
67 total participants at the New Councilor Orientation. The latter participants gave the orientation a 4.2 rating on a
scale of 1-5. Numerous activities have been undertaken by the subcommittee and other ACS leaders, including
holding five Strategy Cafés in 2013, and one at this year’s Leadership Institute – with others planned for 2014. As in
the past, all new Councilors have been assigned mentors.
C. Task Force on Duties and Conduct (Responsibilities)
Alan Ehrlich, the task force chair, summarized the written report of the task force, and noted that it has been
discussing hybrid procedures that could be used to remove Councilors and Alternate Councilors from office for
neglect of duties. Under such an approach, a local section or division could recommend removal to the Council, a
committee of Council, or specifically CPC, which could evaluate the recommendation and act as appropriate. The task
force is also considering revisions to ACS Bylaw provisions governing removal of an ACS Member for “conduct
injurious to the SOCIETY.” The current expulsion procedures are long with many steps. The task force is considering
amending the Bylaws to define more precisely the misdeeds that could lead to charges, to authorize a panel of the
Committee on Membership Affairs to consider charges, to require a two-thirds vote whether expulsion is warranted,
and to allow an appeal to CPC. The task force hopes to have draft procedures prepared by the CPC meeting in San
Francisco.
D. Task Force to Review the Councilor Travel Reimbursement Policy
Lee Latimer, the task force chair, reported that after reviewing the survey results from Councilors and local sections
and divisions, and evaluating models of changes to the existing reimbursement program, the task force was proposing
an increased level of support from ACS for travel expenses and a change in the index used to calculate each year’s
level of reimbursement to local sections and divisions. He described the survey results, including the following: The
program is widely appreciated but comes up considerably short of reimbursing the full costs; 10% of local sections
and divisions felt the current program had a negative effect on recruiting Councilors; many Councilors are moderating
their costs in hotels and registration to minimize the impact on their units (and themselves). Dr. Latimer said that
under the current procedure, whereby the reimbursement limit is adjusted by the CPI each year, the reimbursement
ceiling has increased only 8% in the past 13 years. The use of the Business Travel Index (BTI) would more accurately
reflect the increases in travel costs faced by ACS Councilors.
13. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee approves the recommendations of its Task Force to Review the
Councilor Travel Reimbursement Policy that (1) the base support for Councilor travel be increased to 80% of
submitted expenses or $1,400, whichever is smaller; (2) the new base number be indexed with a business travel index
such as the BTI; and (3) CPC will actively monitor the issues and reimbursement amounts of this program. (Jacobs
abstains)
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The recommendation will next be considered by the Committee on Budget and Finance and the Board of Directors.
E. Task Force on Guidelines on Surveys and Straw Polls
Dr. Ehrlich, the task force chair, reported that the task force had developed draft guidelines early in the year and had
sent them to the Committee on Nominations and Elections (N&E) for review, because N&E had oversight over the
devices (clickers) used for voting in Council. N&E made one addition to the draft guidelines: adding that calls for
surveys which are made from the Council floor must have received prior CPC approval.
14. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee approves the Guidelines for Conducting Surveys in Council Meetings
as presented by its Task Force on Guidelines on Surveys and Straw Polls and as amended by the Committee on
Nominations and Elections.
F. Joint N&E-CPC Task Force on Election Timelines
Peter C. Jurs, task force co-chair, reported that the task force had split into two subgroups to consider various aspects
of the election process. The task force was now recommending four changes: (1) official campaigning should begin
one week (rather than one month) after conclusion of the spring ACS Council meeting, (2) those seeking to be
candidates for national ACS office via the petition process should notify N&E of their intent to pursue this path so
that N&E can provide them with information about the petition process, (3) candidate material should be published in
C&EN two weeks after the fall ACS meeting, and (4) the balloting period will be reduced from six weeks to four
weeks.
15. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee approve the recommendations of the Joint N&E-CPC Task Force on
Election Timelines as presented, and discharges its members on the task force with thanks for their service.
Summary of Councilor Travel Expenses
Dr. Barton called attention to the Councilor travel reimbursement program summary for the fall 2013 national
meeting, which was in the committee agenda.
Schedule of Business Sessions
The following schedule of activities at the fall 2014 National Meeting is the result of previous authorization by
the Council Policy Committee:
Board of Directors:
Sunday, August 10
Council Policy Committee:
Tuesday, August 12
Council:
Wednesday, August 13
Society Committees: executive and open sessions to be set by each body, provided that at least one
executive session be set prior to the Board of Directors meeting, and at least one open session be set
prior to the Council meeting if the committee agenda contains any issue to be voted upon at the Council
meeting.
Standing Committees of the Council: executive and open sessions to be set by each committee, with the
concurrence of the Committee on Committees, provided that at least one executive session be set no
later than Tuesday morning, and at least one open session be set prior to the Council meeting if the
committee agenda contains any issue to be voted upon at the Council meeting.
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Council Agenda
16. VOTED that the Council Policy Committee approve the Council Agenda for the March 19, 2014 meeting of
the Council.
CPC’s 2014 Budget
ACS Secretary Flint Lewis reported on CPC’s budget and explained the various categories of its expenditures.
Open Forum
No comments were offered at the open forum.
There being no old or new business, the meeting was adjourned at 11:35 a.m.
Flint H. Lewis
Secretary
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ITEM V, B
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES
At its meeting in Dallas, TX, March 10-11, 2014, the Committee on Committees (ConC) developed its
recommendations for 2015 Chairs of the Council Standing and Other Committees for approval by the PresidentElect in June 2014. In San Francisco, the committee will continue developing recommendations for all
appointments to Council, Society, Other, and Joint Board-Council committees for consideration by the PresidentElect and Chair of the Board of Directors. The committee appointment process is expected to conclude in early
January 2015.
Also in San Francisco, ConC will receive reports and consider recommendations from its subcommittees on
Leadership Development, Diversity, and Web Page.
ConC will also receive updates on scheduled performance reviews for the Committees on Analytical Reagents,
Chemical Abstracts Service, Community Activities, Ethics, Publications, Public Relations and Communications,
Science, and Women Chemists; and will seek Council approval in San Francisco on recommendations for the
continuance of the Committees on Patents & Related Matters and on Technician Affairs.
In lieu of the Chairs’ Appreciation Luncheon, ConC liaisons now recognizes the contributions of committee
chairs who have served the statutory limit on the committee they chair during their respective committee
meetings. During the Council meeting on August 13, 2014, ConC will also recognize Councilors who will have
served the statutory limit or have otherwise completed their service on committees at the end of 2014, as well as
those Councilors observing significant anniversaries of years of service on Council.
Councilors and other interested members are invited to attend the committee's open session on Monday, August
11, 2014, in the Hilton San Francisco Union Square from 1:30 - 2:15 p.m., to offer their views on any topics on
the agenda, or other matters of interest.
Dawn A. Brooks, Chair
Amber S. Hinkle
Wayne E. Jones, Jr.
Bonnie Lawlor
Zaida C. Morales Martinez
V. Michael Mautino
Sara J. Risch
Diane Grob Schmidt
Spiro Alexandratos
Bryan Balazs
Christopher J. Bannochie
Michelle V. Buchanan
Janet L. Bryant
Dee Ann Casteel
Alan B. Cooper
Judith N. Currano
Flint H. Lewis, Staff Liaison
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RECOGNITION OF SERVICE
Council Meeting, August 13, 2014
1. The following members will have served the statutory limit or have otherwise completed their service at the
end of 2014 on the ACS governance committee shown below:
Mark A. Benvenuto
Donna G. Friedman
Gary D. Anderson
D. Paul Rillema
Louise M. Lawter
Thomas R. Hays
Ann M. Sullivan
Kathleen Gibboney
C. Marvin Lang
John M. Long
Susan M. Schelble
Jeffrey M. Wilson
David L. Cedeno
Ingolf Gruen
Allen E. Pinchard
David M. Singleton
Ronald D. Archer
John Covington
Robert L. Lichter
Diane Grob Schmidt
Andrew D. Jorgensen
Lester M. Bynum
Patricia A. Redden
Jeffrey S. Gaffney
Analice H. Sowell
Jeffrey B. Trent
Martin A. Abraham
Ean Warren
Al Ribes
James L. Chao
Brian G.R. Treco
Lee Y. Park
John G. Palmer
Neal Abrams
William S. Case
Elise B. Fox
Sara J. Risch
Mamie W. Moy
Eleanor D. Siebert
W. H. “Jack” Breazeale
Catherine C. Fenselau
Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks
Constitution and Bylaws
Constitution and Bylaws
Divisional Activities
Divisional Activities
Economic and Professional Affairs
Local Section Activities
Local Section Activities
Meetings and Expositions
Meetings and Expositions
Meetings and Expositions
Ethics
Nomenclature, Terminology and Symbols
Project SEED
Project SEED
Technician Affairs
Technician Affairs
Budget and Finance
Budget and Finance
Budget and Finance
Budget and Finance
Education
Chemical Safety
Chemical Safety
Chemistry and Public Affairs
Community Activities
Community Activities
Environmental Improvement
Environmental Improvement
Minority Affairs
Patents and Related Matters
Patents and Related Matters
Professional Training
Women Chemists
Younger Chemists
Younger Chemists
Younger Chemists
Committee on Committees
Council Policy
Council Policy
Nominations and Elections
Nominations and Elections
Nominations and Elections
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2. The following committee chairs have served the statutory limit as chair on their committees:
Donna G. Friedman
Louise M. Lawter
Bonnie Charpentier
Andrew D. Jorgensen
Robert H. Hill, Jr.
Karl S. Booksh
Sandra J. Bonetti
Gregory Ferrence
Brian G.R. Treco
Anne B. McCoy
Al Ribes
Dawn Brooks
Constitution and Bylaws
Economic and Professional Affairs
Budget and Finance
Education
Chemical Safety
Chemists with Disabilities
Project SEED
Ethics
Patents and Related Matters
Professional Training
Minority Affairs
Committee on Committees
3. Recognition of Council members for years of service on the ACS Council:
Fifteen (15) Years
Harmon B. Abrahamson
Alan A. Hazari
Richard A. Hermens
John G. Palmer
Anne M. Rammelsberg
Elsa Reichmanis
Carmen Scholz
Linda D. Schultz
Khamis S. Siam
Julianne M.D. Smist
Ean M. Warren
Twenty (20) Years
Satinder (Sut) Ahuja
Bruce S. Ault
Arindam Bose
Ronald Breslow
Alan B. Cooper
Ronald P. D’Amelia
Sally B. Peters
Dorothy J. Phillips
Eleanor D. Siebert
Red River Valley (2000-2014)
East Tennessee (2000-2014)
Richland (2011-2014, 1997-2007)
San Diego (2000-2014)
Decatur-Springfield (2000-2014)
Ex Officio (2002-2014)
Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (2000-2001)
North Alabama (2000-2014)
Dallas-Fort Worth (2009-2014, 1997-2002, 1985-1987)
MO-KAN-OK, The Tri-State (2000-2014)
Connecticut Valley (2000-2014)
Santa Clara Valley (2000-2014)
Eastern North Carolina (2006-2014)
New York (1995-1997, 1991-1992, 1981-1983, 1976-1978)
Cincinnati (1995-2014)
Biochemical Technology (1995-2014)
Ex Officio (1995-2014)
North Jersey (1995-2014)
New York (2009-2014, 2002-2007, 1993-1998, 1989-1990)
Santa Clara Valley (1995-2014)
Ex Officio (2014)
Northeastern (1995-2013)
Southern California (1995-2014)
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Twenty-Five (25) Years
Joseph M. Antonucci
Lawrence Barton
Elise Ann Brown
Mitchell R.M. Bruce
George H. Fisher
Thomas R. Gilbert
S. Allen Heininger
Barbara A. Sawrey
Mark Wicholas
Elaine S. Yamaguchi
Thirty (30) Years
George M. Bodner
Martha Casey
Anne T. O’Brien
Thirty-Five (35) Years
Roland F. Hirsch
Forty (40) Years
Janan M. Hayes
Valerie J. Kuck
C. Marvin Lang
Chemical Society of Washington (1990-2014)
St. Louis (1990-2014)
Chemical Society of Washington (2013-2014, 1989-2009)
Chemical Health & Safety (1987-1989)
Maine (1990-2014)
South Florida (2008-2014, 1992-2000)
Florida (1983-1991)
Ex Officio (2013-2014)
Northeastern (1990-2012)
Ex Officio (1990-2014)
Ex Officio (2012-2014)
San Diego (1990-2011)
Puget Sound (1990-2014)
California (1990-2014)
Ex Officio (2011-2014)
Purdue (1985-2010)
Wisconsin (1985-2014)
New York (2010-2014, 1985-2000)
Ex Officio (2001-2009)
Analytical Chemistry (1995-2014)
Bylaw (1987)
North Jersey (1976-1986, 1972-1974)
Sacramento (2011-2014, 1975-2007)
Ex Officio (2008-2010)
Ex Officio (2007-2014)
North Jersey (1975-2006)
Central Wisconsin (1997-2014, 1973-1988)
Ex Officio (1989-1994)
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ITEM V, C
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS
During its spring meeting in Dallas, the Committee on Nominations and Elections (N&E) developed slates of
potential candidates for election to the Council Policy Committee (CPC) and the Committee on Committees
(ConC) for 2015-2017. Information about the candidates and the elections appears under Item III of this agenda
book. At the fall Council meeting, N&E will announce the names of the candidates for the three Elected
Committees, and their photos will be projected on screen to assist Councilors with name recognition prior to
voting.
On Sunday afternoon, August 10, N&E will present a moderated question and answer format for the Town Hall
Meeting which features candidates running for Director-at-Large 2015-2017. This forum will facilitate
communication among candidates, Councilors and Members. The forum begins at 4:15 p.m. in the Hilton San
Francisco Union Square Hotel, and ends at 5:15 p.m., so that members can attend Caucuses or other scheduled
meetings. On Monday, August 11, you can meet the candidates for ACS President-Elect from 1:00–4:00 p.m. at
the ACS Expo, which is located in front of the ACS Booth in the Moscone Convention Center – South Halls B &
C.
While in executive session, the committee will receive reports or updates from its subcommittees on Candidate
Services, Diversity, Town Hall Meetings, and Runoff Elections, and the Task Force on Council Voting
Procedures; and develop slates of potential candidates for President-Elect, 2016; Directors-at-Large, 2016-2018;
and Directors, Districts I and V, 2016-2018.
N&E is always pleased to receive suggestions from Councilors of qualified members as potential candidates for
all elected ACS offices. We will have a staffed N&E table at the rear of the Council meeting room, as well as an
open meeting on Sunday, August 10, from 1:00 - 1:30 p.m. to receive your suggestions or hear your concerns. As
an alternative means of communication with N&E, please visit the ACS Web Site at http://www.acs.org/; under
“Governance” click on “Committees” and then select “Nominations & Elections”, or send an email to us at
[email protected]
D. Richard Cobb, Chair
Catherine C. Fenselau
Lydia E.M. Hines
Carol B. Libby
Les W. McQuire
Anne T. O'Brien
Donivan R. Porterfield
Andrea B. Twiss-Brooks
Lisa M. Balbes
Cherlynlavaughn Bradley
W. H. (Jack) Breazeale, Jr.
Jeannette E. Brown
Martha L. Casey
Milagros Delgado
Lissa Dulany
Staff Liaison: Flint H. Lewis
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ITEM VI, A
Budget & Finance Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUDGET AND FINANCE
The Society Committee on Budget and Finance (B&F) met on Saturday, March 15, 2014, to review the
Society’s 2013 financial performance. The Society ended 2013 with a net contribution from operations of
$15.1 million, on revenues of $490.5 million and expenses of $475.4 million. This was $2.0 million
favorable to the Approved Budget. After including the results of the Member Insurance Program, the
Society’s overall net contribution for 2013 was $16.6 million, which was $3.4 million favorable to the
Approved Budget. In addition, the Society ended the year in compliance with four of the five Boardestablished financial guidelines. The reserve adequacy guideline, measured by the Fund Balance Ratio,
was not met. However, the ratio improved significantly in 2013, primarily as a result of the reversal of
accounting charges recorded in previous years related to the Society’s postretirement benefit plans as well
as investment gains.
In other actions, the committee elected Dr. Joseph Heppert as Vice Chair and voted to recommend to
Council that dues for 2015 be set at the fully escalated dues rate of $158, an increase of $4.00 versus the
2014 dues rate. In addition, the committee received a report from its Subcommittee on Communications
and the Subcommittee on Program Funding Requests provided an update on the schedule and process to
be followed for the 2015 New Program Funding and Program Funding Reauthorization Requests. The
Board Oversight Group on Society Program Portfolio Management provided the committee with a status
report on the Oversight Group’s current plans for 2014. Lastly, the committee received a report on the
actual 2014 expenses for the Society’s postretirement benefit plans as compared to the expenses included
in the 2014 Approved Budget.
Bonnie Charpentier, Chair
Ronald Archer
Pat Confalone
John Covington
Arlene Garrison
Martin Gorbaty
William Greenlee
Sharon Haynie
Joseph Heppert
Neil Jespersen
Valerie Kuck
Thomas Lane
Willem Leenstra
Robert Lichter
Kristin Omberg
Diane Schmidt
Joseph Stoner
Marinda Li Wu
Associates
Alvin Crumbliss
Peter Dorhout
Cheryl Martin
Staff Liaison: Brian A. Bernstein
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SOCED Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION
This report updates the Council on SOCED’s progress in implementing the actions to which it agreed in
Dallas, and highlights significant accomplishments of the Society’s education programs.
Two International Student Chapters have been chartered following SOCED’s approval in Dallas of a pilot
program to form such chapters. The first two chapters are at the Technische Universität München in
Germany and the National University of Singapore.
The four-member U.S. National Chemistry Olympiad team has been selected from the 20 students who
participated in the Study Camp at the U.S. Air Force Academy in June. Andrew Chen, West WindsorPlainsboro High School South, West Windsor, New Jersey (Trenton Local Section); Robert Kao, Edwin
O. Smith High School, Storrs, Connecticut (Connecticut Valley Local Section); Stephen Li, Troy High
School, Troy, Michigan (Detroit Local Section); and Derek Wang, North Allegheny Senior High School,
Wexford, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh Local Section) will participate in the 46th International Chemistry
Olympiad in Hanoi, Vietnam, July 20-29.
Preparations continue for the launch of the American Association of Chemistry Teachers (AACT) in
September. The IT infrastructure, website, and branding needed to support the new organization are
under development. More than 1,000 people have signed up to receive updates on AACT.
Two SOCED working groups are focusing on the importance of hands-on activities; the first is updating
the existing policy statement, and the second is developing a new policy statement directed toward
practitioners. A third working group is collaborating with the International Activities Committee and the
Committee on Science to revise the current policy statement on visa restrictions and scientific progress.
The Committee on Professional Training (CPT), the International Activities Committee (IAC), and
SOCED have formed a task force to consider international chemistry education. The task force will
review the current landscape of international chemistry education and identify opportunities for potential
collaborations among the committees and communities they serve.
A new feature of the ACS-Hach programs is the ACS-Hach Professional Development Grant. Twentynine teachers will be using the grant for professional development experiences such as attending
conferences, participating in summer institutes, and completing graduate level courses.
The ACS Student Chapter awards ceremony at the 247th ACS National Meeting honored 53 Outstanding,
86 Commendable, and 125 Honorable Mention chapters. Representatives from the Green Chemistry
Institute presented Green Chemistry awards to 74 chapters. A total of 2,628 undergraduate students
attended the meeting, of which 2,467 were ACS members.
An estimated 550 graduate students and postdocs attended the ACS Graduate & Postdoctoral Scholars
Reception at the Dallas National Meeting. The Younger Chemists Committee and ACS technical
divisions cosponsored and coordinated the event in collaboration with and support from Membership and
Scientific Advancement.
Andy Jorgensen, Chair
Charles Baldwin
Iona Black
Simon Bott
John V. Clevenger
Deborah H. Cook
Melanie M. Cooper
Thomas B. Higgins
Andrew D. Jorgensen
Diane Krone
Thomas H. Lane
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Jennifer B. Nielson
Ieva Reich
Susan M. Shih
Donald J. Wink
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SOCED Report
Jesse Bernstein
George M. Bodner
Steven A. Fleming
Kimberly Gardner
Jeremy Garritano
Associates
Tracy Halmi
Patricia Mabrouk
Matthew J. Mio
Richard L. Nafshun
Sam Pazicni
Consultants
G. Marc Loudon
Norbert J. Pienta
Staff Liaison: Mary Kirchhoff
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Kristine S. Smetana
Michelle Ward
Ellen Yezierski
ITEM VI, C
ComSci Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE
ComSci has identified two multidisciplinary areas that hold great promise for fostering innovation and
opportunities for chemistry-related scientists worldwide: advanced materials and the chemistry of clean
and renewable energy. ComSci will focus first on advanced materials and has begun planning
multidisciplinary programming at ACS national meetings and gathering materials and insights from
technical divisions and other internal and external groups to coordinate and facilitate increased awareness
and progress in this area.
ComSci will also continue to hold forums of eminent scientists and young investigator awardees to help
illuminate emerging frontiers in science. This will include a young investigator awardee forum to be held
at the August 2014 San Francisco national meeting and a forum of eminent scientists on emerging
frontiers next spring. Last year’s initiative to create on-demand video interviews with Nobel Laureates
and other eminent scientists has drawn favorable reviews, and four videos sponsored by ComSci are now
available online at the ACS “Chemistry over Coffee” site at acs.org.
ComSci continues to play a lead role in identifying and recommending outstanding scientists for highprofile external awards. The ACS Board approved the ComSci recommendation for the annual
Presidential National Medal of Science, and the nomination was submitted to the White House in April.
The ACS Board also identified the Grand Prix Award in France as one warranting a nomination from the
Society, and asked ComSci to identify a worthy nominee. Accordingly, the committee recommended a
candidate, which was approved by the Board and has been submitted to the Grand Prix Foundation for
consideration. ComSci is currently working to draw input from divisions, journal editors and ACS
members at large for input on future National Medal of Science nominees. We are also working with the
Committee on Patent and Related Matters on potential nominees for the National Medal of Technology.
ComSci continues to play an active role on public policy. The ComSci-led policy statement on forensic
science adopted last year has gained recent traction in both the House and Senate. The committee also
assumed a lead role for the development of a new policy statement on responsible fracking, in
collaboration with other ACS committees. ComSci is also lending its expertise to new and/or revised
policy statements on visa and immigration policy, sustainability, scientific integrity, federal R&D, and a
competitive U.S. business climate for innovation and jobs.
Katherine Glasgow, Chair
Rudy M. Baum
Michael R. Berman
Steven M. Bonser
Mark C. Cesa
Debbie C. Crans
John W. Finley
Robin J. Hood
Jennifer Stowell Laurence
Laurie Locascio
Vera V. Mainz
Barbara E. Moriarty
Tina M. Nenoff
Barry J. Streusand
Hessy L. Taft
Gloria Thomas
Ralph A. Wheeler
Associates
Dwight W. Chasar
Matthew A. Fisher
Brian R. Gibney
Martin G. Kociolek
Dorothy J. Miller
Adam C. Myers
James M. Takacs
Staff Liaison: Brian Dougherty
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CEPA Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC AND PROFESSIONAL AFFAIRS
The Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs (CEPA) is currently reviewing all career-related
programming available to ACS members, especially those programs targeted at new graduates. The
committee remains concerned that the unemployment rate for new graduates in chemistry is at an all-time
high of 14.6%. This is an ideal time to provide input to the committee. If you have concerns or
suggestions for career-related programming, please email [email protected] by August 4, 2014.
The Professional Employment Guidelines have been revised and updated to reflect current practices in the
workplace and changes in U.S. labor laws and policies. The revised document was presented for
consideration during the ACS National Meeting in Indianapolis, August 2013. Minor revisions were
made to incorporate suggestions by Council members and others. The document is now ready for action,
and is presented on page 80 of this agenda book.
At the request of then President Marinda Li Wu, CEPA initiated a joint task force with representatives
from CEPA, the Committee on Science, Corporation Associates, the Committee on Chemistry and Public
Affairs, the Graduate Education Advisory Board, and the Younger Chemists Committee to look at the
relative supply and demand of chemists and jobs in the U.S. The task force has completed a draft report
which will be presented to Immediate Past President Wu, CEPA, and the other contributing governance
units for review. I will present the initial findings of the task force to Council during the upcoming
Council meeting.
To better serve the lifelong career and professional development needs of ACS members, the product and
service offerings of Professional Education, Leadership Development, Career Services, and Market
Intelligence have been combined into the new, unified ACS Career Navigator, which can be accessed
online at www.acs.org/careernavigator.
Professional Education
• Short Courses
• On Demand
• Online Courses
• SciMind™
Career Services
• Career Consulting
• Career Fairs
• Virtual Career Fairs
• Career Pathways
Leadership Development
• Online Courses
• Facilitated Courses
Market Intelligence
• Employment
Dashboard
• Salary Comparator
• Employment Reports
• Chemical labor
market tracking
CEPA continues to explore and implement novel approaches to fulfilling our mission of improving the
professional lives of chemists in what continues to be a challenging economic environment.
Louise Lawter, Chair
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CEPA Report
John R. Berg
Mark Blankenbuehler
Peter Bonk
Melissa Betz Cichowicz
J. Scott Daniels
Rick Ewing
Dana Ferraris
Tiffany Hoerter
Diane M. Kneeland
Jan Kolakowski
Katherine L. Lee
Frank Romano
George W. Ruger
Kerry K Spilker
Associates
Archibald Buchanan
Michael (Mick) Hurrey
Michael Miller
Consultants
Joseph A. Martino, III
Toshia R. Zessin
Staff Liaison: David Harwell
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Rachel Morgan Theall
Daryl Stein
John Vercellotti
Sharon V. Vercellotti
David Wallace
Professional Employment Guidelines
9TH EDITION
Foreword
This is the NINTH EDITION of the Professional Employment Guidelines of the American Chemical
Society (ACS). These Guidelines were prepared by the Council Committee on Economic and
Professional Affairs, approved by the Council and adopted by the Board of Directors. Previous editions
were adopted by the Society in 1975, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2004, and 2009.
The Guidelines offer a broad spectrum of recommended practices in employment for professional
scientists and their employers. They include four major sections: Beginning Employment, Employment
Environment, Professional Development, and Involuntary Separation.
Some of the special academic employment relationships are dealt with separately in a companion
document, the ACS Academic Professional Guidelines, the most recent edition adopted in 2013. Whereas
the Guidelines recommend appropriate practices for a variety of employment circumstances, they
explicitly do not include many situations already covered by federal or state statutes. We assume that
chemical professionals and their employers follow the law. However, the ACS does hereby assert
that employment, compensation, and advancement of a chemical professional should be based on
professional capabilities alone, and that gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, age, sexual
orientation, gender expression, gender identity, presence of disabilities, or any other factor not relevant to
the position, should not be a consideration in hiring, firing, or any evaluation of job performance. The
ACS opposes all forms of discrimination and believes that employment should be based solely on
professional qualifications and job performance.
The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest association of professional scientists, has the
opportunity to lead in articulating standards of employment for scientists. We believe these Guidelines
represent a fair and just balance between the legitimate interests of employers and professional
employees, and recommend that these Guidelines be accepted and implemented.
Introduction
Successful employer-employee relationships enable employers to achieve their business objectives and
employees to remain professionally competitive. The employer-employee relationship should be
characterized by mutual expectations, respect, support, and shared goals throughout its duration. While
the employer-employee relationship lasts, and especially when it is being terminated, it should be
characterized by mutual respect and support.
The Professional Employment Guidelines of the American Chemical Society are recommended practices
for employment and are intended to foster productive working relationships between chemical
professionals and their employers. The ACS advocates the application of these guidelines to promote the
security, productivity, and economic well-being of chemical professionals and their employers.
Definition of a Chemical Professional
80
For the purposes of this document, a chemical professional is a person who is eligible for ACS
membership. A contract employee and the contract agency providing the contract employee’s services to
third parties are considered to be “chemical professionals” and employer, respectively, in applying these
guidelines. While the third party may meet some of the criteria described herein, it is the responsibility of
the contract agency to ensure their application.
Beginning Employment
The process of hiring, or being hired, is the key time to establish expectations between chemical
professional and employer. Both parties are urged to follow practices which demonstrate professional
conduct and initiate a good working relationship.
The employer should list the duties and responsibilities of the available position(s) as well as the
qualifications required of the potential employee.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Prospective employees should apply only for positions for which they genuinely believe they are
qualified and have serious interest. The chemical professional should not abuse the funds or
facilities of a current employer for the purpose of seeking new employment. Nor should the
chemical professional abuse the funds and facilities of a potential employer.
Upon request, the prospective employee should provide accurate background information,
including education, qualifications, employment history and interests, so that proper evaluation
can be made. The employer has an obligation to respond promptly to correspondence from the
prospective employee, including acknowledgment of the initial application and receipt of
documents needed for proper consideration of the applicant. The employer should notify
unsuccessful applicants for employment promptly when they are no longer being considered.
Any interview expenses to be reimbursed should be reported accurately by the prospective
employee. If more than one employer is visited on an interview trip, expenses should be prorated
fairly.
The offer of employment and associated compensation should be based solely upon prior
applicable education, training and experience, and current professional competence and
performance. without regard to gender, race, national origin, religion, age, sexual orientation,
gender expression, gender identity, physical disability, or any other factor not relevant to the
position.
Conditions of employment should be described fully and accurately to the prospective employee.
A copy of the proposed employment contract or agreement and a summary of company
policies, including professional liability, and benefits, should be supplied to the chemical
professional at the time an employment offer is made. The employer should notify employees, in
writing, of the employer’s policy on professional liability. The written offer should be consistent
with the employer’s oral description of the position made at the time of interview. If not, any
differences should be clearly stated. Special conditions for the continuation of employment, such
as temporary funding or outside contracts, should be specified.
The chemical professional is obligated to promptly respond in writing to an offer of employment
and honor an accepted offer. The employer is obligated to honor a written and accepted offer of a
position.
81
Employment Environment
1) Benefits
Comprehensive benefit plans, as part of total compensation, should be provided. These should include
health, disability and life insurance; personal, sick and family leave; paid holidays and vacations; and
financial assistance and planning for retirement and a retirement plan that includes both pension and
insurance. Benefits for special employment situations might be less comprehensive than benefits
provided to full-time permanent employees. Benefit plans should be equivalent for employees in the
same position.
•
•
•
•
•
Employers should provide access to both health care and disability insurance plans. Professional
employees should become eligible for coverage as soon as possible after starting but certainly
within 90 days. Employers should provide access to a retirement plan; for example a 401k plan.
Vesting of employer matching funds should increment over time to 100% within 3 6 years.
Eligibility to participate should occur within 1 two year of employment. These plans should
follow the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) guidelines. Should employees
have a defined-benefit retirement plan, the plans should follow the recommendations set forth in
the ACS Policy Statement on Retirement Security.
Permanent part-time employees should be provided with adjusted benefit programs that are at
least proportional to the programs for full-time employees.
The employer should offer employee-assistance plans that provide options for special
arrangements, such as personal leave, flexible work schedules, and part-time employment. The
chemical professional should be informed at the time of employment which of these
considerations are available and how they may be granted.
If a company or institution is purchased by or merged with another, an employee’s years of
service should be calculated from the date employed by the initial company or institution. When
an employer re-hires a chemical professional, the employee’s years of service before the
interruption should be restored immediately for the purpose of determining service-related
benefits.
In the event that the employer requests relocation of a chemical professional, relocation costs
should be the responsibility of the employer.
2) Intellectual Property
The chemical professional must respect and maintain the confidentiality of the employer’s trade secrets
and all proprietary information both technical and business related. Legal obligations of the chemical
professional to the employer should be stated clearly in an employment agreement.
•
The chemical professional should inform a new employer of any previous employment
agreements and should exclude the trade secrets or proprietary information of previous employers
from new employment agreements. The chemical professional should not seek or accept
employment that involves using or divulging any trade secrets or proprietary information.
82
•
•
•
The chemical professional should expect that all inventions created during the time of
employment are the intellectual property of the employer The chemical professional should
promptly disclose and convey title to all inventions to the employer if: the employer provides
compensation, space, time, labor, or equipment in pursuit of the invention; the invention involves
a product or process of the employer; or the invention relates directly to the business of the
employer.
The employer should not assert title to inventions that: were developed on the employee’s own
time; did not involve the employer’s equipment, facilities, supervision, or trade secrets; and do
not relate directly to the business of the employer. An employee may consider negotiating the
rights to commercialize the technology with the employer.
The employer should encourage the chemical professional to publish work in scientific journals
and to present findings at scientific meetings, and support those activities. It is the responsibility
of the chemical professional to obtain appropriate approvals from the employer before submitting
work for publication or presenting findings at scientific meetings. Copyright should be assigned
appropriately.
3) Workplace Atmosphere
The employer should maintain a work environment that enables the chemical professional to make the
best professional contributions. The chemical professional and the employer should both strive to foster a
safe, stimulating and productive work atmosphere.
•
•
•
•
The chemical professional should perform assignments diligently, judiciously, safely, and
ethically, utilizing creative and resourceful ideas for the benefit of the employer. The employer
should establish special recognition programs for employees who demonstrate outstanding
competence and performance.
The chemical professional should give appropriate credit to colleagues who contribute to
technical accomplishments.
Unacceptable performance should immediately be brought to the chemical professional’s
attention.
The chemical professional and the employer should not tolerate any physical or verbal
harassment. Offensive comments or behavior related to a disability or of a sexual, cultural,
religious or racial nature, and statements or actions leading to a hostile or offensive work
environment, are unacceptable. Written guidelines on harassment should be distributed and
posted, and staff should be periodically educated about these guidelines.
4) Change in Employment Status
•
The employer should, by appropriate business practices, provide stable employment and avoid
terminating employees whenever possible except for cause. The employer should inform the
chemical professional, whenever possible, of current and future organizational business and
research objectives with appropriate data which could have an impact upon the chemical
professional’s work or career. The chemical professional should be prepared to adapt to the
employer’s changing business and research objectives.
83
•
•
•
Equal consideration should be given to (and by) both the chemical professional and employer
when giving notice of a change in employment status for reasons other than cause.
In order to maintain continuity of function for the employer and a dignified change in
employment status for the chemical professional, a written advance notice of two weeks should
be the minimum invoked by either party.
Before a change in employment status, the chemical professional should provide the employer
with all records of technical work accomplished and in progress, including publications, invention
disclosures, lab notebooks, technical data, and other related documentation. The employee
should also return to the employer all supplies and equipment, such as chemicals, computers, etc.
purchased by the employer.
5) Safety, Health and the Environment
Chemical professionals are responsible for working safely and employing all necessary safety procedures
in the course of their professional duties. The employer is responsible for providing appropriate
information, physical facilities and equipment that enable the chemical professional to work safely,
comfortably and efficiently. The chemical professional is responsible for seeking information on the safe
handling of chemicals and equipment with which they work.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The chemical professional should inform the employer and coworkers in writing and/or verbally,
as appropriate, of any immediate or potential safety or health hazards.
The chemical professional should inform their employer of the need for safety education and
training for specific high hazard materials, if they do not have experience in working with these
materials.
The chemical professional should be able to recognize, assess, and minimize the risks of hazards
in their work, and be prepared to react in the event of emergencies. The employer should inform
their employees of hazards in their workplace and the steps to minimize the risks of exposure to
these hazards.
All appropriate personnel should be trained in the proper handling of material and equipment and
all pertinent safety procedures to minimize risks.
The chemical professional must not use alcohol, tobacco products or any other drug, legal or
illegal, in such a way as to endanger others or adversely affect professional performance in the
workplace.
The chemical professional and the employer should both work to minimize risks to the
environment. The chemical professional and the employer should strive to ensure that products
and processes are safe and that potential hazards to human health or the environment, including
air emissions, water effluent, and discharges to land should be minimized, properly identified, and
handled in such a way as to protect the environment. Employers should conduct appropriate
environmental studies to ensure the health and safety of their workers and the surrounding
community.
6) Performance Reviews, Advancement and Compensation
Management should periodically review each chemical professional’s performance and capabilities and,
within the framework of job requirements, make assignments to best use the employee’s knowledge,
84
skills, and abilities. The performance review should be a thorough, objective evaluation of job
performance. During the review process, the chemical professional should have the opportunity to
provide input on his/her long-term goals. This input should be considered when planning any projects,
activities, or professional development opportunities in the upcoming year.
•
•
•
•
•
Formal performance reviews of the chemical professional should occur at least annually.
Judgment of the chemical professional’s performance should be rendered by a direct supervisor.
The reviewer should also consider the evaluation of the chemical professional’s performance by
other appropriate supervisors, peers, and direct reports.
The reviewer has the responsibility to discuss fully and promptly with the chemical professional
any unacceptable performance and to document the results of this review. Confidential written
records of such reviews should be signed by the employee and the reviewer to indicate that the
review has been discussed with the employee. An action plan and time table for improving
performance to acceptable standards should be documented and implemented.
Employers should hold all employees fully accountable for safety in their performance reviews.
The employer should provide the employee, upon request, access to that employee’s personnel
files, and protect it from unauthorized access by others. Copies of employee’s documents should
be made available to the employee at no cost to the employee.
Compensation and advancement should be based solely upon professional competence. without
regard to gender, race, national origin, religion, age, sexual orientation, physical disability, gender
expression, gender identity, or any other factor that is not relevant to the position.
Professional Development
Chemical professionals are responsible for managing their own careers. To maximize their value to their
employers and maintain employability, employers should encourage and support their chemical
professionals to develop and maintain technical competence via courses, scientific meetings and other
means.
•
•
•
•
•
Employers should encourage their chemical professionals to actively participate in appropriate
technical societies. The chemical professional should be allowed sufficient time, consistent with
the performance of regular duties, to participate in both the technical and administrative activities
of such affiliations.
The chemical professional should be encouraged to interact with other professionals in the field to
enhance the individual chemical professional’s capabilities.
The employer should encourage professional development throughout a chemical professional’s
career by providing reasonable financial assistance, including compensated leaves of absence, to
employees for training to meet present or potential organizational responsibilities, obtain an
academic degree related to such assignments, or maintain or improve scientific knowledge.
Employers should encourage attendance at conferences relevant to the employee’s position.
Presentations and publications should be encouraged where appropriate. If the employer is
unable to reimburse employee expenses, it is recommended that paid time off be given to attend
the conference.
The employer should incorporate sufficient time for training for job-related performance and
other professional responsibilities into the job.
85
•
The chemical professional should serve the public by using professional specialized knowledge to
advance the welfare of the community. Such participation should be undertaken solely as the
responsibility of the individual, unless specifically acting on behalf of the employer. The
employer should respect the right of the chemical professional to participate as an individual in
political and community activities.
Involuntary Separation
Except for the final section herein, the Professional Employment Guidelines do not apply to involuntary
termination for cause. However, when a chemical professional is involuntarily terminated for any reason,
care should be taken to assure the dignity of the employee. during this difficult time.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
In order to maintain continuity of function for the employer and a dignified termination process
for the chemical professional, a written advance notice of four weeks is preferred. A two week
advance notice should be the minimum invoked by the employer.
Upon notice of termination, the employer should detail, in writing, the benefits available to the
terminated chemical professional under present law, including coverage extension of medical,
dental, vision, and life insurance, some or all of which may be offered by the employer. During
this time, the employee should be entitled to continue to accrue vacation and pension benefits.
The employer should notify the terminated chemical professional in writing of rights and
obligations regarding pertinent patents, planned patent applications, and publications, and provide
assurance that the employee’s rights and interests in these matters will be protected.
The terminated chemical professional should provide the employer with all records of technical
work accomplished and in progress, including publications, invention disclosures, and other
related documentation, and also arrange for disposition of chemicals, computers and other
materials that will no longer be required. In return, the employer should provide the employee a
reasonable length of time to leave the premises and allow them to take personal effects and
information.
If an employer reorganizes operations involving chemical professionals, every effort should be
made to offer the affected chemical professionals other suitable positions within the organization.
Appropriate additional training and education should be provided to facilitate such transfer. If no
other positions are available, the chemical professional should be given assistance in finding
employment elsewhere through use of appropriate outplacement services.
If the employer seeks to encourage chemical professionals to retire, this should be done solely by
means of offering an adequate financial incentive.
A chemical professional terminated for any reason other than cause should receive severance pay
consisting of at least two weeks’ salary for each year of service. Such severance pay is beyond
the regular pay provided for work during the advance notice period and beyond any accrued
vacation pay.
No chemical professional should be terminated for inadequate performance or for cause without
documented evidence. The chemical professional about to be terminated for cause should be
given the opportunity to review the specific charges and to respond to them. This evidence
should be reviewed by human resources and at least one level of management above the
immediate supervisor, provided such levels exist. When inadequate performance is alleged, the
opinions of appropriate professional peers should also be sought and considered.
86
©2014 American Chemical Society
Document History (Moved)
1. First Edition: Approved by the Council and adopted by the Board of Directors, April 19, 1975.
2. Second Edition: Approved by the Council, March 15, 1978, and adopted by the Board of Directors,
June 10, 1978.
3. Third Edition: Approved by the Council, August 31, 1983, and adopted by the Board of Directors,
September 23, 1983.
4. Fourth Edition: Approved by the Council, September 28, 1988, and adopted by the Board of Directors,
December 11, 1988.
5. Fifth Edition: Approved by the Council, August 25, 1993, and adopted by the Board of Directors,
December 5, 1993.
6. Sixth Edition: Approved by the Council, August 28, 1998, and adopted by the Board of Directors,
December 6, 1998.
7. Seventh Edition: Approved by the Council, August 25, 2004, and adopted by the Board of Directors,
December 5, 2004.
8. Eighth Edition: Approved by the Council, March 25, 2009, and adopted by the Board of Directors June
5, 2009.
9. Ninth Edition: Approved by the Council, -------, and adopted by the Board of Directors -----
87
Page 1 of ITEM VII, B
M&E Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEETINGS AND EXPOSITIONS
The official attendance at the 247th National Meeting in Dallas, TX, totaled 13,680. The exposition in
Dallas had 376 booths with 246 exhibiting companies.
Per the National Meeting Long-Range Financial Plan, the Budget and Finance Committee (B&F)
approved the Committee on Meetings and Expositions’ (M&E) recommendation that the Early Member
Registration fee for the 2015 National Meetings be set at $390.
The launch of the new ACS Mobile Application indicated a very favorable reaction to this new attendee
benefit. At the Dallas meeting there were over 6,000 downloads of the Mobile App by meeting attendees.
M&E recommended to the ACS Board of Directors that San Francisco be designated as the site for
meetings dates of August 2023, August 2026, and March 2029. This block of meetings was approved to
strengthen our position when negotiating the convention center lease. If this pilot program with San
Francisco proves a benefit to the Society, M&E anticipates expanding this block scheduling to additional
Tier 1 cities. They further recommended the spring national meetings be sited in Indianapolis in late
March of 2023 and New Orleans, LA in late March or early April 2024. On June 6, the ACS Board of
Directors approved the recommendations from the Committee on Meetings and Expositions regarding the
future meeting sites for San Francisco, New Orleans, and Indianapolis.
In our ongoing commitment to “greening” the national meeting and to additional cost containment, M&E
voted to eliminate the author index in the hard copy program book beginning with the spring 2015
meeting in Denver. The searchable author index is now available via the Mobile app and other electronic
means. M&E is investigating an expansion of the index to include co-authors of the presentation in
addition to the primary author.
M&E initiatives in San Francisco will include:
• A review of the Volunteer’s Code of Conduct.
• A presentation on future proposed meeting sites.
• An update on the P&MR National Meetings Task Force.
• Implementation and review of the national meeting registration and ACS-ID integration.
• Exhibitor digital advertisement and console enhancements.
• On-site Program book changes and push to the Mobile app.
• Co-location of IUPAC 2014 in San Francisco.
Will E. Lynch, Chair
Anthony W. Addison
Arindam Bose
Jetty L. Duffy-Matzner
Kevin J. Edgar
Emilio X. Esposito
Kathleen Gibboney
Robert J. Hargrove
Lynn G. Hartshorn
Martha G. Hollomon
Warren D. Hull
Abby Kennedy
C. Marvin Lang
David J. Lohse
John M. Long
Associates
Mitchell R.M. Bruce
Gregory P. Foy
Silvia S. Jurisson
Martin D. Perry
Michael Singer
Staff Liaison: Alan Hutchins
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Christopher Masi
Guenter Niessen
John Pochan
Robert A. Pribush
Mark Wicholas
ITEM VII, C
DAC Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES
In order to increase communication and collaboration across ACS divisions, the Committee on Divisional
Activities (DAC) is hosting a reception at the San Francisco meeting for division officers and councilors.
It will be held on Tuesday, August 12, from 4:45 - 6 p.m. at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square.
ACS is in the processing of implementing a new application for collecting and organizing abstracts for
national and regional meetings. The name of the new system is Meeting Abstracts Programming System,
or MAPS. DAC is closely monitoring the implementation of this new system, and receives regular
updates from staff and governance groups on the progress being made.
DAC is eager to help divisions through the collection and distribution of division best practices. The
committee is developing plans to address this important issue, and will be contacting divisions in the fall,
if not before, with additional details on this important matter.
Michael J. Morello, Chair
Silvia Ronco
Maria Santore
Douglas Sawyer
Julianne Smist
Robert Tilton
Jeanette Van Emon
Dean Webster
Gary Anderson
Rodney Bennett
Roger Egolf
Semih Eser
Mary Ann Meador
Mary Moore
D. Paul Rillema
Associates
William H. Daly
Huw M. L. Davies
Staff Liaison: John C. Katz
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ITEM VII, D
LSAC Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON LOCAL SECTION ACTIVITIES
The Committee on Local Section Activities (LSAC) is completing its review of the 2013 Local Section
Annual Reports from the 187 local sections. Reviewer comments for the completed reports have been
posted in FORMS and all local section officers and councilors are encouraged to read the comments and
to provide a response, if applicable.
LSAC contacted all members of the Ocean County local section to inform them of the committee’s
decision to take action to dissolve the section after several years of little to no activity. LSAC received a
petition from the Philadelphia Local Section asking to absorb the territory. LSAC will discuss and review
the petition as well as take action during the San Francisco national meeting. If approved, the merger will
be effective on September 1, 2014. LSAC continues to monitor other sections that are beginning to show
signs of low level of member engagement and activity. Local Sections who would like the assistance of
LSAC to revive their section are encouraged to email [email protected]
LSAC hosted a best practice webinar on May 7th. This webinar featured local sections that have held
successful events which promoted member engagement. The transcript and recording of the webinar can
be found at www.acs.org/getinvolved (click on Local Sections and then training and support).
LSAC funded 10 proposals for the Science Café mini-grant program and seven proposals for the Local
Section Leadership Partnership mini-grant program. Local sections will be invited to apply for a
Leadership Development System grant to host an ACS Leadership Development System course within
their local section before the end of 2014.
Martin Rudd, Chair
David W. Ball
Tim D. Ballard
Roger F. Bartholomew
Charles Cannon
Lucy P. Eubanks
Kristi A. Fjare
Subhash C. Goel
Tracy P. Hamilton
Thomas R. Hays
Barbara R. Hillery
Gregory L. Milligan
Jason E. Ritchie
Alexa B. Serfis
Kathleen T. Shaginaw
J. Ernest Simpson
Ann M. Sullivan
William H. Suits
Stephanie Watson
Elaine S. Yamaguchi
Associates
John Engelman, II
Connie Gabel
Kathryn Louie
Mary Virginia Orna
Joseph A. Potenza
Ellen B. Stechel
L. Kraig Steffen
Staff Liaison: LaTrease E. Garrison
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ITEM VII, D(2)
LSAC Report
PETITION FOR CHANGE IN SECTION TERRITORY
The Philadelphia Local Section hereby petitions to have its boundary extended to include the
Ocean County Local Section. The Philadelphia Local Section Board of Directors is unanimously
in favor of this action (vote taken at the April 2014 Board Meeting). We have listed some of the
reasons for approving this action.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Philadelphia is a vibrant, active, member-serving section.
We are eager to have new volunteers join us in the Philadelphia Section.
We have regular networking events and an excellent communications committee.
We have new directions planned for the Section that will benefit from new ideas.
We have solicited responses from the ACS members residing in Ocean County, NJ. Of those
who responded, a majority have favorably indicated they wish to join the Philadelphia Local
Section (26 for, 2 against, 2 no opinion).
The Committee on Local Section Activities (LSAC) has been in contact with the neighboring
sections (North Jersey, Trenton and Princeton) and has not received any objections to this change
in territory. LSAC was prepared to dissolve the Ocean County Local Section due to inactivity
and the lack of a response to an action plan that would have assisted with reviving the Ocean
County Local Section.
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Page 1 of ITEM VII, E
MAC Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AFFAIRS
The Membership Affairs Committee (MAC) is pleased to be able to report that the number of Student
Member undergraduates and other new member categories continues to grow. The number of
international members is also increasing. The committee’s focus is on making sure that these new
members find value in ACS and continue their membership. Data has shown that if a member
accumulates five years of ACS membership, they are likely to become a long-term member.
The total ACS membership as of May 31, 2014 was 158,357, which is 1% less than the membership
number at the same time last year. The committee’s aim and expectation is that we will meet the yearend
membership goal of 161,141.
In addition to the series of tests MAC has already undertaken to bolster the membership numbers and
reported to Council, a sixth test was announced at the national meeting in Dallas and has now been
launched:
•
In January of 2014 in conjunction with ACS Past President Marinda Li Wu’s trip to India, the
executive committee of MAC voted to approve an introductory test for 2014 that would allow for
a 66% discount on Member dues in all categories that equates to a $52 full Member dues rate. At
the Dallas National Meeting, the full MAC voted to extend the test to include new and renewing
members in India for three years. This test addresses the income disparity between chemists in
India and the United States consistently with the World Bank model.
To facilitate online applications and payments from India at the new dues price, functionality has
been added to the Online Membership Application (OMA) in order to present the discounted dues
prices online for those prospective members who enter an address in India.
To date, 72 new members living in India have joined at the reduced dues rate.
To accommodate the efforts of local sections and divisions to recruit and retain ACS members, the
committee is working with the Divisional Activities and Local Section Activities Committees and staff to
develop training and support materials. Of particular interest to Councilors is the upcoming recalculation
of Councilors assigned to sections and divisions according to a membership divisor. If your local section
or division membership has dropped below the new divisor multiplied by the number of Councilors you
currently have, your local section or division could lose a Councilor seat. The calculation will be based
on official membership counts as of December 31, 2014. The message now is that there is still time to
increase the number of members in your division or local section before December 31, 2014, and MAC is
prepared to lend assistance.
The ACS President’s Challenge is another way that sections and divisions are incented to recruit new
members. 2014 ACS President Tom Barton has continued the annual President’s Challenge campaign
offer of $15 paid for every new paid member (including Student Members) recruited by a division or a
local section. Go to ACS President’s Challenge at www.acs.org/MAC for information.
Also helpful to membership recruiting efforts was the Society’s recent clarification of its position on the
use of ACS funds, including allotments to local sections and divisions, to pay ACS national membership
dues. This means that sections and divisions may pay (but not waive) membership dues of certain classes
of members provided that their bylaws do not prohibit such payments -- for example, local sections and
divisions can pay for memberships for students, award winners, or others, but not for current officers or
leaders of the local section or divisions. One easy method to do this is by using the new ACS eGift card.
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MAC Report
At its meeting in San Francisco, MAC will be actively engaged in further discussions about membership
support to local sections and divisions, increasing the Society’s international membership and presence,
and means of improving the value of membership for those members with one- to five-years of
membership.
James M. Landis, Chair
Rita R. Boggs
Robert S. Cohen
Ella L. Davis
James Duddey
Merle Eiss
Carmen V. Gauthier
Resa M. Kelley
Melanie J. Lesko
Roger A. Parker
Kevin Pate
Associates
Bruce Ault
Julie Jessop
Pamela D. Kistler
Thomas G. Richmond
Don Weser
Staff Liaison: Debora Fillinich
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Margaret J. Schooler
Herb Silber
Paul Smith
Ruth Tanner
ITEM VII, F
C&B Report
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS
Since the Council meeting in Dallas, the Committee on Constitution and Bylaws (C&B), acting for the
Council, issued certified bylaws to the Illinois-Iowa and Nebraska Sections, the Division of Physical
Chemistry, and the Malaysia and South Korea International Chemical Sciences Chapters. C&B reviewed
proposed bylaw changes and submitted preliminary reports to the Louisiana, Southeastern Pennsylvania,
Tampa Bay, and Toledo Sections, and to the Division of Inorganic Chemistry. As requested by the
Omaha Section, C&B prepared expedited bylaws for vote by the Section members.
There are a number of divisions and local sections that must conduct their elections through postal mail
because of language in their outdated bylaws. Even though the certified bylaws are posted on the web at
www.acs.org/bulletin5 (click on unit bylaws), please contact C&B at [email protected] for a Word version
of your bylaws to submit proposed changes and to get advice and options from C&B.
In San Francisco, C&B will be discussing and voting on changes to model bylaws for divisions, local
sections, and international chemical sciences chapters and will seek DAC’s, LSAC’s, and IAC’s
approvals on revisions to their respective model bylaws.
There are no petitions either for action or for consideration at this meeting. New petitions to amend the
Constitution and/or Bylaws must be received by the Executive Director ([email protected]) by December
3 to be included in the Council agenda for the spring 2015 meeting in Denver. We recommend sending
draft petitions to C&B at least one or two months before this deadline so that we can assist with petition
requirements and with wording.
The online version of the ACS Governing Documents (Bulletin 5), effective as of January 1, 2014, is
available at www.acs.org/bulletin5. The online version is searchable and allows for copying and pasting
into a Word document.
ACS members are invited to attend C&B’s open meeting on Sunday, August 10, from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.
The committee will give a brief status report and will respond to questions on committee-related matters.
Donna G. Friedman, Chair
V. Dean Adams
Mark A. Benvenuto
James C. Carver
Matthew K. Chan
Herbert S. Golinkin
Stan S. Hall
Donald K. Harriss
Eckhard Hellmuth
Virgil J. Lee
Walter O. Siegl
Associates
David S. Crumrine
Staff Liaison: Barbara F. Polansky
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Blake Vance
Paul F. Vartanian
John A. Whittle
Doris L. Zimmerman
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Other Committee Reports
A. Analytical Reagents
The committee oversees and updates the ACS publication “Reagent Chemicals, Specifications and
Procedures”, which defines the specifications for “ACS Reagent Grade” chemicals used around the
world. The revised 11th edition of the hardcopy version of the book is currently in production and
tentatively scheduled for publication in the first quarter of 2015.
The new edition incorporates the “Supplements” accumulated over the past 7 years, removes some
obsolete test methods, improves instructions for many existing ones, and also introduces some new
methods. Overall, the safety, accuracy, or ease of use in specifications for about 70 of the 430 listed
reagents has been improved, and 7 new reagents added. While there are numerous small changes, such as
incorporation of the IUPAC 2009 re-definition of some atomic weights, there are several changes
particularly worth noting:
1. The replacement of polarography for measuring carbonyl impurities with GC/MS – a process
which is only partly complete.
2. The heavy metals test method for 31 reagents has replaced the use of sulfide precipitation with
the use of ICP-OES.
3. A Green Chemistry Initiative, which incorporates less toxic reagents in existing test
methodologies.
In addition, there is an unadvertised (and nearly unknown) “Standards” section of the book which has
been expanded by the addition of sections on phthalates and brominated ethers; the sections on explosives
and phosphorous insecticides have been expanded.
Paul A. Bouis, Chair
Russ Cooper
Louis E. DuPont
James N. Francis
Kenneth J. Herwehe
Jack Hubball
Michael Jeitziner
Robert W. Kramer
Donald S. MacLean
Tom J. Mancuso
Nelly N. Mateeva
Rajendra V. Mehta
Mary Beth O’Donnell
Richard J. Petroski
Nancy S. Simon
Vanaja Sivakumar
Robert J. Thomas
Tom Tyner
Shyam K. Verma
Wayne C. Wolsey
Associates
Subhra Bhattacharya
Eric Bosch
Norman A. Johns
Huifang Lang
Avrom C. Litin
Allen W. Verstuyft
Consultant
Loren C. McBride
Staff Liaison Robert W. Hauserman
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Other Committee Reports
B. Chemical Safety
(joint with Board)
The Committee on Chemical Safety (CCS) continues to provide support to the ACS community with its focus
being to provide service to our members and the chemical enterprise. We continue to seek ways to strengthen
the safety culture of academic and other institutions as we seek to address ways to improve laboratory safety and
to find ways to prevent or minimize incidents in academic institutions.
CCS has established the new Task Force for Safety Education Guidelines (TFSEG). The purpose of the
TFSEG is to develop guidelines for laboratory safety education for secondary, undergraduate, and graduate
education. Unlike many other disciplines in chemistry, laboratory safety topics and knowledge bases have not
been clearly defined. These guidelines would identify safety topics and areas that should be taught and
competencies that should be tested at various levels throughout the entire educational process. The TFSEG will
be led by co-chairs, Dr. Jack Breazeale and Kirk Hunter. TFSEG has members representing: CCS, Division of
Chemical Health and Safety (CHAS), Committee on Professional Training (CPT), Society Committee on
Education, Graduate Education Advisory Board, Committee on Ethics, Corporation Associates, and Two-Year
College Advisory Board. The new American Association for Chemistry Teachers (AACT) will also be
appointing a member to TFSEG within the next few months. A face-to-face meeting of the TFSEG was
anticipated sometime after the Dallas National meeting.
In the fall of 2013, CCS released the draft of the CCS/Division of Chemical Health and Safety (CHAS) report
of the Hazard and Analysis Task Force (HATF) on “Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in the Research
Laboratory.” CCS received a number of suggestions and corrections for the 2013 draft. The Task Force has
been working to complete its final report and hopes to publish this by the August ACS National Meeting in San
Francisco (see www.acs/safety). This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Chemical Safety Board
(CSB) that requested that the ACS “Develop good practice guidance that identifies and describes
methodologies to assess and control hazards that can be used successfully in a research laboratory.” Once
this report is finalized, it will be submitted to CSB for its review and approval as the appropriate response to
their request to the ACS. CSB will issue a statement of acceptance of the report after it reviews the final report.
CCS publishes a two-volume set of “Safety in Academic Chemical Laboratories” or SACL. Since the
publication of the first edition of SACL, CCS has distributed more than 1 million copies of SACL. CCS
members are now drafting the 8th Edition of SACL – the 7th Edition was published in 2003. The updated edition
will include stories of notable incidents, sections on safety culture, new changes in OSHA Hazard
Communication Standard to reflect the use of the Globally Harmonized System (GHS), and some
reorganization. The release of Volume 1 of the 8th Edition of SACL is expected in early 2015. CCS solicits
comments and suggestions for the next revision of SACL.
For some time CCS has been concerned about adverse incidents, especially fires and explosions, associated with
chemical demonstrations in high schools. In early December 2013 CSB released a video “After the Rainbow”
that focused on preventing incidents from chemical demonstrations that featured a victim of a flash fire from a
“Rainbow” demonstration. In early January 2014 a similar incident with the “Rainbow” demonstration injured
two students, one seriously. On March 12, 2014, during the Dallas ACS National Meeting, CCS released its
first-ever safety alert about the “Rainbow Demonstration” in Chemical and Engineering News. The alert noted
that flammable solvents should be handled in a laboratory hood. Science teachers were asked to stop using
“Rainbow” demonstrations involving flammable solvents like methanol on open benches. Furthermore the
message asked ACS members to forward this safety alert to high schools in their area. Links to good alternative
demonstrations were provided at the CCS website at www.acs.org/safety. At the Dallas Council meeting the
CCS Chair asked Council members to go back to their local school districts to distribute this safety alert. This
alert is provided as an attachment. CCS believes the long-term solution should be strengthening the safety
culture of academic institutions through safety education.
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Other Committee Reports
CCS received its 5-year review by the Committee on Committees with strong praise for CCS and its many
accomplishments – it recommended continuation of CCS. Acting on one of the recommendations, CCS has
scheduled a planning retreat in October 2014 to examine the way that CCS operates and look for measures that
might strengthen our effectiveness in the future.
Since 2012, I have had the honor to serve as CCS Chair and my term expires at the end of this year. I am proud
of the accomplishments of CCS - it is a wonderful committee with determined and committed members who
want to help strengthen and improve safety in the chemical enterprise. Since 2012 CCS produced two major
reports “Creating Safety Cultures in Academic Institutions” and “Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in the
Research Laboratory”, and provided advice and consultation to other ACS organizations and to other
organizations and people who came to the ACS for assistance in safety. In 2014, CCS formed a new Task
Force for Safety Education Guidelines to continue our efforts to strengthen the academic safety culture. I want
to thank the Council for its support of CCS and its Chair – it has been my great pleasure to serve in this role and
I really appreciate the work that CCS and ACS is doing in safety. I also want to use this opportunity to
personally thank the Education Division for providing such a wonderful support for CCS.
Robert H. Hill, Jr., Chair
Russell W. Phifer
Patricia A. Redden
Kyle S. Strode
Linda Stroud
Ralph Stuart
Erik A. Talley
Kirk Hunter
Kimberly Jeskie
David A. Katz
George J. Lechner
Edward Movitz
Todd Nelson
Lester M. Bynum
Regina Cody
Harry J. Elston
David C. Finster
Scott R. Goode
Elizabeth M. Howson
Associates
Darryl Prater
Jason Schaff
Darlene K. Slattery
Weslene Tallmadge
Allen W. Apblett
Georgia Arbuckle-Keil
Anna Dunn
Robin Izzo
Sr. Carol Ann Meyers
Staff Liaison: Marta Gmurczyk
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Other Committee Reports
C. Chemistry and Public Affairs
(joint with Board)
The Committee on Chemistry and Public Affairs advises and recommends ACS action on public policy
matters involving the chemical sciences and technologies. The committee is pleased to report some of the
CCPA activities undertaken to help make ACS a premier advocacy organization.
Public Policy Fellowships
For the past 40 years, the American Chemical Society has been sending chemists to Washington D.C. for
an immersive experience in how the government works through the ACS Public Policy Fellowships. The
purpose of the program is two-fold: to give chemists a better understanding of how government policy
affects the chemical enterprise, and to inject some scientific knowledge into the policy-making process.
ACS congressional fellows serve in the office of a congressional committee or personal office; science
policy fellows serve in the American Chemical Society's Office of Public Affairs office. At the fall
national meeting, CCPA has partnered with the PROF division to organize a symposium, “Celebrating 40
years of ACS Public Policy Fellowships: When Chemists Go To Washington,” which will take place on
August 11 from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm in Room 17/18 of the Hilton San Francisco Union Square hotel.
Fellows from each decade of the program will share their experiences and give insights into how the
program influenced their career paths, as well as the ways in which they were able to influence American
public policy.
Annually, CCPA selects two congressional fellows and one science policy fellow. For the 2013-2014
public policy fellowship term, we are pleased to have two highly qualified congressional fellows: Samuel
Bockenhauer is serving in the office of Senator Al Franken, where he focuses on energy and environment
issues. Kate Stoll is working on the House Energy and Commerce Committee. In addition, Kate Weber,
the ACS Science Policy fellow, is completing her second year working with the ACS Office of Public
Affairs, where she handles a variety of issues. Interviews for the 2014-15 Congressional Fellows took
place in April, and the new public policy fellows will begin in September.
Member engagement in public policy
CCPA encourages and highlights ACS local section engagement in public policy activities by sponsoring
the ACS President’s Local Section Government Affairs Award, which is presented at the ChemLuminary
Awards Reception. CCPA would like to congratulate the Chicago and the Georgia local sections, which
have been nominated for their local section government affairs efforts. Stay tuned to learn which local
section is crowned the winner at the San Francisco ChemLuminary Awards reception! Councilors are
urged to include their local sections’ advocacy activities in their annual local section reports so that they
may be considered for the CCPA ChemLuminary award.
ACS Public Policy Statements
ACS public policy statements define the Society’s advocacy agenda and provide recommendations to
policymakers at the state and federal levels. CCPA is leading efforts to update two statements set to
expire at the end of 2014, including statements related to federal funding of science and technology and
the U.S. business climate. In San Francisco, CCPA will work with representatives from the Committee on
Science, the Society Committee on Education, the Committee on Environmental Improvement,
Corporation Associates, and the Small Chemical Businesses Division committees to finalize the draft
statements for the Board’s consideration. Current ACS policy statements can be found at
www.acs.org/policy.
Susan B. Butts, Chair
Inara M. Brubaker
Charles P. Casey
Raymond E. Forslund
Jeffrey S. Gaffney
Janan Hayes
Russell W. Johnson
Kristen Kulinowski
Pamela Leggett-Robinson
Jyoti Malhotra
Valerie McDevitt
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Sarah M. Mullins
Connie J. Murphy
E. Ann Nalley
Carl A. Picconatto
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Other Committee Reports
Lawrence J. Berliner
Alvin F. Bopp
Hui Cai
Eun-Woo Chang
Associates
A. Jay Dias
Cheryl B. Frech
Lynne P. Greenblatt
Kevin Kuhn
Zafra Lerman
Jonathan Wilker
Matthew Windsor
Ruth Ann Woodall
Consultant
Stephen Benn
Staff Liaison: Caroline Trupp Gil
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Other Committee Reports
D. Chemists with Disabilities
(joint with Board)
The Committee on Chemists with Disabilities (CWD) is continuing to develop a Travel Award similar to
the Lilly Travel Award offered by the Women Chemists Committee - for students with disabilities - to
attend the ACS National Meeting and present their research. The committee seeks to finalize plans with
Merck and hopes to launch this award in 2015.
The committee project to create informative handouts and posters that educate students and members on
the contributions of people with disabilities in discovering new elements and advancing chemical science
is well underway. CWD unveiled the first of this series at the Fall National Meeting in San Francisco.
The digitizing of the handbook “Teaching Chemistry to Students with Disabilities,” an ongoing project, is
in process and CWD is seeking external funding to update and expand the handbook.
Karl Booksh, Chair
Allison A. Aldridge
Kristin Bowman-James
Dennis M. Fantin
Robert A. Gates
Roland F. Hirsch
Lee W. Hoffman
John J. Johnston
Michael J. Kenney
R. Daniel Libby
Todd E. Pagano
Missy A. Postlewaite
Annemarie D. Ross
Marilynn Sikes
Virginia Stern
Judith A. Summers-Gates
Cary A. Supalo
Zelda R. Wasserman
Associates
Darrell G. Watson
Henry Wedler
Nicholas P. DiOrio
Taylor C. Hood
Rafael San Miguel
John E. Sheats
Consultant
Laureen Summers
Staff Liaison: Paula H. Christopher
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Other Committee Reports
E. Community Activities
(joint with Board)
National Chemistry Week (NCW) will be celebrated October 19-25, 2014 with the theme “The Sweet
Side of Chemistry: Candy”. All Local Sections are encouraged to participate through hands-on science
events, local illustrated poem contests, and the Halloween Candy Collection Drive, which is the NCW
2014 Community Event.
Our outreach event at the Dallas National Meeting was held at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science!
Thirty five volunteers from student groups and members of CCA presented eight tables of hands-on
activities from 10 am – 2 pm, reaching an estimated 400 members of the public. At the end of the
activities, kids received a goody bag containing a copy of Celebrating Chemistry, an Earth Day Pen and a
temporary tattoo.
On April 22, 2014, CCA led the Society's outreach efforts for Chemists Celebrate Earth Day. The theme,
“The Wonders of Water”, explored the unique properties of water that are crucial for life and a cleaner
environment. More than 60,000 copies of Celebrating Chemistry were distributed in English and
Spanish. Electronic versions in these languages were also made available online. There were 55 entries
from Local Section contests that advanced to the national Illustrated Poem Contest.
During the San Francisco National Meeting, CCA, along with the California and Santa Clara Valley
Local Sections, will present hands-activities and demonstrations at the Children’s Creativity Museum on
Saturday, August 9, 2014 from 10 am to 2 pm. All are encouraged to visit the museum and show support.
Looking ahead, planning is underway for CCED 2015, “Climate Science: More than Just a Weather
Report”, and NCW 2015 "Chemistry Colors our World”. As always, CCA encourages Councilors to
ensure that their local section has a Member appointed as outreach coordinator in their Local Sections and
to consider nominating outstanding volunteers for the Local Section Outreach Volunteers of the Year
Award. You can learn more about ACS outreach activities at www.acs.org/outreach.
George Heard, Chair
Ronald P. D'Amelia
Holly L. Davis
Marilyn Duerst
George H. Fisher
Kenneth P. Fivizzani
Melissa L. Golden
Alan A. Hazari
George L. Heard
Christine H. Jaworek-Lopes
Sheila Kanodia
Avrom C. Litin
Ressano Machado
Michael B. McGinnis
E. Gerald Meyer
Kim M. Morehouse
Sally B. Peters
Amy M. Pollock
Analice H. Sowell
Sanda P. Sun
Jeffrey B. Trent
Associates
Alex M. Madonik
Verrill M. Norwood
Richard G. Rogers
Linda Youmans-McDonald
Janet A. Asper
Christopher Ciolli
Shawn M. Dougherty
Jacqueline Erickson
Staff Liaison: Alvin Collins
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Other Committee Reports
F. Environmental Improvement
(joint with Board)
As part of the committee’s ongoing efforts to support the incorporation of sustainability into all
dimensions of the chemical enterprise, the committee provides small grants to local sections to encourage
sustainability programming and activities. At the spring national meeting, a grant was awarded to the
Dallas-Fort Worth Local Section to facilitate a full-day session on climate change and sustainability at the
2014 Southwest Regional Meeting. Applications by locals sections for sustainability programming
grants that are received by July 27 will be considered at CEI’s August meeting.
Since 2010, the committee has supported a project allowing undergraduate and graduate students to travel
to and participate in the annual Conference of Parties (COP) meetings of the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change. The meetings are intended to assess international progress on addressing
climate change. The students are both observers and participants in the large vibrant group of young
people who have the greatest stake in addressing mitigation of and adaptation to the warming world. The
students report on their experiences through social media such as Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and blogs,
and their writing has been picked up by publications such as the Huffington Post and the New Jersey Star
Ledger. In San Francisco, CEI is pleased to join the Division of Chemical Education as cosponsors of
“An International Student Summit on Global Climate Change,” which reunites program alumni to discuss
how participation influenced their views and career paths.
CEI is in a unique position to coordinate the development of public policy statements with programming
to inform members of the questions and concerns regarding current policy issues. Much of CEI’s
executive and open meeting in San Francisco will be dedicated to updating four ACS public policy
statements and continuing to advance the ACS Climate and ACS Global Water Initiatives established by
2012 ACS President Bassam Shakhashiri.
In San Francisco, in support of the Chemicals Risk Assessment an Regulatory Decision Making policy
statement adopted last year, CEI is sponsoring a symposium, “Hot Topics: Communicating Risk,”
featuring speakers with experience commutating issues associated with hazard and risk to the public,
policy makers and other scientists. The committee also is cosponsoring 23 symposia with six ACS
technical divisions and the theme, “Chemistry & Global Stewardship.”
Laura E. Pence, Chair
Martin A. Abraham
Georjean Adams
George P. Cobb, III
Alan W. Elzerman
Richard Lomneth
Laura L. McConnell
Anthony M. Noce
Eileen M. Nottoli
Keith E. Peterman
Robin D. Rogers
Chris Avery
Jerry Bell
Jack Driscoll
John R. Fowle
Michael A. Gonzalez
Associates
Carol Henry
John T. Jayne
Michael A. Matthews
Catherine H. Middlecamp
Martin J. Mulvihill
Consultants
Jurgen Exner
Bassam Z. Shakhashiri
Staff Liaison: Raymond J. Garant
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M. Barclay Satterfield
Darlene S. Schuster
Ean Warren
Joseph R. Zoeller
Melissa A. Pasquinelli
Jennifer Wilcox
Jennifer L. Tanir
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Other Committee Reports
G. Ethics
The Committee on Ethics (ETHX) actively engages in conversations with many ACS units in its efforts to
aggregate, facilitate, and encourage the society’s ethics programming, education, and awareness. Since
its last report to Council, ETHX has had interactions ranging from dialog to report and from feedback to
symposia co-sponsorship from many ACS units including: the ACS Board of Directors, the Committee on
Chemical Safety (CCS), the Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs (CEPA), the Division of
Chemistry & the Law (CHAL), the Division of Chemical Education (CHED), the Chemical Information
Division (CINF), the Committee on Patents and Related Matters (CPRM), the Committee on Chemists
with Disabilities (CWD), the Graduate Education Advisory Board (GEAB), the Division of Professional
Relations (PROF), the Younger Chemists Committee (YCC), and others.
The Committee on Ethics commends the Board for adopting the ACS Volunteer/National Meeting
Attendee Conduct Policy. ETHX thanks the Board for the opportunity to participate in production of this
important policy.
ETHX met with representatives from the Board Standing Committee on Planning to discuss the ACS
Environmental Scan and explore the possibility of engaging the ACS in a Survey of Organizational
Research Climate (SORC). The National Center for Professional and Research Ethics (NCPRE)
developed SORC is a validated instrument designed to empirically measure the research integrity climate
in organizations.
Safety education is a critical component of ethics education, particularly for chemistry and related
disciplines. ETHX enthusiastically agreed to participate in the CCS’s newly formed Task Force for
Safety Education Guidelines (TFSEG). Its purpose is “to develop guidelines for laboratory safety
education for primary, secondary, undergraduate, and graduate education.”
CINF, PROF, CHED, YCC and CHAL cosponsored with ETHX, the important and well-attended
“Ethical Considerations in Digital Scientific Communication and Publishing” symposium and panel
discussion in Dallas. Thanks to these groups and to the speakers who made this an exceptional and
positive event. We invite all ACS Divisions and Committees to contact us regarding opportunities for cosponsoring symposia. We are enthusiastic to promote YOUR programing that has a strong connection to
increasing ethics awareness in the community of chemistry and related disciplines.
The ETHX Chair contributed the invited editorial “Exploring Ethics in the Laboratory” to the
November/December 2013 issue of inChemistry and the invited article “ACS Committee on Ethics: An
Overview” to the summer 2014 Chemical Information Bulletin.
In efforts to contextualize and connect ethics-related activities of the ACS to the broader scientific and
professional communities, ETHX continues to engage with organizations external to ACS.
In Dallas, ETHX met with a representative from the Committee on Publishing Ethics (COPE;
http://publicationethics.org) to explore themes of mutual interest, such as publication ethics education.
COPE was established in 1997 and is an independent registered charity in the United Kingdom. COPE
“provides advice to editors and publishers on all aspects of publication ethics and, in particular, how to
handle cases of research and publication misconduct.” The organization makes available a variety of
publication ethics related materials, including the internationally recognized “COPE Code of Conduct and
Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors”.
The ETHX Chair and the Staff Liaison attended the 2013 American Association for the Advancement of
Science and University of Pittsburgh cosponsored short course “Educating Scientists in Research Ethics
for the 21st Century.”
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The ETHX Chair attended the invitation only annual “Connecting Silos Ethics Curriculum Conference”
in 2013 and again in 2014, accompanied by a ETHX committee member. The annual event brings
together about 35 professionals including: university Research Integrity Officers, directors of academic
ethics centers, journal editors, faculty and administrators from business and medical schools, corporate
ethics lawyers, and other leaders including the Chief Ethics Officer of the United Nations. All have
substantial interest and expertise in professional ethics.
ETHX has been working to update and closely align its strategic plan with the current ACS Strategic Plan
for 2014 and Beyond. Critical aspects of the ETHX strategic plan include:
Vision
Ethics will permeate the culture of chemistry.
Mission
The Committee on Ethics promotes and supports high standards of ethical conduct and integrity
in the community of chemistry and related disciplines for the benefit of science and society.
Goals
Goal Zr: Identify and aggregate relevant ethics resources and disseminate to the community of
chemistry and related disciplines.
Goal Hf: Promote & increase ethics awareness in the community of chemistry and related
disciplines.
Goal Rf: Support ethics initiatives of ACS committees, divisions, local sections & other units.
Goal Ti: Catalyze ethics education within the scientific communities.
Gregory Ferrence, Chair
Sergio Nanita
Susan Schelble
James Tatera
Keith Vitense
Ben Chastain
Victor Hruby
William Leong
Edward Mottel
Associates
David Dillon
Laurence Doemeny
Karlo Lopez
Leah McEwen
Steven Trohalaki
Staff Liaison: Eric S. Slater
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Other Committee Reports
H. International Activities
(joint with Board)
With recognition of the outstanding volunteer efforts of its members and associates - supported by
the very capable ACS staff in the Office of International Activities (OIA) - ACS International Activities
Committee (IAC) aims to be a resource for proactively advocating, catalyzing, initiating and implementing
ACS international activities, conferences and initiatives pertaining to education and research and
development of broad scientific understanding, appreciation of chemistry, and promotion of the image of
chemistry. We operate under six high-priority and high-impact activities for 2014 and beyond, e.g., 1) Build
International Younger Chemists Network (IYCN), 2) Provide continuing support for student exchanges and
programs, 3) Continue to help with scientific mobility issues, 4) Continue to interact and collaborate with
sister chemical societies, 5) Continue to support developing countries, and 6) Increase awareness of
chemistry in the world.
International Chapters. At the ACS National Meeting in Dallas, the ACS Council approved the
establishment of ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapters in South Korea and Malaysia. The ACS
Board added its approval on April 15. I am pleased to report that both chapters are now operational and join
a community of six established ACS International Chapters –
(http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/global/international/chapters.html). In addition, IAC has formed a Task
Force on International Chapter Development Strategy, which met via conference call in April. Work is
ongoing, and the target is to produce a report before the San Francisco meeting.
Collaboration within ACS. IAC is giving three ChemLuminary Awards during the ACS National Meeting
in San Francisco, one each for local sections, technical divisions, and international chapters, for their
accomplishments in international activities. As in past years, we solicited and gave out Global Innovation
Grants (GIG) on proposed events and activities with significant international components which advance
IAC strategic interests and priorities. This year, we received a record 19 GIG applications. We managed to
give 9 awards, varying in amount from US$1000 to US$4000.
IAC appreciates the ongoing collaborations with many committees, including MAC, DAC, CPRC, YCC, and
SCC. As announced in Dallas, a joint SOCED/CPT/IAC working group has been formed, with two
members from each committee. The working group agreed to work on opportunities relating to international
education and employment.
A general-purpose presentation on ACS international activities has been put together to facilitate
communication on IAC. A poster has also been designed (http://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/global/international/resources/acs-international-and-you-2014.pdf).
The first two opportunities for its presentation will come during the NORM and CERM regional meetings in
2014.
Education and Outreach Activities. Since 1995, the IAC has worked with Pittcon and its sponsoring
organizers to facilitate participation at the conference by early- and mid-career analytical chemists from
developing and transitional countries. Funding from Pittcon and its sponsoring organizations subsidizes the
travel and registration costs of attendees. Since 1995, approximately 100 early- and mid-career chemistry
practitioners from over 70 countries have benefitted from this program. In March 2014, eight delegates from
Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam were chosen to attend the Pittcon in Chicago.
IAC is also working with CPRC in an effort to internationalize the ACS Chemistry Ambassadors program
(http://www.acs.org/chemistryambassadors). The plan is to initiate the program among our eight ACS
International Chapters and then propagate to other places later.
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Other Committee Reports
IAC was pleased to learn of SOCED’s approval at the ACS National Meeting in Dallas of the pilot program
to establish ACS International Student Chapters, and we look forward to working with them to assure its
success.
San Francisco Activities. We hope you will take time to join us at IAC-related events in San Francisco.
Several events and symposia have been organized, as shown below.
a. ACS International Opportunities for Study and Career
b. Asia-America Chemical Symposium -- Global Stewardship and Chemistry Innovations for
Sustainable Agricultural and Food Products (in collaboration with Federation of Asian Chemical
Societies)
c. Innovation from International Collaborations (in collaboration with SCC, BMGT, PROF, SChB,
and I&EC)
d. Next Generation Ambassadors of Chemistry (in collaboration with Brazilian Chemical Society)
e. Women Leaders in the Global Chemistry Enterprise (organized and sponsored by WCC, IAC cosponsored)
f. Global Stewardship by Increasing Climate Science Literacy (organized and sponsored by CHED,
IAC co-sponsored)
g. An International Student Summit on Global Climate Change (organized and sponsored by CHED,
IAC co-sponsored)
h. Redefining the Mole and Kilogram: Impact on Chemistry (organized and sponsored by NTS, IAC
co-sponsored)
In addition, we plan to have an International Reception on Sunday, August 10, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Hilton
Union Square. The International Lounge Open House will take place at 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. at Convention
Center. Please join us if you have time. We need your participation, input and energy as we work together
to “cooperate with scientists internationally and be concerned with the worldwide application of chemistry
to the needs of humanity” (Article II, Section 3, ACS Constitution).
H. N. Cheng, Chair
Judith L. Benham
Madan M. Bhasin
Ellene T. Contis
Richard S. Danchik
Rama K. Durvasula
Richard W. Hartmann
Jorge L. Colon
Yoko Furukawa
Timothy W. Hanks
N. Bhushan Mandava
Bryan R. Henry
John O. Hoberg
Nancy B. Jackson
Csaba Janaky
Venera Jouraeva
Jody A. Kocsis
Associates
Cynthia Maryanoff
Shelli R. McAlpine
Luke B. Roberson
E. Thomas Strom
Staff Liaison: Bradley Miller
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Eli M. Pearce
Agnes M. Rimando
Martin Thompson
Isai T. Urasa
Javier Vela-Becerra
Douglas B. Walters
Peter Zarras
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Other Committee Reports
FOR COUNCIL ACTION
Petition to Charter an International Chemical Sciences Chapter
One legal application has been received for the formation of a new international chemical
sciences chapter to be known as the South Africa International Chemical Sciences Chapter. The
South Africa International Chemical Sciences Chapter will consist of the territory of South
Africa, and is not part of any other Chapter or Local Section of the Society.
The petition was initiated and signed by ACS members in good standing and residing in the
territory. The application meets all of the requirements of Bylaw IX of the Society, and includes
a statement that the applicants are familiar with and will abide by all governing documents of the
Society including specifically Bylaw IX Section 2(c), which states that the Chapter and its
officers as representatives of the Chapter shall not engage in political activity, shall avoid any
activities that may adversely affect the interests and/or public and professional image of the
Society, and shall assure that all activities of the Chapter shall be open to all members of the
Society. The application includes a proposed budget for the operation of the Chapter, which
includes no allotment of funds from the Society. The petition has been reviewed by the ACS
Joint-Board Committee on International Activities (IAC).
This action seeks the approval of the Council and is contingent on the approval from the ACS
Board of Directors, after which, the Chapter will begin operation.
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Other Committee Reports
I. Nomenclature, Terminology, and Symbols
The Committee on Nomenclature, Terminology, and Symbols (NTS) is monitoring developments
associated with a proposed reorganization of the SI (Le Système International d'Unités) system of
measurements. Recent proposals involve basing the new system on “explicit constant”, rather than the
existing “explicit unit” definitions. Under the proposed system, the seven base units will be referenced to
seven constants, which are referred to as “invariants of nature”. These constants will have their numerical
values specified exactly. Of particular interest to chemists are the re-definitions of the mole and kilogram.
In order to allow ACS members to understand the implications of a new SI, and to support input from
ACS to the recommending agencies, NTS has planned a symposium at the San Francisco ACS meeting.
This symposium has as co-sponsors the Division of Analytical Chemistry and the International Activities
Committee. The half-day symposium, titled “Redefinition of Mole and Kilogram: Implications for
Chemists,” will be presented on Monday, August 11, 8:30 a.m. –noon. Five international experts will
participate in the symposium and panel discussion in the Moscone Center, North Bldg., Room 133.
Maintaining currency on nomenclature-related issues of potential concern to ACS is essential for NTS to
fulfill its duties. A program of “current awareness” to educate and inform scientists on today’s important
issues is in force.
In commerce, there is an important substance class for which traditional nomenclature is not directly
applicable. These industrial chemicals are complex mixtures of variable composition, known as UVCB –
substances of unknown or variable composition and biological materials. Further NTS potential
collaborative action on these international regulations is being pursued.
The committee discussed recent developments of the IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChi) – a
variable-length code which serves as a molecular identifier in some chemical databases.
The committee has expanded on its recently re-defined set of duties and responsibilities. NTS serves as a
resource for items pertaining to nomenclature and terminology throughout the Society. Further
communication on items of mutual interest between NTS and other Society units is being done by
providing a short PowerPoint presentation highlighting key NTS capabilities and expertise. A letter was
sent to Chairs of ACS Committees and Divisions, offering to present this at an upcoming meeting, for the
purpose of showing how NTS might be able to support or enhance ongoing programs. NTS has scheduled
four such presentations for the San Francisco meeting. Additional presentations are being planned for the
Spring meeting in Denver.
Albert C. Censullo, Chair
David W. Ball
Mark Benvenuto
Carmen J. Giunta
Ben B. Chastain
Derek Horton
Bob A. Howell
Richard A. Hermens
Gail Karet
Paul J. Karol
Michael D. Mosher
Warren H. Powell
Jeffrey A. Rahn
Michelle M. Rodgers
Peter F. Rusch
Associates
Graham F. Peaslee
Donivan Porterfield
Jack Secrist
Michael Sheets
James G. Traynham
Tracy C. Williamson
Jeffrey M. Wilson
Daniel Rabinovich
Robert Yokley
Wayne Wolsey
Consultants
Patton M. Giles
Leslie H. Sperling
Staff Liaison: Gerald P. Fenske
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Other Committee Reports
J. Patents and Related Matters
(joint with Board)
The Committee on Patents and Related Matters (CPRM) continues to focus on three main areas. First, CPRM
provides ACS members and the general public with information about patents and other intellectual property
issues. Second, CPRM proposes nominations of notable inventors for external national awards recognizing the
innovations and inventions of chemists. Finally, CPRM monitors legislative and regulatory developments
influencing intellectual property in ways that impact the chemical enterprise.
Over the past few years, CPRM has worked to help reform the patent system. This has culminated with the recent
passage of the America Invents Act. CPRM is monitoring the implementation of the most significant patent reform
law in fifty years. In addition, CPRM has partnered with the Chemistry and the Law Division to provide patentrelated programming at national and regional meetings. CPRM is exploring possible collaborative education
efforts with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Finally, CPRM has created numerous educational
materials, many of which provide guidance regarding second careers in the area of intellectual property. CPRM’s
materials are available on its website.
CPRM has recommended several outstanding nominees for the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the National
Medal of Technology and Innovation. In addition, CPRM recommends nominees for the National Women’s Hall
of Fame, the nation’s oldest membership organization recognizing the achievements of great American women.
Inductees are selected every two years based on their lasting contributions to society through the arts, athletics,
business, education, government, humanities, philanthropy and science.
CPRM also engages in educational outreach to help chemists and others understand the patent system. CPRM
continues to partner with the Chemistry and the Law Division to provide patent-related programming at national
and regional meetings. In addition, CPRM has created numerous educational materials, many of which provide
guidance regarding second careers in the area of intellectual property. CPRM’s materials are available on its new
website.
CPRM has developed active working relationships with many governance units. If you are interested in working
with us, please contact us at [email protected]
Brian G.R. Treco, Chair
Sadiq Shah
Edlyn S. Simmons
Sidney White
David H. Jaffer
Richard D. Jordan
David Mitchell
Xavier Pilai
Sibel Selcuk
Andrew Berks
James Lee Chao
Kirby B. Drake
Jonathan T. Goodman
William Gutheil
Associates
Joseph Mabry
Howard M. Peters
Suguna Rachakonda
Jonathan Sessler
Joseph Antonucci
Carlyn Burton
Jiwen Chen
Ramesh Chand Kumar
Consultant
Hubert E. Dubb
Staff Liaison: David Smorodin
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Other Committee Reports
K. Professional Training
(joint with Board)
At the March 2014 meeting, the Committee on Professional Training (CPT) evaluated 40 periodic reports
from currently approved programs. CPT held conferences with eight departments seeking approval and
voted to approve three new chemistry programs. During the spring 2014 submission period, nine
programs submitted pre-applications for ACS approval, and four programs were invited to move to the
next step in application process. The current number of colleges and universities offering an ACSapproved bachelor’s degree program is 676.
The committee continued discussions of the guidelines revision, and final action was taken on several of
the proposed changes that were circulated to chemistry programs and other key stakeholders early in
2013. In addition, the committee considered a requirement for some coverage of synthetic and natural
polymers in the curriculum required for student certification. The committee reviewed the results of a
short survey of approved programs to learn more about the extent to which polymer chemistry currently is
incorporated into the curricula offered by chemistry programs. A working group was assigned to develop
materials and identify learning objectives to help approved programs understand how this coverage might
be implemented. The committee anticipates approving the new guidelines at the CPT meeting in August
2014.
The committee held a breakfast meeting with 16 Visiting Associates, the volunteers who make site visits
to programs seeking ACS approval. The CPT members reviewed the role and expectations for Visiting
Associates and provided an update on the status of the guidelines revision. The Visiting Associates
shared their suggestions for improving communications regarding the outcome of the site visits.
The committee received an update on the production of the 2014 edition of the ACS Directory of
Graduate Research (DGRweb). Faculty publications and student theses are no longer included, and the
print form of the Directory has been discontinued. Information on NSF Research Experiences for
Undergraduates and searchable statistical data are among the new features added to the last edition.
Plans for two CPT-organized symposia were finalized. The first one will be held at the Biennial
Conference on Chemical Education on August 4, 2014. The presentations will focus on enriching the
professional preparation of undergraduates through capstone and other experiences that integrate student
skills. The second symposium, “An International View on Chemistry Education”, will be held at the ACS
national meeting in San Francisco. The invited speakers will share ideas and effective practices in
chemistry education with an international focus.
Anne B. McCoy, Chair
Thomas J. Wenzel, Vice Chair
Edgar A. Arriaga
Ronald G. Brisbois
Michelle O. Claville
Ron W. Darbeau
Bob A. Howell
Jeffrey N. Johnston
Kerry K. Karukstis
Laura L. Kosbar
Clark R. Landis
Cynthia K. Larive
Lisa McElwee-White
Christopher R. Meyer
Lee Y. Park
Richard W. Schwenz
Consultants
Suzanne Harris
Joel I. Shulman
George S. Wilson
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Other Committee Reports
L. Project SEED
Project SEED provides research opportunities for high school students from economically disadvantaged
families. Since its inception, the Program has had a significant impact on the lives of nearly 9,500
students. This summer, more than 400 high school students were placed in over 100 academic,
governmental, and industrial laboratories to do research projects in chemistry and related sciences under
the supervision of scientists. This outstanding participation is made possible by contributions from
industry, academia, local sections, ACS friends and members, and the Project SEED Endowment.
In April, the Project SEED Scholarship Subcommittee reviewed 45 scholarship applications from Project
SEED alumni; the subcommittee selected 25 winners and 6 alternates for the 2014-2015 academic-year.
These scholarships are made possible by contributions from Alfred and Isabel Bader, and the following
Endowments: Ashland Inc., Bayer Foundation, the Estate of Elizabeth Ernest Fosbinder, and Glenn and
Barbara Ulyott.
The committee continues its commitment to increase the outreach and facilitate growth of the Project
SEED program. The committee encourages all members to continue using the dues check-off option on
their ACS membership renewal to support this remarkable program.
Sandra J. Bonetti, Chair
Barbara Sitzman
Chuanbing Tang
Alan E. Tonelli
Don L. Warner
Keith Kostecka
Adriane G. Ludwick
Joshua J. Pak
Brian A. Salvatore
Jeffrey W. Seyler
Carolyn A. Burnley
Anna G. Cavinato
David L. Cedeño
Ingolf Gruen
Angela Hoffman
Associates
Kimberly Agnew-Heard
Peggy S. Biser
Maria Bohorquez
Michael T.H. Cheng
Michelle L. Rivard
James Visintainer
Staff Liaison: Cecilia Hernandez
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Other Committee Reports
M. Public Relations and Communications
(joint with Board)
The Joint Board-Council Committee on Public Relations and Communications (CPRC) continues to
partner with the ACS Office of Public Affairs to support members in communicating chemistry to the
public. One of our ongoing efforts has been recruiting, encouraging, and recognizing Chemistry
Ambassadors. Committee members worked at several ACS regional meetings and other conferences
during the past year to interest members in joining this initiative to make chemistry more accessible to
students, teachers, scouts, policymakers, the news media, and other public audiences. As a result, a
membership milestone of 10,000 was reached. New recruits also included members already making a
difference as ACS Science Coaches, Undergrad Advisors, ChemClub faculty, or as volunteers for
National Chemistry Week and Chemists Celebrate Earth Day. A letter of thanks and recognition was sent
to all new Chemistry Ambassadors from the chair of CPRC. For more information on this initiative, and
to join, visit www.acs.org/chemistryambassadors.
At the ACS Dallas meeting, the committee partnered with staff to again present a Speaking Simply
contest at the undergraduate poster session. Students had the opportunity to attend a how-to workshop to
learn the skills for explaining the relevance of their research in a way that nonscientists would appreciate.
At the poster session, volunteers judged their efforts and prizes were awarded to the most successful.
CPRC also co-sponsored a presidentially-recommended symposium on communicating the benefits of
chemistry in everyday life.
This past spring, CPRC held a strategic planning session, facilitated by members of the ACS Leadership
Advisory Board. The resulting plan includes an updated mission to support ACS efforts to improve
public understanding and appreciation of chemistry’s contributions to people’s lives. The plan’s specific
goals and strategies will be finalized at the committee’s meeting in San Francisco.
Looking ahead, CPRC member Shirley Corriher will be taking part in a food chemistry event at the
National Press Club in Washington, D.C., in October, which will be open to news media and the public.
David S. Gottfried, Chair
Don Hicks
Milt Levenberg
Doris Lewis
Jennifer Maclachlan
John Malin
Béla Buslig
Keith Butler
Margaret Cavanaugh
Carol A. Duane
Amina El-Ashmawy
William Oliver
Attila Pavlath
Kenneth Poggenburg
Steven K. Showalter
Anne K. Taylor
Associates
Donna Nelson
Keith Pannell
Terence Say
Irene Abia
Lynn Hogue
Patrick Lee
Preston MacDougall
Consultants
Shirley O. Corriher
Mike Lawrence
Staff Liaison: Nancy Blount
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Other Committee Reports
N. Publications
(joint with Board)
The Joint Board-Council Committee on Publications (JBCCP) met and elected Nicole Sampson as vice
chair, who will serve in that capacity from March 14, 2014 to December 31, 2014.
The editorial monitoring reports for Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Science &
Technology Letters, ACS Catalysis, ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, and Journal of Chemical &
Engineering Data were presented, discussed thoroughly and accepted with thanks. Editor reappointments
were reviewed and recommendations were made. The next publications to be monitored will be ACS
Combinatorial Science, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Macromolecules, ACS Macro Letters, and
Journal of Proteome Research.
The Conference of Editors of ACS Publications was held in January 2014, chaired by Dr. Joan
Brennecke, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Chemical & Engineering Data. The agenda for that meeting
and an overview of the proceedings was shared with the committee. A post-conference survey confirmed
Editors found the Conference to be useful and the presentations from ACS leadership, ACS Publications
staff and Editors to be informative.
The Division President presented a written overview of the ACS Publications Division’s operational
highlights for the year and new innovation initiatives.
The ACS Board Standing Committee on Planning gave a presentation on the issues emerging from a
study on the ACS Environmental Scan. The purpose of the “environmental scan” is to study the strategic
context for chemistry, chemists, and the ACS. The committee was informed about the challenges ACS
faces regarding emerging opportunities and strategic options relevant to publications, and invited to
provide input to inform and update the environmental scan.
The committee was provided with the new ACS Volunteer/National Meeting Attendee Conduct Policy,
which the Board of Directors adopted on December 6, 2013 and now appears in the Society’s governing
documents, known as “Bulletin 5.” This new policy provides ACS volunteers and national meeting
attendees with a succinct set of policies and protections.
Staff presented highlights from the results of two studies for the strategic analysis of Chemical &
Engineering News (C&EN). The first study involved qualitative research conducted through exhaustive
interviews with focus groups in November 2013. The second study involved quantitative survey of more
than 4,000 readers of C&EN, including nonmembers who visit the C&EN website. The final report of the
strategic analysis will include recommendations to help C&EN to become even more valuable to its
readers and to ACS.
Stephanie L. Brock, Chair
Michael Appell
David E. Bergbreiter
Kay M. Brummond
Michael P. Doyle
Robert Y. Ofoli
Tatyana E. Polenova
Charles H. Reynolds
Nicole S. Sampson
Associates
Lin X. Chen
David A. Dixon
Jerzy Klosin
Julia Laskin
Staff Liaison: Brian D. Crawford
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Gary B. Schuster
Susannah L. Scott
Richard V. Williams
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Other Committee Reports
O. Senior Chemists
(joint with Board)
The Senior Chemists Committee (SCC) continues to focus on where it can best expend its resources and
talents in support of ACS objectives. The Senior Chemists Newsletter, with a distribution of over 49,000,
highlights activities and interests shared by ACS senior members, and has received so many positive
responses that an Editorial Board has been established to enable better communication.
Launched since the Dallas meeting is the SCC Local Section Mini-Grant Program to encourage senior
involvement at the local level. The response has surpassed all expectations and the committee is hopeful
that this initiative will lead to many nominations for the ChemLuminary Awards sponsored by SCC in
2015.
In keeping with the committee’s Mission, the Senior Chemists Breakfast in San Francisco, co-sponsored
with the ACS Development Office, will feature Professor Jean Frechet, Vice President for Research at
the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia as the guest speaker. His topic
is “Establishing a 21st Century Research University in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: King Abdullah
University of Science and Technology (KAUST)”. Dr. Frechet will share his experiences at the forefront
in Saudi Arabia and the implications for STEM education efforts at all levels in the U. S. and elsewhere.
In addition, SCC will also co-sponsor two symposia, “Innovation from International Collaboration” in
collaboration with the International Activities Committee; and with the Division of Professional
Relations, “I am over 50 and I just got a job”. In an effort to directly mentor students, the SCC is a proud
sponsor of the Undergraduate Speed Networking where a majority of the members will be participating in
the event being held on Monday afternoon in San Francisco.
George E. Heinze, Chair
Ronald D. Archer
Roger F. Bartholomew
Thomas R. Beattie
Dennis Chamot
Maureen G. Chan
Michaeline F. Chen
Donald D. Clarke
Catherine E. Costello
Allen A. Denio
Susan R. Fahrenholtz
Lynn G. Hartshorn
Richard A. Hermens
Morton Z. Hoffman
Robert S. Moore
Eli Pearce
Edel Wasserman
Associates
Raymond P. Anderson
Claude A. Lucchesi
Carol Jean Bruner
Staff Liaison: Cheryl H. Brown
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Other Committee Reports
P. Technician Affairs
The Committee on Technician Affairs (CTA) works through ACS governance channels to advance the
careers of analysts, operators, technicians, and other applied chemical professionals. CTA works toward
three goals:
•
•
•
Increase the awareness of the important contributions that chemistry-based technicians make to
the national economy and to society as a whole
Make technicians relevant to ACS
Make ACS relevant to technicians
This year, 2014 CTA is celebrating its 50th anniversary. CTA kicked off the celebration at the Spring
Meeting by sponsoring a 50th Anniversary BBQ at Gilley’s Dallas. CTA also sponsored the National
Chemical Technician Awards banquet on Sunday, March 16, 2014. The winner of this year’s award was
Diana Deese, an R&D Reliability/Analytical Technician for Kelly Services assigned to The Dow
Chemical Company. Ms. Deese is the 26th recipient of this annual award, which is presented in
recognition of outstanding technical and communication skills, safety, reliability, leadership, teamwork,
publications, and presentations.
CTA is now accepting nominations for the 2015 National Chemical Technician Award. Nomination
packets for 2015 nominees are due by September 30, 2014. For more information about the NCTA visit
www.acs.org/ncta.
CTA’s is proud to sponsor a new ChemLuminary Award for the Best Activity for the Applied Chemical
Technology Professional Community. The award will recognize an event that was held in 2013 and will
be presented for the first time at the 2014 Fall National Meeting in San Francisco.
Susan Marine, Chair
Kara Allen
Michelle Coffman
Ruth Hathaway
Rabin Lai
Shunta Land
Elmer Ledesma
Donna Neal
Richard Partch
Susan Perz
Allen Pinchard
Associates
Kathy Collins
Greglynn Gibbs
Eugenia Narh
Consultants
Kenneth Chapman
Kirk Hunter
Staff Liaison: Victoria Fuentes
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David Singleton
Janet Smith
Mark Thomson
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Other Committee Reports
Q. Women Chemists
(joint with Board)
The Committee on Women Chemists (WCC), in collaboration with Springer, has published the book,
“Mom the Chemistry Professor.” It is a collection of personal accounts and advice from chemistry
professors who are mothers and is due out at the end of June. In San Francisco, on Monday, August 11,
the WCC has organized an all-day symposium focusing on this topic. It will open with a presentation
given by Mary Ann Mason (University of California, Berkeley) who is an expert on the topic of balancing
motherhood and an academic career and will kick off the full day of presentations given by the authors of
the chapters in the book. Following the symposium, the WCC will host a reception to celebrate the
collaboration at “Just Cocktails,” our informal networking event allowing mid-career chemists the
opportunity to interact, inspire and bond.
The WCC will celebrate the career of ACS Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, Madeleine
Jacobs at the WCC Luncheon on Tuesday, August 12th. A panel of ACS members and employees will
contribute to a discussion of the importance of mentoring, entitled “Mentoring and Paying it Forward.”
Additionally, the WCC will recognize the recipient of the 2014 Fall Overcoming Challenges Award at the
WCC Luncheon and recipients of the 2014 Fall WCC/Eli Lilly Travel Award during the poster session
prior to the WCC Luncheon.
Also on Tuesday, August 12th, the WCC is honored to be involved in and to sponsor the all-day
symposium, “Women Leaders of the Global Chemistry Enterprise.” This symposium was inspired by the
immediate past president, Marinda Wu in response to her worldwide travels and numerous different
interactions as ACS President. She organized this collection of presentations, highlighting 16
international women leaders. One leader includes Madeleine Jacobs, she will present “10 Lessons from a
Lifetime of Science,” following the WCC Luncheon. This symposium promises to be informative and
insightful.
Looking to the future the WCC has established an Awards Task Force that is focusing its energy on
increasing the number of women nominated and eventually awarded ACS National Awards. The WCC
Women in the Chemical Enterprise Breakfast in San Francisco will be the first of many WCC programs
centered on this effort. At the breakfast, each table will be devoted to a specific ACS Award and the
discussion at that table will involve the criteria, the nomination process and success stories for that
specific award. We look forward to this opportunity to provide women with information about the award
process and the nomination process, in an effort to increase the number of women award winners. Look
for more programing like this in the future.
Amber Charlebois, Chair
Amber F. Charlebois
Samina Azad
Novella N. Bridges
Christine S. Chow
Amy C. DeBaillie
Kelly M. George
Lisa Houston
Ellen A. Keiter
Maureen A. Kane
Judith M. Iriarte-Gross
Amy Nicely
John G. Palmer
Bevin W. Parks
Laura S. Sremaniak
Gail H. Webster
Amy Balija
Renee S. Cole
Judith C. Giordan
Lisa K. Kemp
Angele Kwimi
Associates
Alice Lurain
Dawn A. Shaughnessy
Misty D. Rowe
Michelle M. Rogers
Nonye Onyewuenyi
Nahid Mohajeri
Cecilia H. Marzabadi
Mary Jane Shultz
Kimberly A. Woznack
Consultant
Teri L. Quinn Gray
Staff Liaison: Brittny Johnson
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Other Committee Reports
R. Younger Chemists
(joint with Board)
The Younger Chemists Committee (YCC) met in Dallas, TX on March 15-16, 2014. YCC continues to
promote its vision to lead younger chemists into successful careers and active roles in ACS and the profession.
This was also the first meeting with the succession of the new YCC Chair, Douglas Hausner, and several new
associates to the YCC. Several CIBA/YCC Young Scientist Travel Award winners were also able to join the
YCC meeting and we look forward to seeing the set of winners in San Francisco.
The YCC has been rapidly expanding the Webinar-in-a-Box as prepared and pre-planned events for local
section engagement. The most recent event was “Love Potion #9: The Chemistry of Scent & Fragrance”, with
the next event taking place on October 7, “Speaking Simply: Communicating Your Science”. Each of these
events are highly-attended by thousands of ACS members and are individually hosted by local sections and
student chapters across the country. The Webinars are further enhanced and expanded by integrating live
Twitter feeds and the occasional Storify site. Please contact your local section chair to find out more about
hosting a Webinar-in-a-Box program.
Partnerships are a vital part of the YCC’s mission, and as such, we continue to strengthen our liaisonship
program, placing YCC members in other committees and divisions as well as welcoming those groups into
YCC meetings. Please let us know if you have a program or idea where the YCC can help! At the San Francisco
meeting, we will deploy an information submission form to streamline media proposals for posting on the YCC
social networks. More information will be available soon. The YCC is always looking for new ways to get
younger chemists involved in ACS. At the 248th ACS National Meeting in San Francisco, CA, we will host our
10th Annual Fun Run, along with ACS Member Insurance on Monday, August 11th at 7:00 am.
We invite you to visit the YCC website (http://ycc.sites.acs.org/), which has been updated with new content and
features, focusing on relevant award and career information. We have also extended our online presence to
many social networks such as the ACS Network, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter (@ycc_acs), to engage more
young chemists. Join us!
Chair, Douglas B. Hausner
Neal Abrams
Juan C. Aponte-Santini
Ashley M. Blystone
Jens Breffke
Jakoah R. Brgoch
Stephen M. Canham
William S. Case
Dionne C. Dickson
Elise B. Fox
Alexander V. Gavrilenko
Wasiu A. Lawal
Kathryn E. Leach
Taina D. Matos
Christine McInnis
Lisa J. Nogaj
Joelle M. Wells
Uzma I. Zakai
Associates
Jenifer C. Braley
Christine E. Dunne
Navneet Goyal
Jasmine N. Hunt
Jeff Klenc
Chanda C. Klinker
Natalie A. LaFranzo
Evijola Llabani
Consultant
Peter K. Dorhout
Staff Liaison Audley Burke
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Kristin M. Nuzzio
Marisa B. Sanders
Artrease Spann