safe to serve - The Salvation Army

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safe to serve - The Salvation Army
SAFE TO SERVE
Safety and Care Guidelines
for Salvation Army Children and Youth Work
in New Zealand
Prepared by the Territorial Children’s and Youth Departments
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
www.salvationarmy.org.nz
How to Use This Manual
This manual can be used in a number of ways:
» Familiarity with the contents will help gain a broad understanding of safety and care
in Salvation Army programmes/events
» Serves as a reference to check against when confronted by particular issues
» Provides various checklists to use in preparing programmes/events
» Forms can be photocopied and used as required or can be adapted to suit
circumstances and need
It is acknowledged that the Safe to Serve manual is a living document and will be
reviewed and updated periodically.
Availability
Copies of the Safe to Serve manual are available from Divisional Children’s and Youth
Departments, DHQ.
Copies are also available from the Territorial Children’s and Youth Departments, THQ.
This manual can be downloaded from:
Territorial intranet (www.intranet.sarmy.net.nz)
Firezone (www.firezone.co.nz)
Please contact your Corps Officer/Centre Manager to access the intranet.
Online Safety Management System
An online system based on this manual is being designed and developed and will be
accessible by 2011.
SAFE TO SERVE > The Salvation Army > i
Definitions
Terms used repeatedly in this manual:
Children’s/Youth Worker
Person who is 18 years
old or over and has
overall responsibility
for the children/youth
and the programme/
event and is accountable
to The Salvation Army.
Children’s/youth workers
have overall responsibility
for any children’s/youth
leaders and helpers in a
programme/event. Can
be paid or a volunteer.
Must be accredited or
in the process of being
accredited.
Children’s/Youth Leader
Person who is 16 years
old or over and has
responsibility for children/
youth in a programme/
event and is accountable
to the children’s/youth
worker. Could be paid
or a volunteer. Must
be accredited or in
the process of being
accredited.
Helper
Person 14 years old or
over who assists in a
programme/event and
is accountable to the
children’s/youth worker.
Regular helpers must be
accredited.
Child/Children
Person aged 0 to Year Eight
at school.
Youth
Person in Year Nine up to
18 years of age.
Programme
Planned, coordinated
group of activities,
procedures, games, etc.,
having a specific purpose,
under the leadership of a
children’s/youth worker,
often at a certain place
during a particular period.
Event
A happening or an
organised occasion,
under the leadership of a
children’s/youth worker,
often at a different place
to the programme. Can be
a one-off occurence (e.g.
Easter camp).
SAFE TO SERVE > The Salvation Army > ii
Acronyms used
frequently in this manual:
TYS
Territorial Youth Secretary
TCS
Territorial Children's
Secretary
DYS
Divisional Youth Secretary
DCMD
Divisional Children’s
Mission Director
DCS
Divisional Children’s
Secretary
DC
Divisional Commander
THQ
Territorial Headquarters
DHQ
Divisional Headquarters
OSH
Occupational Safety and
Health Service
CYF
Child, Youth and Family
Introduction
This manual is for everyone involved in children’s/youth work within The Salvation Army.
It describes a standard of safety that everyone involved agrees to uphold. The main
focus of the manual is to keep children/youth taking part in activities safe from harm. It
is also concerned with the safety of children’s/youth workers and leaders, and the safety
of others who are part of the team.
To be involved in children’s/youth work within The Salvation Army, safe practices must
be followed. The guidelines and procedures in the Safe to Serve manual serve as a vital
tool and guide for education, training, screening and accountability and to bring about
the awareness of safe practices so that they can be considered and followed. Hence, it is
important that this manual be read and understood.
It is essential that the children/youth encountered in children’s/youth work within The
Salvation Army must be cared for. That care is not just helping them discover Jesus
and their place in God’s world, significant as this is, it also pertains to their safety and
wellbeing.
Safety needs to be anticipatory and proactive. It requires thinking ahead and reflecting
on responsibility. By analysing situations and preparing ahead, participants will
experience the best The Salvation Army can offer.
The Salvation Army recognises the value of children/youth as developing, dependant
people with hopes, fears and rights, and is interested in the whole person, not just in
their spiritual development. Its three-point mission statement gives the ‘big picture’ to
many aspects of children’s/youth work with The Salvation Army.
All that is said in this manual presumes that children’s/youth workers, leaders and
helpers have committed themselves to The Salvation Army’s Mission Statement.
Short Mission Statement of The Salvation Army in New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga
Our mission is to care for people, transform lives and reform society through God in
Christ by the Holy Spirit’s power.
Full Mission Statement of The Salvation Army in New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga
The Salvation Army is an international movement and an evangelical branch of the
Christian Church, which expresses its ministry through a balance of spiritual and social
programmes. In its founding it was mobilised by God, and in its continuance is totally
dependent on Him for the power to fulfil its calling. Everything it does is as an offering to
the glory of God and for the worship and adoration of His Name.
The Mission of The Salvation Army is:
» Caring for people: Salvationists follow the example of Jesus by identifying with the
needy, standing alongside them and caring for people in all situations.
» Transforming lives: Salvationists believe that God can transform people and that the
resulting wholeness is experienced through belief in Jesus Christ and by the power of
the Holy Spirit. This transformation is evidenced in discipleship and commitment.
» Reforming society: Salvationists seek to express the love and power of God in the
community. This calls for the challenging of manifestations of evil, injustice and
oppression, and for steps aimed at their elimination.
SAFE TO SERVE > The Salvation Army > iii
A 1
4
B 1
4
C
Guidelines and
Procedures
Forms
Useful Contacts
and Index
2 3
5 6
2 3
5
Sound Practices
Safety
Management
Incident/Accident
Reporting
Protecting
Children/Youth
Accreditation
Salvation Army
Documents
Safety
Management
Incident/Accident
Reporting HSE 5.1
Protecting
Children/Youth
Template
Accreditation
Process
Other Forms
A
B
C
Guidelines and Procedures
1
Sound Practices
1.1 Safety and Wellbeing
1.2 Ministry Time Etiquette
1.3 Guidelines for Publishing Photographic/Film Images and Personal Information
1.4 Guidelines for Appropriate Use of Social Networking Tools
1.5 Guidelines for Appropriate Use of Emails and Mobile Phones
1.6 First Aid and hygiene
2 Safety Management
2.1 Safety Guidelines
2.2 Effective Risk Management
Hazard Risk Assessment Matrix
3 Incident/Accident Reporting
3.1 Definitions
3.2 Emergency Considerations
3.3 Incident/Accident Management
3.4 Incident/Accident Reporting Process
4 Protecting Children/Youth
4.1 Risk Factors
4.2 Types and Indicators of Abuse
4.3 Responding to Suspicions/Allegations of Emotional, Physical or Sexual Abuse
4.4 Procedure for Reporting Suspicion/Allegation of Child/Youth Abuse
4.5 The Salvation Army Sexual Misconduct Policy
5 Accreditation
5.1 Requirements for Accreditation
5.2 Volunteer Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders
5.3 Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders
5.4 Police Checks
6 Salvation Army Documents
6.1 The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy and Statement
6.2 The Salvation Army’s Policy on the Treaty of Waitangi
6.3 The Salvation Army Doctrines
6.4 The Salvation Army’s Sexual Misconduct Policies and Complaints Procedure
1
6
6
9
10
11
19
28
32
35
35
36
38
41
42
45
47
48
51
51
53
54
59
60
61
61
Forms
Safety Management
Programme/Event Overview Form
Team Members Information Form
Travel Plan Form
Individual Record and Consent Form
Safety Guidelines Checklists: PEOPLE, VENUE, SLEEPOVER/NIGHT ACTIVITIES, EQUIPMENT,
FOOD, TRANSPORT, WATER ACTIVITIES
Risk Assessment Management (RAM) Form
Risk Assessment Management (RAM) Form: EXAMPLE
Hazard Risk Assessment Matrix
2 Incident/Accident Reporting HSE 5.1
3 Protecting Children/Youth Template
CYF Report of Concern Template
4 Accreditation Process
Volunteer Details and Agreement Form
Police Check Form
Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers and Leaders
Under 25 Years Driver’s Form
5 Other Forms
Publicity Release Agreements
65
Useful Contacts and Index
131
136
1
Endnotes
91
93
99
111
125
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Safety and Wellbeing
The Salvation Army is committed to the safety and wellbeing of all children/youth
involved in its programmes/events and will act to ensure a safe environment is
maintained at all times. The Salvation Army also supports the safety and wellbeing
of its children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers and encourages their active
participation in building and maintaining a secure environment for all participants.
Behaviour and Language
» Behaviour, attitudes and language of children’s/youth workers or leaders, helpers are
just as important as the input during any children’s/youth programme/event.
» Language and ways of relating that affirm worth, dignity and significance in what is
said and how it is said must be used.
» Behaviour that gives the impression of favouritism or encourages ‘special’
relationships must be avoided.
» Inappropriate gifts that are suggestive of a romantic nature must not be given.
» Correspondence (email, text messaging or social networking) that is suggestive of a
romantic nature must be avoided.
» Do not use negative nicknames, ‘put downs’ or sexist language with other members
of the team or with participants.
» Do not be alone with a child/youth, and remain visible to other children’s/youth
workers or leaders at all times.
Physical Contact
» As a general rule, open displays of affection initiated by children/youth in the
presence of others are acceptable. However, always remain visible to other children’s
/youth workers or leaders and never be alone in a car or other private place.
» Any physical activity that is or may be thought of as sexually stimulating to the child/
youth is inappropriate and must be avoided. Children/youth may not be aware of
creating such situations, but it is the responsibility of the children’s/youth worker or
leader to be alert to such circumstances and follow the guidelines below:
1. Avoid 2. Stop 3. Tell someone 4. Report situation to next level of authority
» The child/youth attending the programme/event may have been taught boundaries
that are unacceptable. For their safety and the children’s/youth worker, leader or
helper’s protection, there are guidelines to abide by. Special circumstances are when
child/youth need medical attention or when they are in immediate physical danger
where the children’s/youth worker must make the decision.
» It is inappropriate for a children’s/youth worker or leader to pursue a romantic
relationship with a participant during the time they are working together. The power
imbalance between those in leadership/oversight of the children’s/youth ministry
and participants means that such relationships are always wrong. Children’s/youth
workers or leaders have a personal responsibility to process and seek consultation
on relationship issues with their next level of authority or support networks, including
supervision.
» If fellow children’s/youth workers or leaders are in a romantic relationship, the focus
must be on the children/youth and public displays of affection must be kept under
control.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.1 > The Salvation Army > 1
Appropriate and inappropriate physical contact
Children
Appropriate physical contact includes:
» Bending down to the child’s level and
listening attentively
Inappropriate physical contact includes,
but is not limited to, the following:
» Gaining permission before hugging
a child and respecting their right to
refuse
» Forcing affection upon a reluctant child
» Taking a child’s hand and leading them
to an activity
» Extended hugging or tickling
» Comforting a child or young person by
placing an arm around their shoulder
and giving a gentle squeeze from the
side
» Praising or welcoming a child by
holding their hands briefly
» Kissing or coaxing a child to kiss you
» Touching any area of the body normally
covered by a swimming costume
» Carrying older children, sitting them
on your lap, or having them rub up
next to you
» Patting a child on the head (culturally
inappropriate)
» Briefly patting a child on the hand,
back or shoulders in affirmation
» Holding a pre-school child who is
crying, provided they want to be held
Youth
Appropriate physical contact includes:
» A brief modest side hug, initiated by
the youth in a public place, as a form
of greeting
Inappropriate physical contact includes,
but is not limited to, the following:
» Forcing affection upon a reluctant
youth
» Handshakes, high fives
» Kissing or coaxing a youth to kiss you
» Normal playful behaviour, which is a
typical aspect of structured sports or
informal sporting activities. Be alert to
the risks involved in contact sports
» Extended hugging or tickling
» Touching any area of the body normally
covered by a swimming costume
» Use of any physical contact that may
be interpreted as sexual advancement
(e.g. intimate touching, fondling of any
sort, massages, etc.)
» Patting a youth on the head (culturally
inappropriate)
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.1 > The Salvation Army > 2
A Guide to Discipline
On no account must any form of physical punishment (e.g. smacking) be
administered, even in fun. The only form of appropriate physical restraint is to
protect children/youth from harm (e.g. reasonable restraint to stop a fight or to
avoid an accident).
The way programmes/events and activities are approached can make a world of
difference in the amount and kind of discipline that needs to be applied. Programmes/
events and activities must be planned and prepared, as well as discussed with others
on the team, so that preventative measures can be taken in terms of behaviour
management to provide a safe, comfortable, fair place where children/youth can grow
and develop holistically.
Shaping behaviour
» Create a loving, caring atmosphere
» Involve youth and children in making the group’s rules
» Focus on positive actions
» Provide meaningful and age-appropriate activities
» Be fair and consistent
» Establish and communicate realistic expectations and boundaries
» Grant respect to gain respect
Managing inappropriate behaviour
» Be aware of the effects of bullying on children/youth and implement strategies
(e.g. supervision, increasing ratios, enforcing rules) to prevent it happening.
» Use various signals to help children/youth stay active on their task (e.g. verbal
instructions, a look, a gentle touch on the shoulder, and so on).
» Redirect aggressive behaviour in children/youth (e.g. removing from situation,
providing alternative activity).
» Correct inappropriate behaviour in a conversation with the child/youth while letting
the child/youth know you care about them.
» For the duration of the activity safely mind objects that become a distraction
(e.g. favourite toys and mobile phones).
Types of Families and Caregivers
» Respect each unique family structure—whether traditional, sole parent or blended
—for the family has the greatest influence on a child’s/youth’s life.
» Be sensitive to using words that make assumptions about any participant’s
background, family status or principal caregivers such as parents or guardians.
» Respect religious beliefs and cultures that are different than yours.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.1 > The Salvation Army > 3
Activities
» Programme/events that include activities or games that require children/youth to act
alone or in pairs, independent of children’s/youth workers or leaders, need to be very
carefully considered. If, during an activity, it is possible for children/youth to come
into contact with strangers, then great care must be exercised. If in doubt, cancel the
activity.
» Any activity needs to have defined boundaries that are easily observed or patrolled.
Avoid situations where it is possible for the children/youth to become physically
isolated. Any games that are played outdoors and over a wide area need extra
planning.
» Activities or games must not exploit gender, physical or intellectual differences. Think
about the message that children/youth may learn from the way the game or activity is
organised and conducted.
» Review visual and audio materials such as videos, DVDs, computer games, lyrics, and
so on to ensure that any elements containing violence, sexual activity or negative
lifestyles are appropriate for the intended audience. Take into account the age of the
youngest person present when reviewing film classifications.
» Children/youth with special needs: Extra care must be taken with children/youth
with known disabilities, special medication needs or behavioral issues. The number
and kinds of children/youth with special needs that can be safely involved in activities
must be considered. Seek training in basic skills for including these children/youth by
asking for guidance and advice from experts.
Before and After Care
» Programmes/events need to start and finish promptly, at the advertised time.
» Ensure care in dismissing or handing over children/youth. Responsibility for younger
children especially must not be passed to adults who are not known to the children’s/
youth worker or leader or the child/youth.
» Written consent from parents/guardians for any alternative pick-up arrangements
must be obtained.
» Some programmes/events with very young children may need to implement a ‘signing
in/signing off’ procedure. Make sure an appropriate adult is in charge of
this process.
Involvement of Helpers from the Local Community
» Children’s/youth workers and leaders welcome help from other adults in
running activities.
» Regular helpers must be accredited or in the process of being accredited.2
» Casual helpers must not be put in a position of having sole responsibility for children/
youth other than their own.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.1 > The Salvation Army > 4
Recreational Drugs
Substance abuse is harmful to children/youth. The Salvation Army holds a firm position3
against the possession and use of alcohol and prohibited drugs. These substances will
not be tolerated at any Salvation Army premises or during any Salvation Army activity.
While the use of tobacco may be legal, it is advised that children’s/youth workers and
leaders provide an example by complete abstention. Those who are 18 years of age
and over who might use tobacco should do so in a discrete manner when minors are
not present or not likely to be unexpectedly present. The Salvation Army supports the
provision of smoke-free environments.4 Designated areas could be set aside for those
using tobacco.
Privacy and Confidentiality
» Care must be exercised to protect children’s/youth rights to privacy. While some
personal information about children/youth in activities is essential, this must be
treated as private and confidential and only used for the main purpose stated on the
relevant form. Refer to The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy 5 in this manual.
» It is the children/youth worker’s responsibility to maintain confidentiality on issues
the child/youth (e.g. learning difficulty) or family (e.g. marriage breakdown) is
experiencing. Exceptions: if required by legislation or the courts. Criminal activity,
such as child/youth abuse, the desire or act of harming others, and suicidal intention
must be reported to the children’s/youth worker or next level of authority (e.g. Corps
Officer/Centre Manager). An appropriate agency may need to be contacted.
For more information on guiding children’s/youth behaviour:
» PlunketLine
0800 933 922
» Parent Help
0800 472 7368
Parenting counselling service run by
Barnardos
» Barnados
www.barnardos.org.nz
Publish a fact sheet on what the child
discipline law means for families
produced by EPOCH and Barnardos
» Parent Centres NZ Inc.
www.parentscentre.org.nz
» Office of the Children’s Commissioner
www.occ.org.nz
Booklets that can be downloaded:
Choose to Hug, Children are Unbeatable
» Youthline
0800 376 633
» Relationship Services
0800 RELATE (0800 735 283)
» 0800 WHATSUP
Helpline just for kids and teens
» Child, Youth and Family
0508 FAMILY (0508 326 459)
» Ministry of Social Development
www.familyservices.govt.nz/info-forfamilies/skip
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.1 > The Salvation Army > 5
6
Ministry Time Etique#e
Sensitivity and common sense are the keys to proper prayer etiquette. Prayers are
prayed ‘in the Spirit’, but people live in a physical world and rules of behaviour need
to be observed when relating to people and their prayer needs. Some issues to be
considered during ministry time:
» Hygiene: In prayer, people operate in close quarters and need to be sure that they
are not a distraction or offense to people they are trying to minister to. Clean bodies,
clean clothes, fresh breath is a must (carry breath mints). Don’t invade people’s
personal space; watch body language, such as if people back away.
» Modesty: Think about the clothes worn in ministry situations. Be properly covered
and dress appropriately when ministering—clothing should not be a distraction. In
cases where people are laying or resting in the Spirit, care should be taken to see that
they are covered (e.g. women with skirts).
» Gender issues: It is highly recommended to pray for a person of the same gender.
Where this is not practical or possible, be visible to others and maintain a proper
distance. Do not draw the person of the opposite gender to a private place outside
the scrutiny of others. It is recommended that a prayer team consist of both genders.
» Touch/laying hands on head or shoulder: Permission needs to be obtained from the
person if they are okay with this. No rubbing or massaging; a gentle touch on the
forehead or shoulder is enough to connect. Respect people’s privacy.
» Confidentiality: If learning things about a person during the ministry time that could
be embarrassing for them if known in a wider circle, such information must be kept
confidential. Exceptions: if required by legislation or the courts. Criminal activity,
such as child/youth abuse, the desire or act of harming others, and suicidal intention
must be reported to the children’s/youth worker or next level of authority (e.g. Corps
Officer/Centre Manager). An appropriate agency may need to be contacted.
7
Guidelines for Publishing Photographic/Film Images
and Personal Information of Children/Youth
The Salvation Army has a duty of care for its children/youth and will ensure their
protection by exercising diligence and discretion in the selection, editing and
publishing of their photographic/film images and personal information.
The terms ‘publish’ or ‘publishing’ cover all Salvation Army public publishing spaces:
» websites
» social networking sites
» Microsoft PowerPoint (or similar)
» corps/centre noticeboards
» printed publications (including magazines, posters, and brochures)
» film footage
This protection extends to all children/youth connected with any programmes and
activities run by The Salvation Army, including clients or the children of clients of
Salvation Army social services and children of The Salvation Army Child Sponsorship
Programme (also known as Cherish a Child).
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.2 > The Salvation Army > 6
Risks
The use of photographs, film footage and information on websites and other publishing
spaces can pose risks to children and youth, who are vulnerable to:
» ‘grooming’ by sexual predators that might use published information to identify and
contact them in person
» misappropriation/distortion of images to create suggestive or pornographic material
» bullying by reference to (or adaptation of) an image/film or published information in a
way that might lower self esteem and lead to stress and anxiety
Even when the personal identity (full name and address) of a child/youth is not
published, other details—such as specifics relating to his or her location and personal
interests—can make them identifiable and thereby vulnerable to predatory individuals
looking to ‘groom’ someone for abuse.
There is also the risk that a photo/film can be taken from a website without permission
and subsequently used inappropriately and exploitatively by others.
Published photos/film and personal info can potentially be used for purposes of bullying.
Minimise Risks
When assessing risk, the most important factor is the potential for inappropriate use
of the images or personal information. To ensure that children/youth are not exploited
and that risks posed to them are minimised, the following must be observed:
» NEVER include the full name of a child/youth along with their image:
› If a photo/film is used online, avoid naming the child/youth (a caption such as
‘children enjoyed a Salvation Army camp’ is appropriate; ‘Sarah Smith from
Corps X enjoyed the Salvation Army camp’ is not appropriate)
» LIMIT the amount of personal information that accompanies a photo/film. This
includes any caption, information in an accompanying articles, recorded sound on
film, and subsequent voiceover material:
› never include email or phone contact information
› avoid information that would enable potential predators to learn more about a
child/youth with a view to ‘grooming’ them as targets for abuse; e.g. ‘Tony likes
to play rugby and is in Year 3 at X Primary School’
› for child sponsorship profiles, the name of a child, their country of origin and
minimal information about interests are all that may be published; e.g. ‘Layla
from Tanzania enjoys playing sports and going to school. She is the youngest in
a large family. Her parents are subsistence farmers who struggle to meet Layla’s
schooling needs’
» ONLY use images of children/youth in suitable clothing. Images involving such
activities as swimming, athletics and ‘sleepovers’ present a higher risk of
inappropriate use. Photographs of these activities should:
› focus on the activity (an entire group playing sports), rather than one person
› show people who are swimming either fully in water or from the shoulders up
› not include images of individuals in night attire
» CROP images to exclude sensitive areas of a photograph:
› for example, an image of a group can sometimes be cropped to avoid showing
someone who is dressed inappropriately or suggestively
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.3 > The Salvation Army > 7
» ONLY feature children/youth using appropriate safety equipment for any activity.
» EXERCISE CAUTION when publishing photos/film of children/youth sitting on adults’
knees, being cuddled by adults, or engaging in potentially-unsafe behaviour with an
adult (such as being carried on an adult’s shoulders).
› these behaviours may be counter to Salvation Army safety guidelines
› consider the context of the activity; a child sitting on their own parent’s/
guardian’s knee would be entirely appropriate, for instance
» EXERCISE CAUTION when publishing photos/film of children/youth engaged in
innocent behaviour that might be misconstrued or used inappropriately (such as a
‘group hug’)
» CONSIDER using photo-released stock photos using models, or illustrations, rather
than an image of an identifiable Salvation Army child/youth
Photography
When securing photography of a Salvation Army activity (including for promotional
purposes):
» provide a clear brief to the photographer about what The Salvation Army considers
appropriate content and behaviour in its photography of children/youth
» do not allow the photographer unsupervised access to children/youth—a leader or
other supervising adult must remain present at all times
» do not allow one-to-one photography sessions
» if parents/guardians or other spectators intend to photograph or film an activity, they
should also be made aware of what is acceptable and what is not
Parental/Guardian Permission
Permission from parents/guardians must be given before publishing the image of a
child/youth. Encourage them to discuss this so that the child/youth can give their own
consent:
» permission can be given though use of a Parental Consent form:
› this may be included as part of a registration form (such as a camp or concert)
› The Salvation Army Publicity Event Agreement form can also be used
› the Individual Record and Consent form in the Safe to Serve manual (Territorial
Youth and Children’s Department) can also be used
» completed forms should be filed and stored as per The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy
» if permission is revoked at any time then the image should no longer be used
NOTE: Salvation Army Early Childhood Education Centres have their own policies around
parental permission for children to be photographed.
Parental Concerns
Encourage parents/guardians to report any concerns regarding inappropriate or intrusive
photography to the Salvation Army organiser/leader. Such concerns should be followed
up on promptly, with findings reported to those who raised the concerns and others as
required.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.3 > The Salvation Army > 8
Statement on Children/Youth Protection
The following Children/Youth Protection Privacy Statement can be used online or in print
to indicate the seriousness with which The Salvation Army takes its responsibilities:
The Salvation Army protects the privacy of our young people by limiting the amount
of personal information we publish about them. We have a clearance process for
the use of photography/film footage, and only use images where we have relevant
permission.
Refer to the following forms located in the Other Forms section:
» Publicity Release Agreement (single-name)
» Publicity Release Agreement (multi-name)
Guidelines for Appropriate Use
of Social Networking Tools
Globalisation, new technologies (e.g. cell phones and the internet) and associated
social change are rapidly changing the world in which children/youth live. Social
‘participation’ gives children/youth a sense of belonging and of contributing to
decisions that affect them.
These guidelines8 are specifically designed for children’s/youth workers and leaders
who use social networking websites either in a personal or professional capacity. Some
common networking websites are Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, Linkedin, Hi5, Bebo,
Flickr, MeetUp, YouTube etc.) The aim of these guidelines is to ensure good practice and
safe use of social networking tools particularly the appropriate interaction between a
children’s/youth worker or leader and child/youth when using these tools or sites for the
safety of the child/youth, the children’s/youth worker or leader and the corps/centre.
» The recommended age for signing up for most social networking sites (Windows Live
Spaces, MySpace, Facebook) is usually 13 years and over. If children/youth are under
the recommended age for these sites, they must not be allowed to use them.
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders must not post any content on their personal
or work profiles that would be inappropriate for children/youth to know or see. The
privacy setting of the site must be set to ensure this content is not accessible to
children/youth.
» Where a profile is being used to contact youth known to a children’s/youth worker or
leader, the message box on the profile can be regularly checked by the next level of
authority (e.g. Corps Officer/Centre Manager) to ensure safe practice.
» Where a profile or group may receive friend/membership requests from individuals
not already known to the children’s/youth worker or leader, the profiles of the
individuals making the request must be checked by the children’s/youth worker
before they are accepted.
» Groups or profiles must include a clear message stating who the profile owner is,
their affiliation, how to confirm their identity, and who to contact in the case of any
concerns about their conduct.
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders must make sure youth are aware that adding
them as a friend makes information on the youth’s profile accessible to the children’s/
youth workers or leaders.
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders must actively check any discussions they host,
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.4 > The Salvation Army > 9
and must make sure these online spaces are kept free from bullying and any other
inappropriate use.
» If a children’s/youth worker or leader is concerned about the content of a youth’s profile
(e.g. unsuitable profile picture or other images), it is recommended that they contact
the youth in a manner that is polite and private, yet in the sight of others. Discussing
such instances as they arise on a case-by-case basis with the next level of authority
(e.g. Corps Officer/Centre Manager) is recommended. The reporting/complaints
mechanism of the site in question may be needed to be used in some cases.
» Children’s/youth workers or leader must report any concerns about youth’s safety
to the next level of authority (e.g. Corps Officer/Centre Manager) and follow the
guidelines mentioned 9 for responding to suspicion or allegation of emotional or
physical abuse in this manual.
Guidelines for Appropriate Use
of Emails and Mobile Phones
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders must be cautious about comments placed in
emails, particularly judgements or evaluations about children’s/youth character or
competency—such comments may be used as legal evidence.
» Sending illegal, harassing, obscene and/or other threatening messages is prohibited.
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders using mobile phones and email to contact
children/youth must not give out the child’s/youth’s personal/private number/s or
email addresses to other persons for any reason.
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders need to maintain professional boundaries when
using these means of communication. It is recommended that group text/email may
be used (having received permission from parents/guardians). Group emails should
also give individuals the opportunity to have their contact details removed from
the list by including a statement (e.g. If you wish to be removed from this email list,
please contact … ).
» Anything that compromises the children’s/youth worker or leader’s ability to maintain
a safe environment and give their full attention to the supervision of children/youth is
discouraged. Unless absolutely necessary, making/taking phone calls or sending and
receiving texts during a programme/event is discouraged for these reasons.
» The use of mobile phones for photography and video is subject to The Salvation Army’s
policies/guidelines and The Salvation Army’s Code of Conduct for Publishing (Children/
Youth) (available from THQ10), which protect the children/youth, the children’s/youth
worker or leader and The Salvation Army.
» The use of Salvation Army computers and access to Salvation Army emails and
Internet services are subject to The Salvation Army’s Code of Conduct for the use of
Computer Equipment (copy available with corps/centre), where applicable.
For more information on safe and responsible use of Internet:
» NetSafe
0508 NETSAFE (0508 638 723)
www.netsafe.org.nz
(NetSafe is an independent non-profit
organisation that promotes confident,
safe, and responsible use of Cyberspace)
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.5 > The Salvation Army > 10
First Aid and Hygiene
Good health is valued in society and it is important that children’s/youth workers
and leaders role model positive health practices. Such practices include minimising
the risk of infection through appropriate hygiene procedures, taking care when
administering First Aid, and making sure that any food is handled appropriately.
First Aid
» Teams must include someone trained in First Aid. The level of First Aid training team
members should possess must be considered for each programme/event. This will
depend on the nature and location of the programme/event.
» For programmes/events that have activities away from the main site, it is necessary
that somebody on the team hold a current First Aid certificate. If a group subdivides
from the main group (such as on camps, hikes or outings) for a significant length
of time (more than two hours) and distance (more than two km), then it is
recommended that each group should have a separate First Aid kit and someone
trained in basic First Aid.
» Programmes/events must have access to a well-equipped and constantly-maintained
First Aid kit. There are many commercially-available kits on the market. Home-made
kits should conform to New Zealand standards—this can be easily checked with
reputable organisations such as St John Ambulance New Zealand.
» Do not be alone when administering First Aid. Another person must be present.
» The children’s/youth worker needs to be aware of any child’s/youth medical needs
and limitations and plan activities appropriately. The Individual Record and Consent
Form can be referred to as applicable.
» Children/youth workers must notify parents/guardians of any First Aid treatment
administered to a child/youth, apart from minor First Aid.
NOTE: First Aid administered to children/youth must be recorded on the HSE 5.1 Form11
First Aid kits
» Make sure the kit itself is clean
» Do not overstock
» Watch the ‘use by’ date on the contents
» Dressings and bandages should be clean
» Eye drops and ointments must be replaced if they have been opened
NOTE: For mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, mouth pieces, resuscitation bags or
other ventilation devices should be used. (Once only or not re-used until thoroughly
disinfected.) Up-to-date training is essential in this area.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.6 > The Salvation Army > 11
Suggested contents of a basic First Aid kit
Quantity
Description
Use
1
Emergency First Aid Guide
To refer to the best procedures
2
Antiseptic swabs
Aid wound cleaning/dressing
1
Adhesive strips: 25 pack
Cover minor wound
1
Tape: hypoallergenic
Retain dressing
2
Pad combine: 10cm x 20cm
Control bleeding
2
Bandage: 7.5cm crepe
Secure dressing
2
Bandage: 10cm crepe
Secure dressing
2
Bandage: 110 cm triangular
For slings, padding
4
Saline steritube: 30ml
Eye/wound irrigation
1
Box of gloves, disposable, large
Hygiene
1
Instant cold pack
Reduce swelling and pain
2
Emergency shock blanket
Retain warmth
1
Burns sheets, small: 70 x 75cm
Non-stick burns cover
2
Eye pad
Emergency eye cover
2
Universal dressing: 91 x 20cm
Control heavy bleeding
1
Scissors: 12.5cm
Cut clothing/bandages
1
Pocket mask
Aid in performing EAR
1
Resuscitation face shield
Prevent body fluid exchange
1
Wound closure strip: five pack
Secure dressing
Other items to consider
» Air splint
» Icepack
» Insect repellent
» Sunscreen 30+
» Jellybeans (for diabetics)
» Pads and tampons
» Ventolin
» Antihistamines
NOTE: Pain relief described as ‘pharmacy-only medicine’, ‘prescription medicine’ and
‘restricted medicine’ should not be provided in First Aid kits.12
First Aid kit suppliers
First Aid courses and kits
First Aid kits only
» St. John
0800 FIRST AID (0800 347 782)
www.stjohn.org.nz
» Triple One Care
0800 4 TRIPLE 1 (0800 487 475)
www.tripleonecare.co.nz
» Red Cross
0800 RED CROSS (0800 733 276)
www.redcross.org.nz
» ProSafety NZ
0800 111 548
www.firstaidkits.gen.nz
» A1 First Aid Ltd.
09 836 6677
www.a1firstaid.co.nz
» OfficeMax
0800 426 473
www.ordermax.co.nz
» Complete First Aid Supplies
www.firstaidkit.co.nz
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.6 > The Salvation Army > 12
Medications
Definitions
Medication
Substances entering the blood stream
for the alleviation of illness. Medication
does not include substances such as
antihistamines13, which are for treating
external problems. Non-prescription
medication includes minor over-thecounter pain relief medicine (e.g.
paracetamol), antihistamine, etc.
Control
The storage and releasing of medication.
Administering
The process by which the drug enters the body
(oral, injection and inhalation).
Recreational drug
A substance that is administered for
pleasure or desirable effect rather than for
treatment of sickness or illness.
Administration
Prescribed medication:
» If medication is required by participants during the course of the programme/event,
then this medication must be noted on the Individual Record and Consent Form.14
» All medication should be clearly labelled with the child’s/youth name, and handed by
the parents/guardians to the children’s/youth worker and placed in a safe storage area.
» All medicines should be kept out of reach of children/youth at all times.15
» All medicines should preferably be stored in clear plastic zip bags to retain all the
dosage and permission details together.
» A designated member from the leadership team will control and supervise the
administration of prescription medication only if it is noted on Individual Record and
Consent Form.16
» Parents/guardians wanting their child/youth to control and administer prescription
medication must indicate on Individual Record and Consent Form.17
» Medication must be administered as per the directions stated. No more, no less! 18
Non-prescription medication:
» A designated member from the leadership team will control and supervise the
administration of non-prescription medication only if it is noted on Individual Record
and Consent Form.19
» Parents/guardians wanting their child/youth to control and administer nonprescription medication must indicate this on the Individual Record and Consent Form.20
» It is recommended that over-the-counter pain relief medicine 21 (e.g. paracetamol)
must be administered by person who is medically qualified to do so. If impractical
and it is decided to provide pain relief medicine, a designated leader must administer
and monitor the usage to minimise misuse, abuse or accidental over-dosage. Parents/
guardians can also indicate on Individual Record and Consent Form.22 It is advised to
seek medical advice before administering minor pain relief to children under the age
of two.23
» Medication must be administered as per the directions stated. No more, no less! 24
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.6 > The Salvation Army > 13
Basic Hygiene
Thorough hand washing is the best way to interrupt infection transmission.
Proper hand washing means:
» use soap and running water
» rub hands vigorously
» wash all surfaces of the hands
» rinse well
» dry hands as well, with a single use paper towel if possible
Hand washing is necessary before and after:
» direct contact with body fluids
» providing toilet care
» cleaning contaminated or potentially contaminated areas
» preparing food
Healthy, intact skin provides an adequate barrier against infection. Breaks in the skin
should be covered with a waterproof bandage or rubber gloves.
General cleaning
Work and public areas need to be kept clean and safe. Hard surfaces need to be
regularly mopped or wiped down with disinfectant. Gloves should be used when using
bleach to prevent cracking of the skin.
Food preparation
High standards of personal hygiene need to be observed by those involved in the
preparation or serving of food. Disposable gloves should be worn whenever possible.
Care needs to be taken to avoid injury to the hands when preparing food, and any open
wounds need to be securely covered with a waterproof bandage.
All equipment used in food preparation (e.g. utensils, cutlery, crockery, etc.) should be
thoroughly washed after use with hot water and detergent, and hygienically stored.
NOTE: Food handling of any kind must comply with the New Zealand Food Safety
Authority guidelines. 25
Blood and other body fluid precautions
At the core of preventing infectious disease contamination is the principle of treating all
contact with blood spills as potentially deadly. A person may be carrying an infectious
disease without being aware that this is so. Individuals need to be aware that practices
can change over time. It is your responsibility to be satisfied that your own practices are
safe.
Potentially-infected body fluids, in addition to blood, include: semen, vaginal secretions,
menstrual blood, urine, vomit, faeces, pus, breast milk and saliva.
Any part of the body splashed with blood or body fluid should be washed with cold
water as soon as possible.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.6 > The Salvation Army > 14
To clean a blood spill or body fluid spill from any surface: 26
» Restrict access to area
» Wear latex gloves
» If solid material is involved, use towels or toilet paper to remove as much of the
matter as possible
» Cover the area with freshly prepared bleach for 10 minutes (mixed according to the
manufacturer’s instruction, concentration 1/100)
» Wipe with warm water and detergent
» Place gloves and all disposable towels in a plastic bag. It is recommended that two
plastic bags be used. Seal the bags and dispose of it in a regulated manner
» Wash hands thoroughly
NOTE: If latex gloves aren’t available, other methods should be used to prevent direct
contact with blood, e.g. plastic bags that can be used as gloves, paper towels.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 1.6 > The Salvation Army > 15
nt
e
m
e
g
a
n
a
M
Safety
Safety Guidelines
Activity is a vital vehicle in which to engage children/youth. Because this must
remain so, The Salvation Army is committed to incident/accident prevention by
providing safe environments for children’s/youth workers, leaders, helpers and
participants in which to deliver children’s/youth work.
All children’s/youth workers or leader, helpers, Corps Officers, Centre Managers, staff
and volunteers who are leading or organising children’s/youth programmes/events
are required to follow safe practices. The guidelines and procedures in the Safe to
Serve manual serve as a vital tool and guide for education, training, screening and
accountability and to bring about the awareness of safe practices so that they can be
considered and followed.
Completed forms 27 are to be collated and stored (in accordance with The Salvation
Army’s Privacy Policy 28 ). Where there is an incident/accident, the matter must be
reported in a timely and accurate manner.
Some general safety practices are common across most programmes/events. These
practices form the core of a safe approach to running a children’s/youth programme/
event.
If required, Divisional Children’s Mission Director/Secretary or Divisional Youth Secretary
can be contacted for specific guidelines on any programmes/events.
Safety Guidelines: PEOPLE
Children’s/youth workers or leaders
» Follow safe practices as outlined in the Safe to Serve manual and elsewhere as
applicable that might not be mentioned herein
» Employed children’s/youth workers or leaders must receive regular professional
supervision, and accountability is recommended for volunteers
» Proper documentation to be completed as applicable and stored in accordance to
The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy29
» Incidents/accidents must be reported according to procedures outlined30
» Appropriate leader-to-participants ratio and gender mix
» Have access to a phone and preferably be contactable at all times
» Are briefed on:
› Individual child’s/youth health, behaviour, relationship
› What to do in case of incident/accident procedures
› Purpose of activity, rules, safety, time-frames, responsibilities and environment
issues
› The Salvation Army’s Policy and Position Statement 31 on alcohol and substance
abuse
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 19
Participants
» Programme/event must be appropriate for age and stage (e.g. video ratings/content,
activities, games)
» Individual Record and Consent 32 form filled in and stored as per The Salvation Army’s
Privacy Policy 33
» Clothing:
› Appropriate for activity (e.g. tied shoelaces)
› Access to spare necessary clothing: raincoats, sunhats, wool hats, polyprops
» Appropriate sleeping arrangements (boy/girl, couples, children’s/youth workers or
leaders) and supervision for participants; venue considerations (e.g. marae or marae
style: male and female sleeping on separate sides)
» Number of participants to be confirmed before and after activity
» Are briefed on:
› Rules: set, communicate and enforce
› Purpose of programme/event and its activities
› Physical and time boundaries and dangers in environment
› Emergency procedures
› Rules that protect people, physical property and relationships with community
and group (e.g. tell a leader if you need to go anywhere)
› Specific rules about how the game/activity is to run (e.g. fair play)
» The following to be monitored:
› Behaviour, group dynamics, relationships, those with special needs, maintaining
adequate supervision and plans for dealing with these
› Watch for wanderers and outsiders interacting inappropriately with children/
youth
› Watch for fights and apply appropriate intervention, prevention, de-escalation
as required
» Participation
› Programmes/events should be designed so that they allow for maximum
participation
› Avoid coercing participants to be involved in certain types of activities against
their will. In stating this, it is recognised that there are practical limitations on
this requirement
› Voluntary participation (challenge by choice) is particularly applicable in the
case of risk-oriented activities (e.g. abseiling). In these activities, instruction by
qualified people is required regarding safety practices and likely dangers
› Be sensitive to participants who may experience phobias before or during
programme/event
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 20
Parents/guardians (for participants under 18 years)
» Parents/guardians told in writing the following:
› Appropriate contact numbers (e.g. children’s/youth workers and leaders,
venues, emergency)
› Start/finish time of programme/event
› What participant will be doing: programme/event, activities
› What participant will be required to bring (e.g. clothing, rainwear, lunch)
› Any risk factors in taking part in a programme/event and its activities
› Where participants are to meet, be picked up from, dropping home
arrangements
› Sign-in/sign-out procedure for very young children is advised
NOTE: Parents/guardians should fill out and sign a permission form. (Individual Record
and Consent Form34 can be used)
External service providers
» Children’s/youth worker or leaders cannot transfer their duty of caring for children/
youth to any outside service provider (e.g. a bus driver)
» Responsibility can be shared, but not delegated
» It is recommended that children’s/youth worker or leaders check that external service
providers have a standard of safety practice comparable to that of The Salvation
Army
Extra help
» Care must be taken in involving people from outside the team if extra help is required
during activities
» It is a requirement that they are not delegated any significant responsibility and they
are not left alone with any children/youth other than their own
Ratios
» Children’s/youth worker must ensure that all children/youth in a programme/event be
under supervision of designated children’s/youth workers or leaders at all times
» Where activities are part of a residential programme/event (e.g. camps) and are coeducational, female and male children’s/youth workers or leaders must be present
» Children’s/youth worker should decide the size for the group to be safely involved in
any given activity. This decision must take into account the nature of the group and the
type of activity
» Some specific high-risk activities, such as water activities, need more stringent ratios
» Where several groups are involved and it may not be possible to have two children’s/
youth workers or leaders for every group in the room, another children’s/youth worker or
leader must be within seeing or hearing range and the door be left open
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 21
» The ratio of children’s/youth workers or
leaders to participants should never fall
below the following ratios:
› two workers/leaders to six infants
under 12 months old
› two workers/leaders to eight
children under three years old
› three workers/leaders to 20
children aged three to five years
› three workers/leaders to 30
children in school-age groups
› one worker/leader to 10 youth (aged
13 years and over)
NOTE: Co-ed groups need both male and
female children’s/youth workers or leaders
Safety Guidelines: VENUE
» Venue must be suitable for the
programme/event and activities and
adequate
space available
» Venue must be secure
2
to
2
to
3
to
3
to
1
to
workers/
leaders
workers/
leaders
workers/
leaders
workers/
leaders
worker/
leader
6
infants under
12 months
8
children
under 3
20
children aged
3-5 years
30
school-age
children
10
youth (aged
13 years+)
» The area being used must have clear
boundaries
» Advice and information must be sought from relevant authorities (organisers, venue
manager) if applicable
» First Aid equipment and fire extinguishers must be easily accessible and locations
known
» Ensure knowledge of use of fire safety instructions and emergency exits.
NOTE: The New Zealand Fire Service recommend that a fire extinguisher should only
be used when everyone is outside, the Fire Service has been called and person using
it can escape safely
» Participants to be briefed on emergency and evacuation procedures (fire, earthquake)
» Awareness of hazards present (e.g. electrical, broken floorboards, broken windows,
etc.) and risk management
» Outdoors to be clear of hazards (e.g. broken glass, holes, slipperiness, etc.)
» Up-to-date weather forecast obtained and appropriate measures taken in response
to predicted weather
» Possible environmental dangers to be considered and precautions taken
» Possible human dangers to be considered (e.g. interaction with the general public)
» Venue Checklist/s 35 can be used to identify and minimise risks
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 22
Off Site Activities
» Communication made to next level of authority (e.g. Corps Officer/Centre Manager)
regarding:
› How long the group will be gone for
› Who is in charge
› Where the children’s/youth worker or leader will be and how they can be
contacted
› List of children/youth with the children’s/youth worker or leader
Separate Venue Checklist 36 can be used to identify and minimise risks
Safety Guidelines: SLEEPOVER/NIGHT ACTIVITIES
Area
» Area used checked for security if possible, exits guarded (i.e. leaders sleeping close
by doors)
» Check-in point(s) and time(s) made clear to participants
» Adequate lighting, torches, emergency lights available and location known
» Appropriate night wear, mattresses, bedding, pillows
» Appropriate sleeping arrangements (boy/girl, couples, children’s/youth workers or
leaders) and supervision for participants; venue considerations (e.g. marae or marae
style: male and female sleeping on separate sides)
» Safety Guidelines as mentioned in Venue Checklist 36 to be considered
Children’s/youth workers, leaders and participants
» Briefed on emergency and evacuation procedures (fire, earthquake)
» Participants and children’s/youth workers or leaders briefed on times/curfew
standards, rules and making sure that rules are enforced
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders must have awareness of monitoring participant
numbers and behaviour through the night
» Children’s/youth workers or leaders must have awareness of issues regarding
participants (e.g. sleep walking, bed wetting etc.)
» Extra vigilance and increase children’s/youth workers or leaders to participant ratios
if applicable
» It is recommended that children’s/youth workers or leaders do not sleep in the same
room as children/youth. Where this is impractical, ensure that the children’s/youth
worker or leader is never sleeping alone in the same room with a single child/youth.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 23
Safety Guidelines: EQUIPMENT
» Equipment must be in safe working order
» Equipment and the site must be suitable for the programme/event and its activities
» Equipment must be used in the manner for which it was designed
» Participants must be able to use the equipment safely and protective clothing worn
as required
» Certain equipment must be used by persons having the specific skills/training/
knowledge in their use (e.g. some gas, electrical and outdoor equipment)
» Availability of repair kit, if applicable
» Spare equipment available and location known
» Permission to be obtained to use equipment
» Faulty or damaged equipment to be reported to appropriate authority
» Equipment to be left tidy and ready for use
Safety Guidelines: TRANSPORT
Drivers
» Drivers must hold full current licence for vehicles (car/bus) they will be driving.
Drivers holding other licences (e.g. restricted) must not be allowed to drive Salvation
Army vehicles
» A Travel Plan38 can be filled in and stored
» If under 25 years of age, Under 25 Years Driver’s Form39 filled in and authorised
» Driving must be sensible and there must be total adherence to all road rules and laws
» Drivers must not use hand-held mobile phones when driving the vehicle
» Drivers must be well rested: appropriate rest breaks or driver changeovers. It is
suggested that nobody drives for longer than two hours without a rest
» No use of alcohol, drugs or heavy medication by drivers
» Names and licence numbers of drivers to be recorded
Vehicle
» Permission to use vehicle obtained
» Must be registered, road worthy and have current Warrant of Fitness
» Must be covered by third party or comprehensive insurance
» Any accidents or damage to vehicle, parking/speeding infringements to be reported
to the next level of authority (e.g. Corps Officer/Centre Manager)
» Vehicle to be checked for the following before proceeding
› Wheels/tyres (matchhead tread test, air pressure, damages)
› Load must be secure
› Adequate petrol/diesel, oil, fluids, water as necessary
› Non-mechanical (e.g. windscreen, mirrors, seat belts) and mechanical parts
(radiator hose, etc.) if required
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 24
» First Aid kit, torch should be available and its location known
» Vehicle to be left tidy and ready to use
Participants
» Participants to be briefed on vehicle rules (no hanging out of windows, no litter
thrown out, etc.) and arrival procedures
» Number of participants to be confirmed before leaving and upon return
» Seating capacity of the vehicle must not be exceeded
» Passengers must not be towed behind or ride outside a vehicle
» Passengers in vehicle must use seat belts
» Child restraints must be used as applicable
» Passengers must not drive vehicle or change gears
» The ratio of children’s/youth workers or leaders to participants applies in vehicles
(Refer Safety Guidelines: People39)
» Whenever possible children’s/youth workers or leaders should not be alone with a
participant in a vehicle or drive them home unaccompanied. Where unavoidable,
inform another children’s/youth worker or leader of the trip and reason for it. It is
advised that the participant be seated in the back seat.
Safety Guidelines: FOOD 40
Storage
» Food must be stored correctly (e.g. fresh or frozen foods are refrigerated/frozen
at the correct temperature)
» Food given out is safe (e.g. tins are not rusty or badly dented, packages are not
broken)
» Food storage areas are kept clean and free from contamination
» Contents of all tins and packages are correctly labelled
» Bulk food that is repackaged is done hygienically and clearly labelled
» Food items to be used by ‘use by’ date mentioned and discarded after that.
‘Best before’ date food items are still acceptable for consumption but are best
used before that date
» Food being kept hot for a period of time needs to be kept at a temperature of
60°C or hotter
Handling
» Food preparation must be carried out in a clean environment
» Food servers should wear gloves
» Food handlers are required to thoroughly wash their hands, even if they choose to
wear gloves
» Fresh gloves are to be used after handling meat/poultry/fish
» Proper disposal of waste, including leftover food
» No one should work with food if unwell
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 25
Equipment
» Kitchen/BBQ equipment in safe, working condition
» Gas connections checked
» Access limited to heat/knives/food, etc. as applicable
» Emergency equipment for fires, cuts, burns: accessible and location known
Permits
» Council permits to be obtained where applicable
Safety Guidelines: WATER ACTIVITIES 41
Supervision
» It is important to remain vigilant and aware of participants, both in and out of the water
» Proper supervision in and around water means leader keeping children/youth WITHIN
SIGHT and WITHIN REACH, where appropriate, at all times
» Children must not be allowed to play unsupervised with inflatable toys; they are not
lifesaving devices!
Children’s/youth workers or leaders
» Remind participants of the safety rules and see that the rules are enforced
» Familiar with specific location and anticipated conditions
» Designated adult is required to be competent and responsible to administer CPR
» Identify those unable to swim
» Increase children’s/youth worker or leader to participant’s ratios if and where
applicable (Refer Safety Guidelines: People)
» Check that appropriate life-saving equipment is readily available/provided
» Advice and information sought from relevant authorities (e.g. organisers, venue
manager, lifeguards)
Participants
» Never let participants, especially children, swim alone
» Participants briefed on risks, help signal, buddy system (assign buddies) and
swimming in a group
» Participants who will not respond to the best efforts of education and correction
should be immediately referred to the Senior Lifeguard or children’s/youth worker
Natural environment
» Activity areas clearly defined
» Water conditions to be checked (e.g. temperature, current, rip, jet skis, water
vehicles, etc.)
» Check for submerged objects and other hazards (e.g. jellyfish, log, rocks)
» It is recommended that groups swim at beaches that are marked with red and yellow
flags, indicating the safest place to swim on the beach and the area where lifesavers
and lifeguards patrol
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 26
» Rivers, streams and lakes are hazardous places because the power and speed of the
water is often underestimated; care must be taken at all times at these sites
Public swimming pools
» Pools are great; they can be exciting, challenging and heaps of fun but need to be
treated with absolute respect. Pool sides are slippery and depth can often be difficult
to gauge
» Always obey the pool’s safety rules and listen to the instructions of pool lifeguards;
they are there to ensure participants have a good and safe time
» Play it safe. Always walk around the pool and remember to check for others before
entering the water
Fishing
» Never fish alone
» Ensure correctly-fitted life jacket for each person, and communication devices
available (mobile phone, VHF radio, torches, flares)
Boating
» The skipper aboard any boat is in charge
» Ensure necessary equipment for the trip is on board
» Everyone on board should know what safety equipment is carried, where it is stowed
and how it works
» For every person on the boat a life jacket or buoyancy aid that meets NZ standards in
the right size and type must be available
» Get a marine weather forecast before heading out, listen for regular updates while
out and remember to check the tides
» If in doubt, don’t go out
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.1 > The Salvation Army > 27
Effective Risk Management
Effective risk management involves selecting the most appropriate strategy for
either reducing the risk or controlling the perceived risk of any activity.
Definitions
Hazard
Source of danger that could result in an accident if undue care is not exercised.
Risk
Chance that a hazard can cause harm, either physically, psychologically or emotionally.
The chance of something happening that will have an impact on objectives.42
NOTE: A Risk Assessment Management (RAM)43 plan can be produced and implemented
for programmes/events. This process helps in identifying, minimising and managing
perceived risks.
Assessing Risk Factors
The concept of risk has three elements:
1. The perception that something could happen
2. The likelihood of something happening
3. The consequence if something does happen
To identify risks and safety concerns or potential dangers, three main causal factors
need to be considered:
1. People
2. Equipment
3. Environment
1. People
Whether it is taking a group to the beach or on a hike/camp or the under-12s to
McDonald’s for a treat, the principles of assessing the potential risks are the same and
must be discussed with the leadership team.
Use the following questions to help identify safety issues when planning for
programmes/events:
Children’s/youth workers or leaders qualifications, training and experience:
» Have they previously led or accompanied groups of children/youth in the activity?
How often? Where? When? What age groups?
» How much experience do the helpers have?
» Have other groups conducted this activity? Where did they go? How did they organise
it? Did anything go wrong? What advice can they offer?
» Can the children’s/youth workers or leaders identify foreseeable risks?
» Is the activity, such as high-risk activities (e.g. abseiling, whitewater rafting, etc.)
being led by a trained professional instructor?
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.2 > The Salvation Army > 28
Participants requirements and issues:
» Is the programme/event and its activities appropriate to the ages and maturity of the
children/youth?
» Have the children/youth done anything similar before?
» How closely do the children/youth need to be supervised? Will constant supervision
be maintained? If not, can this be justified? How far away will children’s/youth
workers and leaders be?
» How much individual attention do these children/youth need for the programme/
event?
» If a child/youth is in difficulty, can other children/youth immediately stop what they
are doing while children’s/youth workers, leaders or helpers help the child/youth?
» If the children/youth encounter difficulty, has the programme/event been organised in
such a way that children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers can provide immediate
assistance?
» How will the children/youth be organised while participating in the programme/event?
» What is the area/distance over which the children/youth will be spread?
» How familiar are the children/youth with the activity emergency procedures and the
implementation of those the procedures by them?
» What are the preparatory activities that have been undertaken?
» Have the children/youth been assessed for any prerequisite skills (e.g. swimming)?
» What plans have been made to deal with incidents/accidents if they occur and what
risk management plans have been made?
» What will the children/youth gain from participation in the programme/event and its
activities?
» How remote is the programme/event and its activities from sources of assistance
(e.g. hikes/camps)?
» How long would it take to get help after an incident/accident?
» How would help be called?
» Does the children’s/youth worker or leader or a member of the team hold a current
First Aid certificate that is applicable for the environment in which the programme/
event is to take place (e.g. remote access activities)?
» Have other factors been taken into account, like voluntary participation in
programmes/events and phobias?
2. Equipment
» Does the programme/event and its activities require any special equipment?
» Is the equipment appropriate for the ages of the children/youth?
» Does the equipment to be used meet safety standards?
» What can go wrong with the equipment and can this be dealt with?
» Are there any relevant safety checks that can be carried out on the equipment?
Have they been done? Are they current?
» Are there requirements for any protective clothing? (e.g. bike helmets, flotation devices)
» Is training required to use any specialised equipment?
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.2 > The Salvation Army > 29
3. Environment
Sun safety44
Children’s/youth workers or leaders of programmes/events that operate outdoors are
required to consider how they will protect children/youth from the effects of the sun.
Sunburn could lead to melanoma later in life, no matter what skin type. Being sun smart
in New Zealand is crucial as its unique environment (clear skies and closer to the sun in
summer) makes people particularly vulnerable to damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation.
Protection against hazards:
» Drink more fluids (non-alcoholic and not containing large amounts of sugar)
regardless of activity level
» Stay indoors as much as possible or try to rest in shady areas
» Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours
» Wear lightweight, light-coloured, loose-fitting clothing
» Wear wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses and put on sunscreen
» Never leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle
Cold weather safety
Very cold temperatures, like very hot ones, can be a health hazard. Proper dress and
some sensible practices can prevent a lot of the problems associated with cold weather.
In addition, knowing the symptoms of danger and how to treat them can keep problems
that do occur from becoming disasters.
General hazards: A significant cold hazard is hypothermia: exposure to cold
resulting in the body temperature getting dangerously low. The worst case results are
unconsciousness and death. Windy conditions, physical exhaustion and wet clothing
can lead to hypothermia. Symptoms of hypothermia are feeling cold, shivering, pain in
the extremities, stiffness, poor coordination, drowsiness, slow or irregular heartbeat,
slurring speech, cool skin and puffiness of face.
Another common hazard in the cold is frostbite, often affecting the nose, ears, cheeks,
fingers, and toes this can even cause permanent tissue damage and loss of movement.
Symptoms of frostbite are numbness, feeling uncomfortably cold, tingling and even brief
pain. In worst cases, one could become unconscious and stop breathing and even die of
heart failure.
Protection against hazards: The best way to deal with cold problems is to prevent them
in the first place. The most sensible approach is to limit exposure to cold, especially if
it’s windy or damp.
» Don’t bathe just before going out
» Dress for conditions in layers of loose, dry clothes. The most effective mix is
polypropylene or wool underneath, with something waterproof on top
» Get dried or changed immediately if clothes get wet
» Hands, feet, face and head should be covered. A hat is critical because 40 percent
of body heat can be lost if the head isn’t covered
» Keep moving when in the cold
» Take regular breaks in warm areas
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.2 > The Salvation Army > 30
Safety precautions:
» The first thing to do is to get where it’s warm. Get out of any frozen, wet or tight
clothing and into warm clothes or blankets. Drink something warm, decaffeinated
and non-alcoholic.
» For hypothermia, call for medical help (111) and keep the person covered with
blankets or something similar. Don’t use hot baths, electric blankets or hot water
bottles. Give artificial respiration if necessary and try to keep the person awake
and dry.
» For frostbite, first be aware of the don’ts:
› Don’t rub the body part, or apply a heat lamp or hot water bottle
› Don’t go near a hot stove
› Don’t break any blisters
› Don’t drink caffeine
› Do warm the frozen body part quickly with sheets and blankets or warm (not
hot) water. Once the body part is warm, exercise it; with one exception: Don’t
walk on frostbitten feet.
Site safety
All sites and site facilities, including accommodation, food, hygiene and sanitation for
all programmes/events are required to meet minimum standards and regulations, and
include the provision of fire safety equipment. Children’s/youth workers and leaders
must familiarise themselves with the basics of these requirements and check that
the site does comply and that all sites used for a programme/event and its activities
are appropriate and safe. Consideration needs to be given to both environmental
and human dangers associated with the use of the site. The safety of a site should be
reviewed regularly.
Location:
» Where is it and how regularly is it used for the programme/event?
» Is it for beginner participants?
» How familiar is the children’s/youth worker or leader with the location and the
expected weather conditions for the time of the year?
» Has advice or permission been sought or gained from the local authorities,
if necessary?
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.2 > The Salvation Army > 31
Hazard Risk Assessment Matrix 45
Consequences
Insignificant
(Minor First
Aid treament)
Minor
(Medical
treatment,
no additional
resources or
treatment
required
Major
(Serious harm
injuries e.g.
fracture,
concussion,
bleeding)
Catastrophic
(Death)
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
3
4
5
6
7
8
4
5
6
7
8
9
5
6
7
8
9
10
Likelihood
Rare
(Will only
happen in
exceptional
circumstances)
Unlikely
(Could happen
but rarely)
Possible
(Chances are
that it could
happen)
Likely
(Will probably
happen at some
time)
Almost Certain
(Will happen
in most
circumstances)
Moderate
(Medical
treatment
required but
serious harm
unlikely)
Risk Evaluation
2–4
Low
It is most unlikely that
harm would arise under
controlled conditions and
even if exposure occurred,
the injury would be
relatively slight.
5–7
Medium
Significant Hazard—
more likely that harm
might actually occur and
outcome could be more
serious (e.g. time off work
or a minor physical injury).
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 2.2 > The Salvation Army > 32
8–10
High
Significant Hazard—
could cause serious
harm or even fatality:
Unacceptable risk .
g
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Incident/Acci
Definitions
Incident
An undesired event or occurrence that could have resulted in harm or damage. A near
miss.
Accident
An undesired event or occurrence that results in harm.
People are hurt, property is damaged and the programme/event are disrupted.
Emergency
An unexpected and sudden event or occurrence that must be dealt with urgently.
Serious harm
Includes permanent or temporary severe loss of bodily function, respiratory disease,
noise-induced hearing loss, communicable disease, exposure to infected material
causing illness, poisoning, chemical or metal burn of the eye, penetration wound of the
eye, bone fracture, laceration, amputation, burns requiring referral to a specialist, loss
of consciousness due to lack of oxygen, acute illness caused by absorption, inhalation
or ingestion of any substance that requires attention of a General Practitioner (GP), any
harm requiring hospitalisation for 48 hours or more.46
Emergency Considerations
Children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers
» To be familiar with the basic procedures to be followed in the event of an incident/
accident
» To be familiar with the procedures for responding to and reporting any incident/
accident or serious harm
» Planning for an emergency must be part of the routine preparations for any
programme/event and its activities
Participants
» Emergency contact details must be available for all participants. The Individual
Record and Consent Form47 can be used to collect these details
Information
» All forms48 to be suitably stored and kept (in accordance with The Salvation Army’s
Privacy Policy 49 )
» Information must be readily accessible in case of an emergency (in accordance with
The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy 49 )
» Offsite activities:
› Emergency information50, such as expected duration, specific movements,
places where contact can be made and a list of participants, to be left at the
corps/centre
› Emergency information to be carried by children’s/youth worker and be easily
accessible (in accordance with The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy 51)
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 3.1 > The Salvation Army > 35
Communication
» A rapid and effective system for communication needs to be established as part of
the emergency planning process
» It is strongly recommended that all programme/events and its activities take place in
areas where there is mobile phone coverage
» It is recommended that the children’s/youth worker be the person involved in
communication
» In the event of an incident/accident, the use of mobile phones by participants must
be monitored until parents/guardians are informed appropriately
» In case of fatality, police will inform the parents/guardians
Media contact
» In the event of an incident/accident, media is to be denied contact with children’s/
youth workers, leaders, helpers and participants
» Media to be advised to contact the Communications Department52, THQ, for further
information
Incident/Accident Management
Incidents/accidents require a systematic and planned response. The effects of
an incident/accident can be wide, depending on the circumstances and type of
incident/accident. These may range from minor disruptions, to normal activities
involving few people, to major problems significantly affecting many people. In some
cases, an incident/accident may become a ‘critical incident/accident’.
Critical Incident/Accident
Critical incident/accident is when the incident/accident causes a person to experience
unusually strong emotional or psychological reactions.
Examples of critical incidents/accidents may include:
» Serious injury
» One or multiple fatalities
» Failed rescue attempts
» Flood and fire
» Suicide or accidental death
» Misadventure
» A sense of helplessness or loss of control
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 3.2 > The Salvation Army > 36
Incident/Accident Response
Some incidents/accidents may only need to be defused. Other incidents/accidents may
require further debriefing or trauma counselling. What may be trivial for one person may
be traumatic for another, particularly where previous experiences remain unresolved.
People who have experienced a critical incident/accident often need counselling and
care. Not all critical incidents require a large-scale response. They need to be assessed
by the next level of authority (e.g. Corps Officer/Centre Manager) in consultation with
other support people as required.
However, it is important that an immediate response is provided in order to assess the
situation and provide initial support.
CORPS OFFICER/CENTRE MANAGER’S RESPONSE FOR CRITICAL INCIDENT/ACCIDENT:
» Immediately provide physical and emotional support for the children’s/youth
workers, leaders, helpers and participants.
» Relieve the children’s/youth workers or leaders of further decision-making
responsibilities as soon as possible.
» Advise parents/guardians of known facts (NOTE: In the case of fatalities, police will
notify parents/guardians).
» Prevent media contact with children’s/youth workers, leaders, helpers, participants
or others involved in the incident/accident. Media can be advised to contact the
Communications Department53, THQ, for further information.
» Activate support for the person experiencing a critical incident/accident through the
Divisional Commander/National Manager or Secretary for Personnel, THQ. Persons
involved in a critical incident/accident may need to talk through the incident/
accident, discuss their reactions in a confidential environment and learn how to deal
with any reactions which they may experience.
» Inform other children/youth and families from the programme/event of essential
details.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 3.2 > The Salvation Army > 37
Incident/Accident Reporting Process
Assess the situation
1 » Ensure the physical safety of the victim
2 » Call emergency services (111) if necessary
3 » Provide First Aid treatment if needed
4 » Ensure the safety of others
NO
Notify parents/
guardians of any First
Aid administered, apart
from minor First Aid
Is ‘serious harm’ involved?
Notify the Corps
Officer/ Centre
Manager
Complete accident report form HSE 5.1 and send
copy to Secretary for Personnel, THQ
If further investigation advised
YES
YES
Notify OSH by phone (0800 20 90 20)
or fax (04 499 0891) as soon as possible.
NOTE: Obtain site clearance (permission to
disturb/alter accident site) and make the scene
safe or ensure it is not disturbed till OSH visit.
Notify the Corps Officer/
Centre Manager
Notify parents/
guardians (Note:
In case of fatalities,
police will notify)
Notify Secretary for Personnel, THQ, immediately
Contact DC/National Manager, DYS/DCS, leadership team
and other extended specialist support people as required
Complete accident report form HSE 5.1
and send copy to Secretary for Personnel, THQ
An investigation to determine cause and action is required
1 » Collect documents related to the hazard (photos, sketches of
accident scene, safety management forms, hazard register, work
procedures, instructions, training schedules, meeting minutes,
expert safety standard advice etc.)
2 » Interview witnesses
3 » Re-enact accident if safe and relevant to do so
NO
Prepare and issue a report to OSH within 7 days where possible.
Include HSE 5.1 form, investigation results (cause of accident and action
taken to manage hazard) and other relevant documentation.
Send copy to Secretary for Personnel, THQ
Assign responsibilities and dates for corrective action—sign off when complete
» Update accident register (HSE 5.2); hazards register (HSE 4.2) (available at corps/centres) as required.
» All documentation to be filed securely as per The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy.
» Review training and induction procedures for the inclusion and management of any identified hazard.
» Assess the implications—for the participants, children/youth workers, leaders and helpers, and for a
return to the normal programme/event.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 3.3 > The Salvation Army > 38
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Protecting Ch
New Zealand has been identified as third highest in the industrialised world54 for
child deaths through maltreatment. Maltreatment or death of a child/youth often
occurs within a context of poverty, psychological stress and limited support.
However, child/youth abuse can occur across the economic spectrum.
Definitions
Child/youth abuse
The harming (whether physically, emotionally or sexually), ill-treatment, abuse, neglect
or deprivation of any youth/child.55
The Need for the Awareness of Youth/Child Abuse
New Zealand research carried out into child/youth homicide between 1999-2006
identified that four-out-of-five of the children/youth who died through maltreatment in
Aotearoa New Zealand were NOT known to the statutory protection agency CYF (Child,
Youth and Family) at the time of, or prior to, their death.56 These children/youth may not
have been known to CYF but they were likely known to at least one community agency,
whether their own GP, preschool/school, church, or a helping agency such as The
Salvation Army.
The children’s/youth worker or leader, in their role, may be the only person/agency who
has the opportunity to engage with a vulnerable child/youth and identify where abuse
is occurring. Thus, there is an obligation to understand how to recognise when a child/
youth need help and know where to go to ensure they get that help. The children’s/youth
worker or leader must act in the best interests of the child/youth and take reasonable
steps to ensure their protection from abuse.
There is both initial effects and long-term impact on the individual child/youth, their
family, the corps/centre and the wider community from abuse. Abuse may be a single
incident or occur over a period of time. Early identification and effective intervention can
lessen the initial and long-term effects of youth/child abuse and promote recovery of the
youth/child and families concerned.
Child/youth abuse can be a very emotive and involved issue and needs to be handled
sensitively; however, the rights of the child/youth should be paramount.
Risk Factors
Research57 has identified the following factors that can place a child/youth at a greater
risk of being abused:
» Poverty
» Low education
» Stress
» Unemployment
» Young parents
» Poor mental health, including alcohol and drug use
» A parent being the victim of family violence as a child
» History of offending and early offending
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.1 > The Salvation Army > 41
It is important to note that just because a risk factor is present, it does not mean a child/
youth will be abused, and it must be acknowledged that many people with one or more
‘risk factors’ will never abuse children/youth.
The purpose of identifying these risk factors is to raise awareness that where a cluster
of such factors is present, children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers need to be
mindful that the risk is higher for child/youth abuse and to therefore be alert to the signs
and symptoms of abuse.
Types and Indicators of Abuse
The following tables provide a summary of types of abuse and some indicators of abuse.
These physical or behavioural signs act as signals to warn and indicate that something
might be happening in the life of that child/youth and must be taken note of.
However, it should not be automatically assumed that abuse is occurring; talking to
the child/youth may reveal something quite innocent. It’s important not to dismiss
significant changes in behaviour, fears, worries and physical indicators a child/youth is
showing.
NOTE: These physical or behavioural signs should not be ignored, but it is not the role
of the children’s/youth worker, leader or helper to become an investigator.
Child/youth at risk of abuse may experience more than one or more of the following
forms of abuse:
Physical Abuse
Physical abuse occurs when a person purposefully inflicts injuries or threatens to injure.
This may take the form of slapping, punching, shaking, kicking, burning, shoving or
grabbing. Many non-accidental injuries result from excessive physical discipline. The
administration of illegal or inappropriate drugs and medications is a form of abuse.
Physical indicators:
Behavioural indicators:
» Bruises
» Offers unlikely explanation for injuries
» Burns
» Wary of physical contact
» Sprains
» Arms and legs kept covered in
hot weather
» Dislocations
» Bites
» Cuts
» Fear of returning home to parents
» Showing wariness or distrust of adults
» Self-destructive tendencies
» Unduly compliant, shy, withdrawn,
passive, uncommunicative
» Chronic running away
NOTE: Physical signs of abuse (including injuries/marks and bodily fluids) may be
treated as evidence and will need to be processed within a narrow time-frame, so there
should be no delay in addressing concerns.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.2 > The Salvation Army > 42
Emotional Abuse
Emotional abuse of child/youth includes constant criticism, belittling, teasing, constant
yelling and withholding praise and affection. It can also be caused by a failure to provide
the psychological nurturing necessary for the child’s/youth physical and emotional
growth and development.
Physical indicators:
Behavioural indicators:
» Delayed speech or sudden
speech disorder
» Highly anxious
» Delays in physical, mental and
emotional development
» Fear of new situations
» Low self-esteem
» Inappropriate emotional responses
to painful situations
» Extremes of passivity or aggression
» Drug or alcohol abuse
» Chronic running away
» Compulsive stealing
Neglect
Neglect is the ongoing failure to provide the basic physical and emotional necessities
of life, including food, clothing, shelter, emotional security, affection, medical care and
adequate supervision.
Physical indicators
Behavioural indicators
» Frequent hunger
» Frequent lateness or non-attendance
at school
» Poor personal hygiene
» Constant tiredness
» Inappropriate clothing,
e.g. summer clothes in winter
» Untreated medical problems
» Low self-esteem
» Poor social relationships
» Compulsive stealing
» Alienated from peers, withdrawn,
pale and listless
» Begs for food or steals food
» Indiscriminate with affection
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.2 > The Salvation Army > 43
Sexual Abuse
Sexual abuse58 is when a person uses his/her power or authority over a child/youth
and takes advantage of their position in the relationship to involve the child/youth in
sexual activity of any sort. This can take many forms: from sexual jokes, innuendo in
conversation, showing pornographic images to children/youth, sexual touching and
invasive acts.
Physical indicators
Behavioural indicators
» Injury to genital or rectal area: bleeding
or bruising
» Over attention to adults of a particular
gender
» Frequent urinary tract infections
» Persistent and age-inappropriate
sexual activity
» Signs of sexually-transmitted diseases
» Persistent headaches or recurrent
abdominal pain
» Bruises, bite marks or other injuries to
breasts, buttocks, lower abdomen
» Regressive behaviour: bed wetting,
speech loss
» Delinquent or aggressive behaviour
» Self-injurious behaviour: alcohol abuse,
self mutilation, suicide attempts,
prostitution
» Signs of depression
» Lack of appropriate role boundaries in
family: child/youth fulfils parental role
Domestic Violence
Domestic violence is violent, abusive and intimidatory behaviour perpetrated by one
person against another in a personal, intimate relationship causing fear, physical and/
or psychological harm. Domestic violence has a profound effect on children/youth and
constitutes a form of harm.
Physical indicators
Behavioural indicators
» Same as signs of physical and
emotional abuse
» Child/youth tells of home situation
» Acts out the aggression seen in
the home
» Clings to people with whom they
feel safe
Bullying
Some of the same indicators of emotional abuse can be seen in victims of bullying.
When bullying is not addressed, victims may feel worthless, at fault for not coping with
the bully, defeated and fearful. The message learnt by the bully when their behaviour is
minimised or ignored is just as harmful. They learn to use power over people, to control
people using fear, that dealing with situations using anger and fear works, and that they
have the right to attack anyone weaker than themselves.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.2 > The Salvation Army > 44
Responding to Suspicions/Allegations
of Emotional, Physical and Sexual Abuse
Children’s/youth workers or leaders may have to make a decision on reasonable grounds
if they suspect the child/youth is experiencing harm. ‘Reasonable grounds’ can best be
described as the behaviours, observations, facts and information that lead to ‘forming a
belief’. Sometimes children’s/youth workers or leaders will have a suspicion that abuse
has occurred because of what they see or sense.
NOTE: Time is of essence when a child’s/youth safety is at risk. Don’t wait to report
suspected abuse.
There may be reasonable grounds if:
» The children’s/youth worker or leader has been told by the child/youth that they have
been harmed.
» Someone else—for example, another child/youth, a parent/guardian or another
children’s/youth worker or leader—tells the children’s/youth worker or leader that
harm has occurred or is likely to occur.
» A child/youth tells the children’s/youth worker or leader that they know someone who
has been harmed (it is possible that they may be referring to themselves).
» The children’s/youth worker or leader is concerned about the presence of new,
unexplained and suspicious injuries in conjunction with several changes of behaviour
in child/youth.
» The children’s/youth worker or leader sees the harm happening.
NOTE: Children/youth may not know how to describe what is happening and may be
afraid to talk because they have been threatened, bribed or made to promise that they
won’t tell.
NOTE: In case of suspected or alleged sexual abuse, The Salvation Army’s Sexual
Misconduct Policy 59 must be referred to. Copies available from Corps Officers/Centre
Managers/Divisional Commanders/National Managers.
What to do when abuse is suspected
Suspicions of abuse against a child/youth must always be taken seriously. Don’t be
put off if the suspicion or allegation involves another team member. The children’s/
youth worker or leader must do something about reporting suspected or alleged abuse,
especially when a child/youth speaks about abuse.
Important points to consider:
» It does not need to be proven that abuse has taken place; there only needs
reasonable grounds for the belief or suspicion.
» Permission is not needed from parents/guardians to report, nor do they need to be
informed when reporting.
» Recognise that any investigation, formal or informal, must have the best interest of
the child/youth at heart.
» In accordance with Section 6, Children, Young Persons and their Families Act (1989),
the most important consideration is the wellbeing and safety of the child/youth.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.3 > The Salvation Army > 45
What to do when an allegation of abuse is disclosed
1. Safety: Ensure that the child/youth is safe, as the safety of the child/youth is
paramount.
2. Don’t panic: The children’s/youth worker or leader may be the first person to whom
disclosure is made. Their reaction may determine whether the child/youth making the
disclosure trusts them with the information.
It is important that the children’s/youth worker or leader:
» Doesn’t react in a shocked or critical way
» Tells the child/youth that they are glad that they were told
» Does not disclose or accuse alleged offender or unrelated persons
3. Find a place to talk: Privacy, yet in sight of others, may help the youth/child feel
more comfortable about making the disclosure and less concerned about telling the
children’s/youth worker or leader what they have to say.
4. Listen: When presented with a disclosure of abuse, the youth/children’s worker or
leader should:
» Reassure the child/youth they have done the right thing
» Communicate to the child/youth the need to involve others for the purpose of help
and support
» Reassure the child/youth that they will only involve people who will ensure their
safety
» Do not make promises that can’t be kept
» Do not disclose or accuse alleged offender or unrelated persons
5. Believe the child/youth: It is not up to the children’s/youth worker or leader to judge
whether a child/youth or anyone else is telling the truth—always act on the basis that
what has been told is the truth.
6. Don’t ask leading questions: It is not the role of the children’s/youth worker or
leader to investigate allegations of abuse. Enough questions should be asked to confirm
the need to take the matter further. Unnecessary questions or interviews could cause
distress or confusion and interfere with subsequent investigation that experts in the area
may undertake.
Allegation of abuse by a staff member/volunteer
1. Where it is alleged that child/youth abuse has been carried out by a staff member/
volunteer/corps/centre member/leadership, no attempt is to be made to protect them
and minimise the alleged abuse.
2. The matter is to be immediately reported to the appropriate next level of authority
(e.g. Corps Officer/Divisional Commander/National Manager/Human Resources
Department, THQ60) for advice and action that needs to be taken (such as procedure for
withdrawing person from programme/event).
3. The Salvation Army has a responsibility to ensure that the alleged offender and his/her
family are given all the support they need. The support may come from within the corps/
centre leadership or from outside The Salvation Army.
For more information on keeping children/youth safe
» Child, Youth and Family
0508 FAMILY (0508 326 459)
www.cyf.govt.nz
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.3 > The Salvation Army > 46
Procedure for Reporting Suspicion or Allegation
of Child/Youth Abuse
Make detailed notes immediately while information is still fresh
(NOTE: The CYF template ‘Report of Concern’62 in the Forms section
of the manual provides a framework to do this.)
REPORT TO THE CHILDREN’S/YOUTH WORKER
If it is the children’s/youth worker against whom the suspicion/allegation
has been made then contact the corps officer/centre manger
Notify Corps Officer/Centre Manager immediately
(If the Corps Officer/Centre Manager is unavailable, notify next level of authority in Division)
» If the response made by the Corps Officer/Centre Manager is not agreed with, the
Secretary for Personnel, THQ, can be contacted
» Where it is alleged that the abuse has been carried out by a Corps Officer/Centre
Manager/staff member/corps or centre member/leadership, the alleged abuser should
be withdrawn from the programme/event immediately as per required procedure
NOTE: Contact Human Resources Department, THQ63, or the Divisional Commander to
discuss the procedure for withdrawing the person
CORPS OFFICER/CENTRE MANAGER TO MAKE A NOTIFICATION TO:
Child, Youth and Family
Email: [email protected], phone: 0508 Family (0508 326 459), fax: 04 914 1211
(NOTE: The CYF template Report of Concern64 in this manual provides a framework to do this.)
In an emergency the Police can be contacted
NEXT LEVEL OF AUTHORITY AT DHQ TO BE INFORMED THAT NOTIFICATION HAS BEEN MADE
Any reports or documentation on disclosures of abuse must be kept
confidential and secure, with access strictly limited and on a ‘need to know’
basis according to The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy65
NOTE: In case of suspected or alleged sexual abuse, The Salvation Army’s Sexual
Misconduct Policy 61 must be referred to.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.4 > The Salvation Army > 47
The Salvation Army Sexual Misconduct Policy
(extract from manual)
. Child Sexual Abuse
. The Salvation Army acknowledges that the Child Youth and Family
Service and the New Zealand Police are the only groups with statutory duty
and the necessary legal powers to fully investigate child abuse. The Salvation
Army will cooperate and consult with the Child, Youth and Family Service
and other appropriate agencies with specialist knowledge to protect children
from abuse. The Salvation Army will not assume responsibility beyond the
level of its own expertise.
. And complaint with regard to an alleged child sexual abuse offence when
the victim is still a child will not be dealt with through the procedures laid
down in the document but must be notified immediately to the Secretary for
Personnel for advice, guidance and action on reporting procedures.
. Any complaint that refers to a past incident, including an alleged
historical child sexual abuse offence (i.e. the child is now an adult) must be
referred directly to the Secretary for Personnel for investigation.
NOTE: This manual is available from Corps Officers/Centre Managers/Divisional
Commanders/National Managers
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 4.5 > The Salvation Army > 48
Accreditation
It is necessary for all children’s/youth workers or leaders (employed or volunteer) in
The Salvation Army to be accredited.
NOTE: Regular helpers need to be accredited.
Expectations
Children’s/youth workers or leaders in The Salvation Army are required to:
» Respect the procedures and beliefs of The Salvation Army, which are based on the
Christian faith
» Abide by and operate according to stated guidelines and procedures as detailed in
this manual
» Be concerned for the wellbeing and holistic growth of children/youth
» Undergo training in children’s/youth work
» Maintain appropriate contact with children/youth and families
A children’s/youth worker or leader can expect that The Salvation Army will:
» Help them understand their role
» Ensure that they know to whom they are accountable
» Ensure that they have a supportive and safe working environment
» Inform and consult with them on matters affecting them
» Provide training applicable to their role
» Encourage them in their spiritual growth
Requirements for Accreditation
1. Complete the Volunteer Details and Agreement66 form (for volunteers) or the
employment agreement (for employees)
2. Agree to and sign The Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders67
3. Have a Police Check68 processed
4. Complete required training
Volunteer Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders
1. All existing and prospective volunteer children’s/youth workers or leaders must
complete the following:
» Volunteer Details and Agreement69 form
» Referees have been contacted
» Police Check processed70
» Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders agreed and signed71
» Under 25 Years Drivers form72 (where applicable)
2. It is recommended that appropriate safety measures and supervision be put in place
whilst the accreditation process is being completed.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 5.1 > The Salvation Army > 51
3. Referees must include the former Corps Officer/Centre Manager or children’s/youth
worker if the applicant has worked in other corps/centres or groups, and someone who
has known them for at least two years, is not a close relative and who is able to speak
objectively about their suitability for working with children/youth.
Questions that could be asked of referees are:
» Length of time they have known the applicant and in what capacity.
» Qualities or special skills that the applicant brings to working with children/youth.
» Ways they consider this applicant a positive role model for children/youth.
» From knowledge of the applicant, how would they handle incidents where they are
under pressure with children/youth?
» Any have concerns about the applicant’s behaviour with children/youth.
» Their observations around the applicant working with children/youth.
» Their recommendations about the applicant for the children’s/youth volunteers role:
not at all/with reservations/recommend strongly/don’t know/not willing to say.
» Any other information relating to the applicant’s suitability that should be known.
4. All documentation collected must be stored securely and only accessed in
accordance with The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy.73
5. A copy of the completed and checked Volunteer Details and Agreement74 form must
be sent to Divisional Headquarters and must be checked by the Divisional Children’s
Mission Director/Secretary or Divisional Youth Secretary.
6. It is recommended that every two years, the Volunteers Details and Agreement75 be
reviewed by the Corps Officer/Centre Manager or delegated representative to determine
ongoing suitability of the children’s/youth worker or leader. This is an opportunity to
discuss the volunteer work and update any information on the Volunteer Details and
Agreement76 form.
NOTE: Standard Salvation Army employment procedures are to be followed for all
employees.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 5.2 > The Salvation Army > 52
Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers
or Leaders
The Salvation Army is committed to the safety and wellbeing of all children/youth
involved in its programmes/events and will act to ensure a safe environment is
maintained at all times. The Salvation Army also support the safety and wellbeing
of its children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers and encourages their active
participation in building and maintaining a secure environment for all participants.
All children’s/youth workers or leaders working with children/youth on behalf of The
Salvation Army are required to sign and abide by the Code of Conduct for Children’s/
Youth Workers or Leaders77 and familiarise themselves with it and any corps/ centre
guidelines. Children’s/youth workers or leaders must abide by the guidelines contained
in these documents.
Responsibilities of children’s/youth workers or leaders towards children/youth:
» Treat all children/youth with respect and conduct themselves in a transparent
manner at all times. Be a positive role model to the child/youth and their parents/
guardians with attitude and language that affirms dignity and self worth.
» Build appropriate relationships with child/youth. Ensure relationships are free from
sexual exploitation or sexual harassment. Refrain from making sexually-suggestive
comments to child/youth or in their presence, even as a joke.
» Never discriminate on the basis of gender, religious belief, ethical belief, colour,
ethnic or national origin, disability, age, employment status, family status or sexual
orientation.
» Never take a child/youth alone to a solitary or a closed non-public space without any
visual access.
» Avoid any form of verbal, emotional, sexual, physical or spiritual abuse.
Responsibilities of children’s/youth workers or leaders towards their team:
» Work as part of the team to the specific roles and tasks given and fulfill them to the
best of their ability.
» Work under the leadership of the Corps Officer/Centre Manager and be accountable
to them for their work with children/youth.
» Raise all concerns, issues and problems with the Corps Officer/Centre Manager as
soon as possible.
Responsibilities of children’s/youth workers or leaders towards The Salvation Army:
» Respect the procedures and beliefs of The Salvation Army, which are based on
Christian faith. It must be recognised that The Salvation Army is a significant branch
of the Christian church.
» Refrain from the use of alcohol or harmful drugs before and during Salvation Army
programmes and on Salvation Army property. Refrain from the use of tobacco on
Salvation Army properties.
» Uphold children’s/youth confidentiality and abide by the requirements of the Privacy
Act and The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy 78.
» Read, understand and seek to implement The Salvation Army’s Policy on the Treaty
of Waitangi78
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 5.3 > The Salvation Army > 53
Responsibilities of children’s/youth workers or leaders towards themselves:
» Refrain from any action that could bring The Salvation Army or themselves into
accusation or disrepute.
» Follow The Salvation Army guidelines governing the safety and care of children/youth
as mentioned in the Safe to Serve manual and elsewhere as applicable that might not
be mentioned herein.
» Commit to their own development as a children’s/youth workers or leaders by
participating in relevant training opportunities.
Failure to comply with this Code of Conduct for children’s/youth worker or leader may
mean that a disciplinary process will be initiated.
The Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders79 must be signed and
accepted and stored in accordance with The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy78.
Police Checks
The New Zealand Police have given approval to The Salvation Army Territorial
Children’s and Youth Departments to obtain vetting information about employees or
volunteers.
NOTE:
» Ideally, the process of vetting must be completed prior to the children’s/youth worker
or leader engaging with children/youth. Where impractical, it is recommended that
appropriate safety measures and supervision be put in place whilst the accreditation
process is being completed
» Police check must be done once every three years
» Police do not perform vetting services for those under the age of 17
Process
Print/photocopy the Consent to Disclosure of Information80 form on corps/centre
letterhead
» The form must be completed in full and signed by the individual concerned
» The corps/centre is responsible for confirming:
› Identity, including maiden names and alternate names, to ensure that the
applicant is the person whom is the subject of the request
› Verifying the signature of the applicant to confirm their consent to be vetted
› Sighting and validating the personal information provided with a current form of
photo identification (passport, drivers license)
» Incomplete applications will not be processed.
» Only requests sent on the Consent to Disclosure of Information80 form will be
processed.
» Use a separate form for each individual request.
» Allow six weeks for this request to be processed.
» Information supplied by Police must be destroyed once it is no longer useful for
employment purposes. Burning or shredding the information ensures secure
destruction.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 5.4 > The Salvation Army > 54
» The information obtained in the course of the vetting process must be treated as
confidential and may not be divulged to any persons other than the individual tasked
with handling this information and the subject of the vet.
Please send the original application to:
Children’s workers or leaders
Youth workers or leaders
» Territorial Children’s Department,
P.O. Box 6015, Marion Square,
Wellington 6141
New Zealand
» Territorial Youth Department,
P.O. Box 6015, Marion Square,
Wellington 6141
New Zealand
Please DO NOT send the application directly to the Police Vetting Services
The results of vetting81
The decision as to whether an individual is suitable or not for a given position remains
with the employer. In making this decision, employers might need to consider the
following when assessing the results of vetting:
» The nature of the offence and relevance to employment.
» Length of time since the crime was committed.
» Age and maturity now as compared to when the crime was committed, the
seriousness of the crime: e.g. length of sentence, use of a weapon, the circumstances
at the time of violent behaviour.
» Pattern of crime: e.g. a short spate may indicate a ‘phase’ but a regular pattern may
indicate continuing inappropriate behaviour.
» The proximity of the person undergoing vetting to the vulnerable person(s). That is,
are they likely to have unsupervised access to these vulnerable people?
Where vetting indicates behaviour of a violent or sexual nature (that is not shown on an
individuals criminal record printout), police may recommend that an individual does
not have unsupervised access to children, young people or more vulnerable members
of society. This is shown by way of a large red stamp. The individual may wish to know
the basis of such a recommendation and, in these cases, should write to the Manager:
Licensing and Vetting Service Centre. Police will provide a written response to the
individual, detailing the basis for the advice given.
For more information:
» New Zealand Police
www.police.govt.nz
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 5.4 > The Salvation Army > 55
ts
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Salvation Arm
NOTE:
» All Corps Officers/Centre Managers need to be familiar with The Salvation Army’s
Privacy Policy.
» Each form in this manual that collects personal information contains a brief privacy
collection statement.
» Corps Officers/Centre Managers must ensure that only necessary personal
information is collected.
» Parents/guardians should be given a copy of The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy when
they complete any forms requiring personal and sensitive information.
The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy and Statement
Privacy Principles and Responsibilities
The Salvation Army is committed to promoting and protecting individual privacy in
relation to the collection, storage, use, access to, correction, and disclosure of personal
information, in accordance with the Privacy Act 1993.
The protection of personal privacy is integral to The Salvation Army in fulfilling its role as
an employer and providing good client service, and it is the responsibility of all staff that
holds or work with personal information about staff and clients.
Personal Information
Information (no matter how it is stored) is personal information if the individual can be
identified from that information.
Privacy Protection Principles
1.
Personal information may only be collected for a lawful and necessary purpose
connected with some required function or activity of The Salvation Army, and it
should not be used for any other purpose.
2. Personal information must, as a general rule, be collected directly from the person
concerned, and it must be collected in a lawful, fair, and reasonable manner.
3. The person must be told that the information is being collected, why it is being
collected, to what use it will be put, and who the intended recipients are.
4. The safety and privacy of personal information must be protected by taking all
reasonable security safeguards to protect against loss, unauthorised access, use,
modification, disclosure, or any other misuse.
5. Every person has the right to have access to information collected about them
and to seek a correction if they feel the information is wrong, or at least to have a
statement of the requested correction attached to the information. Requests for
access must be dealt with promptly—i.e. within 20 working days.
6. Before using personal information, The Salvation Army must take reasonable steps
to ensure that it is accurate, up-to-date, complete, relevant, and not misleading,
and that it is being used for the purpose for which it was collected.
7. Personal information must not be kept for longer than is required for the purposes
for which the information may lawfully be used.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 6.1 > The Salvation Army > 59
Compliance
The Salvation Army acknowledges and accepts the principles and responsibilities
embodied in the Privacy Act 1993, and, in relation to its provision of health care
services (for example, but not limited to, Addiction and Homecare Services),
the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 and the Health (Retention of Health
Information) Regulations 1996. (For more information regarding these services,
refer to the Addiction and Homecare Privacy Policies, which are tailored to those
respective services).
The Salvation Army policy and procedures for responding to requests for personal
information, dealing with complaints under the Privacy Act, and managing breaches
of privacy are to be found in The Salvation Army Workplace Compliance Manual.82
The Salvation Army’s Policy on the Treaty of Waitangi
Preamble
In a 1987 motivational paper ‘The Agenda for the Future’, General Eva Burrows called all
Salvationists: ‘To oppose all forms of inhumanity, and take even more seriously Christ’s
call to ‘clothe the naked, feed the hungry, and shelter the homeless. To withstand
every form of prejudice—racial, tribal, national, sexist, economic, and social. To a new
awareness of human interdependence and of our responsibility for each other.’
Statement
As a founder member of the Conference of Churches of Aotearoa New Zealand, The
Salvation Army has accepted the premise, which ‘acknowledges Te Trite o Waitangi as
the covenant establishing our nation on the basis of bicultural partnership’.
Māori, as tangata whenua, were owners of the land at the time of Pakeha settlement
under the British Crown. The descendants of those and subsequent settlers, and more
recent immigrants, have a responsibility to honour the Treaty.
The Treaty signed in 1840 was a contract between two independent peoples, and
although it was regarded for many years as simply an historical document, its provisions
are still relevant.
The continuing role of the Treaty in New Zealand and the resolution of Māori grievances
and claims are dependent on the political will of Government. While the Army is not in
a position to comment on particular issues, it welcomes settlements already achieved,
and is firmly of the opinion that the reconciliation process should be fair and honourable
to all concerned.
The Salvation Army recognises that as an organisation operating in Aotearoa
New Zealand, it has the responsibility to establish and maintain a good bicultural
relationship.
To achieve this we will
» Affirm the importance of bicultural relationships.
» Provide a forum within The Salvation Army through which Māori voices and concerns
can be expressed.
» Include appropriately in worship, buildings and signage, the unique bicultural nature
of our nation.
» Work towards ensuring Māori feel acceptance and safety within The Salvation Army.
» The Salvation Army is committed to continuing with the outworking of these objectives.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 6.2 > The Salvation Army > 60
The Salvation Army Doctrines
The Salvation Army doctrines (Articles of Faith)83 are simple and straightforward. They
follow closely the orthodox beliefs of the Protestant Church.
Every person becoming a member (soldier) of the Army signs a covenant which amongst
other things acknowledges their acceptance of these truths, which are the foundation
for Salvation Army beliefs and practices internationally.
» We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments were given by
inspiration of God and that they only constitute the Divine rule of Christian faith and
practice.
» We believe that there is only one God who is infinitely perfect, the Creator, Preserver,
and Governor of all things, and who is the only proper object of religious worship.
» We believe that there are three persons in the Godhead—the Father, the Son and the
Holy Ghost, undivided in essence and co-equal in power and glory.
» We believe that in the person of Jesus Christ the Divine and human natures are
united, so that He is truly and properly God and truly and properly man.
» We believe that our first parents were created in a state of innocency, but by their
disobedience they lost their purity and happiness, and that in consequence of their
fall all men have become sinners, totally depraved, and as such are justly exposed to
the wrath of God.
» We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ has by His suffering and death made atonement
for the whole world so that whosoever will may be saved.
» We believe that repentance towards God, faith in our Lord Jesus Christ, and
regeneration by the Holy Spirit, are necessary to salvation.
» We believe that we are justified by grace through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and
that he that believeth hath the witness in himself.
» We believe that continuance in a state of salvation depends upon continued obedient
faith in Christ.
» We believe that it is the privilege of all believers to be wholly sanctified, and that their
whole spirit and soul and body may be preserved blameless unto the coming of our
Lord Jesus Christ.
» We believe in the immortality of the soul; in the resurrection of the body; in the
general judgement at the end of the world; in the eternal happiness of the righteous;
and in the endless punishment of the wicked.
The Salvation Army’s Sexual Misconduct Policies
and Complaints Procedures Manual
NOTE:
» This manual is available from Corps Officers/Centre Managers/Divisional
Commanders/National Managers
» The policy explains what the formal procedures are, to what type of behaviour they
apply to and recognises that the term ‘Sexual Misconduct’ covers a wide range of
unacceptable sexual behaviour.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section A > 6.4 > The Salvation Army > 61
Forms
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Safety
Safety management and risk analysis helps identify and minimise risks prior to
and within programmes/events. This process highlights the importance of safety
enabling effectiveness through preparation.
The forms below are model forms which can be used as is or adapted to suit the
circumstances and need.
It is recommended to obtain qualified advice or refer to other publications or authorities
in case of a specific situation.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Programme/Event Overview Form
Team Members Information Form
Travel Plan
Individual Record and Consent Form
Safety Checklists
PEOPLE
VENUE
SLEEPOVER/NIGHT ACTIVITIES
EQUIPMENT
TRANSPORT
FOOD
WATER ACTIVITIES
F. Risk Assessment Management (RAM) Form
G. Risk Assessment Management (RAM) Form: EXAMPLE
H. Hazard Risk Assessment Matrix
SAFE TO SERVE > Section B > 1 > The Salvation Army > 67
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
PROGRAMME/EVENT OVERVIEW FORM
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Programme/Event Description:
When does it occur:
Day:
Time:
One-off event (tick)
Frequency:
Date:
to
Expected participants:
Male:
Female:
Total: 0
Expected workers/leaders:
Male:
Female:
Total: 0
Supervision ratio (1 to x):
Male:
Female:
LOCATION
Address
Contact phone
First Aid Kit location
Main:
Other venues:
PROGRAMME/EVENT LEADERSHIP TEAM
Name
Team Role
Contact
First Aid designated leader
Names of other adult helpers:
EMERGENCY INFORMATION
Details
Name and address
Contact phone
Remarks
Corps Officer/Centre Manager
Local Police Station
Doctor/s
Hospital
Other
SAFETY MANAGEMENT (To help identify and minimise risks. Complete as applicable.)
Recommended Forms: Team Members Informaton Form, Travel Plan, Individual Record and Consent Form, Relevant Safety Checklists, Risk
Assessment Management Form (RAM)
Children’s/Youth Worker:
Signature:
Date:
Corps Officer/Centre Manager:
Signature:
Date:
This form and relevant Safety Management Forms should be stored and be accessible (as per The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy) as required. Copies should be
also stored and kept if required accordingly (e.g. if going offsite).
Programme/Event:
Corps/Centre:
Children’s/youth worker and contact details:
Date of birth
Address
Phone
Email
Emergency contact person and phone
TEAM MEMBERS INFORMATION FORM
CONFIDENTIAL
Use additional pages if required. This form and relevant Safety Management Forms can be attached to relevant Programme Overview Form and be accessible (as per The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy) as required. Copies should
be also stored and kept if required accordingly (e.g. if going offsite).
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
Name
TRAVEL PLAN FORM
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
This plan can be filled in prior to commencement of journey
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Children’s/youth worker:
Children’s/youth leader/s:
Driver/s name/s
Licence number and type
Number of passengers:
Vehicle registration number:
Vehicle ownership (tick)
Salvation Army
Private
Rental
Type of vehicle (tick)
Car
Van
Bus
Other
TRAVEL DETAILS (Can include departure and arrival details and times, rest stops etc.)
This form and relevant Safety Management Forms can be attached to relevant Programme/Event Overview Form and be accessible (as per The Salvation Army’s
Privacy Policy) as required. Copies should be also stored and kept if required accordingly (e.g. if going offsite).
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
INDIVIDUAL RECORD & CONSENT FORM
CONFIDENTIAL
Note: For those under the age of 18, this form is to be completed by parents/guardians prior to the commencement of the programme/event
PARTICIPANT’S DETAILS
Participant’s name:
DOB
Male
Female
Parents/Guardian’s name: (If participant under 18 years of age)
Address:
Contact phone numbers: Participant:
Parent/Guardian:
Alternate emergency contact and relationship to participant:
Family doctor’s name and contact details:
PLEASE INDICATE IF THE PARTICIPANT SUFFERS FROM THE FOLLOWING:
Condition (tick)
Severity
Condition (tick)
Severity
Condition (tick)
Epilepsy/fits
Asthma/Sinus
Blackouts
Diabetes
Migraines
Sleep walking
Dizzy spells
Heart condition
Travel sickness
Severity
Other (e.g. any phobias):
ALLERGIES: (please specifiy) e.g. medication, food, other (hay fever, bee sting etc.)
MEDICATION BEING TAKEN: (Please list all and use separate sheet if required)
Med #1:
Dosage:
When:
Reason:
Med #2:
Dosage:
When:
Reason:
Note: Medication brought must be kept in original packaging that identifies prescribing physician, name of medication, dosage and frequency of administration
Last tetanus immunisation date:
LIST ANY SPECIAL CARE REQUIRED: (e.g. dietary needs, disabilities)
Swimming skills:
PERMISSION/INDEMNITY SECTION:
› I agree to the participant taking part in overall programme/event and the activities
of this group
› I agree to the participant being given appropriate First Aid as required—will be
administered and recorded by a designated leader
› In the event that I cannot be contacted in an emergency, I give permission for the
participant to receive such medical treatment as the children’s/youth worker/leader
may deem necessary
› I understand that The Salvation Army is part of the Christian Church
and as such will run the programme/event on principles and beliefs
based on the Christian faith
› I understand that all reasonable safety precautions will be taken at
all times and that The Salvation Army, the children’s/youth workers
and leaders and those connected with the group cannot be held
responsible for personal injury, loss or damage incurred by the
participant
› I agree to the participant being transported/picked up/dropped off in Salvation Army
› I agree to the participant being given minor pain relief (e.g.
or private/rental vehicles arranged by children’s/youth worker/leader as necessary
paracetmol) as appropriate—will be administered and recorded by
› I agree to information about the participant being collected as required for activitydesignated leader
specific forms, accident/incident report forms and statistical purposes
(tick)
Yes
No
› I agree to the use of photographic/video footage that may be taken of the participant
› Participant’s medication to be controlled and administered by:
and the participant’s name to be reproduced and published by The Salvation Army
(please tick)
Participant
Designated leader
Parent’s/Guardian’s Signature: (If participant under 18 years of age)
Participants Signature: (18 years and over)
Date:
Disclaimer: Personal information collected on this form is to be used for the lawful and necessary purpose of the programme/event and should not be used for
any other purpose (refer to The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy).
This form and relevant safety management forms can be attached to relevant Programme/Event Overview Form and be accessible (as per The Salvation Army’s
Privacy Policy) as required. Copies should be also stored and kept if required accordingly (e.g. if going offsite).
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
SAFETY GUIDELINES: CHECKLISTS
PEOPLE
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Recommended
Commitment by children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers to follow safe practices as outlined in this manual and elsewhere as applicable
that might not be mentioned herein
Proper documentation completed as applicable and stored in accordance to The Salvation Army’s Privacy Policy
Incident/accident to be reported according to procedures outlined
Briefing
Children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers briefed on the following:
› Individual child’s/youth health, behaviour, relationship
› What to do in case of incident/accident
› Purpose of activity, rules, safety, time-frames, responsibilities and
environment issues
Participants briefed on the following:
› Rules: set, communicate and enforce
› Purpose of programme/event and its activities
› Physical and time boundaries and dangers in environment
› Emergency procedures
› The Salvation Army’s policy and position statement on alcohol
and substance abuse
› Emergency procedures
› Rules that protect people, physical property and relationships
with community and groups (e.g. a children’s/youth worker or
leader needs to be told if participant needs to go anywhere)
› Specific rules about how the game/activity is to run (e.g. fair play)
Check
All children/youth in a programme/event, and its activities, are being supervised at all times by designated children’s/youth workers/leaders
Appropriate children’s/youth workers or leaders to participants ratio and gender mix:
› two children’s/youth workers or leaders to six infants under 12 months old
› two children’s/youth workers or leaders to eight children under three years old
› three children’s/youth workers or leaders to 20 children aged three to five years old
› three children’s/youth workers or leaders to 30 children in school age groups
› one children’s/youth worker or leader to 10 youth (13 years old and over)
Note: Co-ed groups need both male and female children’s/youth workers or leaders
Access to a phone and as far as possible must be contactable at all times
Programme/event appropriate for age and stage (e.g. video ratings/content, activities)
Clothing: a) Appropriate for activity (e.g. tied shoelaces) and b) Access to spare clothing (e.g. raincoats, sunhats, wool hats, polyprops)
Accommodation arrangements (sep. for boys/girls; children’s/youth workers/leaders/helpers, venue) and maintain adequate supervision
Number of participants confirmed before programme/event and its activities
Number of participants confirmed after programme/event and its activities
External service providers used have acceptable standards of safety practices
Awareness of The Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around ‘People’
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Monitor
›
›
›
›
Behaviour, group dynamics, relationships, those with special needs, maintaining adequate supervision and plan for dealing with it
Watch for wanderers and outsiders interacting inappropriately with children/youth
Watch for fights and apply appropriate intervention, prevention, de-escalation as required
Any phobias that participants might experience before or during the programme/event
Parents/guardians informed (prferably in writing) of the following:
›
›
›
›
›
›
›
Relevant contact numbers (e.g. children’s/youth workers or leaders, venues, emergency)
Time of start/finish of programme/event and its activities
What participant will be doing: programme/event, activities
What participant will be required to bring (e.g. clothing, rainwear, lunch)
Any risk factors in taking part in the programme/event and its activities
Where participants are to meet, be picked up from, dropping home arrangements
Parents/guardians of participants under 18 years of age signed Individual Record and Consent Form
Considered
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
SAFETY GUIDELINES: CHECKLISTS
VENUE
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Check
Venue suitable for the programme/event and its activities and adequate space available
Venue secure
Clear boundaries identifying the area being used
Advice and information sought from relevant authorities (organisers, venue manager)
First Aid equipment easily available and location known
Fire extinguishers, fire safety instructions and emergency exits and location known
Participants briefed on emergency and evacuation procedures (fire, earthquake)
Venues clear of any hazards present (e.g. electrical, broken windows/floorboards etc.)
Outdoors clear of hazards (e.g. broken glass, holes, slipperiness, etc.)
Up to date weather forecast obtained and appropriate measures planned in response to predicted weather
Possible environmental dangers considered
Possible human dangers considered (e.g. interaction with the general public)
Awareness of The Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around Venues
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Offsite activities (Fill in separate ‘Venue’ check list for offsite venue/s if required)
Communication been made to appropriate authorities regarding:
› How long will group be gone for
› Who is in charge
› Where will main children’s/youth workers or leaders be and how can they be contacted
› List of children/youth in the group
Considered
SLEEPOVER/NIGHT ACTIVITIES
Check
Area being used checked for security, exits guarded if possible (e.g. leaders sleeping close by doors)
Maintaining regular checks of participant numbers and behaviour
Adequate lighting, torches, emergency lights available and location known
Appropriate and adequate night wear, mattresses, bedding, pillows
Accommodation arrangements (separate for boys/girls, children’s/youth workers/leaders/helpers, venue) and adequate supervision
Maintaining extra vigilance and increasing leader to participant ratio if applicable
Briefing
Participants and children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers briefed on emergency and evacuation procedures (fire, earthquake)
Participants and children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers briefed on schedules/curfew standards and rules
Check-in points/time made clear to participants
Children’s/youth workers, leaders and helpers briefed on issues regarding participants (e.g. sleep walking, bed wetting)
Awareness of The Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around Sleepover/Night Activities
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Considered
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
SAFETY GUIDELINES: CHECKLISTS
EQUIPMENT
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Check
Equipment in safe working order
Equipment and the site it is on suitable for the programme/event and its activities
Equipment used in the manner for which it was designed
Participants able to use equipment safely and briefed on its use if applicable
Protective clothing worn by participants, if needed
If applicable, equipment used by person having the specific skills/training/knowledge in their use (e.g. some gas, electrical and outdoor
equipment)
Repair kit, if applicable, available and location known
Spare equipment available and location known
Permission obtained to use equipment
If equipment faulty or damaged, reported to appropriate authority
Equipment left tidy and ready for use
Awareness of The Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around ‘Equipment’
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Considered
FOOD
Storage
Stored correctly (e.g. fresh or frozen foods are refrigerated/frozen at correct temperatures)
Food storage area kept clean and free from contamination
Food being kept hot for a period of time must be kept at a temperature of 60°C or higher
Handling
Food preparation carried out in a clean environment
Food servers to wear gloves and change appropriately as required
Proper disposal of waste including left over food
Council permits obtained where applicable
Equipment
Kitchen/BBQ equipment in safe working condition
Gas connections checked
Limited access to heat/knives/food etc. as applicable
Emergency equipment for fires, cuts, burns easily accessible and location known
Awareness of The Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around ‘Food’
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Considered
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
SAFETY GUIDELINES: CHECKLISTS
TRANSPORT
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Driver
Driver holds a full current licence for the vehicle (car/bus/other) they will be driving
If driver is under 25 years of age, Under 25 Years Driver’s Form filled in and authorised
Permission to use vehicle obtained
Travel Plan filled can be used if appropriate
Appropriate ratio of children’s/youth workers or leaders to passengers in vehicle
No use of alcohol, drugs or heavy medication by driver
Awareness of Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around Transport
Vehicle
Must be registered, road worthy and have current Warrant of Fitness
Covered by third party or comprehensive insurance
Vehicle to be checked for the following before proceeding
› Wheels/tyres (matchhead tread test, air pressure, damages)
› Load must be secure
› Adequate petrol/diesel, oil, fluids, water as necessary
› Non-mechanical (e.g. windscreen, mirrors, seat belts) and mechanical parts (radiator hose etc.) if required
First Aid kit, torch available and location known
Any accidents or damage to vehicle, parking/speeding infringements must be reported to next level of authority (e.g. Corps Officer/Centre
Manager)
Vehicle to be left tidy and ready for use
Passengers
Briefed on vehicle rules (no hanging out of windows, no litter thrown) and arrival procedures and responsibilities
Number of participants confirmed before leaving and upon return
Passengers in vehicle using seat belts
Child restraints used as applicable
Seating capacity of vehicle not exceeded
Monitor
Driving must be sensible and there must be total adherence to all road rules and laws
Drivers must not use hand held mobile phones when driving the vehicle
Appropriate rest breaks for driver: drivers must be well rested
Passengers must not be towed behind or ride outside a vehicle
Passengers must not drive vehicle or change gears
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Considered
Names and licence numbers of drivers:
Driver/s name/s
Licence number and type
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
SAFETY GUIDELINES: CHECKLISTS
WATER ACTIVITIES
Programme/Event Name:
Corps/Centre:
Check
Children’s/youth worker and leader competency: familiar with specific location and anticipated conditions
Designated adult to be competent and responsible to administer CPR, preventing hypothermia
Increased children’s/youth worker and leader to participant’s ratios if and when applicable
Appropriate life-saving equipment readily available/provided and location known
Advice and information sought from relevant authorities (organisers, venue manager, and lifeguards).
Proper supervision in and around water: keeping participants both WITHIN SIGHT and WITHIN REACH, where appropriate, at all times
Participants
Identified those unable to swim
Participants reminded of the safety rules and monitor that the rules are enforced
Never let participants, especially children, swim alone
Children supervised when playing with inflatable toys
Participants briefed on risks, help signal, buddy system (assign buddies) and swimming in a group
Area/environment
Activity areas clearly defined
Water conditions checked (e.g. temperature, current, rip, jet skis, water vehicles, etc.)
Checked for submerged objects and other hazards (e.g. log, rocks, jellyfish)
Weather conditions checked
Awareness of The Salvation Army Safety Guidelines around ‘Water Activities’
Other relevant Safety Guidelines: Checklists considered
Considered
Corps/Centre:
Activity/Activities:
Date/s:
Description of venue:
Prepared by:
Aim/purpose:
Checked by:
RISK
RISK EVALUATION
PREVENTION
EMERGENCY PLANS
Consider physical, emotional, mental and spiritual events
that may occur
Low/Medium/High
How will you attempt to ensure the risk doesn’t happen?
What will you do if it does happen?
(Refer Risk Matrix, below)
People Risks
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
Programme/Event:
Equipment Risks
2–4: Low
5–7: Medium
8–10: High
Steps taken to minimise risk: (Contingency plans, actions, recommendations, etc.)
Insignificant
Minor
Moderate
Major
Catastrophic
Consequences
1
2
3
4
5
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
3
4
5
6
7
8
Likely
4
5
6
7
8
9
Almost Certain
5
6
7
8
9 10
Likelihood
Rare
1
Unlikely
Possible
Skills required by staff:
Safety equipment required:
RISK ASSESSMENT MANAGEMENT
(RAM) FORM
Environment Risks
Programme/Event: Firezone
RISK EVALUATION
PREVENTION
EMERGENCY PLANS
Consider physical, emotional, mental and spiritual events
that may occur
Low/Medium/High
How will you attempt to ensure the risk doesn’t happen?
What will you do if it does happen?
(Refer Risk Matrix, below)
People Risks
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
RISK
Equipment Risks
2–4: Low
5–7: Medium
8–10: High
Steps taken to minimise risk: (Contingency plans, actions, recommendations, etc.)
Insignificant
Minor
Moderate
Major
Catastrophic
Consequences
1
2
3
4
5
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
3
4
5
6
7
8
Likely
4
5
6
7
8
9
Almost Certain
5
6
7
8
9 10
Likelihood
Rare
1
Unlikely
Possible
RISK ASSESSMENT MANAGEMENT
(RAM) FORM EXAMPLE
Environment Risks
Hazard Risk Assessment Matrix 84
Consequences
Major
(Serious harm
injuries e.g.
fracture,
concussion,
bleeding)
Catastrophic
(Death)
3
4
5
3
4
5
6
3
4
5
6
7
3
4
5
6
7
8
4
5
6
7
8
9
5
6
7
8
9
10
Insignificant
(Minor First
Aid treament)
Minor
(Medical
treatment,
no additional
resources or
treatment
required
1
2
1
2
2
Likelihood
Rare
(Will only
happen in
exceptional
circumstances)
Unlikely
(Could happen
but rarely)
Possible
(Chances are
that it could
happen)
Likely
(Will probably
happen at some
time)
Almost Certain
(Will happen
in most
circumstances)
Moderate
(Medical
treatment
required but
serious harm
unlikely)
Risk Evaluation
2–4
Low
It is most unlikely that
harm would arise under
controlled conditions and
even if exposure occurred,
the injury would be
relatively slight.
5–7
Medium
Significant Hazard—
more likely that harm
might actually occur and
outcome could be more
serious (e.g. time off work
or a minor physical injury).
8–10
High
Significant Hazard—
could cause serious
harm or even fatality:
unacceptable risk .
SAFE TO SERVE > Section B > 1 > The Salvation Army > 91
SE 5.1
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Incid
Where an incident/accident occurs that results in harm to a person or property
or has real potential to result in such an outcome, the children’s/youth worker
responsible for that activity must complete an appropriate HSE 5.1 form.
A copy must be forwarded to the next level of authority at Divisional level. In the
case of serious harm, a copy must also be forwarded to the nearest OSH office
within seven days of the incident.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section B > 2 > The Salvation Army > 95
ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORT HSE 5.1
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
If accident involves a staff member, or serious harm to anyone, forward/fax a copy to The Secretary for Personnel (04 382 0749). Date sent:
Serious harm only: notify OSH immediately by phone, complete this form, and send to nearest OSH office within 7 days of incident. Date sent:
Serious harm includes broken bone, 48 hours hospitalisation, poisoning, penetrating wound of eye, severe crushing or laceration, fatality, or 1 week or more
of work as a result of sprains or DPI (Discomfort Pain and Injury or Occupational Overuse)—see 1st Schedule, H & S Act.
Update Accident Register (HSE5.2) and for a new Hazard or Work Procedure update Hazard Register and associated induction/training procedures.
IF YOU ARE REPORTING AN INCIDENT/ACCIDENT WHERE NO INJURY
OCCURED GO TO QUESTION 10
7. Treatment of injury:
Address:
None
Phone:
First Aid Only
Physio
Doctor (not hospitalisation)
Fax:
Hospital
Other
8. Body part:
PERSON INVOLVED IN ACCIDENT TO COMPLETE
1. Personal data of injured person:
Name:
Neck
Trunk
Lower limb
Mutiple locations
Upper limb
Systemic (internal organs)
9. Nature of injury or disease: (specify all)
Address:
Date of birth:
Sex (M/F):
2. Occupation/role of person invloved in accident/incident:
Employee
Head
Officer
Volunteer
Trainee
Other (e.g. visitor/contractor):
3. Period of employment (if staff member):
Fatal
Back sprain
Other sprain or strain
Fracture of spine
DPI/OOS
Other fractures
Dislocation
Needlestick injury
Foreign body
Amputation
Open wound
Superficial injury
Bruising or crushing
Burns
Poisoning or toxic effects
Multiple injuries
Damage to artificial aid
Disease, nervous system
Disease, musculoskeletal system
Disease, circulatory system
tumour (malignant or benign)
first week
first month
1-8 months
Disease, respiratory system
Disease, skin
6-12 months
1-5 years
over 5 years
Disease, digestive system
Mental disorder
non-employee
Other puncture wound (incl eye)
4. Time and date of accident/serious harm:
Time:
AM/PM Date:
10. Where and how did the accident/serious harm happen? (If not enough
room attach separate sheet/s)
Hours worked since arrival at work/centre (employees only):
5. Mechanism of accident/serious harm:
Fall, trip or slip
Hitting objects with part of body
Sound/pressure
Being hit by moving objects
Body stressing
heat, radiation or energy
Biological factors
Chemicals or other substances
Mental stress
Motor vehicle accident
11. What things caused the incident/accident? (e.g. tiredness, not trained
in safe working procedures, wet floor etc.)
6. Agency of accident/serious harm:
Machinery or (mainly) fixed plant
Material or substance
Mobile plant or transport
Bacteria or virus
Chemical or chemical product
Motor vehicle accident
Powered equipment, tool, or appliance
12. This incident/accident occured while I was working for The Salvation
Yes
No
Army:
13. This information is true and accurate (sign and date):
Non-powered hand-tool, appliance, or equipment
Environmental exposure (e.g. dust, gas)
Animal or biological agency (not bacteria or virus)
(Person involved in incident/accident)
MANAGER TO COMPLETE THIS SECTION
1. What (in addition to 1 above) caused the incident/accident?
I am of the opinion that this was/was not a work-related injury/incident
(delete one). If not work related, or unsure, explain why on a separate sheet.
Sign (Manager):
2. What steps will be taken or have been taken to prevent incident/accident
reoccurring? (e.g. told staff to take care when tired, retrain staff in correct
procedures, put up warning signs for hazards)
3. Could serious harm (see definition on top of form) have occurred as a
result of the hazard involved in this incident/accident?
Yes
No
(If significant hazard involved, complete further investigation)
Position:
Date:
Manager to complete the following if medical treatment/ACC claim likely:
1. Did the injury involve a gradual process?
Yes
No
2. Will the injury cause time off work?
Yes
No
3. Will the injury involve medical expense?
Yes
No
(including first doctor visit)
4. Medical Certificate number:
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This template can be used as a guide and framework for making detailed notes and
also to provide information to Child, Youth and Family.
SAFE TO SERVE > Section B > 3 > The Salvation Army > 101
CYF REPORT OF CONCERN TEMPLATE (1 of 3)
Please ensure that all mandatory* fields are completed. Incomplete information may cause a delay in CYF being able to respond.
Note: If you have already spoken with an Intake Social worker about this report, please complete the following:
Name of Intake Social Worker:
Date/time of the conversation:
Outcome of the discussion (i.e. what was agreed to)
*Notifier details
Name:
Date:
Role:
Corps/centre:
Address:
Phone:
Fax:
Email:
Alternate contact person:
(Please provide contact details if you are unavailable and CYF contact centre staff need to speak with someone to clarify details)
Disclosure of notifier details
I wish as far as possible to remain confidential
Yes
No
a. If there is a reason for keeping your details confidential (e.g. the subject of the notification has a history of violence, you have a genuine
fear for you or your family’s safety, notification will compromise your ability to live and work in the community or the subject of the
notification is related to you) then please provide details.
b. Please note that confidentiality cannot be guaranteed.
*CHILD/YOUTH DETAILS (add other names as required)
*Surname:
First name:
Date of birth:
Age:
*Surname:
First name:
Date of birth:
Age:
*Surname:
First name:
Date of birth:
Age:
Gender:
Gender:
Gender:
*Address:
Phone (landline and mobile):
*Ethnicity:
*Mother:
Iwi:
Phone (landline and mobile):
*Address:
*Father:
Phone (landline and mobile):
*Address:
Paternal grandparents:
Maternal grandparents:
Siblings: (Record only those not included as children/youth in Report of Concern)
Caregiver: (if different from parents)
*Relationship to child/youth:
*Address:
Phone (landline and mobile):
Other family members: (Record significant family/whanau members)
*School/pre-school:
CYF REPORT OF CONCERN TEMPLATE (2 of 3)
REASONS FOR REPORT OF CONCERN
Please record your information below. Use as much space as required to record the details. Headings assist the assessment process.
1. What are you most worried
about for the child or youth
today?
2. Include details of specific
incidents or examples,
including dates, and details
of observed behaviours
(e.g. who, what, when,
where, how) to support the
concerns.
3. Record other concerns that
you may have regarding the
care, protection and safety
of the child/youth.
OTHER INFORMATION
Please record your information that you have on the following and indicate if the information is ‘not known’ or ‘not applicable’.
1. Family strengths and
assets (e.g. positive
aspects of child/parental
relationship).
2. Other agency involvement
both past and present:
(agency/worker’s names/
contact details, comment
on intervention, family
response, what was tried,
outcome, what worked).
3. Why do you believe that
CYF is the appropriate
referral agency rather than
another agency?
4. What efforts have you
made to support the family
or resolve the present
concerns?
CYF REPORT OF CONCERN TEMPLATE (3 of 3)
OTHER INFORMATION CONTINUED
5. When and how did you
advise the family that you
had concerns and would
be making a report of
concern to CYF? Who did
you advise?
6. What was the family’s
response and what is their
likely level of cooperation?
7. What involvement or
ongoing contact do you
currently have with the
family?
CONTACT/VISITING CONSIDERATIONS
Please provide information to the best of your ability and indicate if information is not known.
1. When is the family most
likely to be available?
2. Are there any physical
hazards i.e. guns, dogs,
etc?
3. Is English the family’s first
language or are interpreting
services required?
4. Do any family members
have disabilities we should
be aware of when making
contact or visiting?
5. Are there any other
concerns we should be
aware of?
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B.
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Volunteer Details and Agreement Form
Police Check Form
Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers and Leaders
Under 25 Years Driver’s Form
SAFE TO SERVE > Section B > 4 > The Salvation Army > 111
VOLUNTEER DETAILS
AND AGREEMENT FORM (1 of 2)
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
CONFIDENTIAL
Name:
DOB:
Male
Female
Address:
Contact phone numbers
Home:
Work:
Mobile:
Email:
Alternate emergency contact and relationship to participant:
Volunteers role: (Attach job description if needed)
Corps/Centre:
Hours of voluntary service
Mon:
Tues:
Wed:
Thurs:
Fri:
Sat:
Sun:
Name of corps/centre/church of which you are a member if different from above:
List (names and addresses) of other corps/centre or churches/organisations you have attended regularly during the past five years:
List all previous work involving children/youth (identify type of work and corps/centres or churches/organisations and supply contact names and
phone numbers):
Have you any disabilities preventing you from performing certain types of activities relating to youth or children’s work? If yes, give details:
Do you have a criminal record or are you awaiting the hearing of any charges in a court of law? (NOTE: This question does not require you to
reveal any offence covered by the Criminal Records (Clean Slate) Act 2004. For help in answering this question, contact Employment Relations
Info Line on 0800 800863 for confidential advice). If yes, give details:
Personal References
Please give the names of TWO referees who can be contacted in reference to your application. Referees must include a former Corps Officer/
Centre Manager or children’s/youth worker if you have worked in other corps/centres or churches/organisations, and then someone who has
known you for at least two years, is not a close relative and who is able to speak objectively about your suitability for working with children/
youth. (Note: Corps Officer/Centre Manager must contact the referees before the applicant works with children/youth.)
Name:
Phone:
Address:
Relationship of the referee to applicant:
Name:
Address:
Relationship of the referee to applicant:
Phone:
VOLUNTEER DETAILS
AND AGREEMENT FORM (2 of 2)
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
CONFIDENTIAL
AGREEMENT
Between The Salvation Army
Corps/Centre
And
(Volunteer)
This agreement is entered into under the following conditions:
The Salvation Army corps/centre will:
› Give volunteers some task-related training (where appropriate).
› Be available to help solve and/or listen when problems arise.
› Place volunteers in tasks that will be rewarding.
› Maintain a supportive relationship with volunteers at all times.
› Listen to ideas of volunteers and be willing to share together in short-term planning objectives.
› Provide a safe environment.
The Volunteer will:
› Reliably attend at the corps/centre at agreed times.
› Follow any lawful instruction from Management.
› Attend training.
› Have a positive attitude and be open to new ideas.
› Discuss task-related problems with the Corps Officer/Centre Manager, or his/her appointee, in the first instance.
› Develop task-related skills.
› Share ideas in planning objectives as opportunity arises.
› Be loyal to the corps/centre management.
› Communicate positively and maintain good working relationships with staff and clients.
› Abide by the house rules of the corps/centre.
› Follow safety procedures and work safely at all times.
› Immediately inform corps/centre management if any charges are laid against the volunteer within the term of this agreement.
The Volunteer will not:
› Remove any property or materials from the corps/centre.
› Copy any materials without the permission of the corps/centre management.
› Incur any expenditure without the Corps Officer/Centre Manager's permission.
› Make any statement to the media at any time regarding The Salvation Army, the corps/centre, its staff or clients.
It is agreed that the time and the skill offered to this Corps/Centre is volunteered and not subject to payment except that reimbursement
may be made for task related expenses incurred. Original receipts must be produced for all claims for reimbursement.
CONFIDENTIALITY
It is agreed that the parties to this agreement will maintain strict standards of confidentiality and professional ethics and will abide by the Code
of Ethics and Management Policies in use at this corps/centre. Staff, client and corps/centre information is to be held in strict confidence under
all circumstances and may not be given to any person without approval from the Corps Officer/Centre Manager. Violation of this requirement will
be cause for instant termination of this agreement.
This agreement is to commence on
and is to be reviewed on
.
I have read and fully understand the conditions of this agreement and the attached job description.
Name of Volunteer:
Signature:
Date:
Name of Corps Officer/Centre Manager:
Signature:
Date:
Corps/Centre:
POLICE CHECK FORM
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
Note:
› Ideally, the process of vetting must be completed prior to the children’s/youth worker or leader engaging with
children/youth. Where impractical, it is recommended that appropriate safety measures and supervision be put in
place whilst the accreditation process is being completed.
› Police Check must be done once every three years
› Police do not perform vetting services to those under the age of 17
Process
› Print/photocopy the Consent to Disclosure of Information85 form on corps/centre letterhead
› The form must be completed in full and signed by the individual concerned.
› The corps/centre is responsible for confirming:
› Identity, including maiden names and alternate names, to ensure that the applicant is the person whom is the
subject of the request
› Verifying the signature of the applicant to confirm their consent to be vetted
› Sighting and validating the personal information provided with a current form of photo identification (passport,
drivers license).
› Incomplete applications will not be processed.
› Only requests sent on the Consent to Disclosure of Information86 form will be processed.
› Use a separate form for each individual request.
› Allow six weeks for this request to be processed.
› Information supplied by Police must be destroyed once it is no longer useful for employment purposes. Burning or
shredding the information ensures secure destruction.
› The information obtained in the course of the vetting process must be treated as confidential and may not be
divulged to any persons other than the individual tasked with handling this information and the subject of the vet.
› For more information: www.police.govt.nz
Please send the original application to:
Children’s workers or leaders
» Territorial Children’s Department
P.O. Box 6015, Marion Square,
Wellington 6141
Youth workers or leaders
» Territorial Youth Department
P.O. Box 6015, Marion Square,
Wellington 6141
Please DO NOT send the application directly to the Police Vetting Services
Corps/Centre:
CONSENT TO DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION
Licensing and Vetting Service Centre
Police National Headquarters
PO Box 3017
WELLINGTON 6140
I,
(Surname)
(First Names)
(Maiden or any other names used)
Sex
(M/F). Date and place of birth
Nationality
Suburb
Residential Address
City
NZ Drivers Licence number
hereby consent to the disclosure by the New Zealand Police of any information they may have pursuant
to this application, to The Salvation Army. I understand that any record of criminal convictions I might
have will automatically be concealed if I meet the eligibility criteria stipulated in Section 7 of the Criminal
Records (Clean Slate) Act 2004.
Signed
COMMENTS OF THE NEW ZEALAND POLICE
Agency Code:
(Office use only)
Date
CODE OF CONDUCT
FOR CHILDREN’S/YOUTH
WORKERS OR LEADERS
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
The Salvation Army supports the rights of the child/youth and will act without hesitation to ensure a safe and caring environment is maintained at all times.
YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES ARE TO:
Children/Youth
› Treat all children/youth with respect and conduct yourself at all times in a transparent manner. Be a positive role
model to the children/youth and their parents/guardians so that your attitude and language affirms dignity and self
worth.
› Build appropriate relationships with children/youth. Ensure the relationships are free from sexual exploitation or
sexual harassment. Refrain from making sexually-suggestive comments to child/youth or in their presence, even as
a joke.
› Never discriminate on the basis of gender, religious belief, ethical belief, colour, ethnic or national origin,
disability, age, employment status, family status or sexual orientation.
› Never take child/youth alone to a solitary place or a closed non-public space without any visual access.
› Avoid any form of verbal, emotional, sexual, physical or spiritual abuse.
Your Team
› Work as part of the team to specific roles and tasks given to you fulfill them to the best of your ability.
› Work under the leadership of your Corps Officer/Centre Manager and be accountable to them for your work with
children/youth.
› Raise all concerns, issues and problems with your Corps Officer/Centre Manager as soon as possible.
The Salvation Army
› Respect the procedures and beliefs of The Salvation Army (a significant branch of the Christian Church), which are
based on Christian faith.
› Refrain from the use of alcohol or harmful drugs before and during Salvation Army programmes and on Salvation
Army property. Refrain from the use of tobacco on Salvation Army properties.
› Always uphold children’s/youth confidentiality and abide by the requirements of the Privacy Act and The Salvation
Army’s Privacy Policy.
› Read, understand and seek to implement The Salvation Army’s Policy on the Treaty of Waitangi.
Yourself
› Refrain from any action which could bring The Salvation Army or yourself into accusation or disrepute.
› Follow The Salvation Army’s guidelines governing the safety and care of children/youth as mentioned in the Safe to
Serve manual and elsewhere as applicable that might not be mentioned herein.
› Commit to your own development as a children’s/youth worker or leader by participating in relevant training
opportunities.
Failure to comply with this Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders may mean that a disciplinary
process will be followed (e.g. withdrawal from children’s/youth work).
I have read and accepted The Salvation Army Code of Conduct for Children’s/Youth Workers or Leaders and affirm
my ongoing commitment to it.
Name:
Signature:
Date:
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
UNDER 25 YEARS DRIVER’S FORM
This form must be completed by drivers under the age of 25 and be endorsed by the Corps Officer/Centre Manager and forwarded to the Divisional Youth or
Children’s Department, DHQ, for approval. (An approved copy to be sent to Territorial Youth /Children’s Departments, THQ.)
I,
vehicle.
(name of driver), wish to apply for permission to drive a Salvation Army
Corps/Centre:
Position held:
Date full licence gained:
Licence number:
Date defensive driving course completed:
I understand that in the event of an accident where it is deemed that I am ‘at fault’, I will be personally responsible
for the standard/underage excess while I am driving on official Salvation Army business. I also understand that I will
be personally responsible for traffic infringements and parking fines.
Driver’s name:
Signature:
Date:
Corps Officer/Centre Manager endorsement
I understand that this endorsement requires that corps/centre meet any underage excess payments provided the
driver is on official Salvation Army business.
Corps Officer/Centre Manager:
Signature:
Date:
APPROVAL
Divisional Children’s Mission Director/Secretary or Divisional Youth Secretary:
Guidelines: (The following are the minimum requirements of drivers and vehicles that transport children on Salvation
Army programmes and activities.)
› Current full drivers licence appropriate to the class of vehicle being driven.
› A safe driving record.
› Current Registration and Warrant of Fitness on the vehicle. The vehicle must be currently roadworthy.
› Drivers must not use hand held mobile phones when driving
› The number of passengers carried must not exceed legal requirements.
› Seat belts must be used. Child restraints must used when applicable.
› There must be an absolute adherence to all road rules and laws.
› No use of alcohol or drugs by drivers.
› Standard excess—$500 current as at September 2010.
› Additional underage excess: Under 21 years—$1500; 21-25 years—$1000; current as at September 2010.
› In the event of an accident where it is deemed that the driver is ‘at fault’, the driver will be personally responsible
for the standard/underage excess while driving on official Salvation Army business.
› Excesses are subject to change without notice.
› Evidence of any documentation must be provided if required.
Other Forms
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
PUBLICITY RELEASE AGREEMENT
(SINGLE-NAME)
I, (insert name):
of (insert address):
Phone:
Email:
agree to participate OR agree to let my child (insert name)
participate with The Salvation Army in a photographic / filming / recording session
OR a journalistic interview conducted via telephone/or in person at (insert location)
with
or
of The Salvation Army,
an authorised representative of The Salvation Army
on (insert date)
Signature:
Date:
I understand that material gathered in these sessions or interviews including comments, opinions, photographs and/or other
audio visual content including personal testimonies* may be used publicly and may be edited and reproduced for print / film /
video / audio / internet media/ or other form for the sole and express purpose of Salvation Army publicity.
* If you request, personal testimonies can be used with anonymity protected. If this is your preferred option, please indicate by
circling your preference: Anonymity Protected, YES or NO, use my material without protection of anonymity.
The Salvation Army
New Zealand, Fiji & Tonga Territory
PUBLICITY RELEASE AGREEMENT
(MULTI-NAME)
I/we, (insert name/s):
of (insert address):
Phone:
Email:
agree to participate OR agree to let my child (insert name)
participate with The Salvation Army in a photographic / filming / recording session
OR a journalistic interview conducted via telephone/or in person at (insert location)
with
or
of The Salvation Army,
an authorised representative of The Salvation Army
on (insert date)
Signature:
Date:
Signature:
Date:
Signature:
Date:
Signature:
Date:
Signature:
Date:
Signature:
Date:
I understand that material gathered in these sessions or interviews including comments, opinions, photographs and/or other
audio visual content including personal testimonies* may be used publicly and may be edited and reproduced for print / film /
video / audio / internet media/ or other form for the sole and express purpose of Salvation Army publicity.
* If you request, personal testimonies can be used with anonymity protected. If this is your preferred option, please indicate by
circling your preference: Anonymity Protected, YES or NO, use my material without protection of anonymity.
x
e
d
n
I
d
n
a
s
t
c
Useful Conta
The Salvation Army
» DIVISIONAL HEADQUARTERS
» TERRITORIAL HEADQUARTERS
04 384 5649 or 04 802 6269
› Northern
09 639 1103
› Territorial Youth Secretary
04 382 0725
› Midland
07 839 2242
› Territorial Children’s Secretary
04 802 6269 Ext 24542
› Central
04 384 4713
› Secretary for Personnel
04 382 0730
› Southern
03 377 0799
› National Health and Safety
Coordinator
04 382 0715
› Communications Secretary
04 802 6269 Ext 24270
› Commercial Manager
(for SA insurance queries)
04 802 6269 Ext 24220
Departments Responsible for Protecting Children
» Child, Youth and Family Services (CYF)
0508 FAMILY (0508 326 459)
www.cyf.govt.nz
» CYF National Office (Wellington)
04 916 3300
www.cyf.govt.nz
Other Useful Contacts and Telephone Numbers
» Occupational Safety and Health Service
(OSH) (Department of Labour)
0800 20 90 20
www.osh.govt.nz
» Kidsline (24 hours)
0800 KIDSLINE (0800 543 754)
www.kidsline.org.nz
» Family and Community services
04 9136601
www.familyservices.govt.nz
» Lifeline
0800 543 354
www.lifeline.co.nz
» The Kids Help Foundation Trust
0800 WHATSUP
0800 942 8787
www.whatsup.co.nz
» Barnardos
04 385 7560
www.barnardos.org.nz
» Jigsaw Family Service
04 385 7983
www.jigsaw.org.nz
» Safekids
09 630 9955
www.safekids.org.nz
» Are you OK?
0800 456 450
www.areyouok.org.nz
» NetSafe
0508 NETSAFE (0508 638 723)
www.netsafe.org.nz
» Children’s Commissioner
0800 224 453
www.occ.org.nz
» Ministry of Youth Development
04 9163300
www.myd.govt.nz
SAFE TO SERVE > Section C > The Salvation Army > 133
» Youthline
0800 376 633
www.youthline.co.nz
» Plunket (National office)
04 471 0177
www.plunket.org.nz
» Family and Community Services
04 9136601
www.familyservices.govt.nz
» National Network of Stopping Violence
Services
04 802 5402
www.nnsvs.org.nz
» Lifeline
0800 543 354
www.lifeline.co.nz
» Shine—Te Kakano Tumanako
0508 384 357
www.2shine.org.nz
» NZ Family Violence Clearing House
04 801 2707
www.nzfvc.org.nz
» National Poisons Centre
0800 POISON (0800 764 766)
www.posions.co.nz
» Water Safety New Zealand
04 801 9600
www.watersafety.org.nz
» Women’s Refuge
04 802 5078
www.womensrefuge.org.nz
Index
A
Abuse 7, 41-48, 53
Accident 3, 19, 28-29, 35-38
Accreditation 51-55
Activity 4, 8, 19-32, 59
Activities (offsite) 23
Activities (night) 23
Administration 13
Adults 4, 8, 26, 44
Allegations 45-48
Area 4, 13-15, 22-23, 29
Articles of Faith 61
B
Boating 27
Body fluids 14
BBQ 26
Behaviour 1-6, 8, 19-20, 23, 42-45, 61
Beaches 26
Blood 14-15
Briefing 19-20, 22-26
C
Cleaning 14
Communication 10, 23, 27, 36
Code of Conduct 10, 51, 53, 54
Child, Youth and Family (CYF) 41, 46-47
Clothing 7, 20, 23, 30
Contents 1, 11-12
D
Danger 1, 28
Definitions ii, 13, 28, 35, 41
Discipline 3, 5, 42
Documentation 19, 38, 52
Doctrines 61
Drivers 24, 51, 54
Drugs 5, 24, 42, 53
E
Emergency 12, 20, 22, 26, 29, 35-36
Environment 1, 10, 19, 26-31, 37, 51, 53
Equipment 8, 10, 14, 22, 24, 26-27, 29
Experience 20, 28, 36, 42
External 21
F
Factors 21, 28-29, 41
Family 3, 5, 41, 44, 46, 53
First Aid 11-12, 22, 25, 29, 38
First Aid kits 11-12
Fishing 27
Film (images) 6
Fluids 24, 30
Food 14, 25, 31
SAFE TO SERVE > Section C > The Salvation Army > 134
G
Gas 24, 26
Gloves 12, 14-15, 25
Groups 9, 21, 26, 28, 52
Guardians 3-4, 8, 10-11, 13, 21 ,36-37, 45, 53, 59
H
Hazards 22, 30-32, 38
Hand 2, 14, 24
Help 3-5, 21, 26, 29, 41, 46
Helpers ii, 1, 4, 19, 21, 28, 35-37, 51, 53
Hygiene 6, 11, 14, 31, 43
Hypothermia 30
I
Information 5-7, 9, 22, 26, 35-36, 45-47, 52, 54-55, 59
Incident 19, 29, 35-38, 41
Internet 9-10
K
Kitchen 26
L
Language 1, 53
Leaders ii, 1, 4-5, 9-11, 19-28, 35-37, 42, 45, 51-55
Life jacket 27
Likelihood 28, 32
M
Media 36-37
Medication 4, 13
Mission Statement iii
Mobile phones 3, 10, 24, 27, 36
Q
Qualification 28
R
Ratios 3, 21-22, 26
RAM 28
Recreational drugs 5
Reporting 10, 35, 38, 45, 47
Risk 2, 7, 26-31
Risk matrix 32
Risk evaluation 28, 32
Rules 1, 3, 19, 20, 24
S
Safety and well being 1
Sexual abuse 44-47
Sleepover 23
Social (networking) 1, 6, 9
Storage (food) 25
Suspicion 10, 45, 47
Swim 7, 26, 27, 29
Supervision 3, 10, 19-26, 28-29
Sun 30
T
Team iii, 1, 3, 6, 11, 13, 21, 29, 51
Transport 24
Treaty of Waitangi 60
Training 4, 11, 24, 28-29, 51, 54
U
Useful (contacts) 133
V
Venue 20-23, 26
Vehicle 24-25, 30
Vetting 54-55
Volunteers 19, 51-52, 54, 111
N
Night activity 7, 23
Non-prescription 13
O
Offsite activities 23,35
OSH ii, 38, 95
Outdoors 24, 30
P
Parents/guardians -4, 8, 10-11, 13, 21 ,36-37, 45, 53, 59
Participants 1, 13, 19-32, 35-37, 53
Participation 1, 9, 20, 29, 53
People 6-7, 9, 19-22, 28-29, 35-37, 42, 44, 46, 55
Permits 26
Physical contact 1-2, 42
Photographs 6-7
Police check 51, 54-55
Policies I, 8, 10, 19, 59-61
Procedures i, ii, 19-24, 29, 35, 46, 51-53, 60-61
Privacy 5, 6, 8-9, 19, 35, 46, 52-55, 59
Privacy Policy 59
Publishing 6-8, 10
W
Water 7, 14, 26-27
Washing 14
Waste 25
Weather 22, 27, 30, 42
SAFE TO SERVE > Section C > The Salvation Army > 135
Endnotes
1 Refer Section A5: Accreditation
2 Refer Section A5: Accreditation
3 www.salvationarmy.org.nz/explore-
25 Food Standard Authority, www.
nzfsa.govt.nz.
4 The Salvation Army Workplace
Compliance Manual, chapter 20
27 Refer Section B: Forms
28 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
(https://intranet.sarmy.net.nz—
Human Resources, useful documents)
5 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
29 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
connect/about-us/position-statements
Documents
6 Excerpts taken from ©Prayer
Etiquette by Barbara Lardinais, www.
hannahscupboard.com/prayeretiquette.html, used by permission.
7 Adapted from The Salvation Army
Code of Conduct for Publishing
(Children/Youth)
8 Excerpts taken from Youth Work
Ireland, (2009) Appropriate Use of
Social Networking Tools: Guidelines
for Youth Work Staff and Volunteers,
(Dublin: Irish Youth Work Press)
9 Refer Section 4: Protecting Children/
Youth
10 Refer Section C: Useful Contacts
and Index
11 Refer Section B: Forms
12 www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/
catalogue/pdf/first-aid-2009.pdf
13 www.dermnetnz.org/treatments/
antihistamines.html
14 Refer Section B: Forms
15 www.pharmacylive.co.nz/safe-use-
of%20medicines, www.everybody.
co.nz, www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/
catalogue/pdf/first-aid-2009.pdf
16 Refer Section B: Forms
17 Refer Section B: Forms
18 www.medsafe.govt.nz/Consumers/
safe.asp
19 Refer Section B: Forms
20 Refer Section B: Forms
21 www.pharmacylive.co.nz/safe-useof%20medicines, www.everybody.
co.nz, www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/
catalogue/pdf/first-aid-2009.pdf
22 Refer Section B: Forms
23 www.pharmacylive.co.nz/safe-useof%20medicines, www.everybody.
co.nz, www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/
catalogue/pdf/first-aid-2009.pdf
24 www.pharmacylive.co.nz/safe-use-
of%20medicines, www.everybody.
co.nz, www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/
catalogue/pdf/first-aid-2009.pdf
26 More info—http://ehs.uky.edu/
clean.html
Documents
Documents
30 Refer Section A: 3 Incident/accident
Reporting Process
31 www.salvationarmy.org.nz/explore-
connect/about-us/position-statements
32 Refer Section B: Forms
33 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
34 Refer Section B: Forms
35 Refer Section B: Forms
36 Refer Section B: Forms
37 NZ Transport Agency, www.nzta.
govt.nz
38 Refer Section B: Forms
39 Refer Section B: Forms
40 Food Standard Authority, www.
nzfsa.govt.nz, The Salvation Army
Community Ministries Food Safety
Policy
41 www.watersafety.org.nz
42 From AS/NZ 4360:2004
43 Refer Section B: Forms
44 www.sunsmart.org.nz
45 Refer https://intranet.sarmy.
net.nz (Human Resources—useful
documents—The Salvation Army Health
and Safety Handbook, July 2007)
46 Section 2(4) Health and Safety in
Employment Act
47 Refer Section B: Forms
48 Refer Section B: Forms
49 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
50 Refer Section B: Forms
51 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
52 Refer Section C: Useful Contacts
and Indexs
53 Refer Section C: Useful Contacts
and Index
54 Unicef (2003) ‘A league table of
child maltreatment deaths in rich
nations’
55 Section 2, Children, Young Persons
and their Families Amendment Act,
1994
SAFE TO SERVE > Section C > The Salvation Army > 136
56 Doolan, Mike (2204). Child death by
homicide: an examination of incidence
in New Zealand 1991-2000. Te Awatea
Review, 2(1), 7-10 www.vrc.canterbury.
ac.nz/resource.htm
57 Vulnerable Infants study, CYF
58 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
59 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
60 Refer Section C: Useful Contacts
and Index
61 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
62 Refer Section B: Forms
63 Refer Section C—Useful Contacts
and Index
64 Refer Section B: Forms
65 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
66 Refer Section B: Forms
67 Refer Section B: Forms
68 Refer Section B: Forms
69 Refer Section B: Forms
70 Refer Section B: Forms
71 Refer Section B: Forms
72 Refer Section B: Forms
73 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
74 Refer Section B: Forms
75 Refer Section B: Forms
76 Refer Section B: Forms
77 Refer Section B: Forms
78 Refer Section A6: Salvation Army
Documents
79 Refer Section B: Forms
80 Refer Section B: Forms
81 www.police.govt.nz/service/vetting/
guidelines
82 Refer https://intranet.sarmy.
net.nz (Human Resources—useful
documents)
83 www.salvationarmy.org.nz/exploreconnect/about-us/articles-of-faith
84 Refer https://intranet.sarmy.
net.nz (Human Resources—useful
documents—The Salvation Army Health
and Safety Handbook, July 2007)
85 Refer Section B: Forms
86 Refer Section B: Forms

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