Ju U g

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Ju U g
Un.
MLIV
WEGlHIHIGTOI1,
·
Ju
U
g
U. C. mnRECH 1945
U
·
a
0. :
* *ffl!
N EVERY JOB
THERE'S
Noel Coward take vote. Bohel, Sreek,
writes al/ont the lrookalyt boys this lime
hi/; reg air;' n othly pe...m. Ilm i',eortif irtpt
a yelt cuitnis to u~sfr.o}n ¢1 r'st. C amptlil. l&*ly.
MEMORIES OF "GREENPERNT"
If eve, we want more ien at the trrant,
No need to wvorry, no nieei to liula
Just gather an armay of all New Yorkers,
As eoinbat troops they'd sure
he
After tt SeSSioi
Life over
it ia
A
MAKE IT ELECTRICAL
(Or More lighi on, a Dark Subject)
You say hepilckled, tl,,k,. haile'd,
Limi'ar leg-*edi pile
lel,
d
,
Stewed, or wiao'tv,
roggead aIi
Use a nly tern, yrll like lies lit
fi' &tusnIALL 1,EIy
EtT,
L,. U. N,, 124.
corkers.
OR
TWO
He,.es t ,aI with
rpogc. She
tIlT thiNkjs
that
f.rr..
....
.. .h.
a fri uwork Pith a ... w
of amooy,, shoyld hIdrs:e an x1ra teda.
AWARDS
I fslaked fior medals for foremelt
'Te ime that WOUld le enoIgh
Fiji the good old Army a.td Navy
Just ut, nul called my bluff.
They sent the governor and mayor
The VancouIver air base bodl
A eolonel and a commaarler
O(le guest for every hand.
)..Irger garlne,
hete wouhl be quite tame.
One .rilp to the top nf the,tniili
Sh{ate
I'll guarantee as par aroonpers they would rate.
A rush-houly ride on t~he Bronx Expiress
They'd .. ake CIonanlos. on I in.iss ay guess,
With their New
Year's Eve i,
hll Tdin s
Square,
The action h.ere just cant compare.
For a leader give en/ the "Little Flower,"
Put hill on stilts, you have,isenhower'
how's this fir a
lase, "Butch and his,ol"?
That just amUat enidts our recruiting.
TI{*PLaWA
el ws muic hd then canic speeches,
Our praises they elmite toI sing
Soa flag red arnd blue, with
a big white "E/,
Abov o Ur plant couild swing
It Iiok a lot of teamwork
Andi a litile overtime,
A foreman with lots of patience
TO keep those gala in Iino.
Wait! A war try fer a ])siler they hoist
M'oider da hums, 'fore dry get us foist!"
PIVT. WILLIAM
S rEIfcx, Jli.,
Formerly of L. U, Xa 3.
iTe era.t give vent to his feelings
With a cusp word or two or three
Bit knlows he must handle wen/es
Like handling T.N'!.
CONTENTM ENT
It's niee to sit by the res
And see the Jlg aglew.
Lis-ten
to the snatp ud crackle.
Watch th. fl.niies weave to
See the sparks fly npwa'Id
LAUGH
We're mighty proud of that little pin
I hi Armny ard Navy "/,"
But thie one they gave the foreiala
Lootks just ike aiiine to In.
fnd
rio,
TIUti! SMFTIT,.
In a filtatig, lutid or siiioike,
L. U. No. 4b.
See then, disappear sitaether
lip through the chinmecyts
throat.
It's nice to sit by a IIe bI,' gh,
Especially o, a cnld and win.y
night.
flrothrr SntiU, f/ot a ldere
p
n/
fire~her orrces
tellng
ob
e'
.r.
t heIr, and h,'s wrirttit a 14ftil
hIehotes no lrothire
serm
e~l/e
's
it's all if fun]
Yes. it's Tiee to sit by the fireside
G'w'~van-You
..
every titae
yOU
kick jut.
With your pipe ,i.. e.sy chir
Whe, the day's work is over
And you art' free fro eare,
natlrl'.l.dt Ib sn hatppy
eilter if
hlcc puid vour eliiers w itill[
It.IT. Mor,I,,
L. (U. N., 13122.
Watch the good wife knitting,
As busy as a [tee,
While you sit there smoking,
With the children on your knee.
Wr,,%M A. W/is I'mE ol7,
1. 0.
'rothte" A. J.,, har'on of L. U No. B.66,
H~oust~o,
Texas as/redl is to priltt the fohioiris01
poae~tp *hieh
toe of Mbirh mem~be'rs *u'r.rte
crd
tedicrLt.., to " s l"i
' /lirknr,,n, Ie'IOawIts it /
mj
a a
fir 50 yeote a.,I tis
0eh,rit'dhis edhty-fifth
birthday aid is still gobrtl sitevii,
Linemen there
were, who juit hpeaure,
They thought they were sn is,
WIould violate all sfid y laws,
This country
e
anld devise.
And it wrought their own undoing,
For they sleep, heneath the aol
And we hope they're ntopursuing,
Such wilful w'ay w ih Gid.
I'rom~ t I,'oth'r' nrpross tie horder caomes
ninanthntp'
e ,4tabe to
tar' S old ro at ,tr atlr
Mi rhfs linrt' ,lt. I o
t e dI on. . fI
m4
,,ortkS itt,,
a aunhiler of years in "(Ii ]very JOa',
Your linesm I've perusedl with rlstraetin.
And mow thit yeuL've left us,
tihe on the
hah,
It gives me a swet, satisfacti,,
To pjl yel all epitalth, erstwhil
W
r DoteIt
S, that all who ntmayfOlow, will harken,,
Unless they clir vie wit, It tale,,ted ge,
They the d.oo... of that
pagemay rit larken
For your lites were un,
,iqtue inl the atnals if
prose
'ihioalgt
perharis oif lmistaikes th en,~ w ere
F,'
Vuairitpoet, i
Aut rev
scurt
yon
expressedl
wihtl,,ut
e, thanks to your, Lileie
Mt~int,
i, Leln..
J.
L, V. Na. 110.
oetry fi.al *
so. t wh
r
parody o7 it.
e will take
YOU'RE DOING ALL RIGHT
You sailors nnd soldiers aren't doing so bad,
There's ..ot }1thing you don't have. (Don't
throw it bots/I)
You'v,
got all the eigarettes
the factories
are moama',
You've
Yeu've
You'Ve
you've
got
gol
get
got
all the ham and even the barone
all the cigars and chewing gum,
i11 the whiskey anti all ihe, irn.
all the gasoline that's worth a
dam,
While we, got alonig the best we can.
You get all the steaks that are easy to chew.
You ge t he best lhIb to make your stew.
Yot marrield all the gals here at hon,
Ilefor e on.-t hbt the world to roI,,
U, puys here at Finm are holdibg the sacks,
you'vo got all the WAVE3S and all if the
WACS.
You've gAt swell yachts to sail around. [Jus?
tlc,,n,,
ftll.ows/.
you've' got a jeep t) ala.e to uwr,.
,ca, to you sOllter, a.... sIaeli, you're doing
all right,
Although-uf
eoursu--you do have to fightl
C, F, MItH,
,. U, No. 48
Q. At. Atuiae
fwoO &;4he~tMSt., A %¼ c'adhisa, L. C.
dik
CHAT
Page
Frontispiece-Our Electrical Brothers on thee Nazi fron t
Open Letter to Bosses -....
Full Employment Bill Erects National Landn larkLegal Battle of Labor Enters New Phase
Newspaper Columnist Views Joseph 1). Keer nan's Work
I. B. E. W. Electronics Schools Just Keep Ro Iling Along
A Decisive Fight In tihe Big Woods
.
Security Bill Foctses Gaze on Jobless
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* This Joural I ,ill
The first of each mt
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_92
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_ 101
........
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d84
86
87
88
I90
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Member Develops New Breed of "Electrical" Chickens
Pearl Harbor Needs Fllectricians
-
Why?
Death Claims Paid
In Memoriam
Official Receipts
83
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Management Fails1'o PIan For Post War
Editorials
Woman's Work
..Correspondence
.
82
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...lO. he held responsle Ilows
for
h is ihe closin date; all copy iln
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P ,ttsc'nt Code,''
Marshallteavitt, L. U. No, 124. writes us
that "Bother Geojge Brown is the only Iay
mereber, within thd kenof your co
ets, whb tlas kept a completo file of the
Eh[I.CTRICAL WORIKERS' JOURNALT since gaiy
in the prs!nt Ciftl'y." This is good news
because it irailes rea l ap,,
I eciath)1 of
the value ot he ,J(RtNAI. Wt know this
publication has ral illuenee with our
Bigabors and witb peOOle outside of the
104
-
_
10_3
Our mail he
cnais.
a derfo
Robert F. Wallace, 4.Ii. No. 683, Celunhus,
Ohio.
e says,: "I didn't lihe laxt month's
solutio.. to tihe '
IaYoll l)o It' because it
involves several vio)latilzs of th cde, and
if we art. geiS to tadvalce the highest arid
most adequahe sta...dars Io, the eire
industry' as stated fn page 19 of that .a.no
issue, we shoulId try to cmiply wiih the
-
II(1
expressed by correspondents.
he i uur
our bands oin or beforc
Another local In inn pubIcation, The
Acplitfter, published by I,, U. No., 1(48,
itdleiates al,,w t
sirhe
Of (Cor ocMal
niolls afdI tuhth l'dep jislecest ill tifluonisl.
The Am..plifier
ix puhixhed a
In(iianLIli]iM,
Indiana. It is ut ..d.1-ohlkig six-pagti utesEXIiC{ pIVE OFl(FIC
Internatiom
r~i~l{
1200 J1th St., N. W_,
Iatill ,L BllW.h
h.i.gtn
.. 5,1). .
l{rll
hap(l:r aiR]
S
tl}11Stel
lTAZE
eaitoois
tly
( 1.
5,th St., N. W., Washington 5,D. {.
1200
1!terlti
*.tj.rll,' a
asIre!W, W. A. IlAN,. {47
Stlith Sixth Avt., .I L, Vernon, N. Y.
VICE PRESII)ENIS
First DEstri, t
r. IJNIES
1[5 Dundas St., Lo.Ld..I,
.
i.. . (l,,nela
Second Distt
r.]EllN
J. IRIF:AN
Ril. 239, Park S
Bhlg, 14'sti.ii 16. IllaTs.
Ele
Third District
Wit,lliAi[.
WD
AK. t
Room 1102, City Contre Bldg, 121 N...th ilojllt
St., PhiblddlpIhia q. Pa.
Fourth District
Gi(ItRON M, VFRpMA N
1423 ]Ismi1es Cllirma[ 8~.lk ]Mhis.,
Chattanooga, *]It!1111,
Fifth Dithtrlit
G. X. TAIMit
905 Watts Bldg., B
irminigha I, Ala,
Sixth District
M. . It ...Y...
4200 Lake Shore IDrive, (hkiegt, I3, IlL
Seventh District
W.. , IN(oRAM
3641 Laughton St., Fort Wvorth 4 'h'i Mas
Eighth
District
504 Denyrl Theatre
li, W. fill,l
lBldg., 1olly*, 2, (oho
Nith Distrilt
,
. Sr{'I M ... I..
910 (eltril Tsw,]r~, Sl.E Illhsvt,,O 3, C dl
Railroads
J,. J. list
330 South Wells St., RIoon 600, Chicago 6I}1
a
)It
with illhmtratiions,
]ivly aPlLVy
iOn
lu..
The Anplifier hIt
soihal attitud, 'The
1,'aling atrticl, inl the Crst numithber points
out that I. B. E. W. stewards .1(n1nsr "Clothe
a Child Projoe.l" The publctation is al1o
trying to get trl/ .lll .lh.I(*rs
INITERNATIONAL
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
C'IAM~Ls M, PAhULSF:N, C'Oielrill(Il
4917 W. Cu)ler
AVe., Chieago 41, Ill.
Firslt )istliet
IlAnY %A N ARSIOALy. JiR.
[;0 E. 25 0thSt., New York 10, N. Y.
tIiiI
·
]
lst
i't
F. L. KaLLEy
~111~St.
%/5 Be
Ilyde Palk 36, Mass
'fihT]d District
WILLIAd GC. .......
2 L0d-5 law & Ijiharneo Bldg., Pittsburgh I9, P,
Fourth District
C
..
V.
......
2025 2iud St., N. E., \Vasillgtoll 2, D. (.
Ffllh Dislrlit
DAN MA.NX NI
130 No, Wells St., Chieago 6, il.
Sixth PItrict.
D. W. W
TatY
ElddysLo.nL' Apiartients, Vathington 5, D. C.
Sivipith DP trvit
('qyrsJ.
F.,
347g 191h SI.> Sa,, Francisco 10, C(1if,
Eighth IDistrile
u.ion
.....
ani
J. L. Me. Biem.
15l Jlmes St., 4abor Terplh,
WXillipcg,,Iln,
Cai',lLda
the
dilficul ties
to ',derstand
,ncountered by
business
nma nager s.
John C. Tooracy, L. U, No. 664, writes to
express the apprcciation of ,ailay old-tilleFs
for the picture
this O(Vo of the October
issue, "dhpinting a portion of our old navy
yard." He ays: "It do.so't matter how
often the eld-tilers nay halve passeld those
familiar old la.dma.h
s, Ihero is a thill and
exhilaration cxprrienced ill seeing thoem
pictured, that warms the cockles of the
heart."
Our cover
photo this month is published
courtesy of the Balhniore
Museum of Art. The paintig is "The Net
Wagon" by Gifford Beal.
Lhrotgb
the
Ia
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
Our Electrical Brothers on the Nazi front.
Communications are the life of an army, and electricians make history the world over.
VOL. XLIV
WASHINGTON, D. C., MARCH, 1945
O~pen
All4"
Dear Boss:
I haven't written you many letters lately. One
reason, I take it, is the fact that the war has taught
all of us something of the value of cooperation.
Betterl relations exist between labor and management. Indeed, there appears to be real opportunity
for union-management cooperation to become the
rule rather than the exception.
On the other hand, disquieting reports reach us.
As the newspaper boys say, these come from unimpeachable sources. While many important employers are sincerely and patiently attempting to
usher in a regime of cooperation, other employers
are just as quietly and patiently blueprinting an
all-out open shop drive against operating unions.
Unimpeachable reports have reached me from two
industries that these drives (in the traditional
spirit of the class-war) have been carefully
plotted, and are ready to explode, as soon as the
peace comes.
Boss, this is nothing short of treason to the republic, and let me tell you why.
If we get any kind of prosperity after the war,
we will get it only with teamplay. There is opportunity to pass from war to peace without too much
dislocation. There is a chance to put to use the 150
to 200 billions of dollars in savings; there is a
chance to get production of consumers' goods
moving; there is a chance to transfer wartime
workers and returned soldiers to peacetime jobs;
there is a chance to balance private enterprise and
public works equably; there is a chance to boost the
national income from the wartime level of 148
billion to a peacetime level of 185 billion; there is
a chance to head off an after-war slump; but these
chances depend on teamplay, cooperation; antisocial employers can not rock the boat. Boat-rockers
may wreck the ship of state.
Look back with me at what happened at the
close of the First World War. Powerful employers
in 1921 launched a sweeping anti-union drive. It
was carefully planned, highly financed. Newspapers boomed broadsides against labor. Courts
issued injunctions. The drive was successful. It did
not break the unions, but it deflated them. And it
NO. 3
To6 B3aes
dropped wages far below prosperity levels. War
on wages played an important part in subsequent
events. It is not too much to say that the great crash
of 1929 was the result of the open shop drive of
1921.
Wages are a method of distributing income. If
the wage earner-the consumer-does not receive
enough in his pay envelope to buy back goods produced, business is thrown out of balance and recession sets in. The bosses between the years 1921
and 1929 took an unconscionably large share of
national income in profits, wasted it in stock exchange orgies, or invested it abroad, with the wellknown result.
The Committee on Economic Developmentyour committee, boss-has itself seen this necessity
for after the war. The C. E. D. has set the postwar
job level at approximately 55 million men-about
10 million more than were employed in 1939. But
whether the United States finds employment for
55 or for 60 million men, after the war, the same
methods must be put into operation-team play
and cooperation. The same readjustments must be
made. Wages must go up, not down, so that goods
produced, can be purchased. The low-paid segments
of the population must be retrieved, and made
prosperous. Boss, the truth is, this is the only way
to save the American system. It cannot be saved by
internal squabbles.
If bosses in 1945 or 1946 can follow this vicious
old pattern again, the United States will be headed
for another crash. Nothing can prevent it. Nothing.
This is why, boss, I say that an open-shop drive
after the war is nothing short of treason.
It is doubtful if our country can stand another
crash, and another depression like that of 19291933. It may finish us off. It may do the job on us
that the Nazis hoped to do, and could not.
Radicals say: "Don't stop this prospective
open-shop drive. Let the damn fools do their worst.
Let the crash come, and then we'll get complete
state control."
Boss, I don't want this. I want democracy. I
think you do too. If you do, don't rock the boat.
-JOHN Q. ELECTRICAL WORKER.
U4
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
qjj EMPLOYMENT Bil
C&ect
IVal
EMOCRACY in An.er.ia, like a gasoline
engine, makes progress on its explosons.
D
O to change the figure, a ship of state,
demorracy, does not resem/ble agreat ocean
liner which drives directly to the port but
is more like a great sailing ship that tacks
against the wind and by a zigza; course
reaches its haven.
This prio.ess is well illustrated by the
course of the full employment.
policy
runing
through CongrESS throughout the last 10
years. Agitation for full employment
eally
began in the great depression, 1933, anti
tuit~hlutNI
ulnder surface throughout many
y.ars, with the application of many minds
upon the subject.
Bill Is Landmark
A bill known as the Full Employment Act
of 1945 has been
introduced
into the Senate
by Senator James E. Murray. This bill
surely represents a landmark in American
history. It is not long, declares a great
policy, and provides for constant surveillance of the program by a Senate committee.
It should be of great interest to labor inasmuch as labor has been in the thick if such
legislation for more than a generation,. Labor
has always stood for wiping nut the husinoss cycle and for continuous and steady
employment. Labor's high wage theory,
strongly pushed in the 1920's, certainly has
played a great part in all the legislation
that has appeared in the direction of stabilizing the econonmy.
Senator Murray is chairman of the suboroimitee of the Committee on Military Affairs. This subcommittee is caled War Contract Subcommittee and has upon it, in addition to Senator Murray, Harry S. Truman,
now Vice President, and Chapman Revel.comlb of West Virginia. The committee says
this about its bill:
Threat of Postwar Unemployment
During the var, we have transformed our
¢conomy into an economic skyscraper of
breath-taking magnitude.
At preiseit our
economy is producing goods and services at
the rate of $196,000,000,000 a year. This
compares with a gross national product of
around $99,Ofi00000,000-,ronly about half
the size-in 1929.'
Aolost half of the framework supporting
this giant stricture consists of war contimcts. When war contracts are withdrawn,
the danger is that the entire edifice will
topple over.
In considering the magnitude of this
problem, we must remember that we have
reached the present unprecedented level of
production without the serlices of the more
than 11,000,000 men and women in the Army
and Navy. When the war is over, these
people will want jobs. Moreover, during the
war almost 7,000,000 individuals have beei
added lu
hllecivilian labor trce
. A large
proportion of these, particularly women, will
insist upon their rights to continued enployment.
In lM, prices in general averaged about the
*
ame ua durinto the present year.
l iandmA4
Murray bill crystallizes public opinion
of last five years in notable document. Labor greatly involved
Unless an economic substitute is fouud for
war coltracts, mass unemployment will be-
comlie a serious threat and the nmber of
unemployed ,ne, and woen, i fins country
could easily surpass nnything that was
dreamed of during the last, deprmssion.
Existing Legislation Inadequate
At various tImes one or anthear of the
demobilization statutes have ben iscu.,sed
as though they represented a significant approach to the problems of postwar unemployment. Before passage of the Coontrac.t
Settlement Act, for example, many mianufacturers talked as though all they needd to
assure a high level of postwar production
was the quick settlement of their termination claims. In the same fashion, the coordination of war prodaution ut-haeks ,d{I lhe
disposal of surplus war property have on
various occasions been endowed with all
importance which, in the light of cold
analysis, they never deserved. The blunt fact
is that all three measures are basically
ailed at liquidating war production. They
are purely transition mecasures-yes, important transition measures- but nothing
mm.'. None of them attempts to assure a
sound postwar econom.y.
In addition to the three industrial demobilization laws, a number of other postwar measures have been enacted during the
Seventy-eighth Congress. We h
ave
enacted
a . 1, bill of rights. But its provisions are
not yet fully adequate to meet, the needs of
returning soldiers and sailors. Although we
have provided for loans to state inemqphoymerit compensation boards, we have done
nothing to increase c
overage under unemploym.ent compensation and old-age alin
SUrvivors insurance,
to
liberasze
benefits,
or to provide for health insurance. We have
passed legislation to provide for a miscellaneous assotlment of
oied-control and
rivers and harbors projetS, but have postponed action to develop the river baslns of
ore country in a courageous and corprehensive fashion under a Missouri Valley
Authority, an Arkansas River Authority,
andi
similar agencies in other areas. We have
tlone little in the preparation of a pls/twar
tox program, on the protionib of foreign
tradE, nr in the adjustment of freight rates
that discriminate agains
t industrial activity
in the South and the WVest. We have passed a
road bill but have delayed action on postwar
airports. We have not coma to grips with
the problem of monopoly and international
cartels. We have not yet mapped out postwar policies on the fundamental questions
of labor relations, wages, and prices.
As measured against the bachground of
our economic needs, the postwar laws that
have been enacted add up to very little. ThE
balanc.o sheet shows that the Seventy-eighth
Congress never came to grips with the
problem of providing an economic substitute for war production.
The repercussions of this failure have
already been felt. Knowing that practicall
nothing has been, done to provide for post
war employment, hundhreds of thousands of
war workers, vitally meeded in the production of the weapons of war, have quit their
war jobs and sought refuge in civilian
industry and trade. It is incumbent, there.
fore, upon the Seventy-ninth Congress to
map out a broad plugranm of postwar legislation. This is essential not only to the
preservation of our economy in the yean' to
cone.
but also to our catching up on delayed
schedules of war production.
A Public Responsibility
Il January, 1944, the President of the
United States, in his message to Congress
on the state of the union, outlmd all "
nomic bill of rights.'" Tb first point in this
document was the following:
"The right of a useful and remunerative
Job in the industries, or shops, or farms, or
mines of the nation"
Ten months later, in an address at Chicago, the President stated that
"'to assure the full realization of the right
to a useful and remunerativ, employment,
an adequate programl must proivile America
with close to 60,000,000 productive jobs,"
Statisticians may debate a.ong themselves as to whether the prerise goal should
be a little nmre or a little less than the
President'!
60,000,000 f
igure.But no
thoughtful American no matter what his
creed or station in life-would deny that
every man or woman in the country who is
willing to work and capable of working bas
the right to a job.
As yet, unfortunately, we do not have in
America, an 'adequate program" to provide
60,000,000 productive jobs. Nor will such a
program develop out of thin air. The right
to a job is ntI self-enforceable, It can be
translated into reality oniy through the
joint action of the people of our countrybusiness, labor, agriculture. nn all erart
groups-acting through the medium of their
duly elected Govenmient. In short, the socalled right to a job is a mnanh,gless figure
of speech unless our Government assumes
responsibility for the expansion of our
peale.tine economy so that it will be capable
of assuring full employmnnt.
Strategy of Full Employment
The fight for full employment is a twofold battle.
On the one hand, the .ovErn..eit mlust
do everything in its power to stimulate increased opportunities for empioymnet In
private enterprise. This is the major front.
On the other hand, to the extent that
private enterprise cannot by itseIf assure
full employment. the Government must take
such measures as may be necessary to fill
the gap.
A more preeise way to describe the relationship between private and Iublic activity is by examining the various types of
investment and other e
xpenditures that
makIe up our total jiroiductio of goods and
services-technicaly referred to as "the
gross
n.atin cIal product." A. of the niiddle
of this year, the gross national product, or
total expenditures,
amounted to about
rThe gross national product, as calculated by
the Desartmelnt of Commecrce, a, at proe.nt the.
cawomonl used nooiasur.i..i oMf
ouat,~n Utota
eo.nomic activity Wohen taxe, and reserves are
SLtactcad frao lhe
grols r.l.otiaI
prrI ntlod
, tie
remainder is the lational I.o1....
e1
as
MARCH, 1945
duringthe ensuing
Federal Government, required
fsca1 year or year tos assure a full emrployment
volume or the grass national product, and
"3. The estmsated VolUme of prospective invest.
ment and expeniditle by private enterprises,.
conlsumers, State and oal goverlnments, alid the
Federal Government during the ensuing fiscal
ates
and Informa.
year or years. and the estii
tlon herein called for shalJ take acclount of such
for
and
ortner
expenditure
oregln1 ilvesftent
.import
as affect the volume of the
exports and
igros 11ational produtl.
++(b) Ifthe eslimated agg egate vohlue of prosee-It/vae vesiment and other expenditute, as set
the
is les
]
.I ian
(a 3 of ishlseioe,
,l3mated aggirgat, VoItauie of investment and
to sasule a uHi ,mother ependijture rquld
oI.duct,
pioy nent volume of the rc..s natIonal
as set forth in ca) 2 oI this section, the President
dgt set forih a eIlleral
shall ill the natioualhl
Ifogrm. for encourg/zig increased non-Federal
Ive:lteat and olider exenlditure, oarticularly
pronote
uchlnesll tyent and expenldture asill'
increased employmnent in private enterhiriset. togerillr yblih sucrh he'slati e reconinetidatio0hs as
ha may deem necessary or desirable. Sueh prograntlma include, huIt nlerd n1ot behllibitd t. a
presentalt on, of current and projected Federal
Po0licies and alivities with reference to bilaking
and Currency,
ozhdoly and comlpetition, wages
an1d working conditions, foreign trade and inllysltlhe
'eurity.
inelit, agricutltre. taxation, social
irt such
developmnent of naturalIndresources.
other topies as ,,ay directly or indirectly affect
the level of non-lederal investmentand other
explnditure.
"le T, the extent that such increased hon.
Federal invc.t.n.nt and other expendilure as
m.ay hr expected to result from actions token
tinder IhI progra... set fur h in accordance with
(b) of bits sectloln are insficirent I prnvide a
fill e, plo.y..
nu tvol ni.e of the gros~ hinolal
VICE-PRESIDENT TRUMAN
SENATOR MURRAY
induct, the Prelident shall include, in lhe
transmiiled in accordance with secbion
Idt
201 of the Budget and Accounting Al of 191.1 as
2. To reporl to the Senate and the loule of
$196,000,00,000. As can be seen from amendled, a genral pro.ram of sucgh Federal in- flepresentatldt's
m, later than March I of each
elr1stii[en and oIlier expenditure as will be stTable 1, this totaI is made up of the fl,year,
its hirindigs and rceom~mnendotions on the
tiehent to bring the aggregate volume of investtogether silth a proposed joiut
Budget.
National
erit anlld otlher expenditure by private business.
lowing:
resolution sellin iWtbllh foy the ensuing fiscal
Billiam COnSumers. State and local govermnent, and the year a geierl] policy on the total rolume of
required
Federal Government, up to the level
expenditures anti
ther lnveatment, the
Idvtlark to assure a full employrlent volume of the groal federat
total reeipts, to be collected fromi taxes and
hall
be
dosianed
nationlal
product.
Such
progrlam.
95.5 to contribute to the national wealth or well-being. other revenue, and the volume of borrowinds or
Consmers$ expenit ur--e-------Id
i-nW
2.0 and may illude, but tieed not be limited to, nit debt etirement,. for the purpose of
Capital outlays of businms.........
as a guide to the individual commitbtre of Conspecific programs for sistance to business enterExpenditures by State and local
gre.
dealing
with
sluh,
subiject%,
prses. particularly small btuiness enlerprises;
4,e Vacaicies il the nminbership of the corn7.2 for usefuil public work-s. particularly such public
goVetllnlH11
.......... nittee shall itno affect the power of the remaining
w.orks as tend to promyote increased investment
Expenditures by the Federal Governhiembers
t execute the funcIIon, of the yornan/d other expenditure by" private enterpr'ises:
as
6 for useful public services, particulrly such, rnittee and shall be filled in the same, manner
ment ---------------------.The car
In
Ihe
case
of the original selectio,
public ,ervices as tend to raise the level of heailth
a
chairin/itte shall selIet a ch~arman and Aice
and e.ucation: for slum clearance and urban
naila frain aliolig its hic..bers.
Total -------------------------- 196.4 rehabilitation: for conservation and developentar
duty authorized
Id) The committee, or ally
of natural resources: and for ruralelectrifieatinn*
s uhorized to sit and
subcmilnsttee there
construction shall
All programrs calling fol plte
A Full Employment Bill
act
at
such
pleces
an
l~imes,
to
require
by subnovide for the performance of the neceesary
peila or otHjeiw/e the
attendance
of such witwork by private concerls on lhe basis of conThe text of the bill is Its follows:
production
of
suih
books,
papers.
nesses
and
tile
traL
[.; awarded In accodallce with applicable laws.
Sec. 1. This Act mly te cited a "The Full
anld dtcmlentenis, Io ariiiietcr such oaths, to take
'(dl The President may from ifle It time
Emgployment Act of I045.'
and
such
testimony.
to
procure
stch
pniitihig
Iransi t Congress such supplemental or revised
bintig, alld lo make such expenditures as It
formahion, programs, fir lcgslative
estimateS,ll
Declaration of Policy
services
deems
davianble
Thle
cost
of
seo
raphic
recomnmenldatiolln
A he nay deem necessary or
to report suich Iearigs shi lt not be in excs~ oa
See. 2. Tho Congress hereby delaret thatdesirable.
25 celts per hundredl words.
work and wilflni
(at Every American able lo
(e) The cmmntilte is empowerrd 1to appoint
to work has Ihe right o, useful ard relulirra"Preparation of National Budget
aid fix the compensation of s.ch experts. conshop,
dr
por
oiices. or
five job in the indilstries.
imposed
'Ste.
402
ta}
In
addition
to
the
duties
and aren.sultaits,
eccnilleians. anld clerical
farms. or mines of Ihe nation:
upon tIhe Bureau o the Budget by section 201 of
graphic asiglstarce as It deems necessary and
(b) It is thil responmsstilhy orf ite Ciovllnlment
Act
of
1921,
as
so
fixed shall
1he
Iudget
and
Accounting
itdviable.
hul
the
co...p[srAllon
to guarantee that riglht by asuring continuing
a¥enided. the bureau. under such rufles and rge-g
prescribed under
nort exceed the c,oni*nsat,o
full eniploymeni; anld
prescribe
h, sh]allthe ClassIfication Ad, oI 1923 as mended, for
Llattyn air Ilie piesddenr tay
of the Government to assure
p
i i Ls the
,.() With te assistlance of the several departcomparable duties. The cotm.ittee milay uilira
roeni by I Igecitiraing
continuing fi °cilup
mOltS and agenels,. pielare for bim/ the infrsuch volhnary ard 'uemlnmpratld services as it
to the fullest extent poail.e without Fde till
called
for
in
section
401;
Tationn
and
estimate
dems necessary
anl il
auhorized lo utilize the
htglient
lnae1stlnct and other
i
exrinidlnte, th
'(21 Cooperate with the several depaltments
sri-kes,.
faclitfe$,
irformatioi, and
e I soun]d of
.oyment
by private entlrfeasible levels of eml
if lie Government.
the dcpartraent, and agencies
and aencie~s in develguing such estimles and
prise. (2) pru¥idinmI Wlhatevir voltimyne of Fedliatl
.
tte. shall be
prolrams as may be useful in IIgiding the
ththe colun
if) Thu expenses
investmrncntand e}Ihll eselndlWItre may it elede'l
aid one-half froi tlhe conlinpent flnd of the
preparation. of th national budget.
to assral
contir. lin frill t',uiployrin...I
Ilhr.ough
he
B/reau
of
the
froll
the
cotirngea
t fnld of
"lb)
The
President
-enate
and
one-halt
Sec. 2 Tharho udget anid Alcountang Act of 1921,
voucher
the House of Representatives upont
llndget. shall issae suceh directives to the several
as alrieded. is hirrey
"lv
iIended by lrluriinug
signed
by
lhe
CIII
hiai.
to
as
will
enable
them
and
agenclies
departn/ents
lmnedia tely frioloirtri, secieDn 217 of ttl]e Ill
as flay be
)repare such plans and proiaii
See, 5 Theme ire hereby authorized to be adanew t ite, Wo b, ti tl IVI. 1hich SlhItll road a
be imeeassa ry to
gleeded durlng thie ensuin or $nbsequent fiscal
ropmiad sIucli
,Lull as mai
follows;
yealrs to help achieve a full employmen.t volue
eli1hiale al, de efici y in tle naUonal Budget.
tt thel grss'aiona.. product."
"Title IV. The National Production
And Employment Budget
Joint Committee on the Budget
'See. 401 (a) In addition to tih esicmates anr¢d
ed fur Ill setion 201 uf liie
..
other irforrmna.tioni
Budget arld Aceltlintinr Act lit 1921, as imilrdeil,
the President shall iansIflt ti[o Co'llaions ui I}h
first day If
lctI re.u.lr SI.,(ion thu NaIrloil2
piocluction aid inpluipvmerit B1ldge~[t (hliiltei
referred 1t, as thr nmlionai
hIud.et'y. vthie hl shl[
uiid 'olritlset forth in sumrI
"] The eslimblted m11itl[tir of jobhs needed dnrilui
the ensuing fiscal
ar11or
i
eal's 1 aSsure coi.mu the cfi ietilad
i
tinuing
uHl eIuMiimicn[,ut.
dollar volume of lhe
1
"tios ilu.loria
.. [ oal rdikl. at
the expected level of p1ic's, ler ui'ed Io *uiovmde
rfe u i' ,t I ,as
~tlch 11[uimibFr ofrv lI (hie' l driii
envolUme of the giross laijmlal[
'full ,inplorneit
See. 4 a/). There is hereby cstal)liehod a .'oilt
Coniinliitee on the rudgel, to be .o..... i.rd of sii
r,,l,,ets of the Senate, to be appointed Lv the
P.resident of the Sellate from among the members
iff the Senate Committees ol Ailropi'iatiolln,
Finance, anid Banking a.id Currinov , and I.
of Representatives to
rouse
m1elube~rs froiml the
he appo'i~tcd by the Speaker of the House of
the members of
lSu'prusetmtlt[s from .im...
the liousetCommitees on Aproprialtons. Way.s
and Mea.g, alnd ITinkir
Wnd
Culrreny, with sueIk
party representation as will reflect the reallve
iiio'mtbeil shilp of thi majority and niinniity parties
h
tI
oot flepro
enIalivos.
u
in the, SIriate anld hIe
(d} It shall be the function of the Joint Coinlittee oi Illse Budget1. To niake a detailed study of the inforgatIon
and estimate, transmitted to Congress by the
Ycesidellt on tile first day of each regular session
in
accordance with section 401 and section 201
oif thi' Budrte and Accounting Act of 1921, as
ahindorhi
alld
p ro duett'l,
'2. The estimated vo me ot rivest tent .nd
,onoilier expenditure lI, tinvte 'lttrlr111,s,
stoners, State anid local governments, ald hle
TIe comparaTcl
e
figure for ie nationla inrgime
dming thefirst half of 1944 is 155 hilolln dollars.
Rate of Expenditures
See' 6. (al The President shall periodically
revelow al) Fedrial xIr edIttires undet a promore l mlanonec year for
pril ions for pirqdsn
the psuiros of .SCelnlamii..g the extent to which
the carteret and ;ml ctlipaed Ievel of non-Federal
,eCdinlV
warrants a
Ivestmfeent aI d olWh
detr-e0ae Ini sch Futldyrid
wridit ire,
fi) Sthbjeel 1I sueht ilinIgms amld s/ltadards
s may be set foill inI ridi vidul approraiioi,
acrs and othim-I sttu[ls, Chin rate of Federal exer[ilds oa
penditure
.
i.der a mjiurp'llal ons for
rla,
ii.m h. aried to whatever
moere than nilem I'nr
extent and iI whatever nainner the President.
ac.ing It...
llhphm
ie t iielor of hishe Blureau ot
Ito he ticesary for
Illm udIlet, ma"y diebi'igi
tihe pIrpose of
ssurinpg rant inuing full epldoyinIm. Wtwithdue onlsiderltoll being given to curand in
rent andd anticipae variations In savings
investment ang other lx, rndlttre by private
buneslh,
con.sumers, and S ate and local governtents.
See. 7. SecIlon 212 of the Budgel and Accaunt(Continued on page 10¢)
The Jourail of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operathrs
a
2.9d BATTLE
LABOR
4
n AuAtew Phae
orizIng a closed-shop contract as indicating
an intention on the part of Congress to
authorize a majority of workers and a company, as in the instant cse, to penalize
minority groups of workers by depriving
them of that full freedom of association
and seif-organization which it was the
prime purpose of the act to protect for all
Justice Jackson Dissents
N the basis of recent decisions In ,ases
In a sharply dissenting opinion on this
case Jtustke J ackson joined with three other
judges in upholding "the right of each union
control its own adndssions to memberunder closed-shop or maintenance toship,"
and the right toexclude "those
whose loyalty is to a rival union or hostile
of membership agreements
organiza..... Justice Jackson went on to
prent with the company. The company then state that "the exclusion of those whose
signed a closed-shop contract with the inde- loyalty is 6, a rival uadon or hostile organiis one of the most comnmon and most
pendent which required that the company zation
understaudable of practices designed to dewould be forced to discharge all workers who
did not become
membrs of the union. As fend the uadon against undermining, spying
and discord and possible capture and dea result of this agreement 43 CIO workers
livery
over to a rival. Some unions have
were discharged by the company.
The National Labor Relations Board held battled to exclude Commuliss some racketeers. and all to exclude those deemed
that ditchite of thcae CIO members was
The Court Decides
unfair labor piactice and brought the case disloyal to their purpose.
"There are those who think that the time
Union rights and union dut.es as exelusive to the Supreme Court which in a five to four has come when unions should be denied this
decision
said
that
the
anion
could
not
legally
bargaining ag'nts far gresp) of employees
control over their own affair,." But the Na.
have been more clearly (lefined by the refuse membership to the CIO workers who tonal Labor Relatios Art expressly permits
applied
for
it.
Supreme Court in two recent cases, In the
closed-shop agreements except in cases when
ease of Bester William Steele vs. the Louisthe ctifiied union is "established, mainThe
Opinions
tille and Nashville Railroad and the
tained or assisted" by unfair labor prac:Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and
The majority opinion stated "that the tices of the employer.
Enginemen, the court decided that the duties of a bargaining agent selected under
The effect of this ruling, which penalizes
Railway Labor Act imposes on a labor
the terms of the act extend beyond the mere the employer by forcing him to reinstate
organization acting by authority of the representation of the interests of its own the discharged workers with back pay,
statute as the exclusive bargaining repre- group members,." It must represent the seems to be that the "employer is
empowered
sentative of a craft or class of railway em- interests of all employees "fairly and im- and required to do the policing" of the losed
ployees the duty to represent all the em- partially"
shop under the terms of the agreement. The
ployees in the craft without discrimination
The independent union did not refuse dissenting opinion voices a sharp warning
because of their race and that the courts membership to all of the former CIO unionto unions, which will undoubtedly reflect
have jurisdiction to protect the minority of ists who applied for membership under the the opanilon of a substantial number of union
the craft or class from the violation of such terms of the agreement. One hundred and leaders. "that a gcod deal labor has fought
obligation.
eighty-six valid votes were east; for the for may be jeopardized if the price of obClosed-shop policy was laid down for the independent 98, for the CIO 83, and five for taining it is to have the union policed by
unions by the court in the case of the Na- neither. Of the 43 CIO workers who were
the employer." Employer opposition to
tional Labor Relations Bsi~d against the discharged, 12 did noL apply for membership
closed-shop agreements will undoubtedly be
Walla.e Corporatian and Richwood Clothes- in the independent union and 31 were black- stiflened "if employers must underwrite
pin and Dish Workers Union. In this case bailed by the independent because of their
the fairness of closed-shop unions."
the National Labor Relations Board cer- attempts to organize the Wallace employees
tifed an independent union after an elction for the CiO union. The majority opinion on Serious Obstacles
in which the contest was between the inde- this matter was that "no employee can be
In the Wallace case it happened that an
endent and a CIO union. Prior to the lec- deprived of his employment because of his independent won the election, but counsel for
tion, both unions had agreed that the prior affiliation with any particular union." the National Labor Relations Board assured
winner would enter into a c.o.ed.shop agree"We do not construe the provisions auth- the court that it is not a one-way policy to
require independent unions to admit their
enemies. Counsel stt
at the same policy
would have been applied, in the samemanner, if the CO union had won and had excluded some indrpendent members on the
suspicion that perhaps they were company
spies. This decision will undoubtedly inter
pose serious obstacles to all future bargaining for closed shops and is likely to be felt
by both the CIO and A. F. of L. unions many
times as often as independents.
Justice Jackson concludes his dissent by
stating that "of course it is the employer
who is penaliwod here, and on shallow and
superficial
examination it may seem like
another victory for labor. The employer
must pay many thousands of dollars for
bours unworked because it performed reluctantly but in good faith its closed-shop
agremment made under authority and with
the approval and instigation of the CIO
unions whose members now gain back pay
by its repudiation. We think this cannot be
The Supreme Court of the United States
(Continued on page 112)
before the United States Supreme Court
O there is grout.d for the belief that the
labor movement in the United States is
passing into a now phase. The straggle of
the unions for recognition and the right
to bargain and of workmen for the right
to join without interference s.ems to be
cahld tlnming in a victory for labor forces.
In a recent opinion Justice .acksonsitates
that we "appear now to be entering the
phase of struggle to reconcile the rights of
individuals and minorilils with the power
of those who control collective bargaining
groups."
The "Wallace Case" defines and
limits union and employee rights
ff
MARCH, 1945
4
*nown ;ospaper}iOnla
to
prolt
e. d k noi...edge ,f
a
moer
man with
Lahey is8
labor than any othr. What he say,
Brother Keeno
of
is siwificaIt.
E thought t would be a good idea to
drop a nolo {o Donal] Ne]son amI as¢I
Whim for a plaragaph or two of his own
to
contribution
,nan's
.
e
estimate of Joe
w.as Ndlson's stros g
the war effrt. K.e.na.
bltar dirccttd the
right urn. whI n thb
$70,000,0,000 an.aal bsiness of WPB.
"1
"Dear Mr. Lahey, M, Nelson, wre,
am happy to be able to say
t
fLw
woris
regarding the work of Jseph D. Kelnan.
"Joe has been
w.iIt
the pde(le(-,s.. ..
ktewqap e4 C mn u4
oaeph4 5h.e Kenan WORK
Edwin A. Lahey praises energy, pafience and efficiency of I. B. E. W.
leader
f
,,
te odd ob to aolther. While ibe
fimtan
,th in his ta.t.s, tvx of his uncles, who were
tle t, loca[
eaily stages of th, defense pj ogtmrn made elertriiclans, had him aplnticA
134 of the Intet-,rnttimmal;1 [ltlh,,hon.l of
*thit conrtructaint WO.ke, ,
it possibleto
III 1914, lutrtng ;1 diefiro area to ara thaumgbiamt the ,ountry Electritcul \rers.
M.
J,,e \xnt to (IChallos
f-o.
...
lressoim
thim bailding of Ar,,y
in order to ,frdhti
Paulson, then head of Loeal 1[:l and..ne..'
camps and ne..w wal prod.uction fatdities.
chait-mwan of the exeutllve board of tbe
Meeded
,¥ n
o..el's wee(
Later, when indtitid
I. B. E. W., for help in ftnhlir a jol. Piaulon
.. or
by the htes of tbould in.. order to ana
r
heIikaa
Te-t.jiwiath
not only trot let ;o j,
,
oe
Keenan
war produ.iction irusliesi
.I,
his
worked hard to ntrlhnizt friction and eoi- phone Catitpany, but took hi .
tme,llttlyounl... Elcutrical
,i11g
an..
itt
filling
n
tinh..s..I.. Illl
cie the differences
'
'I)tIlst[,], who
inkerin lin
tetivtic- .
W
agement whibhit-hititly ar-ise durinjg sucb
Ke,,na's
Ieep, loavlty, did
,till
letoins
Je
n~ts.
large-scale readjesKltm
["ran ft.,aid shappnig
more thai
.. n1y ohhc,
e ......... career hiI tbe, labor tmlav...e.tt.
The Logical Person
Beginnilt, as a c1a1l--spJlcer rbthe Pleindin
tConlqt.en.ty. wben develptmh
plhone
.
o..nlalny, Ke,-n Iase through the
ditoaect
cated the nt-I of a vice ehairhnl
eaine su, ai-vi lI for
ranks of his trade, ...
lIabor
il
p gluetion
the War Produ.tion Bo.a.
a
inl 1923, amd
the Federal EIletric Coll l1y
functions, Joe lte.nan leot-id as tile manmfor
..
c.tial]
left that job in 19:1 to bee...e anlt. .
e O ffice
of
. Tb
this delicate and key posi
Labor Production is in charge of developing engineer. He was cttid secretary of the
il 19:17, and
Chicago Federation of laor
ludction in war
progtlams to .tin.l..ate tirt
plants and other essential establish..ents, devoted his fall time to the labor ioveitwenSt
the War Producti.n [hat-i als long [s I ('an
retoembe,.
Ili, idefatigable offolrs in the
investigate rt.aa.s. for relatively law labor
production in plants and imp..rove thee conditions, assist in the ,stabtishmeut of joint
labor-maagelment co...mities. act as a central point of rref-een.t
aInd Ihfo..atillo
tile War Productimn Bltrd with
in
from that {iate until his
intly into Govern-
fl%- tt serv..e.
Etch shifting of the hurm-altvtath! sands
-cutves,
..a..earance
..
of
witnessed the d
the deflation of o.ace-great rejtaihmt tas. Jo,
Keenan was a notable oeept ion to this
renld. When the fr-atewtk o1f one of the
early war agencies woh l fall apart, the
great minds of those ag-enicies wooal e re,ealed as packig their bags and leavi ng
Washington in a huff. Biu there inl tib
e of
wreckag, would be Joe K1enan, tilawar
.
of poltical amnitions
the swiriinm current.
around him, at his batte.e.I desk, and harking telephone entrcatios. perhas, to som.
at Ih(, ,tber end of the
duious labor
skate
11hi. eve-ywherc
to get men hert,,
country,
t,olatl..s for the
to find new and ,-i rettt
dialsJirdtdiL(-t
hoary, old imdtntaial
putes-t to trop [hei' c ['llabba natl sIfiils
t1,51LI,
tldiIll
it t
concepts of "tla
se.iotI
,y..
a..it
}vi, vll
in short, to sUatt
this nation's defcmse c pe a Lins.
Notable Exception
bb nle't lliO to
Ifi ehTai
ln
It witsdne
tile efforts of Joe Ka.a:,u that the building
and eont.rurti.on trade sabiliattiom LgIgeegritlflltl lt
I
mint was rec .ed.. [is tripairlite
labor, ad... I t a-tlts
between govt nllt,
madie it possible for the huge wam building
,
bases, and.
program of canton.ment. ai,
other emergency instaIatoims to be finisbhd
ahead of time ant with as few iIterruptions
>ly pssble ander thei
as was hu...nl
stances. Building tradles unions and eelitaCt.aethtue
.- w.rking tndnlit.n..s.
tars revised
an1d disehal1tel I,The unIions a--u'red
tens Of
sponsibility fiyr the Illov..a... li
(Contimued on page 106)
,espect to
the handling of indilml a I elatibns problems,
and secure appm-opriae tiler-a.ge.cy action
orrect
problems af indutstrial health and
to c
safety, transportation and housing, vhen
laeduce
labor producsuch problems may
tivity.
"It is often said that an executives
achievement is largely based on the associates he selects. I know that my job was
lightened because Tlo iet!lin Was one of
our top staff hi the i mportant an sensitive
Ie has served
on
spot of labor Iott.tiebhbi'f.
his country without stiat in a critical period
in its history."
That's a naie lItelr of recommendation
from tilh boss i, any CaSe.
His Early Life
Joe Keenan IannlO Ilb
ho,-l way inl the
rough-ad-tumbble sheool of labor politics,
and before enterinig thie governtnt service
in 1940 had been active in the lefor mave,c nturmy. le
nmTit in Chicago fur a quarter
was born in Chicago in 1896, the hilest of
eight children , and the sont of a truck driver.
hOncme;
was the .ei ghburHis boyhood env
hood of Thloop amnd Van Bmure Streets, oi
Chi(alt
. When Joe was
the near west side Vf
12, his father was pe-lnitnetlIy paralyzed,
and he immediatly went to work to help
his mother support her lIrgo family.
His first job was as an errand boy for a
euli1inor; then mesold score earaIs and workd
as a bat boy in, a ball park; ltter jumping
VeWsRK
Brother Joe Keenan on the Western Front.
ilhe Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
n1
As James A. Morrell, union business representative, told the new class, electronics
is a "fust"for electricians who expect to
stay abreast of the rapid developments of
receid years.
Electronics class at Temple University under auspices of L U. 98.
I.B.E.W.
ELECTRONICS Sch
j"Ad Keep Ral/in 9 4/on?
DAYTON
(From Dayton Journal)
LECTRICAL workers in Dayton are preparing themselves for widespread postEwar use of eleetronics.
An adult training class in electronics was
instituted at Parker High School with W. G.
Williamson as instructor. Eighty-eight
workers have enrolled.
E. R. Puterbaugh, field representativ for
the Apprentice and Training Service of the
War Manpower Commission, 11 West Mon,ment Avenue, was instrumental in arranging
the course.
Classes to Expand
Classes will be held Tuesday through
Fridays, fromn 7:30 to 9:30 p. m ., and will
last for an indefirite period of time, possibly
Ls ]long as three or four years.
Classes soon may be expanded to include
postwar phases of the electrical industry
other than industrial electronics, Puterbugch said.
Williamson, member of the Electrical
Worker' Unimo
No. 82, A. F. of L., was
sent by the union last September to
.ar.quette University, Mi]waukee, Wisconsir, fop
intensive training in the new electrical trade
work.
The clnon, which pesonsors the cou.rse,
planS to erect a two-story bui[ding as soen
Is possible to house the classrooms.
It ishoped the classes nay be extended
from an adult education p
rogram
to
include
vocational programs for youth.
The union contemplates spending as much
as $25,000 fol the program. Electronics is
now in the same stage as radio
1e ,oredlly
was two decades ago, Puterbaugh assrted.
With Marquefte School as leader,
local union classes spring up everywhere. I. B. E. W. leads again
Believing that in the postwar era, every
lathe, press and light switch will be run by
electronics rather than switches or buttons,
union officials and Electrical Workers feel
that such classes are necessary to keep them
informed of changes in the field.
Opening talks last night we", given by
J. E. Breidenbach, business manager of the
local union, who has for years advocated
education in the electrical industry; Clare J.
Shatkey, director of Parker IHigh School,
and Perry Ritchie, assistant director.
Breidenbach is president of the Central
Labor Union and business agent of the
Building Trades Council and Electrical
Workers' Union No, 82, as well as business
ntasnger of the Electrical W
orkers'
school.
J. W. Howell is secretary. Both are members
of the union executive board.
ST. LOUIS
(From St, L4ils St<r-Timnes)
To meet the challenge of recent advance'tents threatening to revolutionize the pictricinns' trade, the A. F. of L. Internal na
Brotherhood of Electricnl Workers, Local
No. 1, began a class in electronics at the
Lwioa hall, 4249 Gibson Ave.
About 40 mem.ber attended the 1irst
reekly class in the course which wilt last
about 20 weeks. Eventually the course will
be made available to any of the 2,500 .e.n.bors of the local who wish to tale the course
which will cost the union about $10,000, John
T. Meinert, union president, said.
Electronics Widely Used
Electronics is the science dealing with
the movements of electrons. While by no
mleans new, it has been given great impetus
by war needs and has bee, widely applied
in industry and military oplrations.
adar
is one of the more spectacular products in
this field. Electronics is used il welding,
heating meta:s, regulating motors and in
mnany safety devices. Another electronic
equipment is the photo-electric tube,
Oscar W. Rosenkoetter, a union member
who has just completed an intensive 10-week
course in electronics at Marquette University, Milwaukee, is the instructor of the first
class. Seven other members, all chosen beerbuse they had
,niversity
training in elec.
trieal engineering, will take the electronics
course at Marquette and become instructors
for the local.
A..angemelnts for the lboal class were
made by the union's edua.tional committee,
composed of Gus Schumann, chairman; W.
B. Smith, Allen Siepmann and Elmer Kimn
Instruction in the class will be both theoretical and practical. In addition to lectures
and te'tbook work, class
nembers
Will have
an opportunity to operate electronic equipment and will be taken on tours of industrial
plants where such eqipment is in use.
Instructors Academically Trained
Instruction in electronics for members is
being carried on by the I. B. E. W. on a
iation-wide scale. Eighty-five unio
representatives from various parts of the nation
were in the first class at Marquette, which
was attended by Rosenkoetter. Eight or 10
succcive classes are planned at Marquette.
'Electronics has grown fhom a $1 billion
industry three years ago to n $5 billion or $6
billion industry now,' Schumann explained.
"Electricians must be able rot only to maintain electronic equipmen
t must be able
to install it."
The sentiment of lbe
1sitdtLs was summarized by H. P. Koenig, assistant business
representative of the union, who said, "Little
did ie think when we served our time that
we would have to go to school and study our
trade again."
PHILADELPHIA
(From Temple University News)
At this date some 100 members of Local
Union 98, International Bmroth.crl.ood of
Electrical Workers, have satisfactorily ormplated the first course in Electronics giver
at Temple University rnder the Engineering, Science, and Managenct War
'raining Program. The group of nore than
125 were assigned to five sections, and have
silent 72 hor-s attending classes two nights
a week, three hours a night, front 7 to 10
p. e., covering theoretical as well as practical industrial applications of electronics.
Some 80 of the members intend to continue
on in the next course of "Imlustria Electronics" for a similar priodd. This group
will start class meetings and laboratory sessions on January 3, 1945.
In a conference with various inlstruc.or'
of the groups we have found that the .e..bars of Local Union 98 attending class have
MARCH, 1945
been the most eonseientious and interesting
group that we have had under our program.
We have trained some 8,149 personis in eletronics for varous war industries such as
RCA Manufacturing Company, Philco Radio
and T levision Uorporation, and the Signal
CorpIs. and the instructors are of one opinion:
that the Local Union 98 group is very
receptive arid at a1 l titms. tries o tie up
the theoretical and practical applications
of the days work in this imports.ol flt'l
We believe that the program to Ldate has
been very sIc.s. fill, and we were fm, [tnale
in assignitng to this group the follloing
"I lle
Mr. Ghanger D. Seh
ader--Shlst
.f Scb
eree ill Eliectrical Englneerin. a, Massaluse.
wts lu stital of Teehnology. 'Tweve
yI a idntiistlt,
r~s'
experienee
lphii hleerie ('oinpony . Five )elIs teaching expit.b.net hit cctloicr.
311.. Elda rl C. Tlabbert Bachelr of Srincne in Electliteal Engmneerin's at Drexel
tf r echl Di gitgy.
... uiteei, yQa
Institute
ih ilus tial e Npwriene
at Phihladelthib ,
Electric (opon}lfy anid two yearst teaching
Ux 10rihInce0.
fit. S. Ealh MeorIBachelr of Selelite
In Eleetial Engineering at Vhirieiia
Polytechnic Institute. Sixteen ytars' industrial experience at Philaiddplia Elctile Comipany aid nine years' {taching
radioiii
electronics.
Mr. Oliver F. (finev
Bachelor of Science
in Electrical Elgineering at /nmtsity
of Miri..esota. Two years' i.du.tril, ,xIparlane it Various industries td'd {w,
years at Philco Radio and Television Co'pr'atitn. Two years' teaching eutrunkis
and radLt.
Mr. Horace E. Shone-Bachelor of Scince
i Electrical Engineering at Syracuse
University. T[en years' industria experienee at Genere'l Electric C6ilipitlry alid
Federal
Corn ulunicat~il,,s
CoImHfissbion.
Two years' teachLig experience in eIectron ics.
Tnthe five sections, 72 hours each, with
some 125 students attending. thele were
9,000 possible student hours. By checking
our attendiance records from the instructors
we found that the absenteeism in the cl.sse.
asl practicall
y negligible, and in checkinj
with the stuu
ents
we found that in
.li.o.t
all ases the absences were unavoidahle, duo
to personal or working conditions, with
vjoltr s students reu(pesting a chance to
make up the nights that they had missed.
We wish to coipfirw,,t you and yourl Inlinttee on the organization of your lneelnhtrs,
and we are glad that Temple Uni,,rsity was
able to offer training in the fieldl of ehtronics D) your moen. It has been a pdeasue
for the
I
stiat "e.officers and instructors If Temple Unmveisity to work with
Local Union 98 in
tventure.
his We hole that
you will feel
e to offer suggestions fLo a
more successful program and in consulthin
us about any other training problems thatf
you may have.
go
The Electron Theory
Folilowhig the elton theory of matter
all substances are corn posed of atoms. These
atoms when briken d.wn, al esmall worlds
in themselves, the p
v pottin
,siAi standing
still and the negalVe electini
revolving
around ill its <,rhit. WerrIlt } added to some
atom.s eontainig one or niote nu'lelr parides with zero (ha
ec. These are known
as ieUtleon. Althouh these
l
iticles are
present~ they do not disturb
thle elhctrial
halance of the atom as they cont..ain nll
charsc' eithe.r }
or,osiive
Iilgtmtmi. So/etimes there are ehllers Of positive protons
.iln neiativ e lections a llin ilret balance.
When thi, hlnlar,,ti is dft.iihtld or .verxeighlted with ele (t..I.ns or cI{,nIits the entire
atoml becomes poehlhid. When this halppens
,it)her in the titI or ill
grolp of atoms
such as in a fluo... .. t tube where both ends
Ilohw but the tille os not light it is said
and liquids and are known to us as conductars. Vaum!Lns and gases are also conductors
but as there is very little resistance the
electrons fly withIgreat
velocity fromi the
negative cathode to the positive anode due
to the pressure and the attraction of the
opposite pole. This pressure can be in the
forni of heat, light or electrical current.
Like Billiard Bolls
V
i,, an
eletrical p.essu,, is .Ulp esed
ta ..c n utors the electrons
start to drift from atom to atom aid whiile
the individual
.ovemenLt
of the electron is
coparatively slow the results are immediate. Thb best compan kon Ca.bh, made by
imagining that you have put ten billiard
ball, in a Ifint and a
ists
as
o y
hit the
In'st nie ile llst one will fly ill the nlotil.
The btidvihil niotion of each ball was very
,lowbllt Ille result was insta..taliou.
Tihe
word dill is used in electronics to describe
to hb i n].iW . 'I his iNal happ....l titlher to onle
the movonlirt of the electron because the
atom or oilions of aliens whhh means that moqenieitf 4heinfividlmhal electo~n is om,the atoo o, groupi o atia i' said to be paravtily siw. It is not inp than a few
hni.ized. This happ"ro when the magnetic imches per ..minlte. This in no wamy affects
flield of posilve In.rton is ,.er-halanc.
tile rapid as.ni.sion of electricity egardAlong these lines also rones the eli.imlation less of i stance.
of the idma of
It is like an
This is it t tie when gases or van' ur,
orang crate
,
filed
...
;witn
The tighter' are used as a conductor, as the electrons fly
they are ]nkl(d the ltss spice 1her is for fromt tile nelr, ye eathode to the positive
the eleelro s to ov btween. ']his is also
anode, wilh ti ... en.d.us velocity. The low
true of the erate whic
Ihohs
l them because is always
oro negative to positive. This is
the protons and elections are lattbied in.
the 'eve.se oI what our text b
ooks
have
To an electron thele is no such things as taught us in the past, but can easily be
a conductor. It will drift through anything proven in elertltmies. The intlidUtion of a
if sufficient pressure. i im pLrssed upon the third ellemet in a tube! is lcnown as the grid.
i¥1assT'his has been prvenl by
b reakdown
of If the grid of the tube is made positive it
insulators and other so ailed insulating ma- aiod the positive anode of the tube in
teaials when u..dler high tension voltage.
pulling Ig iter
number of negItwively
In other masses these prtoio, ,nl eIec- char'e d leI¢.on fromt the negative ,etode.
tres are imore tightlyvatLiend together, but lint, if the grid is made negative it nppost,
coitain certaill large
l l Lin lbl [ ,io f ree-rov ing the passage
,g
electrons from the catlodo
elections. These are usuaiiy found in metal
(Co,,tItinlne oi page 107)
tiponl these
CHICAGO
(By CHARLEs D.tMAsoN)
The flow of electrons through g.s'. or
VacuUmS explfinbls to US, what before were
conshitred ,accidets, filashovers or leaks
The introduction of the gas r vacuul
tube brings out the fact that 6cticrilty
ean be conducted by a gas, a vaI u
or l.y
,m
type of material containing a sufficiert
amount of free roving electrons.
L.U. No. 16, Evansville, Indiana, vored +o send worthy Brother Herbert Lamey to Mar.
quette University. Guy Vaughn, business manager, hands Brother Lamey his check for
salary and expenses.
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS aud Operators
F
"lie is of age, you is ask heem yousef,"
said Jles. as he emptied the contants of the
watIr bucket over Else's head, and knelt down
andmopped the blood off his face.
4 5Zeaaae FIGHT
. n the Al 9 Wood
Trouble
Mtis {$ bf,
fly upward.
zai,
teaible as the sparks
Job 5:7.
Casey is the teacher and Big
Hac learns a lesson
The Peaceable Race
Who says Mhat the Ihst are fighters by birth?
Says little Dan Crone.
Faith! Mhere's ,t A ... re peaceab 1e race oA
the earthIf ye s ,'e th i}lo shne.
T. A. Daley.
T
HE next moaring the two farn teams
had pulled away with their loads when
T
Hec drove up. He had evidently been
drinking and the scowl on his face boded ill
for anyone who should be so unlueky as to
Cross his path, Jack's team had hardly landed
the first pole against the whIeel of Hee's
wagon to he rolled into piace, when he
grabbed it with an oath, and shouted, "Git
t',n mah way wid dem hooks. A h use de two
hooks wet do Lawd Almighty done gib me."
A heave and a shove and it shot into place
against the far boster stake of the wagon.
Three more po es followed. IJ, threw the
boom chain ove them and was making ready
to tighten it with the boom pole when Jules
spoke up, and said, "Nodder pole, she go
on dat load, He,."
"Who is yv' talking to, little ian? Ah
leckon ah's driving dis team an' ah doan
stant fer an.y w'ite trash to toa mnc wat
ah is to do. Git mot'n math wy." lie sent
Jules spinning down with a quick shove an'
drew back his foot. At that test ant Terry's
quest of a quiet life ended agnhi. lice sHddenly felt a hand ca.th him by the back af
his shirt collr, and before lie knew what
was happening, he was lying on his back in
the dust. lie sprang to his feet, and shouted,
as he face, Terry. "Yo' red-headed,, b-....Git outn ,,h way afore ah is 1rek yo in
piee,." Terry didn't move. The gang stood
bleath.ess wondering what would happen
left to the jaw--ift him dazed and helpless
before he couht move, Terry pivoted on his
left foot, and a right cross, that sbtared
froam the ground, landed on fhe's jaw with
the n.omnltum of a pile driver and stretched
him out senseless.
Terry stood looking down at him.
Once more, the long patient hours spent
by Dannie in teaching hins his favorite
nockout plinch.hatI proved theitr vahle but
he felt no altimon at his victory, Denude was
was stilb r forever-lh e
gone-his viee
w'ould never know grief overTerry's growing
lack of love fin the fighting game. No,
know.
.ever
Danni. would
The gang stood around in stunned silence.
They had never seen a light like this before and, in all Iobhability, never wuld
atgak~*
"Is he dead?" whispered nie.
said another soernfully,. 'He's
"Naw
.
jus' phouo' knoched out, an' I'll bet this is
the first time that the big eonk ever had a
man to stand up to him before like that."
I'He never laid a hand so yer partner,"
said another to Jtabs, "Where did he learn to
fight lkit that?"
Terry Wisecracks
Terry forced a laugh as he answered the
question.
"Shut, an' it was an oId aunt av mine
that taught me. She had five boys an' she
taught them all how to handle their dukes.
Wan day, whin they was growed up, they
ganged up on her an' I helped her to lick the
bunch. She tuck a likin' to me an' showed me
what to do in a fight," and as an afterthought, he added, "she was a sister to Johnr
L. Sullivan an' she licked hin wance afore
he left home for this country."
"It's lucky for Hee that he didn't run up
against your aunt 'sted of you," said Jack,
with a laugh in which the gang joined.
flee's eyes opened. Hle looked up at the
gang standing around him with a puzzled
expression on his face,. He got up slowly,
and said;
"W'i[h wan oh yo' fellas done hit me on
de hack of my haid wid do peavie?"
(Nobody did, HeC," said Jules. "You is
maW de Mran' rush at my fricn', Terry,
w'el he is kip you front niakin' de beeg keeck
on Amew'en [I i down. He is jus' hod' out he.s
fees' an' you is run iota eet an fa' down,
an' notin'. she 'appen alter dat till you is
jus' get up tow."
lee's swollen face contorted itself into
the semblance of a smile; he stuck out his
hand to Terry, with a chuckle, and said:
"F,' de Lawd, man, yo' is pack a roes'
mighty wallop wid yo' fist. Yo' is lick ah feah
an' squ.ah. I sh.' had it retan' an I bab no
grudge agin yo', shake!" And when Terry
(elttitled on page l0as
neat.
"'Do yo' know who aht is?" he bellowed.
............
"Ah'm Hce McGinnis, an' no
kin lay A ban' on me an' get
..........
way wiu it. bring on yo' gang an' ah'Ibu t
dent up, an' den ah'I ten' to yo', yo'-Still Teriy didn't .. ove.
To all but Jules it looked as if Terry was
scared stiff.
"Fo' do Ins tam. yo' red-head, ah is done
tale yo' to git Outon,,,h way."
Meets His Match
Hie made a sudden rush at Teriya quick
side step-a foot stuck out, and }iee tripped
over it and went sprawlring.
Jumping to his feet he wheeled, and with
his face onvulsed with rage, rushed in
again with a mighty, round-at, swing that
beat the air. Te,ry duceltd it, and countered
with a terrific, left to HIee's solar ,Ires. He
stomach
his
doubled up-his hands clutching
- -a left uppercut smashed into his face and
drove his head up-.aright to the heart-a
Rugged Canadian wood country builds strong nord men
MARCH, 14945
H
SECURITY 24/
Qpoe n oS/Uz
(First in series)
sented to Congress its ninth annual report. Social security during and after the
war is the subject of the report. The role
which social security can and should play
in our industrial society, the problenm involved in meeting reconversion needs and
practical measures for correcting the defects
in the present social security programs are
thoughtfully presented.
The need for a social security program
exists in good times as well as bad, the report
points out. "People grow old and cannot keep
on working. The livelihood of millions of
families is cut short by the disability or
death of the breadwinner." Unemnployment
has not been avoided even in these years of
unparalleled industrial production.
As the war comes to a close and the
change-over from war production to peace
production must be made, a vast industrial
readjustment will be necessary. "While
industry is being regeared to peaceine production and mien are coinig back from all
corners of the world to take their places in
civilian life, mioiens of persons will have
to change jobs. In the country as a whole,'"
the report says, "we must expect considerathe short-term
unemployment."
The Question
The immediate qu.stion is whether the
Federal-State unemployment insurance system call meet the Natio's needs "during the
transition to peace and the years ahead]'
A umnmary of the full report is also being
sent to you. This bulletin will give you som.e
of the reasons for the board's proposals for
changes in the unemployment insurance
system.
Unemployment ihsurance is hitended to
meet the problems or short-term unemplovmont-it cannot cope with prolonged and
widespread unempl/yment. As the ]'eport
points out, "by reidacing a part of heir
wage loss while out of work, unemploymn..t
insurance can help wo.kers and their
families get ablng while the plant is retooling or while they are looking for new
jobs in their own town or elsewhere."
At the same time, the report says, "these
benefits, by helping to stabilize purchasing
power and sustain the morale and efficiency
of the working population, protect business
and the economy as a whole."
If, however, unemprloyment insurance is to
fulfill its functioneffectively, its protection
"must be broadly available to persons who
depend on employment for their living and
must provide benef.ts, which in amunt and
duration, replace a reasonable part of the
wages which workers lose because of invoelntary unemployment,"
There are serous shortcomings in the
present Federal-State unemployment insurain.e system, the report points out, and
action is "urgently needed now to make the
changes which will enable the unemployment
compensation program to fulfill the purpose
Low-down on jobless insurance based
on report of Social Security Board
for which it was established." All of these
shortcomings can be eliminated, the board
believes, some by state action alone, some
only through changes in the Federal law.
The Defect
Narrownless of coverage is the most serious defect in the present system: Some 15
to 20 million workers are now excluded
from state systems. Chief among these are
about three and a half million workers employed by small firms, about three million
farm workers, two million domestic employees, bearly a million workers in nonprofit institutions, more than three million
Federal civilian employees, three million
empblyees of state al I local governments,
and about 200,000 marithe workers.
Sioial Security Board recommendatios:
Utner.pboynont insurance protletion shouhl
As Ilany Is
be cxtteded to these workers,.
th.ee and a half .illo
workers can be
brought under state systems by amedbng
IIe state laws to include all firms in industries now covered who em ploy one or more
workers. Others, notably Federal and maritime workers, could best be protecaed under
a Federal system. This would requb'i Federal legislation.
Benefit duration period is too short: Present d r.ation provisions a.en't long enough
to carry iost u.i.em ployed workers over the
gap between jobs without u.nne.essarv dif-
fiulties. Doring tfi postwar reeonversion
period, the report points out, a worker may
be unemployed for a considerable time before
be finds work for which he is suited, and 'it
is not to his interest or society's that he be
forced by lack of funds to take casual or
dead-end jobs which offer no future security
to his family."
Social Security Board recommendations:
The board is strongly of the opinion that
unemployment benefits should be payable for
at least 26 weeks in a year. Actual operation
of the state systems has shown that, over an
average period, the present rate of unemployment insurance contributions can finance
benefits considerably longer in duration
than those now provided.
Part Replacement
Benefit payments ar, too small: Unemployment insurance is intended to replace
only part of the wages lost by an unemnployed worker. Iis weekly benefit amount
ordinarily should replace about half his
H.owever, for a large proprevious earnin.s.,
portion of workers who were drawing benefits in 1943, the weekly benefit was less than
half the workers' average wage. Also, except
for the District of Columbia, no provision
is made in the state laws for a worker's dependents.
Social Security Board recommendations:
The board believes that the maximnumi benefit for full-time unemployment should be not
less than $25 a week, including dependents'
allowances. Also, benefits should be related
not only to previous wages but to the
worker's dependents. This woukl provide
more adequate benefits for workers with
families. State unemployment insurance
funds could, it has been shown, finance
larger benefit payments than are now being
paid.
Disqualification provisions are unduly severe: Under all but a few of the original
stateunemployment compensation laws, the
major disquaiifications were in the form of
(Connuriid on page 106)
These people are inquiring at the Social Security Board field office about their benefits.
322The
Mesne
Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
lECT
beoe#
4i "ELECTRICAL"
Members write key a'thles for the
JOURNAL
Loueey Clausius' Chickens
N the town of rapiot hm, California, near
the base, )f
oak
.etIitucovered
,.
Santa
CCruz Mo
ftain
us, and near the Pernanente plant of lie,,ry Kaiser, is the white
stucco home of Louis Clausius, electrical
superintendent of Permanente Metals, and
also a member of our organization. in the
front of his horns are flowers and lawn.
In the rear is gardening space danked by
a nice large garage. In the rear of the
garage is an additional building which Lou
has in al bironic moment called the
"chieken house."
When we innocently asked
Leo what breed of chickens he owned, he
replied "Electrical. Would you like to see
them?" And then he opened the door. Out
came the strangest specimens of hybrid
poultry west of the Mississippi. Pandora
would never have opened her magic box if
she had seen Lou's birds, and Darwin, his
theory all shot to pieces, would have made
for the nearest tavern to drink and forget.
First, you should know their origin. You
see, "Lou.ey," as he is nick-named, turned
to some form of diversion from the daily
grind of checking intricate electrical circuits and analyzing overload conditions,
etc., and decided to make a hobby of raising
a number of chickens for the table and at
the same time garner a few eggs. So he
asked about breads. One friend recommended
Leghorns. He got some. Another boosted
lor Rhode Island Reds. He got some. Another pluaged Minors.. He got some. And
so on and on. The result was terrific. As
they were not egregated, but lived as eIle
big happy family, this chicken melting pot
brought forth an embarrassing mmenit for
Loupey. He had proudly sent in an application for membership in the Poultry Producers' Association. So the P. P. A. sent
a field representative to check on the
application. After one good look at this
incredible fhwck, he wiped the bears from
his eyes and wrote, "Application denied.
Not poultry." If you saw them you could
hardly believe them, Some few were so
badly mised they walked backwards and
were continually scratching dirt in their
own eyes. A Plymouth Rock head would be
attached to a Leghorn body with a Minorea
tail, one wing fromaa Black Giant, one from
a Silver Wyandotte and all supported by
the dainty tootaine of a Bantam. One little
bird had a suspiciously large foot like a
turkey, and I noticed its mother seemed to
be somewhat flighty.
So Lou has mixed his hobby with his daily
occupation-namely working out intricate
electrical problems. Applying the nomencisthre of the trade to the flock, he has tagged
them according to Hoyle. 'Hysteresis" is a
nervous little hen, always flying around.
UI call that one 'Impedance' because he has
all the resistance there is," said Leu, "and
this tough rooster, who seems to be a friend
of all the old hens is named 'Magnetic'."
Some nore of their liemen follow: "K. V. A.-
BAu L
Chichen
Soldier member describes German Front. Barbarians of Japan.
Power Factor Synlchronous" (because she
was always in step); 'Frequency" laid an
egg each day; Exciter" was a proud young
rooster vwith a bright red comb who kept
a safe distance from old "Magnetic" ;
"Torque," a strng little hen, was always
starting something. "Eletroysis" was a
funny little bird that was always picking
a hole in something. Repulsion was a shy
little hen who didn't like "Magnetic" or
Exciter."
"Potential"
was harid
to keep
cooped up. "You will always find hint in
the field," exldne'd Luecy. But one more
word about this imnovation in poultry culture. This flock produces eggs and last Sunday a chicken d
inner,
a nice juicy pullet
which did not lay, tIer nillle was "Wattles,,'
"But seriously," sai Loueey "we have a
championnamed 'Kilo Erg.' She has already
laid one thousand."
IL.
W.
FItMING,
L. I. No. 332.
Those Germans!
The country that should ordinarily be a
part of the heeading of this letter has been
purposely deleted, for it is .ot yet possible
to tell whether it should be France or
Germany. Hiewver, for the first time during
this war I have made several trips to
what was formerly hlitler's Germany, but
now very well handled by our own fores.
Being one of the filrL teatirs f the Third
Army to make such a mission we feel that
it was a menorable week. Here are some
of the high lights of a trip to a ghost town.
a city that formerly had a population of
nearly 1,700 and where we found not one
person within the place. What few there
were, about 15, were hiding in a cave near
the city and, of course, due to Nazi propaganda, were afraid to come out for fear
of the Americans.
After a trip, somewhat n
ervously
made
over a mine-laden road and past the redl
nants of what a few hours before had boen
a btrrifie battle, we Inter ed the pina.
A tank
would be forItd Im 'd on this street, another vhicbl
hL.itr
lw"h.
Isel
and almost
continuously there was artillery fire overhead and small arms fire deown tle side
streets. The windows in some of the houses
were blown outbut all-in-all the town was
not too badly damaged.
It was iitt.r..ting to note the names of
the streets.-Adolf litler Strasse, Ilern.an
Goring Stra.sse, Strasse
...
ar.
y 13th (wbhn
the Nazis came to power) Paool Go.bbels
St.rssa, etc. Everywhere there were Nazi
emblems strewn on the once imm..acuilately
clean streets. Our ndssion was to collect ad
firearms, radio seding sets, etc., or any
thing that could
ob
useful against our
troops. A house-ti-hou.. searcbh was ilganized and it was the strange feeling of quiet
that surrounded the entire place that made
it more eerie than ever. To open each door
cautiously and avoid booby-traps was a
trick in itself,
The residents had evacua.ed in a great
hurry for theme were half-e aten
eals on.
the table-a wine glass half full with open
bottle beside it--beds untaddishes uTIwashed, etc. Occasionally a cat would jump
out of a room as the door was openld or a
goat or chicken would make a sound upon
our approaeh. Beyond that there
,as
complete quiet except for the shelling that continned. In one place the people were so
Nazified that they had the swastika imprinted in the plaster of the halfwvays and
room ceilings. And how these people hayc
lived-during the tine that they subjected
all of Europe to their orders. The homes
were wonderfully furnished, inside espesatly, with tile in the hallways and beautifully furnished hath rooms. Unlike the
poor French which they enlaved, there
was clothing, bed clothing and food in every
one (if the ji.its... Duwntotw the sh.ps Were
well stocked, with fine large piees of beef
hanging inside the butcher shop. Every once
in a while a Nai soldier would be flushed
from his hiding place in a cellar and one
even came out as the furnace door was
(Continued oi page 107)
Farm plants are steadily improvlng through elecfrictfy
MARCH, 1945
Us
W~eeds
By ANTHONY BARTOLATA,
Press Secretary, L. U. No. 1186
ES, Pearl Itarbor n
eeds
electricis to
keep the fighting ships on the firing hales.
YThere is ro place else where a nmn can
feel he is so close to the fighting and doing
stI nmuh to help the kids in blue who man
the guns.
These fighting ships are floating powerhouses, electricity being used to turn tile
propellerl to control the guns, to operate
the range fitders, to detect the incoming
enemy ships or planes and to operate the
many mnw gadgets that are yet military
traftsmal
secretS. The electrician is the key
Iarbor. One needs only to tall
.
in Pearl
with the mn who operate these gadgets to
I,,t a part the
underst and h
trician is playing in winning this war.
Local Union No, 118(; has jurisdiction
over Pearl Ilarbor anI anyone comaing inet
this territory should bring his traveer with
him because it is inmpossible for an individual to unravel all of the red tape that
confronts hip, if he presetlls a grievance.
electricans anId any
Irn, tnher, we mleed
.larbor
local union referring men to Pearl
should ,eonslIr that when the man arrives
on the job he will be 2500 miles fron, the
mainland, aid if he is not an electriian, he
cannot be sent home the next day and another man called to replace him. So do not
use this appeal as a place to dump unwanted
men but give us somne sal electricians.
Anyone coring here should forget the
e here with
romance of the islands and
the intention of doing a job 1and remembering he will live in ba racks.H e will stand in
line for everything he buys, sends, In Ircelyes. lie vill be hanpered by all the Civil
Service red tape and he will be lost in the
mmi.ensity of the operation. lie will beconfined to the island of Gai, and (In his jayday, he will go to Honmulu where the sidewalksare so cirowd.ed d b calnnot turn unless
the crowd tuns with bin,.
No Tropical Dream
ri r] are strangely misi ri and
n
The hula
appIoxhatetly
f .. en. to woanois
e
th ratio
201} to one. This will make him wonder why
e
h
he camne to this old rock when he ouhl
home en juying lthe comforts of the mainland.
This quest.in will be answered the nxt day
when he climbs aboard lille of our lighting
ships that has caught a fish in her iinaruis
and all the electrical w.oik that has been
ntlailrlnd
hi some
so carefully instalhld
yard is blown to hades. tlis job will be t. put
this back into working oud anderalong with
the other tradesmen, get this shipback on
the fighting Zine.
(Ceontinued on page 106)
Mana4zeVe
OIh TIo
Plan #"
So
Pad
uwt
tar, laborunions have participated
re- only toa very small eI tent in the planning
ni theadoquaeyfr
failing to plan
NAGEMENTfull is employmernt
convel.s.in period at the close of the
war, This is the general conclusion of a
study published last November, called "The
Readjustment of Manpower in Industry
During the Trans itionI froi War to Peace,"
which Hleon Baker made for the Industria
Relations Section of Princeton University.
According to this sirvey of approximately
100 representative industrial colcerns, a
ole intergood l/lauy COulpanies are
ested i, planning for production and sales
than in trying to figure aut how they can
provide jobs; aI a result, manpower plairing has largely hee, overlooked or postpnied. In those few com.panies which have
carried on employent planning as well as
product ion phenleng, often the twoesprits
have not been coordinated.
.ecoversion
of r
Reconversion Changes
Ironically, the fact that a company faces
many reconversion changes and expects to
expeee....I.
difficulty in making these adjust-
merts doesn't seem to make mUch difference
in the managelmnt's decision to plant or it
to phi,, for postwar eiploymem. Apparently
the degree oe int .. s. and foresight of top
mnanitgemeat, rathe, than the diffilcuities inricinversion prodlem, to a
voPld in the
.Ite.rrlrewhebther a company
harge extent
plans lt all ind how mu...h p..o..ie.s is made
il preparing for postwar emphlyment.
Managemenlts plans for jobs afte' the ;va
are fu. theY limited Ly a einldoery to.. e...entra le only on a few aspects tf the man,n
po eri ynrobeinl- su h as the ree lloymuent
i...
. o te , oitlier flctlor
t
of Wal V eteranrs
ride. The few ronlpillies that [hive tried a
mere scientilie investgation h,,V gone no
further than to suggest possible check lists
of items to be studied and methods of
approacb.
activities which industrial concerns arl carrying on to meet their postwar emnployment
problems, and the few attempts that have
been made, either in labor-management
committees or in collective bargaining, have
been piecemeal. Recen¥le unions and management have made some effort to clarify
reemployment procedures, especiadly with
regard to seniority status of returning veterans, but otherwise neither mnaagement
nor unims have shown any general interest
in revising labor cottracts as preparation
for the transition perird.
And the Unions?
On the basils of the Princeton University
study it doesn't seem likely that employcr5 will make much effort to seek union eooperatihn in p.stwar planning. in a little
less than half of the companies which are
unionized does .nanlge...entexpect actually
to discuss postwar problms with the unions.
Approximae]ly half of the companies intend
to keep their unions entirely in the dark
about postwar plans, not telling them anything about those plans as they become
more definite, and abont one fourth of the
complnis expee to inform unions only of
developmen...ts strictly within the ,Iluective
bargaining area. Same companies comnented "Planning is rot the union's province,' while others said that political factors
within the unions or inableity of local uniol
eflieers to hanidle planning problems made
i .ion-n.a.agm.lent plalling efforts impracticable.
Some nions want to help their employcrs drawv up postwar plans, and soi don'L
A numniber o local unions in the conpanies
(Continued on Page I0o)
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
14
JOUnflAL OF
ELEETRIEIAL WORKERS
OFIKci£tAI. SUW:ION IflTIuRtIoTIOCiOM
E
IhfhEMOT
OF E.E CTRIAL WOIHEES
These figures do not paint a picture that encourages the
regimentation of workers at this hour. According to dispatches from the meeting of the Big Three, it is apparent
that they foresee the inxinent closing of the war against
Germany. It is no wonder then that labor concludes that
the proposal for regimentation of lablnr is nothing more
than the fulfillment of the dastardly old philosophy of
"soak labor, and then soak labor agaill."
Is Labor As Good
As a Fish?
Soak
Labor
The fact lbat once again the military has brought
forward some kind of arrangement for the regimentation of labor three years after the war
began, justifiably raises suspicion. It is apparent that the
great job of production has been achieved; that we are
already in the transition period from war to peace and
that men are being laid off rapidly from key jobs; that
100,000 men a mownth are being demobilized from the
armed services and still the military wants something
resembling a national service act.
As usual they have carried on their campaign without
reference to facts or legitimate arguments. They have
given patriotic utterances about dire need, and they have
tried to over-awe the Congress with personalities who
claim the aforesaid step is absolutely necessary.
At no time has there been any evidence that there has
been a shortage of war materials on any front. As a matter
of fact on the German front more shells were fired by
artillery in one 24-hour period than at any time in the
history of warfare. If there was dislocation of materials,
it was ieot due Lo shortage at the source of supply but to
failure of logistics due to unexpected adjustments which
had to be made. At all times the War Department has
been in complete control of the manufacture and distribution of munitions for artillery and other arms. If there
has been any shortage, it has been entirely due to lack of
planning and foresight on the part of the military. The
implication that labor has contributed to this dislocation
is one of those vicious insinuations that do harm to a
loyal and patriotic body of workmen.
As the American Federation of Labor points out, there
is much to be learned by comparison of the performance
of the British worker under the terrific stress of invasion,
and the American worker. The British worker is operating
under a national service act; the American worker has
been free. Absenteeism in England has averaged 10 per
cent, compared with 6 or 7 per cent in the United States.
The strike rate in Britain in 1944 was 16 per cent higher
than in the United States. In munitions industries production per man hour in the United States has been approximately double that of Great Britain. Donald Nelson said:
"We call our secret weapon the initiative, intelligence and
know-how of the free American worker."
From November, 1943, to November, 1944, war plants
reduced employment by 1,300,000. In scheduled releases
of workers from war plants due to cutbacks and run-outs
during the first half of 1945, there will be about 350,000
men.
Labor unionists will pick up the
schedule of proposed appropriations
for 1946 and may have subject for
both smiles and tears. They will learn that the Department
of Agriculture, for instance, expects to receive around
$502,000,000 exclusive of some of its big extra agencies.
The Department of Commerce expects to receive
$87,000,000, and even the Office of Education will receive
$18,000,000, while the United States Public Health Service
will receive $122,000,000. These are great sums and as far
as we know are entirely legitimate and necessary for the
advancement of certain segments of the population. We
place beside these great sums the sum of $15,000,000 for
the Department of Labor and all its functions except
Federal grants to states under the Children's Bureau.
The Extension Service of the Departmentof Agriculture
alone has an appropriation of $20,000,000 to help farmers
with their various problems. The Bureau of Animal
Industry gets $16,000,000 for its specialized work, and
wonder of wonders, the Fish and Wildlife Bureau gets
almost $8,000,000 for its extension work. The American
working man appears to be about twice as good as a fish.
Victory In
Telegraph
The American Federation of Labor scored
almost a clean sweep in the nationwide
NLRB elections among Western Union
workers. Four A. F. of L. unions participated in the election victory: the Commercial Telegraphers Union, two
Federal labor unions and the International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers. The election was made necessary
by the merger of Postal Telegraph with Western Union.
The election was the most extensive in NLRB history,
although the number of workers participating did not
score a new record.
This is regarded everywhere as a noteworthy victory.
It may be noted with equal justice and interest that the
four A. F. of L. unions had prior to the election agreed on
jurisdictional lines and cooperated and supported each
other in the balloting.
Democracy and
Education
Democracy rests upon a sound popular
educational system. Wherever you have
a good system of public schools you
will have democracy. Thus, countries where democracy
fails are countries where the minister of propaganda
serves as the chief source of ideas for young people. In
the postwar world the United States should develop a
stronger system of popular education based upon liberal
ideas and a free play of discussion. A step in this direction
is now being taken by the United States Office of Education. Its latest report, out this month, presents a plan
for strengthening the Office of 1Education, giving it more
money, increasing its staff, and permitting it to play a
MARCH,
1945
Si
larger part in the educational affairs of the country of the American Federation of Labor to respond to the
without interfering with the control of the educational call of the Red Cross for funds to carry oil its work during
system through state offices of education. We believe this the year 1945. If possible increase your contribution to
this worthy cause. We are determined that the war shall
is a move in the right direction.
We predict without reservation that in the years to be won. Let us be equally determined that the Red Cross
come the United States will have a ministry of education shall be enabled and permitted to measure up to the needs
that will have nothing to do with state propaganda, but of the situation and the high standard which we have
will keep open the channels of free discussion and a lively set f±r it."
Fred Geyer, Business Manager of Local Union
A
play of ideas.
Letter No. 277, has addressed this letter, which is selfexplanatory, to the Honorable Ralph A. Bard,
Amen Charles M. Kelley, an oldtime unionist and
of the Navy:
Undersecretary
),
bro
Lu
of
staff
the
(on
skilled newspaperman
Manager of Marine Local No. 277, InterBusiness
attitudes
"As
writes knowinglv and incisively on the pompous
of Electrical Workers, A. F. of L.,
Brotherhood
national
of the so-called conservative:
to
a deplorable and outrageous situattention
"Generally it is the liberal who is stigmatized as being I call your
the Todd's Hoboken Shipyard,
in
arisen
has
a 'starry-eyed dreamer.' The term might better be applied ation that
marine electricians, which has
hundred
several
to the reactionary, who lives in a never-never world all involving
thousands of man-hours of
of
his own. When you get right down to brass tacks, it is the caused the loss of tens
very time the Navy Departthe
liberal who is the realist, for he recognizes that 'nothing critically needed labor at
Conmmlsslon ;lre appealing
Manpower
War
the
is as constant as change,' and believes in adapting himself ment and
shipyard workers.
needed
to new c onditions. The reacliottary, on the cotvtrar3, for the recruiting of viutlly
"'On Tuesday, January 9, a few hundred electricians
visions the world of tomorrow as it was yesterday."
employt'd at the yard staged a two-hour work stoppage
Dangerous William Green, President of the American because of a grievance pertaining to overtiue work. This
Federathion of Labor, has sent to all in lolls an stoppage was entirely unauthorized by the union, which
Reaction
is definitely opposed to any walkouts, strikes or stoppages
expose of the triple-plated reactionary, antion war work. As soon as the union officials learned of the
consliunion crowd which is trying to write into state
tutions the old open-shop policies and plans, now illegal stoppage, they took inmnediate steps to put an end to it.
in the United States. This organization originated in the They issued orders for the night shift to go to work that
South and hides behind both rdligion and palriotism. It is night and for the day shift to report to work the following
in accordance
called the Christian American. It is heavily financed by morning. The night shift reported to work
However,
night.
all
worked
ani
order
union's
the
with
industrial tycoon s, fascists, ex-Ku Klux Klanners and
Wednesday
on
reported
shift
day
the
other variegated anti-Christian and anti-patriotic citizens. when the men on
The Christian American organization sponsored the morning ready to work, they were handed notices to the
anti-labor legislation which was enacted into law in effect that they were suspended from work for five days.
unFlorida and Arkansas and which was defeated in Cali- This the company did by way of punishment for the
fornia. This same anti-religious and anti-patriotic organi- authorized stoppage of the day before.
"This action by the company is so palpably stupid that
zation is now engaged in an effort to secure the enactment
the union is at a loss to understand why it was taken.
of anti-labor legislation in Texas and other states.
Lewis Valentine Ulrey is chairman and Vance Muse is In order to penalize workers for a two-hour interference
secretary-treasurer. Their home office is in Houston, Texas. with important war work, the company has created an
They are tied up with "Pappy" O'Danieh Muse has a long infinitely greater interference with war work by keeping
business record as lobbyist for big business. He has re- many hundred essential shipyard workers away from
ceived financial contributions from the duPonts, Armours, their work for a week.
"Not only was the five-day suspension preposterous
Instills and other former triple-plated anti-unionists!
the circumstances, but it was done by the company
under
It is a commonphlae, of course, that the rise of fascism
consultation with or notice to the union. Immediwithout
in any country is marked by an attack upon organized
learning of the suspension, the union officials
upon
ately
labor.
a conference with the personnel director of
for
arranged
Angels of Apart from the not ignoble sentiments that
We pointed out to him how ridiculous it was
company.
the
cluster around the ]red Cross society, the
Mercy
loss of production by multiplying it many
the
aggravate
to
American people should support tie Red
we offered on behalf of the union, to
is
more,
What
fold.
Cross for its far-sighted statesmanship, its merciful
for the unauthorized stopresponsible
men
the
penalize
handling of human problems incident to the war, and its
to rescind its order and
conmpany
the
requested
We
page.
fervor for humanity on all international scale.
so that there would
work
to
back
go
to
men
the
allow
to
The American Rted Cross opens its campaign for 200
yard which is so
the
of
work
the
with
interference
no
be
million dollars on March 1. It certainly should have the
in order
further,
offered
We
effort.
war
to
the
important
support of all labo r people as it. hIls had during the war.
the
notify
to
stoppage,
such
of
repetition
a
prevent
to
The American Federation of Labor says this about the
that lly participant in such Stopunion
the
of
memlers
Red Cross:
'The working people of the nathion have developed a page would be severely dealt with. All or our efforts were
out the
new sense of appreciation of the service rendered by the in vain. The company has persisted in carrying
order."
suspension
ridiculous
American Red Cross. We respectfully urge every member
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
Is
CLOTHES ON YOUR BUDGET
BY A WORKER'S
IRED of bearing about that budget? Well
I don't see how we can ,eave the shbject
before taking up the matter of clothes
which are such an important part of every
woman's life. If you are keeping to your
budget you have a lidted amount set aside
for clothing for yourself and your fanily.
Last month we discussed how to get the
best value for your food allowance. This
month let's consider how you are to get
your money's worth from your clothes allow.
once. It will only be possible in the brief
space allotted to give a summary outline,
but we hope it will prove helpful.
Importance of Clothes
Many people say, "Clothes are immaterial, it's the person that counts.' And
they are perfectly right to a degroe. In
judging relative values, the person is
infinitely more important than the clothing
she wears and a perfect frump may be the
bestie-led of all, among a group of friends.
Relatives and friends know you and love
you for what you are, But what about the
rest of the people with whom you come in
contact and with whom, you would like to be
friends or whom you wouil like to impress
In some way? They do not know you have
a lovely charaeter, or a nice disposition or
make wonderful apple pie. The first impression they get of you is from your appearance and unless you are neat and attractive and your tlothee fit well and are
suitable, it may be their last. Appearance
is important.
What to Do About It
Bonkstands, libraries, the woman's page
of many of the daily newspapers are teeming these days with articles on personal
appearance and
selection
of clothes. Watch
for them, study theri they'll really prove
helpful. Here are pointers for you tostudy:
( Make a personal analysis. Study your
own physical characteristics and your personality traits and choose garments to
correspond.
(2) Learn something about fabrics texture, value, possibilities of the cloth-so as
to get good material in the garments you
buy.
(3) Learn the technique of a well-made
garment. Find oat what constitutes the
ideal dress or slip or hose and then try to
buy accordingly.
(4) Ascertain your clothnig needs. Pln
to work from a basic color (black, brown,
navy, or any neutral shade) and then stagger your purchases throughout the year
so that there will be no great drain on the
budget,
Do's and Don'ts for Beauty
TF YOU HAVE A LONR FACE:
Do--Wear round necks, hats with wide
brims and shallow crowns.
W1IE
Dn't-Wear V-necks, long necklaces,
dangling earrings, tiny high hats.
IF YOU HAVE A ROUND FACE:
Do-Wear long oval or V-shaped necks,
tall hats, with up
ward
sweep or diagonal tilt.
Don't Wear
round
or square necks,
choker necklaces, round-brimmed hats, flat
sailors.
Ir YOU HAVE A SQUAWE FACE:
Do--Wear soft oval necklines and long
oval necklaeel;. Do wear hats with large
draped crowns, irregular lines, diagonal
brims.
Don't-Wear
or
round
square necks,
choker beads, pancake, pillbox or turban
bats,
With a prominent nose wear your hal,
soft at the sides ant low on your neck and
hats with forward brims-avoid wearing
your hair pulled back severely, poke bonnets
and off-the-face hats. The same rules apply
with regard to prominent foreheads and
receding chins.
Long necks call for high collars, ascot
scarves, high, squre and round nItllines.
Avoid low V and U-shapd necklines For a
short neckline the opposite is the rule.
FOR
OUND SHOUILDERS:
Do-Wear soft, rolling collars, back yokes,
ltmsely bloused
bakts,
boler.o jacket and
wear the hair soft and loose at the bak.
Don't-Wear collarless dresses. low reold
necklines, peasant blouses, heavy detail in
front, up-hair-do's.
ATTENTION AUXILIARIES
Many of our local unions are using
motion picture machine. in connection
with the Westinghouse Electronics
course in which sO many of them are
participating. Why not borrow the ma,hine one night for an auxiliary meeting ant obtain some filhs from tile
0. W. I. that would ie instructive and
interesting to your group. These films
may be rented through the 0. W, I.
distributor in your area and
therei
no rental fee, but a 50 cents per walk
service charea may be made for eacb
subject loaned.
Itere are a few of the titles that
might prove appropriate:
Canning the Victory Crop
Food and Magic
The Farm Garden
Care of Children of Working
M1others
Out of the Frying Pan Into the
Firing Line
Wartime Nutrition
When Work Is Done
Prices Unlimited
Keeping Fit
FOR PROMINENT DEpRERE:
Do-Wear loosely fitted skirts and those
with fullness in the back, long jackets, ver.
tieal lines.
Don't-Wear tight, tailored skirts, hias
skirts, nipped-in waist lines, bright belts.
FOR THICK ANKLKS
Do Wear dull-finished stockings, conservative colors, medium-high heels.
Don't-Wear ankle socks, fancy shoes,
strap across ankles or instep.
Judging Fabrics
The best rule to follow in buying anything,
is to purchase it frno a reliable stoe that
stands behind the goods it sells.R owever,
here are sOme pointers to help guide you
in your selection.
Cotton-IL.ok for fineness and closeness
of weave. Find out if it is guaranteed for
color and against shrinkage.
Wool--Watch for the labels which will
indicate "100 per cent wool," "virgin wool,"
etc. In buying cloth to make garments be
sure it is preshrunk or be sure that it is
shrunk before you use it.
Silk-I know there's none to be bad just
now, but we can all dream, can't we? And
just for your private postwar plams, in
selecting silk ,nateial buy that with a fir,
weave because it is less likely to shrink or
pull at the seams.
When you buy ready-made garments
the best
advice
that c. be given is thislearn everything you catl about the garen.h t
and then. o..ly purchase those Labeled with
correct information which you call understand readily.
Labels sbohld bear a trademark or brand
name. They should state the correct size ag
standardized by the United States Governmeot. Directions for care and the guarantee
of fast color and aeainst shrinkage shuld be
stated-AND--don't forget the union label!
That's a must for every
uion iOla... .....
man, for in addition to the unmn label's
being a guarantee of a better grmnent., buying union-made goods is also our m eans
of
keeping faith with Brother and Sister unih..
iets the country over and of assuring better
wages and coditions for every worker,.
Consider everythisg you buy boftre purebasing it. Buy only if you need the gairmevnt
and only if it is attractive,
becolnhrg
and
servieeable. Exi
riem styles are not ,rood
buys for usually they ca.. b worn only a
shglge setleon and tbis makes them very
expensive. Garrentms which are g, ng to
need a great deal of care and cleaning oily
in,
ease
vIhlhig
cost and ale
inmadsi:abke
forour budgeteere.
And that's Ill we hava space for
m.onth but from time to time we sh1al
to bring to yltll' atten.tion facts that
consumer shoul kuow about the goods
buys.
this
try
the
she
NO. IT.
L. U. I..
NO.
1IF.ElTtor:
ST. [.OUIS, MO.
Total No.
Fl,
T~IIN,
IwI.,
turd
I.. wa~ IC ity huns
meeting ill January by the rateiere .f lutter
jiatLoinll Presldent Ed Br-owi. who 'llk..
oI
Uiofiln.. it, the postwar era andl Iala abou..t
electrteul elducation, which we afre all Iliore or
less bayl S in need of. Our schoal opened with a
bang! S. R. 0. was the order of the day, every
seal was laken by a bright young or old /as tile
case niay be.
Bir'ther.
L..cal No I has spent qlte I lIt f money
enl this venture, but it will comi. back to Ilslflufny
bthes over.
BrIther John
Rflher
has Ist hi, fine son overseas., Brothers plIeae pray for the"e 'v.oIdrftl
kills whI> are fighting for you,.
id dion't ever
fiorat then. I for one never will.
Work around here is good arid it Io.k. as if
it will eo..tinue.
LiKv KIrr[A, x..
S'.
L. I. NO. 7,
SPRINGFIELD.
E
ditor,
The year
1945 is It full swi"
MASS.
arId we always look
and hope IuI lhe
est. lit I
sometitesour prayers are nut an
swered. for we cannot get eve rylhig.
But it will be a goor start far thl (Central Labor union, of which we are aIC reher. whleh is
havhig a 'nortgnge-bu rning hnniliet somtetha
this niantllh,
",d I see Ill the papers ill the old
4 a
tiine Ineln er o the
d
liffer.nt radek ire eint$
incited, fur own organizer, WIte r Keneick.
will he one of the old.-Iiti.rs
eluntnned.. in the
newspapers,. %'e all hope for a woiiherfjI year
for the (,entral Labor Inion,
a
I.d hope it will
gel better and better, for they certailny
have
had their ups and dlown, all tlentl
yesea
yong
through 1he depression an.d holdai,,,
fi to the
I)ihlitn when
Inlly biggernranniathms folded
up. Ilat, with the
unoderf]l actxie w,,rker and
goad union.e...
they were able to hut up until
the present, when, they ha.e the
h
uildin
as
their owni.
]Mlany noen from nil over the worl d have glone
in andt jut of those doors ald hnave received
finalcial help whenever it was poshile to take
care tif then,.
The ie.lulers are still goving sIrea.
for the
course on electronics,
and. after
Ill tie vaeatiln, ithe tw clmsses were* si.,d
I
after
the first of the year, and. its fIr aI
rain hear,
they lrl ha.ing la very eniI otte dndnc,' nani I
hope it will be a benefit to then, in the lnig
rlln
neorek
prfowed
hp
quite
a litle Thier is not mueh big work, lut there
is quite I little alterati.n..
lowver, it .e.ns to
be V.attinK harder and harder to get tlieral,
,nd, aftel elnih of the real o ld fahio..... sno wwi hat- had, the folluwmn,
leek evetythilg is ,itl
ralld~lillh It gelts oller evlry day,
with v... illtie no'w beinut melhad hy the sun,
hut I goues wu wall nil 15¥e through iI antd he
tharnktau]we are notl ut. ini the null :lnl
Ilizzards
our boys irc lighting in.
E. ]ifILAnRI.y, P. S..
I. U. NO. 66,
STON, TEXAS
iturday,
13, wan
Jatiii,v
reIl leth , (lly for
lra...l
611. It waa
doable birthilhy, wil B-6
eeI.lehrihi
its 51St. lhitiiday, ILIl{I I
Milk"Ua
u l O f I.... o old Ii .. er pension aemel...r.,
eela'blatji
his 85th birtlhdy. Althulrht we were
veoy prtild of our 51st birthday. tCI.
mebers
i
deeided Ito forego auiy forIual ehlhration, dIe
to the war. lowever, the Ihey. etiu dlnI l rtis-t
at, ,nfornifil celebratin of Dal's birthday. Dad,
B(I
R EA D
Fift;-two
Nt. 66.
W
years a unionist, by L. If.
griping
hen brings returns,
h
y L. ['.
No. 471.
Central labor Union of Albuquerque
hIs a plan, by L. U. No. 611.
l,. U No. 715 says how about postwar
phlin
.. hg., Inther
u
In onists?
Look 1o the future, by L. U. 980.
L. U. No. 1220 comes through with a
nmafste¢r akgreerment.
These letters reach deep into problems
of the iresent hour.
an ohll4trra
lineman, has been 3mnentt~or of the
I. I. E. W. for a2 years. When
ad joipied the
uinin, it was rot easy to be aIloyal utember, as
union nitnube rs t hell were ciassed as "Reds" an<d
hounded by the police and blacklisted by eam-
luyers. li.w..r, (or 52
years
Iaa hits kept
faith, and to hit anId his kind we owe our
strong ttriioiit arid our good wages sid warking
onditioans..
uld has climobed pales in almists
and has friends ill
every state ill the unio,
themn ail [1 fi rt, now, in lphto of his 8$ years.
he gets itchy feet and takes ofF when the snow
has rneltteL. Dal
talr a
Ifie
bilrthday,
a
ndi we
with hin nin in...
re, and wish that we had more
like hi,.
RegiNt rjatiaon ihs started for our ceetrian tea
school, wit ih
tart, classes on Februry f at
the triin ilslt
if thiuston. John
ittle, who
eootplcttd the Internatdonal's course at Mib
aukre,
will be the teacher, and
our nwi.cbrs
are Iooking folrward 1o he starting of clansea.
The so I-hlI-t "work or fight" bill nnw pending
in Congress
is atother stab in the hack if the
',fritbm
lu.
riulner the guise of helping the
war effort, it iv rl-'ilred to
rob the workir
of
his rights a il ,eIk up the riosed shop. The
inanmoth
a r prdultiton figures are tie best
argunenTs in Ihl
IC
thy t A u,,,r, ai Iiter i, doming
its part Willint]y. anl Ihat tiny at teipt at force
will
tot hell, any, bIlt miay hinder
the wlar
erfurt. Slaye
altar has no place ill a free
:%me rits.
Severnl oIf elar mirabers inl the afiniel forces
liffaent
ha'o
beten
lhote on furlough frolnt
parts of the wi lr]d fhhif Petty OIfficer WValIlace
B]. ((;oaat~ 'aiyne, of the Seah~ees. was
tonie
froiti the Abutiuls, Cecil Baker of the Navy
from North Afrita, aid Fancis (Sadie) iawkInl of the Army flaiu the South Pu-ifi,
LUKE GALLOWAY, P. S.
I,. U. NO . 6R
DENVEli ((L*0.
iit
Uniloai
,
0
Nr, f;s huin
receevedi
I'Oait I l
led Cpos at crIliut.e of app]'eiti.. for the
ver1
s-aqi idol .e. I...se o af the meeatites
. . I the
call f
h,ll
lr o.n.r.. 'Po those who htave sI
,et.e..Iuslv
i..e.. uf the irblood or of tInt.' ill .n.k
i gn Iap iointIrl l I S-it
, tr i Tging for trttIa.. . artati rn
an. oh i
lehhi ls, thi coinmittee, the
h
edI I(R,
and thlse' "lmIn thie blnd nity l
hatehepedto
a
niicIer reia'very are extetel/y
gnatteful.
Sjptcilal ttentio ri shoulh ba naittrle if 1hist tIetlielt s who h ar ., hy
IiItiotnff
i.i.n
a
ol inii4r,
.
bIecaiie m.emb..
er
of (he Galo I JClb. 'hlise .. e1i
are
earfie M ills, Iosephi Dlolaan aI.. Ilrge
Porte r. Many ma re
iresoon to Ile cligil s Our
beiligai lhi a..ss
..
n. niatrI er, J. Clyde Willi its, has,
by hiS (. l/t ittio
tO needy aen
rs arid his
eguilar docitloais to time Red Cross, IontrHiuted
,in,.re that, a
Due to thle hange in Rled
portioll of
(ross plans, we are now diverting
our donatinnfs to urt twi blood bank, fron. which
members of ocal tinUin No. 08, rnemlers worklug il the jurisdict.i.. of No. 6g, an.i
heir
immediate faitlillcs 'nay draw if the need arises.
'lhe Com ittI,
is especially thilft
to the
woenfolk willo have so graciously donated to
the establilshment of our own bank. Mrs Georgc
Waihman aId Mrs. Joe Doan are Lwo whom
. thI
writer has earne
have given eight or more
times to the Red (ross,
It is the itattirt of the writer that a votet of
appreciation should le extended publicly to that
teacher of our electmrles class, Mr. Richard
Hyde. We were fnrLuate in securing hint, and
it is our loss that he hias had to leave. After
ticationenputting in eight hnurs
.It
the modifA
ter, and eve ral h
on his own business each
lnr
day, plus the t .i. reittitllel for teahing
our
three elasses each we-k he found it to Ie more
Ihan he coul] do with jurtice to each job.
Ilia
character is suh that lhe stayed until the classes
were well estabih
,ed,
and we are dulya pp reci(,Live.
We have be.en luiky in not having many srfious acciideIt~s or iness
as of this writing.
has had art operation,
}towever. liarild Peerr
from which he is reroverin
nicely. Matrlie
Neff broke his pieiaIh .one before the holidays,
hut is back at work lIg
since. He says it's a
good thing he i In
electrician so that he could
hire cut for ''light" work.
The Cxarining board, connistlrI of Dlik lifl*lye, Fred Iauer aid Ed Wright, ore to by
commended
for
heir efnseieitlious work i[t
bringing the work af the board to a higher
level. They have ..n....ruized the exanmiuallo,*
making then, inre
to existing cIudiCuitable
tionts.
The electrtnies
e
lass is being watched closely
by more people thaI
we realize Not
.
(lily iI
this course betrinz obsiner
.. ed by leaders of lahor,
but by edu .to rs ais well, especially those primarifly irIte rested I
vocational train ao The
writer has bearat very faoroattle conmmnents from
representatives oif erllloyers as well as teachers.
It seems that Iahdr, by its action. has a
aIl.
siderable intflutiene oan p)blic opi nion. and it liehooves us to culivate this to the fullest extent.
GLEN }L GnIBRaT, P. 8.
L. U.
(O. 103,
BOSTO,
NI
S'S,
BOSTON,
MASS.
Editnr: Thil
an open
P.klCletter
is
to
the boys of LeIIul
103 who are fightlitg for us in all parts of the
world, It is sent willh he hope that the "Joti,yaL" will rejii'h lil,
an
with it IriIll
OIr
wishes fo I.odspied and the hope far a fast return to II8, wit,' thhik If you constantly.
The old Ia.a is still Itlandlitng up ati sluginfff
it out on the bahte front. We are doing Ior
ItlUOS in every way to nid you in pinning htarl
the ears if "Mtstarha," Jlitter and 'Bucktoo..th"
To~j. All oI yuIr old pals are we(Mig in shiltyards, war plants, e('
We are huildlng .iiaty
adl var... Ieat
s of filejlitles that have to do
with the proscuiioutnf the wari. Your unioni Itris
])lirhnseJd tnnry ilu]]111s worth
of W.ar [lItt.ls,
o
o l
es
l
ih, ittand it is safe to say thL o IIii
...
IfivIdually puIctased out half million dollars'
worth of bonds aiI
stalnps.
TIhorl wer-e 110 of vIii, G. t. Joes, Seales, Navy
aniIMarine (!,arps eni, in U'nele Saut's
fores,
n e
To date, we hap ll
..In of
. nor nxirl
tg waot
west ill Gu,,ll, a,,i
Itwo others were seriously
~youndea at (;ualcadilenn
We reali
how tou'fh your fare nist hit
ze
"out there, rind we II pr
nolStantly for a auiek
end to thil
awfu I onIlict. Adornint
the wall
of our office is tialiloprJItu honor tell, upon
go
which is placed yeur name, butt I sauppose
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
you
don't get much compenstion from that knowledge. However, this honor roll constantly
rt,.
mirids us at homle that yiaare "out there."
We :re proud of the fact that Ie have a
job to do. ald t honor your every wish whenever you meakea request, Sr, if you think of
anything that your Brothers at borne may do
for you. do not hesitate to let us know of your
President Jack Qreeney. Business Manager
Ed. Carroll and Financial Secretary Bill Doyle
receive letters frol all over the world firo, you
heys, and pass on the newI contained in your
lIttt.r to tile ¢sit of IS. Keep or writ rig Keep
US ifloreld as 'o yeor ,elfare, and, though we
may be mIles apart, oiver the waves go our
hond wishes for a speedy vtory and a quick
jillip
htoe,e I]ose our letter to you in probably the best way we know how, by quoting
the following poem written by Catherine Young
Glen:
rasch, did a ,wll job last year in getting out
two c'lasses in electronics. But it isn't satisfied
with that. It has, asked, and been granted by
the [ocal, perission to iriatal Iequipment costing nearly $4,000 in order to carry on classes
In advanced elecironics, The local now has 140
enc who are well grou..dedIII
he bThey and
genera! opplilatin . .of lme ro
hut thl coI-.
mittee feels that the organizeibm shrinl haoe
a goup of expIerts ca
pableot
,
~, ajly
eat] in the new field. So, with hhe help of
Marshall Ilavenhill the . engineer who ir...ueted
the porevirus classes. Ill( who. irihirn.allv. is
the foremost authtrity
.
n th. ¢oIjict in this
area,
it
plans
to
initiate classes
inl advancdl
kept a complete file of the ELEC;iCAI. WERS'
JOURNAL since early in the present century.
M,,A
tlsA¥mT, P. S.
L. LT' NO. 212.
CINCINNATI, OHIO
Editor; At our
mleeting ii
January..
e bad the
show~ing of a fih ion electronics. It Wia quite intoreftig, arind I hope that btoreof the Beothers
oil] find thlt . ta " ie out ant see tiehei sifa
Bill (CIlluriehId tilbean interesting timl at the
sch..l in Mihwaukee, and should have lots If
,nforirmtio to give us at our meetings.
Mts. (ulln prillted Bill with o fine holy
laughte, this mnith. jin S
tapleton
became the
father of ani.th,-rI T
,aby girl, aId Charles
Braarlltuy hl([It le i
grarudnatter
when his
Wwau.,,Iir
t
I. flwm t. her on('hr~ltmas
day. IIer husband. Roy C. Slat'r, is stationed
at Ft. Kaox, KentInky.
We worle maldoetd to hear that Brother Milton
Weisenhlobir, Jr., was reported killed iT action
in Iiolland December 6. up to the proseit toim,
this bas not been officially confirmed, and we
hope that it may have been in err r. His, fathhr,
Milton WeilsenhoTn. Sr., is a memler oI Iln[g
standing ill Local 212.
Brother
1th Nahiel's son has
.een
reported
a wli-ving in actiorn We hope thiat he may
soon show ip with his unit.
In Chi i.wlamoi. we have had our share of snow
and ie. We slide to the jo anod skid Ihome again
in the een oig. Fortunately, mIost of oi r work is
coder roof, so the work oves a.i.r. arid our part
i.
the waIII effo t iL lthimpajed.
V. J. Fre.I'AITE, P. S
second
electrollies for those who have suessfdully cornpItted te primary cou
re... .
is new oourse willl
Icorsis of 20 lessons. 10 af whih will hr deilvted
to the building aill catestuction 'f the com.po_
nells of various elcton-cit
I(ilnlteilt. andl 10
]es ohs devoted to work on electronir equipenet
nanutreturled and in use it pre ,*nt. A full list
of aiiaratus used in the school wark will lbe
ABSENT
given in this column at ]n.tr dote, when availSon:;times between [o£shalow ns nI the grass
abilities and priorities hae been ironed out,
The little truant wa
The Iocals' schoolroom on the Westr,,rt Avenue
e'Iof sunJlght pass,.
Our eyes grow dill{ with tende roIess. the while,
side of the building has been fitted and furThinking ,' see thee thinking we see thee smile.
nlshedtmtil it is sort of a show-.plhee. It is ilArd, sometimes in the
luminated by the first installation uf the new
twilight,
gloom alpart,
The tll[ trees whiper, whisper heart to heart.
ci, Id-eathode lamps in thi, a.rea. an.l they light
F]ron our fond lips the ,ager answers fall,
the place up Ike a jeweler's i id, w.
Thinking we hear thee- thinking we hear thee
Two of 124's eldest and most 'aldo
alerabr
call.
have bees
hospitalized icrently. Fred Goldsmith,
the l.al.s treasourel is still urnlee
ret tllrent for
We
rTay God will keep you and guide you
hea rt ailient. FTed was a memher of 1-. UI 124
while we are absent oI.e from the other.
in New Orlens, when the nonlher indtiated a
As a parting shot, you may be interested to
proub in that clty, and ,cme to Klansas
(ity
know that our Assistant Business Manager Joe
about 1004, along with the itumber. We arI
Slattory was reelected for the third consecutive
L. I[. NO. 215,
Edrto,-I ho ar
Olad to lea]rr that George Brown, the othr
time to tile office of vice president of the Boston old enliber, is hack at his hoole.
of 1944 Is pail. We,
POUGIHKEEPSIE,
(o .r.e'srongy,
N. YV.
l
as
organoiatinh,
Building and Construction Trades Council. Joe
still powerful, figure just donca't fit a hospital
has executed the duties of this officl with dignity,
can proudly look
bed. In the
rougher days,
ohder,George's figure
back it the n.n y athievemei,
et
which we have
and has reflexbed great credit upon himself antI
was a colvincing argulmlent in favor of Unionuceomplithed. Through the untiring efforts of
our unioa..
wn. Hr,0
B her Brown is the only lary meber
eur business lareLager, William sorenson,
alonug
wilhin the ken/ of your correspondents who hbs
HENRY J. Hunroa, P. S.
with the helpfulcooperation of each and every
ealhe r, we are imarching toward progress in)
IL U. NO. 108,
Rditor
We have
1945,
TAMPA, FLA.
several interesting
One of ~he early highlights of t144 was our
activities which
suess fuI decision, against the Dfensae Plant
have rot been concluded as yet, but we just have
Corloration concerning the payment Of tr.ns
been infornied that our new agreement with the
portation expense. This was in conneetion with
Peninsular Telephone Company has been aca nlagnesiuril Plant construction projecL in th i
cepted. T., JOURNAL carried ar article asoit
territory.
this progressive company and our
agreement;
The award totaled upward to $12,000. and
with them in a recent issue. Among the features
benefted rot only Cur own members
jut others
Ii this.ew
agreenent is a general incepaSe of
f-om otlying locals who worked or this project.
fram five to seven and a half cents an hour.
This ease, to our knoiledge, was the first of
The acceptance of this agreement by the Peninits kind whereby an award was granted in favor
sular Telephone Conpany is noteworthy, owing
of a union orgarization against the Defense
to the tact that it is the fi.st large
a
greement
Platt Cor.pratIon.. voltvhitg traveling expense.
gigned in Florida in spite of the newly adopted
Realiiing the many electrical changes, through
state amendment prohibiting losed-shop conelectrolecs, after the ware Local 215 has wade
tracts. A test of this amendment: is in preparaanother important advance toward progress.
tion. and no doubt it will be proven uneon
Again much credit iI due our budsineas manager
stitutionsiL
in the establishment of an electronies school at
We still have a few calls for marine elecVassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. This course,
trielans at this writing, hut, as mentioned becomprising 20 weekly lessons, is sponsored by
fore, any Brother at a distance froal this local
the cl!111]aelaer Pl'ytelhnic Insttie, and has
wanting a job had better write or wire our
been in operation sice early November. Thirty
business manager first before coming here. HIousof our members are in attendance, pard wideing is still a serious problem also.
spread ar.d continued enthusiasm is shown, ]y
all. I might add that this course has secured
C{as.. A. SrHmnr, P S
much favorable publicity in the p~rss.
Along with the nlally duties that confront our
L. U. NO. 124.
Editor: Unlike a
business manauger. he has found time to assist
KANSAS CITY. MO.
chain which is only
the International Ofine in the oerganiatin of
as strong as its
electrical workern in the employ of the Cint ral
weakest link, a redlit union is as strolls as one
Hudson Gas and ],:lectrie Company.
lhnk, and that link is its secretary-treasurer.
This utilihY conl'ur, which controls gas a..
`WtAR YOUR SERVICE STAR
His strength is in the depth of hlisconcern for
electric power in the entire h dgon Valley of
the welnpro of his fellow n lalso in his willThe above emblems, designed for I. B. E. W. New York Sttate, ha8 had its ei. ...... a l,
bigness to sacriifie mnnt of his leisure time in
enuther-s hbaylilg ne/bers of their
union in frirce for inany years. At tile oiltet,
f
am ily in
their behalf. That's lay (arr, and that's what
the service, are made in pllastic, with celluit seenled anihnpossihle undertaking. You ar,
he best. His enthusiasm has kept the Electrical
Wlid lapel hutton, and
realize the pressure and disfavor whih is ex... Ior
u woen
me,Workers' L. U. 124 reedit union ticking for three
bern there is an ordinary pin attached, for erted hy a citrparliy as powerful as this to prIea" years, and now it is hegirritng to took.
of its employees.
hTl scarcity of vent 1he 'organiation
Our cooperative banking venture is paying off fastening to the garmnt
Many obstacles aid dtsappointments were 40olidals for war uses has made it .ecessalry
2 per cent Oil its 1943 business. The Brothers
arebeginning to realize their credit union is
to manufacture the nleblems of the above countered, bit, through persistence andla t y
hours of hard work,
our
goal was aechi-vfd. The
not Inly II good investment, it also is a shark- Ii to-iaIs, We Can furnish theni with one,
were held a nld the result lratifying.
free port when thli inaube .nain
e gets rough.
two or three stars, and the price of the eletions
The International Biotherhood of Ehlctrial
The educational c nItntit-lt, {evtdod by Joe M.el-blcm is 25 cent,.
Workers was chosen, by an
erwhe. ..lld,, ntus
is
MARCH, 1945
Happy Birthday
Seabees
Gzoaog F. MF;IIAN, P. S.
L. U. NO. 245,
TOLEDO, 01110
Edi t r: The BlIes
songs alttilant
deduction plan fur the less
ineote tax still leaves
the taxpayers' view. The
again- 'The pityrotil
painiful enlertion of
Idu
to
h be desired fron.
Cdisoin soy .an I ki ru
must have Crou. bea i
the] hrge,
economy sile
when he figures up his ineone from both the
ranch. BacIk BH..ha]in recompany and hi
left a
signed as presideut If ILoat 245 and
six-months' unexpired term. Jin/lmie Lee was
appointed as president by the executive board
He ire's
to serve until the next rtguIlr electia.
wishing the scrappy Irishm- n an extraordinary
amount of Iuck ard a lo, of iatierI e and -kill,
for he will need them all.
are lplay ing
The machinists at Atne stait>l,
thte
a new Yerion of in old gaullt called "Hidt
see Chit Keller. [hayer
Thimble" F.r letoitl
pilans oin changlagi
Brown,. Acne eleciricia.
jobs soon. Brownie rctcivetd a card front Untce
Sam with all offer for the duration. GnXtod luek.
I
ill mis Ihat yteli.
fellow, anti we
has hits smile back at work
Steve LaPrir
again. Steve's ,
laughter was ,erio]y iijared in
AI
r a while.
..
a. warried
acar crash aid had
I am happy to rerto u that ,i-s la orte ha
,'Lostthie
Hmade excellent recve'cry. ]IIa, lete
firt round of an illnes I,,ut with the 11u germ,
vrtdtntly. Don
hlit ntalIaged to K, 0. thletbuli
pressure boilers.
is now hand riding the high
Martin nlrets sun wais hoere on ick leave
front (;real Lakes lluspital
Robert Lee, of the line departmient. vi.%ted his
folks recently. Boh waus statl'',,ed in Idaly and
,rote
says the strap was rugged. George Pethe
we.athler
Iete
to iay that the
his Dad from l
was hot, the battle hotter, and every one was
very, very busy. CaIl Sta. Eriff, plti
in the Seagbee, wrote to fienils boick hon.e the
.landwaralershall
latest
news about the
Earl Diehl was chosen as the loal's canlidate
.lase are
for the new school of electronics.
farl may ilid hiinsetf
g
up towu, rid
bein made
back it, school again.
i
tome again after a bad
George Ashtonl s son
car crash and a stretch in the hospital.
Stan Nicholas is a proud D.& Riehard Nicholas is in he Na'y and plays drums and trapts
A short tlnie
in one of the finest Navy hian,.
ago they broadcasted from Honolulu and Start
was, of course, at the radioPGive the, a listen,.
folks, they arc rod.
Dana Gibson's son is following in his Dad's
footsteps. Son is ill the Air (Cops and wrants
to be a pilot, but prexy says he nteeds navigators
very much., I wonder who will win?
The constant snow, cold weather
anduixintl
labor
situation,
have
played
havoc
with
the
and some people's religion, too. When soi, of
the cars refused to sinrt, you shouh1 hear the
Iing's "English as siu is spoke-. I think I earneid
sonic new w ordls, tol.
By now, buy bonds!
D. D. DEITOW, 1'. S.
c
0 II
Editor:
to
gain
we wi
II
rot.nrtnillrmn the
t ]1 a t death
hood
shadow
dreadfulinto .ir lives- Away
has cast its
ill soine far off land lit iwl, of our triLt, loyal
,
L. U. NO. 309
EAST ST. LOUIS.
ILL.
Brothers. Deatth
ni any
llae tn
1hn in, thnI ba.Itleftnt
niltes from home, Our hearIls we]i.
when wc were tol] If
cur loss. Hlow
hilh
I...e thy
were~
We hope that they hil not die in vain, and
pray that somleone, sramntwhere along h. I t way
a
tn, l naIterl
knows
life what it's all auout
of
the cause and then sets a new course for .l.,
the world so t~hat 1sen mnaydie inl peace
people cIf
Editor: Si pereyd"'lgping the untimely death of Brother
liar' ty Fnru kes. h., one of our oli-timn members, in the WtIRin, I have beer fortunate to
Iearn that the ause of his death was from using
an ungrounded electric drill while working on
a laIder. In this manner, hereceived an electric
wich cauised himl to fall from the ladder,
shackh
striking his head, which resulted in death. Tie
never regai ned onsciousness. That's an awful
p ice to pay, especially for wiremen whn belong
the [. B. E. W., knowing they have an nrganisatile whieh will light to the filish for any
safety messuo which will safeguard them fron'
thD possibility of iajLry or death.
There is so nlh talk about the man power
shortage, couhl it be possIble that the melhbers,
annyof whon fre Will bey od 45 years of age,
neir wirer.... en wv It,,ualt the irst war plants
the
and those which followed. will have an Opporlunit3 to gn back there and maintain them at
the estatil isheddunion or prevailing stale of
wages, rehasi,g many less experienced and
ynu iger men fr other duty?
In nty opinion, ocdanlaid labor tuld bring
sliIcoilsderlibout grntly tia.reaetul efhcienc'
able savings to lhe taxpayer if giei, tie opportileity to shnIll.er tile responsibi.lity of mlailttaning these war plants. We had to know plenty
when we
to b[ild Mhem; who tan dispute i,
say lhat We are best. qualified to keep them
L. U. NO. 349.
MILAMIP,
FILA.
jority, as the bargaining agent-the onward
march of progress!
In closing, I might idd that work is holding
are enjoying full-time
bers
up well. The mem
employment, with a bright outlook for the
future.
From son/ewherl, inttheo Paieih (QIIe a
V-MMail letter to tile ELTECTRICAL WRV(KE$is'
P
aRy
bsht Ir,
Kt
ftl
Brother
JOIURINAI,,
GLEM, forImerly of L. U. Nod. 3. l tells us
that l).c...nl.r 28 was tIhe third birthday of
the Seahers and sa ys that he Seabees in
his outfit wouhl be very prond E we wuld
publish thet flhlowirr nutit writtn by aI
of the
fellow Seabee in eI.nn..lcllIratil..
eve¢t.
''the third allntiverIsal'V 0 the ~workingesi.,
fightngest burch of men' in tie nation's
lres, the NaVy Saables, will Ie
a rad
..served oIl l)ee.nl.er 28 by 210,000 ofi.ers
and men oif the In ited States Naval (onstruetion Bahttaltions.
"Hot-I, just th ree weeks after the Pearl
an
anho irzed
disadter,
with
HIlarblr
strength of 3,000. the Salb.es won their
et, with
iuadaleaa, aId have
spurs at
the assault troops i, every major America,
amphibious o.. ratitY. They can now boast
that they built tile netwk of air and naval
Iat
1ir
pushid the Japs
bases in the I'a
they dvehlpad amthat
bark :.000 miles;
phibhims equipenlt and techll.iqtes that
lpe1jed carry the dy (Ill the Aft-iran, Sieilian,
Italan and Normandy bea hheads.
r
+
"'Every
cOnituti;ssinaed
construction
bat-
talion is either curreatly overseas or has
completed a tour of duty; nany barttalibrn
are on thebirPe.'ol.d tours..Seve y-ix per
cent of the Sabes ate how outside the
continental liinits of the United SUttes;
essei.tial men have never seen
..
only b00
foreign service.
"As General Diouglas MacAthur wrote
in a letter to Salbee chief, Vice Admiral
Dip,, V)!(ili, 'The illy troubid with y..r
Seahues is that you don't have enough of
them !'"
and not Ihekilled. The Brothers
nrde
dwho
the
supreme samriAce are:
Brother Robert Davis
Birother Rudolph Tunfirk.
president, Brother George
At this thie our
the adViner, has several pIns at work ifr
valnianbat of Eleetrical Workers il our jurisf
diction.
In the near future, we will have a course in
.
lecatlvncid oh,etrntnis, ir1nth1ril pratiral
Brothers
interested may contact the
triity, All
comlnltttll
in ellargt' of inietihiment.
Tile trunnillttee has ia the afrratenm en.ts made
for the cablehsplicing course, whil ish now
ilosed. rthere will Ibetwo clh.ses 12 Brothers
dgnsIttve
I
each Ias. This onriac will run 1
eteks,I' well econmlended instructor will be
Brother William (lark.
We hope i, see Brother Auerust Steehr, who
ti j h ...n.n.
las heIn ill, lack nnll
were glad to see
The ini lbes of oui ,leal
]-tlher
Woh.r.w leue,
of tihenilre
State,
Navy, back in tbwn far a few weeks. roth(r
touch hal
.. I
tl stild rIed il the iluwii.inti Iihnnde, and has Heel,atetiveI slvUle, fViril ts. tl I,
ling iIIhIds
sily inl the 'IlaruM ..ett. itahll
itared in the hospital I.. tiO Wil tOift for
(ILhltc stnlotline and h, }il, hits ieIn trt'lsferred
Inl the East Coasti fr fuLher tlt.Iqlentt. W.
hnpe
that his cndlitihn CeItialfr, I., lillafor
ste
adily,
OLlYE[t II BROWN, P. 8.
going?
Po s..ly your C oagres.artI or Senator doesat
know
ajuthow you feel about it. We here have
,he inerest taken by our
boon encouraged by
in the,
iIes
atter in the past.
represetatt
We uf Iotal 319ttwih at this ilnle to extetd
tar Iynipalwhy to
}Rowe, Woill niost
Brothers
recently
Lacy anid Leonard
tinthe,*
lost their
Brother latcher is grarlual}Y improving from
his ... l. t illies.
R. C, T..n.... P. S.
Erttir: This '
Idlof.
n onl
tarlo loal
of the flrntharhoal to send reltreser tayies to
the next Ontaria Pratvilie.al {outeI At their
itieniding
lat m.eeting in Toronito, delegates
oganizations
,vte asked to take back to their
the matter of a pro,iliciat licease. The 0. P. C.
Ias repeatedly go.e On record in favor of such
legislation, and .. Wiak aI Ontario locals to
giul the serertary, JIrther BIorden Coehrane
Apt, 6W, 151slBloor St. West, Toronto 9, any
suggestions they may have on the subject and
all infoilation, such as ltlnber of men,affected
by such licensing in billr ltealbly; if they have
a locallicense law; the fees paid and its enforcement, if ally. This provincial act can Ih
ecured and made worthwhile if we can get
Iamaittai the support of our own memlbers
_. (T. NO. 353,
TORONTO, lINT.
an
in Ontario.
any .. mdbiers iII Florida or California
inlerested, Toronto is digging itself out
frol Ilnder three feet of snow, and not iaking
a very good job of i, either, Some well known
poet called canada "Our Lady of the Snows."
She's no lady Whe' sIte buries us in drifts so
high yu ean't get out the front door. rite first
wleout
d
the bedroom window.
morning I cra
pley wet stuff
in tha t soft,
h]k
wei Iup to my
rt
'ad then ei..edback into tcI btefure the sheets
tuggied he-man, that's me.
were old. Just
The next nni,inin they shioveld out a half
ddze, street ca.xa, sd, if You waited to. you
could start Iltt ill the geeiral dire.tion uf your
ldung you got oft for breakwork. Six bhluks
fast, ujauother six hlocks and it was dinner time,
Itnch. I
SO y u invhit, th. ...tu..r i an. in for
WUIt hSO
long ..n some of the cars I knew the
If
are
tr
lpttl~lan's tlirst
unte,
his wife's
nlaiden nane,
paes in th. beer ration
Ili
pat extra
bI.ooks wlthout tearing them. Oh, well, we had a
while (f d dtinds,atWaIyI
ludr annual danee wa~. a success, they tell
id, aIt]hough the hotel staff was not as cooperative as in the pasi--bhey must be new e.denonstrated a few
phlyfeem Briher Brilgeman
tIew dance steps that were unliqule inl that you
don't do them with your feet. It looks hard on
and how
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
{00
the systeni to M,, thnt then ITl no dancer, The
ladies all hIk,dlvr1
r,ely fil their hair-do's
aind new hose ITey h}rd sveId since Chritias-.
The men just I.ekd,
Brother Bill al4ILI had a very unfortunate
and serious
ccidentl while work rg in Owen
Sound. lie is now in Toronto (;eneri hospital.
Brothel A. Ma rte ls slowly rounding into shape.
Our best wishes to bath these Brothers for a
speedy reovery. The offiers and members synpathize with B-other F. Colwill in the loss of
Avery,
whom
T had
pTevtyouely reported
o
at all times,
nid that in, there is n... point in
coI.pdlinlng if nFiotiiig iS done to o..e.t
the
to his me..ory, I cannot
wrong. That is hoiw hhI .n.rveu.Bet is Iorn., for, in
satisfying' the gripes, il.Iprovern.nt iS Iliade.
N]nageraeFrt r..I aes money tor mor
e efficient
the 'ckl list, passed away on Janatry 21.
In paying tribute
Fil, justice in n.re
w.ords, ie was iT ora eized
labor all his working lays, but most of his
energy iin the padst 30 yenrsw.,s Sploit Iv flle
municipal and provincial political
fiold in the
belief that tLt-. tila lay tbe r..(d top the better-
ienlit of the
illnintr
nlas,, lie was well liked
by his assuciatt-, and we bhail diss him.
IL J. (;AN,
hiF wife recently.
Sit len;
fit
fow ,
dI(K NtTTLAhT, P. S.
L. IT. NO. .409.
WINNIPE'LG, MAN.
Editor: The new
year has started off
with great promise
L. U. NO. 47,4.
MEMPHIfS, TENN4.
P. S,
Fditr
Whoa I
took the job of
press secretary,. I
said the griping would be left off. However, I
find it to be an "1old Ameriecn custom.' Brother
Perry Moorae lav that is what we are paying
as far as attendance at our Inionthly meetings
the 20 per cent for.
goes. For it so hapip.en.ed that at the Dfeeceblye
Back in 1620. we grilled about the eouI winters
meeting, which is the regular meeting to needin New England. and built a warm house. We
nate and elect committees for the roating year., griiled aiout the hot sugrnn
Irs,. ad made the
we had a poor ittenddnee, and it was
decided cooling system. We griped about the foast, then
that Htid ie
on the agen.da would be deferred
m adewagons, b
ridges
and homes. We griped
until Inlr lainary meeting. As I have already
about the stage coaeh, and developed a train.
lt
stated we- hud at }lo
turnlout of nominating
We griped about the bad roads and made super
alterial ti, eh..o.e fro,.
highways.
After the procedure of nominating and halBrother Carmoan told mn one which may get a
lntinu was performed, we have the following
paint- lie says when he was a boy he heard a
coimitttes who will carry on dluring 1945:
lan in chureh telingr the Powers Above that
For the Fort ]Rouge hopn: Grievanee, C.
he was short on imet. Th1.t ry or may not be
(ob, A. Te/t, P. Strang. Cooperative Motive
called griping. Another nan who overheard his
Power, E. Snyder. Car
iepnrtmeint, C. Folson.
prayer had lots of meat, and he gave the nlanl a
Transeona shops:
E..rierannia
Corder., A. Candha,
and asked him, how he was on bread.
llne. G. Patterson. (pop..rat
e Motitue Power,
"Bread, man I hare a harn full of cor." "Clod
A. Canadlin. Car Dtlpartnle t. R. St. Mare. Rep.
to hear that brother," and the trade was mlade.
rese-nting both shops: Sick isiti/ng, [I. Pullin, E.
Our soldiers gripe to go home, and the Japs
Philipson, R. St. Mario. Dfelegates to the Winnigrilp because they don't.
Peg arid District Trades and Labor Council,
Back home we gripe to ret pood jnih for our
J. Young, R. flout, W. Marsh. Western Region
opes and ourselves,. manaement gripes for more
Federation representative, t. Wilson. Union Stagenerous profits, and that is how it shoult be,
tion grievance. A. IfrE.aheran, J. Mortham.
because the sum of all these grifes represents
Press SecretaryRR. J. Cant.
u r restlessness and our dlisBatisfnetion with
A sad note ha. crept into the closing {lays of
things as they are -our desire to do better as
this month. I regret to state that Brotter t.
ture goes on. There il one thing to keep in mind
Member Wins DSC For D-Day Actions
For single-handedly wiping out two mnachnlegun nests and capturing an
enenoy sniper oil the Normandy beach on D-Day, Sergeant Richard J. Ga{lagher,
son of Mrs. Katherine Gallagher, 131 Grant Avenue, Brooklyn. has been awarded
the Distinguished Service Cross, highest Armay hono, that can be eonmfurerd by
an overseas commander. Gallagher was a member of L. U. No. 3 and was
employed at Consofidated Fir, Alarm Company before joining the Army in
May, 1943,
According to the War Department, Sergeant (then Private First Class)
Gallagher's company was pinned down by heavy fire on D-Day, June f, when
he decided to advancd
, alone, to investigate the eermy gun emplacemq nts.
Undeterred by intense fire, he proceeded through a field sown with mines
and up a slope to a m achinegun nest which had been inflictitn heavy casualies
on his compony. Using hand grenades and his tifle, he wiped out this emplacenllt and then returned to the beach to lead part of his company through the
eitned field and to the more forward position.
When the neoo
wet- settled on the slope, Gallagher again proceeded forward
and to the top of the hill, where he discovered anothere..niy machinegun in
a wooded area. He not only captured the nan who had bee. firing his gun,
but alo an enemy rifleman who had been sniping from the cliff.
In the words of the Army cliation: "The tena.ity of pinpose skill and
peronal bravnemry
by himn
-tlt
great redhit on himself and
are in keeping with the highest tradition of the Armed Forces."
liesides the DSC, Gallagher has also teen awarded the Combat infantry
Badge his mother eports. A brother, John A., chief phar.m.acist mate, serving
in the Paeril, has been recommended Tor the Navy C.rss, Navy equivalent of
the DSC. Another brother, Staff Sergeant William II. Gallagher, made the
initial landings with the Marines on Gualdalcanal and other Paci 5c islands
and holds the Ordfe of the Purple Heart. A third hrother, Thomas A. Gallagher,
Technijeia Fifth Grade,
serving
is
with a Railway Operating Battalion in
westerin urel, and the fifth son in the family, Robert I. Galflnher, is a war
worker, a nelnber of Local Union No. 3, 1. B. E. W., eupllyed at Automatic
Plitc Alarm,,,
New York, New York.
machiner-y sn labor
can pioduFbeT it.er gr.ins at
lower p. ices.
This enables the ce...n..ner to
buy inule, am[ the lesult is inore jobs, higher
wages and fair p.rilit,
The reluorter Jrio (Jwn L n thF lbevee,
D)A7,y MAE.
L* U. NO. 611.
ALIB UQU IE.RQU E,
N. MaX.
Fo
Adifer
o
contB lnution this
outith, we are sublittfing t he substance of two letters which are being mailed
frone the Albuquerque Central Labor Union. One
is to the nerchants of Albutqelrqe and theother
is to the unin non of Albuquerque,. The one
addressed to the rter.ha.t.
l
is as o[Ollows
bear Friend:
The success which you have no deservily enjoyed the past f
ew
years we believe has beet,
at least partially, caused by the business which
wetabers of the Amnercan Federatiho of Labor
have given you. We hllieve you appreciate their
business. In the light of this belief, we feel perfectly free to aiddtil
you.
We believe a closer cooperation betwoen you
and our lmelhershlp is nleceeoary for the continued
prosperity of b
yoU ano
urselves.
We take this opportunity to advise you. that we
propose to pay monre attention to the way in
which our money is spent,
We reat ize the people in bushiess are going to
get all this nilnoy whith the tax collector does
not get Just as we haveenleavored Through our
vnte to exerctie o control over the Government which spends thfle t axes, wenow hope to
exercise, through our purchasing power, oe01,
control over blusiinesses who spend the b alance
of our earnings.
If you handle eommnuodities which arte produced
by the efforts of labor-Fan
nlost conmodities
a-c--we believe the union label should be lieplayed on these if possible.
We make our
o.o.
..tinder the banner of
organization, anti would much rl her see some
of it go to our Brothers uoler the same hanner.
We pronise,inch closer attention to this matter
in the future
We believe thereeis
another
matter which
should be called to your attenitioti
n matter
which is of in.nF.ediate in
.rt.
net-that of local
wages. ihese wanes, established by union lalor,
are the source of hlcal income. We bl ]iev it tiandainty
ofour interests that you employ only
union labor wherever ant
possible;
.henever
either ill your plate of busilns or anywhere
where you arc ev
en
renotely respo nsible.
Your
place of bus iness riprisena you as far as we
are concerned. We do not trade with property
owners
as
such, perhaps
yoe
do
but wt
do
trade with you. We ask you as It friend to see
to it that as In ch f your morley aI possible is
speot with members of union labor, whether you
spend this nan.y directly ir indirently.
Yous fom better it illn .
CENTRAL LABOR UNION,
AI.BUQUERT{QUE, NEW MEXICO.
The following letter is to the union en of
Albuquierque:
Dear lirother:
We hope hi-, has beet, the most prosperous
year of your life, and Jhat you hay have many
)hore as pim-arliur s, ai.¥ihout the lrials caused
ly the war. IT, insure this ..
ontinlled prosperity,
let us dn our poktwar paiiing now.
rho Fenlral L.ahe.r uJnion is putting on a Sregram to get the nirnlueis of the difflerent loals,
mlmI
the inerihanls, c nistiol
.. of the U]ion lalhe~l,
and stiniaito a greater h.e d or tic Iiolween
the merchants antid orgatnizeld lhtbor of the different crafts.
the plan i. 1. ask every bulsiness house in
AlbumIquerquie to bardle and tlisphay as much
union
i
ad e goods ,s possible. Wit are dependig
on yoU atd your falnfly to demand these goods
whlkh
tou Or thi."v Feioe
. o
ur uiiion-ni..
Il
..'
y.
Further, we pli pose to denIa nil that every
nsiniess
iiai ii Albutue riuee
ilo s'y nilioi labor
MARCH, 1945
101
George
rother Copp gave ul a fine resume
B
whenever and wherever It Is pjsihle if h exfthe electronics school which he attended at
peelts our patronage in the way of trade. We
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. We expect to start our
hope ve ean depend upol your support if we
own class in the near future,
have to blacklist anyone who will not cooperate.
With a prayer for the saeo return of cur boys
We promise this program full pubdicity by nidntd girls in the Armed Forces, I will close this
vertising if neessary.
for the reInecessary
We believe thse steps
F,. COWoY, P. S.
ereloymel t of our returriag se, rvieenen and
that you) help your local
ask
war workers, We
e
kdot r: T regret
L. I. NO. 697,
rIIe.I.Attend your
coopelsie with us in this
of the
to
write
GARY-IlAMMONI),
eetutigs and deirnd full ejpeesenetat..n
local
dm1, of on funt
IND.
of your l.eol in the C. I. U. Colie to C. L. U.
tnbet,'lor s.
o(hi tine
yourself and help organfize.
arry, who sevlral years ago
larrn ,er lames
Fraternally Y¥lO,
iray
,asnetL two weeks
hltl his eard in Local Ill,
RI 17NON.
CENTRAL LABI[
..no, u.n.le'ia hteing the etit"e.
l
Jaales, IBaribur. Serretayl,
Ilis hooe local waost i]L Ilaji.l.on, Ohio, hit at
Ihe bica of sendliaIg ouit li(ae lotters has the
car,
ad a withdrawal
the tIlteof his dlethih
enthusiti'tc sttpprIt of .I.ly lenalliti labor noon,
We finally ettleit our Ihespltaizatiun insuiminludue onee of the ni/loon Ini imallit A. IF e[L.
ante peI.oim by alohtJilg cte plan of a wellorganizers in the c.e/lnily, who add it was the
tloewn itLuranee onpally.
best thinag f the kind he had seeti
o..iber at the
.
rhe rIdle stork let.l a ynun
At this wttluig it i too :tileY to have received
We
I 1 Ih....l.r..,ouLds.
I o"rIT a ..oolef
I
ellplie s freln thle ..ierchanlts, ut nJbtoy are es
'rho aolvantages to be fihleed by abnor in fol
touniol
litter
lOWing the In}lgOInl aid olL ii to
s.
wnca cannot be enlpihaLsi.. d too .rgly,
JAln;. 1I i'ulwio",
I'.S.
Ie , is
mut nIfws of hiBr,-thr
teleel t
roaders, and especially tinibders of Local 637
away fIote h e We .have a ew Buesiness MaItager, Irother Ccil It. Mithtll . Other erueels
L. U. NO. 637,
IROANOKE, VA.
1945, are Pieliwho iisaellnwd duties blttlyII
Veto Piieslhht E. L.
denlt airl M. Nofsilr,
fer ",Lr nahLreaIiee clnss of
will registel hi,
le
stark 'nttlea dll('ILlL' ait! left Inother
;2
John
uJ.
l I.oo..te.I
y...I. elet ridao
S..L..LS to ',e that all of ile fr....u4 over Henry
Wtaloiee's ,lppoiretnlect i jilst a smoke screeni
irrrtd up by the saeiel cws of Wall Street,
ILt object being, of coIlI'sC, to give union Ilhor
a kIlt; in the pants.
I
eothe £uture,
Thley know that Walhote Ilo.eks
Ithai Jes-e JoIll s looks to tlill ftaveS the
arel'i~eary past. It ha. given the big shots a
rd's," filsta
W
sot. i. lit arm sice ''Mnkey
.uOll. victory, so we cal expect a lot of aiiti-
labor dope fromt now on and I think that we
shouhl prod our frien tlw Congress and Senate
d hatetful
to be ni guard agnist soned
legislation that may be proposed against labor.
L/abor eon expect no mercy from these i
aropoations, that have joined eartels that inelude (reIana
and
,lap interests;
,ere-
these
panits who knew that they wer,, ar,,mg Hiithe
and the gaps foll wil and broke the laws tII
tie so!
BodCatel reaetees andl NIatIonI SoeLti ¥"
'enniitee,and see
by the Senate Invest gut ng
how reIltltei these big ee.rl..eral ions ale! And these
oLothe eludes who are, lihtilia the WVaITfce apmeirthent and labor's interfert.
I'll
bet Jesse
Jones
gets
a teie,
fat
la'eilh
with some Wall Street IIIrI...e when he leaves the
geeerlment service.
l,
IT.B. FEitWEiT. 1',8
L. U. NO. 715.
MILWAUKEE, WIS.
Adif,: Although
the Correspondenece
Lot
des
columiln
Teal from us very oftun, this rulaeo broadcast
oeslnicians' local ha, bli'e steadily pushibg right
alohg. We are s..I.o. to bt!ll our inuith year of
lteceetsstLl
operation, aId hold) agreements
with
f
o
Ihefollowing statios througIhout the stIte
Wiseon sin WTNMI, ylill;v.u te; WIIBL, ShebloyganI; WTAQ, Creen ety: WILIN, Racine, WISN,
Meihwuckee; WSAI h , Wausno ; KFIZ, Feindi do
lit<; W\IIY, Alpletentie; WENMP, Milwaukhe;
WIllA. Madison. and WOSIH. Oshkosh.
in
...
ganze.
a
aetenI .ecently
WOS has it
nenotiatlos are in plgatess, so, stritfly speakbug, it doeb not yet belong in the list. But 'Miero
(Red) I~ickeronn, Fioulleiial Sceretary-rrreastu'r
(Iruldy W. Ayers, Recordi..g Seetlelry L. N. Alrhart and Press Seretlay I . J. C byd.
eIemei.er new i/tiBig thitigs are expecled
less leanelIar, arnd ahleady results ae'e
In, anId
I air
sure
Brother
Miteholl has
the
full support of each and every ietmhe r of out
local.
On September 1, we also molvedl our offices I.
Rooms 205 206, Rush Buildieg, 11 Foankin Ron, .
eetetig, at the Patrick
We are holding Cur
lot e on the sicond
liehry
Saturday at 8$00
p. lB. aeel the fourth S8a.(ty it 3:30 ai. a. Visittig Brothers are invitedl to ttlol.
Local NI. 6$7 is very sbcre~ssully nlannlli,0
two defene jobs in the vilchity ef Roanoike atnd
jobs, and we hope to keep all
severall sn a/e
our
ebers
..
busy.
1'. J. (JII".,) (iorn. P. S.
L. U. NO. 665,
~11CH.
LANSING,
MICIL
LANSING,
Edaor, E ye
here
seeces
1
~ to
n
. thing
tl
b~
rtin'ning
t1s
smrooothly as possible. All are working eight hours
per lay. At this writaing, the Gee I Ieal Motors
Forge joh has about 30 mel, inc[oling the foreInat, left.
It is with regret that we anttunce at this time
'ex, who passed frloe
the 'passng of 'Dick'
oulr ralk, December 30, 1914, lrid Ixtend Ile
deepest sympathy to B roter (Cleo Fox, hi,
father. Ii; vwas one of oir yofung helpe rs, and
hadt teen ill for sone tim.,
The effort to revive the License Law in MAiegan seems to have loglgd down tee. porrily
the
The writer thinIks that a [.l oo way to curtail
irhlstoner"' would be to ]]LIt a stop to hareetc., selling
stores, dhine
wares, djte
wirire sIillesoSO that oly ual/iiled contractors
aned electriians ouldrl get Ihe materials.
We w.ender if Brother "Iliii" Treihlely
s still
Ir Ianlilteon, Ohio? Anld guess Bother Art Jarthewirter at his hoIme
holed up for
tells h
at Lake Odessa. We'll bet that tan OI Beother
E. (Iloisey/ HIosngton cut in sunny Caliern ia
is really something.
WI woeidd sure like to see a few Tnew fares at
meetings. Albut the only tilne we
cur realli
got it goo']d tirn out is when something speecizd
is to to..ie ne, then erYleyody eolal, out or
hiding t vote '"No."
A great effott is being nade by our Te`lple
association to raise the n eesosary fureds to I...y
off the mortgage on our hail We wish then, lots
of hick.
I am a union nqember because a labo r union is part of democracy, Nowhere in
the world except in a free democracy can workers have the right to deal collectively
of other workI, with thouenal..
with their employers. I am a union meeber because
ame
control of the unions
,rs have built the unions to what they are today, I have the s
that I have of democracy. The majority of those who vote cal elect the ones they
choose as representatives.
I belong to the union because the initiation fee and dues I have Id ine first
I joined the Electrieal Workers in 1903 have not cast me a dim e.. H iglher wages and
better working conditions have paid my dues mayfodd each month. bhen, too, when I
retire I will receive a union pension, and a paid-up life insutan.ce policy. In addition
pensio, also pension from
I will have unemploynuert Federal insurance and a Federal
liy former employers. All these were seeme..d for me through the efforts of organized
labor.
It may seem abmu-d but high wages and improved working eonditims have not
hbave contributd to
cost my employers extra money. Organization and enthusiasm
lower labor costs.
labor has carried otl in the war effort
oi Tembher because organized
I am a union
passed over the President's
edera
legislation.
l
ti-union F
, ode, the most hIeartlessI
utlaw
unionism
vtto, legislation inteLned to discredit labor among the workers and o
in the cour.s.
I am a union niendilr because I have seen the suffering aid haird the agony of
ulithdrpaid workers. With out the hop)e of ,iideidal, that suffering may breed the
brutalized nlature of the Nazi in the hearts of our eltizens.
Iama union ,e,,btr because, while the multitude of our nitnebers do not profuss their belie in Christianity, they do practice Christian ethics.
I am a union 12be(r betause nmy son, who is a mebler If tile I. B. E. W., and at
p resent is in the urnled forces, will carry oi after the fightitg is over. The returnin g
fiighters will buihl a new A nerila, ated will have a part in buildirg a new world civiii
zatiun. They will build something better than wasever built before.
F}PANK FARRAND, L. U. No. 46.
102
The Joural of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operbrs
Canadian Hero
From L. U. No. 1283, Windsor, Ontario,
comes a newspaper clipping on the death in
action of one of its young members.
Brother Robert Nault Poolewas reported
wounded in action
in September
of last
year, recovered, and returned to action in
holland from whence word has come that
he has been killed in action.
Brother Poole enlisted in April of '43 and
arrived overseas in September of that year
with a reinfo-cement unit. Before his enlaisment, Brother Poole was employed by
the rural power division of the Ontario
Hydro Electric Power Commission.
we habe a majority, we've never yet failed to
get an agreoment, and we'retoo old to start
now.
Top journeymen scale tnn $6:.50 and chief
technleian $78.50. Theeoare a long way below
the new Chicago scale. (Make a note of that,
Miss Jones.) Mostly our
areem entscover at
least two weeks vacation, with double-time on
holidays and call-backs. In home places, the narrow-backs have still got us beat for scale.
(Speaking of inside men. Wet'e sure found 'ena
eoopterative with our R, B. T. local and we're
always ready to show our app.ocliation.) The
last new agreement to take effect gave the
Brothers at Madison a $b.04$a-week raise. Reeeivd
ain lump sumn, the retroactive raises
brought the techs a total of $1,400.00 ill back
lay.
We see by the papers that the public is still
being told of what wonderful things are in
store for all (7? of us in that wonderful postwar
world Dou btlless, stores will offer many desir-.
able products made by applcltien of new scientific knowledge. But doesn't it strike you as 'illy
to pot so much emphasis on what will be for
sale and so little on whether we will be able to
buy? Whether we are able to buy, of course.
deelnds upon our having purchasing power derived from employment and upon the cloditions
under which we are eraplaye.l (rganized labor
has demonstrated to the world that it is powerful
in niproving poor worklng conditions of long
hours ani low pay. But we haveIn't ,een so hLt
at grappling
ith the ploorest working conditions of all no Lio., ald no p;h. As recently
as five or six years ago, this thing of no hours
and no pay was a orions business to sone of
the Brothers of thoi ocnal. Wse haven't figotteu
that in some of our slatl ios ere-third or our
nclabeors mere laid off. No nlitter what you call
it, h."] times, lrhorslion
recession, deflation,
fnaneiol panic orhusiness crash, to those of us
who have to work for a living it
spellsonly
thing: unemploy ent. Th, local stands to suffLr. alo,* with the laid-off niiters. during general ,nemployment. The loeNaIs does all off, hut
its troubIls and expenses increase. In its netotiaLiones, the local reets with stiffer resistance
Iromn employers, who also are hurt by a depJroeslon. noring widespread unel.. loyne at, i
you get into a strike you find a dozen hungfy
scabs ready to steal your job. Bearing these
timings in mind, stop and consider the listurhihg
but incontrovertible Loct that there is still abso,
lutely no
fifallible assulancleh tha8thi country
will not again find itself in the samedepression
it was in for 12 solid years. Brothers. that's
re) iear one-third
C our working life!
There are, a good number of our members in
military service right now. sure, t
heir
seniority
is protemted, but they weren't all at the top oF
the ift. When they return home, if they walk
smack into a mess of unemployment the ones
at home can take all the credit for it. W.e can
tell 'em we didn't have
time
to think about unelploylment, that we were buiy spending our
overtime. They'll understand in a pig's ear,.
Out of the hundereds of hou..... ids of men in the
Blrotherhood. there rust e~, somewhere. some
wizards with a postwar plIa. t, produce
oontinluou
hiigh snihooyn. sit for all, If so, how
about hahring the ideas.?
L. U. No. 715 is kinds fussy about outsiders
bitaing pick-ups i, our area so much so, that
it's been a long time since any non-I. B. E. W.
tech sic ianswore sent into or te tory to rtrigtu
note blrodeast, where the jolt did not end up
covered by anI. It. E. W technician. We don't
take any particular delight out of it--we'd much
prefer to see the Blue Network and the NBC
technicians join the I. B. E. W., where they
beh.l..,
and we are convinced that some of
those tvchsdiias feel the sale way. Boul, nfortuntely, lonehbody
eems iltent on maintaining the two-union idea for somehody's advatage, and we don't think its the technicians
themslv es
Sorry if we've over-stayed our welcome for
this time.
F. L. DCR...T, P. S.
L. U. NO. 767,
BATON ROUGE, LA.
Editor: I wish to
report our local
meeting of January
16, 1945. We opened the meeting at 7:30 p. m.,
and the turn-out was O. K. We initiated 12 new
niseshera.
Our new recordbig secrelary is
Brother Burt Humphrey. Brother J. D, Parker
is our business
ianager, as Brother 0. M<lark resigned. Brother Ray Anenn left us
'ole tnme ago to go in serne buliness for himself. We sure miss you, Bay. The members we
took Ii January 16 were electricians and helpers
from L, S. U. If we can miake the progress in
the future that we have in the pas we can't
complain. Our electroiics school hasopened at
the Baton Rouge trade school. an{ X5per cent
attending ar 1. B. E. W. members , Our professor
is Brother J. D. Penton. who is well known in
this part of the state. Brother Penton taught
electrical classes at Cohn Trade School in (Chicago, Illinois. The schoel is opesn three
nights
a week and anyone who wants to atteld shoul
get in touch with Brother Penton. This study
is very interesting, and every Electrical Worker
should take advantage of the course, as it is
free. S., hoys, don't let the grass grow under
your feet. (pine on out to meetings and the
trade school.
C. R. IEPIL
L. U. NO. 887,
CLEVELAND, OHIO
P. S,
diltor, In the intfrcst of providing
furthere
diucation
in the electrical field for the benefit of the
iuiemhers of Local Union B-887, at (levelani,
Ohio, an educalona. Io nnittee was appma tesd
to handle this matter. The first erfort of the
committee was to organize dosses in electronics
as usedl il industry.
The coinr-, given in electron .s as lIased on
the course that the Westighouse Electric and
Manafa-turing Company
reThin indJed. This
ecurse w.s gives to tlhe mel hers at cost, anti
It adqno plan was inauguraedindn whilh, two
inIstrticttis wore used, one to give a refresher
tl1ltqe is] basic electricity as it relates to the
electron theory
endits practialI use in industry, the
lther the study oIf electronics
asiLI ctroale machinery,
The instcr-etor selected to
,ivc the course
to our classes were Mr. (V J. Werto, supervisor
of power and distrilbution, Cleveland Leion
Terminal Comepony, arid Brother Al Seidl, a
imenslr of loal Union B 887, With very conpertnt te hanbodle a couarse of hi kind, and who
have done a very excellent job in doing so.
The colaetPee en, educatio w,
on ...setd of
Brothers H. G. Folger, chai rman; T,.revor Lane
and{ P. C. }.rank. This committe took
. eare f
all details connected with holmg the
.l.sses
in electronics. Further in connertion with the
expounding of the theory of electronils, we had
practical den.onstrations by Bh,,bet Sriih l, wo
brought his personal
]laoratory equipment, for
demionst rat ions.
Theclasses are mostly composed of New York
C(teral failroad e.e.t.rieiaa; the small percentage of other railroad men in this iienity
is dite to smaller forces, and that is why the
former predominates. The quartest we use for
the clas1en iar furnished by the Cloveland Union
Terminal Company. F.t this we are very gratefui, for it keeps (ho cost of tenting ,pae somewhere, dow1, and does not add any aidditiosal
burden on those who would and are taking the
course as we offer it.
E1. G. Fw,..R, P. S.
L. U. NO. 980,
Editor: Now be-
lig firmly established in the new
year, a brief survey of the future clearly indicates the tresmesidous job ahead of us in 1945.
Foremost Is the winning of the war. The most
dangerous part of that job lies in the hands
of our capable anId courageous fighting men and
their admirable leaders.
Our part of that job consists of fuilsiti,
themn with everything they need to prosecute
the battle, and to have it ready for them before
they need it. But our duty does not stop there.
The majority of thse fighting men., who are
giving their youth and risking their lives, will
some day be returning home. What kind of a
home will they return to? That is also the responsibility Of we who Ar" here on the home(ront now.,
Therein lies the battle of the homifront.
There are those who would
take advantage
of this world chaos to amass a wealth and
power anl to perpetuate their power through
the years by coisplete subjugation of the great
nass of Americans, the workers.
They would use this time of national emergency to aeonipllsh their desires inder it false
pretense of patriotism.
Shall we allow our boys to return to a hoein
such as they found upon their return froil Wordi
War I ?
Most emlphatically not!
We must provide such security that they will
return and ,e as justly proud of us as we are
of them.
We can do it by maintaining a co.s. vigilance
of our local, state, and national governnents.
By making it a government of, for, and by the
people.
We have a measure of security in the present
Social Security law. But this can he broadened
and extended by the enactment into legislation
of the Murr.y-Wagner-Dlingell bill.
We have a waRe and hour law that now affordI a
..
eagure of protection to the workers
that some
industrialists
have for so long expiloited. We can only continue and improve this
legislation by being constantly alert.
These and many others are the reasons why
we must stay on our toes in 195. We
lon,,
through our individual and organizatolnal efforts, eftee, a progressive change in mnany of
our governmental shortcomings. But we must
all participate.
Shall we resolve, throughout this year, to
contribute our full support to the task ahead?
Without a doubt we shall!
And nlay we petition God's blessings npon our
every effort.
ILtS. (OiFLANO
/
' 9.
NORFOLK, VA.
Editor: There is
not a great deal in
the way of news
from Local 1217 this month. E.veryhody se..Is
to have holed up for the winter,.. ..and
wsi as
scarce as hens' teeth. I ran report that a sound
flnt on rodio was shown at the January meettig. It is die hope of President oltk .bat we
will be able to secure for show
o
ing
in the way of technical aspects of radio thot
will be of valise to otr mnembership. Accordingly,
the local has iet up an educational committee
whose nhhel is to secure educational hilms and
literature from the manufacturers of new equipment and teSlnilque for the btnefit of our
,.srr,,lni s. Also the local has set up an entertainnent committee. That's finel Now, if these
committees will educate and entertain us, we'll
he sitting pretty. Don't you think so?
The membership of L. U. No. 1217 seeme to
have put their press secretary out on a limb,
so to spelia. They were informed when I acL. U. NO. 1217.
ST, LOUIS, MO.
V19CH, 1945
1l3
copted the joIb that they
woul
have to
help
supply meI with nesitems. A ]lette
was dispathed I to1
alilfi
swad.,
It baill leftterI (it
beasl I thought an), full
of hilee
phrases,-b
asking Tor their, cojoprllenO i givling
me news
l~oneerOhg the happenings at bhill station. So
far, the, atewad lit KSD ha,, been the only one
Io
respond. tle,
mst
hav been kmllilble to
y
What is I
ste~ward, atyway? I found a dietfinnny deffinition whc
says: "A steward is I
person
entrutewith. Tthelb
malO.9eent of
affairO not hi.sn I .. n,",Ter
you have it. I donl'[
know,
of I beltr
mliree of ncws, thani the
fC~nd,who
arli sliposd Io knowf bhou everlyhndIy ellse's afais
it their own. (.me" on, fella~,,
gie
out. No., if flonlehotdy
will tell] mel ,hat
is a, prssse
rear, Y.anlyway, evtlIythi
wiOf"ll
heI
jake. S.
far,
n
otingha apl,TareI In thin
,ohlluu
bon.the ha,
at KIIOX, WIL,
HXOK, or WTMV. The, ;inly
e
xus
[Oetonmke
is, thoset Brothers, .n(
all itobusy ellklrlll their
WTVilB.{1Old they haw. n'
forianthinlg
time
Olse.
8erie...ly, now. is the time far
Svrei
o
pill their
shesler II the witeel and1
give an
sho
h...a
Fill the warffort. for xlt have about
reached lb,
plael' where l,e ca look down anti
seel the placid
green valley of Ipeacel
aheald. L. IJ.
s
11.I7 sll~ds it, besll
regards f thl
nI-llfill memi'besis ISO armeld
forces. W, hill" In;L forgtten
is haclk Is studa ehilif superol o l WeN after
a long,trick with Uncle Sammy%, Navy, Brothers,
MeChlantha,, ad Sill Iall SS4ehenP~l uspid visii
at th
Delao
meninsi
111rother ant] Vji¢
President Thompaoi,,
of WGN is, the pju
father
of I .. le technician. Gfierelyes WH FC chief.
K up
amongst the
clouds gelling hi, I....asse
FM
h transittr
n
ill. Thomas1i
Dunllop, forroeely WilD lud supr
vio r
isl Ie...i
th
WBBM his, first love,
and D. IT lD,noIp .. r.
prizefd us, by attendilin Ih Decembr meetfing to
Woner
never~g
mfe..e..II,
hour
DEATH CLAIMS FOR MONTH OF
JANUARY,
1945
~
I. U.
~
Ift.,
T
~
Amu
I b ------ --- .................Io oo
ao.
A. "ID
I
......
LSO i%
helal treasurer
I fl l
Iah
IO IIl~0
I
the auditor ElO tilne Ihs[[in
th
Tk ...
t
, ,t ..
oo.erl
.Brothe
..em.adv..ises
e J.
a ..
eIl the
AIJ
,y-lawsl will bein hnokIl f ...m fl,rii
,exlmetlug..
M
Brother M...
Illeerrecol
his 441 lusertaryg/tip antl B...h c [yes till,
oe.. .
Thel adv~isor.y glnt
eapoirlted hy Itra
I
tional
P,,oalden1
[lI.... .. ....A
IChieago
DI),eeberl
19, an1 the, writer, haln,,~1
been ap-~ li
pominted ... reoduing secretary.
gaveT the minat,,a
to B...ther, Re)I Timrlh
of Local 40, whowa
chairmn
.....
i
I.... illformed they appeared !i
the
iFebury(1l:^.1Be.theta (!rox.ly, Bns.hol;i Fsehe,
Fill
'ork
Symos,
C incinna.ti/
Volk, St. Lous;Grrtan Dnvr
TindelL,
Hollywoo.d, and Ilhe O1,
rtratedd
iliade reom
OlaedathlO, for
thl goodI of and it Ille
of
O,
II. J$
1. I1. E. W. broa.dcasting
tecnin,
towad
solidifying
our
ranks
and
ultitoly4
hflgiglng
W. F. lt I.1,,;m~ P. S.
NABET tech minoL.B. F, W..
wh... ,,e I..
com.bine or
efforts; fo, the
postare.The
L,. U. NO. 1220.
di,,Thf
Till
only dbilpargln, thing th,,..,h the,
who.le meetCHI1CAGO, ILL*
il
,t
advise one fellow in,, was, the eyical) anj hithag, reft...ner I the
"riding
academyIll
w~helI soef
the "chosen
rdobroadcast lloals that Lel iido
1220)
few'*" hun~g their hills and, ]lai
theill heads. This
has, stie...sflily cullpitlete
egotat~lons Of
ln n t
nnsribe ,till
dent
know, why they clled it
,blasgr ag'enen
ith the Innafv
gI
i' ;n ~
owners of the hfolhwig ,,dle
st~
inl Chir
goo" bd Ih]sat-wa~te
daysl, wherethel "od iron'
ee:wJJDb, WIND, WAIT, W!iES, WAAF ,
s~lrlt
was th e eldbig acattlny
."i Ilhehtel
WIlC WSBW I a...I W(FL. I'll
nem1iat0n,411
III jl]K sollntiflln we dropped in(Ito tat ....n.saedDotele
../'l
2, .,I were,
bowne
y I
till.
"gWn
Sto
l .. . I . lnaybo I Shiftld stjp
all.~
auayG ehodyinm
...].gcrnl[oi gan
amll d..
in, the
oet~fimpoisn,aaiIn,
sickleave
an
hellbda paly. It, ~le/
as bill hrhfing of a
IIIll i ,age scl e fro.lu lhe lInesen $i;),00 it,
wee-k to hill
of$8(030 per vweek
within three1
iIr
E"ditor: Neve
~
L. F. NO. 1275,
senioity
I Ife
O~ O , t WO Ieorh
yer~ for
I
L'S
~ppenings
[II
call
~
E . I II;,
IiI o~
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
}% p, J,,~m~,.,..
I~ Tl
~l .
ITIOOO
"~nIiT0of
MelmT750 .'
AF
O k M~.,.
~~~~~~~~~~I
Tilla
J
10n. ,o~~S
I
~ Ihu,.
Mh...
1
.
0
]; K,
,TI
I
~
Ol
o
~ ~~~~~C
FORT WILLIAM,
II I
it ITIIm;~,,
K J
ilth.
ii-i
fromT th, telephone
oprhr I
the
rIII lihelly of will
ON'r.
Arrhnr Jharr for WIDt, Mr,, Rallph Attlass fiur .tOItNA
we1 are.i takln
WIN
, MrI T.n
Dyer
fr WNAIT, All. Juhn
Dyer for WG;ES. }".1. WiliamI
}Ju),
hs
fiur
Wl hi ... .enh
....
fo
r very
s
,,y
f ue.es
u
W A A , MrI. R
ichardI .6offtan. Ill
\ f (II'CM,.
."d are nwoin~ris I
cur Will Fear. WeOare
r MlMillerforl WS IC, and.iM,. Maurie Llynch
orgnzdlow
with a
nIonshp
laua
in our
fir WCFL. I'T,}za{
fo thcusl hrnaidasters
Obrinetw
ich Wl
obtained
last year. Ion,
weeMr, W. Friedman.
and Allos.lih.
The
blnfItrlStI
oall"
Offcewtepees'rle b" InternsiIThe girls put on a~t
danle
olmionI.ly lbto ris
thllna] FITp esestatie .[eIs'l
('. Itul J1
1 I I llan
flirtels and they really Imrkf, downto on
JnTh,
O.Bart~low. LneI11I I 1lslo 12210 waIrITTe~
sln tickeos,
Teco... a hit of ~on
(ledby E'.ueneJ. Kruel.])I~llf;W %Valle
sell, thenk hu
ing
hi fforts are
weI
reI, Thon.. lpon, %itc prtsildet, and, George Iwsl,
5untrield: n.. till reffus
ITInBy. With the aOflleY
exect
iv
hoard
bill
hI-d
we.Iax sen,,t
ha". 'geprel
to ISo.mhe
"d-out I....
consfiderah1,
assisance WaS oflied'l bl expeditin~ ng01alu
I,.iB..0..thr
h the uhle
asslistanle
aI.t I bulstm s",a..d hllst Ih..t ...at I..sIf
and. effots of Mr. Ralph At].,,
andM,]r Arihur, hsI.. ,lal
tol our 14 gfrls whoihave joined tihe fnee xveIO'e
]]JllrTf Or the,
.. a.aser
ill ~ni
n~onI
ll
V
s lnt
smal
reme..rn.....
I. Il
thrllf ITIo
of
the details with, the unlnn
ei~elaenI~tai"e ,
the'y
are
nut
~nfIotte".
Thlb rntnse
f the..
... Cop
l'affn In...Ia..e1,t
W,
wish ifo hile tih
opportunity to wish our
I ...wn thSuifhnuIt these1 11egoliattoI1s will henr1
slaterm
mbr
in t,e1,l A lhnr
Iwr sacra
y
i
otlt Lhe adl.... tafea galibd II
er
.... aI...g.o.... t
ihe .. ... nlln yetr Oknd Iogaua~the.
ITT the
and labor worfk logetherl
for thle
good If thel
spll,,dil[ shawi
... Ill
a Ill ve dlin~l,e
bhill firslt
Imfnatty.
yar, of r.al/liizath/u. All. our, thanks Ill morn-.
Wal La~borB.ldor
appr-oval o[ eoll'4e1 is ec
her -u f Local 33.9 l il le r always li/llng to
,al.y. ITSh~isl OasIergreemet it till Clir in, the
elip
with oIr dace
,l
to lAK,~
In
Fran.k
history ef Chics;re hrn-ladeatin, under, L D. E. W.
K.elly for, his, wise tllunsl ...dI Illthirl[
efforts
Loe..al
h
is1220 ,b'presets telhaitian in, rdio
r.
il hStill.f nI ,ilh ...r
hSooks Owhic
aIll~t
strtra... .WGN
W14th;I, WJO)R, weIS .,.,
tlmo, I~ P
Iolel
WED(
also; thes alenns,
.9111I0.ISll~ lb," were
itill ial fort,,I,,IoIr IT o
rit
;It Ihin timE.,
This abo., I...... thi el
I,
fo,-patIf th,
Genera~~~~~~~lihtresfllteshr
:
1)rtheDe
terrhory
foMo
MA
e~litl~lt
Pi
tukI.
NOar, of CBS-W]IBMT. I
longimel and
staun..h
fths
IIIeobe . al alieis
nom3anleave
ff try,
ll some~k
fini
lamillnk
Jh gloid Of
o.
hKs hel.th. Irti,l,~IKbil, 'If W[Il(!. hi onl leave
NOTICE
far one ,ear. is ,g,,im to. the (Wt.
Brother, ILak
KurIa'l
is
bac(k a~I'l.
. tansmtte
ehle
at WCFL
LoalI ITnjionNn. 969. L.Ofi,,iI1e. Kentucky,
afirethic yllr
PITh
Unle
Sal as.,. CRAM ill tle
es]Is
attenitiontO their Bow
headquar..ter,,
l
oae
t 400 I~oflan~l,
Buildlnj, Foulth
ant{
celpt IIr some nDW,
Innbans.
Brthe(AydeWhile Market Strc... oiTsvmille 2, Kenitucky.
.
SarHI~l"
f1
ilmeIft.*
.
I:
310
(S,,~,,~
lml
U,
u r, ,]
D4II~
,
l
L~O, 151)
RiibI
:
,
m~ U0~IS
,1,,s
2 1
1 i5,U
In I~D
3
IT
u..
,M
..... .....
IH
h;,
]n~~l~
i~~irll~iI~
~t
~in
~
HW
.
.
.
~ ,.o
Ifill 11
~k.* t~ .rr~~r,
m~oII
J~~m*,
~
.I* . P
~,,m
II
~
I[
I 4,,I
, ITaH
TIr
1.lI
....l. .
.
.
.
,
.
]U0~
I~r
I..........
IIo,
~~ ~ ~
-- -~I ~ ~~~9,3
-----
"i ---
34
104
The Jounal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS aRd Operators
I
':'
N
KKK
DeWitt Bratchef L. I. No. 53
I
Initiated Augte
IN MEMORIAM
I
Mary An, German, L. IT. No. 1
Initiated
Maoy1, 1944
John B. Hayes, L. U. No. I
Iliaed
November 20f 1912
Kemp Leonard, L. IT. No. 1
Iuitiated June 22, 1897
Edwin Jones, L. IT. No. 1
lnintmid Jantary 17) 1917
A. L. Crump. L. U. No, 1
hitiatetd Febrlary 17, 1942
R. A. Hercules, L. U. No,.
ir~tliiled A gtL 20, 1137
Hhwshilere felhiar of sorrow and rgi t
Ihatl we lhe I illiels if ]lerticJd V/. keWs l.. cal
]No I. l"eebid Ih~ pa n~' o f il
~lh~nemes
ST$id CGenea.i.
STlwT,
os thay¢s,
......aid. Jones,
Crl..
amidHercules.
Whinj, In The pJl~iIV of these
.nen...
rs, Local
NO. I ha s mitt true
nICala
d I...al
l
.W...
hoe
kiii deeds and noble characnts ,l ITT i .......bered .. ost by bho.e who knlew the h, ,sI. , lie it
ReSOlved. Tbhat we pay trItltlde I1 thi ru rrIter1oly
by
pmess, hg our
A heartfelt s.,pal
ry an, d sorrow
to thei
bereaved Imtiesli
whomnotirni their loss
it th irc dak hour of orrlow; and be it futitel
R£sotved. That we in or
nleeting assebled
stand ill silence for oITI
illt~it,
us a tribulte to
IlhlJ
m1emtory; and be it firther
ILeslved, That a copy of Ihse resolutions be
soil TT heir faim iti,. a Co 3 s nt,~to o - M le tricai Workers' Journl for publieat iui abd a copy
written into the m
inutesof our local, arid our
charter draped for a pe iod of M days.
M. J. LYNG.
JOHN MISINERT,
LEO J. HENNESSEY.
St. Louis, Mo.
ContRlttee
It i,
James L. Collins. I. U. No. 9
Initiated farch J6, 1895
Ernest Hawet
, L. U. No. 9
Initatead Jaiuary 21, 1916
Local Union NO. B-9. of the InternatIonal
Brotherhood of Fleetrnral Wrker. r.eIords with
Ilrofound en170W ftie dealh of its ieiolbers wh-ose
names ae mentionned above.
Thies, men were known by the members of
Local Union NO. B-9 for their zeal Ill the cauce of
fitintism and as members of our Brotherhood for
their good example in pursuing this aim.
Thle great interet shown by thee Ina I the,
problems of our Brotherhood beldpd to actuate
all the members or our local union, and they shalt
lonW b remnermicred for- their ccouragen cqnt and
Wor, iI o11o hehalf.
Whereas we deem it fitting and roper that Ihe
byemlbern
of Local Union
No. fls9 offer their
tribte to the mm11ory of our departed frolhersA
flor their loyalty to our Birotlerhaod and counttry: their taithfur.ess to their local union anid
fr ciiids; thve efire be it
Resolved, Tha the sincere
sympathy of the
rnernterhnh of the ITternatilonaI Brothehood t
ElectrIcal Workers Is hereb
yextended to their
bereaved families.
WILLIAM PARKER.
Chicago, Il.
HIarold (hrisani
CY QUINLAN.
HARRY SLATER.
Commaitee
Edward Blake, L, U. No, 2
Iittiated FebruaNy 4, 1942
Lotal No, 2 records the passing of Brother
Ed.ard Blake.
Brother Blake,. an overseas velan of the first
W ,,zld W.,,
ca n
i a ou
em ' c d ,ol the
beinning of World War No, 2, anl did Ia fine job
cf backing the attack on the home font up to the
time of his atsal illness.
Brother Blake did not have a wide aeqlaintance
With the letbehip
hbt thine who knew himyl
foindbhi. to be one who lvetd MI sildshilne and
happines, who loYVed his Ealle; ho was honest
and sincere.
To hil wile and relatives. we of Lofal No. 2
oIler our deepest symp tIhy
ht also c,om or
IhieiH at 'lis tune,it
the onsoation Ihat he has
eatered a new life, that GCd Ilas ordained.
DAVID E LUND,
HAROLD BAtTY,
ROY A. THORNIHLL,
St. Los1s. Mo..
¢ o nni tie
Oscar Stanley Bailey, L. IT. No. 948
Rmnritnated J...uu. 16, 1923
It Is with deo sOrroW anld regret that we, the
members of T., t. 944 record the assIing of our
Broii ier. Oscar Statley Bal eY. oo] D]ecemyblr 22,
1944; therefore be it
les~Ilved, That We py tribute to his memory
by Ixpro-g/ng to h.a relativs our heartfelt
Sympatlhy it tie Ioss of thei loved one; and be
it further
Resolved. Tian
a coy of tlhiee resolutions be
spread on the
miIIuIItes of our meeting. that a
copy be Sent to his harnilf,
ai copy to the Journ
and our charter be d r
1 aperiod of ;II dIIIvs.
,pe
GE)IIGE
JESSE 1. TORIAN,
Flirt, Mich.
Commllnittee
~ERNEST,
Charles E, Hal}, L. UL No. 17
tnitotead A gUquf 30, 1912
L. B. Frie, L. If. No. 17
lNrtltcd Aprit 10, 1922
With a sfncere feeling ol
,r1rowand regret we,
wlemembership of Lt U. No. B-it recl d the
death of our de parted friendst and Brot-hers,
Charlies E, flail and I, B. Frie; therefore be it
Resolved. That we pay trI bite to their mlemory
by expresSIng to their fairilies and friends our
si2cere sym ~ipat
ty: and Diieil fur ther
Resolved, That a a~py of these resolutions be
Senll t their rintle, a
lbe spread on IIo
rninutt. and a copy be sent to he JourOal of the
Electrical Wlorkers for publicatio; anid be it
f urther
Resolved, That the 'neiliberi. sIlrd Ial sielene (or
I perio dof one
in ute as a trib te to their nroii/ory and that ou' chartel be di aped for a period of
30 dayls
VIRGIL G0. IyEIITIAN,
CLYDE BRAKE,
If. E. CUNNINGOAIM,
Detroit, MMle,
Commnittee
~py
Robert 'Tolso,
I., U, NO. 28
Ihtiaued Deeer..r 2I , 1916
Joseph S. Wimbhrough, L. U. No. 28
Iailiated JtzlI, 5, 1942
Whereas it is with deepest sorrow thait we
the yiy.obers of Local Imnimo.i No. B-28, I, B E W.,
pay our lost tribute or respect to the oemory of
oulr ]ate Blrthers, Rehbelt TolSOn and Joseph S.
Wimbroagh, whoin
od, in HiB
wlsolim,
.nIite
saw fit to remove
,rom.
our
idkst: and
Whereas we w,,is It extend to their families
and relatives our deep and heartfelt sympathy:
therefore be it
Resolved. That we, in meeting asserbled, stand
in silence for one minute as a tribute to their
m1emory; anld bt it lurther
Resolved, That
e op o
af Rifl re;olutions be
senit to their bereaved familes, a copy spread
upon the mrrintites of this mieeting. a copy be
sent to ou-r official JoIrnia for publication. and
that our dhaiter be di aped flr a priod of 30 days.
CAMPBELL CARTEIR.
CHARLES P.K HENER.
BaltimOre, Md.
CamuIiittee
Oliver C. Kerstetter, L. U. No. 30
hTitiated J,,i {0, 1942
Thie passing ontward of a dear friend of Il...l.
acquaintance inevitably brings a depth of .orrow.
When the associations over a period of years
have been unusually close and cordial anld the
taking has been sudden and unexpected.
hom
ahiouk at
ilet i.a [kteri~ifled bleyu'id expression.
It is therefore difficult to adequately express II
sense of loes with Whici Local Unon No. B-30
must record the death
ofBrother Oliv.
G.
Korstetter,
W, wish fri
extetd ni
leepest syrmathy to
his family and relatives; t]tere oic be it
Resolved. That we pay tribute to lhfs imemTory
and stand in silent prayer for One minute; and
be it further
Resolved, That our charter be draped for a
ehloId 3O daysl: Da I e
of tese reu
Lion
~e ,,rl[Ihi i fsdy,
1hat a copy be sent to our
offical Journa for publication
CIIARLES P. NyE+,
Erie. pa.
Financial Secretary
r. I
Larr/son
L. U. No. 84
Iidfluited October 9, 1911
B. T. Haddon. L. U. No. 84
kniotcyd Nole,.ber ).1$35
We record tIle deaths ol thlee our Brothers' i
sorrow and regret. therrefore
be it
Reslved, That we teidrr o%[r sincere stmpathy to thelanLTime of our Brothers: and be it
further
Resolved. That a copy of these .e.o..iu.h,,
te
spread on our ninotts, a copy sent to ouIr oficial
Journal and hat o, r chartlr he draped
oI ;10
days.
ITOYLE MeCAIN,
A. C. SPIEGEL,
W. P. ROSE,
FRED GRIMES,
A Ilanlta, Ga.
Co..
irU,,,
18, 1942
L. U. No. 53
Litti¢ied illy/ 22, 1941
TI
il .
eep sorrow and leglet that we
reotod the death of Brothers DeWitl BiatEther
and Hal.id Chrsrnan.
Resolved. That we pay triute to their memory
by
to their fatoitie.s or,
Ixpre.sng
inMcere
,ympathy: and be it Iarther
Re.solved. Thiat we stand in silenI rmed tation
for oine mirainut as a tribute to tisir ii,(nlryol arid
that a copy of these resoluitins bet set~B t;otlt
ar iliTe.acopy be sent
tre Eltr
,.
Ihoi;
fVerke'~d
JoIIIrl
ftII pIublicatio
n, and t copy ree;rded in
TIh ITII"I.II It
Uii neIxt regula, meeting; anld be
it billH"e
Re'oilv'd TIt
our
hat charter be ds aped for a
pea mdt of 30 days.
J. SIIEPIIERD,
L. L SIMMS,
GEORGE GCILtIAM.
C£ TESlINrIoF,
It. A. CATI4CATT,
S. QT31 GLEy,
Kansas City, Mo.
CoII ltmittee
D. E. Sheon, L. U. No. 6g
ItIntIle Deccfitfler 2.L.l)
Whereas Almighty God. in His infintte wISdo.,
s La
I ken uIlddelly frome ouI ridsit .r e ,I..d
and 'worthy Brother and friend. D, E, Slhon,
wib passed away on November a. 1!},44: anld
Whoria in the death of Brother S
Loca
Liown.
UnI.on B-66 has lost a true and loyal WI') tuer, ,,10
had wet.n an ouistanding member foro 31 years;
therefore be it
Rehllvcd. That We pay tribute to hi, m.mory
by exploiting to his fanily .nd h ends Ilar
sincore tampathy; and be it ftrither
Re.oived . lIn't a copy of Ilest resolnliors be
elto I his fahtlTy, a copy spread on the ..trtities
of Local Ftnon B-60. and a copy setit to the
Electical Wolkers' Journal for publicatri, and
lIe it further
flesolved. That the members stand in silence
for one minute and our chatter be draped for 80
dlays as; a trLiiLIte to his nyhrenov.
F. C. CALILENDER.
J. A, GRIFFIN,
G. N. PATTON,
houlsto, Texas
LniniT'itLe,
John Glennon, L. U. No. 104
Initiated Decmlnber 4, 1924
John McKenzie, L. U. No. ]01
/vitiated Milareh I
1937
I. is with deep sorrow and regret that we tile
,aeinbers
of Loc¢al Union 104, record thie
lassil
of amr Brottlrs. John Glennon andi Join, McKenzie, who passed so sfddenly frni our mtidst;
thy retore be it
iesolved. That %re, tile meubers of Local
Union 104. pay tribute to their yeoiry by exC
piv.srig Io their families o1 sion, ere syNpathy
a.d betit failhter
}lesllved. That our charier b, draped 60 day,
in respet II their yeJory and that a copy od
thee resolutions he
sent
t heir
a eopy
IImfles,
. OyWetto the Ir1ternatonal Brdother if Electrica.
spread a1r the minulte of our regular meet-inllg.
JIENRY N. FITZGERALD.
Boston, Mass.
RecO~oing Secretary
Jesse H. Parker, L. U. No. 116
Reilitlited June S, 1917
It Is with sincere feelings of solrow and re ret
that we, the .hembers
of Electrical Workers'
Lo¢cal No 116. record the passing of our worthy
lbrthler, Jesse Parker; and
Who,ene
in tie pP... g of flf oTBier Parker,
Local Union No. 16 has lost a true and lya]
nernober Wbose kindness will Ie remembered
most by those who knew hin, best: so be it
Rcesilved, That we pay tribute to hibi enleory
by expresiing ,,iir
heartfelt s V otp t y :ariI sort oW
to Ills bereaved family; and Te it further
ltes{lv"d, That we an our iraelyrig assembled
shiald in silence for one minute as tribute to hi,
memnory; and be it further
Ritoveed, That a copy of th"ese reIoutions be
'elill
his
1b faitly, a copy be senlt t. 'm
,ot,,s
publicbation and a copy ba wriir In
Iotr minu
ntes.
anid 'Iat or charter be drapedfor
a period 0'
days.
GEORGE ZIMPLEMAN,
L H CLARKE,
JOHN R. GRANgER,
ItI Wrorh.
Texas;
Commrnittee
Charles Scott, L. U. No. 138
RrfIrtsiled April 1. 1937
Whereas
S with a sincere feeIona if sorro
and renret that we, the members
, of ,. U No.
t-13$. L 1s. E. W., ecord the pass Rg oEf Brother
hamles Scott; therefore Be it
Resolv d That
, pay, tribute to his hemnory
[
u p ei,?-g oflr deep sympathy to
ian
my;
ald he it further
Resolved. That our charter be draped fIr a
perioil of 30 days, a copy of these resolutions be
senI
to his family. a copy be .sp'ic
or, o..
iallateis. anrd a ropy hr sent to the Electrical
WIoTkorb' Jor.al
l
for publiation.
CHARLES F. STARKEY.
h1laritont, bilt,
IecrdhIg Secoretary
I
MARCH, 1945
lls
Edward P. Re~id, L. U. N,, 2217
G. E. Kratz.. L. U., No. 752
Re{10itae
Augliqt 12, 19316
ad regret
It is with a Rdde,,, feeIinF If s.orro On
Ihli we,
per... .f T .
[- Noi 27.. ,Iehod the
passing of our Blother, Edward p. RIlid,Deonx
lhie31, ]944,
In hi, man.y yearsof fantinthluIIIev
o h]lo
of friends. Li U. No. 217 has itotIItrue
&ridoyl
dhd,mImbe
hilst kffnd deI,
chainriot. Wfil t.e iemii~loendinlo.
byths
%-Ol]~ hon] Ie.;
IIIIIII!~Ol tit it
~q~leThin ,, pay Ulibull ft, I
by exprIsuin: O"r bearitt ..... mpaIthy
ohji'lbetrayed hOaliy alldI rIsixI,e h.
ho, of ~XNbITOWld( a lh~py Of thi, rN
sent to til, fainnly of ottr dcaIl~
.PO be pyOb spred
,
Ine lllitlI, {)A L. U Ni.~ 2]?,
dnd Tacoly be. lint [~. ouI JIIIII~a] forl
dind ou.r iharn~z lbl hiai,, lO
in
]i OrJlldin 30
daysT nd that we s
,iadiI sibat Ot, A.d.
JtT.on~
one, []n[]lll{ ole ,IIiD11
.. Onl flhL [... I
I.,e Brothdt. EdI,ard P. eind.
CLIFFORD A. JUN'G
T, E. MYfERS,
GLENN JONES.
GEORGE A%.]]1LL,
otqcn~it+Ve
Ogden, Utah
Danie I,, Whilt,
L. U1.No. 333
ini~taled
IIhlIch 18, 1927
Wit], the deerbsL
Itw.w,the ... e..bhN, of
ij~gIflly
Loei,
Union B-J.33, ~(~
h
i
18zotler, DT.ni(lI L Whi~ M hlcm
)it)~~~ifi ;
f~h~fy
by
Reso]¥e,g Tht we" pn~
tibui
hi,~t
It Wol[}ler
"I'liI. b,
]Rulvd,I~ That a eepy o£ 11,Is( ,,t
spne ,int..the rnhts
..
I.i
co
s~t to
3r"da~ L.Oy ~¢qt w ile Eh~ehrL dVWok, hLS ..
fo
ulcti
o an
nd 1/c it b"uIUle
a~edfor
eIeI
lif 301 IIIy, qld IhatI this bed
passing.
V;ETulsa,
if. E. ITO
J P DI'
A. U. NASION.
INebilidtcd DIeoIe
Claudills D. Messnor L. U. No. 812
IS, 1943
IniSiatel Aprnl g, 1942
It I.Iisw
ihbO
Ideps
dhlwa
rgret Unit we,
th, nOembers oi LoIn Uull.. Nil. 812.
reor the
TOBsson, id trhn, r C.![L, Ius. D, ye'~ler
ln~i~iad Dcc¢,ne 20, 19t3
ronthe
SP
Mesno
bl
wab
k.11cd
In
action
December
It is wih s~bntre fe
insff .,rro
and reluet
)1, ll}MN in Gemn
hlie SIrlng %wb Ih.
C.,C, of Engddin,e,,; theyelore De, R
recorld I 1~1.
pabig Of olIr ~faldse alz
.... EI
o,,
lbeso1,ed*
That
altin~t
Rhh
O IIl [ndo1nor I,&( *%,
G. £. Kbaz a.it J. 0. Cari
.... g, ... IhI I [oll~ b it
hibod, In mbOting assembled. II.Inc il lsnic for
fb,,IIed. 'Ihat TO pay tkonini. II 11hl~
e~
Ia
period
of
30
.Co.d
adb
d
it furtiuer
by ".pres1~mg toi
their fmh
Iad [~ind
,I, m r
ReIolved 'iot
II Cpy Of R}l,, r-sIntidon, be
,lleere $.Opanh3 ill IIheit Ii)U o ~oro
and W
it flu tile],
spread on /h,
mninnfsi, .OW
Lncal Union Ill.
Resoved, That
h,a,I In,
Th., Ior 812 Snd acopy be, aiint to our J.,oUla T.r ptilihol,-Idl of 30 d~
a,,
Ihdl ,, ... o,, Ii i,,
]
,.a Io; anid b. it linrther
luIon be Iero t 1se,
I
I
mh
~ tlh, Jhounal
ResIolvd
That S copy of these resouions
be
J~orpubic~iiL
d ~,Iy
inled opuHd dhe
IS~13t.~ h. is at]d; stltdbe it ROUnde
o¥hl
ST .of O.O
h
u...
ah
ReSbOlvd. That IIIe uhie
f LOIal Union N.,
ER L MILEFS.
812 be, draped.
..... io/l~lir/Ior I peiod
in SO
I
]. ~.,RIIROUGIT,
days asI sjign of respectlL Iul
{)orn tedBrther.
hl
A 1H. P'1111ONF;
ANqCRIl
D1iETHC.
UHOtIS .I Tex lS!
LUinlrhithde
LUTINEI CLEAVER.
CHfARLES A. CIHRISM1VAN,
Wbi~ldispor
P..
CO.. mittte
John Ral1ph Ietry..n, , U,' No., 837
J. G. Carringto,, L. U. No. 752
11itioted JIndllly 29, 19316
It
th Sinhc ..... fciI p Of hrlow slid redret
]-g~7.... old
VIat
, ll! i~lltlb}).i oJ [I,. I, lNo
'ia
as~lg
bi
.L...II IfOI lltl
a
" i""
, ClJnd slid
Brito{~e Johia IadplL [I elltqi... Jllel(!foreIli it
py IUIhnh tl lia, n~le'iO]'IY
Tlil haOe
IeFI a1.v1d.
y lxpbcs~ltg tOl h,' reta~IMveg
, llatbnJ
....
symiPath,
ifill,
the,
'IfS tbliJ love'd OIIe; thin b,
fn
ResoIed, That A C~pyII th~s{! r{!aoh1ltiions
KennetJ. Jliew,
L. IL No. 859
Illiavit d Norlember 22, 1411
Lecult,
1L.IT.No. 859
lhitiatell Mbireh 8, 1937
It ds,,ith deep .......
t1int Otgil., that we,. the
membersd Iohkf
LmalUi-o
*59 . .... ....I .,
..
casualty
el x~Vold War, It the pi.~ln of
off
~11,0h,,- Si/.%g. Eerlr~
...
Hewe W.II,
h.
IpreaI "Io Tilt II]/~[$o
...
"n"H~ , ti ln~ Ia Inpy beie
Wabs kilbed ,, indanhmi Gelit.....y on thiI ... nb 16.
1944. an~d ILt~iliel
SS[II e [hothe1
[O, inhutz' doi
h,~il~b
drapei lit S pei-od .£ 30 dl
bSind
be it Januay 2. 194 . frmli,Ier
aIn,.Oni
WVhe red WIe wih 1. extenld lo their TO..Inll(, ~ad
, silefo
'rtad I, in
Reielld.
That ith mel
reaivs ot, tiep and, hcaz thin[ ayinpl[4lhy there
foOe be, it
MERRIT C. PURYEAR,
Readlred. That ~e, in n'letn al,,OnIed stand
a
Roting storetoy
OkI
in Ti~neb, idr Ine,...
I.n Oil a India, to
their
ineIinory; alld Ide it fowdhr
John J. [L~ c.
."U. No.853
iTeo,,d.
That IT copy If these rio1.1hon, h,
,`ldt to lhirl frin[Je," a el~ >y lb, i 3end Opotl the
Inllidiated July S. 1943
hinhl,,,c of th.is
...
ng a...d a o~py b, ien, 'o
1347
a
fi
o[sineefelg
orw
IT. the mer.ou- official Je..lrie[ III phbi,,,Vt OHhand IIIe cha.ier
Charles L. Bronec, L. U'. No
)~ 13~
bei Of L [.
I
OL 3 th,
rcr
Illat {,',
O"11f
litothe
Of Local S--83) be, d~i,,,,d I... I
. IIqd
AT30 d...
Joh. J. LDWloh;Ihhl'lfl$O b, II
IIlnillfdll
3IorIch 1, 1943
DANIEL CASIGLA.
1347]~M h~Re~led.
Thait III Day fribilleIo hisI Illemorhy
Toby York, N Y.
N, ~O~llndt $eerethor
Clifford BI.
BurDdic, L.U. No.
·
e ... ;h
psIng[Iohinin£ly
[]~vObl,,,m h y~2 ,,.lla[hy;
did tb, it fro-thort
It i, with ~/nee
... eel~ings of sro
Resolved.
That the menibmberiad in, silne
Herbert Whortey. L. U, NO. 1228
and regret
Io hi,
I
Jn
;~,
that e,i,
{he Incebel of Local Unio...
for, II ber d of oi1o ...
1347.T,hrecod
birdttatd Apri 6, 1943
l
id
bl.
dr'aped
1h;alhF
fill
hill
,
ald
les ,era
ers. CharI,
thI Osio
o,Iffir
Ied, and [ty-l~he
be it further
oif 30 daiy,; ani
, e period
teeor
With I sincere fieelinof
soroiad rere
we,
L. IIIlle
.[]dCifilrd B. lyindilk t;'
lthe~
mebrso
L. U1 N,.. 122~. reordlb,
deatn
Resohved. Thin I eOIIY o[f these remluilt~ions b
of ... deparid fnled and 13rotller, Herhbert
Realdyed, Thdi we,,as a I.dy in m,,teibi asp....ed in th( mint~o:.
l
ozrine(
h~ln, I ,od¥ $e
WI!horIIY; andt tlezefo
i,It ~
liemb].d. staild i]1Idh,n
Ili, Izn
for
Ucibi~ tolIfhclr
hTl(Z,1orall1J
bi Jt fl.
lthe,
Ont to o., .111ie.a J1O.Ciel T., pub1iatio.h.
Resolved. Thalt we, pay Olrib
by hi, il~leorn
IeSe11-d, TroIt 33e drlihe {)u Ith1;tel forlI
STANLEy W. TUTTLE.
by ,.pressbn,
to Is, lan~d Yad
I.es
u
,lt"ie
o[ SO~y
datl
O' I ... y eI these
re.o1tions
Kearnhy ' iN. J.
I'ocornaliga$ecretary ,In...ei, Ayrpaiy ad Ile i~uthe
IsPred oD ]I. mI*;~lu, O Or neetlng and I
Resolved, That T copy oif
these res0]thtin, be
Coby T.. sell"o ~]l(
cainii Jo
a]e
a I}
sent to hlisaiIy
coy bl~ lpread n
...
ourI
Iood lo, pnbhlhwhiou
Bernard i E. Rodgers L, U7.
N,. 1335
mininte. ORd I I'py be ito
el,
tN, b,,
e1cilica
Workers'
J..o.1na
fio,
Pwjbtucak~n
aid
be
it
RAY P. GREI
FREE,
Initiated November 20, 1942
Ibe,,,ndia
g S.TONRY
Wthereasit
haI1,,l.,sd A~nlighty Cod Id Hi.I fi-rther
Reso.lved, That,thelhi(
]...e.
here p .... Ot Oddly
bnfinite MqTdO, and ,I/ery, N, ]cII ..I. fiiiTi
our
in silencfor I peI lio hf .. l. /nhinu, asl. tlibu,
Rit
Llt'
e. enze anid WOtiny 13rot11er, B3,,11a.d
ClytonM1.Day,
I 302
tohhiniaeory,
Rodgers; and
W, R[ENTA¥ FULTONq,
lnitlhiatd .lum. 30, 1942
Whereas inR
th a.iltig o[
Brother Rodger,,
Boston masa.
REll/
hecretary
wisdom, L. U, B-1335 of NeW ilk, MN.J., has. last a trl/e
W]h..... Ahlmighty (Jrd, In It1s infini,
r
om
es
indi I.oal zrlezIIbeI 1Ihosc, kind audI howei chaI.,n Gillmb
..
,S.
6h I'l
eailed k~ eter aTn~l
worhyBohr claiuni MI Day: the[
eWho
eier W i be IelIO~l111~!Od hITOt by thol
tcrete beth
it
Alden Becker, L. U, No. 1249
Resoe qhant Ie pay 1iO)uIIe No I
his
mreely
knew hill best; so be, IL
Re... ved, Tht did pay tribute To Inis memory
by~ ipls
ing
his
NO
tli~lm,
OI r heartfell
Initia~tebluy 31, 1944
sypah
ill thel I.", ofthch ovd
me; aid be, by expesO.
u/Jr hitarll]..s...a1hy
..
In
.... I
W
With deesi ,,orrow an egrt
11111we, lhe, n/er
it Jtt l lh*
to his bihiI
JereavSld ur a Ulda1iv. in theihr dark
bets of Lot'a[l UIdjn
[-24[ . ....... I ]l pjii,- l
be
h..,s of SOlO~w; a.ld be, , ntht~hl',
Rove.That i coi
p a lfthesi zO Iol~htkm
In,
BrolheF,
A[iert
Beckei;
thcielorebet i[
Ipread "P... ih~ mh
(e Om
,ff itee
ing
. .....
veThat
ah ,,Ppy f these resoltu,,l1 bo
RsleThat We Stand tot ol
Ounidrl in
b,i ,....t ,u hI'. III.a
I
d, lal~i~ a copIy
afld b( it
li~~~sn,
ih~II
,P
th,i~
flrul o[, ...
oIr
itr~h,he. r~+
'lI aw.1 stient tII0ute to hi, Ilen11ocy;
flieh Jl-.Shiufll~ao; pubhtIIa[,~La.,d I
dhaped IJll aI jn.liod of "I) lka;: ald b
Resolved That our, elhalt b, {)rte() for a
Resie e o ['IIhat the
Oanlel
tr
in THOnce
period Of SO dLy; aOd be, i fi.t~Cr,
and ILI L, inlrher
ill th. olrl
butel to hi, cation
(eF a " OD '.1
e
[1,
...
ui, a;I a.1
l~s[e.That a copy 'If thOe n,,.IutIons II
H,,slved, That Oll h e
atbe, draped ITOr
Thcrnor.
,,pread IIm the NlT11n~1
~f Ohif n~I,,nn.
4I dd
Prio
ef I"3O 1 :l~lhl
1a~
W~sadirl
Iha
.. s ,
Iient
FEVEN IDJC ?ARE/
I, ,enI No IIhe Iffi~cla JI ...... III ,Ie
[hoh rI.od
lArIlo Teias,
1~1 usii,
fio,
pull~eail"
hil
a'l
Sn
cop3
sen
t
tb
I
iIyI
..
of
AIItewoiy i out. latu E111o1he. BIllialad E. R1de1.11I1
car, deprled
BroI.he I, an
Ix)elz
f In~
.ympathy*
WALrER E. I{IGI{ES,
~0o
EARL~.JW]iUC;[[E,
T. It. fliff~rd, L. U. No. C,
EILM¢ER WAIL,
ARtH[iia
E, 1HL[,.
1,1LO) D W. I URI*IS.
lm It 1)hd
D
'm,II
1 2, 1935
Newark* A* J.
Clonlithte
W/[LLIAM G 11.BEIC.
Syaus., y.
C .. mniltee,
J1.It Rca., L. l'. Nil. 605
Thomas Kenaih. L. ['. No. 675
LIDoy K. Heinnderso, L. U. No. 558
ii, glembers
IniliOlld Febtllhn-y Z0, 1923
It Ji v"
{it,
'I' lo
I .. Mail
Ixeth
Wlh,,ia A]ll~Jghly (',,d, I, Hir,
h.,
of L. U]. N,,
IJ-G1pil,
I~:d I i, de;Ilh e of hl
~inilmited S'ptl'Onb(~ ,5, IN,2
t ml.
t~ken O
I.,, m
.. rudt emI ,,lhI(ml I a. d orl h
It
,svithl
de{
.. .. ........ ... dI....T
lt ,a~,e h
W%,Ile
lilh ]nb
I
l~ Lf]. C} N., E- {1105(x.1end
Blother, T]/omas ];,.l~lCh th.OV,,I be~ t
ebers~ of LO11 li .. 1~o
558 . O~u
.... I O, hi
'.nd
dear 1h,"o'd, Tbaf we as a
body in m
hue. loyal
sembkdfl
r
... Ia I'll
e o'I1f.u
o Il'lh"
l it ,a
Ro ,1O] Tht
Ble ,I per, tI< i, lll(Ilo. ......
;
yI
mi IIr
imbehl:b~I
1h,,lr
1,
Resolve.,d 'lla, IIalh
~.~
be ¢baI
d.I1
len'
,
I.~ E~O'I
..Ia. 3 0
O.
thi
uIca
e.ad IT it £urh~le
'WukeS' J.5~OLI]Dbte p~iiheatwiol.
ReNA~hed, Thalt I copy Of the"e 1-[!sob1litii
be
din~t to the ,,I ... a.e fa]lh,]y and "hat . only be
s~pridnEou ... ,inntlhida;n III
III ,ent
,IH[toI
I
f]u m
cru ial ihal l IT,lI~: h1OhrOo.d inr
R. A TOTIN S~ON,
3J W, MeNE
IEL¥.
pub~wluca bn.
Z. K. DEND¥
I I '[INTN.
GEORGE E JACKSONT,
aekson, Slids.
C01/]illcetd
Elizabeth, N. J.
lice0 rdillgSerty
Sheffield, Al..F,
orthe Comittee"
~
~With
~~~~
~ut
L. u. No.
~~nbJ~
~E.
~id.tr1,
~thl
~
[ IN
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
Members'
bilizing employment,
assome of those who
advocated experiec... a.ting believed it ould
do, it has had "the unfor.sen effet of
nholding back devel.hqnent of the program
0¢ket
mid even ,ttng down standard,"
"State
unemploymnt insurance reserve
P,Itickt
funds need protection against periods of
durable,
uiuutmma.ly heavy unemployment: There is
now about six billion dolars in the totea
handsome unemployment trust fund kept in the United
flader
States Treasury, but these are separated
to contain
into 51 state accounts, each of which can be
Official
drawn on only for payments under the reReceipts
sfective state law. That is, a state can pay
u aemployment benefits only within the limits
brrown or black
of the amount in its own reserve fund. Untemployment risks vay in different states
and the amount of unemployment insurance
cotnibations as well as benefit amounts
vary widely.
SECURITY 111LLL
Social Security Board recommendations:
The board believes that every state unem(Continued froms p., ;e 91)
o ......n. .enf of payment of f benefits for a
ployment trust fund would probably be able
spelified piecod of time to wi rkers who had "to withstand benefit drains during .re.nquit a job without good cawsse, or had been
version, even if bnefits were payabl, in each
discharged for misconduct or refused to state for 26 weeks to aII eligible unemploed
accept suitable work offers d them. Since workers, at weekly rates up to a $25 maxiUnemnployllen t insurance is in itended to ommam." From a Iong ann. e point of view,
pensate workers only for iv, oluntary unrashowever, som provision is needl "for poolplymnent, such disqualificatinon was in order. ing the great different unemployment risks
If, however, a worker contmit ted LWbe uitra- of the states.' This could he done by polling
ployed though able and availlable for work, the various state funds intl a single fund.
nearly all the states paid thee benefits after
It this were done, the report points out,
the initial period of disqualil ication.
"
much stronger benefit provisions could be
'During the past five years, there has financed than are pos.sible when risks and
been a clear trend toward m
"I'll di
reserves
...... are divided."
qualifications," the report sayys. By January,
A Federal reinsurance systm to protect
:944, more than half the states had Frostate unemployment insurance res..rv. , .ouvisions either reducing we
or !flcdinp benefit pied with minimum benefit standards would
rights of claimants who had bbeen disqualified
go far toward improving the present un..afor the above r'easos. Furt her, in an in- piloyment insurance programs.
creasing number of states it is not iiomghi
Unenmployment, a iational rather than a
to show that a worker is unem .poyed throu.gh state problem: "Just as a single employer
no fault of his own; he must show that his or industry cannot stabilize employment, so
employer is at fault in order to get benefits.
the different states are stabjee to risks of
"These developments," the repport points ut, unemployment from economic and natural
'threaten to distort and in eereus imeasure
factors which they cannot controL"
to defeat, the purpose andi u,,ction of nemIRecommendation: The past year of adpltoyennt .i.urans.e--to pa y benefits to ministration andi study of the social security
qualified workers when they a re unemployed, program has "deepened the conviction exable to work and available for work."
pressed by the board in its eighth annual
report that unemployment is essentially a
Recommendations
national problem and can be dealt with most
Social Security Board ree
I... tom thmd
?effectively and economically through a naGood cause for voluntary leav
should tional
... system with decentralized operation."
include compelling persona Iand
fam..ily The recommendations which the board has
reasons. Disqualification shou dinvodv ohly
i,,,made for improving state laws, "are offered
a lengthening of the waiting period, that is, as a statement of the general direction and
a postponement of benefits
Inor most in-k,. kiml of action which it believes necessary as
stances, for not more than feo Ir,orieweeksto U nbiriman, if the States and the Federal
Experience rating provisio as threaten to Government working together are to realize
undermine the effectiveness
Yf- the purp.oses of the unemployment compenmeat insurance: Such provi si.n. have, led sation program outlined in the Social Soemployers to contest benefi pI~leeaymets
rarity Act."
their
forner
workers, since I
affected their "experience rec oral" and thereNEWSPAPER (0f:IAMNIST
fore their contribution rate. In experience(CIA1tint.d11 fro, ,age 87)
rating states, the report po ins out. "'erthousands of craftsmen fIrom metropolitan
ployers have had an inceatiy 'a to resist imi areas to the frequently iselated and unidards in their
provemnent of benefit stun&
hahited sites for the construction of Army
state on the ground that such changes might canIPS, Navy bases, aid war plants.
keep them from getting, or Rmake it impossiKeenan also helped work out a similar
bid for them to continue toe njoy, contribustabilization pact for the shilpbuilding industion rates as advantageous a, those else- try, wherein labor, management and govwher." Experience rating Ihas also led to ernment developed a system of self-governinterstate competition to redaace contribution ment which paid off in high production
records and a miniaume of disputes. In
rates of employers.
recent months, Kegienhas been concenSocial Security Board rec ommendations:
trating on the industrial problems of the
The board believes that the I Causes of .nemployment are beyond the con trol of individ- aircraft industry. While the aircraft facual employers or industries. Instead of tat- tories were scraping the hottom of the man-
L~eather
Holder
Holder
This month we received a letter
from International Representative C.
E1. Rnhter identifying two more of the
Seabees
i
1hose pi Li.i sjppc],pn d pa
page 347 of the September JOURNAL.
He tells us that the seconId fellow from
the left in the first row is Brother Roy
Davis of Sierra Madre, California,
and the fellow on th, extreme right in
the second row is Brother John Noble
of Paln
Springs, California, both
members of L. U. No. B-1008 of Monrovia, California.
powe barre, they were faced with inc eased
pcr.duttiol ldenlands in 1944. But lKermn, betiered that free abt r could meet the de.nand.
He had seen production in our big aircraft
plant ilcrease 25 I.er cent, with
an
increase
in ananpower of only 15 fier cent, through
mooperntifv ac tiol by mii
... eme..I
and labor
in the atproach to the problen.
PEARL HlARBORt
t(Continued
rom page 93)
No, this is not the nice clean construction
work he has been doing back on the mainland but it is the most important job today.
Anyone coming here should come with the
full knowledge that it is no picnic but with
the full conviction that lie is contributing
more
towards theil war effort than any other
civilian any place on the face of the earth.
The stories that the menmbers mght hear
fromn returning ehWtrieian.s froii Pea.l IlarFor are probably true but in must cases, the
reason that their beefswere not adjusted
to their satisfaction was because they left
their cards in some mainland local aTnd attempted to represent themselves and found
that an
individual does not count for very
niuch in this big operation.
The Navy is no different from any other
employer. The individual does not count for
much but when he is organized and represeiited by an organized group that knows
its way around, things are different.
The True Picture
As press secretary of Local Union No.
1186, I thought it was proper that wegive
the correct picture of the conditims at
Pearl Harbor because so nany of the men
have come here with a bright pieture painted
by some of the recruiting agencies and arc
sadly disappointed. When an electrician
lands at Pearl Harbor, we would like to
have him figre on staying there at least
until his contract is fulfilled, and that is
18 months.
The writer has just completed an 18
months' contract phus a short a. igns.e..t
with the 0. W. 1. as a technical engineer installing radio equipment at Saipan and has
been associated with the boys who are doing
the fighting for the past two years. As
iungh as some people might think Pearl
Harbor is, it is certainly a lot hotter than
the accommodations affordd our Brother
members doing the same type of iork in
the actual battle areas.
The wages are $1.46 per hour for third
class, $1.52 for second class and $1.58 for
first class.
Contact your nearest Civil Service, United
States Employment Service Office or the
Pearl Harbor recruiting office for full information.
(Continued on page 112)
MARCH, 1945
tO1
1. B. E. W. ELECTRONICS SCHOOLS
(Continued fon, page 89)
to the anode. This grid is like a screen
through
which
the electrons
must
pass
through, and by being able to control the
flow of electrons once again we can see the
terl
valve is suitable. From the slightest
trickle to wide open it can readily be seen
that a small charge in the grid can coatrol
huge currents of electricity.
there are thIee practical ways we know
of to startthis
lloM of electron ehinssiorh
Hent, light and high velage.
The incandesce. t lamp is an Iten weanr
all familiar vith. The electrons ill tll, lseus
ibrak free frol the filani.nt at l lhiver
arund it iln ani eleftnmie cloud. The 4,ctrould e'Ydjsh~n in, this ase is d..e! hy
The electron microscope wllth a nagnifloation of 100,000 TO one, Cal phi Wagph
500 eight-by-ten-inch pictrues or t cirtle
only one-.ighti, inch in
diameter.
I'ifteen tho.sadI
biles to
nile
itrh were
marked olF and u hen photegraihed wele
one.rnalter of an irch apalt on. aln 4ight by
ten picture. Batitl ra
al,h
llp
a to the
sze of pill..ws. [
dhe use of this leh.r.oseop,
bettel fabrics, clothes, ,abrht,.
I,etas, ete
can be experleied A ith the lfir(,v
olf letli
mental
unaitis. In the eleetrial
teild it
Mreans It"",nger an.d lighter ceductatrs, bette, inshlt..n., and gloater
e
nll,
r'lg ctaallilies by thI
.
.inov.al"I Je*>sTlltli. The ee,iron milcr.oscope tlfiS efeetr-nls intead of
light I/o hrdrrglaphl
tinder iiie],Val ion.
tile lutiine of til
abject
how many times during these year sin.e
1933 that this place has been accorded the
"hl'" of H itlerland.
Yes, wi visited the home]and of the nt.ster-race An d we saw the great ,aster-race
Ilee or hide out or present themselves to us
fith hands high in the air. The enemy has
be.n
titked but apparently ieotcompletely.
Why he fights on or why there should be
any is~stalle at all tl oe r overwhelmlni
pow.er i besonld the iai.ia... tion. But, we
1111t int, freget that his ztli(s are not yet
destroyed and until lhey lir there wl net
be a colilvlered Gernllanv. Ther'e will be
Illa.e a. ,lore
d
days such as the one d
seItIlod wid although they are nrve w ,tckhig it ,ii .. t.. he said that it has notn(t eres.melgi, it
has taken the .an
i
-power ti'nd
I
I
I
]¢s ,rrrs
f the most powpriiil atioiig in
Ti'heie
stre l huses ,i/nt t .r...hentUbeS
,!j,,eln. fIr cooking, This is the
Ihe wol]d 1, rake this very peraflle.
sali
luimride.l.
as
hatinlg fre.
..
i..itlher
source
alsoWoald
WitnrIts
much of it as we will sec up
in diathemy. T
high
lhse fieealiSt(ItoectioTI e(qnlsston fromj a solid sub)- d.ctrs u,
hire, hen se't in tule solidly. There has
srinne. Light lTn]ll hiJh voltage cal als. he queney tIes set np hellrin g nls hliht will bee, little snow, hu,,t
thli , the cold rain,
Iass thiroul.h uily object phited
,etwcen
used to start the flhw of electron
evIr lois pi arid. Hieti'oit in is as; ,utiA h
jmirhm.
its
Thi heat will h, it.. .ame
Thetles.
{If In elly
dS l,,ivtiUmelg else that we have
The emisson 4 eletron s can e c...
..
insi
ahs denut bie.
fherifore,
a
:,,
.eeonlds'
to light.
tolled I .ut the
ise
oid the grid as I Cr11time wilI ruok a ha.lre piee of .... t welI
Of c.....se, there ale lier sielodights that
trolling fat,,o is.1...e.
lel,hsh1abillt
hedone, anil by
lnptrlthld
pe'ateoil 'ill nlt
caus, the electrons are always there ,,ldy burn. The us, ii inegathen Ilub es an.d their could he hIrld hut they ,ill have to wait.
SMte RIIIEaT K. GARR[1Ty,
to i, uhed to do the job needed. The iurw of
rays also will kill iny bacteria, iset. eggs,
F..orn.erly of I_ Ik No. 949.
lehctin's from the negative cath.de tO the
larva, .olId, r Nriy[ti. The u
for hlee
la
pohisitive anode is her
ntion
emis...In
which
til'ebeau have only been touched. In a sealed
ilrans when the eletpons are brohken away package ptlced between the cathlolde and the
"Please Don't Fence Me In"
Irol at solid to fly to at opposite polarity, anlode
Every
time T hear it I think of conditions
this beam ,ould
all[is
Itoy
isects,
but the drift of elctrlls means setting
etc., which would make the life of the pack- as they existed after the last war when milthe fc-r'o¥ing electrons in Inotion by ai1- age g(N)ds inllit ed. Allthouh all in sects and lions of Am..rican °lm......
king men" And
'
plying an cItedrical I pessu e. This is kno..,
. .erewalkinl tile streets
so forth were destroyed, the girani or the 'working WOrie'
as current. Our hn"s hla noaw governs thie vitamins of the grain wouMld ot be bhruted.
idle, without hope of oltaiing a job and
printdples Ipeltaiullhli, It.
ul.re..t whicllh is
The intl'dlhcti,}It Of the ehi ereephalo- yet thoulsa..ds Of artiehs offer',d for sale
pitlrtiluhly
"the current which an e
ih in the fivesid
t.. -cent stores
lectric
pryssnr.
p-aph hit, medica] cirehs ,ill give a bettel:
fo rees through a tesi stauc equals the pre..
u Idersta
tndag of the huian brain,. This bore the Iabe1 "Made in a]t ...... The abovesniredivided By the risi stane'' Thi' also is
mentioted song vividly rillifght to my niflid
IliaChinle, b[y electtonics, r..eilsb the faint
a
round-table dirusirml
Amps = xt![ or [
hebad over the
voltages given off by the lievng blain cells.
It.
British Boad..casting (ompany on .What
It
is
able
to
detect
t
emors
or
itbtl
brain
The electrical iressure or volts applied
to lo with. Japan after he War." While
abnorniallites i lthiot opening the skull In- listenhlg to this broadcast there passedl
to
enductor
e
ause the fl.e-roving leetrans to start drifting il onet direction This sanity has long been a queitruinale subject, through .ny inlbd the visionof the cruelties
inflicted by the Japalnse
drift is always froin .ngative to positive. but with the use of this machine doctors
sldtiry on Our
The study of the different atoms such as hope to Un'avel this mys try. New ethouds Arn,,,ical sethliers while they
prisoners
more
of shock therapy whbich 'epdr the patient
of war if Japan. I rellniher very d.early
hydrogen, deuterium .and hydrogen isitilm
and helium all give a dilferent piwctue, hut unto a state (if coma are being studied by the at1ousts of the beheading of our Amerthe Illinois Ne'ropsychiatic Institute. Why ican Ai nnei; the cruelties inflicted on our
the principle is thi sa,.
The positive the dark curtain
if insan ity s Iillted from
sottl.rs oil thre infamous delth narch from
protonl balance by negative electron.
mime patieints after they have been rendered Iataaln whcn, while marching, if one of
Within the next few years a complete into this state of coma is still
nr.t unp
derstood
revolution in cigiorio, chemaisry, and (,l.by medical sciene. IBt with 4li use of the
triity can he ex peeld. Here are sonic of rew eIectronic machine these things lay
be
the latest developmelnts.
made clear.
These are only a few of the thingzs we can
expect in the neal future, lndthe,op
tstion of theloca l un
,ions
in teaching the elctron theory to their
wl[
iembers
determine
the part we are to play in the new and
better worilId.
hatirg the lihl....l with an elcetri,
Electrtonic School of Local ITsion No. 134,
4. B. E. W.:
HirlIar]'inter ... .hairlllan;
Lester .I'Mhlon, sec. t. ary; Thrones J Murlay, businss
.
.i ...
cntative; Joseph Flymn,
executiv hoard.
Instructors: Ross Utter and Alfred Lohe.
THOSE GERMANS
pange 92)
Frightened and only
UTA
-
ME
S.7"
(Continued rot
I~~~:
opened.
partially
clothed they would gladly stlritt!ldi and
their eyes would wince as thei rilb,s were
smashed in front of their eyes as a gesture
(if contempt to the enemy.
The headquarters of the N-ti party wer,
about the best furnished places ill the citylarge pictures of Adolf adorned the walls
together with giant red, white and black,
swastika imprinted flags. It made uas wnder
ERWVICE flUTTON
beautiful spein
goldnn.dflled. white
background, flags ii colo, blue iar, size 9/16
X 11/16; some siz
of standdrd I. 8. E. W
,ll/I)
[(em
...................... $1.75
Vnusualv
I
TMis Journal at ELECTRICAL WORKEAS and Operators
7103
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~The
Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operatoms
ira.I
FULL EMPLOYMENT BILL
Coltinued from page 85)
jag Act of l921 *s almended, s amended to readl
as follows:
The Bureau I thlie Budget shall, at the request
of anly conlmttc nf ttllerthotHs. of Congress,
furnmh the cormoittP, with such aid and ilfor.
mat[on as it may r.i..t...
Sec. 8. Section 213 of the Budget and A-emirtCag Act of
,2I, as amiendud. shal.l asply with
CCL.e1 moreto
lb the ptqovl1ns (If thCi. ,.
,ee 9. Nlthi
caontined hotela shall be con-
it involve
way
applying innority rlls in such a
that both veterans
and civilian
workers
will get a square deal. A controversy important
to unions already has developed over the interpretation of the Selective Service Act. Memo-
randum
No. 190-A, issued by tile
Selective
Soe-
ice System, lays down the rules: "A returning
veteran is feltitled to reinstatement in his forlier position or one of like senirity. status,
and pay even though Cuoh reinstatement necessitates the discharge of a non-veteran with a
greater sen,, iiy." Areerding to the PrHIeeton
study, such an interprettimon, gvino a priority
in getting jobs to men in the armed forces,
runs counter to maiy labor agreements calling for equality of treatment of veterans and
civilian workers on the basin of soninrity built
Definition.
tp either in cI1vlan Jobs or in the armed servtees during the war. This interpretation conSec. 10. A. used in this Act(a) The tern, full enployment' means a contains the seeds of uch, controversy between
dition in which the nulber of persoIs able to
veterans and n on-veterans because its applicawork, lacking work. and s.eking work, shall be
no greater than the numbe, of unttlCed opportunition wonId endanger tit, ,ehao0lty ay.temi for
ties to wmok, al toeal
prevailing wages and
which labor has worked for so. long the deterworkiln conditions
-oIhe type of job avaiable,
milati'en of this issue vitally interests uniors.
and not below
&i.fmilim
standards required by
a. As war work slackeis, the Iongth of the
1aw. and in which lhe abunion of frctional tlneloplayment Ineludig season al imd technohlogcile unwork week becomes a difficult problem for
employment, ald other tranitioneal and temporary
onions. Vor example, soiC labor agreements
unemployment,
Is Io greater than the minqauom
state that the work week shall be reduced beneeded to presrve adequate flexibility En the
economy.
low 40 h
oursbefore employees arm laid onf.
(
"Cros
C)
ntiona Prouct'i" means the gross
Blut.
as iI -1hacks oert n war proilietion prnlsainal production If goods ands
rves.r
as
grals, s o.. of thee agricme nta nay have
calculated by thie Tlpartment of Commerce.
to be changed because of wartime restrictions
(C) The ten., Federal investment and other expenditure" includes all outlays made by any deol a shorter work week.
partment or branch of the Government, Including
4. As cut-barks ill war work develop and as
ny independent a ency or anuy corportion owlled
or controlled by thte United States,
industry converts to pearetibae preduetien,
many war workers will lie Iaid off, will le transMANAGEMENT FAILS TO PLAN
ferred to other j
orbobs
will be downgraded
(Continued from page 93)
fro, wartime jobs, which often have required
more work, more skill, and higher pay than
studied, feel that planning is the companies'
the johs which these workers will have to
buimness and that unions merely should
take in peacetim e production. All these disoppose policies unfair to them. Other unions
s in jobs involve the question of sCIhave asked maragment for info...ation on locatio.
iority. Unions and m.anagement will have to
specific matters, and ib some companies
together andwolk out proceduresand policies
labor-manag.ement cooperation in postwar get
for handling these jot, changes and for agreeplanning has been effective; unions and eming pmonthe relative status of veterans and
ployers, for example, have gotten together prewn I etinpcyee,, for inStai Ce* if confusion
to study postwar products and markets and is to be avoided.
5. In d
to estimate the eomnanies' postwar employiscussing new agreements with their
employers, Saolle union s have asked that proment and problems of ]econversion.
So far, oft/ers of the InternatIonal InIIss vistia be niade for paying ditilisual wages.
have not done very much to encourage local Sinc, aord inrig ito the Plrimetnn report, few
onllaprites have adopted dismnissal -age
arunions tO cooperate with management on
rangements or expfet to adopt thrll it's largepostwar Plans. Tbose international
.
union ly up to the unions to work (or such pamlent,
ofieers feel that imdvidua] companies can t, if they want added income to hell their Iem)
by thenselves, do very much about postwar
bers adjust from wartime to peacetime job,.
problems and that, even in those aspects
Io the solutjar of eopin yloent protbleays such
which can be handled in the individual cam- as these, which the Princeton study discusses
paneis, problems of the local unions vary quite fully, labut-iaoagement cooperation will
help to ease the tra.sitiot froam war to place.
and must be dealt with by the indivbiual
strued as eahlimg for or aothorizomgla
The operation of plants,
factories.
or other
productive faalItties by the Federal Governmnetl
(h Tpu]or]
h use of CI
lmeasur$ (4
o any t, Pe
wha~soever in deterMining the alocation or Mitribulion of inanpower: or
te) Any chalge Mn the existing procedures on
appro priatlons.
SC
CTPICIE
Y
lEe ulclr~r. A fec
q i diak
si t,aid. r nd, lIrkenc
iyt
A rr~l r ~et~innRyta aG .
* INSIDE TRADE INFo0UM1ON
0/
um3 tsnr$.
c bn wrA . ~~ C c~sd
A'y1
, aroreW ~In g
and4
a~
trng Dia¶T sHc~a L i/ g -t/ ug.l
~W
and on5y CMQr
~Bf. Ka pi ctk
,.~
l e Igenndraia theICad,lt
lh
bElo
aM,~¢r~Al~plkTtc,
mm~
e
aiti o sca tm atl
Rfi
m?,0~
t
~~
~
~
Is,~j~
our soldiers asked for water he received a
cuff from a rifle butt. I remember the accounts of our soldiers being forced to sland
for hours in the broiling sun without any
sem lblance oIf
sheter. I remember acco.nts
of many other cruel ties to which our gallant
menc were su~bjecked.
I know very well that trade and commerce comprise the life blood mid the
arteries of any nation and I am in no sense
an isolationismt. I also realize there is all too
much discord among us and our Allies. I
therefore would not say anything that would
in any vay promote the exisaing wrangling.
But some things are very hard to listen
to even though I am a complacent and
mild sort of individual. One of the things
hard to take were the words spoken on the
broadcast referred to, "We can't fence in
the 70,000,000 people of Japan. We did more
business with Japan over a mentioned period
than we did with China and all South
*Amne r ka combined.
I maintain thit this is po.itively not the
time to be talking about doing commercial
business with the barbarians of Japan
except that if we must talk about business
let's confine our business talks to how we
can best accomplish the buMiness of annihilation. For the next century let us spell
japan and tokyo as well as mikado with
small letters rather than with capitals so
that oir grandchildren's children out of
their
inqtdsitiveness may ask, "Why
Daddy?" and their daddies can go to town
in relating the story of the sneak attack on
Hawaii and the subsequnt cruelties inflicekd
on our soldery in violation of all the treaties
ever writtel as to the treatmet of prisoncr5 of War.
JOHN C. TOOMEY,
L. U. No. 664.
nIons,. Conlsequ.ently, officers of internationll unions have made only a general
attack on postwar job problems, stressing
the neeess ty for full nployment and the
need for conunity, indstry-wide, and national Ianmling. However, when certain issues have become important enough to involve action by the Federal Government-as
in War Labor,Bard wage ases and ill the
interpretation of the Seletie
Service Act.
particularly with regald to seniority and
war veteran.s. i.nternalotional uInm oclicers
have shown n uinterest il urging local un.oI s
to take a stantd.
A number of imlrtMn problems alreadly
are e..e..gilg ill wNih labor is
erned.
1. Before either imanagelllellt or unions
can begin to think about postwvar employment plans within industrial concerns, they
will need to esti nte Ile future needs of
their Conlpanhis for wo-kers aid to compare these fig,,es with the number of present emplyees,. the nmrber of employees in
the ared sCvices, anld
estimntes
of the
number of present workers who will give
up their jobs after the war.
2. IanlliJn, the
prI ,,ef
i
-lil-leg
war vetCeras puts Midons in a difflul t poqsdilo, h
A I)ECISIVE FIGHT
ICont
nued
frolm page W0)
met Hec's hand in a firm grasp, with a gerial
smile, he made a friend who wuld stand by
him against any odds.
"Yo' know,"
continued Ilee, "Cah oie,
black .. a.i.y she done say to me, 11tee' she
say, 'yo' is de fightilest wan oh all ma.h
ehillur. Soene day, somn
wite ilan, w'ot is
bigger'n yn', is goin' to hit yo' so bawd oa
dat fool halid of yo.s, dat he is ,n' yo' to de
k{ingdomhln
,
an'...
i.
h is hope yo' is nrobber
come back,' an' y,' sbuah mOS' donle (lat,"
said Mec, with another chuckle.
"Yo' las' name doan 'aplpen to be Iditsummers. huh?"
"N(,, [lli, my name is Casey."
"Den if yo' is Pbhbr fight dat big red-head
ah is put all iah tunney on ye', an' den quit
work. Come on yo* felas, wot yoall standin'
rlun' wastin' de boss's tam ft.]? Pile all de
poles yo' wants to on ma, load an' ahl hau
dem from heah to Jer.oe..ino, an' back
aOwn."
Without any further interru ptions the
poles were kept moving steadily out along
MARCH, 1945
the line and the last pole was rolled off the
cars well ahead of the freight's arrival.
As Hce pulled away with his load Terry
turned to the gang and said. "I want to ask
a favor
a
v ye. Kape quiet about this fight.
I've got rasons for kapin' quiet a,' if the
nwa,;ev this wan leaks out it dlI get me inta
trouble, s klape shut about it. Froi, owel
ye'llII id ye have no better friend tban
.
lec.
If an.ywan notices his fate an' asks ye bat
happoled, tell thinl sonethin' witit wvrng
wlhin ble ¥s abou t t, load the last poe oIl
his wagon an' he got hit in the face.
The E.anff promised sohlemnly tO keeIT luiet.
Witb the cars unlloaded, Jack, Jules and
Terry sayyed to finish the skidding upof the
poles and do the loading while the others
wenIt back to digging holes. The pole raising
gang hed ialeady started work alId a fine
lead of the forties was nearing the eanp.
That night Tan called Jules int, his tent,
and said, "Yo got the eats unloaded in
good time, dlubs.'
"Yes, 'ral. I is kip d'ose pole niovi,' SO
fas' dat she iSnl...' catch oii fire.'"
'What happened to MGinnis? lis face
is all puffed up like a ballon''L
1'Dat beIg licgut, hers 'aye narrow 'scape
for to get kill. Lie 'ave four pole on bet's
wagon, an' we is mak' ready for to load de
Ias' pole, w'en, pouffe! son,'tin, sh is liap,
de dat
an' Icee, he is get hit so hard iliil face
we is t'ink for ,tleeew'ile be i, daid. but bye
an' bye, h.es come back from were hewas
an' we is get dose last pole loaded on hees
wagol an now, exerting, she is all light."
"Perba;,s soie)Tie drew a rd heiring
across his path, i 2"' said Tan, shrewdly.
{To be continued)
Government Films Available
Since so ninny of ourI'local unions noI
.
have .iccess tI moving pictie mnetiiese" il
connection wit
thte Westiiughouse
E
leetronics Course! they may be interestA., Ihi
obtaining Ither filns that can bW shwn at
leecaI ui ..n I .e.. ings or social gatheriuigs.
0. W. 1. has quite a numuber of fi..s
.
n
interestin
sulbjets available. Tbhey may
be obtaind by applying directly t, the
nearest 0. W 1. ditribu to. There is no
rental fee on 0. W. 1. illmns but dist rib
tors mbay nake a service charge of 50 .Ints
for each subjct loanied pe, week plis
trUs prlration charges- iere are a few of
the interestingfilus offered:
Our Fighting Forces
N'ormantdy
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Pa ratron ps
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Building a Bomlber
Suggestinn Box
The Home Front
Black Marketing
It's Everybody's War
Price If Victory
Safeguarding Military Infoumation
Prom time t titime we'll bring you additionaI titles of available finls.
GLOSSARY
(Conetinued from Septenlber Lstuey
lP~"l~e bel, sa,rowded
for space
h,ile
Poant few ton/hs that we were mlbl?,o
eonttiao o,
£
iossary started soic
a~ie.
git
109
lWe are taking advantage of a few extra
inehes of s
this
Wace,o.th to add to it.
Coupling-term
used
to
represent
"JIFFY"
SOLDER POT
the
mean s by which energy is transferred from
one circuit to another.
Current-.gradal drift of IIrc electron
along a conductor.
Cyle---i
periodic phe.n..i....
oI e colnFlte, set of the reoceurririg vlW.l -
Density
cont.. t ratii..
anything;
qt.antity per units voum ,l;l.
Dieletri--material 'hWi i will not conduect anl electric curretli.
th.. capaciDielect rc
,.Constant--rai&
tance of a .ond.enser ith :, 'ltlhtrie b,tween the plates t, the tir):iitncf
of the
vanci coridemiser wilh L vati l .nbetween the
plate~s.
D irect Cutrrcnt--.clirrenlt xVIillt is constanlt
Swinging Cup--No Spilled Solder
TRIAL OFFER
Send $1.50 with this ad to
100 S.
CLYDE W. LINT
Jefferson St.
Tille Oqiial J.iff
Money
fack
if Not
('IIICAGO 6
Loe"
Satisfactory
1ypotenuse--tbe side opposite 1hbe 9 de*
glee angrle of a Iight triangle,
II ysteress-.a lagging or retIfrdalbin of
in magnitude in. dir(Il.
the effect when the forces acting upon , bhdy
Effective Value th, vnhleif alternating are changed; encountered both in imngnetti
voltage or cuIinc which ba s ti e >ane effect and dielectric phen1onlena.
as the corresIpn]dIg vlue( of tlirel voltaige
Impedance,-the total oposiitbim to the
of current; for a sic
.
u.! enlv e effective flow of alternating
orpulsating curtr[t.
value is .707 times t ,n ita.x: .I ill valuo.
which
luductanee--property of a circuit
Electricity--ene oIf Ilh L'[datllcntal quanopposes a changet' iln current,
itties in nature enis till g of eementary
luduilunr-the act or process of producin g
particles, electorts. nI... IrAl.... which is voltage by the relative motion of a magnetic
manifested as a forc, of attklactiln or repul- field rnd I conductor,.
slOB arid also in wIrk that cai ble performed
Inductive Beatance-the opposition to the
when electrons are.
IaIuMed
It,move; a maflow of aiternatein
or pulsating curre.t due
tti-ial agency ,hich whtIn in n...t.on exhibits
to the inductance if the circuit.
magnetic, chemical, and thernmal cffetcs. and
lnstantanelous V'slue--when a value is conwhen at rest is acconpartied by nit interplay -tinually varying with respect to time a value
of forces between associated localities in at any pa -ticalar istaut is known as the inwhich it is present.
Electrode-the solid
condctors of a cell
or battery which are pIaced in contt
t
ith
the liquid; conductor which makes eletrical
con tact with a liqudl orel
.
Electrolyte-the liquid in a battery or
other elcetr/oehemical
stanta~,neouls value.
Insu latnr-a medium which will not conduct ck'ctricity.
(To be, continued)
dlevice.
Electroniagnel-tenpriy mn... et which
is constructed hy wihding a mlnbiei' of tunis
of insulated "ire lbout a.. i-il corre.
Electromotive Fore--differenee of electrical potential lr pres.ureIe .asared in volts.
ElectrOn one of thi ultm
ite subdivisions
of n-at te] havig a.bout. 1/ 1845 of theI mass
nf a hydroegen ati
(carrying a negative
chaige of electric1ty); .. i. of the negative
particles if an aton.
Energy-the capaitcy LeerIeint work.
Excitor-sala1l gene t.ci few
.. sl.ll llyirg direct In/r rlt to the ill cilia ioffs winding,.
iiehl
Farad-unit of c
alpacitance
eual to the
amlount of capacitante
.
i.issui.e w.henI volt
can stoic I cou.hnih of 0cUtieity.
Field of Force-region in pace filled with
force
I
hich preads out in all d rectiois and
w1l] act through a vac.un..
Flu, miagretic fiehl wdich is established
in a nagnetic circiet.
Fore--that
which teIis to change the
state 0f rest or mlotion of mat or.
F[srequeny--l periodie phei.noena the
nurnlerIof coniudlte
n,-ocetlniefles
in unit
time; in alternati hg current the num... br, of
cyleos per second.
Fuse,-a circuit
protectingf device which
makes ase of a substanc.e which has a lowI
nl ,Itig point.
(;eneratcor-a~ device for convertinig tIlethanical energyilto
electrical energy.
l.enry-un it If induetanc; the ildudtane
preseIt which will cause I voUt toI be in..uced
if the curent changes ;it I lierate
of I amploI per second.
Hydrometer -- device for measuring the
specific gravity of liquids.
41~ze,
Yon want the JOURNAL! We want you to
have the JOuIRAL!
When yot move notify us of the change of
residence at once.
Namie ...........................
Local ?niin..................
New Address
.-......................
ZOaNE NO.
Ohi Address-..---
---
---
ZONE NO.
---
---
---
INTERNATIONAL BROITERHOOD OF
ELECTRICAL WORKISRS
1I00 15th St., N. W.* Washington 5, D. C.
The Joufnal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS poid Operaors
I1;
.
LOCAL UNION OFFICIAL RECEIPTS FROM DECEMBER 11, 1944,+
+
I
JANUARY 10, 1945
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LEGAL BATT'LE
(Conitinued form bareDO)
justified ...
.. ufair labor prac.ticeoutlawed
by Congress. Thor
res.istnce
tO 1clod-shop
,,i... will likely ine tiflened if employers.
must underwrit,, the
arns
of closedshop
uniol, to appilicIant
I'd members and that
a good deal labor bas tonight for only IIe
jeopardized if theprice of obtaining it ill to
have thin uno poi
ceby the employer, are
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Lbibe h~a never come from the governmea. Utiberty nog always come from Ohn ubjects of it__Woodrm
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PEARL HARBOR
(Continued friom pageIN6)
I wilI be on the mainland for a short
furlourh and if any.on wishes, to reachri
Only ... do La through moy IT... Lo...l Unb..
130.
1,
bamlmking forward to Loring a lot of
I, ILL E. W. members,
arriving at Pear
Hlarhot to assist us in keeping the Nally
battle, wagois in tip-top shape
+V
47(
2.25
Ledger sheets o, ab , per 100 --$.50
Arrears, Official Notice of. Pe 100
-30
l'laper, OITICial Lttler, per 300~
Ard;isliriis
90
Ac olit Biliok.
,.5
Ritu1als, extra. each
..
225
Iriokl, M.hlItIO Io, It. S. (smaf
Tieeeipt 130'k, A~iiill;tiit~ (300) re3.00
Book, MIi.. . tt or tR. S. 0(igo
I-eipts) …--.--75
]look, Day..........(750 -Ii' 1.50
feeceijit Book, Appkicabli;
1.50
........
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arbon o ltel)t
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100
i ....... O'l
50---- Iteceiilt Bloot,
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Itt coip11le
I( iShla]irS
(310~ yeM~lsealllanooll
ceti[{s) ....
II lerl'Jlc;al l~Oktl,t, SuibscrinLh)fl per
1eireipi Book, Tieellalnnl$ (750 re- 3.50
2.00
-year
COipts)
- 00
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l1i~velOl)i-%. I flilcl. pir
assleYGUlUt
i.ook, OTerLIrrt
RleceiLp
1,75
(30)0 err ci gts)
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sit];all ]"F. rifa littig
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BIook., Overit'e as0essincult 350
R11ceip
.20
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…
per .1,)001
Receipt Book, Tomnjiorary (7301 re.3.50
W
.......
eiits)
67 00
------per $0,0ooo
Reed [t Ilook, Te.lm(ra ry (:10§ Ie- 1.75
I1410A
Labels, 't/iorl, I)r
1o
I'lr for h
prge
ibls, Papi-r,. l
{dI retelljirary
Receipt Bo'i,,
2
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P~~~~~~lllperf,.
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b .... Rctipt, ¢etls).1.1,23
.3
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wl~rlng, ipr (]4
indL'r Financial
I~edger. buMs hcat
Receipt Rook, Treasu irit'
- 8,$0
Seel rein rv 'N 2fl tab lade'
Receipt Ifolders. Membhers' lest her
ILedger ptier go lit aboe ]ed~er,
.35
h
.locket- FoldIfln, celte
..1.50
.
..
per ]00
Receiplt Holdery Mbrnthts' Pl'nket,
(ellt]Iinid. Meld only) a bulk. Somall1.50
-st Ut. -0 . ... -- .-----per -- b
200
Secretary>,
3.5
- L~edger.
pas..... .. Fig. LrItI~ .
Research weekly report cards. per tOO .10
Fi.nin-0…
tiages
Seal, cut or ...........
300
Seal .........
750
82.00 Se[ (DPo
tk
........-........
e-)
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e rely,
- Io--SeLedg-er.
free
.
rraTelili: cards
Witbdrawal Cards, wilh Tra..s. CdS.,
pv r dozen........
Warraill Boolk, for R. S ---------------
FOR E. W. B. A.
Book, Minute -----------------.......
ChartLers, Duplicates..........
ReitJbtatolno~nt Ilianks, per 'IUI)....
per 1----I
COiIstitutiotl and/ By-Laws,
Single Copies ................
W it
hals,each -------------------
p4
No.
No.
N..
No.
No.
I-Gold Filled Button Gill Tie
Cla~sp….....1)
2-10 kt. Cold Lapel Button
3-Rolled told Ill, (f.o ]dihes) 4 Rolled Cold tapel Hitt"oi
S10 it
ClId
littloll Ioitlud
V
,10
.25
1.10
.75
7?5
1-75
OlId Tie Clasp
25
-tton-NO. 6-10 kt. Gold LapelB
75
No- 7-1i) Il. Cold LaPel BImIIon.- ]
NO. 10-10 lit. Gold Rng --to 10.4
No- 11-10 It, Cold Badge of I.o.or- 2.25
No. 12 l0 4. (,old F'Ihltln Itled
Ioltd (h1i,] Tie (lsp
trl]
Adxida:~r {111[1[oid
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XII. 13--WV~rll,1"
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-Ii';' ry riot strit C. 0- DI
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NOT;CE Wh-Ven pr.on
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iitn relh~iM
t?0TQ ;iIn
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be
,
neccs$t~r, ;z'tals
LABEL
ADDRESS, G. M. BUGNIAZET, I. S.
1200 Fifteenth St. N.
.50
,75
JEWELRY
.lhit accompnnic$ the
amount of cash
i-ertite, trill be s,,pplied ,hent the ref
The abo,totbe rccouuitr4. Afl Stpplies sent by is hav.e post.ge or ¢order. Ottlrrl~isc lhe order wit
press charges prepoid.
METAL
.40
.30
W*ashingion 5, D. C.
When the wrong man uses the right means, the right
means work in the tcwronf utay.
All virtue lies in use. Power to use is the only right
to possess.
Who can make the muddy warer clear? Let it be still
and it will clear itself.
To him who waits. time opens eLery door.
-- CHINESE SAGES.
-. 1

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