Program Book

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Program Book
May 13-16, 2015
Grand America Hotel | Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
International Meeting for Autism Research
www.autism-insar.org
PROGRAM BOOK
INSAR 2015 Sponsors
We thank the following organizations for their generous support of
INSAR and the IMFAR conference.
Platinum Sponsor Level
Gold Sponsor Level
Silver Sponsor Level
Hilibrand Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Kim Adams Marvin
Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation
Roche
Bronze Level Sponsors
Eugene and Janet Lerner Family Foundation
Supporter Level Sponsors
Novartis
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THURSDAY
MAY 14
FRIDAY
MAY 15
SATURDAY
MAY 16
AM
Keynote Address ................................................ 17
Panel Sessions .............................................. 17-19
Poster Sessions............................................ 19-29
PM
Keynote Address ................................................ 30
Oral Sessions ............................................... 30-33
Poster Sessions............................................ 34-46
AM
Special Interest Groups (SIGs) ............................ 47
Keynote Address ................................................ 48
Panel Sessions .............................................. 48-50
Innovative Technology Demonstration .............. 51-52
Poster Sessions............................................ 53-64
PM
Oral Sessions ............................................... 64-67
Panel Sessions .............................................. 68-70
Poster Sessions............................................ 70-80
AM
Special Interest Groups (SIGs) ............................ 81
Keynote Address ................................................ 82
Panel Sessions .............................................. 82-84
Poster Sessions............................................ 84-96
PM
Oral Sessions ............................................... 96-99
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Meeting
Information
Sponsorship .................................Inside Front Cover
Special Interest Groups Schedule .......................... 5
Speaker Ready Room ............................................ 5
Grand America Hotel Floor Plans ........................ 6-7
Schedule-At-A-Glance ...................................... 8-10
In-Conjunction Events ......................................... 11
Keynote Speakers .............................................. 12
Awardees ..................................................... 13-14
Acknowledgments .......................................... 15-16
Abstract Author Index ...................................... 100
General Information .......................................... 162
Exhibitors ....................................................... 164
Notes .............................................................. 166
IMFAR 15th
Annual Meeting
May 11 – 14, 2016
Baltimore Convention Center
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Abstract submission for the
2016 meeting is scheduled
to open in September 2015.
Watch our website for details.
www.autism-insar.org
INSAR Mission
Statement
To present and promote an integrated
approach and understanding of research
on autism spectrum disorder
Strategic Initiatives
Setting the Bar – INSAR will promote
and enhance the highest quality research
agenda at the Society’s Annual Meeting
and in the Society journal.
Expanding the Scope – INSAR will
cultivate cross-cutting breadth of research
from basic science to service delivery
that encompasses the range of ages and
diversity of ASD.
Global Reach – INSAR will expand the
scope of its activities to encompass global
perspectives on ASD.
Next Generation – INSAR will foster
opportunities for leadership and career
development for the next generation of
ASD researchers.
Follow us on Twitter: @IMFAR2015
Include us in your tweets: #IMFAR2015
Building Identity – INSAR will grow its
membership and organizational identity.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/
International-Meeting-for-Autism-Research-IMFAR/187261661300052
1
IMFAR WELCOME
Welcome to the 14th Annual IMFAR, and to Salt Lake City! The 2015 Scientific Program has arisen to match the
heights of the surrounding Wasatch and Oquirrh mountain ranges.
Over 1,400 abstracts were submitted for this year’s IMFAR. With the leadership of Sally Ozonoff and
Jacki Crawley, our Scientific Program Committee has assembled an outstanding array of keynote addresses,
breakouts with panel, oral and poster sessions, Special Interest Groups, and special luncheon events for
students and stakeholders.
We can be especially proud of our 2015 awardees for outstanding performances in the categories of Lifetime
Achievement, Advocate, Slifka/Ritvo Innovation, Young Investigator, and Dissertation.
My thanks go to the INSAR Board, Scientific Program Committee, and the abstract reviewers who diligently
worked to uphold our high standards for presentations. I would also like to express my gratitude to Jennifer Gentry
and Joe Dymek, who once again provided expert assistance in organizing the process and logistics that support
IMFAR.
Finally, I want to also recognize the Salt Lake IMFAR Preconference planning committee who contributed to the
outstanding day long workshop that shared the IMFAR experts with the autism community of Utah and surrounding
states. Kristina Cottle, Anne Asman, Terisa Gabrielsen, Patrick Leytham, Paul Carbone, and Tia Korologos led
our planning efforts and deserve recognition for their outstanding work. Other members of the Utah planning
committee include:
Jessica Bowman
Paul Carbone
Teresa Cardon
Julia Connelly
Aaron Fischer
Thomas S. Higbee
Laura G. Holmes
Julia Hood
Gary Knapp
Stacy S. Manwaring
Carma Mordecai
Rob O. O’Neill
Rebecca Annette Parker
Harper Randall
Allison Sampson
Cheryl C. Smith
Jared Stewart
Clain S. Udy
Scott D. Wright
On behalf of those listed above, and many others who contributed to this community effort, we hope you enjoy our
region and the IMFAR experience.
William M. McMahon, M.D.
IMFAR Meeting Chair
IMFAR is the Annual Meeting of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR).
2
SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM
Topics again spanned the full range of autism research, including diagnostic, behavioral and intellectual
assessment, social behavior and social cognition, communication and language, cognition and attention, repetitive
behaviors and interests, early development, adult outcome, behavioral and pharmacological interventions across
the lifespan, brain structure and function, genetics, animal models, molecular biology, comorbid syndromes,
epidemiology, services, family issues, new technologies, and perspectives across cultures and countries.
WELCOME
Welcome to the 14th annual International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. It is
our privilege and great pleasure to share the Scientific Program with you. The wealth of fascinating, high quality
abstracts for panels, oral sessions and posters made our job both difficult and rewarding. The 1,442 submissions
this year were rated by dedicated reviewers, topic chairs, and members of the Program Committee, resulting in
1,225 acceptances. Presenters come from over 40 countries across the globe.
Several innovations were successfully incorporated into the 2015 program. 1) New this year are Keynote Panels.
Our Keynote Lecturers, Richard Grinker, Sally Rogers and Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, each generously agreed
to assemble a Keynote Panel Session of outstanding talks with high relevance to the subjects of their own lecture.
Keynote Panels will immediately follow each corresponding morning Keynote presentation. These topical panels
are designed to encourage in-depth discussion of the issues raised by our renowned speakers, and to contribute
a diversity of viewpoints. 2) This year, the Program Committee revived an earlier IMFAR format, which assembles
oral sessions into four talks instead of eight, to maximize the representation of topics across the limited number
of oral sessions. All 20 submission topics thus have an oral session this year. 3) Continuing this year are the
popular evening poster sessions with light hors-d’oeuvres, and lunchtime poster sessions with food kiosks nearby,
designed to enhance opportunities for scientific interactions in more relaxed, social settings. 4) The online
submission software now provides check boxes to a) permit unaccepted panel abstracts to be routinely considered
for oral sessions and poster presentations, b) state whether the authors are or are not willing to present their
findings in poster format if there is not an opportunity to give a talk, and c) identify early career investigators in
panel proposals, to ensure the inclusion of the next generation of autism researchers in prestigious IMFAR panel
sessions. We look forward to your feedback on each of these modifications.
Our heartfelt gratitude is expressed to each member of the Program Committee and to each Topic Review
Chair (listed on page 16). Their hard work, spanning many months, is reflected throughout this scientific
program.INSAR President Francesca Happé, INSAR Board members, and INSAR Board-IMFAR Liaison Laura Klinger
contributed tremendously, valuable input to substantive decisions at each phase of program development. Our
wonderful Jennifer Gentry, INSAR Administrative Director, provided a crash course in institutional memory from
earlier IMFAR conferences, generating timetables and assembling abstract spreadsheets for review decisions,
along with Josh Andrews who implemented each stage in the submission and acceptance process through the
Confex software system. Personal thanks are extended to everyone involved in the hard work of organizing the
scientific program for another successful IMFAR in 2015.
We are honored to have the opportunity to showcase the latest exciting findings in autism research, and hope
that the work presented during our three days in beautiful Salt Lake City will improve the quality of life for people
on the autism spectrum and their families.
Sally Ozonoff, Ph.D.
IMFAR 2015 Scientific Program Chair
Jacqueline Crawley, Ph.D.
IMFAR 2015 Scientific Program Co-Chair
3
PRESIDENT’S WELCOME
It is really an honor and a pleasure to welcome you to Salt Lake City for IMFAR 2015! I look forward to learning a
lot, as ever, from the wonderful community of autism researchers gathering for this meeting.
There are many people to thank for their hard work in making IMFAR 2015 a success. This beautiful location
was chosen by Past-President, Helen Tager-Flusberg, on whom I have relied enormously for wisdom and guidance
throughout my three years as President-Elect and then President. Our IMFAR Meeting Chair, Bill McMahon, has
been responsible for the fantastic pre-IMFAR stakeholder conference, our opening reception, and giving IMFAR
2015 a local flavor. Our IMFAR Scientific Program Chairs, Sally Ozonoff and Jacki Crawley, have done a magnificent
job of deciding on keynotes and the scientific content of the program, as well as organizing and overseeing the
hard work of abstract review. Jennifer Gentry and her colleagues from Association Resources are responsible for
the smooth running of INSAR all year and work especially hard around IMFAR; and Joe Dymek and colleagues from
Conference Direct do an exceptional job of ensuring our conference runs without hitches. I would also like to thank
all the INSAR Committee Chairs and members, the volunteers who work so hard all year round to further the aims
of our Society, to support and advance research for the benefit of those with autism, their families, carers and
friends.
This is my second and last IMFAR as President of INSAR. At the end of the INSAR Business meeting on Saturday,
I will hand over the gavel (metaphorically and literally!) to Geri Dawson, your new President. I know she will lead
INSAR in new and exciting directions, and I hope she enjoys the role as much as I have. I’m delighted that I’ll be
staying on the Board of INSAR as Past-President for two further years, with special responsibility for INSAR’s
‘global reach’ mission.
During this Board’s two-year term we have really tried to make INSAR your International society, welcoming autism
researchers from all over the world, and advancing science for people with autism and their families globally. We
have introduced very low rates for INSAR membership and IMFAR registration for people from low and middle
income countries. We have instigated the first ‘Regional-IMFAR’, which will take place later this year in Shanghai
(November 6-8th, 2015). At present, there are many parts of the world where it isn’t possible to hold IMFAR; it
would not be financially viable, or it would be inaccessible to most of our student membership. Regional-IMFAR is
our attempt to bring many of the aims and benefits of IMFAR to those parts of the world, through partnership
with local researchers and stakeholders, with more flexibility to address the issues most relevant in that place
at the current time. I am most grateful to Andy Shih, of Autism Speaks, for facilitating this first Regional-IMFAR;
I hope it will be a huge success and that we can hold Regional-IMFARs in future years in India, Africa, South
America, and many other places. In my remaining two years on the Board I also hope to create an INSAR-led online
repository of global, open-access autism research tools.
In light of INSAR’s global mission, I am particularly delighted that the INSAR Advocate Award for 2015 goes to
Merry Barua, who has worked tirelessly as a parent and autism advocate, almost single-handedly building the
autism community in India. You won’t want to miss her acceptance speech, or that of the INSAR 2015 Lifetime
Achievement Award winner, Laura Schreibman, whose fundamental work on behavioral interventions will be known
to everyone here. This year our Awards Ceremony will also feature short presentations by our Dissertation Award
winners, reflecting the importance INSAR places on our student, post-doc and early career members.
Lastly, I would like to thank the outgoing INSAR Board and welcome the three new Board members. Connie Kasari,
Laura Grofer Klinger, Helen Tager-Flusberg, James McPartland, David Mandell and Tony Bailey have truly been a joy
to work with; not only experts in their fields, wise and thoughtful, but kind, collegiate, funny and infinitively patient
with my fumbling efforts to lead the Board. I will miss working with them, and am delighted that Jamie stays on
with me as Past-Treasurer to represent their ideas and aims within the new INSAR Board. I am very pleased to
welcome the newly elected Board members: Kasia Chawarska as Secretary, Raphael Bernier as Treasurer, and
Craig Newschaffer as Vice-President. David Amaral also joins the Board as the newly appointed Editor of our
journal, Autism Research. It is wonderful that we have such talented scientists joining the Board, who will bring
fresh ideas, energy and passion to INSAR’s missions.
If you have ideas about how INSAR can better pursue the aims of the autism research community, or how IMFAR
could better meet the needs of autism researchers, please come and tell me during the meeting. We are your
international society and your concerns shape our mission and aims. Thank you for the opportunity to be part of
the INSAR leadership – and I wish you all a really enjoyable and productive meeting.
Francesca Happé, Ph.D. FBA
President, International Society for Autism Research
4
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Special Interest Groups (SIGs)
7:15 AM - 8:45 AM
Creating Patient Centric Information Commons for Autism Research
Room: Envoy
Session Chairs: Isaac Kohane and Megan O’Boyle
Anxiety in Autism: Mechanisms, Measurement, and Treatment
Room: Savoy
Session Chairs: Mikle South, Amy Van Hecke, Alana McVey
Minimally Verbal Individuals
Room: Murano
Session Chairs: Nancy Jones, Terry Katz, Connie Kasari
Multiple Risk Factors for ASD: Genetic Predisposition and
Environmental Influences
Room: Grand Salon
Session Chairs: Heather Volk and Gayle Windham
Saturday, May 16, 2015
7:15 AM - 8:45 AM
ASD and Sex Offenses: Guidance for the Criminal Justice System
Room: Envoy
Session Chair: Dr. Laurie Sperry
Co-Chairs: Dr. Rachel Loftin, Dr. Philip O’Donnell,
Dr. Alexander Westphal, Hannah Heyward, Ph.D. candidate
Implementing and Evaluating Community-Based Early Intervention
Room: Savoy
Session Chairs: Dr. Kristelle Hudry and Dr. Giacomo Vivanti
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Friday, May 15, 2015
Technology and Autism
Room: Murano
Session Chair: Sue Fletcher-Watson
Committee: Alyssa Alcorn, Renae Beaumont, Ouriel Grynszpan,
Mari MacFarland, Helen Pain, Katharina Spiel
Approaching Adulthood: Transitional and Vocational Issues in ASD
Room: Grand Salon
Session Chairs: Dr. David Nicholas and Dr. Lonnie Zwaigenbaum
Speaker Ready Room
for Oral Presenters
Location: Sussex Room
All speakers should stop by the Speaker Ready Room to upload
their slides prior to their presentation time. A staff person will
be available to help speakers upload their slides and other files.
If at all possible, please upload your slides the day before your
presentation. The Speaker Ready Room will be open as noted
below:
Wednesday, May 13
Thursday, May 14
Friday, May 15
Saturday, May 16
3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
7:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
If speakers do not upload their slides ahead of time, they can still
load them on to the computer before they present. However, if
there are problems loading the presentation just before presenting,
the speaker runs the risk of using up his/her presentation time.
Regional IMFAR
November 6-8, 2015
Shanghai International
Convention Center (SHICC)
2727 Riverside Ave., Pudong
Shanghai, China
Abstract Submission Deadline:
31 July, 2015
Early Bird Registration Deadline:
15 September, 2015
www.regionalimfar2015-shanghai.org
5
Grand America Hotel — Floor Plan
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
General Sessions, Panel Sessions,
and Oral Sessions
FIRST FLOOR
Tech Demos &
Poster Sessions
D
B
D
A
SIGs
B
N
oms
MURANO
GARDEN
SALON
tro
SAVOY
VENEZIA
GARDEN
SALON
Registration
600 SOUTH PORTE COCHERE
COATROOM
RECEPTION
GRAND
SALON
PATIO
GRAND
SALON
Opening
Reception
RECEPTION
SALES
OFFICE
GARDEN COURTYARD
OAK ROOM
EARL’S
LOUNGE
GRAND
SPA
GIBSON
GIRL
LOUNGE
JOU JOU
LOBBY
LOUNGE
NEWSSTAND
LOBBY
GARDEN CAFE
TERRACE
FITNESS
RETAIL
RETAIL CENTER
GUEST
ELEVATORS
OUTDOOR
POOL
EXECUTIVE OFFICE/
BUSINESS
CENTER
TERRACE
LA BONNE VIE
Cultural Diversity Networking Luncheon
Press
Conference
6
Exhibits
GRAND BALLROOM RECEPTION A,B,C
Res
ENVOY
GRAND BA LLROOM
C
IMPERIAL BALLROOM RECEPTION A,B,C
Stakeholder
Luncheon
Panel
Sessions,
Oral Sessions
A
IMPERIAL BALLROOM
C
Grand America Hotel — Floor Plan
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
THIRD FLOOR
N
(Overlooks Garden Courtyard)
(Overlooks Garden Courtyard)
TERRACE
TERRACE
VENICE VERSAILLES BELVEDERE
SUSSEX
FONTAINBLEAU
HERMITAGE TUSCANY
VIENNA
AMBASSADOR
GRENOBLE
Speaker Ready
Room
EMBASSY
PROVENCE
ELEVATOR
RIVIERA
MILANO
AUDUBON
RESTROOMS
BAGATELLE
Press Room
7
SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE
WEDNESDAY
10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
12:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Press Conference
Murano
Registration Open
Grand Ballroom Registration Desk
Early Career Workshop – pre-registration required
Grand Ballroom A
4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
THURSDAY
7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Registration Open
Grand Ballroom Registration Desk
Coffee & Pastries
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Exhibits Open (see exhibitor list pages 164-165)
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Welcome from IMFAR Organizers
Grand Ballroom
President Address – Francesca Happé
Grand Ballroom
Keynote Address – R. Richard Grinker - Who Owns
Autism? Exceptionalism, Stigma, and Stakeholders
Grand Ballroom
Break
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Keynote Panel – Autism and Society: Taking Stock
of the History and Meaning of Autism Research
Grand Ballroom B
Panel – An Update on Vocal Complexity in
Infants and Children with ASD
Grand Ballroom A
Panel – Approaches to Examining and Identifying
Neural Biomarkers for Autism: Progress and
Challenges
Grand Ballroom C
Panel – Attending to Attention Among Persons
with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Perspectives
on Strengths, Weaknesses, and Goodness-of-Fit
Grand Ballroom D
Panel – Pivotal Response Treatment: Novel
Intervention Models to Optimize Outcome
Grand Salon
Poster Presentations – Brain Function;
Cognition: Attention, Learning, Memory; Medical
and Psychiatric Comorbidity; Repetitive Behaviors
and Interests; Service Delivery/Systems of Care
Imperial Ballroom
Lunch Break
On Your Own
Student “Meet the Experts” Luncheon –
pre-registration required
Savoy
May 13
Cultural Diversity Meet & Greet Happy Hour
Little America Hotel /Lucky H Lounge
(Open - no pre-registration)
Opening Reception
Center Courtyard (outdoors)/
Grand Ballroom (backup location)
May 14
1:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Oral Sessions 1A – 5B (details follow):
Oral Session 1A – New Insights into
Social Intervention
Grand Ballroom B
Oral Session 1B – Interventions for
Adults with ASD
Grand Ballroom B
Oral Session 2A – Prenatal Risk
Factors and ASD
Grand Ballroom A
Oral Session 2B – Neuropeptide
Hormones in ASD
Grand Ballroom A
Oral Session 3A – International Cross-Cultural
Perspectives on Identification
Grand Ballroom C
Oral Session 3B – Scaling Autism Interventions
Across Cultures in Community Settings
Grand Ballroom C
Oral Session 4A – Neural Signatures of Social
Perception and Reward Motivation in ASD
Grand Ballroom D
Oral Session 4B – Relationships between
Behavior and Sensorimotor Circuitry in ASD
Grand Ballroom D
Oral Session 5A – Experiencing Autism:
First-Hand and Sibling Perspectives
Grand Salon
Oral Session 5B – Social Motivation, Social
Reward, and ASD Traits in Clinical and
Typical Samples
Grand Salon
Break
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Keynote Address – Lifetime Achievement
Awardee – Laura Schreibman
Grand Ballroom
INSAR Awards Ceremony – Lifetime
Achievement, Advocate Award, Slifka/Ritvo
Innovation, Young Investigator, Dissertation
Grand Ballroom
Poster Session – Early Development
(<48 months); Family Issues and Stakeholder
Experiences; Genetics; Interventions
Non-Pharmacologic – Preschool; Other
Imperial Ballroom
Student Social (offsite)
Author Present Times for Posters:
This year poster presenters have been asked to stand at their posters during the full Poster Session time.
 Presentations with this symbol may not be placed in a session within their subject area as
they replaced withdrawn presentations.
Abstracts with this symbolhave been reviewed by the Cultural Diversity Committee
and include an issue of cultural diversity (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status),
a cross-cultural focus, or use a diverse population.
8
SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE
FRIDAY
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
7:15 a.m.- 8:45 a.m.
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
10:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Welcome & Simons Foundation Update –
Wendy Chung, M.D., Ph.D.
Grand Ballroom
Keynote Address – Sally Rogers – Reflections on
50 years of ASD Early Intervention Science
Grand Ballroom
Break
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Innovative Technology Demonstrations
Imperial Ballroom
Keynote Panel – Responses to Early
Intervention and Mechanisms of Change
Grand Ballroom B
Panel - EU-AIMS: Translating Cellular and
Animal Models of Synaptic Gene Deficits
to Large-Scale Clinical Studies
Grand Ballroom A
Panel - Factors Associated with Adult
Outcomes for Individuals with ASD
Grand Ballroom C
Panel - From Genomic Discovery to
Genetically Defined Autism Subtypes
Grand Ballroom D
Panel - Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders
and the Lifecourse in ASD: Clinical and
Epidemiological Perspectives
Grand Salon
Poster Presentations – Communication and
Language; Diagnostic, Behavioral and
Intellectual Assessment; International and
Cross-Cultural Perspectives; Interventions
Pharmacologic
Imperial Ballroom
Lunch Break
On Your Own
Student “Meet the Experts”
Luncheon – pre-registration required
Murano
Cultural Diversity Networking Luncheon
(open – no pre-registration)
Envoy
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Autism Community Stakeholder Luncheon
(open- no pre-registration)
Savoy
SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
Special Interest Group (SIG) – Creating Patient
Centric Information Commons for Autism Research
Envoy
Special Interest Group (SIG) – Anxiety in Autism:
Mechanisms, Measurement, and Treatment
Savoy
Special Interest Group (SIG) – Minimally
Verbal Individuals
Murano
Special Interest Group (SIG) – Multiple Risk
Factors for ASD: Genetic Predisposition
and Environmental Influences
Grand Salon
Exhibits Open (see exhibitor list pages 164-165)
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Coffee & Pastries
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Registration Open
Grand Ballroom Registration Desk
May 15
Oral Sessions 6A – 10B (details follow):
Oral Session 6A – Preterm Birth and ASD Risk
Grand Ballroom B
Oral Session 6B – Early ASD Surveillance
and Screening
Grand Ballroom B
Oral Session 7A – Conditioning and Anxiety
Grand Ballroom A
Oral Session 7B - Repetitive Behaviors
and Interests
Grand Ballroom A
Oral Session 8A – Adult Outcome: Influence of
Family and School Contexts and Psychopathology
Grand Ballroom C
Oral Session 8B – Cognitive Aging in ASD
Grand Ballroom C
Oral Session 9A – From Mice to Monkeys: New
Approaches to Dissecting the Neurobiology of ASD
Grand Ballroom D
Oral Session 9B – Metabolomic and
Genetic Factors in ASD
Grand Ballroom D
Oral Session 10A – Brain Anatomy in ASD
Grand Salon
Oral Session 10B – Brain Connectivity in ASD
Grand Salon
Coffee Break
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Panel – Tackling Teenage Troubles: Interventions
Aimed at Guiding Adolescents with ASD through
the Challenges in the Domains of School, Peers
and Psychosexual Development
Grand Ballroom B
Panel – Integrating Human Genetics, Functional
Genomics, and Model Systems to Illuminate
the Etiology of ASD
Grand Ballroom A
Panel – Meaningful Social Outcomes in Real World
Settings: Targets, Interventions, and Change
Grand Ballroom C
Panel – Neuronal Migrational
Abnormalities in Autism
Grand Ballroom D
Panel – Understanding Early Dyadic
Interaction in ASD
Grand Salon
Poster Session – Adult Outcome;
Interventions – Non-pharmacologic –
School Age, Adolescent, Adult; Social
Cognition and Social Behavior
Imperial Ballroom
9
SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE
SATURDAY
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
7:15 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
8:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Special Interest Group (SIG) – ASD and Sex
Offenses: Guidance for the Criminal Justice System
Envoy
Special Interest Group (SIG) – Implementing
and Evaluating Community-Based Early Intervention
Savoy
Special Interest Group (SIG) –
Technology and Autism
Murano
Special Interest Group (SIG) –
Approaching Adulthood: Transitional and
Vocational Issues in ASD
Grand Salon
Registration Open
Grand Ballroom Registration Desk
Exhibits Open (see exhibitor list pages 164-165)
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Coffee & Pastries
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Welcome & Autism Speaks Update –
Robert H. Ring, Ph.D.
Grand Ballroom
Keynote Address –
Jeremy Veenstra-Vander Weele –
Pathways to New Treatments
for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Grand Ballroom
Break
Grand Ballroom Foyer
Keynote Panel – On the Road to Translational
Treatments in Autism-Related Genetic
Syndromes
Grand Ballroom B
Panel – Translational Developmental Research
in Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors:
From Basic Mechanisms to Intervention
Grand Ballroom A
Panel – The Value of Registries and Biobanking
to the ASD Community within the Social and
Cultural Landscape
Grand Ballroom C
Panel – Investigating Multiple Components of
Language Development in the Same Children:
The Uconn Early Language Study
Grand Ballroom D
Panel – You Want Me to Eat What?
Novel Treatment Approaches for Food Selectivity
and Feeding Problems in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder
Grand Salon
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
1:45 p.m. - 2:35 p.m.
2:40 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Poster Presentations - Animal Models;
Brain Structure; Brain Function; Epidemiology;
Molecular and Cellular Biology; Other
Imperial Ballroom
Lunch Break
On Your Own
INSAR Business Meeting
Grand Salon
Oral Sessions 11A – 15B (details follow):
Oral Session 11A – New Treatments for
Early Intervention
Grand Ballroom B
Oral Session 11B – Implementation of
Evidence-Based Practices in Routine Care
Settings: Feasibility, Acceptablity, and
Provider Fidelity
Grand Ballroom B
Oral Session 12A – Psychiatric
Comorbidities in ASD
Grand Ballroom A
Oral Session 12B – Medical
Comorbidities in ASD
Grand Ballroom A
Oral Session 13A – Language Interventions
in Young Children with ASD: Effectiveness
and Impact
Grand Ballroom C
Oral Session 13B – Language and Learning
Abilities in School-Age Children and Adolescents
with ASD
Grand Ballroom C
Oral Session 14A – Complex Genetic
Variants and Models of Autism
Grand Ballroom D
Oral Session 14B – Epigenetics of Autism
Grand Ballroom D
Oral Session 15A – Assessment and
Measurement of Sensory Issues
Grand Salon
Oral Session 15B – Sex Differences:
Assessment and Measurement
Grand Salon
IMFAR Annual Meeting
IMFAR 2015
Open to all IMFAR Registrants
Annual Meeting abstracts
are available online
www.autism-insar.org
OPENING RECEPTION
5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
Center Courtyard (outdoors)/Grand Ballroom (backup location)
10
May 16
IMFAR 2015 IN-CONJUNCTION EVENTS
Wednesday, May 13
(pre-registration was required)
Noon – 3:00 p.m. • Grand America Hotel – Grand Ballroom A
The INSAR Board of Directors and the Student Committee are hosting the 2nd Annual IMFAR Early Career Development Pre-conference Workshop.
This is a three-hour workshop focused on grant writing. Reservations were accepted prior to the Meeting; registration and table assignments were confirmed via email.
Faculty providing grant writing expertise will include: David Amaral, Tony Bailey, Jim Bodfish, Alice Carter, Tony Charman, Mirella Dapretto, Adriana DiMartino,
Eric Fombonne, Lisa Gilotty, Alycia Halladay, Jana Iverson, Alice Kau, Laura Klinger, Julie Lounds Taylor, David Mandell, Jim McCracken, Daniel Messinger,
Matt Mosconi, Craig Newschaffer, Alison Singer, Sarah Spence, Wendy Stone, Helen Tager-Flusberg, Elena Tenenbaum, Amy Van Hecke, Sara Webb
Cultural Diversity Meet & Greet
4:30 – 5:30 p.m. • Little America Hotel – Lucky H Lounge
IN-CONJUNCTION EVENTS
2nd Annual IMFAR Early Career Development Pre-Conference Workshop
New to IMFAR? Want to reconnect with other members before the conference? Join us for Happy Hour before the Opening Reception. The event will be
held in the Little America Hotel which is directly across the street from the Grand America. This event is open to all IMFAR 2015 registrants.
Thursday, May 14 and Friday, May 15
Student “Meet-the-Experts” Roundtable Luncheons
(pre-registration was required)
Lunch period: 12:30 – 1:45 p.m. each day • Grand America Hotel • Thursday – Savoy Room • Friday – Murano Room
Research assistants, student scientists and postdoctoral researchers, bring your lunch and network with expert autism scientists in a unique and informal format.
Sit at a roundtable with the autism expert of your choice, who will share experiences about their career, research from their laboratory, and advice on how to build a
successful research career. Reservations were accepted prior to the Meeting; registration and table assignments were confirmed via email.
Experts on Thursday, May 14th: David Amaral, Bryan King, Geraldine Dawson, Jacqueline Crawley, Richard Grinker,
Francesca Happé, Young Shin Kim, Catherine Lord, Jamie McPartland, Sally Ozonoff, Lonnie Zwaigenbaum
Experts on Friday May 15th: Kasia Chawarska, Connie Kasari, David Mandell, William McMahon, Sally Rogers,
Stephan Sanders, Paul Shattuck, Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, Amy Wetherby
Thursday, May 14
6th Annual IMFAR Student Social
7:00 p.m. (directly following the poster session) • The Leonardo – 209 East 500 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84111
All INSAR Student members are invited to join us for an evening of informal socializing and networking among students and trainees actively engaged in autism research.
We have rented The Event Center and Courtyard on the third floor of The Leonardo (a short walk from the conference hotel) for this event. Food is free and alcoholic beverages
are available for purchase. Attendees are also invited to explore the museum exhibits (included with event). No ticket required.
This event is hosted by the INSAR Student Committee. Funds for complimentary food were generously provided by the INSAR Board of Directors. Cash bar.
Friday, May 15
Community Advisory Committee (CAC)
Community Stakeholder* Luncheon
12:30 – 1:45 p.m. • Grand America Hotel – Savoy Room
Autism stakeholders are invited to attend the 6th annual Stakeholder* Luncheon. This event is organized by members of the INSAR Community Advisory Committee (CAC) as an avenue to bridge the gap
between scientists and members of the autism community. Pre-registration is not required. Hosted by the INSAR Community Advisory Committee.
*The term “stakeholder” has various definitions. In the context of the CAC, a stakeholder is someone who is affected by, or has a personal investment in autism.
Co-Sponsored by: Autism Science Foundation and Autism Speaks
Cultural Diversity Networking Luncheon
12:30 – 1:45 p.m. • Grand America Hotel – Envoy Room
Bring your lunch to the room. Pre-registration is not required.
11
IMFAR 2015 KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Roy Richard Grinker, Ph.D.
Roy Richard Grinker is Professor and Chair of Anthropology, and Director of the Institute for Ethnographic Research,
at the George Washington University. He is Editor-in-Chief of Anthropological Quarterly. Grinker was born and raised
in Chicago. He graduated from Grinnell College in 1983 and received his Ph.D. in Social Anthropology at Harvard
University in 1989. Dr. Grinker has published books and articles on a range of topics such as ethnicity, north-south
Korean relations, and autism. His work on autism includes a total population study of autism prevalence in Ilsan, South
Korea and qualitative research on approaches to early identification and intervention in Korea, the U.S., India, and
South Africa. Grinker is the author of Unstrange Minds: Remapping the World of Autism (Basic Books, 2007). The book
is both an account of the cultural factors underlying changes in autism prevalence, and his own experiences raising a
daughter with autism. Unstrange Minds received the KEN award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness, was a
finalist for the American Anthropological Asssociation’s Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing, and was selected
by Library Journal as one of the “30 Best Books of 2007.”
Sally J. Rogers, Ph.D.
Sally J. Rogers is a developmental psychologist, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Director of
Training and Mentoring at the MIND Institute, University of California Davis. She is involved at the international level
in major clinical and research activities involving autism. She has received many awards for her teaching, research,
and clinical contributions. She has published over 200 papers, chapters, and books on topics including cognitive
development in children with profound mental retardation, cognitive and social development of blind infants,
symptoms of toddlers with Fragile X Syndrome, as well as numerous papers on clinical and developmental aspects of
autism. She has made seminal contributions to the study of imitation in autism research. Her current research focuses
on developing effective interventions for infants and toddlers with autism that families and professionals can deliver.
In addition to research, she is also a clinician, providing evaluation, treatment, and consultation to infants, children
and adults with autism and their families. The intervention model that she developed with Geri Dawson and other
colleagues – the Early Start Denver Model – is internationally known and recognized by Time.com and Autism Speaks
as one of the 10 main medical breakthroughs of 2012.
Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, M.D.
Dr. Veenstra-VanderWeele is a child and adolescent psychiatrist who uses molecular and translational neuroscience
research tools in the pursuit of new treatments for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and pediatric obsessive-compulsive
disorder (OCD). As a predoctoral fellow, medical student, and resident, he trained in human molecular genetics in the
laboratory of Edwin H. Cook at the University of Chicago. He expanded his research experience with a post doctoral
research fellowship in molecular neuroscience with Randy Blakely and Jim Sutcliffe at Vanderbilt University, with the
goal to develop mouse models of social dysfunction and repetitive behavior. Currently, his molecular lab focuses on
the serotonin, oxytocin and glutamate systems in genetic mouse models related to ASD and OCD. While developing
a molecular neuroscience research program, he also built a clinical/translational research program to study new
treatments for ASD and Fragile X Syndrome. He moved both arms of his research program to Columbia University
in 2014 to continue to pursue novel treatments for children with these challenging conditions.
12
IMFAR 2015 AWARDEES
INSAR Lifetime Achievement Award
Laura Schreibman, Ph.D.
Laura Schreibman, Ph.D., is director and
principal investigator of the Autism Intervention
Research Program at the University of California
at San Diego. She is also a Distinguished
Professor Emeritus of Psychology, and Research
Professor at the University of California, San
Diego, where she has been on the faculty since 1984. She has been
a licensed psychologist in the State of California since 1977. She
earned her Ph.D. in 1972 at the University of California, Los Angeles,
where she focused on the field of behavior analysis and treatment
of childhood autism. Her research since her degree has continued in
the same vein where she has conducted both basic research on the
nature of ASD and applied research on effective interventions. She is
co-developer of Pivotal Response Training, one of the first naturalistic
treatment approaches for individuals with autism. Her most recent
research interests have focused on the development and dissemination
of naturalistic developmental behavioral intervention (NDBI) strategies,
the development of individualized treatment protocols, translation
of empirically based treatments into community settings, analysis of
language and attentional deficits, generalization of behavior change,
parent training, and issues of assessment. She is an author of four
books and more than 160 research reports, articles, and book
chapters. The Science and Fiction of Autism, published in 2005 by
Harvard University Press, is her third book.
INSAR Advocate Award
This award honors community members/advocates who have
influenced the ability to carry out autism research.
Merry Barua
Merry Barua is Director, Action for Autism India,
National Centre for Autism. She is an activist,
educator, and a parent to a son with autism.
Merry started the autism movement in India when
lack of information and misconceptions about
this condition abounded. With little support from
society or authorities of the time, she set about changing the scenario
in awareness, diagnostics, education, human resources development,
and policy, among others. Merry writes, teaches, lobbies, trains,
sensitizes, counsels, and advocates. Her focus on ‘spreading the word’
and enabling individuals with autism and their families to empower
themselves, has led to a growth in services and the formation of
empowered parent groups, and in particular of parent-driven services.
Merry’s vision of an inclusive society looks not merely at individuals
with social and communication challenges, but at all those who do not
fit into society’s judgmental norms. Merry is an Ashoka Fellow.
AWARDEES
The Lifetime Achievement Award is given annually by the Executive
Board of the International Society for Autism Research. This award
acknowledges an individual who has made significant fundamental
contributions to research on autism spectrum disorders that have had
a lasting impact on the field. The focus of the awardee’s research can
be in any discipline.
Bios provided by recipients
Slifka/Ritvo Innovation in Autism Research Award
Dissertation Awards
The Alan B. Slifka Foundation promotes innovative research on
autism spectrum disorders conducted by junior investigators. The
objective of the award is to lead to new treatments and improvements
in the quality of life of individuals with autism. The Foundation
provides one $25,000 (for one year) research award to an INSAR
member. The award may support clinical research (diagnosis
or treatment of autism or educational efforts) or basic research
(epidemiology, genetics, neuroscience, immunology etc). The goal
of the Slifka/Ritvo Award is to support promising junior investigators
to pursue excellent research for which they do not have funding and
are not likely to get funding readily. The recipient of the Slifka/Ritvo
Award will be recognized at the Awards Ceremony at IMFAR.
Dissertation Awards are given annually to active scientists and
clinicians in training in all areas of autism research. Awards are for
the best basic science dissertation and for the best clinical/behavioral
dissertation in autism accepted by the university in the year 2014.
These awards provide a stipend of $1,500 each.
Oleksandr Shcheglovitov
University of Utah
Vanessa Hus Bal
Shulamite Green
Katherine Stavropoulos
University of California, San Francisco
UCLA
Yale Child Study Center
Young Investigator Awards
Young Investigator Awards are given for the best biological and
clinical empirical research papers published or in press in 2014, by
an investigator who has been awarded their Ph.D. or M.D. in the
past seven years. These awards provide a stipend of $1,500 each.
Sarah Cassidy
Brian O’Roak
Ryan Stevenson
Coventry University
Oregon Health & Science University
University of Toronto
13
IMFAR 2015 AWARDEES
Diversity Travel Awards
Diversity travel awards are given to individuals who are currently
members of INSAR, studying in or working in autism research
in-health-related institutions, universities, public agencies or other
stakeholder-related activities. The awards are given to persons from
racial, ethnic, and disability groups that have been historically underrepresented in the sciences in their home country. The awards provide
a stipend of $1,000 for individuals from North America, Europe
and other parts of the developed world; for individuals from the
developing world, the stipend is $1,500. The purpose of the awards
is to increase participation of individuals currently underrepresented
in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences, defined
as: individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups,
individuals from low and middle income countries* or individuals with
disabilities, including ASD.
Thomas DeRamus
Anthony Goodwin
Hala Harony-Nicolas
Sharlene Lansiquot
Gloria Law
Jose Maximo
Alida Acosta Ortiz
Adelle Pushparatnam
Amie Senland
Belinda Williams
UAB Cognition Brain and Autism Lab
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Yale Child Study Center
National Institute of Education
University of Alabama, Birmingham
City University London
University of Cambridge
University of Saint Joseph
University of California Los Angeles
Professionals from Low Income Countries Travel Awards
Subcategory of Diversity Travel Awards provides a stipend of $1,500
to each awardee.
Tawakalt Fagbayi
Sabri Herguner
Michelle Hoogenhout
Shoba Meera
Joy Okpuzor
Andrew Olagunju
Arkoprovo Paul
Daniel Valdez
Chongying Wang
Li Yi
University of Lagos
NE University
University of Cape Town
National Institute of Mental Health
and Neurosciences
University of Lagos
College of Medicine, University of Lagos
National Brain Research Centre
FLACSO
Nankai University
Sun Yat-sen University
Student Travel Awards
Student Travel Awards are available to graduate students, postdoctoral
fellows, and medical students and residents actively engaged in autism
research. These awards provide a stipend of $500 each. First priority
is given to students who are presenting their own original research at
IMFAR 2015 and who have not previously received an IMFAR Student
Award.
Shan Andrews
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
School of Public Health
Thomas Avino
University of California at
Davis MIND Institute
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
School of Public Health
Yale University
University of Missouri, Columbia
University of Southern California
University of Connecticut
University of California, Santa Barbara
Indiana University
Kelly Bakulski
Laura Boccanfuso
Kimberly E. Bodner
Daniel Bone
Kathryn Bradbury
Jessica Bradshaw
Jennifer Bush
Sara Calderoni
Allison Canfield
Iris Chin
Matthew Cranwell
Amanda Crider
Jennifer Davis
Matthew Davis
Jennifer Ference
Lilli Flink
Hannah Friedman
Ivy Giserman Kiss
Laura Green
Kathryn Greenslade
Clare Harrop
Karen Jones
Minyoung Jung
Elizabeth Karp
Cara Keifer
Paula Krakowiak
Deidre Krupp
Michelle Lee
Anne Geeke Lever
Emily Levy
Lauren Libero
Supriya Malik
Meghan Miller
Cari-lene Mul
Emily Neuhaus
Eileen Oberwelland
Alexa Pohl
Hannah Reuman
Melanie Ring
Liron Rozenkrantz
Eric Rubenstein
Magali Segers
Megha Sharda
Asma Soltani
Nicole Stadnick
Ryan Stevenson
Emily Trimmer
Tawny Tsang
Katja Tuononen
Ashley Wagoner
Carla Wall
Daniel Yang
Shuting Zheng
Stella Maris Scientific Institute
University of Connecticut
University of Connecticut
Newcastle University
Georgia Regents University
Pennsylvania State University
University of Kentucky
University of Calgary
Yale University School of Medicine
Yale Child Study Center
University of Massachusetts Boston
The Tree House Community
University of Washington
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
University of California at Davis
Osaka University
University of Washington
Yale Child Study Center
UC Davis
Oregon Health and Science
University, Center for Spoken
Language Understanding
Northwestern University
University of Amsterdam
Yale Child Study Center
UC Davis MIND Institute
University of Birmingham
UC Davis MIND Institute
Anglia Ruskin University
Seattle Children’s Hospital
University Hospital Aacehn
Autism Research Centre,
University of Cambridge
Yale Child Study Center
City University London
Weizmann Institute of Science
UNC Gillings School of Public Health
York University
International Laboratory of Brain,
Music and Sound Research
University of Montreal
Neurophotonics Laboratory
University of California, San Diego
University of Toronto
University of New South Wales
University of California Los Angeles
University of Eastern Finland
Wake Forest University
Yale University
Yale Child Study Center
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
Early Career Workshop Travel Awards
Up to 10 Early Development Career Workshop Travel Awards will be
available to current Student members who will be attending IMFAR
and the Early Career Workshop (prior to IMFAR). The award provides
a $200 stipend paid following IMFAR. Awardee names will
be displayed on the screen in the general session room prior to the
INSAR Awards Ceremony.
*Please refer to the posted list of countries identified by the World Bank as low-income, lower-middle income, and upper-middle income at http://www.autism-insar.org/imfar-annual-meeting/travel-awards.
14
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
NSA
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15
NSA
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15
PRESIDENT
PRESIDENT
Francesca Happé
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London
Geraldine Dawson
Duke University School of Medicine and Institute for Brain Sciences
PRESIDENT-ELECT
VICE PRESIDENT
Geraldine Dawson
Duke University School of Medicine and Institute for Brain Sciences
Craig Newschaffer
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute
VICE PRESIDENT
TREASURER
David Mandell
University of Pennsylvania
Raphael Bernier
University of Washington
TREASURER
SECRETARY
James C. (Jamie) McPartland
Yale Child Study Center
Katarzyna (Kasia) Chawarska
Yale Child Study Center
SECRETARY
PAST PRESIDENT
Connie Kasari
University of California, Los Angeles
Francesca Happé
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London
PAST PRESIDENT
PAST TREASURER
Helen Tager-Flusberg
Boston University
James C. (Jamie) McPartland
Yale Child Study Center
PAST TREASURER
Autism Research
Laura Grofer Klinger
TEACCH, University of North Carolina
Journal Editor: David G. Amaral
1
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) is the professional organization that oversees the annual International Meeting for Autism
Research (IMFAR). INSAR is responsible for appointing all committees that govern the organization and approving the content and format of the
IMFAR Annual Meeting.
MIND Institute, UC Davis
Autism Research
Journal Editor: Anthony Bailey
University of British Columbia
(President-Elect joined the Board in 2014)
NSA C
A
C
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Chair: Carla Mazefsky, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine
C
A
C
Co-Chair: Sarah Logan, Medical University of South Carolina
Co-Chair: John Robison, College of William & Mary
C
D
C
T
M A M
C
Chair: William M. McMahon, University of Utah
M A
Co-Chair: Tamara Daley, Westat
Co-Chair: Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp, Center for Disease Control
C
Co-Chair: Vanessa Hus Bal, University of California, San Francisco
Co-Chair: Carolyn McCormick, Brown University
C
Co-Chair: Sally Ozonoff, UC Davis
Co-Chair: Jacqueline Crawley, UC Davis
C
Co-Chair: Debbie Hilibrand, The Hilibrand Foundation
Co-Chair: James C. McPartland, Yale Child Study Center
M
C
Chair: Susan Bookheimer, UCLA
N
E
C
Chair: Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp, Center for Disease Control
C
Chair: Alison Singer, Autism Science Foundation
S
G
S GC
Co-Chair: Laura Gutermuth Anthony, Children’s National Medical Center
Co-Chair: Mayada Elsabbagh, McGill University
NSA S
Jennifer Gentry
Administrative Director
Kate Flaherty
Association Administrator
NSA M
C
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Joe Dymek
Jennifer Marshall
NSA A
C
Joshua Andrews
15
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Meeting
Committee
William McMahon
Meeting Committee Chair
Anne Asman
Jessica Bowman
Paul Carbone
Teresa Cardon
Julia Connelly
Kristina Cottle
Aaron Fischer
Terisa Gabrielsen
Thomas S. Higbee
Laura G. Holmes
Julia Hood
Gary Knapp
Tia Korologos
Patrick Leytham
Stacy S. Manwaring
Carma Mordecai
Rob O. O’Neill
Rebecca Annette Parker
Harper Randall
Allison Sampson
Cheryl C.Smith
Jared Stewart
Clain S.Udy
Scott D. Wright
Scientific
Program
Committee
Sally Ozonoff
Jacqueline Crawley
Program Committee
Co-Chairs
Nirit Bauminger
Jan Blacher
Dermot Bowler
Ed Cook
Manny DiCicco-Bloom
Evan Eichler
Mayada Elsabbagh
Dani Fallin
Deb Fein
Matthew Goodwin
Connie Kasari
Laura Klinger
Mark Lewis
Cathy Lord
Ann Mastergeorge
Declan Murphy
Bob Schultz
Alison Singer
Sarah Spence
Aubyn Stahmer
Jeremy VeenstraVanderWeele
Lonnie Zwaigenbaum
16
Topic
Review
Chairs
Nirit Bauminger
Somer Bishop
Jessica Brian
Lauren Brookman-Frazee
Shana Cohen
Ed Cook
Manny DiCicco-Bloom
Christine Ecker
Mayada Elsabbagh
Dani Fallin
Deb Fein
Sebastian Gaigg
John Herrington
Shafali Jeste
Bryan King
Mark Lewis
Ann Mastergeorge
William McMahon
Brian O’Roak
Frederick Shic
Mikle South
John Swettenham
Jeremy VeenstraVanderWeele
Linda Watson
Abstract
Reviewers
Gregory Abowd
Brett Abrahams
Lauren Adamson
Evdokia Anagnostou
Matthew Anderson
Laura Gutermuth Anthony
Claudia Arberas
Paul Ashwood
Bruce Baker
Mary Baker-Ericzen
Angela Barber
Gregory Barnes
Nirit Bauminger-Zviely
Peter Bell
Ayelet Ben-Sasson
Raphael Bernier
Leandra Berry
Lucy Bilaver
James Bodfish
Valerie J. Bolivar
Sven Bolte
Kristen Bottema-Beutel
Katherine Bowers
Brian Boyd
Lauren Brookman-Frazee
Patricia Brooks
Mark Brosnan
Jonathan Campbell
Roberto Canitano
Carissa Cascio
Sarah Cassidy
Bhismadev Chakrabarti
Tony Charman
Sen-ching Cheung
Colby Chlebowski
Shawn Christ
Deborah Christensen
Julie E. Cleary
Shana Cohen
Edwin Cook
Daniel L. Coury
Jacqueline Crawley
Julie L. Daniels
Mirella Dapretto
Gabriella D’Arcangelo
Adriana Di Martino
Gabriel Dichter
Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom
Aisha Dickerson
Cheryl Dissanayake
Amy Drahota
Vikram Dua
Amie Duncan
Maureen Durkin
Christine Ecker
J. Christopher Edgar
Inge-Marie Eigsti
Lauren Elder
Mayada Elsabbagh
Craig Erickson
Annette Estes
Charlotte Exner
Susan Faja
Margaret Fallin
Deborah Fein
Erinn Finke
Sue Fletcher-Watson
Eric Fombonne
Thomas Frazier
Sebastian Gaigg
Louise Gallagher
Grace W. Gengoux
Shweta Ghai
Cheryl Glazebrook
Ofer Golan
Sylvie Goldman
Matthew Goodwin
Kyle Gorman
Georgianna Gould
Vinod Goyal
Dido Green
Matthias Groszer
Amanda Gulsrud
Abha Gupta
McLeod Gwynette
Alycia Halladay
Benjamin Handen
Ellen Hanson
Jill Harris
Clare Harrop
Sigan Hartley
Sissel Berge Helverschou
Robert Hendren
Susan Hepburn
Sabri Herguner
John Herrington
John Herrington
Laura Hewitson
Claudia L. Hilton
Eric Hollander
Jamie Horder
Patricia Howlin
Kristelle Hudry
Ted Hutman
Susan Hyman
Brooke Ingersoll
Ana-Maria Iosif
Suma Jacob
Laudan Jahromi
Shafali Jeste
Emily Jones
Amy Kalkbrenner
Rajesh Kana
Connie Kasari
Brandon Keehn
Elizabeth Kelley
Tal Kenet
Lauren Kenworthy
Connor Kerns
Bryan King
Margaret Kjelgaard
Cheryl Klaiman
Natalia M. Kleinhans
Laura Klinger
Mark Klinger
Gregor Kohls
Alexander Kolevzon
Beena Koshy
Sara Kover
Margaret Kurzius-Spencer
Emily Kuschner
Christine Ladd-Acosta
Meng-Chuan Lai
Oriane Landry
Alison Lane
Nicholas Lange
Elizabeth Laugeson
Mariana Lazar
Brian Lee
Li-Ching Lee
Matthew Lerner
Bennett Leventhal
April Levin
Susan Levy
Mark Lewis
Longchuan Li
Rebecca Lieberman-Betz
Jill Locke
Eva Loth
Sandy Magana
Iliana Magiati
David Mandell
Katie Maras
Ann Mastergeorge
Nicole Matthews
Sofia Mavropoulou
Rolanda Maxim-Gott
Grainne M. McAlonan
Joseph McCleery
James McCracken
Keith McLarren
Camilla McMahon
William McMahon
James McPartland
Kathryn McVicar
Idan Menashe
Judith Miller
Aaron Mitchel
Cecilia Montiel-Nava
Eric Moody
Michael J. Morrier
Eric Morrow
Matthew W. Mosconi
Ralph-Axel Müller
Donna Murray
A. Rebecca Neal-Beevers
Ann Neumeyer
Shana Nichols
Christine Wu Nordahl
Guiomar Oliveira
Brian O’Roak
Sally Ozonoff
Damon Page
Juhi Pandey
Zhiping Pang
Greg Pasco
Nalin Payakachat
Elizabeth Pellicano
Olga Penagarikano
Prithvi Perepa
Margaret Pericak-Vance
Jennifer Phillips
Benjamin Philpot
Anilkumar Pillai
Elizabeth M. Powell
John Pruett
Atif Rahman
Judy Reaven
Elizabeth Redcay
Angela Reiersen
Anna Remington
Alexandre Reymond
Catherine E. Rice
Catherine E. Rice
Amanda Richdale
Ashley Robertson
Diana Robins
Herbert Roeyers
Danielle Ropar
Michael Rosanoff
Agata Rozga
Lisa A. Ruble
Victor Ruggieri
Natalie Russo
Nicole Russo-Ponsaran
Lori Anne Sacrey
Mustafa Sahin
Stephan Sanders
Noah Sasson
Celine Saulnier
Tal Savion-Lemieux
Angela Scarpa
Roseann Schaaf
Diana E. Schendel
Suzy Scherf
Laura Schieve
Synnve Schjolberg
Robert Schultz
Frank Sharp
Mary Sharp
Paul Shattuck
Stephen Sheinkopf
Frederick Shic
Matthew Siegel
Linmarie Sikich
Jill Silverman
Alison Singer
Isabel Smith
Tristram Smith
Marjorie Solomon
Fumio Someki
Mikle South
Sarah Spence
Laurie Sperry
Kerri Staples
Kyle Steinman
Lindsey Sterling
Sheri Stronach
Jessica Suhrheinrich
Helen Tager-Flusberg
Zohreh Talebizadeh
James Tanaka
Cora Taylor
Barbara Thompson
Audrey Thurm
Vanessa Troiani
Tychele Turner
Lauren Turner-Brown
Flora Vaccarino
Daniel Valdez
Amy Van Hecke
Marleen Vanvuchelen
Jeremy VeenstraVanderWeele
Pamela Ventola
Ty Vernon
Michele Villalobos
Gregory Wallace
Katherine Walton
A. Ting Wang
Chongying Wang
Zachary Warren
Linda Watson
Marc Weisskopf
Susan White
Tyler Whitney
Gayle Windham
Max Wiznitzer
Ericka L. Wodka
Jason Wolff
Gulnoza Yakubova
Mu Yang
Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp
Benjamin Yerys
Gregory S. Young
Debra Zand
Dana Zavatkay
Sasha Zeedyk
Ousseny Zerbo
Andrew Zimmerman
Lonnie Zwaigenbaum
• IMFAR ANNUAL MEETING Salt
Lake City, Utah, U S A
•
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
w w w . a u t i sm-i n sa r. o rg
8:30 - Welcome from IMFAR Organizers
8:45 - INSAR President’s Address
Grand Ballroom
Keynote Address
100 - Who Owns Autism? Exceptionalism,
Stigma, and Stakeholders
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM - Grand Ballroom
Speaker: Roy Richard Grinker, George Washington University,
Washington, DC
This presentation focuses on critical themes and challenges in the cultural
study of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). First, in clinical, research, and
advocacy settings ASD has emerged as a singular and powerful construct
that encompasses an increasing number of heterogeneous phenomena.
What forces made this category possible? How did it become both a
valid and unstable construct? Second, the growth of genetic and other
biomedical perspectives on ASD risks reducing ASD to biology alone,
and, as a consequence, masking the fact that scientific representations
express cultural values about diversity and disability. Difference constructed
on the molecular level is still difference, no less stigmatizing and socially
consequential because of its biological source (and perhaps even more
so). How can we integrate both the biological and sociocultural aspects of
ASD into research? Third, ASD is now, in some respects, a commodity that
circulates in an industry of “stakeholders,” such as therapists, producers of
high-cost diagnostic tools, and advocacy organizations. Indeed, as health
professionals are discovering in low- and middle-income countries, few
diagnostic categories cost as much as ASD. How does the economy of ASD
influence the science of ASD?
Keynote Panel Session
101 - Autism and Society: Taking Stock of
the History and Meaning of Autism Research
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: Roy Richard Grinker, George Washington University,
Washington, DC
Current debates about the present and future of autism research generally
focus on scientific discovery and are fitted into the framework of the scientific
method. This panel departs from convention to “take stock” of the field, and
explore autism research as a system of knowledge and practices in social,
historical, and economic context. The questions at the core of this panel
concern the various and sometimes contradictory aspects of the field of
autism research: How has the definition of autism changed over time for
a range of individuals, communities, and audiences, and what factors led
to those changes? What kinds of authority (e.g., institutional, bureaucratic,
academic, legislative, familial) have structured, and been structured by,
scientific representations of autism? Is autism a disease, a disability, or an
aspect of a ‘normal’ range of human variation? Is autism singular, or do the
boundaries and definitions of the category constrain the ability of researchers
and clinicians to address the dimensions of autism as outcomes of a
common set of developmental pathways shared by all humans? Speakers
from the fields of anthropology, disability rights, linguistics, and epidemiology
will employ historical, ethnographic, philosophical, and public health
perspectives to explain the dramatic changes in the field of autism research
over the past several decades and outline possibilities for the future.
11:00 101.002 The Lived Experience of Autism J. E. Robison,
The College of William and Mary, Springfield, MA
11:30 101.003 Emic and Etic Perspectives in the Construction of
Authoritative Knowledge on Autism O. Solomon, University of
Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
12:00 101.004 ASD vs. ASC: Is One Small Letter Important?
S. Baron-Cohen, Autism Research Centre, University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
THURSDAY – AM
Welcome Address and INSAR President’s Address
10:30 101.001 Trends in the Prevalence of Intellectual Disability
and Autism Spectrum Disorder M. S. Durkin, Population Health
Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Panel Session
102 - An Update on Vocal Complexity in Infants
and Children with ASD
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: T. Woynaroski, Hearing and Speech Sciences,
Vanderbilt University, Thompsons Stn, TN
Research spanning several decades has demonstrated that vocalizations
differentiate young children with ASD from their typically developing peers
and predict spoken language and other developmental outcomes in ASD.
This panel presents recent findings from several different research groups
on vocalization in infants and children with ASD. We open with a presentation that: a) highlights several ways in which the vocalizations of children
with ASD differ from their typically developing peers, b) examines associations between these aspects of vocal development and other key domains
of deficit in ASD, and c) explores how these differences in vocal development
and other domains relate to later cognitive and communication outcomes in
ASD. The subsequent series of talks draws on a large database from the
LENA Research Foundation, as well as an independent sample of children
with ASD who are in early stages of language development, to test the
stability and/or validity of several current options for automated analysis of
child vocalizations. Implications of the findings for research and clinical
practice will be discussed.
10:30 102.001 Relations Among Canonical Babbling and Volubility in
Infants Later Diagnosed with ASD and Other Markers Predictive
of Outcome E. Patten1, G. T. Baranek2, L. R. Watson3, K. Belardi4,
E. R. Crais5, K. Poon6 and D. K. Oller7, (1)Department of Audiology
and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science
Center, Knoxville, TN, (2)Division of Occupational Science and
Occupational Therapy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences,
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (4)Speech & Hearing
Sciences, University of Noth Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC,
(5)Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, The University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (6)National Institute
of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore,
Singapore, (7)Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition
Research, Klosterneuburg, Austria
17
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
11:00 102.002 Stability and Validity of Automated Vocal Analysis As
a Measure of Vocalization Complexity in Preschoolers with ASD in
Early Stages of Language Development T. Woynaroski1,
D. K. Oller2 and P. J. Yoder3, (1)Hearing and Speech Sciences,
Vanderbilt University, Thompsons Stn, TN, (2)Konrad Lorenz
Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research, Klosterneuburg,
Austria, (3)Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
11:30 102.003 Looking Under the Hood of the Infraphonological
Vocal Complexity Score P. J. Yoder1, T. Woynaroski2, D. Xu3,
J. A. Richards4, S. Hannon5, S. S. Gray6 and D. K. Oller7, (1)Special
Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Hearing and
Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Thompsons Stn, TN, (3)
Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University
of Colorado, Boulder, CO, (4)LENA Research Foundation, Boulder,
CO, (5)LENA Research Foundation, Denver, CO, (6)Mobility Core
Research, Nuance Communications, Dracut, MA, (7)Konrad Lorenz
Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research, Klosterneuburg,
Austria
12:00 102.004 Toward Improved Clinically Useful Automated
Vocal Assessments for the Prediction of ASD D. K. Oller1,
P. J. Yoder2, D. Xu3, J. A. Richards4, J. Gilkerson3 and S. S. Gray5,
(1)Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research,
Klosterneuburg, Austria, (2)Special Education, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (3)Department of Speech, Language and Hearing
Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, (4)LENA Research
Foundation, Boulder, CO, (5)Mobility Core Research, Nuance
Communications, Dracut, MA
Panel Session
103 - Approaches to Examining and Identifying Neural
Biomarkers for Autism: Progress and Challenges
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: J. McCleery, Center for Autism Research, Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Discussant: T. P. Roberts, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA
Clinicians involved in treating heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, are
all able to utilize a number of scientifically validated biomarkers to better
understand the origin and nature of their patients’ diseases, and to
initiate tailored interventions. One of the greatest current challenges to
understanding and treating autism and other psychiatric conditions is the
relative absence of such biomarkers. The current panel presents four
research programs involving differing approaches to the search for brainbased biomarkers for autism spectrum disorders. Bartley and colleagues
present data utilizing arterial spin labelling to establish voxel-based
reliability of activity across 10 weeks in a brief biomarker assessment;
Stefanidou and colleagues present evidence that event-related potentials
biomarkers for core social processing atypicalities may differ across
development and/or intellectual ability levels in autism; Hudac and colleagues
describe evidence for a significant role of genetic variability in defining
an electroencephalography-based biomarker for social processing within
individuals diagnosed with autism; finally, Roberts and colleagues describe
a robust, multi-modal set of biomarkers for variability in language-related
functioning in individuals with autism. Together, these presentations describe
both challenges and successes in the field’s application of cutting edge
neuroimaging procedures and approaches to the identification of meaningful,
clinically-relevant biomarkers for individuals with autism.
18
10:30 103.001 Cerebral Blood Flow Biomarkers of Autism during a
Passive Viewing Task G. K. Bartley1, H. S. Liu2, J. D. Herrington3,
B. E. Yerys4, J. A. Detre5 and R. T. Schultz3, (1)Center for Autism
Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(2)University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Center for
Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (4)Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, (5)Neurology, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA
10:55 103.002 Evaluation of Atypical Human Action Sound Processing
As an Early Biomarker for Autism C. Stefanidou1, R. Ceponiene2
and J. McCleery3, (1)School of Psychology, University of
Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom, (2)UCSD Medical
Center, California, CA, (3)Center for Autism Research, Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
11:20 103.003 Biomarkers of Social Perception in Children with ASD
and Loss of Function Gene Mutations C. Hudac1, A. Kresse2,
T. DesChamps2, S. J. Webb3 and R. Bernier2, (1)University of
Washington, Seattle, Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, (3)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
11:45 103.004 Electrophysiological Signatures for ASD: Putting the
“Bio” into Biomarker T. P. Roberts1, W. C. Gaetz2, J. I. Berman1,
L. Blaskey1 and J. C. Edgar1, (1)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (2)The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Bala
Cynwyd, PA
12:10 Discussant
Panel Session
104 - Attending to Attention Among Persons
with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Perspectives on
Strengths, Weaknesses, and Goodness-of-Fit
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: O. Landry, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia
Throughout the lifespan, where and how visual attention is allocated affects
what we learn about the world, how we interact with others, and how we
plan goal-directed behaviors. Several “atypicalities” in visual attention are
cited among persons with ASD. Under some circumstances, such as visual
search, this atypicality takes the form of enhanced performance. In other
circumstances, such as attentional disengagement, the abnormality is
characterized as impairment. But in many other aspects of visual attention,
the differences that emerge between individuals with autism can simply
be identified as superior or inferior. For example, the processes involved
in the modulation of attentional focus, such as needed under varying
conditions of perceptual load or when the task necessitates efficient
attending to target information in dynamic complex environments, can involve
diminished performance in one circumstance and enhanced performance
on another. Across all these permutations of strengths and weaknesses,
the understanding of the subtle nuances of attentional processing provides
considerable insight into context-specific cognitive and social styles and
level of performance of persons with ASD. In this panel, we will explore the
nuances of visual attention of persons with ASD within the frameworks of
both strength and weakness within the demands of the environment.
10:30 104.001 Attentional Priority for Special Interests in Autism
Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Neurotypical Passions
A. Remington1, O. E. Parsons2 and A. P. Bayliss3, (1)Institute of
Education, London, United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research Centre,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)School of
Psychology, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
11:30 104.003 Challenging the Myth of Attentional Overfocus Among
Persons with Autism Sprectrum Disorder J. A. Burack1,
D. A. Brodeur2, J. Stewart3, J. Querengesser4 and O. Landry5,
(1)Educational & Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal,
QC, Canada, (2)Department of Psychology, Acadia University,
Wolfville, NS, Canada, (3)McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(4)Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University,
Montreal, QC, Canada, (5)La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia
12:00 104.004 The Curious History of the Gap/Overlap Procedure
J. T. Elison, Institute of Child Development, University of
Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Panel Session
105 - Pivotal Response Treatment: Novel Intervention
Models to Optimize Outcome
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: A. Y. Hardan, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
Discussant: L. Schreibman, University of California, San Diego,
La Jolla, CA
This panel will review new research into state-of-the-art models for
disseminating evidence-based Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) for
ASD across key contexts and stakeholders. The first presentation examines
results of a large randomized controlled trial of PRT Group (PRTG) and
reviews data on the effects of group parent education on child language and
parenting stress and empowerment. The second talk introduces the novel
Classroom PRT (CPRT) approach for training teachers and will present
preliminary teacher outcomes and child characteristics from large-scale
application of CPRT in school settings. The third presentation reviews
preliminary data on the effects of brief individually-administered PRT on
child language use, as well as neurophysiological function measured
with EEG for a small subsample. Finally, our fourth panelist will discuss a
package treatment model which combines both parent training and cliniciandelivered intervention in home settings to maximize treatment effects and
data supporting this model will be shared. Overall, this panel offers a review
of innovative research in intervention models of PRT to optimize outcome
across multiple universities, documenting novel approaches for community
implementation of evidence-based motivational treatment practices. We
seek to stimulate further research interest in the development of highquality autism interventions and in effective strategies for wide-spread
dissemination.
10:30 105.001 Pivotal Response Treatment Parent Training Group:
Effects on Parent Factors and Child Outcomes from a Randomized
Controlled Trial K. L. Berquist1, G. W. Gengoux2, M. B. Minjarez3,
J. M. Phillips2, T. W. Frazier4 and A. Y. Hardan2, (1)Stanford
University, Stanford, CA, (2)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, (3)Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA,
(4)Cleveland Clinic, Center for Autism, Cleveland Clinic Children’s,
Cleveland, OH
10:55 105.002 Examining Outcomes and Satisfaction in a Randomized
Trial of Classroom Pivotal Response Training (CPRT)
A. C. Stahmer1, J. Suhrheinrich1 and S. R. Rieth2, (1)Psychiatry,
University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)Child and
Family Development, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
11:20 105.003 Efficacy of Brief Pivotal Response Training on Language
Outcomes and Neurophysiological Indices in Children with ASD
M. B. Minjarez1, T. DesChamps2, A. Kresse3, G. W. Gengoux4,
A. Y. Hardan4, K. L. Berquist5, S. J. Webb2 and R. Bernier6, (1)
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Seattle Children’s Hospital,
Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Seattle
Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, WA, (4)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine,
Stanford, CA, (5)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, (6)Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
11:45 105.004 Pivotal Response Treatment Package: Combined
Parent Training with Clinician-Delivered in-Home Treatment
G. W. Gengoux1, J. M. Phillips1, C. M. Ardel1, M. E. Millan1, R.
Schuck1, T. W. Frazier2 and A. Y. Hardan1, (1)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine,
Stanford, CA, (2)Cleveland Clinic, Center for Autism, Cleveland
Clinic Children’s, Cleveland, OH
12:10 Discussant
THURSDAY – AM
11:00 104.002 Visual Search in Time Among Persons with an Autism
Spectrum Disorder N. Russo1, W. R. Kates2 and B. Wyble3, (1)
Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, (2)SUNY Upstate Medical
University, Syracuse, NY, (3)The Pennsylvania State University,
University Park, PA
Poster Session
106 - Medical and Psychiatric Comorbidity
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
1 106.001 A Delphi-Procedure Study of Standards of Clinical
Assessment and Treatment of Individuals with Co-Occurring Gender
Dysphoria and Autism Spectrum Disorders J. F. Strang1, H. Meagher2,
L. Kenworthy3 and L. G. Anthony1, (1)Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders,
Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville, MD, (2)Catholic University
of America, Washington, DC, (3)Children’s Research Institute, Children’s
National Medical Center, Washington, DC
2 106.002 ASD in Sibling Pairs Discordant for ADHD A. M. Reiersen
and M. B. McGrath, Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis School
of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
3 106.003 Alexithymia As a Predictor of Dimensional Scales of Autism
Symptoms K. Stephenson1, M. E. Maisel1, J. C. Cox2 and M. South3,
(1)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(2)Counseling and Psychological Services, Brigham Young University, Provo,
UT, (3)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
4 106.004 Antipsychotic Medication Use and Metabolic Monitoring
in an Integrated Outpatient Clinic for Individuals with Autism and Other
Neurodevelopmental Disabilities L. M. Ruiz1, M. Damron2, K. B. Jones3,
D. Weedon2, P. S. Carbone2, A. V. Bakian1 and D. A. Bilder1, (1)Psychiatry,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (2)University of Utah, Salt Lake City,
UT, (3)Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
5 106.005 Anxious Imagery in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
A. Ozsivadjian1, M. J. Hollocks2, M. Absoud3, J. Southcott4 and E. Holmes5,
(1)Guy’s Hospital, London, United Kingdom, (2)Denmark Hill, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Children’s Neurosciences Centre,
Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom,
(4)Children’s Neurosciences Centre, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation
trust, London, United Kingdom, (5)Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit,
Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom
6 106.006 Assessing ASD Symptoms and Comorbid Psychopathology
in Adults with ASD: Who Should You Ask? A. N. Heintzelman,
A. M. Pearl, M. Murray and K. C. Durica, Department of Psychiatry,
Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
19
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
7 106.007 Association Between Age at Menarche and Autistic Traits
in Turkish University Students A. Herguner1 and S. Herguner2, (1)Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, Konya Reseach and Training Hospital, Konya,
Turkey, (2)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Meram Faculty
of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya, Turkey
8 106.008 Association Between Pubertal Stage and Behavioral
Profile Across Neurodevelopmental Disorders M. Penner1, A. Dupuis2
and E. Anagnostou3, (1)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview
Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Clinical Research
Services, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)
Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
9 106.009 Associations Between ASD Symptoms, Internalizing
Symptoms, Empathy, and Social Loneliness in Young Adults with ASD
A. M. Pearl, K. C. Durica, M. Murray and A. N. Heintzelman, Department
of Psychiatry, Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
10 106.010 Autism Spectrum and Psychosis Risk in the 22q11.2
Deletion Syndrome; Findings from a Prospective Longitudinal Study
A. M. Fiksinski1, T. Opacak1, E. J. Breetvelt1, S. N. Duijff1 and J. A.
Vorstman2, (1)Psychiatry, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus UMC Utrecht,
Utrecht, Netherlands, (2)UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
11 106.011 Body Mass Index (BMI) Is Negatively Correlated with
Adaptive Functioning in a Population of Children with Neurodevelopmental
Disorders L. Capano1 and E. Anagnostou2, (1)Autism Research Centre,
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview
Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
12 106.012 Burden of Psychiatric Symptoms in ASD: Understanding
the Full Range from Inpatients to Outpatients and Across IQ M. D. Lerner1,
C. A. Mazefsky2, M. Siegel3, R. Gabriels4, D. L. Williams5, J. Pierri6,
C. Peura7 and K. D. Gadow8, (1)Psychology, Stony Brook University,
Stony Brook, NY, (2)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,
Pittsburgh, PA, (3)Tufts School of Medicine - Spring Harbor Hospital,
Westbrook, ME, (4)Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO, (5)SpeechLanguage Pathology, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, (6)University
of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, (7)Developmental Disorders
Program, Spring Harbor Hospital, Westbrook, ME, (8)Psychiatry, Stony
Brook University, Stony Brook, NY
13 106.013 Chronic Sleep Reduction and Psychopathology Symptoms
in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder E. K. Baker1
and A. L. Richdale2, (1)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe
University, Melbourne, Australia, (2)Cooperative Research Centre for Living
with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Australia
14 106.014 Close but No Cigar: Factor Structure of the ADHD Rating
Scale in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder B. E. Yerys1,2,
J. Nissley-Tsiopinis3, A. de Marchena1, L. Antezana1, T. J. Power2,3 and
R. T. Schultz1,4, (1)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, (3)Center for the Management of ADHD, The Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (4)Departments of Pediatrics
and Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
15 106.015 Correlates of Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal HealthRelated Quality of Life Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
K. Kuhlthau1, E. McDonnell2, N. Payakachat3, D. L. Coury4, J. Delahaye5
and E. Macklin5, (1)Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA, (2)Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA, (3)Pharmacy Practice, University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences, Little Rock, AR, (4)Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus,
OH, (5)Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
20
16 106.016 Dietary Influences on BMI in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorders S. R. Straka1, S. L. Hyman2, B. L. Schmidt2, K. Evans3
and P. A. Stewart2, (1)Developmenal and Behavioral Pediatrics, Golisano
Children’s Hospital University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY,
(2)Department of Pediatrics and Clinical and Translational Science Institute,
University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY, (3)University of
Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY
17 106.017 Dispositional Mindfulness Predicts Anxiety in Adults
Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder M. E. Maisel1, K. Stephenson1,
J. C. Cox2 and M. South3, (1)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young
University, Provo, UT, (2)Counseling and Psychological Services, Brigham
Young University, Provo, UT, (3)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham
Young University, Provo, UT
18 106.018 EEG Endophenotypes in Autism Spectrum Disorder
J. K. Capal1, K. C. Dominick2, C. Carosella2 and R. Lieberman3, (1)
Department of Neurology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center,
Cincinnati, OH, (2)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati,
OH, (3)CARE/Crawley Building, Suite E-870, University of Cincinnati
College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
19 106.019 Eating Problems Are Associated with Autism Severity in
Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder O. E. Stolar1, D. A. Zachor2,
D. Eitan3 and E. Ben Itzchak4, (1)Pediatric, The Autism Center, Assaf
Harofeh Medical Center, Ra’anana, Israel, (2)Assaf Harofeh Medical
Center, Tel Aviv University, Zerifin, Israel, (3)ALUT the Israeli National
Organization for children with ASD, Zerifin, Israel, (4)Ariel University/
Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Givat Shmuel, Israel
20 106.020 Eating Problems in Men and Women with ASD and
Average Intelligence A. A. Spek, Autisme Kenniscentrum, Utrecht,
Netherlands
21 106.021 Elevated Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders A. P. Hill1, K. E. Zuckerman2 and
E. J. Fombonne1, (1)Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR,
(2)Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
22 106.022 Ethnic Differences in Comorbid Impairments in
Attention and Hyperactivity Among Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder
A. B. Ratto1, L. G. Anthony2, L. Kenworthy3, K. M. Dudley4, A. C. Armour2
and B. J. Anthony5, (1)Children’s National Health System, Silver Spring,
MD, (2)Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Children’s National Medical
Center, Rockville, MD, (3)Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National
Medical Center, Washington, DC, (4)Children’s National Medical Center,
Rockville, MD, (5)Center for Child and Human Development, Georgetown
University, Washington, DC
23 106.023 Features of Pathological Demand Avoidance Identified
Using the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders
(‘DISCO’) E. O’Nions1, J. Gould2, C. Gillberg3, P. Christie4 and F. Happé5,
(1)Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College
London, London, United Kingdom, (2)National Autistic Society, London,
United Kingdom, (3)Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden,
(4)Nottingham Regional Society for Adults and Children with Autism
(NORSACA), Nottingham, United Kingdom, (5)Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom
24 106.024 Fractal Analysis of Autonomic Nervous System Function
in ASD H. Saghir1,2, T. Chau2,3 and A. Kushki2,4, (1)Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Institute of Biomaterials
and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(3)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Autism Research Centre, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
26 106.026 Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Associated Clinical
Features in Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorders F. Fulceri1,
M. Morelli2, E. Santocchi3, A. Narzisi3, S. Calderoni4 and F. Muratori5,
(1)Calambrone Pisa, IRCCS STELLA MARIS FOUNDATION, Pisa, Italy,
(2)Stella Maris Foundation, Pisa, Italy, (3)University of Pisa – Stella Maris
Scientific Institute, Pisa, Italy, (4)Magnetic Resonance Laboratory, Division
of Child Neurology and Psychiatry University of Pisa; Stella Maris Scientific
Institute, Pisa, PI, Italy, (5)Stella Maris Scientific Institute, Calambrone
(Pisa), Italy
27 106.027 Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Whole Blood Serotonin
Levels, and Behavioral Symptoms in Children and Adolescents with Autism
Spectrum Disorder S. Marler1, E. B. Lee2, G. M. Anderson3, B. Ferguson4,
E. McDonnell5, D. Q. Beversdorf6 and J. Veenstra-Vander Weele7,8,
(1)Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Pediatrics, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (3)Child Study Center, Yale University School of
Medicine, New Haven, CT, (4)Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia,
MO, (5)Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA,
(6)Radiology, Neurology, Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO, (7)Columbia University, New York, NY, (8)New York State
Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY
28 106.028 History of Tympanosotomy Tube Placement in Children
Referred to a Tertiary Autism Diagnostic Center S. Monteiro1, L. Berry2,
J. B. Swanson3, E. Smith4, R. Rodrigues4, A. Spinks-Franklin3 and
R. G. Voigt3, (1)Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Childrens Hospital,
Houston, TX, (2)Suite 180, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX,
(3)Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (4)Pediatrics,
Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
29 106.029 Impact of Feeding Disorders in Parental Stress in Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder and with Other Developmental Disabilities
M. D. Valicenti-McDermott1,2, K. F. Hottinger3, K. Lawson3, R. M. Seijo1,2,
L. H. Shulman1,2, M. Schechtman3 and S. Shinnar4, (1)Pediatrics/CERC,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (2)Children’s Hospital at
Montefiore, Bronx, NY, (3)Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY,
(4)Neurology, Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert
Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
30 106.030 Internalizing Symptoms in Adults with ASD: Relation to
ASD Symptomatology J. L. Mussey1, M. R. Klinger2, S. P. Thomas2,
P. S. Powell3 and L. G. Klinger1, (1)TEACCH Autism Program; Department
of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Allied Health
Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
31 106.031 Investigating Sympathetic Over-Arousal in ASD
S. Panju1, J. A. Brian2, A. Dupuis3, E. Anagnostou4 and A. Kushki1,5,6,
(1)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital/ U of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)The Hospital
for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Bloorview Research Institute,
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(5)Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(6)Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
32 106.032 Longitudinal Changes in the Presence and Severity
of Self-Injurious Behaviors, and Predictors of Change, in Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorders G. N. Soke1, C. DiGuiseppi2, T. Fingerlin3,
C. Robinson4, S. A. Rosenberg5, R. F. Hamman6 and A. M. Reynolds1,
(1)University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, (2)Epidemiology/Colorado
School of Public Health, University of Colorado - Denver, Aurora, CO,
(3)National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, (4)Pediatrics and Psychiatry,
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (5)Department
of Psychiatry, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurroa, CO,
(6)Epidemiology, Colorado School of Pubic Health, Aurora, CO
THURSDAY – AM
25 106.025 Gastrointestinal Issues in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorders Compared to Children with Developmental Delays and a
Population Based Sample in the Study to Explore Early Development
(SEED) A. M. Reynolds1, G. N. Soke1, L. A. Croen2, J. Daniels3,
M. D. Fallin4, T. V. Kral5, L. C. Lee6, C. J. Newschaffer7, J. A. Pinto-Martin8,
L. A. Schieve9, A. Sims10 and S. E. Levy11, (1)University of Colorado
Denver, Aurora, CO, (2)Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern
California, Oakland, CA, (3)UNC Gillings School of Public Health, Chapel
Hill, NC, (4)Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (5)University
of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, (6)Epidemiology,
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (7)
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (8)
Biobehavioral Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia,
PA, (9)National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities,
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (10)Biomedical
Research and Informatics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing,
MI, (11)Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
33 106.033 Loxapine Substitution for Reversal of AntipsychoticInduced Metabolic Disturbances: A Retrospective Chart Review
J. A. Hellings1, S. Jain2 and R. Andridge3, (1)Psychiatry, The Ohio State
University Nisonger Center McCampbell Hall, Columbus, OH, (2)The Ohio
State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, (3)Biostatistics,
The Ohio State University, College of Public Health, Columbus, OH
34 106.034 Medical and Psychiatric Comorbidities in a Cohort of
Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder N. Brondino1, L. Fusar-Poli1,
U. Provenzani1, M. Rocchetti1, C. Panisi1, R. Keller2, F. Barale1 and P. Politi1,
(1)Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia,
Italy, (2)ADULT AUTISM CENTER, ASL TO2, TURIN, ITALY, Turin, Italy
35 106.035 Medical and Psychiatric Comorbidity Among US
Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder from the NCSA B. Sheppard1,
T. Lateef2, J. P. He2, M. D. Fallin3 and K. R. Merikangas2, (1)Johns Hopkins
School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (2)National Institute of Mental
Health, Bethesda, MD, (3)Mental Health & Wendy Klag Center for Autism
and Developmental Disabilities, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD
36 106.036 Methodological and Reporting Issues in Child Weight
Research in ASD S. N. Grondhuis, The Ohio State University, Jackson, MS
37 106.037 New Directions and Research Opportunities for
Investigators: Longitudinal Outcomes in the Autism Speaks Autism
Treatment Network (AS ATN) D. S. Murray1, A. M. Shui2, K. Kuhlthau3,
D. L. Coury4 and P. Wang5, (1)Autism Speaks, Boston, MA, (2)02114,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, (3)MGH, Boston, MA,
(4)Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, (5)Science Department,
Autism Speaks, New York, NY
38 106.038 Parental Co-Regulation and Expressed Emotion As
Predictors of Psychopathology in Children with ASD V. Ting, A. Maughan,
C. S. Albaum and J. A. Weiss, Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON,
Canada
39 106.039 Parental Eating Disorders and Broad Autism Phenotype
Traits: Is There a Link? J. M. Lee1, B. A. Barrionuevo2, N. D. Dueker1,
J. R. Gilbert1, M. A. Pericak-Vance1 and M. L. Cuccaro2, (1)John P.
Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School
of Medicine, Miami, FL, (2)University of Miami Miller School of Medicine,
Miami, FL
21
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
40 106.040 Physiological Arousal Is Related to Parent-and Self-Report
of Anxiety in Youth with ASD: Preliminary Evidence for the Concurrent
Validity of Anxiety Symptoms L. Sterling1,2, J. J. Wood3 and P. Renno4,
(1)Psychology, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA, (2)Psychiatry,
UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles,
CA, (3)Departments of Education and Psychiatry, University of California
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Department of Education, UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA
47 106.047 Sleep Problems in Autism Spectrum Disorders: The
Influence of Anxiety, Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours and Intolerance
of Uncertainty E. K. Baker1, A. L. Richdale2 and D. Soliman3, (1)Olga
Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne,
Australia, (2)Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism Spectrum
Disorders (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Australia, (3)School of Psychological
Science, La Trobe University, Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
Bundoora, Australia
41 106.041 Precision Grip Control with and without Visual Feedback
in Autism Spectrum Disorder S. Mohanty1, K. A. Neely2, L. M. Schmitt1,
Z. Wang1, D. E. Vaillancourt3, J. A. Sweeney1 and M. W. Mosconi1, (1)
Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, UT Southwestern Medical
Center, Dallas, TX, (2)Department of Kinesiology, Penn State University,
State College, PA, (3)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
48 106.048 Sleep Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder: Examining the Role of Anxiety and Sensory over-Responsivity
M. O. Mazurek1 and G. Petroski2, (1)Department of Health Psychology,
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (2)Department of Health
Management and Informatics, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
42 106.042 Psychiatric Follow up of Children and Adolescent with
Past History of Autism N. M. Mukaddes1, T. Mutluer2, B. Pasabeyoglu3 and
A. Umut4, (1)Istanbul Institute of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Istanbul,
Turkey, (2)Child Psychiatry Clinic, Van Education and Research Hospital,
Van, Turkey, (3)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Bakirkoy
Professor Mazhar Osman Mental Health and Disorders Hospital, Istanbul,
Turkey, (4)Istanbul Institute of Child &Adolescent Psychiatry, ISTANBUL,
Turkey
43 106.043 Psychophysiological Predictors of Gastrointestinal
Symptomatology in Autism Spectrum Disorder B. Ferguson1, S. Marler2,
E. B. Lee3, J. E. Akers4, M. O. Mazurek5, K. Sohl6, A. McLaughlin5,
B. Kille5, K. Hartnett5, E. A. Macklin7, E. McDonnell8, L. Alstein9,
J. Veenstra-Vander Weele10 and D. Q. Beversdorf11, (1)University of
Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, (2)Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (3)Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN,
(4)Research Core, Thompson Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental
Disorders, Columbia, MO, (5)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO,
(6)Child Health, University of Missouri - Thompson Center, Columbia,
MO, (7)Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard
Medical School, Boston, MA, (8)Biostatistics, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA, (9)Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA,
(10)New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, (11)Radiology,
Neurology, Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
44 106.044 Relationships Between ASD/ADHD Symptoms and
Abnormal Eating Behaviors in Children M. Hamada1, H. Ito2, Y. Murayama3,
M. Katagiri4, A. Uemiya4 and M. Tsujii5, (1)Osaka-Hamamatsu Joint
Center for Child Development, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Hamamatsu-city, Japan, (2)Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Nagakute, Aichi, Japan, (3)Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Hamamatsu-shi, Japan, (4)Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Hamamatsu-city, Japan, (5)Chukyo Univesity, Toyota, Japan
45 106.045 Sensory Feedback Mechanisms Underlying Postural
Control Abnormalities in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD):
A Preliminary Study Z. Wang1, R. Hallac2, K. Conroy1, R. Greene3,
S. P. White3, J. A. Sweeney1 and M. W. Mosconi4, (1)Center for Autism and
Developmental Disabilities, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX,
(2)Analytical imaging and modeling center, Children’s Health, Dallas, TX,
(3)Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, (4)Psychiatry and Pediatrics,
Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, UT Southwestern
Medical Center, Dallas, TX
46 106.046 Sleep Disturbance and Aggression in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder : An Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network Analysis
G. P. Cejas1, E. Anbalagan2, G. Singh1, R. Brown1 and K. Sohl3,
(1)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (2)University of California at
San Diego, San Diego, CA, (3)Child Health, University of Missouri Thompson Center, Columbia, MO
22
49 106.049 Suicidal Ideation in Korean Children at-Risk for Autistic
Spectrum Disorder (ASD) V. Hus Bal1, B. Leventhal1, G. Carter2, G. Yim1,
P. S. Hong1 and Y. S. Kim1, (1)Dept of Psychiatry, University of California San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, (2)University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia
50 106.050 Suicidality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
A. C. Armour1, Y. Granader1, A. B. Ratto1, C. E. Pugliese1, J. L. Martucci2,
L. Mohamed3, L. Kenworthy4 and J. F. Strang5, (1)Center for Autism
Spectrum Disorders, Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville, MD,
(2)Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville, MD, (3)Children’s National
Health System, Rockville, MD, (4)Children’s Research Institute, Children’s
National Medical Center, Washington, DC, (5)Center for Autism Spectrum
Disorders, Silver Spring, MD
51 106.051 The Relationship of ASD Symptoms with the Occurrence
of Self-Injury Behaviors Among Middle School Students Y. Murayama1,
H. Ito2 and M. Tsujii3, (1)Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Hamamatsu-shi, Japan, (2)Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Nagakute, Aichi, Japan, (3)Chukyo Univesity, Toyota, Japan
52 106.052 The Role of Verbal Ability in the Co-Occurrence of
Problem Behaviours and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum
Disorders C. Horlin1 and E. Anagnostou2, (1)Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Bloorview Research
Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON,
Canada
53 106.053 Variability in Autism Symptom Severity: The Role of
Diurnal Cortisol and Daily Stress in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder
P. Renno1, L. Sterling2, J. T. McCracken3, K. S. Mallya4 and J. J. Wood5,
(1)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Claremont McKenna College, Los Angeles,
CA, (3)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel Institute for
Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Department of
Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA,
(5)Departments of Education and Psychiatry, University of California
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
54 106.054 Who Are You Afraid of?: Stress Response to Performance
Evaluation in Young Adults Diagnosed with ASD C. Nielson1, M. E. Maisel2,
C. Kindt1, S. Shahan2, T. Homewood1, A. Grow2, A. Ashton2 and
M. South3, (1)Neuroscience Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(2)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(3)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
55 106.055 “Typical Teen” or “Typical ASD”?: Changes in Self- and
Parent-Report of Co-Occurring Conditions for Adolescents with ASD
Following a Social Skills Intervention S. M. Minnick, A. M. Pearl,
K. C. Durica, A. N. Heintzelman and M. Murray, Department of Psychiatry,
Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
Poster Session
107 - Service Delivery/Systems of Care
56 107.056 A Pilot Study of a Screening Model to Triage Toddlers
Referred for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to a Tertiary Care Center
(TRC) Using a New Level 2 ASD Screening Test R. Choueiri1, J. F. Lemay2
and S. Wagner3, (1)Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Memorial
Children’s Medical Center, Worcester, MA, (2)Developmental and Behavioral
Pediatrics, Alberta Children’s HOspital, Calgary, AB, Canada, (3)Behavioral,
Developmental and Educational Services (BDES),
New Bedford, MA
57 107.057 ASD Database Development within the Uk’s National Health
Service, for Service Evaluation/Research Purposes D. Wimpory1 and
B. Nicholas2, (1)Penrallt Road, Bangor University & BCU Health Board,
Bangor, United Kingdom, (2)Gwynedd LL57 2AS, Bangor University, Bangor,
Wales, United Kingdom
58 107.058 Adults on the Spectrum Sharing Success: A Model
E. Francis1, B. V. Parsons2, R. J. Wuebker3, K. J. Cottle4, A. R. Asman5,
J. Viskochil4 and W. M. McMahon4, (1)University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(2)Psychiatry Adjunct, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(3)Management, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (4)Psychiatry,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (5)Department of Psychiatry, University
of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
59 107.059 Are We Failing the M-CHAT? Self-Assessment in a Diverse
Community Sample C. B. Nadler1,2, C. Low-Kapalu1, L. Pham1 and
S. S. Nyp1,2, (1)Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children’s Mercy
Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, (2)University of Missouri - Kansas City School
of Medicine, Kansas City, MO
60 107.060 Autism Research: Contribution from the Arab WORLD
F. Alnemary1, Y. Alamri2 and F. Alnemary1, (1)University of California,
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)University of Otago, New Zealand,
Los Angeles, CA
61 107.061 Barriers to Early Diagnosis in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder: Preliminary Results S. N. Brasher and J. Elder,
College of Nursing University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
62 107.062 Bridging the Gap: Primary Care Physician Self-Efficacy
in Assessing and Treating Sleep Problems in Children with ASD
K. S. Kwedar1, C. R. Engelhardt1, N. C. Cheak-Zamora1, M. O. Mazurek1
and K. Sohl2, (1)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (2)Child Health,
University of Missouri - Thompson Center, Columbia, MO
63 107.063 Characterizing Parent Influence in the Diagnosis of ASD
P. Colatat1, Y. Qian2, M. L. Massolo2 and L. A. Croen2, (1)Olin Business
School, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, (2)Division of
Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA
64 107.064 Community General Pediatricians’ Barriers to Providing
Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnoses: A Qualitative Study G. King1,
M. Penner2, E. Anagnostou3, M. Shouldice4 and C. Moore Hepburn5,
(1)Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Holland Bloorview
Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Bloorview Research
Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (4)Hospital for Sick Children, Toronot, ON, Canada, (5)Division
of Paediatric Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
65 107.065 Comparison of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder with
and without a Guardian N. K. Naylor1, H. Coon2, D. A. Bilder2, L. Francis1 and
W. M. McMahon2, (1)S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Salt
Lake City, UT, (2)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
67 107.067 Development and Preliminary Validation of a New Scale to
Measure the Social Validity of Skill Building Interventions for Autism Spectrum
Disorder N. I. Berger1 and B. Ingersoll2, (1)Michigan State University, East
Lansing, MI, (2)Psychology, Michigan State University,
East Lansing, MI
68 107.068 Development of the Autism Family Navigator: A Pilot Study
on Barriers to Care T. Savion-Lemieux1, L. Girouard2, L. Stern3, M. Steiman4,
R. Simon5, L. Fernandez6 and M. Elsabbagh7, (1)Psychiatry, McGill University,
Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)2155 Guy Street, 5th Floor, McGill University
Health Centre - Research Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada, (3)Montreal
Children’s Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada, (4)Psychology, The Montreal
Children’s Hospital-McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(5)Psychology, Montreal Children’s Hospital - McGill University Health Centre,
Montreal, QC, Canada, (6)Montreal Children’s Hospital - McGill University
Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada, (7)McGill University, Montreal,
PQ, Canada
THURSDAY – AM
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
66 107.066 Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation for Services Provided to
People with Autism: Update and Recommendations J. M. Tilford1 and
N. Payakachat2, (1)Dept. of Health Policy and Management, University of
Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, (2)Pharmacy Practice,
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
69 107.069 Developmental Trajectories Diverted: Empowering
Frontline Community Childcare Providers to Support Children’s Social
Communication Development through a Coach-the-Coach Model
S. M. Ziegler1, S. K. Fuhrmeister1, E. Brooker Lozott2, C. Payne3,
T. D. Ryan4 and J. Stapel-Wax5, (1)Infant and Toddler Community Outreach
Program, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (2)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA, (3)Marcus Austim Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (4)Marcus Autism
Center,Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (5)Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA
n
70 107.070 Early Intervention Service Providers Knowledge and Use
of Intervention Practices J. M. Paynter1 and D. Keen2, (1)AEIOU Foundation,
Moorooka, Australia, (2)Autism Centre of Excellence, Griffith University,
Mt Gravatt, Australia
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71 107.071 Evaluation of a Parent-Response Scale to Measure the
Progress of Children with ASD in State Early Intervention Programs
B. Elbaum1, D. M. Noyes-Grosser2, K. Siegenthaler3, R. G. Romanczyk4,
R. N. Cavalari5, R. L. Carter6, J. D. Dare7 and A. L. Barczykowski8, (1)
Department of Teaching and Learning, University of Miami, Coral Gables,
FL, (2)Bureau of Early Intervention, New York State Department of Health,
Albany, NY, (3)Bureau of Early Intervention, New York Department of
Health, Albany, NY, (4)Department of Psychology, State University of NY
at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, (5)State University of NY at Binghamton,
Binghamton, NY, (6)Department of Biostatistics, State University of New York
at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, (7)Population Health Observatory, State University of
NY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, (8)State University of NY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
72 107.072 Examining System-Level Resources in Building Employment
Capacity for Adults with ASD D. B. Nicholas1, L. Zwaigenbaum2, M. Clarke3,
K. P. Stoddart4, B. Muskat5, W. Roberts6, M. Spoelstra7, S. Duhaime4,
H. Emery8, L. Ghali9, D. Barrett10, L. Parakin11, C. Carroll12, P. Mirenda13,
I. M. Smith14 and T. Jackman15, (1)University of Calgary, Edmonton, AB,
Canada, (2)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (3)Pediatrics,
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, (4)The Redpath Centre, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (5)Social Work, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (6)Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(7)Autism Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada, (8)University of Calgary, Calgary,
AB, Canada, (9)The Ability Hub, Calgary, AB, Canada, (10)Autism Society
Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (11)Autism Calgary Association, Calgary,
AB, Canada, (12)Autism Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS, Canada, (13)University
of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (14)Dalhousie University / IWK
Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (15)Autism Society Canada/Autism
Society Newfoundland and Labrador, St. John’s, NF, Canada
23
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
73 107.073 Examining the Overlap of School Disciplinary Action,
Hospitalization, and Police Contact in Individuals with Autism Spectrum
Disorder: Predictable Factors for Preventable Outcomes P. F. Turcotte1,
L. J. Shea1 and D. S. Mandell2, (1)A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Philadelphia,
PA, (2)Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine,
Philadelphia, PA
74 107.074 Factors Affecting Caregiver Satisfaction with a FamilyCentered Evaluation for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) E. Bernabe1 and
L. Dewey2, (1)Behavioral Health, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for
Children, Wilmington, DE, (2)Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children,
Wilmington, DE
75 107.075 Home and Community Based Services Waivers for
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder D. L. Velott1, E. Agbese1,
D. S. Mandell2, B. D. Stein3,4, A. W. Dick3, H. Yu3 and D. L. Leslie1,5,
(1)Public Health Sciences, Penn State Hershey College of Medicine,
Hershey, PA, (2)Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine,
Philadelphia, PA, (3)RAND, Pittsburgh, PA, (4)University of Pittsburgh
School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Psychiatry, Penn State Hershey
College of Medicine, Hershey, PA
76 107.076 Identifying Interventions for Dissemination and
Implementation Research Using the National Database for Autism
Research (NDAR): Promises and Pitfalls N. Payakachat1 and J. M. Tilford2,
(1)Pharmacy Practice, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences,
Little Rock, AR, (2)Dept. of Health Policy and Management, University
of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
77 107.077 Imprinting Variation in the Diagnosis of ASD at Two
Specialty Clinics P. Colatat1, Y. Qian2, M. L. Massolo2 and L. A. Croen2,
(1)Olin Business School, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO,
(2)Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA
78 107.078 Improving Early Access to Care in Underserved
Communities A. D. Norton1, M. Zuniga2 and J. Harris2, (1)Autism, Children’s
Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, NJ, (2)Children’s Specialized Hospital,
Mountainside, NJ
79 107.079 Improving the Patient Experience for Families of Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder through Use of an Autism-Specific Care
Plan S. broder-Fingert1, A. M. Shui2, C. Ferrone3, K. Donelan4,
A. M. Neumeyer5 and K. Kuhlthau6, (1)Boston University School of
Medicine, Newton, MA, (2)Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA, (3)Lurie Center for Autism, Lexington, MA,
(4)Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA, (5)Pediatrics, Lurie Center for Autism Massachusetts General
Hospital, Lexington, MA, (6)Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts
General Hospital, Boston, MA
80 107.080 Mapping the Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders
By Age 7 in Australia: 2010 – 2012 C. A. Bent1, C. Dissanayake2 and
J. Barbaro3, (1)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe
University, Melbourne, Australia, (2)Olga Tennison Autism Research
Centre, Melbourne, Australia, (3)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
81 107.081 Meta-Analysis of Community-Based Early Intervention
Programs for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders A. S. Nahmias1,2,
D. S. Mandell3 and J. Pereira1, (1)Center for Autism Research, Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Psychology, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
82 107.082 Missed Opportunities: Use of Early Services and Age
of ASD Diagnosis Among African American Children S. S. Richardson,
S. E. Barnum, T. Hamner, J. P. Berman and C. A. Saulnier, Marcus Autism
Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA
24
83 107.083 Patterns of Psychiatric Comorbidity in a Sample of
School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Receiving Community
and School Based Mental Health Services N. Stadnick1, C. Chlebowski1,
M. Baker-Ericzen2, M. Dyson1 and L. Brookman-Frazee1, (1)Psychiatry,
University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)Child and Adolescent
Services Research Center, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego,
San Diego, CA
84 107.084 Provider Practices Regarding the Treatment Referrals and
Recommendations Made to Parents of a Child with ASD K. Pickard1 and
B. Ingersoll2, (1)Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, (2)Psychology,
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
85  107.085 Reducing Disparities in Timely Autism Diagnosis
through Family Navigation E. Feinberg1,2, M. Augustyn1, K. Devlin2,
J. Sandler2, Y. Linhart1 and M. Silverstein1, (1)Department of Pediatrics,
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, (2)Department of
Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health,
Boston, MA
86 107.086 Relations Among School Professionals’ Knowledge,
Previous Experience, and Self-Efficacy for Working with Students with ASD
L. L. Corona1, M. L. Rinaldi1 and K. V. Christodulu2, (1)University at Albany,
SUNY, Albany, NY, (2)Center for Autism and Related Disabilities, University
at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY
87 107.087 Supporting Students with ASD in the Inclusive Classroom:
Teacher Perspectives M. Sreckovic1, T. Schultz2, H. Able3 and T. White4,
(1)Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Special Education, University of
Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI, (3)School of Education, University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (4)University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
88 107.088 The Effectiveness of an ABA Training Workshop for
Teachers and Health Care Professionals in China C. Wang1, D. Yip2,
N. Dunn3 and P. Bains4, (1)School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin,
China, (2)P.L.A.I. Behaviour Consulting, HongKong, Hong Kong, (3)BCBA,
Burnaby, BC, Canada, (4)BCBA, Vancouver, BC, Canada
89 107.089 The Effects of Medicaid Home and Community-Based
Services Waivers on Unmet Needs of Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder D. L. Leslie1,2, K. Iskandarani1, A. W. Dick3, B. D. Stein3,4,
D. L. Velott1 and D. S. Mandell5, (1)Public Health Sciences, Penn State
Hershey College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, (2)Psychiatry, Penn State
Hershey College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, (3)RAND, Pittsburgh, PA,
(4)University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Psychiatry,
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
90 107.090 Timeliness of Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis and
Subsequent Use of Services K. E. Zuckerman1, O. Lindly1,2 and
B. K. Sinche1, (1)Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR, (2)Public Health, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
91 107.091 Trajectories of School-Based Services for Youth with ASD
C. J. Spaulding1, J. A. Gates1, K. D. Gadow1 and M. D. Lerner2, (1)Stony
Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, (2)Psychology, Stony Brook University,
Stony Brook, NY
92 107.092 Using Parents’ and Children’s Input to Inform a PeerMediated Intervention for Young School-Aged Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder M. Kerr1, A. Boudreau2 and I. M. Smith3, (1)Mount Saint
Vincent University, Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)Dalhousie University, Halifax,
NS, Canada, (3)Dalhousie University / IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS,
Canada
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
94 107.094 Variables Associated with Coverage for Educational,
Mental Health, and Medical Services in Autism Spectrum Disorder
S. J. Lee, J. W. Lee, L. Kraus and L. V. Soorya, Psychiatry, Rush University
Medical Center, Chicago, IL
Poster Session
108 - Brain Function
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
95 108.095 Changes in Parietal Cortex Response in Children with
Autism Followed By a Visualizing Reading Intervention J. O. Maximo,
D. L. Murdaugh, A. R. Lemelman, S. E. O’Kelley and R. K. Kana, Department
of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
96 108.096 Abnormal Induced Neural Oscillations in 16p11.2
Deletions and Duplications S. S. Nagarajan1, L. B. Hinkley2, C. L. Dale3,
A. Findlay1, T. Luks1, P. Bukshpun1, T. Thieu4, N. Pojman5, E. Marco6, S.
Khan7, K. Heiken8, S. Qasmieh8, W. Chung9, P. Mukherjee1, R. L. Buckner10,
T. P. Roberts11 and E. H. Sherr6, (1)UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (2)UCSF
Autism & Neurodevelopment Program, San Francisco, CA, (3)Radiology
and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (4)Neurology, UCSF,
San Francisco, CA, (5)Neurology, Radiology, UCSF, San Francisco,
CA, (6)University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, (7)
CHOP, Philadelphia, PA, (8)Radiology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (9)Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, NY, (10)
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, (11)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA
97 108.097 Searching for Neuroimaging Targets for Interventions in
ASD K. Pelphrey, D. Yang, D. G. Sukhodolsky, M. J. Crowley, D. Oosting,
H. E. Friedman, C. M. Keifer and P. Ventola, Child Study Center,
Yale University, New Haven, CT
98 108.098 Thalamo-Cortical Underconnectivity during Sensory
Stimulation in Youth with ASD S. A. Green1, L. M. Hernandez2,
S. Y. Bookheimer1 and M. Dapretto3, (1)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral
Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Interdepartmental Neuroscience
Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping
Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
99 108.099 Self-Related Processing and Its Reflections in Memory:
An fMRI Study of Youth with and without ASD R. S. Brezis1, L. S. McKay2,
T. Galili3, T. Wong4 and J. Piggot5, (1)School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary
Center, Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel, (2)University of Dundee, Dundee,
United Kingdom, (3)Department of Statistics and Operations Research,
Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, (4)Department of Radiology,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (5)Department of Psychiatry,
University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom
100 108.100 A Pilot Neuroimaging Study of Phelan Mcdermid
Syndrome A. T. Wang1,2,3, T. Lim1,2, J. M. Jamison1, L. A. Bush1,
L. V. Soorya4, A. Kolevzon1,2,5 and J. D. Buxbaum1,2,3,6, (1)Seaver Autism
Center for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount
Sinai, New York, NY, (2)Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount
Sinai, New York, NY, (3)Fishberg Department of Neuroscience,
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (4)Psychiatry,
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, (5)Pediatrics, Icahn School
of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (6)Genetics and Genomic
Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
Poster Session
109 - Cognition: Attention, Learning, Memory
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
101 109.101 A Child-Friendly Eye-Tracking Paradigm Reveals
Impaired Implicit Repetition Learning in Adults and Children with ASD
S. B. Gaigg1, E. Jones2, A. Roestorf1, D. M. Bowler1 and C. T. Derwent1,
(1)Autism Research Group, City University London, London, United Kingdom,
(2)Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United Kingdom
102 109.102 A Meta-Analysis of the Wisconsin Card Sort Task
in Autism O. Landry1 and S. Al-Taie2, (1)La Trobe University, Bendigo,
Australia, (2)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
103 109.103 Absent Optimism Bias in Updating Beliefs about Future
Life Events in Adults with High-Functioning Autism B. Kuzmanovic1 and
K. Vogeley2, (1)Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine: Ethics in the
Neurosciences (INM-8), Juelich Research Center, Juelich, Germany,
(2)Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital
Cologne, Cologne, Germany
THURSDAY – AM
93 107.093 Using a Wireless Measure of Electrodermal Activity:
Comparisons to Traditional Wired Equipment L. Stein1, T. Chaspari2,
S. A. Cermak1, S. Narayanan2, A. Schell3 and M. E. Dawson4, (1)Occupational
Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)Signal Analysis and Interpretation Lab (SAIL), University
of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Psychology, Occidental College,
LA, CA, (4)Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
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104 109.104 Accuracy, Response Time and Visual Search Strategies
of Adolescents with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder during a
Disembedding Task T. Falkmer, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia
105 109.105 An Eye-Tracking Study of Visual Attention to Human
Faces and Nonhuman Graphics in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
C. Wang1 and H. Zheng2, (1)School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin,
China, (2)Department of Social psychology, Nankai University, Tianjin,
China
106 109.106 Assessing Tactile Perceptual Inference and Learning
in Autism Spectrum Disorders L. A. Sapey-Triomphe1, G. Sanchez2,
S. Sonié1, M. A. Henaff1, C. Schmitz1 and J. Mattout1, (1)Lyon Neuroscience
Research Center, Lyon, France, (2)University of Trento, Center for Mind/
Brain Sciences, Rovereto, Italy
107 109.107 Assessing the Use of Eye-Blinking As a Measure of
an Individual’s Engagement with Ongoing Visual Content C. Ranti1,
W. Jones1, G. J. Ramsay1, A. Klin1 and S. Shultz2, (1)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA, (2)Department of Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
108 109.108 Attention Biases in Anxious Youth with Co-Occurring
ASD Symptoms R. J. Mercado1, C. M. Kerns2 and P. C. Kendall1,
(1)Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
109 109.109 Attention Does Not Modulate the Imitation of Biological
Motion Kinematics in Autism Spectrum Disorders S. J. Hayes1, M. Andrew1,
D. Elliott1,2 and S. J. Bennett1, (1)Research Institute for Sport and Exercise
Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom,
(2)Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
110 109.110 Attentional Sensitivity to Features of Angry Faces and
Domain-General Cognitive Characteristics T. Isomura1, S. Ogawa2 and
N. Masataka3, (1)Primate Research Institute, Inuyama, Aichi, Japan,
(2)Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan,
(3)Kyoto University, Primate Research Institute, Inuyama, Aichi, Japan
111 109.111 Atypical Binocular Rivalry Dynamics of Simple and
Complex Stimuli in Autism J. Freyberg1, C. Robertson2 and S. BaronCohen3, (1)Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University
of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Harvard University,
Cambridge, MA, (3)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, United Kingdom
25
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
112 109.112 Behavioral Differences in Reward Salience but Not
Motivation in Toddlers with ASD: Results from a Visual Search Task
C. McCormick1, G. S. Young2, J. Bernstein3 and S. J. Rogers4, (1)
Brown University, Providence, RI, (2)MIND Institute, University California
Davis, Sacramento, CA, (3)MIND Institute, University of California, Davis,
Sacramento, CA, (4)University of California at Davis, Sacramento, CA
113 109.113 Bootstrapping the Hippocampus? Atypical Learning
Characterizes Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders J. McCauley1,
T. A. Lesh2, T. A. Niendam2, J. S. Beck2, C. S. Carter2,3, J. D. Ragland2,3
and M. Solomon2, (1)Department of Human Development, University of
California-Davis, Davis, CA, (2)Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral
Sciences, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, Sacramento, CA,
(3)Center for Neuroscience, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA.
114 109.114 Brain Organization Underlying Superior Math Problem
Solving Abilities in Children with Autism T. Iuculano, K. Supekar and
V. Menon, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University
School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
115 109.115 Building a Percept: Early Influences on Mid and HigherLevel Visual Abilities in Autism Spectrum Disorder J. Guy1,2, L. Mottron3,
C. Berthiaume3 and A. Bertone1,3,4, (1)Perceptual Neuroscience Laboratory
for Autism and Development (PNLab), Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)Integrated
Program in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(3)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants du développement de
l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montreal, QC, Canada, (4)School/
Applied Child Psychology, Educational and Counseling Psychology,
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
116 109.116 Cognitive Control of Visual Attention in ASD in Response
to Social and Non-Social Stimuli A. S. DiCriscio1,2, S. Miller3, M. L. Kovac4,
E. Hanna5 and G. S. Dichter6, (1)University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill,
Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Geisinger-ADMI, Lewisburg, PA, (3)Carolina Institute
for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Carrboro, NC, (4)Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities- UNC
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)Duke University, Durham, NC, (6)University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
117 109.117 Colour Perception in Autism and Williams Syndrome
M. B. Cranwell1, D. M. Riby2, A. S. Le Couteur3 and A. C. Hurlbert1, (1)
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne,
United Kingdom, (2)Department of Psychology, Durham University,
Durham, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle
University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
118 109.118 Concurrent and Longitudinal Predictors of Theory of
Mind in TD Children and Children with ASD T. D’souza1, C. NavarroTorres2, D. A. Fein1 and L. Naigles1, (1)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(2)Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
119 109.119 Contextual Influences on Eccentric Viewing in Young
Children with ASD G. S. Doneddu1, S. Congiu1, D. Corda2, G. Baldus2,
L. Ferretti1, G. Saba1, D. Serra1 and R. Fadda3, (1)Center for Autism
Spectrum Disorder, Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu, Cagliari, Italy, (2)BalCor
s.n.c., San Sperate, Italy, (3)Department of Pedagogy, Psychology,
Philosophy, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy
120 109.120 Decreased Habituation to Naturalistic Stimuli in
Autism A. L. Cardinaux1, H. Nejati2, C. K. Rogers3, K. Tsourides2,
T. K. Gandhi4, M. M. Kjelgaard5 and P. Sinha2, (1)Brain and Cognitive
Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, (2)Brain
and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, (3)Department of Brain and
Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge,
MA, (4)Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, New Delhi,
India, (5)MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
121 109.121 Distribution of Visual Attention When Comparing
Paired Faces in Typically Developing Infants and Infants Later Diagnosed
with Autism K. M. Hauschild1 and M. S. Strauss2, (1)The University of
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (2)University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
26
122 109.122 Do Children with Autism Change Their Behaviour in
Response to Volatility in the Environment? C. Manning1,2, E. Pellicano2,
T. Karaminis2, L. E. Neil2 and J. Kilner3, (1)Department of Experimental
Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, (2)Centre for
Research in Autism and Education (CRAE), Institute of Education, London,
United Kingdom, (3)University College London, Institute of Neurology,
London, United Kingdom
123 109.123 Do Children with Autism Show Reduced Susceptibility
to Visual Illusions? C. T. Allen1, C. Manning1,2, M. J. Morgan3,4 and
E. Pellicano1, (1)Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE),
Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom, (2)Department of
Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom,
(3)City University, London, United Kingdom, (4)Max Planck Institute for
Neurological Research, Cologne, Germany
124 109.124 Do Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Process
Own- and Other-Race Faces Differently? L. Yi1, P. Quinn2, C. Feng3 and
K. Lee4, (1)Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou,
Guangdong, China, (2)University of Delaware, Newark, DE, (3)Sun Yat-sen
University, Guangzhou, China, (4)Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
125 109.125 Does Being Bilingual Impact Executive Functions in
Autism Spectrum Disorders? A. M. Gonzalez Barrero and A. Nadig, School
of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal, QC,
Canada
126 109.126 Downcast Gaze and Hypersensitivity to Direct Gaze in
Young Children with ASD S. Congiu1, R. Fadda2, D. Corda3, G. Baldus3,
D. Serra1, L. Ferretti1, G. Saba1 and G. S. Doneddu1, (1)Center for Autism
Spectrum Disorder, Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu, Cagliari, Italy,
(2)Department of Pedagogy, Psychology, Philosophy, University of
Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, (3)BalCor s.n.c., San Sperate, Italy
127 109.127 Evaluating Gender Differences in Perceptual Profiles
of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder E. Marcil1,2, J. Guy2,3,
L. Mottron, M.D.4 and A. Bertone2,5,6, (1)School/Applied Child Psychology,
Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, McGill University,
Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)Perceptual Neuroscience Laboratory for Autism
and Development (PNLab), Montreal, QC, Canada, (3)Integrated Program
in Neuroscience, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (4)Centre
d’excellence en Troubles envahissants du développement de l’Université
de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montréal, QC, Canada, (5)Centre d’excellence
en Troubles envahissants du développement de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM), Montreal, QC, Canada, (6)School/Applied Child Psychology,
Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University,
Montreal, QC, Canada
128 109.128 Examining Attentional Bias for Facial Features Across
Development and in Autism K. A. Dalrymple1, N. Wall2, M. L. Spezio3,
H. C. Hazlett4, J. Piven5 and J. T. Elison6, (1)Institute of Child Development,
University of MInnesota, Minneapolis, MN, (2)University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, MN, (3)Psychology, Scripps College, Claremont, CA,
(4)Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (6)Institute of Child Development, University
of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
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129 109.129 Exploring the Clinical and Cognitive Phenotype of Child
Savants with ASD P. Heaton and E. Bennett, Psychology, Goldsmiths
College, University of London, London, United Kingdom
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130 109.130 Exploring the Driving Behavior of Young Novice Drivers
with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Driver Instructor Questionnaire
V. Ross1, E. Jongen2, M. Vanvuchelen3, T. Brijs2, K. Brijs2,4 and G. Wets2,
(1)Transportation research Institute (IMOB), Hasselt University,
Diepenbeek, Belgium, (2)Transportation Research Institute (IMOB), Hasselt
University, Diepenbeek, Belgium, (3)Hasselt University Faculty of Medicine
and Life Sciences, Diepenbeek, Belgium, (4)Faculty of Applied Engineering
Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
132 109.132 Extending the Characterization of Semantics in ASD to
Non-Verbal Domains K. Steinman1,2, M. K. Askren3, T. Ward4, J. E. Elgin5,
J. Wenegrat6, R. K. Earl2, R. Bernier2 and T. J. Grabowski3, (1)Seattle
Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, (3)Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(4)Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA, (5)Seattle
Children’s Autism Center, Bothell, WA, (6)University of Washington Autism
Center, Seattle, WA
133 109.133 Familiarity and Affect in Adolescents with Autism
Spectrum Disorder J. H. Filliter1, M. Kerr2 and S. A. Johnson3, (1)IWK
Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)Dalhousie University, Halifax,
NS, Canada, (3)Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie
University, Halifax, NS, Canada
134 109.134 Habituation Speed and Novelty Preference to Faces in
Preschoolers with ASD S. Ghods1, C. Healy2, B. L. Zappone3, S. Corrigan4,
E. Jones5, K. Toth3 and S. J. Webb6, (1)Center for Child Health, Behavior
and Development, Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, WA,
(2)Child, Health Behavior and Development, Seatle Children’s Research
Institute, Seattle, WA, (3)Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, WA,
(4)Child Health, Behavior, and Development, Seattle Children’s Research
Institute, Seattle, WA, (5)Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development,
Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United Kingdom,
(6)Psychiatry and behavioral sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
135 109.135 Hazard Perception Abilities of Young Novice Drivers
with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Driving Simulator Study V. Ross1,
E. Jongen2, M. Vanvuchelen3, T. Brijs2, K. Brijs4 and G. Wets2,
(1)Transportation research Institute (IMOB), Hasselt University,
Diepenbeek, Belgium, (2)Transportation Research Institute (IMOB), Hasselt
University, Diepenbeek, Belgium, (3)Hasselt University Faculty of Medicine
and Life Sciences, Diepenbeek, Belgium, (4)Faculty of Applied Engineering
Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium
136 109.136 How Genetically Induced Enhanced Synaptic Plasticity
and Regional Cortical Rededications Account for Autistic Superior
Performances: The Trigger-Threshold-Target-Neglect Model for Autism
L. Mottron1, P. Duret2, O. Collignon2, L. Xiong2 and F. Samson2, (1)Centre
d’excellence en Troubles envahissants du développement de l’Université
de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)Psychiatry, Clinique
spécialisée de l’autisme, Montréal, QC, Canada
137 109.137 Individual Cognitive Strengths and Weaknesses in
Autism Spectrum Disorders: Diversity Is the Rule D. H. Skuse1, W. Mandy1
and M. Murin2, (1)Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit, UCL Institute of
Child Health, London, United Kingdom, (2)Great Ormond Street Hospital,
London, United Kingdom
138 109.138 Integration of Visual and Proprioceptive Perception
of Movement Kinematics in Children with and without Autism Spectrum
Disorder N. Salowitz1, A. V. Van Hecke2 and R. A. Scheidt1, (1)Biomedical
Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, (2)Marquette University,
Milwaukee, WI
139 109.139 Intolerance of Uncertainty, but Not Anxiety, Predicts
Sensory Sensitivities in Autism L. E. Neil1, N. Choque Olsson2 and
E. Pellicano1, (1)Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE),
Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom, (2)Karolinska Institutet,
Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Women’s and Children’s
Health, Stockholm, Sweden
140 109.140 Isolating Visual- and Proprioception-Based
Generalization of Motor Learning in Autism Spectrum Disorder E. Sharer1,
S. H. Mostofsky1,2,3, L. M. Oberman4,5 and A. Pascual-Leone4,5, (1)Center
for Neurodevelopmental and Imaging Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (2)Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of
Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (3)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (4)
Department of Neurology, Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain
Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA,
(5)Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
141 109.141 Item-Memory for Words, Pictures, Abstract Shapes
and Nonsense-Words in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder M. Ring,
S. B. Gaigg and D. M. Bowler, Autism Research Group, City University
London, London, United Kingdom
142 109.142 Joint Action Coordination in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder F. Fulceri1, A. Tonacci2, F. Apicella3, A. Narzisi4,
L. Billeci5, F. Muratori6 and A. Contaldo6, (1)Stella Maris Foundation,
Pisa, Italy, Pisa, Italy, (2)Clinical Physiology Institute, CNR, Pisa, Italy,
(3)”Fondazione Stella Maris” Scientific Institute, Pisa, Italy, (4)University
of Pisa – Stella Maris Scientific Institute, Pisa, PI, Italy, (5)National
Research Council of Italy (CNR), Pisa, Italy, (6)Stella Maris Scientific
Institute, Calambrone (Pisa), Italy
THURSDAY – AM
131 109.131 Exploring the Role of Verbal Mediation in Executive
Functioning in Children with Autism I. Gangopadhyay1, M. Buac2,
E. K. Haebig2, M. M. Davidson2, M. Kaushanskaya2 and S. Ellis-Weismer2,
(1)Communication Sciences & Disorders, Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI, (2)Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
143 109.143 Joint Attention and Information Processing in Higher
Functioning ASD P. C. Mundy, 2825 50Th Street, UC Davis,
Sacramento, CA
144 109.144 Longitudinal Changes from 11 to 16 Months in Visual
Attention to Dynamic Social Scene Among Infants at High and Low Genetic
Risk for Autism L. Sperle and M. S. Strauss, University of Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh, PA
145 109.145 Mental Rotation: A High-Level Perceptual Strength
of Young ASD Children Y. Yoshimura1, L. Mottron2,3, N. Takesaki4,
T. Takahashi5, T. Hirosawa4, N. Furutani4, H. Hiraishi5, C. Hasegawa5,
S. Kitagawa5, Y. Minabe5 and M. Kikuchi5, (1)Kanazawa University,
Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan, (2)University of Montreal Center of
Excellence for Pervasive Developmental Disorders (CETEDUM),
Montreal, QC, Canada, (3)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants
du développement de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montreal,
QC, Canada, (4)Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, Kanazawa
University, Kanazawa, Japan, (5)Research Center for Child Mental
Development, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
146 109.146 Negative Emotionality Disrupts Pattern Separation in
Adults Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders E. Anderberg1,
C. Nielson2, K. Stephenson1, S. Atwood2, M. South3 and C. B. Kirwan3,
(1)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(2)Neuroscience Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(3)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
147 109.147 Neural Correlates of Goal-Directed Reaching Movements
in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder N. Salowitz1, A. V. Van Hecke2,
N. L. Johnson3 and R. A. Scheidt1,4, (1)Biomedical Engineering, Marquette
University, Milwaukee, WI, (2)Psychology, Marquette University, Milwaukee,
WI, (3)College of Nursing, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI,
(4)Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
148 109.148 Pitch Direction Perception Predicts the Ability to Detect
Local Pitch Structure in Autism and Typical Development N. E. Foster1,
M. Sharda1, E. Germain1, R. Chowdhury1, A. Tryfon1,2, T. Ouimet1,2,
K. A. R. Doyle-Thomas3, E. Anagnostou3, K. L. Hyde1,2 and NeuroDevNet
ASD Imaging Group4, (1)International Laboratory for Brain Music and Sound
Research (brams.org), Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(2)Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(3)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)http://www.neurodevnet.ca/research/asd,
Vancouver, BC, Canada
27
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
149 109.149 Pitch Perception in Adults with Autism Spectrum
Disorder Speaking a Tone Language G. Y. H. Lam1, C. K. S. To2,
S. T. T. Cheng2 and L. S. Iao3, (1)Department of Educational and
Psychological Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, (2)Division
of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Hong Kong,
Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (3)Division of Psychology, School of Social
Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom
160 109.160 The Go/No-Go Task Online: Evidence of an Inhibitory/
Excitatory Imbalance in Autism in a Large Sample F. Uzefovsky1,
C. Allison2, P. Smith3 and S. Baron-Cohen1, (1)Autism Research Centre,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research
Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge,
United Kingdom, (3)Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University,
Cambridge, United Kingdom
150 109.150 Playing Games with Your Eyes: An at-Home Video
Gaming System for Training Attention Orienting in ASD L. Chukoskie1,
M. Westerfield1 and J. Townsend2, (1)Institute for Neural Computation,
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (2)Neurosciences,
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
161 109.161 The Relation Between Classical Conditioning and
Prototype Learning in Individuals with ASD P. S. Powell1, A. T. Meyer2,
L. G. Klinger3 and M. R. Klinger4, (1)University of North Carolina, Chapel
Hill, NC, (2)Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC,
(3)TEACCH Autism Program; Department of Psychiatry, University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (4)Allied Health Sciences, University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
151 109.151 Privileged Role of Symbolic Number Sense in Mediating
Math Abilities in Children with Autism M. Rosenberg-Lee1, A. Hiniker2 and
V. Menon3, (1)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA, (2)Human Centered Design and Engineering, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford
University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
152 109.152 Procedural Learning and Language Impairment:
Evidence of a Deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorder with LI but Not in
Specific Language Impairment H. Bani-Hani1 and A. Nadig2, (1)School of
Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal, QC,
Canada, (2)McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
153 109.153 Psychometric Properties of the Revised Executive
Function Challenge Task (EFCT) L. Kenworthy1, K. M. Dudley2, Y.
Granader2, C. Luong-Tran1, C. E. Pugliese2, K. Harmon3, J. F. Strang2 and
L. G. Anthony2, (1)Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville, MD,
(2)Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Children’s National Medical
Center, Rockville, MD, (3)Children’s National, Rockville, MD
154 109.154 Reduced Anticipatory Responses during Dynamic Object
Interactions in Autism A. L. Cardinaux1, K. Tsourides2, H. Nejati2, D. Jin3,
T. K. Gandhi4, M. M. Kjelgaard5 and P. Sinha2, (1)Brain and Cognitive
Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, (2)Brain
and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, (3)Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, Cambridge, MA, (4)Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied
Sciences, New Delhi, India, (5)MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston,
MA
155 109.155 Self-Referential Metacognition in Adolescents with ASD
Learning Mathematics M. Brosnan1, H. Johnson1 and B. Grawemeyer2,
(1)University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom, (2)Birkbeck College, London,
United Kingdom
156 109.156 Skill Learning in Young Minimally-Verbal Children with
Autism and the Effect of Vestibular Stimulation G. Katz-Nave1, Y. Adini2,
O. Hetzroni1 and Y. S. Bonneh3, (1)Special Education, University of Haifa,
Haifa, Israel, (2)Vision Research Inst., Kiron, Israel, (3)University of Haifa,
Haifa, Israel
157 109.157 Superior Vocal Identity Memory in Autism I. F. Lin1,
T. Yamada2, Y. Komine3, N. Kato3 and M. Kashino1,4, (1)NTT Communication
Science Laboratories, Atsugi, Japan, (2)Department of Psychiatry, Medical
Institute of Developmental Disabilities Research, Showa University, Tokyo,
Japan, (3)Medical Institute of Developmental Disabilities Research, Showa
University, Tokyo, Japan, (4)Department of Information Processing, Tokyo
Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan
158 109.158 The Co-Occurrence of Autistic and Dyspraxic
Symptomatology in the General Population D. Smith, D. Ropar and
H. A. Allen, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham,
United Kingdom
159 109.159 The Cost of Attentional Engagement: Target Switching
during Visual Search in 2-Year-Old Toddlers with ASD H. Smith,
A. S. Carter, E. Blaser and Z. Kaldy, Department of Psychology,
University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA
28
162 109.162 The ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ Test: Complete
Absence of Typical Sex Differences in Performance in ~400 Men and
Women with Autism S. Baron-Cohen1, D. Bowen2, R. Holt2, C. Allison3,
B. Auyeung1, M. V. Lombardo4, P. Smith2 and M. C. Lai1, (1)Autism
Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
(2)Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United
Kingdom, (3)Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University
of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (4)Department of Psychology,
University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus
163 109.163 Thermal Pain Perception in Adults with Asperger
Syndrome H. Haker1,2, F. Hagenmuller2,3 and W. Rössler2,4, (1)Translational
Neuromodeling Unit, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Zurich,
Switzerland, (2)Collegium Helveticum, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich,
Zurich, Switzerland, (3)Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich, Zurich,
Switzerland, (4)Department of Psychiatry, Laboratory of Neuroscience
(LIM-27), University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
164 109.164 Three Facets of Visual Orientation Processing in
ASD F. Shafai1,2, K. Armstrong3, G. Iarocci3 and I. Oruc1, (1)Department
of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (2)Graduate program in Neuroscience, University
of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (3)Department of Psychology,
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada
165 109.165 Time Course of Facial Emotion Recognition in FirstDegree Relatives of Individuals with ASD: An Eye-Tracking Study
A. Lartseva1, T. Dijkstra2, F. Huettig3 and J. K. Buitelaar4, (1)Donders
Centre for Neuroscience, Nijmegen, GE, Netherlands, (2)Donders Centre
for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands,
(3)Psychology of Language Department, Max planck Institute for
Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, Netherlands, (4)Department of Cognitive
Neuroscience, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, Netherlands
166 109.166 To See but Not to See: Visual Perception Mediates
Imitation in ASD H. Stieglitz Ham1, G. Rajendran2, M. Corley3, S. Vaz1,
M. Falkmer1, A. Bartolo4 and T. Falkmer1, (1)Curtin University, Perth,
Australia, (2)Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom,
(3)Psychology, PPLS, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom,
(4)Psychologie, Laboratoire URECA, Université de Lille Nord de France,
Lille, France
167 109.167 Transitive Inference in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder and Limited Verbal Ability C. T. Derwent, S. B. Gaigg and
D. M. Bowler, Autism Research Group, City University London, London,
United Kingdom
168 109.168 Understanding of Prior Intention in the Children with
Autistic Spectrum Disorder C. H. Chiang1, C. T. Huang2 and C. Y. Hung2,
(1)Department of Psychology, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan,
(2)Psychology, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – AM
169 109.169 Use of an Experimental Design to Examine Factors
That Contribute to Episodic Memory Deficits in Children with High
Functioning Autism K. Zielinski, University of California, Los Angeles,
Hermosa Beach, CA
171 109.171 Writing Ability and Working Memory in Children with
Higher Functioning ASD M. C. Zajic1, N. S. McIntyre1, L. E. Swain-Lerro2,
T. Oswald3 and P. C. Mundy4, (1)UC Davis, Davis, CA, (2)School of
Education, UC Davis, Santa Rosa, CA, (3)2825 50th Street, UC Davis,
Sacramento, CA, (4)2825 50Th Street, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA
172 109.172 “Scattered Attention” in Face Perception: The Case of
Co-Morbid ASD+ADHD J. Parish-Morris1, B. E. Yerys2, L. Antezana3,
A. de Marchena3, C. Chevallier3, N. J. Sasson4 and R. T. Schultz3,
(1)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Psychiatry,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Center for Autism
Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(4)University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX
Poster Session
110 - Repetitive Behaviors and Interests
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
173 110.173 Are Social Cognitive Deficits Relative in Autism?
Examination Using a Social Versus Nonsocial Salience Paradigm
K. Unruh1,2, N. J. Sasson3 and J. W. Bodfish4,5, (1)Vanderbilt Brain Institue,
Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (3)University of Texas
at Dallas, Richardson, TX, (4)Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Nashville, TN,
(5)Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
174 110.174 Examining the Impact of Repetitive and Restricted
Behaviors on Adaptive Functioning of Children with ASD S. Maisel1,
K. L. Campe2 and E. Hanson1, (1)Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA,
(2)Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
175 110.175 Grit in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum
Disorder C. McMahon1, J. Haut2, R. Schatz3, T. Otero2 and A. Merrill4, (1)3C
Institute, Cary, NC, (2)Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, (3)Counseling
and Educational Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, (4)School
Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
176 110.176 Hobbies in Adults with ASD: An Exploratory Descriptive
Analysis S. Pacey-Smith1, B. A. D’Entremont1, S. Nichols2, S. D. Voyer1 and
S. Byers1, (1)Psychology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB,
Canada, (2)ASPIRE Center for Learning and Development, Melville, NY
177 110.177 Measuring Restricted Interests and Repetitive Behaviors
in Infant Siblings at-Risk for ASD: Comparing Home Setting Versus Clinic
Performance of 12 Month Olds N. Brane1, M. Lewis1, E. S. McGarry1,
K. Fiorello1, S. E. Gillespie2 and A. M. Wetherby3, (1)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA, (2)Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta,
GA, (3)Florida State University Autism Institute, Tallahassee, FL
178 110.178 Modeling Higher-Order Repetitive Behavior in the C58
Mouse Strain C. M. Whitehouse1, R. L. Shafer2 and M. H. Lewis1,
(1)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, (2)Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
180 110.180 Repetitive Stereotyped Behaviour or “Stimming”: An
Online Survey of 100 People on the Autism Spectrum R. L. Steward,
Robyn Steward, Suffolk, United Kingdom
181 110.181 Restrictive and Repetitive Behaviors in Young Children
with Autism: M. Baker-Ericzen1, M. Kinnear1, M. Ballatore-Weinfeld2,
M. Fitch1, S. Kanne3 and M. O. Mazurek3, (1)Child and Adolescent Services
Research Center, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA,
(2)Autism Discovery Institute, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego,
San Diego, CA, (3)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
182 110.182 Sensory Processing Patterns in Dyads of Children with
ASD and Their Parents M. Glod1, D. M. Riby2, E. Honey3 and J. Rodgers1,
(1)Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United
Kingdom, (2)Department of Psychology, Durham University, Durham,
United Kingdom, (3)School of Psychology, Newcastle University, Newcastle,
United Kingdom
THURSDAY – AM
170 109.170 Vertical but Not Oblique Line Orientation Discrimination
Is Disturbed in ASD Children O. V. Sysoeva1, M. S. Davletshina2,
E. Orekhova1 and T. A. Stroganova1, (1)MEG Centre, Moscow State
University of Psychology and Education, Moscow, Russia, (2)MEG Center,
Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, Moscow, Russia
179 110.179 Obsessive and Circumscribed Patterns of Interest (OCPI)
of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder M. Verile1, M. D. Forsythe1,
J. Shenouda2 and W. Zahorodny3, (1)Pediatrics, New Jersey Medical
School- Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, (2)Rutgers New Jersey Medical
School, Newark, NJ, (3)Pediatrics, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School,
Newark, NJ
183 110.183 Sensory Processing Patterns, Activity Choice and
Participation of Children with Autism Across Ireland R. Ferguson1,
F. McCaffrey2, S. Cross1, G. Kelly3 and J. Casey3, (1)Research &
Development, Middletown Centre for Autism, Armagh, United Kingdom,
(2)Research & Development, Middletown Centre for Autism, Armagh,
Northern Ireland, (3)Life and Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Antrim,
United Kingdom
184 110.184 Sensory Response Patterns As Predictors of Adaptive
Outcomes in Children with ASD or Other Developmental Disabilities
L. R. Watson1, G. T. Baranek2, J. Sideris3, J. C. Bulluck4, A. V. Kirby2 and
K. Williams2, (1)Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, The University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Division of Occupational
Science and Occupational Therapy, The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)Frank Porter Graham Child Development
Institute, Chapel Hill, NC, (4)Department of Allied Health Sciences,
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
185 110.185 Stability of Sensory Subtype One Year Following
Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder A. E. Lane and K. PhilpottRobinson, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
186 110.186 Stress Regulation in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorders (ASD): A Scoping Review M. A. Braeken1, L. Van Schuerbeeck1,
J. Steyaert2 and M. Vanvuchelen3, (1)Hasselt University, Diepenbeek,
Belgium, (2)Leuven Autism Research (LAuRes), University of Leuven
(KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium, (3)Hasselt University Faculty of Medicine
and Life Sciences, Diepenbeek, Belgium
187 110.187 The Hardness of Standing Support Surfaces Influences
Tip-Toe Behavior of Autistic Children: Evidence from a Pilot Study
G. Valagussa, V. Balatti, L. Trentin, V. Terruzzi and E. Grossi, Autism Unit,
Villa Santa Maria Institute, Tavernerio, Italy
188 110.188 The Relation Between Restrictive and Repetitive Behaviors
and Family Routine Among Families of Children with Autism S. A. Fox1,
C. Tam2, K. V. Christodulu3, M. L. Rinaldi4 and A. C. Israel2, (1)Clinical
Psychology, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY,
(2)University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY, (3)Center
for Autism and Related Disabilities, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany,
NY, (4)University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY
189 110.189 Toe Walking and Autism: Cross-Sectional Study on
Presentation Patterns and Correlation with Autism Severity G. Valagussa,
V. Balatti, L. Trentin, S. Melli, M. Norsi and E. Grossi, Autism Unit,
Villa Santa Maria Institute, Tavernerio, Italy
29
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
Keynote Address and INSAR Awards Ceremony
111 - Lifetime Achievement Awardee
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM - Grand Ballroom
4:00
4:30
Oral Session – 1B
113 - Interventions for Adults with ASD
Awards Ceremony
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: N. Bauminger-Zviely, Bar-Ilan University,
Ramat Gan, Israel
Advocate Awardee Address
2:40
113.001 Designing and Evaluating a Summer Transition
Program for Incoming College Students on the Autism Spectrum:
A Participatory Action Approach C. Shane-Simpson1,2,
E. R. Hotez3, J. T. Pickens1, M. Giannola4, A. Donachie5, J.
D’Onofrio6, A. Alvizurez7 and K. Gillespie-Lynch8,9, (1)Psychology,
The Graduate Center at the City University of New York, New York,
NY, (2)Psychology, College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY,
(3)Psychology, The Graduate Center at the City University of New
York/Hunter College, New York, NY, (4)Psychology, The College
of Staten Island, New York, NY, (5)College of Staten Island, Staten
Island, NY, (6)Center for Student Accessibility, College of Staten
Island, New York, NY, (7)Psychology, College of Staten Island,
New York, NY, (8)Department of Psychology, College of Staten
Island - CUNY, Staten Island, NY, (9)Department of Psychology,
The Graduate Center - CUNY, New York, NY
2:52
113.002 Nonsymbolic Augmentative Communication for
Minimally Verbal Adults with ASD and Severe Intellectual Disability:
An Intervention Study J. P. W. Maljaars1 and I. Noens2,
(1)Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven,
Leuven, Belgium, (2)Leuven Autism Research (LAuRes),
Leuven, Belgium
3:04
113.003 Examining PEERS® for Young Adults: Improvements
in Social Responsiveness and Depression and Relations to EEG
Activity B. Dolan1, K. A. Schohl1, A. J. McVey1, S. Stevens1,
K. Reiter1, S. Potts1, N. Gordon1 and A. V. Van Hecke2, (1)Marquette
University, Milwaukee, WI, (2)Psychology, Marquette University,
Milwaukee, WI
3:16
113.004 Increasing Strength and Flexibility of Adults Diagnosed
with Autism Spectrum Disorder and an Intellectual Disability through
a Strength and Conditioning Program K. Carr, N. R. Azar, S. Horton
and C. A. Sutherland, Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor,
ON, Canada
Merry Barua, Action For Autism, New Delhi, India
5:00
Lifetime Achievement Awardee Address
Laura Schreibman, University of California, San Diego,
La Jolla, CA
Oral Session – 1A
112 - New Insights into Social Intervention
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: N. Bauminger-Zviely, Bar-Ilan University,
Ramat Gan, Israel
1:45
1:57
2:09
2:21
30
112.001 A Randomized Wait-List Control Trial of a PeerMediated, Theatre-Based Intervention to Improve Social Ability in
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder B. A. Corbett1,
A. P. F. Key1, S. M. Fecteau2, C. R. Newsom3, L. R. Qualls4,
P. J. Yoder5, E. K. Edmiston6, D. D. Jones7 and B. D. Valencia1,
(1)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Psychoeducation and
psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, QC,
Canada, (3)Pediatrics, Psychiatry, & Psychology, Vanderbilt
University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, (4)Psychiatry, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (5)Special Education, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (6)Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (7)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center
Psychophysiology Services, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
112.002 Students’ Evaluation of an Autism Peer Education
Program: Initial Impressions of the KIT for Kids K. A. Scheil1,
J. Campbell2, J. Bowers-Campbell3, M. C. Davis4, E. Caldwell4 and
R. Jacob4, (1)Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY,
(2)Department of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology,
University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, (3)Georgetown College,
Georgetown, KY, (4)University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
112.003 Randomized Controlled Trial of the Classroom Scerts
Intervention Project for Students with ASD L. Morgan1,
V. P. Reinhardt1, N. Sparapani2, C. Schatschneider3 and
A. M. Wetherby1, (1)Florida State University Autism Institute,
Tallahassee, FL, (2)Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ,
(3)Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
112.004 Social Validation of Evidence-Based Practices in
Autism: Investigating the Evidence of Social Validity for EmpiricallyDemonstrated Treatments Identified By the National Autism Center
and National Professional Development Center on ASD
K. Callahan1, H. L. Hughes1, S. Mehta2, S. M. Nichols1, H. T.
Wang3 and M. Kutlu4, (1)Kristin Farmer Autism Center, University
of North Texas, Denton, TX, (2)Educational Psychology, University
of North Texas, Denton, TX, (3)Special Education, National Taiwan
Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan, (4)Special Education, Anadolu
University, Eskisehir, Turkey
Oral Session – 2A
114 - Prenatal Risk Factors and ASD
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: M. D. Fallin, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of
Public Health, Baltimore, MD
1:45
114.001 Maternal Mid-Gestational Serum Cytokines and
Chemokines and the Risk of Autism with Intellectual Disability:
The Early Markers of Autism (EMA) Study K. L. Jones1,
L. A. Croen2, C. K. Yoshida2, L. S. Heuer1, P. Ashwood3 and
J. Van de Water4, (1)University of California, Davis, CA, (2)Division
of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA,
(3)UC Davis/MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (4)MIND Institute,
University of California - Davis, Sacramento, CA
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
114.002 Organochlorine Chemical Concentrations in Maternal
Mid-Pregnancy Serum Samples: Association with Autism Spectrum
Disorders in the Early Markers of Autism Study
K. Lyall1, L. A. Croen2, O. Zerbo2, C. K. Yoshida2, M. Kharrazi1 and
G. C. Windham1, (1)Environmental Health Investigations Branch,
California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA, (2)Division
of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA
2:09
114.003 Maternal Sub-Clinical Hypothyroidism and Risk of Autistic
Endophenotype in a Risk-Enriched Pregnancy Cohort I. Burstyn1,2,3,
N. L. Lee3, E. Schriver2, J. Pandey4, L. A. Croen5,
M. D. Fallin6, I. Hertz-Picciotto7 and C. J. Newschaffer2, (1)
Environmental and Occupational Health, Drexel University,
Philadelphia, PA, (2)A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University,
Philadelphia, PA, (3)Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel
University, Philadelphia, PA, (4)Center for Autism Research, The
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (5)Division of
Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA,
(6)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD,
(7)Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA
2:21
114.004 Maternal Blood DNA Methylation during Pregnancy and
Autism Observational Scale for Infants (AOSI) Score at 12-Months in
the Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI)
K. M. Bakulski1, J. I. Feinberg2, S. C. Brown3, C. J. Newschaffer4,
L. A. Croen5, I. Hertz-Picciotto6, R. J. Landa7, S. E. Levy8,
S. Ozonoff9, J. Pandey10, A. P. Feinberg2 and M. D. Fallin11,
(1)Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (2)Medicine,
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (3)Mental Health,
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD,
(4)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (5)Division of Research,
Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, (6)Public
Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, (7)
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins
School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (8)Developmental & Behavioral
Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(9)MIND Institute and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento,
CA, (10)The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(11)Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2:52
115.002 Lessons Learned from Phase I Proof-of-Mechanism and
Biomarker Studies in ASD: Measurement and Trial Considerations
J. T. McCracken1, E. Hollander2, L. Scahill3, M. del Valle Rubido4,
F. Shic5, O. Khwaja6, L. Squassante7, S. Sadikhov8,
L. Boak9, F. Bolognani10, P. Fontoura11, C. A. Wall12, R. J. Jou13,
R. L. Loomis14, M. C. Lyons12, A. Gavaletz13, C. J. Ferretti15,
B. P. Taylor16, G. Berlin15, R. Noone17, L. N. Antar15 and D. Umbricht18,
(1)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel Institute
for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA,
(2)Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore
Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY,
(3)Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA, (4)Roche,
Basel, Switzerland, (5)Child Study Center, Yale University School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (6)F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG, Basel,
Switzerland, (7)Product Development, Biometrics, F-HoffmannLa Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland, (8)Roche Innovation Center,
Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Basel,
Switzerland, (9)F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel, BS, Switzerland,
(10)F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG, Basel, BL, Switzerland, (11)Roche
Innovation Center Basel, Basel, Switzerland, (12)Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (13)Child Study Center, Yale University, New
Haven, CT, (14)Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven, CT,
(15)Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine,
Bronx, NY, (16)Dept. Of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine,
Bronx, NY, (17)Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein
College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (18)NORD, F. Hoffmann - La Roche
AG, Basel, Switzerland
3:04
115.003 Effects of Intranasal Oxytocin on Systemizing and
Empathizing Tasks in Children with and without Autism
L. Strathearn1, S. Kim2, U. Iyengar3, S. Martinez3 and P. Fonagy4,
(1)Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Baylor College of
Medicine, Houston, TX, (2)Menninger Department of Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX,
(3)Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of
Medicine, Houston, TX, (4)University College London, London,
United Kingdom
3:16
115.004 A New Vasopressin V1a Antagonist Restores Normal
Social Behavior and Reveals a Specific Brain Network in the
Rat Valproate Model of Autism C. Grundschober1,
T. Mueggler2, F. Knoflach3, C. Risterucci3, P. Schnider4 and
B. Biemans3, (1)Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, 4070, Switzerland,
(2)Roche Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland, (3)Neuroscience
Discovery, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, pRED, Pharma Research &
Early Development, Basel, Switzerland, (4)Medicinal Chemistry,
F. Hoffmann-La Roche, pRED, Pharma Research & Early
Development, Basel, Switzerland
Oral Session – 2B
115 - Neuropeptide Hormones in ASD
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: M. D. Fallin, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of
Public Health, Baltimore, MD
2:40
115.001 Affect, Social Behavior and Communication Among
Children Prenatally Exposed to Oxytocin Receptor Antagonists
E. Friedlander1, D. Mankuta2, M. Yaari1, A. Harel1, R. Ebstein3
and N. Yirmiya1, (1)Psychology Department, Hebrew University,
Jerusalem, Israel, (2)Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology,
Hadassah Ein Kerem University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel,
(3)Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore,
Singapore, Singapore
THURSDAY – PM
1:57
Oral Session – 3A
116 - International Cross-Cultural Perspectives
on Identification
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: M. Elsabbagh, McGill University, Montreal, PQ,
Canada
1:45
116.001 What Will It Take to Improve Early Identification and
Intervention Globally? M. Elsabbagh1, P. J. de Vries2 and The
Global SIG Team3, (1)McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada,
(2)Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town,
Cape Town, South Africa, (3)McGill University, Montreal, QC,
Canada
31
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
1:57
2:09
2:21
116.002 Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Low
and Middle Income Countries: An Integrative Review L. Stewart1
and L. C. Lee2, (1)Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (2)Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
116.003 Findings from the Minneapolis Somali Autism
Prevalence Project K. Hamre1, A. S. Hewitt2, A. N. Esler3 and
J. Hall-Lande1, (1)University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN,
(2)Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, MN, (3)Pediatrics, University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, MN
Oral Session – 4A
118 - Neural Signatures of Social Perception and
Reward Motivation in ASD
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: R. T. Schultz, Center for Autism Research,
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
1:45
118.001 Parsing Heterogeneity: Additive Effects of Oxytocin
Receptor Gene Polymorphisms on Reward Circuitry in ASD
L. M. Hernandez1,2,3, S. A. Green1,2, K. Krasileva2,4, L. Sherman2,5,
R. McCarron1,2, C. Ponting1,2, D. H. Geschwind1,4, S. Y. Bookheimer1,6
and M. Dapretto1,2, (1)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences,
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping
Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Interdepartmental Neuroscience
Program, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Department of Neurology,
David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA,
(5)Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (6)Center
for Cognitive Neuroscience, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
1:57
118.002 Neural Reward Imbalance Between Social Incentives
and Circumscribed Interests in Autism Spectrum Disorder
G. Kohls1, M. Mosner2, L. Antezana2, R. T. Schultz2 and B.
E. Yerys3, (1)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, RWTH Aachen University,
Aachen, Germany, (2)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Psychiatry,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
2:09
118.003 Joint Attention and Brain Functional Connectivity in
Infants and Toddlers A. T. Eggebrecht1, J. Elison2, E. Feczko3,
J. D. Lewis4, S. Kandala5, A. Todorov6, J. J. Wolff2, A. Z. Snyder7,
L. McEvoy8, A. M. Estes9, L. Zwaigenbaum10, K. N. Botteron11,
R. C. McKinstry12, J. N. Constantino12, A. Evans13, H. C. Hazlett14,
S. Dager15, S. J. Paterson16, R. T. Schultz17, M. A. Styner18,
G. Gerig19, S. Das4, P. Kostopoulos20, .. The IBIS Network21,
B. L. Schlaggar12, S. E. Petersen12, J. Piven18,22 and J. R. Pruett12,22,
(1)Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine,
St Louis, MO, (2)University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN,
(3)Emory University, Atlanta, GA, (4)McGill University, Montreal,
QC, Canada, (5)Psychiatry, Washington University School of
Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, (6)Psychiatry, Washington University
School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, (7)Radiology, Washington
University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, (8)Washington
University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, (9)Speech and
Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(10)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (11)Washington
University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO,
(12)Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO,
(13)McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, McGill University, Montreal,
QC, Canada, (14)Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities
and Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel
Hill, NC, (15)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (16)Center
for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (17)Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (18)University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (19)School of Computing &
Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute SCI, University of Utah,
Salt Lake City, UT, (20)McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal
Neurological Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada, (21)Autism Center of
Excellence, Chapel Hill, NC, (22)*Shared Senior Author, NC
2:21
118.004 Emotion Processing in Adolescents with ASD: Using
Multiple Measures and Varying Intensities R. Luyster1,
C. A. Nelson2 and E. Auguste3, (1)Emerson College, Boston, MA,
(2)Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital,
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (3)Mt. Holyoke College,
South Hadley, MA
116.004 Factors Associated with the Utilization of Services
for Children with Autism in Saudi Arabia F. Alnemary1 and
H. Al-Dahlaan2, (1)University of California, Los Angeles, Los
Angeles, CA, (2)King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research
Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Oral Session – 3B
117 - Scaling Autism Interventions Across
Cultures in Community Settings
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: M. Elsabbagh, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
2:40
117.001 A Cross-Cultural Comparison of a CaregiverMediated Joint Attention Intervention for Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): Malaysia and the UK
A. Pushparatnam and C. Hughes, Centre for Family Research,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
2:52
117.002 Parent Mediated Intervention for Autism Spectrum
Disorder in South Asia (PASS) a Randomized Control Trial
J. Green1, G. Divan2, U. Hamdani3, V. Vajaratkar2, A. Minhas4,
C. Taylor5, C. R. Aldred6, K. Leadbitter6, R. Emsley7, A. Rahman8,
V. Patel9 and P. Cardozo2, (1)Institute of Brain, Behaviour and
Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United
Kingdom, (2)Sangath, Porvorim Bardez Goa, India, (3)Human
Development Research Foundation, Islamabad, Pakistan,
(4)Institute of Psychiatry, Rawalpindi, Pakistan,
(5)University of Manchester, manchester, United Kingdom,
(6)University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,
(7)Centre for Biostatistics, Institute of Population Health, University
of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre,
Manchester, United Kingdom, (8)Liverpool University, Liverpool,
United Kingdom, (9)London School Of Hygiene and Tropical
Medicine, London, United Kingdom
3:04
117.003 Autism in the African American Community of South
Los Angeles: A Community Partnered Participatory Research
Approach T. Carr1, C. Franklin2, A. Gulsrud3, F. Jones2, L. Jones2,
C. Kasari4, E. Lizaola1, J. Panganiban5, J. Smith1, K. White2,
B. L. Williams6 and A. Wright2, (1)University of California Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Healthy African American Families,
Phase II, Los Angeles, CA, (3)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (4)UCLA
Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA,
(5)University of California, Los Angeles, Arcadia, CA, (6)University
of California Los Angeles, Culver City, CA
3:16
117.004 Potential Ethnic Disparities in Special Education
Classroom Quality in a Large Urban County A. C. Stahmer1,
J. Suhrheinrich2 and S. R. Rieth3, (1)Psychiatry, University of
California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)University of California,
San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (3)Child and Family Development,
San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
32
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
120.002 “What ‘Being on the Spectrum’ Means to Me”: How
Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder Understand and
Explain Their Diagnoses L. Berkovits1, B. L. Baker1 and J. Blacher2,
(1)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)University of California - Riverside,
Los Angeles, CA
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: R. T. Schultz, Center for Autism Research,
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
2:09
120.003 Encouraging Participant-Centered Autism Research:
What We Know from Potential Participants A. R. Marvin1,
C. A. Cohen2, J. K. Law3 and P. H. Lipkin4, (1)3825 Greenspring
Avenue/Painter Building 1st Floor, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (2)Medical Informatics, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (3)Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (4)Pediatrics/
Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2:40
2:52
3:04
3:16
119.001 Cortico-Cerebellar Dysfunctions Associated with
Visuomotor Abnormalities in Autism Spectrum Disorder Vary
According to the Quality of Visual Feedback M. W. Mosconi1,
S. P. Coombes2, L. M. Schmitt3, G. Magnon4, D. E. Vaillancourt2
and J. A. Sweeney1, (1)Center for Autism and Developmental
Disabilities, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX,
(2)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, (3)Center for Autism and
Development Disabilities, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas,
TX, (4)University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
2:21
120.004 The Sibling Experience: Quality of Life and Adjustment
in Siblings of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder in
Adolescence L. L. Green and S. Gavidia-Payne, Health Sciences,
RMIT University, Bundoora, Australia
119.002 Atypical Lateralization of Motor Circuit Connectivity
in Children with High-Functioning Autism Is Associated with
Motor Deficits D. L. Floris1,2, A. D. Barber2,3, M. B. Nebel2,3 and
S. H. Mostofsky2,3,4, (1)Autism Research Centre, Cambridge,
United Kingdom, (2)Center for Neurodevelopmental and Imaging
Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (3)Department
of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD,
(4)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
119.003 Post-Movement Beta Rebound Is Decreased in Children
with ASD W. C. Gaetz1, L. Blaskey2, E. S. Kuschner2, L. Bloy2,
R. Murray3, C. Fisk4, M. Ku4, D. Chudnovskaya4, J. W. Dell5,
R. Golembski4, P. Lam4, S. E. Levy6 and T. P. Roberts2,
(1)The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Bala Cynwyd, PA,
(2)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(3)Radiology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia,
PA, (4)The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(5)CHOP MEG Lab, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (6)Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
119.004 Praxis-Related Alterations of Cortical Oscillations
in Children with Autism: Associations with Symptom Severity,
Repetitive Behaviors and Motor Planning J. B. Ewen1,
B. M. Lakshmanan2, A. S. Pillai3, M. Hallett4, N. E. Crone5 and
S. H. Mostofsky6, (1)Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins
School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (3)Neurology and Developmental Medicine,
Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (4)Human Motor Control
Section, NIH/NINDS, Bethesda, MD, (5)Neurology, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (6)Department of
Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Oral Session – 5A
120 - Experiencing Autism: First-Hand and
Sibling Perspectives
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: A. T. Singer, Autism Science Foundation,
New York, NY
1:45
120.001 How Should We Describe Autism? Perspectives from
the UK Autism Community L. Kenny1, C. Hattersley2,3, B. Molins3,
C. Buckley4, C. Povey3 and E. Pellicano1, (1)Centre for Research
in Autism and Education (CRAE), Institute of Education, London,
United Kingdom, (2)Providence Row, London, United Kingdom,
(3)The National Autistic Society, London, England, United Kingdom,
(4)Royal College of General Practitioners, London, United Kingdom
THURSDAY – PM
1:57
Oral Session – 4B
119 - Relationships between Behavior and
Sensorimotor Circuitry in ASD
Oral Session – 5B
121 - Social Motivation, Social Reward, and ASD
Traits in Clinical and Typical Samples
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: J. Blacher, University of California - Riverside,
Los Angeles, CA
2:40
121.001 Perceived Social Support in Cognitively High
Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
S. Alvarez-Fernandez1, H. R. Brown1, J. A. Raithel1, S. L. Bishop2,
S. B. Kern1, C. Lord3 and A. Di Martino1, (1)Child Psychiatry, NYU
Child Study Center, New York, NY, (2)Psychiatry, University of
California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, (3)Weill Cornell
Medical College, White Plains, NY
2:52
121.002 Measuring the Value of Social Stimuli in Autism
Spectrum Disorders I. Dubey1, D. Ropar1 and A. Hamilton2,
(1)School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham,
United Kingdom, (2)Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL,
London, United Kingdom
3:04
121.003 Bridging the Gap Between Social Motivation and
Empathy: Autistic Traits Modulate Spontaneous Facial Mimicry of
Social Rewards in Individuals with ASD J. Neufeld1,2, T. B. Sims1
and B. Chakrabarti1, (1)Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and
Neurodynamics, School of Psychology and Clinical Language
Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom,
(2)Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Karolinska Institute,
Stockholm, Sweden
3:16
121.004 Relative Contributions of BAP Subdomains to Social
Relationships and Loneliness J. C. Bush and D. Kennedy,
Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University,
Bloomington, IN
33
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
Poster Session
122 - Family Issues and Stakeholder Experiences
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
1 122.001 Face Processing and the Broad Autism Phenotype
B. H. Feldman1 and A. Dimitropoulos2, (1)Case Western Reserve University
Dept. of Psychological Sciences, University Heights, OH, (2)Department of
Psychological Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
2 122.002 A First-Hand Account of Raising a Child with ASD
A. Mao, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, TX
3 122.003 Evidence-Based Treatment and Assessment of Autism
Spectrum Disorder A. S. Weitlauf, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,
Nashville, TN
4 122.004 Parents with Autism of Children with Autism S. Begeer1,
M. Wierda2 and H. M. Koot2, (1)Department of Psychology, Vrije Universiteit
Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands, (2)Developmental Psychology,
VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
5 122.005 A Compass for Hope: A Parent Training and Support
Program for Children with ASD and Problem Behavior A. D. Rodgers1,
A. P. Ables2, J. A. Odom1, T. M. Belkin3, G. Mathai Kuravackel2,
R. J. Reese1 and L. A. Ruble1, (1)University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY,
(2)University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (3)Indiana University- Purdue
University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN
6 122.006 ASD Symptoms As Predictors of Negative Outcomes in
Parents and Typically-Developing Siblings T. S. Tomeny1, L. K. Baker1
and T. D. Barry2, (1)Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, AL, (2)Psychology, The University of Southern
Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS
7 122.007 Applying Principles of Community-Based Participatory
Research in Autism Biomarker Discovery A. Yusuf1 and M. Elsabbagh2,
(1)Department of Pscyhiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(2)Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
8 122.008 Assessment of Transportation and Mobility Adults on the
Autism Spectrum in NJ C. Feeley1, D. Deka2, A. Lubin2 and M. McGackin3,
(1)Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation, Rutgers
University, Piscataway, NJ, (2)Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center,
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, (3)Autism
Family Services of New Jersey, Family Support Center of New Jersey,
Brick, NJ
9 122.009 Autism Spectrum Disorders- Understanding Parental
Pursuit to Access Speech-Language Services in the Indian Context
S. S. Meera1, R. G. Shankar1, B. S. Mathew2, A. J. S. Mohammed3 and
N. Shivashankar4, (1)NIMHANS, Bangalore, India, (2)Fr. Muller College of
Speech and Hearing, Mangalore, India, (3)Dr. S. R. Chandrasekhar Institute
of Speech and Hearing, Bangalore, India, (4)Dept. of Speech Pathology
and Audiology, NIMHANS, Bangalore, India
10 122.010 Challenges Facing Families with a Child with ASD
C. A. Cohen1, A. R. Marvin2, J. K. Law3 and P. H. Lipkin4, (1)Medical
Informatics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (2)3825 Greenspring
Avenue/Painter Building 1st Floor, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore,
MD, (3)Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of
Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (4)Pediatrics/Neurology and Developmental
Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Baltimore, MD
34
11 122.011 Compassion Meditation in Parents of Children with
ASD and Potential Effects on Stress, Parenting Skills and Children’s
Outcomes S. Fernandez-Carriba1, E. Robbins2, B. Ozawa-de Silva3,
B. Dodson-Lavelle4, T. Pace5, C. L. Raison6, P. Rochat2, L. T. Negi7 and
E. Jarzabek8, (1)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (2)Psychology,
Emory University, Atlanta, GA, (3)Life University, Marietta, GA,
(4)Mind and Life Institute, Hadley, MA, (5)College of Nursing, University
of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, (6)Psychiatry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ,
(7)Emory-Tibet Partnership, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, (8)Pediatric
Neurodevelopmental Clinic, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare
of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
12 122.012 Concerns of Parents and Teachers of Children with
Autism in Elementary School G. Azad1, M. Kim2 and D. S. Mandell3,
(1)University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Hamilton, NJ, (2)Temple
University, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
13 122.013 Daily Hassles and Relationship Satisfaction in Parents
of Pre-School and School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder:
The Moderating Role of Spousal/Partner Support H. L. Schneider1,
C. S. Ghilain1, M. V. Parlade1, N. Ekas2 and M. Alessandri1, (1)Psychology,
University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (2)Texas Christian University,
Fort Worth, TX
14 122.014 Development of a Parent Mentor Training Program in
Japan T. Takezawa1, H. Haraguchi2, T. Yoshikawa3, M. Ogura4, J. Adachi5
and M. Inoue6, (1)Education and Social Service, Institute for Developmental
Research, Aichi Human Service Center, Kasugai, Japan, (2)Child and
Adolescent Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,
Kodaira, Japan, (3)Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Hospital,
Aichi Human Service Center, Kasugai, Japan, (4)School of Basic Research
and Improvement of Practice for Education, Naruto University of Education,
Naruto, Japan, (5)Special Education, Hokkaido University of Education,
Asahikawa, Japan, (6)Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago,
Japan
15 122.015 Early Access to Care in the Province of Quebec: A Policy
Analysis Framework K. Shikako-Thomas1, T. Savion-Lemieux2, L. Stern3,
M. Steiman3, R. Simon4, L. Girouard5, A. Yusuf6 and M. Elsabbagh7,
(1)School of Environmental Design, University of Montreal, Brossard,
QC, Canada, (2)Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(3)Montreal Children’s Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada, (4)Psychology,
Montreal Children’s Hospital - McGill University Health Centre, Montreal,
QC, Canada, (5)2155 Guy Street, 5th Floor, McGill University Health
Centre - Research Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada, (6)Department of
Pscyhiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (7)McGill University,
Montreal, PQ, Canada
16 122.016 Early Intervention Services and Effects on Parent
Stress N. Broderick1, A. Stainbrook2, C. G. Herrington3, A. P. Juárez4
and Z. Warren1, (1)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Department
of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN, (3)Vanderbilt
Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Pediatrics &
Psychiatry, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN
17 122.017 Effects of Sensory Sensitivity and Intolerance of
Uncertainty on Anxiety in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder M. Uljaravic1, S. Carrington2, S. Leekam1 and M. Prior3, (1)Wales
Autism Research Centre, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom,
(2)Wales Autism Research Centre, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom,
(3)Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Carlton North,
Australia
18 122.018 Emotion Regulation and Depression in Parents of Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder A. Costa and G. Steffgen, University of
Luxembourg, Walferdange, Luxembourg
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
30 122.030 Maternal and Paternal Stress in Parenting Children with
ASD H. E. Friedman1, D. Oosting1, C. M. Keifer1, A. J. Schneider2,
C. A. Paisley2, J. Wolf1 and P. Ventola1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale
University, New Haven, CT, (2)Center for Translational Developmental
Neuroscience, Yale University, New Haven, CT
20 122.020 Examining Changes in Parental Distress, Self-Efficacy,
and Children’s Problem Behaviors from Admission to 2-Month Follow-up
within the Autism Inpatient Collection (AIC) Sample K. A. Smith1, T. Flis2,
R. Chappell3, B. L. Handen4 and M. Siegel5, (1)Maine Medical Center
Research Institute, Portland, ME, (2)Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry
Unit, Sheppard Pratt, Baltimore, MD, (3)Sheppard Pratt, Baltimore, MD,
(4)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA,
(5)Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Westbrook, ME
31 122.031 Mealtime Structure in Families with Children with ASD
K. K. Ausderau1 and E. Laird2, (1)University of Wisconsin - Madison,
Madison, WI, (2)Common Threads, McFarland, WI
21 122.021 Factors Influencing Relocation for Military Families with
Children with ASD J. Davis and E. H. Finke, Communication Sciences
and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
22 122.022 Fathers’ and Non-Fathers’ Physiological Responses to
Distress Vocalizations of Infants with Autism Spectrum Disorders
G. Esposito1,2, S. Valenzi3, T. Islam3 and M. H. Bornstein4, (1)Department
of Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento, Rovereto, Italy,
(2)Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore, (3)RIKEN
Brain Science Institute, Wako-Shi, Japan, (4)Eunice Kennedy Shriver
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD
23 122.023 First Concerns Among Latino Parents of Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder S. Magana1, M. Rivera2 and E. S. Robb1,
(1)Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago,
Chicago, IL, (2)Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
24 122.024 Implementation of Early Service Interventions and Its
Effects on Parent Resilience K. Herrington1, A. Stainbrook2, N. Broderick3,
A. P. Juárez4 and Z. Warren5, (1)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN,
(2)Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN,
(3)Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Pediatrics
& Psychiatry, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN, (5)Pediatrics,
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
25 122.025 Influence of Pre and Post Doctoral Fellowships on Autism
Research Career Trajectory A. K. Halladay and A. T. Singer, Autism
Science Foundation, New York, NY
26 122.026 Intensity of Parenting Stress, Child Negative Emotionality,
and the Interaction of Parent’s Self-Regulation Skills B. J. Wilson1,
T. Ward1, E. F. Geib1, T. Estrada2, R. Kramer1, S. Nanda2, E. Lovell2 and
J. Kim2, (1)Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA,
(2)Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA
27 122.027 Keeping up with the Times: Measuring the Stress of
Parents of Children with ASD over Email B. L. Ncube1, J. M. Bebko1,
M. Thompson2, M. Spoelstra2 and L. Verbeek2, (1)Psychology, York
University, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Autism Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada
28 122.028 Many Voices at the Table: Collaboration Between
Families and Teachers of Somali Students with Autism D. B. Baker,
Education, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Ithaca, NY
29 122.029 Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Child Sleep Quality
in Young Children with ASD M. M. Abdullah1, J. Youssef2, W. A. Goldberg3,
Y. Guo4, C. Taylor Lucas1 and K. Lakes1, (1)Department of Pediatrics,
University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, (2)Center for Autism and
Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of California, Irvine, Santa Ana,
CA, (3)Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine,
Irvine, CA, (4)Department of Nursing Science, University of California,
Irvine, Irvine, CA
32 122.032 Mental Stress in Parents of Autistic Children: A Pilot Study
of the Related Psychological Dimensions S. Melli1, C. Zarbo2, A. Compare2
and E. Grossi1, (1)Autism Research Unit, Villa Santa Maria Institute,
Tavernerio, Italy, (2)Human and Social Science Department, Bergamo
University, Bergamo, Italy
33 122.033 Modeling Depressive Symptom Trajectories Among
Mothers of Children with ASD from Diagnosis to Age 9 A. Zaidman-Zait1,
E. K. Duku2, P. Mirenda3, T. A. Bennett2, P. Szatmari4, S. E. Bryson5,
E. J. Fombonne6, I. M. Smith5, T. Vaillancourt7, C. Waddell8,
L. Zwaigenbaum9, S. Georgiades10, M. Elsabbagh11 and A. Thompson2,
(1)Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel, (2)Offord Centre for Child Studies
& McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (3)University of British
Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (4)University of Toronto, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (5)Dalhousie University / IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada,
(6)Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, (7)University of
Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (8)Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser
University, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (9)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB,
Canada, (10)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (11)Department
of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
THURSDAY – PM
19 122.019 Evaluation of a Support Group for Fathers of Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder M. Elfert1,2 and P. Mirenda3, (1)Reach Child
and Youth Development Society, Delta, BC, Canada, (2)Douglas College,
Coquitlam, BC, Canada, (3)University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC,
Canada
34 122.034 Parent Feeding Practices of Picky-Eating Children with
and without Autism Spectrum Disorder E. P. Trinh1, F. J. Biasini2 and
A. R. Lemelman1, (1)University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL,
(2)Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
35 122.035 Parental Disclosure of a Child’s Diagnosis of Autism
Spectrum Disorder in the Emergency Department B. Muskat1,
A. Greenblatt2, D. B. Nicholas3, C. Kilmer4, P. Burnham Riosa1,
S. Ratnapalan5, J. Cohen-Silver6 and L. Zwaigenbaum7, (1)The Hospital for
Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Social Work, The Hospital for Sick
Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)University of Calgary, Edmonton, AB,
Canada, (4)Social work, University of Calgary, Edmonton, AB, Canada,
(5)Paediatrics and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, The Hospital for
Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (6)Pediatrics,
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (7)University of
Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
36 122.036 Parental and Child Characteristics That Contribute to
Parental Concerns in Toddlers at High Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder
over Time E. A. Karp, L. V. Ibanez, S. R. Edmunds, C. Harker and
W. L. Stone, Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
37 122.037 Parenting Teenagers with an Autism Spectrum Disorder
before and after the Transition to Secondary School L. van Esch1,
K. Hannes2, K. Van Leeuwen1 and I. Noens1,3,4, (1)Parenting and
Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium,
(2)Methodology of Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium,
(3)Leuven Autism Research (LAuRes), Leuven, Belgium, (4)Psychiatric
and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, USA, Boston, MA
38 122.038 Peer Responses to Mild Social Digressions By College
Students Labelled with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Asperger Syndrome
M. Brosnan and E. Mills, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom
39 122.039 Psychosocial Adjustment and Sibling Relationships in
Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Risk and Protective
Factors K. M. Walton1 and B. Ingersoll2, (1)Psychology, Nisonger Center,
The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, (2)Psychology, Michigan State
University, East Lansing, MI
35
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
40 122.040 Questioning, Directing, and Commenting: Parent-Child
Talk in Autism C. Kang1 and C. Kasari2, (1)Graduate School of Education
and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles,
CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
52 122.052 Understanding and Reducing Endorsement of Stereotypes
of Autism: An Intervention Using Counterstereotypic Exemplars M. Freeth
and C. Wood, Psychology Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield,
United Kingdom
41 122.041 Raising a Child with Autism: A Developmental Perspective
on Parental Adaptation C. Dissanayake1, R. McStay1 and D. Trembath2,
(1)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne,
Australia, (2)School of Allied Heath Sciences, Griffith University, Gold
Coast, Australia
53 122.053 Understanding and Sharing an Autism Spectrum Disorder
Diagnosis: Perspectives of Diverse Families Participating in a Family
Navigation Program S. Rajabiun1, G. I. Orsmond1, X. Grossman2,
S. Blenner2, I. Fernandez-Pastrana2 and M. Augustyn2, (1)Boston University,
Boston, MA, (2)Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA
42 122.042 Rural Parents’ Knowledge of Autism and Child
Development A. B. Barber1, L. G. Renfroe1, L. K. Baker2, D. Ray3,
T. S. Tomeny2, S. E. Strickland3 and A. Evans4, (1)Communicative
Disorders, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, (2)Department of
Psychology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, AL,
(3)University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, (4)Pediatrics, University of
Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
54 122.054 Well-Being of Mothers of Preschoolers with Autism Is
Mediated By Their Children’s Treatment-Related Improvements in EveryDay Communication Y. Ozturk1, C. Dissanayake2 and G. Vivanti3,
(1)Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento,
Rovereto, Italy, (2)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, La Trobe
University, Melbourne, Australia, (3)Olga Tennison Autism Research
Centre, Northcote, Australia
43 122.043 Severity of Child Autistic and Comorbid Symptoms,
Parent Mental Health and Parenting Behaviors M. Tsujii1 and H. Ito2,
(1)Chukyo University, Toyota, Aichi, Japan, (2)Hamamatsu University
School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan
55 122.055 What Constitutes Autism Knowledge? Insights from Adults
on the Autism Spectrum K. Gillespie-Lynch1, S. Kapp2, J. T. Pickens3,
P. J. Brooks4, B. Schwartzman5 and K. Guardado6, (1)College of Staten
Island, Brooklyn, NY, (2)Department of Psychology, University of California,
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Psychology, The Graduate Center at the
City University of New York, New York, NY, (4)Department of Psychology,
The Graduate Center - CUNY, New York, NY, (5)Education, UCLA, Los
Angeles, CA, (6)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
44 122.044 Silver Linings: Optimism and Positivity As Buffers of
Stress and Lower Well-Being in Mothers of Adolescents with ASD
J. Blacher1 and B. L. Baker2, (1)University of California - Riverside,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
45 122.045 Social Support As a Protective Factor for TypicallyDeveloping Siblings in the Presence of Parental Stress: A Moderated
Mediation Model T. S. Tomeny1, T. D. Barry2 and L. K. Baker1,
(1)Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa,
Tuscaloosa, AL, (2)Psychology, The University of Southern Mississippi,
Hattiesburg, MS
46 122.046 Stability and Change of Insightfulness Among Mothers of
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder E. R. Hotez1,2, M. R. Swanson3,
A. Delavenne4, T. Hutman5, M. Sigman6 and M. Siller7, (1)Psychology, The
Graduate Center at the City University of New York, New York, NY,
(2)Psychology, Hunter College, New York, NY, (3)University of North
Carolina - Chapel Hill, Carrboro, NC, (4)Hunter College, New York, NY,
(5)The Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles,
CA, (6)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(7)Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York,
New York, NY
47 122.047 Stakeholder Perspectives on the Inclusion of Secondary
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Challenges and Support Needs
S. Hedges, UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
48 122.048 The Cost of Autism Spectrum Disorders T. Falkmer,
Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia
49 122.049 The Impact of Children with and without Developmental
Disabilities on Relationship Satisfaction and the Parenting Alliance
C. E. Walsh, JFK Partners, University of Colorado, Denver, CO
50 122.050 The Relation Between Parent Stress and Children’s
Communication Skills Following a Theatre-Based Intervention for Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder C. M. Herrington1, C. R. Newsom2 and
B. A. Corbett3, (1)Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical
Center, Nashville, TN, (2)Peabody Box 74, Vanderbilt University Medical
Center, Nashville, TN, (3)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
51 122.051 Understanding Student-Teacher Relationships Among
Children with Autism: The Role of Parental Involvement and Child Behavior
S. R. Cohen1, S. Zeedyk2, J. Blacher3 and A. Eisenhower4, (1)University of
California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (2)University of California, Riverside,
Riverside, CA, (3)University of California - Riverside, Los Angeles, CA,
(4)Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Boston, MA
36
Poster Session
123 - Interventions - Non-Pharmacologic - Preschool
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
56 123.056 A Telehealth Approach to Parent Coaching in ASD
L. Vismara, Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON,
Canada
57 123.057 Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Multiple Interventions and
Outcomes for the Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder C. Fonnesbeck1,
A. S. Weitlauf2, N. A. Sathe3, M. McPheeters4 and Z. Warren5,
(1)Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt Kennedy
Center, Nashville, TN, (3)Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center,
Institute for Medicine and Public Health, Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
TN, (4)Vanderbilt Universtiy, Nashville, TN, (5)Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
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58 123.058 Brief Background of Parent Training in ASD L. Scahill,
Pediatrics, Marcus Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Marcus Autism
Center, Atlanta, GA
Wit
59 123.059 Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Accessing
Early Intervention in the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring
(ADDM) Network A. Messina1, A. V. Bakian1, W. Zahorodny2,
M. Kurzius-Spencer3, S. A. Rosenberg4, C. E. Rice5, M. S. Durkin6,
S. Pettygrove7, L. M. MacLeod8, J. Shenouda2, M. Rajan9 and
D. A. Bilder1, (1)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(2)Pediatrics, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, (3)Dept
of Pediatrics, University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ,
(4)Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado School of Medicine,
Aurroa, CO, (5)National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental
Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA,
(6)Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison,
WI, (7)Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ,
(8)Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, (9)Department of
Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers New Jersey Medical
School, Newark, NJ
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
60 123.060 Comparing Two Parent-Implemented Interventions on
Direct Observation of Joint Attention and Language of Preschool Children
with Autism: A Pilot Study M. E. Kerwin1, M. E. Soreth1 and C. Gangemi2,
(1)Psychology, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ, (2)Family First, LLC,
Haddonfield, NJ
61 123.061 Comparison of a Self-Directed and Therapist-Assisted
Telehealth Parent Training Intervention for Children with ASD B. Ingersoll,
Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
63 123.063 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Comparing Pre-Diagnosis
Autism Spectrum Disorder-Targeted Intervention with Ontario’s Autism
Intervention Program M. Rayar1, M. Penner2, N. Bashir1,
R. L. Hancock-Howard3, W. Roberts4 and P. Coyte5, (1)Hospital for Sick
Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Institute of Health Policy, Management
and Evaluation, Unviersity of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Integrated
Services for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (5)Institute of Health Policy, Managment and Evaluation,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
64 123.064 Developmental Trajectories of Response to Treatment for
Toddlers with Autism: Findings from the Early Social Interaction Project
W. Guthrie1, C. Lord2 and A. M. Wetherby1, (1)Florida State University Autism
Institute, Tallahassee, FL, (2)Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY
65 123.065 Dosage Effects of an Early and Intense Motor Skill
Intervention in Young Children with ASD L. R. Ketcheson1 and J. Hauck2,
(1)Sunfield Center for Autism, ADHD and Behavioral Health, Ann Arbor, MI,
(2)Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
66 123.066 Effect of Comorbid Psychopathology on Response to
Pivotal Response Treatment D. Oosting1, H. E. Friedman2, C. M. Keifer2,
A. J. Schneider3, C. A. Paisley3, A. Jack2, N. M. McDonald4, K. Pelphrey2
and P. Ventola2, (1)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (2)Child
Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)Center for Translational
Developmental Neuroscience, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (4)Child
Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
67 123.067 Effectiveness of Using a Mobile App Parent Training
Program to Increase Language in Children with Autism G. C. Law,
M. F. Neihart and A. S. Dutt, Psychological Studies Academic Group,
National Institute of Education, Singapore, Singapore
68 123.068 Effects of School-Based Interactive Book Reading on the
Vocabulary and Emergent Literacy of Preschoolers with ASD R. Hudson,
I. S. Schwartz and R. M. Greenway, College of Education, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
69 123.069 Enhancing the Social Interactions of Preschool Children
with Autism: The Effectiveness of a Peer-Mediated Intervention
M. K. McCalla1, S. E. Edwards Leger2, A. R. Lemelman2, E. P. Trinh2,
C. O. Leonczyk2 and S. Mrug2, (1)Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD,
(2)University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
70 123.070 Evaluation of the PEERS Play Intervention for
Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) K. Toth1,
G. L. Boulware2, R. Leon-Guerrero2, A. Wolken3 and S. J. Webb3, (1)Center
for Child Health, Behavior and Development, Seattle Children’s Research
Institute, Seattle, WA, (2)PEERS Play, Seattle, WA, (3)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
72 123.072 Gesture in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder:
Before and after Intervention E. S. LeBarton1,2 and R. J. Landa3, (1)Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Center for Autism and
Related Disorders, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (3)Department
of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Baltimore, MD
73 123.073 Impact of Parent Training on Parental Competence and
Parental Stress L. Lecavalier, Psychology, The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH
74 123.074 Implementation and Impact of Focused Early Intervention
Services A. Stainbrook1, C. G. Herrington2, N. Broderick3, Z. Warren4 and
A. P. Juárez5, (1)Kennedy Center and Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (3)Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (4)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (5)Pediatrics &
Psychiatry, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN
THURSDAY – PM
62 123.062 Conducting Assessment and Treatment of Problem
Behavior for Children with Autism Via Telehealth K. Pelzel1, K. Schieltz2,
D. Wacker3, A. Suess4, S. Lindgren5 and T. Kopelman6, (1)Center for
Disabilities and Development, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa
City, IA, (2)University of Missouri - Columbia, Columbia, MO, (3)Pediatrics,
University of Iowa Hopsitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, (4)University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA, (5)Pediatrics, University of Iowa Children’s Hospital, Iowa City,
IA, (6)Psychiatry, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA
71 123.071 Family Implemented TEACCH for Toddlers (FITT) Reduces
Parent Stress and Improves Toddler Social-Communication Skills: Results
from a Small, Randomized Controlled Trial L. Turner-Brown1, K. Hume2,
B. A. Boyd3, K. Kainz4, S. Jennings4, S. Zheng5 and C. C. Arnold4,
(1)Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC,
(2)University of North Carolina at Chapel HIll, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)Allied
Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC,
(4)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)School of
Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
75 123.075 Improved Parent Interaction Style Associated with
Improved Child-Parent Joint Engagement 3-Months after a Low-Cost,
Group, Parent-Training Workshop K. Houghton1, A. Rattazzi2,
S. H. Cukier2, P. Landolfi2 and C. Lewis3, (1)Lancaster University, Chatham,
NY, (2)PANAACEA, Buenos Aires, Argentina, (3)Psychology, Lancaster
University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
76 123.076 Joint Attention during an ABA Intervention Session Can
Predict Progress of Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder
S. Van der Paelt, P. Warreyn and H. Roeyers, Department of Experimental
Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
77 123.077 Lasting Effects of a 12-Week Group Parent Education
Model for Pivotal Response Treatment E. Salzman1, S. Schapp1,
E. Solomon2, K. L. Berquist3, M. B. Minjarez4, T. W. Frazier5, J. M. Phillips6,
G. W. Gengoux6 and A. Y. Hardan6, (1)PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium,
Palo Alto, CA, (2)PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium, Mountain View,
CA, (3)Stanford University, Stanford, CA, (4)Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA, (5)Cleveland Clinic,
Center for Autism, Cleveland Clinic Children’s, Cleveland, OH,
(6)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of
Medicine, Stanford, CA
78 123.078 Long-Term Outcomes of Early Intervention in 6-Year-Old
Children with Autism A. M. Estes1, S. J. Rogers2, J. Greenson1, J. Munson3,
J. Winter4 and G. Dawson5, (1)Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis
MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (3)University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(4)Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY,
(5)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC
79 123.079 Parent-Mediated Intervention for Hispanic Families of
Young Children with Autism J. Kinard1 and L. R. Watson2, (1)The University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Division of Speech and
Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
80 123.080 Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of
Reciprocal Imitation Training on Children with Autism S. Malik1, C. Oliver1,
J. Moss1, B. Ingersoll2, C. Stefanidou1 and J. McCleery3, (1)School of
Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom,
(2)Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, (3)Center for
Autism Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
37
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
n
raw
81 123.081 Pivotal Response Treatment Alters Brain Function in
Children with Autism G. Rosenblau1, H. E. Friedman2, B. C. Vander Wyk3,
K. Pelphrey3 and P. Ventola3, (1)Center for Translational Developmental
Neuroscience, Yale Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (3)Child Study Center, Yale
University, New Haven, CT
91 123.091 The Effect of an Outdoor Adventure Program on
Functioning of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder D. A. Zachor1,
S. Vardi2, I. Brodai-Meir3, S. Eitan3 and E. Ben Itzchak4, (1)Pediatrics,
Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Zerifin, Israel, (2)Etgarim
non-profit organization, Tel Aviv, Israel, (3)Ariel University, Ariel, Israel,
(4)Ariel University/ Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Ariel, Israel
82 123.082 Pivotal Response Treatment Improves Neural Efficiency
for Social Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
M. Rolison1, J. H. Foss-Feig2, R. Tillman3, H. S. Reuman2, A. Naples2,
K. Pelphrey2, P. Ventola2 and J. C. McPartland2, (1)Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(3)University of Maryland, College Park, MD
92 123.092 The Effects of Teacher Perceptions on Fostering
Engagement during Dyadic Play Interactions with Students with ASD
J. Panganiban1, H. Gould2, Y. C. Chang3, S. Y. Shire4 and C. Kasari5,
(1)University of California, Los Angeles, Arcadia, CA, (2)UCLA, Los
Angeles, CA, (3)Semel Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (4)University
of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (5)UCLA Center for Autism
Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
d
h
Wit
83 123.083 Predicting Growth of Communication Skills of
Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Treatment in a
Community-Based Pivotal Response Treatment Program K. L. Fossum1,
L. Williams2 and I. M. Smith3, (1)Psychological Services, IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)Psychology & Neuroscience, Dalhousie
University, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)Dalhousie University / IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada
84 123.084 Predictors of Successful Parent Training in Pivotal
Response Treatment during the Jumpstart Program: Parent Mental Health
and Self-Efficacy N. L. Matthews1, B. Conti2, B. Harris1 and C. J. Smith3,
(1)Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ, (2)Clinical
Programs, Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ,
(3)Research, Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ
85 123.085 Prevalence and Correlates of Use of Complementary and
Alternative Medicine in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Europe
E. Salomone1, T. Charman1, H. McConachie2 and P. Warreyn3, (1)Institute
of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (2)Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University,
Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, (3)Department of Experimental
Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
86 123.086 Receipt of Early Childhood Special Education and
Therapeutic Services Prior to Autism Diagnostic Evaluations in Children
Referred to a Regional Autism Clinic S. Monteiro1, L. Berry2,
A. Spinks-Franklin3, D. Treadwell-Deering4, S. Broton4, J. Dempsey5,
R. P. Goin-Kochel6 and R. G. Voigt3, (1)Pediatrics, Baylor College of
Medicine/Texas Childrens Hospital, Houston, TX, (2)Suite 180, Baylor
College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (3)Pediatrics, Baylor College of
Medicine, Houston, TX, (4)Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas
Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, (5)Baylor College of Medicine, Houston,
TX, (6)Autism Center, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
87 123.087 Reliability of Retrospective Parent Report: Hours and Type
of Intervention L. D. Haisley, M. L. Barton and D. A. Fein, Psychology,
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
88 123.088 Sensory Treatment for Autism to Alleviate Tactile
Abnormalities Reduces Severity of Autism and Improves Self-Regulation:
A Randomized Controlled Trial in 100 Pre-School Children L. Silva and
M. Schalock, Teaching Research Institute, Western Oregon University,
Monmouth, OR
89 123.089 Student Change in Response to Early Achievements
Intervention Translated for Public Preschool Classrooms K. P. Wilson1,
R. J. Landa2 and E. Stripling3, (1)8000 York Road, Towson University,
Towson, MD, (2)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (3)Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD
90 123.090 Telehealth Delivery of Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention
for Anxiety in Youth with ASD: Perspectives of Parents in Rural
Communities S. L. Hepburn1, J. Reaven2 and A. Blakeley-Smith2,
(1)Psychiatry & Pediatrics, JFK Partners/University of Colorado School
of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (2)Psychiatry, JFK Partners/University of Colorado
School of Medicine, Aurora, CO
38
93 123.093 Toddlers and Families Together: Caregiver
Implementation and Perceptions of Strategies to Facilitate Joint
Engagement C. Wong1,2, K. C. Gallagher1, J. Page1, K. Wong1, G. Arellano1
and S. Arbiv1, (1)UNC Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute,
Chapel Hill, NC, (2)UCSD Child & Adolescent Services Research Center,
San Diego, CA
94 123.094 Using EEG to Target GABA-a for the Treatment of Social
Disability in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders S. Loo1,
S. J. Webb2, I. Mohammad-Rezazadeh3, G. Frishkoff4, R. T. Amoss5,
B. H. King6, L. Scahill7 and J. T. McCracken8, (1)Psychiatry and
Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human
Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Cognitive Sciences Program, Georgia
State University, Atlanta, GA, (5)Marcus Autism Center, Emory University
School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (6)Psychiatry and behavioral sciences,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (7)Pediatrics, Marcus Autism
Center, Atlanta, GA, (8)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA
Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA
95 123.095 Why High-Risk Families Decline Early Treatment: Barriers
to Treating at-Risk Siblings K. K. Powell1, E. Schoen Simmons1 and
K. Chawarska2, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
96 123.096 Efficacy of Adapted Responsive Teaching in a Community
Sample of One-Year-Olds at-Risk for ASD L. R. Watson1, E. R. Crais1,
G. T. Baranek2, L. Turner-Brown3, J. Sideris4, J. S. Reznick5, L. Wakeford2,
J. Kinard6 and K. L. Martin7, (1)Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences,
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Division
of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, The University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)TEACCH Division, The
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (4)Frank Porter
Graham Child Development Institute, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)Psychology,
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (6)The
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (7)Carolina
Institute for Developmental Disabilities, The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
Poster Session
124 - Early Development (<48 Months)
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
98 124.098 A Comparison of Live Versus Video Modalities for
Measurement of Eye Contact in Infants at Age 6 Months As ‘Red Flags’
for ASD A. Townsend1, J. A. Chevallier2, P. A. Filipek1, C. Laufer1,
M. M. Abdullah3, P. Horner3, J. T. Phan3, K. Pham3, K. Jung1 and
J. M. Williams1, (1)University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,
Houston, TX, (2)UT Houston, Houston, TX, (3)University of California,
Irvine, Irvine, CA
99 124.099 A Computational Approach to Eye-Tracking Analysis
Reveals Slower Orienting to Movements in Social Scenes in Toddlers with
ASD Q. Wang, S. Macari, K. Chawarska and F. Shic, Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
100 124.100 A Dynamic Eye-Tracking Paradigm: Eye Gaze Patterns
in Typically Developing and Infants at-Risk for Autism C. Parikh and
A. M. Mastergeorge, Family Studies and Human Development, University
of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
101 124.101 A Novel Parent Report Questionnaire of Early Behavioral
Signs Between 6 and 24 Months of Age: The Autism Parent Screen for
Infants S. E. Bryson1, L. A. Sacrey2, L. Zwaigenbaum2, J. A. Brian3,
I. M. Smith4, W. Roberts5, P. Szatmari6, T. Vaillancourt7, C. Roncadin8 and
N. Garon9, (1)Autism Research Centre, Dalhousie/IWK Health Centre,
Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada,
(3)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital/
U of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Dalhousie University / IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)University of Toronto, Bracebridge, ON,
Canada, (6)University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (7)University
of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (8)Kinark Child and Family Services,
Markham, ON, Canada, (9)Psychology, Mount Allison University, Sackville,
NB, Canada
103 124.103 Acoustic Properties of Affective Vocalizations
Produced By Six-Month-Old High- and Low-Risk Infants L. DiNicola1,
E. Schoen Simmons1, F. Shic2, R. Paul3 and K. Chawarska2, (1)Child Study
Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (3)Sacred Heart
University, Fairfield, CT
THURSDAY – PM
97 124.097 18-Month Predictors of Later Outcomes in Younger
Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Bsrc Study
K. Chawarska1, F. Shic1, S. Macari1, D. J. Campbell2, J. A. Brian3,
R. J. Landa4, T. Hutman5, C. A. Nelson6, S. Ozonoff7, H. Tager-Flusberg8,
G. S. Young9, I. L. Cohen10, T. Charman11, D. S. Messinger12, S. Johnson13,
L. Zwaigenbaum14, A. Klin15 and S. E. Bryson16, (1)Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Amgen, Inc.,
Thousand Oaks, CA, (3)150 Kilgour Rd., Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital/ U of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Department
of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Baltimore, MD, (5)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los
Angeles, CA, (6)Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s
Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (7)MIND Institute and
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California
Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (8)Boston University, Boston, MA,
(9)MIND Institute, University California Davis, Sacramento, CA,
(10)Psychology, New York State Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY, (11)Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (12)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (13)University of
California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (14)University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, (15)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare
of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA,
(16)Autism Research Centre, Dalhousie/IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS,
Canada
102 124.102 A Preliminary Investigation of Child, Caregiver and
Sociocultural Factors Influencing Caregiver-Reported Autistic Trait Scores
on the Quantitative – Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT) in an
Unselected Sample of Asian Toddlers I. Magiati1, D. A. Goh2, D. Gan3,
J. Kung3, B. F. Broekman4, A. Rifkin-Graboi5, P. K. Agarwal6, H. Y. Chen7,
S. M. Saw8, Y. S. Chong9, K. Y. Kwek10, P. Gluckman11 and M. Meaney12,
(1)National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, (2)Department
of Psychology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore,
(3)Psychology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore,
(4)Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Singapore, Singapore,
(5)Growth, development, and metabolism, A-Star, Singapore institute for
clinical sciences, Singapore, Singapore, (6)Psychology, KK Women’s and
Children’s Hospital, Singapore, Singapore, (7)KK Women’s and children’s
Hospital, Department of Psychological Medicine, Singapore, Singapore,
(8)Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of
Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, (9)Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine,
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National University of
Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, (10)KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital,
Singapore, Singapore, (11)Liggins Institute, University of Auckland,
Auckland, Australia, (12)Singapore Institute of Clinical Sciences, A-Star,
Singapore, Singapore
104 124.104 Adaptive Behavior Profiles in Toddlers with
Autism Spectrum Disorders R. E. Nevill1, D. Hedley2, N. Fields3,
Y. Monroy Moreno4, J. Wilkins5, J. A. Mulick6 and E. Butter5, (1)The Ohio
State University, Columbus, OH, (2)LaTrobe University, Melbourne,
Australia, (3)Kent State University, Kent, OH, (4)National Autonomous
University of Mexico, Iztacala, Mexico, (5)Nationwide Children’s Hospital,
Westerville, OH, (6)Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Westerville, OH
105 124.105 An Autism Screening Tool for Underserved Young
Children: Preliminary Findings Y. Janvier1, J. Harris2, D. S. Mandell3, M. Xie3
and M. Zuniga2, (1)Medicine, Children’s Specialized Hospital, Toms River,
NJ, (2)Children’s Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, NJ, (3)Psychiatry,
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
106 124.106 Anogenital Distance (AGD): A Novel Biomarker of
Elevated Fetal Androgen Activity in Toddlers with Autism? A. L. Pohl1,
L. Ruta2,3, A. Gagliano4, M. L. Eisenberg5, M. Hsieh6 and S. Baron-Cohen1,7,
(1)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United
Kingdom, (2)Stella Maris Scientific Institute, Calambrone (Pisa), Italy,
(3)Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council of Italy,
Messina, Italy, (4)Department of Paediatrics, University of Messina,
Messina, Italy, (5)Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,
(6)Department of Urology, Children’s National Health System, Washington,
DC, (7)CLASS Clinic, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation
Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom
107 124.107 Associations Between Behavior Problems and
Dopaminergic Variants in High- and Low-Risk Siblings D. N. Gangi1,
D. S. Messinger2, L. V. Ibanez3, W. L. Stone3, M. L. Cuccaro4 and
E. R. Martin4, (1)5665 Ponce de Leon Blvd, University of Miami, Coral
Gables, FL, (2)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (3)Psychology,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)Dr. John T. Macdonald
Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine, Miami, FL
108 124.108 Attention Shifting from Emotional Faces in High-Risk
Infants and Relations with Later Social-Communicative Behavior
J. B. Wagner1, B. Keehn2, H. Tager-Flusberg3 and C. A. Nelson4,
(1)Department of Psychology, College of Staten Island, CUNY, Staten
Island, NY, (2)Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, (3)Boston University,
Boston, MA, (4)Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s
Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
39
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
109 124.109 Attention and Proximity to Threat Among Toddlers with
Autism Spectrum Disorders G. Greco1, S. Macari2, L. DiNicola1, L. Flink2,
S. S. Lansiquot2 and K. Chawarska2, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT
110 124.110 Attention to Conspecific Auditory Information in Infants
at-Risk for Autism J. D. Ference1, A. Sorcinelli2, S. Curtin1 and
A. Vouloumanos2, (1)University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, (2)New
York University, New York, NY
111 124.111 Attentional Protective Factors in Typically-Developing
6-Month-Old Girls at High-Risk for Autism F. Shic1, S. Macari2 and
K. Chawarska2, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
112 124.112 Can ASD and ADHD Symptoms in Children with Autism
Predict Early Attentional Disengagement in Their Infant Siblings?
C. H. Cheung1, E. Jones2, T. Gliga2, G. Pasco1, M. H. Johnson2 and
T. Charman1, (1)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Centre for Brain and
Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of London, London,
United Kingdom
113 124.113 Catching up Vs. Falling behind: Longitudinal Investigation
of Developmental and Adaptive Skills in Toddlers with ASD J. Lorenzi1,2,
C. Klaiman2, C. A. Saulnier2 and S. Hoffenberg2, (1)Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, VA, (2)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
114 124.114 Cerebellum Enlargement in 4-6-Month-Old Infants at
High Familial Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders I. Pote1, S. Wang2,
A. Blasi3, T. Charman4, E. Daly1, M. H. Johnson3, M. Kuklisova-Murgasova5,
S. Lloyd-Fox3, E. Mercure6, V. Sethna1, S. Williams7, D. G. Murphy1 and
G. M. McAlonan1, (1)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental
Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Engineering
Science, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford,
Oxford, United Kingdom, (3)Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development,
Birkbeck, University of London, London, United Kingdom, (4)Department
of Psychology, Henry Wellcome Building, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (5)Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical
Engineering, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(6)University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience,
London, United Kingdom, (7)Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom
115 124.115 Characterising ‘other Developmental Concerns (ODC)’
at 36 Months in Infants at Familial High-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder:
A Bsrc Study T. Charman1, J. A. Brian2, K. Chawarska3, S. Georgiades4,
I. Hertz-Picciotto5, J. M. Iverson6, E. Jones7, R. J. Landa8, S. Macari3,
D. S. Messinger9, C. A. Nelson10, S. Ozonoff11, C. A. Saulnier12,
W. L. Stone13, T. Hutman14, S. J. Webb15, N. Yirmiya16 and G. S. Young17,
(1)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (2)150 Kilgour Rd., Holland Bloorview
Kids Rehabilitation Hospital/ U of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(3)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT, (4)Offord Centre for Child Studies & McMaster University, Hamilton,
ON, Canada, (5)Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis,
Davis, CA, (6)University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (7)Birkbeck
College, University of London, London, United Kingdom, (8)Department of
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Baltimore, MD, (9)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (10)Education,
Harvard Univesity, cambridge, MA, (11)MIND Institute and Department
of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California Davis
Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (12)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta,
GA, (13)Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (14)Psychiatry
and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (15)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(16)Psychology Department, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel,
(17)MIND Institute, University California Davis, Sacramento, CA
40
116 124.116 Clinical Correlates of Social Affect in Early Infancy:
Implications for Early Identification of Autism Spectrum Disorder
J. Bradshaw1, L. K. Koegel2 and R. L. Koegel2, (1)Clinical, Counseling,
and School Psychology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa
Barbara, CA, (2)Koegel Autism Center, University of California Santa
Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
117 124.117 Cognitive and Adaptive Functioning of Children Who
Lose Their ASD Diagnosis E. Moulton1, M. L. Barton1 and D. A. Fein2,
(1)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (2)University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT
118 124.118 Contingent Maternal Vocal Responses to 9-MonthOld Infant Siblings of Children with Autism M. R. Talbott1, C. A. Nelson2
and H. Tager-Flusberg3, (1)University of California, Davis, MIND Insitute,
Sacramento, CA, (2)Education, Harvard Univesity, Cambridge, MA,
(3)Boston University, Boston, MA
119 124.119 Contingent Smiling Behavior in 2-to 5-Month-Old
Infants with and without ASD during Dyadic Interactions R. Sandercock1,
W. Jones1, A. Klin1 and S. Shultz2, (1)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta,
GA, (2)Department of Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
120 124.120 Decreased Neural Response to Touch As a Marker of
Autism Risk Across the First Year of Life H. M. Fichtenholtz1,
N. M. McDonald2, L. C. Anderson3, C. M. Keifer4, H. E. Friedman5,
J. A. Eilbott6 and K. Pelphrey4, (1)Yale School of Medicine, West Haven,
CT, (2)Yale School of Medicine, Fairfield, CT, (3)Psychology, University of
Maryland, College Park, MD, (4)Child Study Center, Yale University, New
Haven, CT, (5)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (6)Yale University,
New Haven, CT
121 124.121 Developmental Plateaus in Gaze Following in 24-MonthOld Toddlers with ASD: An Eye-Tracking Study L. DiNicola1, E. S. Kim1,
C. A. Wall1, G. Greco2, S. S. Lansiquot2, L. Flink2, Q. Wang1, S. Macari2,
F. Shic1 and K. Chawarska2, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University, New
Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT
122 124.122 Differences in Means-End Exploration Between
Infants at Risk for Autism and Typically Developing Infants in the First 15
Months of Life S. Srinivasan1, M. Kaur1 and A. N. Bhat1,2, (1)Department
of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, (2)Center for
Health, Intervention & Prevention, Department of Psychology, University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT
123 124.123 Does Functional Gaze Following of Children with an
Autism Spectrum Disorder Really Rely on Gaze Direction? an Eye-Tracking
Study L. Van Schuerbeeck1, M. A. Braeken1, R. Meesen2, J. Steyaert3 and
M. Vanvuchelen4, (1)Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium, (2)Faculty
of Medicine and Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium,
(3)Leuven Autism Research (LAuRes), University of Leuven (KU Leuven),
Leuven, Belgium, (4)Hasselt University Faculty of Medicine and Life
Sciences, Diepenbeek, Belgium
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
125 124.125 Early Social Communication Predictors of Clinical
Diagnosis from 18 to 24 Months T. N. Day1, W. Guthrie1, C. Schatschneider2
and A. M. Wetherby1, (1)Florida State University Autism Institute,
Tallahassee, FL, (2)Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
126 124.126 Early Social Development in Preschoolers with Autism
Spectrum Disorders: A Comparison of DSM-5 Profiles T. A. Bennett1,
P. Szatmari2, E. K. Duku1, S. Georgiades3, S. E. Bryson4, E. J. Fombonne5,
I. M. Smith6, P. Mirenda7, J. Volden8, C. Waddell9, L. Zwaigenbaum8,
W. Roberts10, T. Vaillancourt11, M. Elsabbagh12, A. Zaidman-Zait13 and
A. Thompson1, (1)Offord Centre for Child Studies & McMaster University,
Hamilton, ON, Canada, (2)University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(3)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (4)Autism Research
Centre, Dalhousie/IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)Oregon
Health & Science University, Portland, OR, (6)Dalhousie University / IWK
Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (7)University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (8)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada,
(9)Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC,
Canada, (10)Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(11)University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (12)Department of
Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (13)Tel-Aviv
University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
127 124.127 Effects of Race, Ethnicity, and Maternal Education on
Reported Regression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
J. B. Swanson1, A. Spinks-Franklin1, L. Berry2, D. Guffey3, C. G. Minard3,
R. G. Voigt1 and R. P. Goin-Kochel1, (1)Pediatrics, Baylor College of
Medicine, Houston, TX, (2)Texas Children’s Hospital, Autism Center, Baylor
College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (3)Dan L. Duncan Institute for Clinical
and Translational Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
128 124.128 Emotional Reactivity in Toddlers with ASD: Diminished
Response to Threatening Stimuli during the Laboratory Temperament
Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB) S. Macari1, L. DiNicola1, A. C. Dowd2,
L. Flink1, E. B. Gisin1, G. Greco1, S. S. Lansiquot1, E. Prince1, S. H. Kim1,
F. Shic1 and K. Chawarska1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Department of Psychology, University of
Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
129 124.129 Empathy Emerges: Attention and Affective Responses
to Maternal and Experimenter Distress in Infants at Risk for Autism at
12- and 15-Months A. C. Dowd1, B. G. Davidson2, J. G. Hixon1 and
A. R. Neal-Beevers1, (1)Department of Psychology, University of Texas
at Austin, Austin, TX, (2)Dept of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin,
Austin, TX
130 124.130 Examining the Structure of Temperament Traits in
Toddlers with and without ASD C. A. Wall1, L. Flink2, S. S. Lansiquot2,
S. H. Kim1, F. Shic2, J. Koller3, K. Chawarska2 and S. Macari2, (1)Child
Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (3)The School of
Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
131 124.131 Exploring the Relationships Between Visual Preference
for Biological Motion, Joint Attention Behaviors and Language Development
in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders M. Franchini1,
H. Wood de Wilde1, B. Glaser2, E. Gentaz3, S. Eliez2 and M. Schaer1,4,
(1)Office Médico-Pédagogique, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland,
(2)University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland, (3)Faculty
of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva,
Switzerland, (4)Stanford Cognitive & Systems Neuroscience Laboratory,
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
THURSDAY – PM
124 124.124 Early Gross and Fine Motor Abilities in Infants at
Heightened Vs. Low Risk for ASD: A Bsrc Study J. M. Iverson1, F. Shic2,
C. A. Wall3, Y. Bensinger-Brody4, S. Curtin5, A. M. Estes6, J. M. Gardner7,
T. Hutman8, S. Johnson9, B. Z. Karmel7, R. J. Landa10, A. R. Levin11,
K. Libertus1, D. S. Messinger12, C. A. Nelson13, S. Ozonoff14, J. Piven15,
S. J. Rogers16, L. A. Sacrey17, K. Sheperd18, W. L. Stone19,
H. Tager-Flusberg20, J. J. Wolff21, N. Yirmiya22 and G. S. Young23,
(1)University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (2)Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (3)Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (4)Physical Therapy, Touro College, Bay Shore, NY,
(5)University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, (6)Speech and Hearing
Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (7)Infant Development,
New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities,
Staten Island, NY, (8)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los
Angeles, CA, (9)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(10)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins
School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (11)Neurology, Boston Children’s
Hospital, Boston, MA, (12)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL,
(13)Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital,
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (14)MIND Institute and Department of
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California Davis Medical
Center, Sacramento, CA, (15)*Shared Senior Author, NC, (16)University of
California at Davis, Sacramento, CA, (17)University of Alberta, Edmonton,
AB, Canada, (18)Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Kennedy Krieger
Institute, Baltimore, MD, (19)Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle,
WA, (20)Boston University, Boston, MA, (21)Department of Educational
Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN,
(22)Psychology Department, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel,
(23)MIND Institute, University California Davis, Sacramento, CA
132 124.132 Frequencies of Vaccine Uptake in Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorder and Type of Onset Described By Parents
R. P. Goin-Kochel1,2, S. S. Mire3, R. H. Fein4, A. G. Dempsey5, D. Guffey6,
C. G. Minard7, R. M. Cunningham8, L. C. Sahni9 and J. A. Boom8,
(1)Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (2)Autism Center,
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, (3)Educational Psychology,
University of Houston, Houston, TX, (4)University of Houston, Houston, TX,
(5)Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, TX,
(6)Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (7)Dan L. Duncan Institute for
Clinical and Translational Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston,
TX, (8)Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, (9)Immunization Project,
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
133 124.133 Gaze Following in Infants at Risk for Autism: The Role of
Eye Information, Head Turns and Salient Objects E. Thorup1, P. Nystrom1,
G. Gredebäck1, S. Bolte2 and T. Falck-Ytter3, (1)Department of Psychology,
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, (2)Division of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)Dept. of
Women’s & Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
134 124.134 Growth Trajectories in Initiating Joint Attention during
the First Three Years of Life in Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder M. Dereu, H. Roeyers, S. Van der Paelt, P. Warreyn and
I. Schietecatte, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health
Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
135 124.135 Infants and the Emerging Autism Phenotype
A. Gulsrud1, T. Carr2, L. Huynh3, K. Berry3, T. Paparella2 and C. Kasari4,
(1)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)University of California Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA, (3)University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(4)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
136 124.136 Inhibited Toddlers and ASD Screening A. Ben-Sasson,
University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
137 124.137 Jealousy and Social Engagement in Very Young Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorders N. Bauminger, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat
Gan, Israel
138 124.138 Joint Attention and Language Development in Infants at
Risk for Autism B. G. Davidson1, A. R. Neal-Beevers2 and J. Cartwright3,
(1)Dept of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX,
(2)Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX,
(3)UT Southwestern, Dallas, TX
139 124.139 Latency to Share Interest at 12 Months Is Associated
with Joint Attention Trajectories in Infants at High and Low Risk for ASD
C. Ponting, M. La-Vu, C. Dull and T. Hutman, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral
Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
41
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
140 124.140 Longitudinal Development of Preferential Attention to
Biological Motion in Infants at Low and High Risk for Developing ASD
L. Olson1, R. D. Sifre2, S. Shultz3, W. Jones4 and A. Klin4, (1)Marcus Autism
Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School
of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, Atlanta, GA, (2)Marcus Autism Center, Emory
University School of Medicine, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA,
(3)Department of Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare
of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, (4)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA
141 124.141 M-CHAT-R with Follow-up Phone Interview
(M-CHAT-R/F): Analysis of Changed Responses K. R. Bradbury1,
D. L. Robins2, M. L. Barton1 and D. A. Fein1, (1)Psychology, University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (2)AJ Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University,
Philadelphia, PA
142 124.142 Measuring the Importance of Fyi Screener Items
in Predicting Adost Totals at 12 and 18 Months: A Machine Learning
Approach E. S. Kim1, S. H. Kim2, S. Macari3, K. Chawarska3 and F. Shic3,
(1)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)40 Temple St., Suite 7D, Yale
University, New Haven, CT, (3)Child Study Center, Yale University School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT
143 124.143 Motor Development, Autism Symptoms, and Emerging
Executive Functioning in Infants and Toddlers at High and Low Risk for
ASD T. St. John1, A. M. Estes2, S. L. Alvarez3, S. Dager3, S. J. Paterson4,
J. Pandey5, R. T. Schultz4, J. R. Pruett6, K. N. Botteron7, H. C. Hazlett8 and
J. Piven6, (1)University of Washington Autism Center, Seattle, WA,
(2)Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(3)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)Center for Autism Research,
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (5)The Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (6)*Shared Senior Author, NC,
(7)Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO,
(8)Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
144 124.144 Online Queries of Parents Suspecting Their Child Has
ASD: A Clinician Mediated Machine Learning Prediction of ASD Risk
E. Yom-Tov1 and A. Ben-Sasson2, (1)Microsoft Research Israel, Herzeliya,
Israel, (2)University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
145 124.145 Optimizing Stimulus Selection for Early Detection of ASD
Based on Preferential Attention to Audiovisual Synchrony in Toddlers
A. Abraham1, A. Trubanova2, J. B. Northrup3, D. Lin4, P. Lewis5, A. Klin1,
W. Jones1 and G. J. Ramsay1, (1)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta,
GA, (2)Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, VA, (3)University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (4)Department
of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, (5)Marcus
Autism Center, Atlanta, GA
146 124.146 Parent Education Level and Developmental Progress in
Toddlers with ASD T. Aronson1, J. Lorenzi1,2 and S. Hoffenberg1, (1)Marcus
Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University
School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (2)Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
147 124.147 Parent Prediction of ASD in Infants at Risk C. Wang1,
M. Feldman2, R. A. Ward3, M. L. Hudson4 and X. Liu5, (1)Centre for Applied
Disability Studies, Brock University, New Westminster, BC, Canada,
(2)Centre for Applied Disability Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines,
ON, Canada, (3)Applied Disability Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines,
ON, Canada, (4)Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada,
(5)Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada
148 124.148 Parental Concerns and Their Relation to Early
Intervention and Social-Communicative Functioning within the First Two
Years of Life L. V. Ibanez1, E. A. Karp2, Z. Warren3, D. S. Messinger4 and
W. L. Stone2, (1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Psychology,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (4)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL
42
149 124.149 Patterns of Repetitive Behavior with Objects in Infants
Developing ASD M. Miller1, G. S. Young2, A. Belding3, A. M. Hill1, A. Tubbs1
and S. Ozonoff4, (1)UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA,
(2)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis MIND Institute,
Sacramento, CA, (3)Psychiatry, UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA,
(4)MIND Institute and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
150 124.150 Perception of Biological Motion and Integration of AudioVisual Stimuli in Infants at Risk for Autism H. S. Reuman1, R. Tillman2,
T. Kim3, E. J. Levy1, K. Law1, A. Naples1, K. K. Stavropoulos1,
A. T. Odonkor3, S. H. Kim1, E. Schoen Simmons1, K. K. Powell1, S. Macari4,
F. Shic1,4, K. Chawarska4 and J. C. McPartland1, (1)Child Study Center,
Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Clinical Psychology, University of
Maryland, College Park, MD, (3)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (4)Child
Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
151 124.151 Predictors of Functioning in Preschool and School Age
Children with ASD M. C. Lyons1, R. Paul2, K. D. Tsatsanis3 and F. Shic4,
(1)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Sacred Heart University, Fairfield,
CT, (3)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT, (4)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT
152 124.152 Reduced Attention to Fearful Faces in 10 Month Old
Infants at Risk for Autism J. L. Kleberg1, P. Nyström1, G. Gredebäck1,
S. Bolte2,3 and T. Falck-Ytter1,4, (1)Department of Psychology, Uppsala
University, Uppsala, Sweden, (2)Division of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)Center of
neurodevelopmental disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden,
(4)Dept. of Women’s & Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm,
Sweden
153 124.153 Referral Patterns and Early Signs of Possible ASD
Among Children Referred for Generic Developmental Early Intervention
N. Rasuratnam1, M. Penner2, C. Saul3, J. A. Brian4, L. Vismara5 and
W. Roberts1, (1)Integrated Services for Autism and Neurodevelopmental
Disorders, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)York Region Early Intervention Services,
Newmarket, ON, Canada, (4)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview
Kids Rehabilitation Hospital/ U of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (5)
Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
154 124.154 Response to Name: Increasing the Sensitivity of This
Very Specific Sign of ASD J. Miller1, J. Shamash2, J. E. Norry3 and
T. P. Gabrielsen4, (1)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Center for Autism Research, Children’s
Hospital of Philadlephia, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Center for Autism Research,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (4)CPSE, Brigham
Young University, Provo, UT
155 124.155 Sensory Responsiveness in Infants at-Risk for
Autism Spectrum Disorders within the First Two Years of Life M. Kaur1,
S. Srinivasan1 and A. N. Bhat1,2,3, (1)Department of Physical Therapy,
University of Delaware, Newark, DE, (2)Department of Kinesiology,
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (3)Center for Health, Intervention &
Prevention, Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
157 124.157 Sex Differences in Adaptive Skill Trajectories from 12 to
36 Months in Infants at High and Low Risk for ASD T. Hutman, L. Gomez,
B. E. McCarthy and M. Del Rosario, Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences,
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
158 124.158 Sex Differences in Visual Attention to the Mouth
in Infancy: Implications for Language Development and ASD
R. Burger-Caplan1,2, W. Jones1 and A. Klin1, (1)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA, (2)Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
159 124.159 Sex and ASD Risk Status Predict Both 3-Year
Expressive Language and Expressive Language Growth from 1 to 3 Years
in Children at High and Low Risk for ASD S. R. Edmunds1, L. V. Ibanez2,
C. Harker2, E. A. Karp3 and W. L. Stone3, (1)UW Mailbox 357920, University
of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(3)Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
160 124.160 Stability of Temperament in Toddlers with Autism
Spectrum Disorders S. S. Lansiquot1, L. Flink1, C. A. Wall2, S. H. Kim2,
F. Shic1, J. Koller3, K. Chawarska1 and S. Macari1, (1)Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center,
Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)The School of Education, The Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
161 124.161 Temperamental Features in Toddlers with ASD Are
Independent of Symptom Severity L. Flink1, S. S. Lansiquot1, C. A. Wall2,
S. H. Kim2, F. Shic1, J. Koller3, K. Chawarska1 and S. Macari1, (1)Child Study
Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study
Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)The School of Education,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
162 124.162 The Role of Audiovisual Synchrony in Modulating
Attention to Biological Motion in Infancy R. D. Sifre1, W. Jones2, A. Klin2 and
S. Shultz3, (1)Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, (2)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA, (3)Department of Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
163 124.163 The Role of Early Gesture on Expressive and Receptive
Vocabulary in Infants at High and Low Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder
S. R. Edmunds1, L. V. Ibanez2 and W. L. Stone3, (1)UW Mailbox 357920,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington, Seattle,
WA, (3)Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
164 124.164 Visual Attention Patterns of Toddlers with ASD:
Comparison of Performance on the Visual Exploration Task (VET) and the
VET-Toddler S. Zheng1, L. Turner-Brown2, K. Hume3 and B. A. Boyd4,
(1)School of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel
Hill, NC, (2)Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel
Hill, NC, (3)University of North Carolina at Chapel HIll, Chapel Hill, NC,
(4)Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Chapel Hill, NC
165 124.165 Visual-Motor Integration Associated with Familial Liability
for Autism M. B. Nebel1,2, J. L. Haworth3,4, C. Hess3, S. H. Mostofsky1,2,4
and R. J. Landa3,4, (1)Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of
Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Center for Neurodevelopmental and Imaging
Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (3)Center for Autism
and Related Disorders, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD,
(4)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins
School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
166 124.166 When an Early Diagnosis of ASD Resolves, What
Remains? L. H. Shulman1,2, E. D’Agostino1, M. D. Valicenti-McDermott1,2,
R. M. Seijo1,2, E. Tulloch1,2, D. J. Meringolo1,2, N. L. Tarshis1,2 and S. J. Lee1,
(1)Pediatrics/CERC, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY,
(2)Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY
Poster Session
125 - Genetics
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
THURSDAY – PM
156 124.156 Sex Differences Do Not Distinguish High-Risk ASD,
High-Risk No ASD, and Low-Risk Children through Three Years: A Bsrc
Study D. S. Messinger1, G. S. Young2, S. J. Webb3, S. Ozonoff4,
L. Zwaigenbaum5, K. Chawarska6, R. J. Landa7, K. R. Dobkins8,
W. L. Stone9, A. Klin10, M. C. Lai11, S. Baron-Cohen12 and A. S. Carter13,
(1)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (2)MIND Institute, University
California Davis, Sacramento, CA, (3)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)MIND Institute and Department
of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California Davis
Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (5)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB,
Canada, (6)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New
Haven, CT, (7)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (8)Psychology, University
of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (9)Psychology, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (10)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare
of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA,
(11)Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital and
College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, (12)Autism Research Centre,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (13)Department
of Psychology, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA
167 125.167 A Comparison of Gene Expression in Inflamed
Ileocolonic Tissue and Peripheral Blood from GI Symptomatic ASD Children
S. J. Walker1 and A. Krigsman2, (1)Wake Forest Health Sciences, WinstonSalem, NC, (2)Pediatric Gastroenterology Resources of New York and
Texas, Far Rockaway, NY
168 125.168 A Comprehensive Meta-Analysis of Common Genetic
Variants in Autism Spectrum Conditions V. Warrier1, V. Chee2,
P. L. Smith3, B. Chakrabarti4 and S. Baron-Cohen5, (1)University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research
Centre, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Autism Research Centre,
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United
Kingdom, (4)Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics,
School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of
Reading, Reading, United Kingdom, (5)Autism Research Centre,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
169 125.169 A Genetic Multi-Mutation Model of Autism Spectrum
Disorder I. Kramer1, A. R. Marvin2, P. H. Lipkin3, J. K. Law4 and
P. A. Law5,6, (1)Physics Department, University of Maryland Baltimore
Country, Baltimore, MD, (2)Medical Informatics, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (3)Pediatrics/Neurology and Developmental Medicine,
Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore,
MD, (4)Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of
Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (5)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD, (6)School of Medicine, Congo Protestant University,
Kinshasa, Congo-Kinshasa
170 125.170 A Peripheral Blood-Based Biomarker for Gastrointestinal
Inflammation in ASD GI-Symptomatic Children S. J. Walker1 and
A. Krigsman2, (1)Neuroscience Graduate Program, Wake Forest University
Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, (2)Pediatric Gastroenterology
Resources of New York and Texas, Far Rockaway, NY
171 125.171 Advances in the Genetics of Dup15q Syndrome: Insights
Gained from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells S. Chamberlain, Genetics and
Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT
172 125.172 Analysis of Genomic Copy Number Variations and
Exome Sequencing in Japanese Autism Spectrum Disorder Subjects
K. Nakamura1, I. Thanseem2, N. Mori2, M. Tsujii3 and N. Matsumoto4,
(1)Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki
University, Hirosaki, Japan, (2)Department of Psychiatry, Hamamatsu
University School of Medicine, Shizuoka, Japan, (3)Chukyo Univesity,
Toyota, Japan, (4)Department of Human Genetics, Yokohama City
University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan
43
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
173 125.173 Autism Traits in Extended Family Members
M. L. Cuccaro1,2, N. D. Dueker2, J. M. Lee2, J. R. Gilbert2, E. R. Martin2 and
M. A. Pericak-Vance2, (1)Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation Department
of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine,
Miami, FL, (2)John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of
Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
174 125.174 Autism-Risk, Schizophrenia-Risk, and Central Nervous
System-Related Genes Display Genomic Features Common to Genes
of Developmental Regulation E. L. Casanova1, A. E. Switala2 and
M. F. Casanova3, (1)University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (2)Psychiatry &
Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (3)Psychiatry
and Behavioral Science, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
175 125.175 Characterization of Gene Variants Involved in Synaptic
Pathways in Extended Utah ASD Pedigrees K. Ramachandran1,
T. M. Darlington2, D. A. Bilder2, J. Morgan2, M. Williams3, A. Shcheglovitov3,
G. Schellenberg4, K. Eilbeck1 and H. Coon2, (1)Biomedical Informatics,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (2)Psychiatry, University of Utah,
Salt Lake City, UT, (3)Neurobiology & Anatomy, University of Utah,
Salt Lake City, UT, (4)Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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176 125.176 Characterization of Neuronal Development in Autism
Using iPSCs Reveals Disease-Specific Changes in Axon Formation and
Expression of Synaptic Function Genes D. M. Dykxhoorn1,2, B. A. DeRosa1,
H. N. Cukier1,2, K. C. Belle1, J. M. Lee2, M. L. Cuccaro1,2, J. M. Vance1,2 and
M. A. Pericak-Vance1,2, (1)Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation Department
of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami,
FL, (2)John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami
Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
177 125.177 Chromosomal Microarray Results and Medical
Management for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other
Developmental Conditions K. S. Ho, R. J. Vanzo, A. Peiffer and
C. H. Hensel, Lineagen, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT
181 125.181 Differences in Small Non-Coding RNA Expression in
Primary Auditory and Temporal Lobe Association Cortex May Have Effects
on Cell Cycle, Immune and Other Pathways in Autism Spectrum Disorders
B. P. Ander1, N. Barger2, B. Stamova3, F. R. Sharp3 and C. M. Schumann2,
(1)Neurology, UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (2)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA,
(3)MIND Institute and Department of Neurology, University of California
Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
182 125.182 Distribution and Mutational Specificity of Autistic Trait
Severity in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) J. N. Constantino1, Y. Zhang2,
S. Sant2, K. Long3, L. Malik4 and D. H. Gutmann5, (1)Washington University
School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, (2)Psychiatry, Washington University
School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, (3)Psychiatry, Washington University
in St Louis, St. Louis, MO, (4)Psychiatry, Washington University School of
Medicine, st louis, MO, (5)Neurology, Washington University in St Louis,
St Louis, MO
183 125.183 Do Parental Medical and Psychiatric Conditions Have
Sex-Differential Risk Effects for Autism? M. C. Lai1,2, A. L. Pohl3,
M. Whitehall1 and S. Baron-Cohen1,4, (1)Autism Research Centre, University
of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Psychiatry,
National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei,
Taiwan, (3)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge,
United Kingdom, (4)CLASS Clinic, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS
Foundation Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom
184 125.184 Documentation of HLA-DRB1*1302 As a Maternal
Prenatal Risk Factor for Autism Using Imputation in a Maternal-Fetal
Incompatibility Model W. G. Johnson1, E. S. Stenroos2 and S. Buyske3,
(1)661 Hoes Lane, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, (2)Neurology,
Rutgers University - Robert Wood Johnson Medial School, Piscataway, NJ,
(3)Statistics and Biostatistics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ
178 125.178 Circadian Network and Autism: Unusual Alternative
Splicing Pattern of the JARID1 Genes Z. Talebizadeh1, A. Shah1 and
L. DiTacchio2, (1)Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO, (2)University
of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS
185 125.185 Dysregulation of Regulatory Small Non-Coding RNAs in
the Superior Temporal Gyrus Brain Region of Autism Spectrum Disorders
B. Stamova1, B. P. Ander1, N. Barger2, F. R. Sharp3 and C. M. Schumann2,
(1)Neurology, UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (2)Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA,
(3)MIND Institute and Department of Neurology, University of California
Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
179 125.179 Common Autism Genetic Polymorphisms Hidden in HLA
and KIR Genes A. Torres1, M. Benson2, P. L. Bray-Ward1, D. C. Ward1 and
R. Johnson3, (1)Center for Persons with Disabilities, Utah State University,
Logan, UT, (2)Research and Evaluation, Utah State University; CPD,
Logan, UT, (3)BSP CCR Genetics Core at Frederick National Laboratory,
Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick, MD
186 125.186 Exploring Non-Coding Regulatory SNPs As Genetic
Markers for Autism Spectrum Disorders L. Peixoto1, S. Poplawski1, C. Kao2,
H. Hakonarson2, R. T. Schultz3 and T. Abel1, (1)University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, (2)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(3)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA
180 125.180 Contribution of Small Copy Number Variations (CNVs)
to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) I. M. W. Silva1, E. S. Moreira1,
N. C. V. Lourenço2, A. L. Bossolani-Martins3, M. Lazar4, K. M. Rocha4,
M. Aguena4, D. S. Marco Antonio1, A. C. Fett-Conte5, C. Rosenberg6,
E. Vadasz7 and M. R. Passos- Bueno8, (1)Department of Genetics and
Evolutionary Biology, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil,
(2)University of Sao Paulo - USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, (3)Federal University
of Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, (4)University of
Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil, (5)School of Medicine in São Jose do Rio
Preto- FAMERP, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil, (6)Department of Genetics
and Evolutionary Biology, University Sao Paulo, Biosciences Institute,
Sao Paulo, Brazil, (7)university of sao paulo-institute of psychiatry,
Sao Paulo, Brazil, (8)Department of Genetics and Evolutionary Biology,
University of Sao Paulo - USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil
187 125.187 Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay
O. J. Veatch1, J. S. Pendergast1, R. M. Leu2, C. H. Johnson1, S. H. Elsea3
and B. A. Malow4, (1)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Pediatrics,
Emory University, Atlanta, GA, (3)Baylor College of Medicine, Houston,
TX, (4)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center,
Nashville, TN
44
188 125.188 Homozygous Deletions of Non-Coding Transcriptional
Control Sites Leads to Autism Spectrum Disorder K. Schmitz-Abe, Boston
Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
190 125.190 Imaging Autism in Mouse and Man J. P. Lerch and
J. Ellegood, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
191 125.191 Integrating Analytical Methods to Identify Rare Variants
Associated with ASD in High-Risk Utah Pedigrees T. M. Darlington1,
V. Rajamanickam2, R. Sargent2, A. V. Bakian1, D. A. Bilder1,
G. Schellenberg3, N. J. Camp2 and H. Coon1, (1)Psychiatry, University of
Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (2)Genetic Epidemiology, University of Utah,
Salt Lake City, UT, (3)Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
192 125.192 Intergenerational Patterns of Quantitative Autistic
Traits in Hispanic Families A. Abbacchi1, Y. Zhang2, K. A. Zambrana3,
D. S. Messinger4 and J. N. Constantino5, (1)Washington University School
of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, (2)Psychiatry, Washington University School
of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, (3)Department of Psychology, University of
Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (4)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL,
(5)Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
193 125.193 Investigation of Parent-of-Origin Effects in Autism
Spectrum Disorders S. Connolly1, R. J. Anney2, L. Gallagher2 and
E. A. Heron1, (1)Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland,
(2)Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
194 125.194 Linkage Analysis of Whole Exome Sequence Data in
Multiplex Autism Families Including Cholesterol Covariates C. L. Simpson1,
Y. Kim1, C. A. Wassif2, J. Mullikin3, E. Tierney4, F. D. Porter2 and
J. E. Bailey-Wilson1, (1)Computational and Statistical Genomics Branch,
National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health,
Baltimore, MD, (2)Section on Molecular Dysmorphology, National Institute
of Child Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, (3)NIH
Intramural Sequencing Center, National Human Genome Research Institute,
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, (4)Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD
195 125.195 Modulating RBFOX1 Expression in Human Stem CellDerived Glutamatergic Neurons H. N. Cukier1, B. A. DeRosa1,2,
K. C. Belle1,2, Y. Park1,2, A. J. Griswold1, J. M. Lee1, J. L. Haines3,
M. L. Cuccaro1,2, J. R. Gilbert1,2, D. M. Dykxhoorn1,2 and
M. A. Pericak-Vance1,2, (1)John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics,
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, (2)Dr. John T.
Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami
Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, (3)Department of Epidemiology and
Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
196 125.196 Mutation Characteristics in Families with Two or More
Siblings with Autism Spectrum Disorder S. W. Scherer, Hospital for Sick
Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
197 125.197 PTEN Mutation in Children with Autism and
Macrocephaly: A Case Report of Two Previously Unrecognized Promoter
Region Mutations D. U. Menon, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD
198 125.198 Penetrance and Specificity of Significant Chromatin
Pathway Sequence Risk Variants in Utah Extended ASD Pedigrees
L. Jiang1, T. M. Darlington2, A. V. Bakian2, J. Morgan2, G. Schellenberg3,
K. Eilbeck1 and H. Coon2, (1)Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah,
Salt Lake City, UT, (2)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City,
UT, (3)Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA
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199 125.199 Province of Ontario Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Network: Integrated Discovery from Genes to Treatment E. Anagnostou1,
J. P. Lerch2, S. W. Scherer3, P. Szatmari4, R. Nicolson5, R. Schachar6,
P. D. Arnold7 and R. Weksberg8, (1)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Medical
Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Hospital for
Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (5)Psychiatry, Western University, London,
ON, Canada, (6)Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (7)Psychiatry, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(8)Dept. of Paediatrics and the Institute of Medical Science, University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
200 125.200 Quantification of FMRP in Human and Mouse Tissues
By Capture Immunoassays W. T. Brown1, T. Adayev2, C. Dobkin3,
R. J. Kascsak4, R. Kascsak4, S. Nolin1 and G. LaFauci2, (1)Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY,
(2)Developmental Biochemistry, Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY, (3)Institute for Basic
Research in Developmental DIsabilities, Staten Island, NY, (4)Monoclonal
Antibody Facility, New York State Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY
THURSDAY – PM
189 125.189 Identification of Gene-Environment Interactions
Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders C. Ladd-Acosta1, B. Lee2,
B. Sheppard3, N. B. Gidaya4, L. A. Weiss5, G. C. Windham6,
A. M. Reynolds7, L. A. Croen8, D. E. Schendel9, C. J. Newschaffer10 and
M. D. Fallin11, (1)Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (2)Drexel
University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Johns Hopkins
School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (4)Drexel University, Kennett
Square, PA, (5)Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San
Francisco, CA, (6)Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California
Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA, (7)University of Colorado
Denver, Aurora, CO, (8)Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern
California, Oakland, CA, (9)University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark,
(10)A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA,
(11)Mental Health & Wendy Klag Center for Autism and Developmental
Disabilities, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Baltimore, MD
201 125.201 Recurrence Rates for Autism in Multiplex Families and
Twins Demonstrate Sex Differences in Familial Genetic Liability
D. M. Werling1 and D. H. Geschwind2, (1)Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco,
CA, (2)Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA
202 125.202 Scalable Sequencing Pipeline on Cloud J. Y. Jung1,2,
A. Lancaster1,2, Y. Souilmi1, P. J. Tonellato1 and D. Wall2, (1)Center for
Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (2)Stanford
University, Palo Alto, CA
203 125.203 Sleep Problem Profiles of Individuals with ASDAssociated Mutations R. K. Earl1, C. M. Hudac1, T. Ward2, J. Gerdts1,
E. E. Eichler3 and R. Bernier1, (1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(2)Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA, (3)Howard
Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA
204 125.204 Social Communication Skills and Impairments in Children
with Dup15q Syndrome: Is There a Distinctive Phenotype That May Inform
Intervention Targets? S. S. Jeste1, A. Gulsrud1 and C. Kasari2, (1)UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment,
Westwood, CA
205 125.205 Social-Communication and Restricted and Repetitive
Behavior (RRB) Profiles in Children with Phelan-Mcdermid Syndrome
Compared to Non-Syndromic Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
L. V. Soorya1, C. Farmer2, L. Bush3, S. Youngkin1, A. Kolevzon4 and
A. Thurm5, (1)Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL,
(2)NIH, Bethesda, MD, (3)Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department
of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL, (4)Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,
New York, NY, (5)Pediatrics & Developmental Neuroscience, National
Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD
206 125.206 Strategies for Detecting Increased ASD Risk in Male and
Female Probands S. J. Sanders, UCSF, San Francisco, CA
45
THURSDAY May 14, 2015 – PM
207 125.207 Systems Biology Approaches to Determine Genetic Risk
Factors for Autism Spectrum Disorders A. Yousaf1, R. Waltes1,
D. Haslinger1, S. M. Klauck2, M. Sachse1, A. Voran3, M. Schaefer4,
M. Schulte-Rüther5, S. Chichon6, M. Noethen6, J. Ackermann7, I. Koch7,
C. M. Freitag1 and A. G. Chiocchetti1, (1)Department of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe
University, Frankfurt a. M., Germany, (2)Cancer Genome Research
Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany,
(3)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Saarland University,
Homburg, Germany, (4)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics, University Medical Center Freiburg,
University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, (5)University
Hospital Aachen (UKA), Aachen, Germany, (6)Institute of Human Genetics,
University of Bonn, Germany., Bonn, Germany, (7)Molecular Bioinformatics,
Institute of Computer Science, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main,
Frankfurt, Germany
208 125.208 Systems Biology of Late-Onset Severe Regressive
Autism A. R. Gupta, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
209 125.209 Targeted Behavioral Intervention for Children with
Dup15q Syndrome Focuses on Language and Joint Attention C. DiStefano1
and C. Kasari2, (1)Center for Autism Research and Treatment, University
of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism
Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
210 125.210 The Language Phenotype of the 16p11.2 Deletion
and Duplication in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders
(ASD): The Svip Study S. H. Kim1, C. Lord2, L. Green-Snyder3, R. Bernier4,
W. Chung5, E. Hanson6 and R. P. Goin-Kochel7, (1)40 Temple St., Suite
7D, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Weill Cornell
Medical College, White Plains, NY, (3)Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston,
MA, (4)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (5)Pediatrics and Medicine,
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, (6)Developmental
Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, (7)Autism Center, Texas
Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
211 125.211 Tissue-Specific Expression Quantitative Trait Loci
(eQTL) in GI Symptomatic ASD Children S. J. Walker1,2,3, A. Krigsman4
and C. D. Langefeld1,2, (1)Wake Forest Health Sciences, Winston Salem,
NC, (2)Center for Public Health Genomics and Department of Biostatistical
Sciences, Winston Salem, NC, (3)Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative
Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, (4)Pediatric Gastroenterology Resources of
New York and Texas, Far Rockaway, NY
212 125.212 Use of Blood Transcriptomes to Characterize ASD
Phenotypes B. Stamova1, Y. Tian1, C. W. Nordahl2, M. D. Shen2,
S. J. Rogers2, D. G. Amaral2 and F. R. Sharp1, (1)MIND Institute and
Department of Neurology, University of California Davis Medical Center,
Sacramento, CA, (2)MIND Institute and Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, University of California Davis Medical Center,
Sacramento, CA
213 125.213 Use of a Quantitative Autism Score (QAS) Reveals
Genetic Associations E. R. Martin1,2, N. D. Dueker1, A. J. Griswold1,
H. N. Cukier1, D. Van Booven1, J. M. Lee1, P. L. Whitehead1, J. R. Gilbert1,2,
J. L. Haines3, J. P. Hussman4, M. L. Cuccaro1,2 and M. A. Pericak-Vance1,2,
(1)John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami
Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, (2)Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation
Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of
Medicine, Miami, FL, (3)Case Western, Cleveland, OH, (4)Hussman
Institute for Autism, Baltimore, MD
46
Poster Session
126 - Other
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
214 126.214 Locomotor, Anxiety, and Risk Assessment Related
Phenotyping and Striatal Transcriptome Analysis in Four Autism Mouse
Models E. Elliott and O. Oron, Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University,
Safed, Israel
215 126.215 Extracellular Signal Related Kinase Activation in Autistic
Disorder C. Erickson1, L. K. Wink1, E. V. Pedapati1, T. L. Schaefer1,
R. Shaffer1, B. Bayon2, B. Ray2 and D. K. Lahiri3, (1)Cincinnati Children’s
Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, (2)Indiana University School of
Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, (3)Psychiatry and Molecular Genetics, Indiana
University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN
• IMFAR ANNUAL MEETING Salt
Lake City, Utah, U S A
•
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
w w w . a u t i sm-i n sa r. o rg
Special Interest Groups (SIGs)
129 - Minimally Verbal Individuals
Friday, May 15, 2015: 7:15 AM - 8:45 AM
Location listed under each session
Room: Murano
Session Chairs: Nancy Jones, Terry Katz, Connie Kasari
127 - Creating Patient-Centric Information Commons
for Autism Research
Room: Envoy
Session Chairs: Isaac Kohane and Megan O’Boyle
Presenters: Geraldine Bliss, Megan O’Boyle, Paul Avillach and
Isaac Kohane
Phelan McDermid Foundation http://22q13.org
Center of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School
https://cbmi.med.harvard.edu
Without getting this right, the core of the Precision Medicine agenda—linking
data to specific patients/subjects—is at risk. As an example, the emerging
use of electronic health record systems and other large clinical databases
that allow the data acquired during the course of care to be used to
identify distinct subpopulations, clinical trajectories, and pathophysiological
substructures of ASD.
128 - Anxiety in Autism: Mechanisms, Measurement,
and Treatment
Room: Savoy
Session Chairs: Mikle South, Amy Van Hecke, Alana McVey
Symptoms of anxiety significantly increase individual impairment and the
burden of care on families and communities. We have organized our meeting around three broad topics of a) basic research including physiology
and imaging; b) measurement groups including international collaborations
to review existing instruments and those in progress; c) clinical treatment
groups including both behavioral and medication treatments. Smaller groups
will meet for a short time to identify priorities and mechanisms for future collaboration then present findings to the whole group for discussion. Graduate
student Alana McVey will work as a liaison for matching student and group
member interests within the SIG and discuss issues and career opportunities
in this area.
130 - Multiple-Risk Factors for ASD: Genetic
Predisposition and Environmental Influences
Room: Grand Salon
Session Chairs: Heather Volk and Gayle Windham
FRIDAY – AM
Analysis of large-scale systems of biomedical data provides a perspective on
neuropsychiatric disease that may be otherwise elusive. An analysis of largescale systems of data from autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and of ASD
research as an exemplar of what might be achieved from study of such data.
Those with experience in creating large data sets from multiple,
heterogeneous sources with wide heterogeneity in both the ‘big’ness of the
data in bandwidth/storage as well as complexity will recognize that finding
the right data and matching it up correctly to the right individual across these
sources is so fraught with difficulty that it has contributed to the substantive
shortfall if not outright failure of both large scale national population-scale
efforts and local single institution/single population studies. As a result there
is no widely available implementation of a framework to support a clinical
information commons. We have had some success at the national and
international multi-institutional level.
The goal of the 2015 SIG is continue work to develop practice parameters
and to improve ways to evaluate minimally verbal individuals (MVI) in the
areas of: characterization, intervention, developmental considerations and
underserved populations. Leaders will organize project teams with mentors
partnered with junior faculty and student members.
The objectives for 2015 build on the discussions and objectives outlined by
each workgroup at the last meeting:
• Each working group leader will provide a brief update
of discussion and activities since IMFAR 2014
• Depending on state of the literature for each workgroup’s
topic, they will:
• Work on developing proposals for research projects that
will address the critical information gaps
• Work on outlining and drafting one or two specific
practice parameters
Following this year’s SIG, our aim would be for groups to submit the research
proposals for funding, or publish an article on information gaps or the
practice parameter as applicable.
While increasingly accepted that ASD arises from complex interactions
of genetic and environmental factors (GxE), investigations of joint effects
and evaluation of underlying mechanisms are limited. The goal of this
SIG is to bring together researchers from multiple disciplines to overcome
barriers and brainstorm strategies to facilitate collaboration and research
progress in this complex field. To identify and address challenges in this
area, the 2015 session will use relevant materials from GxE workshops
held to address other diseases and discuss how to apply them to ASD,
establishing a common language for interdisciplinary collaboration. Further,
we will briefly review existing evidence for GxE in autism etiology through
short presentations from experts with experience in structural and functional
genetic data, epigenetics, and environmental epidemiology to be followed by
group discussion, feedback, and networking.
Welcome Address and Sponsor Update
8:45 AM - Welcome from IMFAR Organizers
8:50 AM - Simons Foundation Update, Wendy Chung, M.D., Ph.D.
Grand Ballroom
47
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
Keynote Address
131 - Reflections on 50 years of ASD Early
Intervention Science
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM - Grand Ballroom
Speaker: Sally J. Rogers, University of California at Davis,
Sacramento, CA
In May of 1965, Life Magazine published a cover story on Ivar Lovaas’s
UCLA autism intervention study, bringing autism and the challenges it
creates for children and families into the public eye for the first time. Fifty
years later, early autism intervention is the topic of lawsuits, protests,
and hope. The powerful effects of high quality intensive early intervention
delivered in the first few years of life provide new insights into the multiple
mechanisms underlying developmental and behavioral impairments
associated with early ASD. This keynote will (1) describe and illustrate
the kinds of gains that high quality intervention can facilitate, (2) identify
treatment elements common to the most successful approaches, highlighting
research from the Early Start Denver Model (Dawson and Rogers 2010), and
(3) consider varying ways of conceptualizing treatment response.
Keynote Panel Session
132 - Responses to Early Intervention and
Mechanisms of Change
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: Sally J. Rogers, University of California at Davis,
Sacramento, CA
Discussant: C. A. Nelson, Harvard University Boston Children’s
Hospital, Boston, MA
New studies of early intervention effects in ASD are being published
monthly, with varying designs, methods, measures, and outcomes. There
is growing acceptance of the ideas that (1) individual outcomes in autism
reflect transactional processes among environmental and biological variables
throughout life and (2) that developmental processes and rates may be
particularly malleable in early childhood. There is increasing impetus among
families and care professionals for early intervention research findings to
be incorporated into an increased range, sophistication, and availability
of services to young children and their families. However, this impetus is
tempered by concerns about overemphasis on early childhood services,
unreliability of early symptoms, difficulties with assessment processes,
and lack of community services for early identification, diagnosis, and
treatment. In order to guide public services and clinical practice, early
intervention science must move more deeply into two areas (among many):
(1) mechanisms by which specific intervention practices may be changing
children’s developmental trajectories or rates, (2) individual or subgroup
patterns of response to specific interventions, and (3) variables that mediate
and moderate intervention response. This international panel brings together
a distinguished group of scientists involved in studying the processes and
mechanisms involved in response to early interventions.
10:30 132.001 The Social Brain and Language Learning P. K. Kuhl,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA
10:55 132.002 Studying Why and for Whom Intervention Works
P. J. Yoder, Special Education, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
11:20 132.003 Social Learning Processes Underlying TreatmentRelated Changes in Children with ASD Receiving the Early Start
Denver Model G. Vivanti, Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
Melbourne, Australia
48
11:45 132.004 Early Interventions for Autism: Mechanism and
Developmental Science J. Green1, A. Pickles2, H. McConachie3,
E. Jones4, T. Gliga5, T. Charman6 and M. H. Johnson5, (1)Institute
of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, University of Manchester,
Manchester, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Biostatistics, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of Health
and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United
Kingdom, (4)Birkbeck College, University of London, London,
United Kingdom, (5)Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development,
Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United Kingdom,
(6)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom
12:10 Discussant
Panel Session
133 - EU-AIMS: Translating Cellular and Animal
Models of Synaptic Gene Deficits to Large-Scale
Clinical Studies
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: E. Loth, Department of Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology
and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
Discussant: J. Buitelaar, Department of General Psychiatry and Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical
Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands
Autism spectrum disorders are one of the most common and severe
neurodevelopmental disorders yet effective treatments for the core symptoms
are still lacking. This is mainly due to a) the high clinical, etiological and
genetic heterogeneity between affected individuals, b) restricted knowledge
of the underpinning pathophysiological mechanism(s), and c) the absence
of reliable biomarkers to identify more biologically homogeneous subgroups.
This panel will present examples of the integrated translational approach
adopted in EU-AIMS, a large-scale public-private partnership, to identify
biomarkers and new treatment targets for ASD. First, we combine patientderived pluripotent stem cells (Price) and animal models (Steckler) of
monogenic forms of ASD to understand pathophysiological mechanisms.
Here, we focus on genes affecting synapse development and function
(SHANKs, neurexins, neuroligins) and their downstream effects on excitatoryinhibitory balance and brain connectivity. Next, we translate this to patients
using methods such as MRS. Preliminary findings from a pharmacological
study validate the Glutamate/ GABA system as a tractable treatment target.
Finally, we carry out linked large-scale clinical studies spanning children and
adults with ASD and patients with specific synaptic gene deficits to identify
biomarkers (including markers of E/I imbalances) for patient stratification that
can be used in future clinical trials.
10:30 133.001 Utility of Rodent Mutants with Altered Synaptic Signaling
Pathways to Test Possible Pharmacological Interventions for ASD
T. Steckler1, S. Baudouin2, T. M. Boeckers3, F. Esclassan4,
G. Gilmour5, G. Kumar6, M. E. Modi7, M. M. Petrinovic8, J. Talpos9
and P. Scheiffele10, (1)Neuroscience Therapeutic Area, Janssen
Research and Development, Johnson & Johnson, Beerse, Belgium,
(2)Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff, United Kingdom,
(3)Institute for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Ulm University, Ulm,
Germany, (4)Eli Lilly, Sunningdale, United Kingdom, (5)In Vivo
Pharmacology, Eli Lilly, Sunningdale, United Kingdom,
(6)Neurosciences, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Beerse, Belgium,
(7)Neuroscience, Pfizer, Cambridge, MA, (8)F. Hoffmann-La Roche,
Basel, Switzerland, (9)Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Beerse, Belgium,
(10)Biozentrum University of Basel, Basel, BS, Switzerland
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
10:55 133.002 Cellular Phenotypes in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
from Autistic Individuals J. Price1, G. Cocks1, A. Kathuria2,
K. Warre-Cornish1, R. Taylor3 and L. Andreae4, (1)Cells
and Behaviour Unit, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(2)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (3)MRC Centre for
Developmental Neurobiology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology
and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (4)MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
11:45 133.004 Glutamate and GABA in Autism Spectrum: A Clinical
in-Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Assay L. A. Ajram1,
J. Horder2, M. A. Mendez3, A. Galanopoulos4, L. Brennan5,
R. Wichers6, D. J. Lythgoe7, S. C. Williams8, D. G. Murphy9 and
G. M. McAlonan9, (1)Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, United
Kingdom, (2)De Crespigny Park, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, England, United Kingdom, (3)Forensic
and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (4)Behavioural and
Developmental Clinical Academic Group, King’s Health Partners,
London, United Kingdom, (5)Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College
London, London, United Kingdom, (6)Institute of Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (7)King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (8)Neuroimaging, Centre for
Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (9)Department of Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology
& Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
12:10 Discussant
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: L. G. Klinger, TEACCH Autism Program; Department
of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Discussant: P. H. Bell, Eden Autism Services, Princeton, NJ
There is a growing literature documenting the social, employment, and
mental health difficulties faced by adults with ASD. With the increasing rates
of ASD diagnoses, the number of individuals with ASD entering adulthood
each year will double over the next 6 years. While we know that employment
rates are extremely low, little research has examined what factors are related
to positive adult outcome. The talks in this panel describe the results of four
separate large-scale studies focused on identifying factors that affect adult
outcome. The presentations incorporate a range of methodologies including
a long term follow up study from childhood, two prospective studies from
adolescence into adulthood, and a high school employment intervention
program. Further, the presentations incorporate a variety of adult outcome
measures including employment, adaptive behavior, social connectedness,
mental health, motor skills, and quality of life. Across these studies, the
importance of several childhood and adolescent factors emerges and
potential intervention targets are identified. Each presentation will address
implications for promoting positive adult outcomes.
10:30 134.001 Correlates of Middle Adult Outcome: A Follow-up Study
of Children Diagnosed with ASD from 1970-1999 L. G. Klinger1,
M. R. Klinger2, J. L. Mussey1, S. P. Thomas2 and P. S. Powell3,
(1)TEACCH Autism Program; Department of Psychiatry, University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Allied Health Sciences,
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)Psychology,
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
FRIDAY – AM
11:20 133.003 EU-AIMS Clinical Research Platform to Identify
Biomarkers for Patient-Stratification E. Loth1, D. G. Murphy2,
T. Banaschewski3, S. Baron-Cohen4, S. Bolte5, T. Bourgeron6,
T. Charman7, S. Durston8, J. Horder9, M. H. Johnson10, E. Jones11,
L. Mason11, L. O’Dwyer12, A. M. M. Persico13 and J. Buitelaar12,
(1)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Department of
Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (3)University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany,
(4)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge,
United Kingdom, (5)Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden,
(6)Pasteur Institute, Paris Cedex 15, France, (7)Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (8)Psychiatry, Brain Centre Rudolf
Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands,
(9)De Crespigny Park, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, England, United Kingdom, (10)Centre for Brain
and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of
London, London, United Kingdom, (11)Birkbeck College, University
of London, London, United Kingdom, (12)Department of General
Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Radboud
University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands,
(13)Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Unit & Lab of Molecular
Psychiatry and Neurogenics, Rome, Italy
Panel Session
134 - Factors Associated with Adult Outcomes for
Individuals with ASD
10:55 134.002 Longitudinal Development of Manual Motor Performance
in Autism Spectrum Disorder from Childhood to Mid-Adulthood and
Predictions of Adaptive Daily Living Skills B. G. Travers1,
E. D. Bigler2, M. D. Prigge3, A. Froehlich4, N. Lange5, A. Alexander6
and J. E. Lainhart7, (1)Kinesiology, Program of Occupational
Therapy, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI, (2)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(3)Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (4)University
of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (5)McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA,
(6)Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI,
(7)Psychiatry, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI
11:20 134.003 Disconnection from Postsecondary Education and
Employment Among Young Adults on the Autism Spectrum
P. T. Shattuck, A. M. Roux, J. Rast and J. Rava, AJ Drexel Autism
Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
11:45 134.004 Evaluating the Effectiveness of Project Search to
Support Employment for Young Adults with Autism Spectrum
Disorder M. R. Klinger1, A. W. Duncan2, L. G. Klinger3, M. M.
Daston4 and E. Riehle5, (1)Allied Health Sciences, University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Div of Developmental and
Behavioral Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical
Center, Cincinnati, OH, (3)TEACCH Autism Program; Department
of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC,
(4)Project SEARCH, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH,
(5)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH
12:10 Discussant
49
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
Panel Session
135 - From Genomic Discovery to Genetically
Defined Autism Subtypes
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: B. J. O’Roak, Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR
Discovering the genetic basis of idiopathic autism spectrum disorder has
been challenging. Recently, new genomic approaches leveraging exome
sequencing have identified large numbers of new candidate genes based on
new or “de novo” mutations in families with a single affected child, so called
simplex families. Even with the likelihood of hundreds of genes involved,
many genes are now moving beyond candidates to bona fide risk factors
for autism. Detailed analysis of genetically defined autism subtypes may
revolutionize our understanding of the disorder and provide significant targets
for interventions. In this session, the results of the complete sequencing of
the Simons Simplex Collection, ~2,500 families will be presented. The roles
of different mutation types and classes of genes will be addressed, as well
as how roles may differ in boys and girls with autism. We will also explore
how novel biomolecular modules relevant to autism are being discovered
using emerging data from the developing brain and new computational
approaches. These potentially link many risk genes together into common
pathways. Finally, the session will end with detailed discussions of two new
genetically defined autism subtypes, unexpected clinical associations, and
rationale for moving forward with this genotype first approach.
10:30 135.001 Defining the Contribution of Different Classes of De
Novo Mutation to Autism I. Iossifov1, B. J. O’Roak2, S. J. Sanders3,
M. Ronemus4, N. Krumm5, D. Levy4, J. Shendure6, E. E. Eichler7,
M. W. State3 and M. Wigler4, (1)Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory,
Cold Spring Harbor, NY, (2)Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR, (3)Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (4)CSHL,
Cold Spring Harbor, NY, (5)University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(6)Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, (7)Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA
11:00 135.002 The Discovery of Gene Modules for Autism Utilizing
Co-Expression and PPI Networks F. Hormozdiari1, O. Penn1,
E. Borenstein1 and E. E. Eichler2, (1)University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, (2)Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA
11:30 135.003 Disruptive CHD8 Mutations Define a Subtype of
Autism Early in Development R. Bernier1, H. A. Stessman2,
B. Coe1, J. Gerdts1, B. J. O’Roak3 and E. E. Eichler4, (1)University
of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Genome Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR, (4)Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA
12:00 135.004 The Transcriptional Regulator Adnp Links the
Nbaf(mSWI/SNF) Complexes with Autism F. Kooy1,
G. Vandeweyer1, C. Helsmoortel1, A. Van Dijck1, C. Romano2,
B. de Vries3, E. E. Eichler4 and N. Van der Aa1, (1)University of
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium, (2)Oasi Institute, Troina, Italy,
(3)Radboud Universtiy Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands,
(4)Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA
50
Panel Session
136 - Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders and
the Lifecourse in ASD: Clinical and
Epidemiological Perspectives
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: C. M. Kerns, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Discussant: B. Lee, Drexel University School of Public Health,
Philadelphia, PA
There is a growing body of evidence that individuals with autism spectrum
disorder (ASD) frequently experience co-occurring psychiatric symptoms.
This scientific panel integrates clinical and epidemiological perspectives
to examine the conceptualization, measurement, and negative outcomes
of this co-occurrence. Our first talk highlights key insights regarding the
conceptualization of psychiatric syndromes in ASD derived from clinical
evaluations of several thousand children and adolescents with ASD, other
psychiatric syndromes and typical development. Talk 2 synthesizes the
literature on comorbid psychopathology in ASD, examining how different
measurement approaches may influence prevalence estimates. Using
national data, talks 2 and 3 then examine the relationship of co-occurring
psychiatric symptoms in ASD to life course outcomes, in particular adverse
childhood experiences and criminality. The overarching goal of this panel will
be to consider the implications of co-occurring psychiatric syndromes in ASD
to epidemiologic research, clinical practice and public health – that is,
to consider how our conceptualization of psychiatric co-occurrence may
inform etiological models, measurement and treatment development as well
as our ability to address the real-word service needs of individuals with ASD.
10:30 136.001 Programmatic Research into Co-Occurring Psychiatric
Syndromes in Autism Spectrum Disorder K. D. Gadow, Psychiatry,
Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY
10:55 136.002 Modifying Symptom and Diagnostic Criteria for
Additional Psychiatric Disorders in ASD: What Is the Evidence?
E. Simonoff, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
11:20 136.003 Adverse Childhood Experiences and ASD: The Role of
Co-Occurring Psychiatric Symptoms C. M. Kerns1 and B. Lee2,
(1)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Drexel University School
of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA
11:45 136.004 Autism Spectrum Disorders and Criminal Convictions:
The Role of Psychiatric Comorbidity R. Heeramun1, C. Magnusson2,
C. H. Gumpert3, S. Granath4, C. Dalman5, M. Lundberg5 and
D. Rai6,7, (1)Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Trust, Bristol,
England, United Kingdom, (2)Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,
Sweden, (3)Centre for Psychiatry Research & Education, Karolinska
Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, (4)Research and Development Unit,
The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention, Stockholm,
Sweden, (5)Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska
Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, (6)Avon and Wiltshire Partnership
NHS Mental Health Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom, (7)Centre
for Academic Mental Health, University of Bristol, Bristol, United
Kingdom
12:10 Discussant
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
Tech Demo Session
137 - Innovative Technology Demonstrations
10:00 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
1 137.001 Shared Genomic Segments (SGS) Analysis Method:
Application to Extended Utah Pedigrees at High Risk for ASD
V. Rajamanickam1, T. M. Darlington2, R. Sargent1, N. J. Camp1 and
H. Coon2, (1)Genetic Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(2)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
2 137.002 Creating a Spatial Data Architecture for the National
Database for Autism Research M. L. Miranda1,2, P. Maxson1, N. Sandberg1
and D. Hall3, (1)National Center for Geospatial Medicine, University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (2)School of Natural Resources and Environment,
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (3)Omnitec Solutions Inc.,
Bethesda, MD
3 137.003 Delsia: An Innovative Funding Vehicle That Is Turning
Science and Technology into Reality for the Autism Community
D. G. Smith1, E. Clayton2 and R. H. Ring3, (1)Autism Speaks, Boston, MA,
(2)Autism Speaks, New York, NY, (3)Autism Speaks, Princeton, NJ
5 137.005 Olfactory Detection Thresholds in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorders Using Pulse Ejection Systems H. Kumazaki1,2,
A. Tomoda1, K. Okada3, T. Muramatsu2 and M. Mimura2, (1)Research
Center for Child Mental Development, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun,
Fukui Prefecture, Japan, (2)Department of Neuropsychiatry, School of
Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan, (3)Department of Information &
Computer Science , Graduate School of Science and Technology,
Keio University, Yokohama, Japan
6 137.006 Feasibility of Ecological Momentary Assessment of Emotion
in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders M. L. Kovac1, E. Hanna2,
S. Miller3 and G. S. Dichter4, (1)University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Duke University, Durham, NC, (3)Carolina Institute for
Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Carrboro, NC, (4)University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
7 137.007 Can Virtual Reality be Used for Behavioral Analysis
in Autism Spectrum Disorder? a Simulation for Interpersonal Distance
Preference Assessment M. Simoes1,2, S. Mouga1,3, A. C. Pereira1,
P. Carvalho2, G. G. Oliveira1,3,4,5 and M. Castelo-Branco1,6,7, (1)Institute
for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (2)Center for Informatics
and Systems, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (3)Unidade
de Neurodesenvolvimento e Autismo do Serviço do Centro de
Desenvolvimento da Criança, Pediatric Hospital, Centro Hospitalar e
Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (4)University Clinic of
Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal,
(5)Centro de Investigação e Formação Clínica, Pediatric Hospital, Centro
Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (6)ICNAS
Produção, Coimbra, Portugal, (7)ICNAS, University of Coimbra, Coimbra,
Portugal
8 137.008 Eye Tracking Analysis of Attention to Text for Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorders J. B. Plavnick1, L. Skibbe2,
J. L. Thompson1 and S. Bak1, (1)Michigan State University, East Lansing,
MI, (2)Human Development and Family Studies, Michigan State University,
East Lansing, MI
10 137.010 Littlehelper: Using Google Glass to Assist Individuals
with Autism in Job Interviews Q. Xu1, S. C. S. Cheung2 and N. Soares3,
(1)University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, (2)Center for Visualization and
Virtual Environments, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, (3)Geisinger
Autism & Developmental Medicine Institute, Geisinger Health System,
Lewisburg, PA
11 137.011 Using Wearables to Augment Social Interactions for Adults
with ASD L. E. Boyd1, A. Rangel2, S. Hirano1, L. Escobedo3, M. Tentori2 and
G. R. Hayes1, (1)Informatics, UCI, Irvine, CA, (2)Computer Science, Center
for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada, Ensenada,
Mexico, (3)Computacion y sistemas, Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana,
Tijuana, Mexico
12 137.012 Teaching Executive Function and Social Cognition Using
a Kinect-Based Intervention Tool C. Whalen, M. Casale, M. Small, A. Mittal
and J. Quiocho, Research and Development, West Health Insitute, La Jolla,
CA
13 137.013 Socially Animated Machine (SAM): A Novel Design for
Robotic Research in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders S. A. Koch1,
C. D. Clesi1, J. B. Lebersfeld1, C. E. Stevens1, A. G. Parker1, M. E. McNew1,
M. I. Hopkins2, F. R. Amthor2 and F. J. Biasini2, (1)University of Alabama
at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (2)Psychology, University of Alabama at
Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
14 137.014 Social Personalized Human-Machine Interaction for
People with Autism: A Close Look at Proprioceptive and Visual Orientation
Integration P. Chevalier1, A. Tapus2, J. C. Martin3, C. Bazile4 and
B. Isableu5, (1)ENSTA ParisTech, Palaiseau, France, (2)Computer Science
and System Engineering, ENSTA-ParisTech, Palaiseau, France, (3)LIMSI,
CNRS/ Université paris-Sud, Orsay, France, (4)FAM-La Lendemaine,
Les Molières, France, (5)Université Paris Sud, Orsay, France
FRIDAY – AM
4 137.004 A Novel Approach for Efficient Submission of Research
Data to the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) P. Langhorne,
F. Farach, D. Voccola, C. Tirrell and L. Rozenblit, Prometheus Research,
LLC, New Haven, CT
9 137.009 The Effect of Gaze-Contingent Feedback on the
Performance of Adolescents with ASD in a Virtual Reality Driving
Environment J. W. Wade1, D. Bian1, J. Fan1, L. Zhang1, A. Swanson2,
M. S. Sarkar3, Z. Warren2 and N. Sarkar4, (1)Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (3)Computer Science, Middle Tennessee State
University, Murfreesboro, TN, (4)Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN
15 137.015 Using Robots As Therapeutic Agents to Teach Children with
Autism Recognize Facial Expression S. Mavadati1, H. Feng2, P. B. Sanger1,
S. Silver1, A. Gutierrez3 and M. H. Mahoor2, (1)University of Denver, Denver,
CO, (2)Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Denver, Denver,
CO, (3)Psychology, Florida International University, Miami, FL
16 137.016 Affect and Social Behaviors of School-Aged, High
Functioning Children with ASD during Robot Interaction C. Daniell1,
E. S. Kim1, C. Makar1, J. Elia1, B. Scassellati2 and F. Shic3, (1)Yale
University, New Haven, CT, (2)Computer Science and Mechanical
Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)Child Study Center,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
17 137.017 Understanding Interaction Dynamics in Socially Assistive
Robotics with Children with ASD E. Short1 and M. J. Mataric2, (1)University
of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Computer Science, University
of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
18 137.018 A 3-D Learning Environment for Infants and Toddlers
at-Risk for ASD: Can Technology Improve Early Social Communication
Vulnerabilities Z. Zheng1, Q. Fu1, H. Zhao1, A. Swanson1, A. S. Weitlauf2,
N. Sarkar3 and Z. Warren4, (1)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN,
(2)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN, (3)Mechanical Engineering,
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
51
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
19 137.019 The Benefits of Online Play: An Investigation of Virtual
Worlds for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder K. E. Ringland1,
C. T. Wolf1 and G. R. Hayes2, (1)Informatics, University of California, Irvine,
Irvine, CA, (2)Informatics, UCI, Irvine, CA
20 137.020 ASC-Inclusion – a Virtual World Teaching Children with
ASC about Emotions S. Newman1, O. Golan2, S. Baron-Cohen3, S. Bolte4,
A. Rynkiewicz5, A. Baranger6, B. Schuller7, P. Robinson8, A. Camurri9,
M. Sezgin10, N. Meir-Goren1, S. Tal2, S. Fridenson-Hayo2, A. Lassalle3,
S. Berggren4, N. Sullings6, D. Pigat3, K. Ptaszek5, E. Marchi7, S. Piana9
and T. Baltrusaitis8, (1)Compedia, Ramat-Gan, Israel, (2)Department of
Psychology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel, (3)Autism Research
Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (4)Center of
neurodevelopmental disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden,
(5)Spectrum ASC-Med, Gdansk, Poland, (6)Autism Europe, Brussels,
Belgium, (7)Institute for Human-Machine Communication, Technische
Universität München, Munich, Germany, (8)Computer Laboratory, University
of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (9)University of Genova,
Genova, Italy, (10)Department of Computer Engineering, Koç University,
Istanbul,, Turkey
27 137.027 A Smartphone Application Designed for Teaching
Emergency Safety Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
J. Huber1,2,3,4, S. So5, T. Jegathesan1, S. Davis1, M. Goodman1, E. Young1,3,
N. Mistry1, D. M. Campbell1,6,7, H. J. Bonifacio1,7,8 and A. Mihailidis4,5,
(1)Pediatrics, St.Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Division of
Neurology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Division
of Developmental Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Department of Rehabilitation Sciences,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (5)Artificial Intelligence &
Robotics in Rehab Team, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health
Network, Toronto, ON, Canada, (6)Allan Waters Family Simulation Centre,
St.Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (7)Pediatrics, University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (8)Divisions of Adolescent Medicine and
Emergency Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
28 137.028 An Interactive App for Social Skills Training in Autism
Spectrum Disorder B. Kinsella1 and A. Kushki1,2, (1)Autism Research
Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (2)Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University
of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
21 137.021 Design of a Collaborative Virtual Environment to Foster
Collaborative Skills for Children with ASD L. Zhang1, A. Swanson1,
A. S. Weitlauf2, Z. Warren3 and N. Sarkar4, (1)Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN, (3)Pediatrics,
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN
29 137.029 Mebook – a First-Person Social Narrative Game
N. M. Uzuegbunam1, W. H. Wong2, S. C. S. Cheung3 and L. A. Ruble2,
(1)Electrical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Center for Visualization
and Virtual Environments, Lexington, KY, (2)University of Kentucky,
Lexington, KY, (3)Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments,
University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
22 137.022 Generative Language Learning in Severe Autism:
Experimental Evaluation of a Mobile Application O. Wendt1, N. Hsu2,
A. Torelli3, K. Warner3 and A. Goss3, (1)Heav 202D, Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN, (2)Educational Studies, Purdue University, West
Lafayette, IN, (3)Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue
University, West Lafayette, IN
30 137.030 Using Mobile Phones Screen Mirroring to Improve Social
Skills for Children with Autism M. Habash, Leeds Becket University,
Ottawa, ON, Canada
23 137.023 Creating Exploratory Touch-Screen Games That Include
Novel and Surprising Aspects As Motivators of Communication for Children
with Autism A. M. Alcorn1, J. Good2, H. Pain3 and S. Fletcher-Watson4,
(1)School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United
Kingdom, (2)Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer,
Brighton, England, (3)School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh,
Edinburgh, Scotland, (4)University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland,
United Kingdom
24 137.024 Design and Assessment of a Web-Based Training Tutorial
Developed to Empower Parents with the Knowledge and Skills Necessary
to Effectively Improve Their Child’s Communication and Behavior during
Daily Activities K. A. Kobak1, A. Swanson2, L. Wallace3, Z. Warren2 and
W. L. Stone4, (1)Center for Psychological Consultation, Madison, WI,
(2)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (3)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,
Nashville, TN, (4)Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
25 137.025 Investigating the Usability of a Tablet-Based Interface for
Management of Anxiety-Related Arousal in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder T. A. Chiu1 and A. Kushki1,2, (1)Autism Research Centre, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Institute of
Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto,
ON, Canada
26 137.026 Seeing the Doctor without Fear: Systematic
Desensitization for Medical Visits in ASD V. Pensosi1 and B. Villamia2,
(1)28223 Pozuelo de Alarcon, Fundación Orange, Madrid, MAD, Spain,
(2)Fundación Orange, Madrid, Spain
52
31 137.031 Technology-Based Framework to Improve Quality of
Life of Parents of Children with Autism in Gaza Strip M. Habash, Leeds
Becket University, Ottawa, ON, Canada
32 137.032 Enhancing the Perceptive and Cognitive Visual Processes
in Low-Functioning Autism: Sigueme (FOLLOW-ME) V. Pensosi, 28223
Pozuelo de Alarcon, Fundación Orange, Madrid, MAD, Spain
33 137.033 AMP: An Autism Management Platform E. J. Linstead,
R. Burns, D. Nguyen and D. Tyler, Schmid College of Science and
Technology, Chapman University, Orange, CA
34 137.034 Use of Behavior Imaging to Assess Inter-Rater Reliability
in a Multi-Site Pharmaceutical Trial R. M. Oberleitner1, U. Reischl2 and
K. G. Gazieva1, (1)Behavior Imaging Solutions, Boise, ID, (2)Department of
Community and Environmental Health, Boise State University, Boise, ID
35 137.035 Analysis of Parent Responses to Using a Remote Autism
Diagnostic Assessment System N. L. Matthews1, C. J. Smith1, N. Nazneen2,
R. M. Oberleitner3, A. Rozga4, G. D. Abowd4 and R. Arriaga5, (1)Research,
Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ, (2)UserWise
Usability Research and Consulting, Mountain View, CA, (3)Behavior
Imaging Solutions, Boise, ID, (4)School of Interactive Computing, Georgia
Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, (5)Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA
36 137.036 Web-Based Toolkit for Multimodal Data Analysis in ASD
Research O. O. Wilder-Smith and M. S. Goodwin, Northeastern University,
Boston, MA
37 137.037 Tablet-Based Method for Handwriting Assessment
B. Dirlikov1, M. B. Nebel2, A. J. Bastian3, L. Younes4 and
S. H. Mostofsky5, (1)Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (2)Center
for Neurodevelopmental and Imaging Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (3)Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Kennedy Krieger
Institute, Baltimore, MD, (4)Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Johns
Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (5)Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
Poster Session
138 - Diagnostic, Behavioral and Intellectual
Assessment
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
41 138.041 A Comparison of Clinical Versus Self-Report Measures:
An Evaluation of the Broad Autism Phenotype in Parents of Individuals
with Autism J. Barstein, K. Nayar, N. M. Heckel, L. Bush and M. C. Losh,
Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and
Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
42 138.042 A Comparison of Diagnostically Relevant Item Response
Characteristics Between Females and Males with Autism R. A. Embacher1,
A. Y. Hardan2 and T. W. Frazier3, (1)Center for Autism, Cleveland Clinic
Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, OH, (2)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, (3)Cleveland Clinic,
Center for Autism, Cleveland Clinic Children’s, Cleveland, OH
44 138.044 A Method for Universal Screening of Social Challenges
in Elementary School Students C. J. Smith1, E. Pollard2,
S. E. Ober-Reynolds3, N. L. Matthews4, A. J. Stein5, R. Melmed6 and
D. Openden7, (1)Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix,
AZ, (2)Research, SARRC, Phoenix, AZ, (3)Southwest Autism Research &
Resource Center (SARRC), Phoenix, AZ, (4)Research, Southwest Autism
Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ, (5)Neurology, University of
Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, (6)Southwest Autism
Research Center and Melmed Cente, Scottsdale, AZ, (7)Southwest Autism
Research and Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ
45 138.045 Ability and Disability in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A
Systematic Literature Review Employing the International Classification of
Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY)
S. Mahdi, Karolinska Institutet, Kista, Sweden
46 138.046 Accuracy of ASD Diagnoses in a Sample of Black
and Hispanic School-Aged Children J. M. Jamison1, M. Oliphant1,
P. M. Weinger1, J. Krata2, E. Holl2, J. Shaoul2, B. Hernandez2,
J. D. Buxbaum1,3,4,5,6 and A. Kolevzon1,7,8, (1)Seaver Autism Center for
Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,
New York, NY, (2)YAI, New York, NY, (3)The Mindich Child Health and
Development Institute,, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York,
NY, (4)Fishberg Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (5)Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School
of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (6)Genetics and Genomic
Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY,
(7)Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY,
(8)Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
47 138.047 Additional Testing Shows High Performance of Machine
Learning Classifiers and Supports Potential for Rapid, Mobile Autism Risk
Detection D. Wall, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
48 138.048 An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Childhood
Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition (CARS-2) M. C. Davis1, M. D. Toland1,
J. Campbell1, L. Murphy2 and L. Gardner2, (1)Department of Educational,
School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY,
(2)University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN
50 138.050 Assessment of Intelligence in Young Autistic Children:
A Comparison of Tests Available Under and over Age 3 V. Courchesne1,
C. Jacques2, A. M. Nader3, M. Descamps4, É. Danis5, L. Mottron6,
M. Dawson7 and I. Soulières7, (1)Rivière-des-Prairies Hospital, Centre
de recherche de l’Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal,
Montréal, QC, Canada, (2)Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau,
QC, Canada, (3)Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à
Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada, (4)Université du Québec à Montréal,
Montreal, QC, Canada, (5)Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal,
Montréal, QC, Canada, (6)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants
du développement de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montreal,
QC, Canada, (7)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants du
développement de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montréal, QC,
Canada
51 138.051 Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ): A Preliminary Study
of Its Diagnostic Validity in a Clinical Spanish Sample, More Than a
Psychometric Test? C. D. Jimenez de Espinoza1 and
J. L. González-Mora2, (1)Physiology, University of La Laguna, Santa Cruz
de Tenerife, Spain, (2)University of La Laguna, La Laguna, Spain
52 138.052 Child Characteristics As Moderators of Parent-Clinician
Agreement on Autism Symptoms E. E. Neuhaus1, R. Bernier2, S. J. Webb3,
S. Faja4 and K. Pelphrey5, (1)PO Box 5371, Seattle Children’s Research
Institute, Seattle, WA, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(3)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle,
WA, (4)Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard
School of Medicine, Boston, MA, (5)Child Study Center, Yale University,
New Haven, CT
FRIDAY – AM
43 138.043 A Longitudinal Evaluation of Restricted Behaviors and
Sensory Interests in Angelman’s Syndrome Using the Behavior and
Sensory Interests Questionnaire D. Peterson1, J. Love-Nichols1, S. Maisel2
and E. Hanson2, (1)Division of Development Medicine and Program in
Genomics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, (2)Boston Children’s
Hospital, Boston, MA
49 138.049 An Online Verbal IQ Test: Development, Validity, and
Standardization of an Adaptive Vocabulary Test for Remote Phenotyping
of Parents C. C. Clements1, G. K. Bartley2, L. DePolo3, L. Bateman3,
H. Morton4, J. Parish-Morris5, N. Stein6 and R. T. Schultz7, (1)Psychology,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Center for Autism
Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Malvern, PA, (3)Center for
Autism Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(4)The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (5)Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (6)Statistics, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (7)Center for Autism Research, The
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
53 138.053 Classifying Autism Spectrum Disorders By ADIR: Separate Subtypes or Severity Gradient? H. Cholemkery1 and
C. M. Freitag2, (1)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe University, Frankfurt
am Main, Germany, (2)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe University, Frankfurt am,
Main, Germany
54 138.054 Comparing Remote Diagnosis of ASD to Gold Standard,
in-Person Assessment C. J. Smith1, N. L. Matthews2, A. Rozga3,
N. Nazneen4, R. M. Oberleitner5, R. Melmed6 and G. D. Abowd3,
(1)Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ,
(2)Research, Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix,
AZ, (3)School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA, (4)UserWise Usability Research and Consulting, Mountain
View, CA, (5)Behavior Imaging Solutions, Boise, ID, (6)Southwest Autism
Research Center and Melmed Cente, Scottsdale, AZ
55 138.055 Construct Validity and Measurement Invariance of
the Children’s Scale for Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive
(C-SHARP) C. Farmer1, A. J. Kaat2 and M. G. Aman2, (1)NIMH, NIH,
Bethesda, MD, (2)Nisonger Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
53
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
56 138.056 DSM-IV-TR Criteria That Best Differentiate Intellectual
Disability from Autism Spectrum Disorders A. L. Pedersen1,2,
S. Pettygrove3, Z. Lu2, J. Andrews2, F. J. Meaney4, M. Kurzius-Spencer2,
L. C. Lee5, M. S. Durkin6 and C. Cunniff2,7, (1)Psychology & Child
Development, California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA,
(2)Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ, (3)Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ, (4)University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, (5)Epidemiology, Johns
Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (6)Waisman
Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (7)Division of
Medical Genetics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY
57 138.057 Descriptive Assessment of Problem Behavior in a
Large-Scale Randomized Trial in Young Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder T. L. Burrell1, K. Bearss2, N. Minshawi-Patterson3, C. Johnson4,
L. Lecavalier5, T. Smith6, N. Swiezy3 and L. Scahill7, (1)Research, Marcus
Autism Center, Atlanta, GA, (2)Pediatrics, Emory University School
of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (3)Indiana University School of Medicine,
Indianapolis, IN, (4)University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Psychology,
The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, (6)601 Elmwood Ave, Box 671,
University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, (7)Pediatrics, Marcus Autism
Center, Atlanta, GA
58 138.058 Developing ASD Screening Criteria for the Brief Infant
Toddler Social Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) I. Giserman Kiss and
A. S. Carter, Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts
Boston, Boston, MA
59 138.059 Development of a New Measure to Identify Fundamental
Emotion Regulation Processes Across the ASD Spectrum: Application to
the Autism Inpatient Collection C. A. Mazefsky1, M. Siegel2, R. Gabriels3,
L. Yu4, D. L. Williams5, J. Pierri6, C. Peura7 and P. A. Pilkonis1,
(1)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA,
(2)Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Westbrook, ME, (3)Children’s
Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO, (4)University of Pittsburgh School of
Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA,
(6)University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, (7)Spring Harbor
Hospital, Westbrook, ME
60 138.060 Development of an Autism Risk Index Using Remote Eye
Tracking to Social Stimuli: A Preliminary Proof-of-Principle Investigation
T. W. Frazier1 and E. W. Klingemier2, (1)Cleveland Clinic Children’s,
Cleveland, OH, (2)Pediatrics, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
61 138.061 Developmental Changes in the Cognitive Profile of
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders A. R. Lemelman1, J. E. Bice1
and R. K. Kana2, (1)University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham,
AL, (2)Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham,
Birmingham, AL
62 138.062 Developmental Differences Associated with Early
Diagnosis: A Comparison of Toddlers Diagnosed with ASD at Age 2 Versus
Age 3 S. Hoffenberg1, J. Cash1, C. Klaiman1, J. Lorenzi1,2 and C. Hall1,
(1)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory
University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (2)Virginia Tech, Blacksburg,
VA
63 138.063 Diagnostic Accuracy of ASRS and SRS in Screening
ASD in Chinese Community Children X. Xu1, B. Zhou1, H. Zhou1, L. Wu2,
X. Zou3, X. Luo4, W. Yan1 and Y. Wang1, (1)Children’s Hospital of Fudan
University, Shanghai, China, (2)Department of Children’s and Adolescent
Health, Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China,
(3)Pediatrics, Child Developmental & Behavioral Center, The 3rd Affiliated
Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU), Guangzhou, MD, (4)Central
South University, Changsha, China
64 138.064 Diagnostic Trends in an ASD Population P. F. Turcotte,
K. Miller and M. Mathew, A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Philadelphia, PA
54
65 138.065 Discriminant Validity of the ADI-R in Latino Families:
Identifying Differences Between Autism Spectrum Disorder and
Developmental Delay S. B. Vanegas, S. Magana and M. Morales, Disability
and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
66 138.066 Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder Via a
Transdisciplinary Clinic P. J. Thaxter1, V. Nanclares-Nogués2 and L. Daley1,
(1)Autism Treatment Program, Advocate Children’s Hospital, Park Ridge,
IL, (2)Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, IL
67 138.067 Early Predictors of Academic Achievement in School-Aged
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders L. E. Miller1, E. Troyb2, K. Knoch3,
L. E. Herlihy4 and D. A. Fein1, (1)Psychology, University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT, (2)Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI,
(3)MassGeneral for Children at North Shore Medical Center, Salem, MA,
(4)Yale School of Medicine Child Study Center, New Haven, CT
68 138.068 Early Temperamental Persistence and Associations
with Later Executive Functioning L. D. Ankeny1, N. M. Reyes2 and
S. L. Hepburn3, (1)Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO, (2)JFK
Partners, Aurora, CO, (3)Psychiatry & Pediatrics, JFK Partners/University
of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO
69 138.069 Examining the Interaction of Social Function and
Language Skills in ASD A. Kushki1, N. Kong2, J. A. Brian3, A. Dupuis4,
S. Chow2 and E. Anagnostou5, (1)Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Autism Research Centre, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)150 Kilgour
Rd., Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital/ U of Toronto, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (4)The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(5)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation
Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
70 138.070 Extension of the PDD Behavior Inventory to Adolescents
I. L. Cohen, 1050 Forest Hill Rd, New York State Institute for Basic
Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY
71 138.071 Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the
Revised Home Situations Questionnaire for Autism Spectrum Disorder
M. Chowdhury1, M. G. Aman2, L. Lecavalier3, T. Smith4, C. Johnson5,
N. Swiezy6, J. T. McCracken7, B. H. King8, C. J. McDougle9, K. Bearss10
and L. Scahill11, (1)Psychology, Allegheny College, Meadville, PA,
(2)The Nisonger Center UCEDD, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH,
(3)Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, (4)601 Elmwood
Ave, Box 671, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, (5)University of
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (6)Indiana University School of Medicine,
Indianapolis, IN, (7)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel
Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA,
(8)Psychiatry, University of Washington & Seattle Children’s Hospital,
Seattle, WA, (9)Harvard School of Medicine, Massachusettes General
Hospital, Lexington, MA, (10)Pediatrics, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (11)Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA
72 138.072 Follow-up ASD Screening Identifies Children Missed at
Initial Screening Timepoint C. Cordeaux1, K. L. Anderson1, M. L. Barton1,
D. A. Fein1 and D. L. Robins2, (1)Psychology, University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT, (2)AJ Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia,
PA
73 138.073 From a Heterogeneous ASD Phenotype to Quantitatively
Distinct Putative ASD Subtypes A. P. Whitten1 and J. W. Bodfish2,
(1)Hearing & Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN,
(2)Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Nashville, TN
74 138.074 Gender Differences in ASD Symptoms: Do Women with
HFASD Display Fewer Socio-Communicative Difficulties Than Men?
W. T. Brooks1, H. M. Scott2 and B. A. Benson2, (1)TEACCH Autism
Program, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Nisonger Center, Columbus, OH
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
75 138.075 Heterogeneity at the Minimally Verbal End of the
Spectrum C. DiStefano1, C. Kasari2, A. P. Kaiser3, R. J. Landa4 and
P. Mathy5, (1)Center for Autism Research and Treatment, University of
California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism
Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA, (3)Special Education, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (4)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (5)Kennedy
Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD
76 138.076 How Useful Are the Parent-Completed Ages and Stages
Questionnaires for Screening of Motor Problems in Preschoolers with
High-Functioning Autism? M. Vanvuchelen1, M. A. Braeken2 and
L. Van Schuerbeeck2, (1)Hasselt University Faculty of Medicine and Life
Sciences, Diepenbeek, Belgium, (2)Hasselt University, Diepenbeek,
Belgium
78 138.078 Inter-Rater Reliability of Multi-Disciplinary Autism
Spectrum Disorder Diagnoses L. Speer1, C. Muhvic2, H. Sydorwicz3,
M. Clampitt2, L. Best2, K. Ziegler2, S. Parikh3, E. E. Schulte3, K. Giuliano4
and T. W. Frazier1, (1)Cleveland Clinic, Center for Autism, Cleveland
Clinic Children’s, Cleveland, OH, (2)Cleveland Clinic, Center for Autism,
Cleveland, OH, (3)Cleveland Clinic Children’s, Cleveland, OH, (4)Pediatrics,
Cleveland Clinic Children’s, Cleveland, OH
79 138.079 Links Between ASD and Self-Regulation Abilities on
Adaptive Functioning Skills T. Estrada1, H. N. Davis1, B. J. Wilson1,
K. McGill2, O. Dorn2 and J. Mackee2, (1)Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific
University, Seattle, WA, (2)Psychology, Family, and Community, Seattle
Pacific University, Seattle, WA
80 138.080 Long-Term Development of Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorders Following Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention:
Adaptive Functioning L. McCombe1,2, M. S. Lee1,2, C. Chand2, T. Martin1,2
and C. T. Yu1,2, (1)St.Amant Research Centre, Winnipeg, MB, Canada,
(2)Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
81 138.081 Machine Learning and Autism Diagnostics: Promises and
Potential Pitfalls D. K. Bone1, M. S. Goodwin2, M. P. Black3, C. C. Lee4,
K. Audhkhasi1 and S. Narayanan1, (1)Signal Analysis and Interpretation Lab
(SAIL), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Northeastern
University, Boston, MA, (3)Information Sciences Institute (ISI), University
of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA, (4)Department of Electrical
Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
82 138.082 Measurement of Nonverbal and Verbal Abilities in
Minimally Verbal Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders C. T. Moody1
and C. Lord2, (1)Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY
84 138.084 Measuring Treatment Effect in Children with Autism
with the Brief Observation of Social Communication Change (BOSCC)
A. Nordahl-Hansen1, S. Fletcher-Watson2, H. McConachie3 and A. Kaale4,
(1)University of Oslo, Oslo, Oslo, Norway, (2)University of Edinburgh,
Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of Health and Society,
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, (4)Oslo
University Hospital, Vinderen, Oslo, Norway
85 138.085 Moderating Effects of Spoken Language in the Home
on the Relations Between Age at Diagnosis and ASD Symptoms and
Expressive Language for Young Children with ASD Screened in Early
Intervention F. Martinez-Pedraza, M. Maye and A. S. Carter, Department
of Psychology, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA
86 138.086 Parent Reports of Social Functioning Provide Evidence
of Criterion-Validity for the Social Responsiveness Scale, Second Edition
in a High Functioning Sample of Youth with ASD K. Johnston1 and
G. Iarocci2, (1)Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada,
(2)Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC,
Canada
87 138.087 Parent and Teacher Perceptions of ASD Severity and
Comorbid Emotional and Behavioral Symptoms: Differences for Children
with Regressive Onset S. S. Mire1, N. S. Raff1, S. L. McKee1 and
R. P. Goin-Kochel2, (1)Educational Psychology, University of Houston,
Houston, TX, (2)Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
FRIDAY – AM
77 138.077 Identifying Homogeneous Subgroups of Children with
ASD, ADHD, and OCD A. Dupuis1, S. Georgiades2, A. Charach1,
E. Anagnostou3, P. D. Arnold4, R. Schachar5, P. Szatmari6, R. Nicolson7
and A. Kushki8, (1)The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(2)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (3)Bloorview Research
Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (4)Psychiatry, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(5)Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(6)University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (7)Psychiatry, Western
University, London, ON, Canada, (8)Autism Research Centre, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
83 138.083 Measuring Autistic Traits in the General Population: A
Systematic Review of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) in a Nonclinical
Population Sample of 6,900 Typical Adult Males and Females E. Ruzich1,
C. Allison2, P. Smith3, P. Watson4, B. Auyeung5, H. Ring6 and
S. Baron-Cohen7, (1)Department of Psychiatry, Autism Research Centre,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research Centre, Department
of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
(3)Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United
Kingdom, (4)MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United
Kingdom, (5)Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh,
United Kingdom, (6)University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
(7)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United
Kingdom
88 138.088 Predictability of Self-Report Questionnaires (RAADS-RNL, AQ-28 AND AQ-10) in the Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorders in
Adults B. B. Sizoo1 and H. M. Geurts2, (1)Dimence, Deventer, Netherlands,
(2)Dutch Autism & ADHD Research Center, Brain & Cognition, University of
Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
89 138.089 Predicting and Modeling Distinct Developmental
Trajectories of Adaptive Behavior during Pre-School to School-Age in
Children with ASD C. Farmer, L. Swineford and A. Thurm, Pediatrics &
Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute of Mental Health,
Bethesda, MD
90 138.090 Prediction of Intellectual Impairment By Developmental
Assesments in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Compared to
Globally Delayed Children L. Gabis1 and S. Shefer2, (1)PEDIATRICS,
CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER, Rehovot, Israel, (2)Pediatrics, Child
Dev Center, Ramat Gan, Israel
91 138.091 Preliminary Analysis of the Function of Self Injurious
Behavior in the Autism Inpatient Collection (AIC) Sample T. Flis1,
K. A. Smith2, R. Chappell3, B. L. Handen4 and M. Siegel5, (1)Child and
Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Unit, Sheppard Pratt, Baltimore, MD,
(2)Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Portland, ME, (3)Sheppard
Pratt, Baltimore, MD, (4)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center,
Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Westbrook, ME
55
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
92 138.092 Prevalence and Age-Modulated Presentation of
Subthreshold Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder Comorbidity in
Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders E. Serrano Drozdowskyj,
Psychiatry, Gregorio Marañon General University Hospital, Madrid, Spain
93 138.093 Promises and Limits: Exploring Relationships Between
the First Year Inventory (FYI) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule
(ADOS) from 12 to 18 Months of Age with Machine Learning S. H. Kim1,
E. S. Kim2, S. Macari3, K. Chawarska3 and F. Shic3, (1)40 Temple St.,
Suite 7D, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center, Yale
University, New Haven, CT, (3)Child Study Center, Yale University School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT
94 138.094 Psychometric Properties of a New Video-Referenced
Rating of Quantitative Autistic Traits in Toddlers N. Marrus1, Y. Zhang2,
E. L. Mortenson2, L. Malik3, S. Sant2, L. Cole4, K. Long5, A. Glowinski6 and
J. N. Constantino4, (1)Washington University School of Medicine, Webster
Groves, MO, (2)Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine,
Saint Louis, MO, (3)Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine,
st louis, MO, (4)Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO,
(5)Psychiatry, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO,
(6)Psychiatry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO
95 138.095 Quantifying the Behavioural Relationship Between ASD
and Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: More Than Social Imperception
M. E. Stothers1 and J. Oram Cardy2, (1)Western University, Canada,
London, ON, Canada, (2)Western University, London, ON, Canada
96 138.096 Re-Evaluating the Structure of the Autism Quotient: A
Novel 3-Factor Solution J. Burk1, J. Zeman2, T. Thrash3 and C. L. Dickter4,
(1)College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (2)College of WIlliam and
Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (3)College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA,
(4)College of Wiliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
97 138.097 Reliability of Direct Behavior Ratings – Social Competence
(DBR-SC) Data: How Many Ratings Are Necessary? S. P. Kilgus1,
T. C. Riley-Tillman2, J. Stichter2 and S. A. Owens2, (1)Department of
Educational, School, & Counseling Psychology, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO, (2)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
98 138.098 Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors: Restricted By IQ?
J. Viskochil1, M. Stevenson1, D. A. Bilder1, A. Bakian2, K. J. Cottle1,
W. M. McMahon1 and H. Coon1, (1)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake
City, UT, (2)Psychiatry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake
City, UT
99 138.099 SASA: A Sensory Reactivity Measure for Severely
Affected Individuals with Global Developmental Delay and/or Autism
Spectrum Disorder T. Tavassoli1, P. M. Weinger2, A. Kolevzon2 and
J. D. Buxbaum3, (1)Seaver Autism Center, New York, NY, (2)Seaver Autism
Center for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount
Sinai, New York, NY, (3)Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment,
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,
New York, NY
100 138.100 Sensitivity and Specificity of the ADOS 2 Algorithms in
a Large German Sample J. Medda1, H. Cholemkery2 and C. M. Freitag3,
(1)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics
and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt am Main,
Germany, 60528 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, (2)Department of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe
University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, (3)Department of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe
University, Frankfurt am, Main, Germany
56
101 138.101 Sensory Processing Abnormalities – a Constant Across
the Autistic Spectrum J. Horder1, C. E. Wilson2, J. E. Faulkner3,
M. A. Mendez4, V. Stoencheva4, D. Spain2, E. L. Woodhouse5,
C. M. Murphy5, C. Ohlsen6, G. M. McAlonan7, D. M. Robertson8 and D.
G. Murphy7, (1)De Crespigny Park, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, England, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Forensic
and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Forensic and Neurodevelopmental
Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (4)Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Institute of Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (6)Behavioural Genetics Clinic,
Maudsley Hospital, London, United Kingdom, (7)Department of Forensic
and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology &
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(8)Behavioural Genetics Clinic, South London and Maudsley
NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom
102 138.102 Simultaneous Administration of an Autism-Specific
and General Developmental Screener in an Urban Pediatric Population
C. J. Newschaffer1, S. Khan2, J. Guevara3 and Y. S. Huang4, (1)Drexel
University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Drexel University School of Public Health,
Philadelphia, PA, (3)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(4)General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
103 138.103 Social Communication and Cognitive Profiles: How Do
Males and Females Compare? N. C. Ginn, J. L. Mussey and L. G. Klinger,
TEACCH Autism Program; Department of Psychiatry, University of North
Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
104 138.104 Stability of Symptom Severity and Adaptive Function
from Preschool to Elementary Age in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder Y. J. Lee1, C. H. Chiang1, C. C. Wu2, Y. M. Hou3, J. H. Liu4 and
C. L. Chu5, (1)Department of Psychology, National Chengchi University,
Taipei, Taiwan, (2)Department of Psychology, Kaohsiung Medical
University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, (3)Department of Psychiatry, Chia-Yi
Christian Hospital, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, (4)Psychiatry, Liouying, Chi Mei
Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan, (5)Department of Psychiatry, National
Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung
University, Tainan, Taiwan
105 138.105 The Autism Inpatient Collection (AIC): Methods and
Sample Desription M. Siegel1, K. A. Smith2, C. A. Mazefsky3, R. Gabriels4,
D. Kaplan5, E. M. Morrow6, L. K. Wink7, C. Erickson7 and S. L. Santangelo8,
(1)Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Westbrook, ME, (2)Maine
Medical Center Research Institute, Portland, ME, (3)Psychiatry, University
of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (4)Children’s Hospital
Colorado, Aurora, CO, (5)Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Inpatient
Unit at, Baltimore, MD, (6)Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry;
Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University/Bradley Hospital,
Providence, RI, (7)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati,
OH, (8)Psychiatry, Maine Medical Center/Maine Med Ctr Research Institute,
Portland, ME
106 138.106 The Autism Mental Status Exam: Psychometric Validity
of a Brief Screening Tool B. Lewis1, J. M. Jamison2, C. Farrell3 and
D. Grodberg4, (1)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (2)Seaver
Autism Center for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (3)Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics,
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, (4)Box
#1230, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
107 138.107 The Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network (AS ATN)
Registry Data: Opportunities for Investigators A. Fedele1 and
A. M. Shui2, (1)Autism Speaks, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Biostatistics Center,
Massachussetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
108 138.108 The Broader Autism Phenotype and College Students’
Choice of Majors: Validity of the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire
(BAP-Q) J. I. Cline1 and J. C. Cox2, (1)Brigham Young University, Provo,
UT, (2)Counseling and Psychological Services, Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT
109 138.109 The Food Flexibility Challenge Task (FFCT): Developing
an Ecologically Valid Measure of Food Flexibility in Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder H. Morton1, J. Worley1 and E. S. Kuschner2, (1)The
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
110 138.110 The Mullen Scales of Early Learning: Ceiling Effect
Among Preschool Children A. Harel, N. Yitzhak, M. Yaari, E. Friedlander
and N. Yirmiya, Psychology Department, Hebrew University, Jerusalem,
Israel
111 138.111 The New DSM-5 Impairment Criterion for Autism
Spectrum Disorder in Toddlers and Young Preschoolers E. Zander1 and
S. Bolte2, (1)Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Karolinska Institutet,
Taby, Sweden, (2)Center of neurodevelopmental disorders, Karolinska
Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
113 138.113 The Social Attention and Communication Study: A
School Age Follow-up M. Clark1, J. Barbaro2 and C. Dissanayake3,
(1)La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, (2)Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia,
(3)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia
114 138.114 The Social Phenotype of ASD and Parent Report of
Joint Attention in School Aged Children P. C. Mundy1, N. S. McIntyre2,
L. E. Swain-Lerro3 and T. Oswald4, (1)2825 50Th Street, UC Davis,
Sacramento, CA, (2)University of California at Davis, Davis, CA, (3)School
of Education, UC Davis, Santa Rosa, CA, (4)MIND Institute, UC Davis,
Davis, CA
115 138.115 The Value of Implementing the First Year Inventory - Lite
for Screening in a Healthcare A. Ben-Sasson1, E. Tirosh2 and S. Habib3,
(1)University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel, (2)Hannah Khousy Child Development
Center, Bnai Zion Medical Center and Rappoport Faculty of Medicine,
Haifa, Israel, (3)Ministry of Health, Haifa, Israel
116 138.116 The “True” Interrater Reliability of the ADOS in Clinical
Settings – a Never Ending Story? C. M. Willfors1, E. Zander2, N. Choque
Olsson3, C. Coco4, S. Berggren5, R. Kosieradzki6, I. Jifält7, A. M. Elmund8,
Å. Hedfors Moretti9, A. Holm10, V. Nordin11, J. Linder12, K. Olafsdottir13 and
S. Bolte14, (1)Karolinska Institute Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders,
Stockholm, Sweden, (2)Karolinska Institutet, Taby, Sweden, (3)Karolinska
Institutet, Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Women’s and
Children’s Health, Stockholm, Sweden, (4)Stockholm County Council,
Child and Youth Psychiatry KIND, Stockholm, Sweden, (5)Center of
neurodevelopmental disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden,
(6)Region Skåne, Child and Youth Psychiatry Malmö, Malmö, Sweden,
(7)Vårdbolaget Tiohundra AB, Child and School Health services Norrtälje,
Norrtälje, Sweden, (8)Prima Child and Youth Psychiatry AB, Stockholm,
Sweden, (9)Stockholm County Council, Child and Youth Psychiatry
Sollentuna, Stockholm, Sweden, (10)Stockholm County Council, Karolinska
University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, (11)Stockholm County Council,
Neuropediatric Unit, Sachs’ Child and Youth Hospital, Stockholm South
General Hospital,, Stockholm, Sweden, (12)Västra Götalandsregionen,
Child and Youth Psychiatry SÄS Borås, Borås, Sweden, (13)Region Skåne,
Child and Youth Psychiatry Malmö, Lund, Sweden, (14)Division of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden
118 138.118 Use of Expressed Emotion (EE) in Assessing the Quality
of Parent-Child Relationships: A Comparison of Young Children with and
without ASD C. Shulman1 and J. Koller2, (1)School of Social Work, The
Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, (2)The School of
Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
119 138.119 Using Temperament Traits to Identify Subgroups of
School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder S. Georgiades1,
E. K. Duku1, P. Szatmari2, L. Zwaigenbaum3, S. E. Bryson4, T. A. Bennett1,
S. Al Balkhi1, E. J. Fombonne5, P. Mirenda6, I. M. Smith4, M. Elsabbagh7,
C. Waddell8, T. Vaillancourt9, J. Volden3, W. Roberts10 and A. ZaidmanZait11, (1)Offord Centre for Child Studies & McMaster University, Hamilton,
ON, Canada, (2)University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)University
of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (4)Dalhousie University / IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR, (6)University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada,
(7)Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada,
(8)Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC,
Canada, (9)University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (10)Pediatrics,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (11)Tel-Aviv University,
Tel-Aviv, Israel
120 138.120 Validation and Factor Structure of the 3Di Short Version
in a DSM-5 Context G. Slappendel1,2, W. Mandy3, J. van der Ende1,
F. C. Verhulst1, J. Duvekot1 and K. Greaves-Lord1,2, (1)Department of
Child & Adolescent Psychiatry/psychology, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children’s
Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands, (2)Yulius Autisme Expertisecentrum,
Rotterdam/Dordrecht, Netherlands, (3)Behavioural and Brain Sciences
Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
FRIDAY – AM
112 138.112 The Role of Internalizing Symptoms on Family
Functioning in Adolescents with ASD and Their Families S. Iadarola1,
L. A. Oakes2 and T. Smith3, (1)University of Rochester Medical Center,
Rochester, NY, (2)Clinical Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester,
NY, (3)University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
117 138.117 Timed Perceptual Tasks: Better Index of Processing
Speed in Autistic Children? S. M. Duplan1, V. Courchesne2,3, G. Thermidor2,
M. P. Poulin-Lord1,3 and I. Soulières4,5, (1)Rivière-des-Prairies Hospital,
Centre de recherche de l’Institut universitaire en santé mentale de
Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)Rivière-des-Prairies Hospital, Centre
de recherche de l’Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal,
Montréal, QC, Canada, (3)University of Montreal, Montréal, QC, Canada,
(4)Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal,
QC, Canada, (5)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants du
développement de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montréal, QC,
Canada
121 138.121 Validation of Temporally-Sensitive Eye-Tracking Indices
of Social Disability As Treatment Endpoints in School-Age Children with
ASD A. R. Wrencher1, J. Moriuchi1, A. Klin1, S. Shultz2 and W. Jones1,
(1)Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory
University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (2)Department of Pediatrics,
Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University,
Atlanta, GA
122 138.122 Validation of a Quantitative Approach of the Application
of Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS): A Preliminary EyeTracking Study S. Mouga1,2, J. Castelhano1,3, J. Almeida2, C. Café2,
F. Duque2,4, G. G. Oliveira1,2,4,5 and M. Castelo-Branco1,3,6, (1)Institute for
Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University
of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (2)Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento e
Autismo do Serviço do Centro de Desenvolvimento da Criança, Pediatric
Hospital, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal,
(3)ICNAS, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (4)University Clinic of
Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal,
(5)Centro de Investigação e Formação Clínica, Pediatric Hospital, Centro
Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (6)ICNAS
Produção, Coimbra, Portugal
123 138.123 Validation of an Observational Screening Measure of
Red Flags of ASD at 18-24 Months D. Tracy1, W. Guthrie2, S. T. Stronach3,
C. Nottke2 and A. M. Wetherby2, (1)Florida State University, Tallahassee,
FL, (2)Florida State University Autism Institute, Tallahassee, FL,
(3)Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota-Twin
Cities, Minneapolis, MN
57
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
124 138.124 What Could be Driving Phenotypic Heterogeneity? Deep
Characterization of Young Children with and without Autism Spectrum
Disorder from the Study to Explore Early Development (SEED) J. Pandey1,
J. A. Pinto-Martin2, J. Chittams3, L. A. Croen4, M. D. Fallin5,
A. Thompson3, E. Moody6, D. Reinhartsen7, A. M. Reynolds8, L. D. Wiggins9,
G. C. Windham10, J. S. Woodford11, L. M. Young12 and S. E. Levy13,
(1)The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(2)Biobehavioral Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia,
PA, (3)University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (4)Division of
Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA,
(5)Mental Health & Wendy Klag Center for Autism and Developmental
Disabilities, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore,
MD, (6)13121 E 17th Avenue, JFK Partners/University of Colorado School
of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (7)University of North Carolina, Greensboro,
NC, (8)Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School
of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (9)National Center on Birth Defects and
Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Atlanta, GA, (10)CA Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA,
(11)College of Education and Human Development, University of Delaware,
Newark, DE, (12)U Penn, Philadelphia, PA, (13)Developmental &
Behavioral Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
125 138.125 “Making Sense of It All.” Sensory-Processing Sensitivity,
Negative Affect, Extraversion and Effortful Control in Children with and
without ASD S. D. Boterberg, H. Roeyers and P. Warreyn, Department
of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent,
Belgium
Poster Session
139 - Interventions Pharmacologic
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
126 139.126 A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial of Omega-3
Fatty Acids in the Treatment of Young Children with Autism D. Mankad1,
A. Dupuis2, S. Smile3, W. Roberts4, J. A. Brian5, T. B. Lui6, L. Genore7,
D. Zaghloul8, A. Iaboni6, M. Marcon9 and E. Anagnostou10, (1)Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Scarborough, ON, Canada,
(2)Clinical Research Services, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (3)Developmental Paediatrics, Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Integrated Services for
Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(5)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital/
U of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (6)Autism Research Centre, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (7)Autism
Research Centre, Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(8)Autism Research Centrre, Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (9)Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (10)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
127 139.127 Atomoxetine Tolerability and Adverse Events in Autism
Spectrum Disorders in the Multisite Charts Study J. A. Hellings1,
S. L. Hyman2, B. L. Handen3, T. Smith4, P. Corbett-Dick5, R. Tumuluru6,
L. E. Arnold7 and M. G. Aman8, (1)Psychiatry, The Ohio State University
Nisonger Center McCampbell Hall, Columbus, OH, (2)Pediatrics, University
of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY, (3)University of Pittsburgh
School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (4)601 Elmwood Ave, Box 671,
University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, (5)Neurodevelopmental and
Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester,
NY, (6)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh,
PA, (7)Nisonger Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, (8)The
Nisonger Center UCEDD, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
58
128 139.128 Atomoxetine, Placebo, and Parent Training in Autism
T. Smith1, B. L. Handen2, M. G. Aman3, L. E. Arnold4, S. L. Hyman5,
X. Pan6 and K. A. Buchan-Page4, (1)601 Elmwood Ave, Box 671, University
of Rochester, Rochester, NY, (2)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical
Center, Pittsburgh, PA, (3)The Nisonger Center UCEDD, Ohio State
University, Columbus, OH, (4)Nisonger Center, The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH, (5)Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine,
Rochester, NY, (6)Center for Biostatistics, The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH
n
129 139.129 Citalopram Treatment of Young Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Correlation with Maternal History of Depression
A. W. Zimmerman1, K. Singh2 and S. L. Connors3, (1)55 Lake Ave. N,
UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA, (2)Pediatrics, UMass Medical
School, Worcester, MA, (3)Pediatrics and Medicine, MGH Lurie Center for
Autism, Lexington, MA
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130 139.130 Developing and Testing an Intervention to Reduce
Challenging Behaviors within Community and School-Based Mental Health
Services L. I. Brookman-Frazee1, W. Ganger2, M. Dyson3, C. Chlebowski2,
M. Baker-Ericzen4 and N. Stadnick3, (1)Psychiatry, University of California,
San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)Child and Adolescent Services Research
Center, San Diego, CA, (3)University of California, San Diego, San Diego,
CA, (4)Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Rady Children’s
Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
131 139.131 Effect of Treatment with OMEGA-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty
Acids on Behavioural Measures in Children and Adolescents with Autism
Spectrum Disorders C. Moreno1, R. Calvo Escalona2, S. Gutierrez3,
M. Graell3, J. Romo1, M. L. Dorado1, M. Giraldez4, C. Llorente1, C. Arango1
and M. Parellada1, (1)Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department,
CIBERSAM, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañon, IiSGM.,
Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain, (2)Hospital
Clinic of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, (3)Hospital Niño Jesús. Servicio de
Psiquiatría., Madrid, Spain, (4)Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department,
Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maraññon, Madrid, Spain
132 139.132 Effect of Two Doses of Basimglurant on Behavioral
Symptoms in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Fragile X Syndrome;
Results from Fragxis, a Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study J. Quiroz1,
E. Wasef1, C. Y. Wong1, A. Kurian1, D. Deptula1, L. Banken2, M. Rabbia1,
P. Fontoura2 and L. Santarelli2, (1)Roche Innovation Center New York,
New York, NY, (2)Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel, Switzerland
133 139.133 Effectiveness of Over-the-counter Therapies for Autism
S. Bittker, Sole Researcher, Darien, CT
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
135 139.135 Glutathione, Vitamin C and Cysteine Use in Children with
Autism and Severe Behavior Concerns: A Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled
Crossover Study P. G. Williams, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
136 139.136 Irritability, Agitation and Agression in Persons with
ASD: The ATN Pathway for Evaluation and Individualized Treatment
Planning A. Whitaker1, K. Morton2, R. A. Vasa3, A. Y. Hardan4, L. K. Fung5,
A. A. Nozzolillo6, R. Mahajan7, P. Bernal8, J. Veenstra-Vander Weele9,
D. L. Coury10, A. Silberman9 and A. Wolfe11, (1)Psychiatry & Behavioral
Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, (2)Psychiatry & Behavioral
Sciences, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, (3)Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (4)Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, (5)Stanford
University, Palo Alto, CA, (6)Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA,
(7)Psychiatry, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins University SOM,
Baltimore, MD, (8)Psychiatry, Children Health Council, Palo Alto, CA,
(9)Columbia University, New York, NY, (10)Nationwide Children’s Hospital,
Columbus, OH, (11)Center for Child and Adolescent Health Research &
Policy, Massachussetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
137 139.137 Maladaptive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The
Role of Emotion Experience and Emotion Regulation A. Y. Hardan1,
A. C. Samson2 and J. J. Gross3, (1)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, (2)Department
of Psychology, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA, (3)Department of
Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
138 139.138 Meta-Analysis of Pharmacotherapies for Treating
Irritability, Agitation and Aggression in ASD L. K. Fung1, R. Mahajan2,
A. A. Nozzolillo3, P. Bernal4, A. Krasner5, B. Jo6, D. L. Coury7, A. Whitaker8,
J. Veenstra-Vander Weele5 and A. Y. Hardan9, (1)Stanford University,
Palo Alto, CA, (2)Psychiatry, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins
University SOM, Baltimore, MD, (3)Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
MA, (4)Psychiatry, Children Health Council, Palo Alto, CA, (5)Columbia
University, New York, NY, (6)Psychiatry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,
(7)Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, (8)Psychiatry & Behavioral
Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, (9)Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
139 139.139 Nutritional and Dietary Interventions for Autism Spectrum
Disorder – a Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial of a Combination of
Six Treatments J. Adams, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
140 139.140 Pharmacological Modulation of Excitatory/Inhibitory
Balance in Autism Spectrum Disorder L. A. Ajram1, J. Horder2,
M. A. Mendez3, A. Galanopoulos4, L. Brennan4, R. Wichers5, D. J. Lythgoe6,
S. C. Williams7, D. G. Murphy5 and G. M. McAlonan5, (1)Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College
London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (3)Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (4)Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London,
United Kingdom, (5)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental
Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (6)King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (7)Neuroimaging, Centre for Neuroimaging Sciences, Institute of
Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
141 139.141 Physician Practices in Management of Second
Generation Antipsychotic (SGA) Medications and Their Side Effects in
Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders D. L. Coury1,
E. S. Matheson2, R. Baum2 and P. Vora2, (1)Nationwide Children’s
Hospital, Columbus, OH, (2)The Ohio State University College of Medicine,
Columbus, OH
142 139.142 Preliminary Characterization of Medication Use in a
Multicenter Sample of Pediatric Inpatients with Autism Spectrum Disorder
E. V. Pedapati1, L. K. Wink1, C. Erickson1, R. Gabriels2, C. A. Beresford2,
D. Kaplan3, E. M. Morrow4 and M. Siegel5, (1)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, (2)Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora,
CO, (3)Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatric Inpatient Unit at, Baltimore,
MD, (4)Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry; Psychiatry and
Human Behavior, Brown University/Bradley Hospital, Providence, RI,
(5)Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Westbrook, ME
FRIDAY – AM
134 139.134 From Experimental to Investigational: The Potential for
Eye Tracking As a Biomarker for Outcome in Clinical Trials F. Shic1,
M. del Valle Rubido2, E. Hollander3, S. S. Jeste4, J. T. McCracken5,
L. Scahill6, O. Khwaja7, L. Squassante8, S. Sadikhov9, J. Dukart10,
E. S. Kim11, M. Perlmutter1, E. Sharer12, R. Paul13, R. J. Jou14, M. C. Lyons11,
T. Apelian15, G. Berlin16, C. J. Ferretti16, A. Gavaletz14, R. L. Loomis17,
J. N. Cowen4, T. Shimizu18, B. P. Taylor19, C. A. Wall11, R. Noone20,
L. N. Antar16, L. Boak21, P. Fontoura22 and D. Umbricht23, (1)Child Study
Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Roche,
Basel, Switzerland, (3)Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx,
NY, (4)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (5)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences,
UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles,
CA, (6)Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA, (7)F. Hoffmann La Roche AG, Basel, Switzerland, (8)Product Development, Biometrics,
F-Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland, (9)Roche Innovation
Center, Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Basel,
Switzerland, (10)Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development,
Basel, Switzerland, (11)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (12)Kennedy
Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (13)Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT,
(14)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (15)Psychiatry
and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel Institute CAN Clinic,
Los Angeles, CA, (16)Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, Bronx, NY, (17)Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven,
CT, (18)Psychiatry, UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment,
Los Angeles, CA, (19)Dept. Of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx,
NY, (20)Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (21)F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel, BS,
Switzerland, (22)Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel, Switzerland,
(23)NORD, F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG, Basel, Switzerland
143 139.143 Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation over the
Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex and Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus
Improves Core Symptoms of Autism H. C. Ni1,2, J. Hung3 and Y. Z. Huang3,
(1)National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, (2)Psychiatry,
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan, (3)Neurology, Chang
Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan
144 139.144 Results from a Phase I Proof-of-Mechanism Study with
a Vasopressin 1a Receptor Antagonist in ASD D. Umbricht1, M. del Valle
Rubido2, F. Shic3, J. T. McCracken4, L. Scahill5, O. Khwaja6, L. Squassante7,
L. Boak8, F. Bolognani9, P. Fontoura10, C. A. Wall11, R. J. Jou12,
R. L. Loomis13, M. C. Lyons11, A. Gavaletz12, J. N. Cowen14,
T. Apelian15, S. S. Jeste14, C. J. Ferretti16, B. P. Taylor17, G. Berlin16,
R. Noone18, L. N. Antar16 and E. Hollander19, (1)NORD, F. Hoffmann La Roche AG, Basel, Switzerland, (2)Roche, Basel, Switzerland,
(3)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT, (4)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel Institute
for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (5)Pediatrics,
Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA, (6)F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG, Basel,
Switzerland, (7)Product Development, Biometrics, F-HoffmannLa Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland, (8)F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel,
BS, Switzerland, (9)F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG, Basel, BL, Switzerland,
(10)Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel, Switzerland, (11)Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (12)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(13)Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (14)UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA, (15)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel
Institute CAN Clinic, Los Angeles, CA, (16)Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (17)Dept. Of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, Bronx, NY, (18)Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (19)Dept. of Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein
College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
59
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
145 139.145 Safety and Exploratory Efficacy of Basimglurant in
Pediatric Patients with Fragile X Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind,
Placebo-Controlled Study J. Quiroz1, C. Y. Wong1, E. Wasef1, D. Deptula1,
L. Banken2, M. Rabbia1, P. Fontoura2 and L. Santarelli2, (1)Roche Innovation
Center New York, New York, NY, (2)Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel,
Switzerland
146 139.146 Study of Beliefs of Parents of Children with Autism
Regarding Traditional Medicine in 4 Middle-East Countries M. Habash1 and
M. Ftaiha2, (1)Leeds Becket University, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (2)Special
Education, Abu Dhabi University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates
147 139.147 The Treatment of Refreactory Agression and Self
Abusive Behaviors with Proporanolol E. B. London, Psychology, NYS
Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY
148 139.148 Trichuris Suis Ova (TSO) As an Immune-Inflammatory
Treatment for Repetitive Behaviors in ASD E. Hollander1, C. J. Ferretti2,
B. P. Taylor3, R. Noone4, E. Racine4 and E. Doernberg4, (1)Dept. of
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert
Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (2)Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (3)Dept. Of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (4)Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert
Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
149 139.149 Uptake 2 Transporter Blockade Can Ameliorate
Sociability Deficits G. G. Gould1, C. M. Smolik1, W. Koek2, M. A. Javors3 and
L. C. Daws1, (1)Physiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center
at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, (2)Psychiatry, The University of Texas
Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, (3)Psychiatry,
The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX
Poster Session
140 - Communication and Language
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
150 140.150 A Study of Siblings of Individuals with ASD: Comparison
of Pragmatic Language Ability V. Y. Kang1, K. Levesque1, A. Anderson1,
A. Kresse2, S. Faja3, E. E. Neuhaus4, R. Bernier1 and S. J. Webb2,5,
(1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Seattle Children’s Research
Institute, Seattle, WA, (3)Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard School of
Medicine, Boston, MA, (4)PO Box 5371, Seattle Children’s Research
Institute, Seattle, WA, (5)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University
of Washington, Seattle, WA
151 140.151 ASD and FXS: Vocalization Differentiation in the First
Year of Life K. M. Belardi1, E. Patten2, L. R. Watson3, B. Crais1, G. T.
Baranek4 and D. K. Oller5, (1)University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
NC, (2)Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of
Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN, (3)Division of Speech
and Hearing Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC,
(4)Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and
Cognition Research, Klosterneuburg, Austria
152 140.152 An Examination of Narrative Abilities in Individuals with
ASD and Their Family Members M. A. Lee1, N. M. Heckel1, P. C. Gordon2,
C. Stiehl1 and M. C. Losh1, (1)Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department
of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL, (2)Psychology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill,
Chapel Hill, NC
153 140.153 Attentional Cues to Support Word Learning Among
Children with ASD and Typically Developing Children E. Tenenbaum,
D. Amso and S. J. Sheinkopf, Brown University, Providence, RI
60
154 140.154 Characteristics of Speech Motor Functions in Two LowFunctioning Individuals with Autism S. F. Kuo1, A. Lazar1 and B. Gordon2,
(1)Neurology, Cognitive Neurology/Neuropsychology, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Department of Cognitive
Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
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155 140.155 Characterizing the Minimally Verbal: A Pilot Investigation
of the Low-Verbal Investigatory Screener for Autism (L-VIS-A)
E. Tenenbaum1, I. M. Eigsti2, A. Naples3 and G. Righi4, (1)Brown University,
Providence, RI, (2)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(3)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (4)Psychiatry and Human Behavior,
Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI
156 140.156 Computational Semantic Analysis of Restrictive and
Repetitive Behavior in Language Samples of Children with Autism
M. Rouhizadeh1, R. Sproat2 and J. van Santen1, (1)Center for Spoken
Language Understanding, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland,
OR, (2)Google, Inc., New York, NY
157 140.157 Detailed Gesture Analysis Reveals Relationships of
Gestures with Language and ASD Risk in Children with Language Delays
S. S. Manwaring1, L. Swineford2, P. Albert2 and A. Thurm2,
(1)Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake
City, UT, (2)Pediatrics & Developmental Neuroscience, National Institute of
Mental Health, Bethesda, MD
158 140.158 Differences in Fingerspelling Praxis Performance
Between Deaf Children with Autism and Deaf Typically Developing Children
Between 5 and 14 Years of Age C. K. Woxholdt1, S. Srinivasan2,
A. N. Bhat1,2,3 and A. Shield4,5, (1)Department of Kinesiology, University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (2)Department of Physical Therapy, University of
Delaware, Newark, DE, (3)Center for Health, Intervention & Prevention,
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(4)Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Boston University,
Boston, MA, (5)Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders,
Emerson College, Boston, MA
159 140.159 Distinct Language Improvements of Minimally Verbal
Children with ASD inside and Outside Episodes of Engagement As
Response to Treatment A. C. Holbrook1, J. Hopkins2 and C. Kasari3,
(1)Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of
California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Psychiatry, UCLA Semel
Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (3)UCLA
Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
160 140.160 Does Parental Input during Joint Attention Differ for TD
Children and Children with ASD? E. K. McCaffrey1, A. Abdelaziz2,
D. A. Fein1 and L. Naigles1, (1)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(2)Literature, Culture and Languages (LCL), University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT
161 140.161 Dynamic Assessment of the Looking Patterns of Toddlers
with ASD during Teaching A. Bean Ellawadi1, D. A. Fein2 and L. Naigles3,
(1)The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, (2)Psychology, University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (3)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
162 140.162 Early Receptive and Expressive Language Skills: A Joint
Attention Intervention for Young Children with ASD A. M. Mastergeorge1
and C. Parikh1,2, (1)Family Studies and Human Development, University of
Arizona, Tucson, AZ, (2)University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
163 140.163 Effective Way to Improve Competence in Answering
Questions Among Children with ASD: Repeat Your Question or Gesture?
H. M. Chiu1, H. C. A. Chui1, M. K. Y. Wong2, M. M. K. Chan1, W. C. So3 and
C. K. Y. Lam1, (1)The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong
Kong, (2)Department of Educational Psychology, The Chinese University
of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (3)The Chinese University of Hong
Kong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
164 140.164 Examining the Spontaneous Communication of Minimally
Verbal Children with ASD in Supported Versus Unsupported Contexts
E. Fuller1, J. Heidlage1, A. P. Kaiser2 and C. Kasari3, (1)Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (2)Special Education, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (3)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment,
Westwood, CA
165 140.165 Expectations of Social Isolation for Children with HFA
S. D. Lovell1, A. Ramakrishna2, D. Hedley1, S. Narayanan3 and
R. B. Grossman4,5, (1)FACElab, Emerson College, Boston, MA,
(2)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Signal Analysis
and Interpretation Lab (SAIL), University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, CA, (4)Communication Sciences and Disorders, Emerson
College, Boston, MA, (5)Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of
Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
166 140.166 Missing the Mark: Dynamic Differences in the Facial
Expressions of Children with HFA R. B. Grossman1,2,3, T. Guha4, Z. Yang4,
D. Hedley2 and S. Narayanan5, (1)Communication Sciences and Disorders,
Emerson College, Boston, MA, (2)FACElab, Emerson College, Boston, MA,
(3)Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of Massachusetts Medical
School, Worcester, MA, (4)University of Southern California, Los Angeles,
CA, (5)Signal Analysis and Interpretation Lab (SAIL), University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, CA
168 140.168 Gender Differences in Communication in School Aged
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Preliminary Results
O. Conlon1, J. Volden1, P. Szatmari2, S. E. Bryson3, E. J. Fombonne4,
P. Mirenda5, I. M. Smith6, T. Vaillancourt7, C. Waddell8, L. Zwaigenbaum1,
T. A. Bennett9, S. Georgiades10, E. K. Duku9 and M. Elsabbagh11,
(1)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (2)University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Autism Research Centre, Dalhousie/IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (4)Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR, (5)University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada,
(6)Dalhousie University / IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada,
(7)University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (8)Faculty of Health
Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (9)Offord
Centre for Child Studies & McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada,
(10)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (11)Department of
Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
169 140.169 How Multitalker Environments Affect Speech
Understanding in Autism L. C. Anderson, E. J. Wood, E. Redcay and
R. S. Newman, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
170 140.170 Implicit Measures of Receptive Vocabulary Knowledge
in Low-Functioning Individuals with Autism E. L. Coderre1, M. Chernenok1,
J. O’Grady1, L. V. Bosley1, B. Gordon1,2 and K. Ledoux1, (1)Cognitive
Neurology/Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore, MD, (2)Department of Cognitive Science, Johns
Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
172 140.172 Item Response Theory Analysis Suggests Word-Level
Lexical Differences in Children with Autism at 12 Months of Age: A Multisite
Infant-Sibling Study D. C. Lazenby1, G. Sideridis1, N. L. Huntington1,
P. S. Dale2, M. F. Prante3, J. M. Iverson4, K. R. Dobkins5, S. Curtin6,
L. J. Carver5, N. Akshoomoff7, L. Henkel6, D. Tagavi8, C. A. Nelson1 and
H. Tager-Flusberg8, (1)Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston
Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (2)Speech &
Hearing Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM,
(3)Utah State University, Logan, UT, (4)Psychology, University of
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Psychology, University of California, San
Diego, La Jolla, CA, (6)University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada,
(7)Psychiatry and Center for Human Development, University of California,
San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (8)Boston University, Boston, MA
173 140.173 Language Disfluency and Cognitive Load in Children with
ASD S. Torabian1, L. Naigles2, N. S. Alpers3, N. S. McIntyre4, L. E. SwainLerro5 and P. C. Mundy6, (1)University of California Davis, Los Altos Hills,
CA, (2)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (3)Psychology, University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (4)School of Education, UC Davis, Davis, CA,
(5)School of Education, UC Davis, Santa Rosa, CA, (6)MIND Institute and
School of Education, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA
FRIDAY – AM
167 140.167 Freespeech: Large-Scale Data from a New AAC
Application Characterizes Usage for Young Children with ASD – One Size
Does Not Fit All L. Boccanfuso1, J. C. Snider2, E. Schoen Simmons3,
M. C. Lyons1, E. S. Kim2, C. A. Wall3, L. Whitaker4, M. Perlmutter2, K.
Konwar5, R. Schrock6 and F. Shic2, (1)Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT,
(3)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (4)Yale University
School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (5)University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (6)Keysight Technologies, Inc, Santa Rosa, CA
171 140.171 Improved Communication Outcomes Using a Socially
Assistive Robot L. Boccanfuso1, S. Scarborough2, A. V. Hall3,
R. K. Abramson4, H. H. Wright5 and J. M. O’Kane6, (1)Child Study Center,
Technology and Innovation Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of
South Carolina Speech & Hearing Research Center, Columbia, SC,
(3)SC Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, Columbia, SC,
(4)Department of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Science, University
of South Carolina, School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, (5)Department of
Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of South Carolina,
Columbia, SC, (6)Department of Computer Science and Engineering,
University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
174 140.174 Lexical Characteristics Account for Vocabulary Size
in Toddlers with ASD: A Comparison of Comprehension and Production
S. T. Kover1 and S. Ellis-Weismer2, (1)Department of Speech and
Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
175 140.175 Native Exposure to Sign Language Does Not Attenuate
the Social-Cognitive Deficits of ASD A. Shield1,2, A. J. Martin3 and J. Pyers4,
(1)Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA,
(2)Communication Sciences and Disorders, Emerson College, Boston, MA,
(3)Psychology, Hunter College, New York, NY, (4)Psychology, Wellesley
College, Wellesley, MA
176 140.176 Lexical Semantic Impairments in ASD Are Associated
with Difficulties in Serial Order Memory E. Jones1, D. M. Bowler2 and
S. B. Gaigg2, (1)Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United
Kingdom, (2)Autism Research Group, City University London, London,
United Kingdom
177 140.177 Linguistic Aspects of Prosody Is Intact in Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorders A. Kondo1, K. Nishikawa2, T. Konishi3,
H. Takahashi4, Y. Kamio5 and R. Mazuka6, (1)The United Graduate School
of Education, Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo, Japan, (2)Laboratory for
Language Development, Brain Science Institute,RIKEN, Saitama, Japan,
(3)Graduate School of International Culture and Communication Studies,
Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, (4)National Center of Neurology and
Psychiatry; National Institute of Mental Health; Department of Child and
Adolescent Mental Health, Ogawahigashi-cho, Tokyo, Japan, (5)National
Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan, National Institute of Mental
Health, Tokyo 187-8553, Japan, (6)Laboratory for Language Development,
Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, Japan
61
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
178 140.178 Familiar Speech Sounds Elicit Reduced Brain Activity in
the Reward Circuit and Amygdala in Children with Autism D. A. Abrams1,
T. Chen1, P. Odriozola1, K. Cheng1, S. Ryali1 and V. Menon2, (1)Stanford
University, Palo Alto, CA, (2)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford
University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
179 140.179 Moderators of Language Outcomes in Randomized
Controlled Esdm Intervention Trial for Toddlers with Autism K. A. Sullivan1,
W. L. Stone2, J. Munson3, S. J. Rogers4 and G. Dawson5, (1)Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, The Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical
Center, New York, NY, (2)Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle,
WA, (3)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)University of California
at Davis, Sacramento, CA, (5)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke
University, Durham, NC
180 140.180 Mutual Exclusivity in Young Children with ASD
C. E. Venker1, M. B. Winn1, S. Ellis-Weismer2, J. Saffran3 and J. Edwards4,
(1)Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI,
(2)University of Wisconsin-Madison, Middleton, WI, (3)University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (4)Communication Sciences and
Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
181 140.181 Lexical Processing By Toddlers with ASD
S. Ellis-Weismer1, E. K. Haebig2, J. Edwards1, J. Saffran1 and C. Venker3,
(1)University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (2)Communication
Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI,
(3)Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
182 140.182 Parent-Child Mutual Responsiveness, Language
Development, and Peer Relationships in Young Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder A. Rodda1, A. M. Estes2 and J. Munson1, (1)University
of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
183 140.183 Perceptual Binding and Audiovisual Speech Perception
in Autism Spectrum Disorders R. A. Stevenson1, M. Segers2, B. L. Ncube3,
S. Z. Sun1, N. D. Hazlett1, J. D. N. Ruppel1, S. Ferber1 and M. D. Barense1,
(1)Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(2)Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)York University,
Toronto, ON, Canada
184 140.184 Pitch Perception in Autism Is Associated with Superior
Non-Verbal Abilities M. Sharda1, N. E. Foster1, R. Chowdhury2, E. Germain1,
A. Tryfon2, T. Ouimet1, K. A. R. Doyle-Thomas3, E. Anagnostou3,
K. L. Hyde2,4 and N. A. Imaging Group5, (1)International Laboratory
for Brain Music and Sound Research (www.brams.org), University of
Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)International Laboratory for Brain
Music and Sound Research (brams.org), Université de Montréal, Montreal,
QC, Canada, (3)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Montreal Neurological
Institute, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, (5)http://www.
neurodevnet.ca/research/asd, Vancouver, BC, Canada
185 140.185 Quality of Communication in Young Adults with Autism
during a Simulated Employment Interview W. Mitchell and J. Volden,
University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
186 140.186 Quantifying the Use of Gestures in Autism Spectrum
Disorder A. Lambrechts1, K. Yarrow2, K. L. Maras3, R. Fusaroli4 and
S. B. Gaigg5, (1)City University London, London, England, United Kingdom,
(2)Psychology, City University London, London, United Kingdom,
(3)Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom, (4)Center of
functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus,
Denmark, (5)Autism Research Group, City University London, London,
United Kingdom
187 140.187 Quantitative Analysis of Disfluency in Children with ASD
K. Gorman1, H. MacFarlane1,2, R. Ingham1 and J. van Santen1, (1)Center
for Spoken Language Understanding, Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR, (2)Reed College, Portland, OR
62
188 140.188 Relationship Between Autism Spectrum Disorder
Education and Clinical Decision-Making in Early Intervention
S. T. Stronach1 and J. L. Schmedding-Bartley2, (1)Speech-LanguageHearing Sciences, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN,
(2)Communication Science and Disorders, Grand Valley State University,
Grand Rapids, MI
189 140.189 Relationship Between Handedness and Language
Function in Autism L. M. McCue1, A. R. McMichael2, L. H. Flick1,
D. L. Williams3 and T. E. Conturo4, (1)St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO,
(2)Washington University, St Louis, MO, (3)Duquesne University,
Pittsburgh, PA, (4)Washington University, St. Louis, MO
190 140.190 Say What?: Toddlers’ Vocabulary Growth Trajectories
Differ By Word Features L. DePolo1, J. Parish-Morris2, J. McCleery1,
L. Bateman1, S. Thomas1, S. J. Paterson3, J. Pandey3, P. Kostopoulos4,
A. Estes5, K. N. Botteron6, H. C. Hazlett7, L. Zwaigenbaum8, J. Piven9
and R. T. Schultz3, (1)Center for Autism Research, Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (3)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (4)Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill
University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (5)Speech and Hearing Sciences,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (6)Washington University School of
Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, (7)Carolina Institute for Developmental
Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC,
(8)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (9)University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
191 140.191 Some Wh-Questions Really Are Hard for Children
with ASD to Understand M. Jyotishi1, D. A. Fein1 and L. Naigles2,
(1)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (2)University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT
192 140.192 Spoken Language in School-Aged Children with ASD
and ADHD in a Virtual, Public Speaking Task N. S. Alpers1, S. Torabian2,
N. S. McIntyre3, L. Naigles4 and P. C. Mundy5, (1)University of Connecticut,
Willimantic, CT, (2)University of California Davis, Los Altos Hills, CA,
(3)School of Education, UC Davis, Davis, CA, (4)University of Connecticut,
Storrs, CT, (5)MIND Institute and School of Education, UC Davis,
Sacramento, CA
193 140.193 Study of Communication Deficits in the Siblings
of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using the Children’s
Communication Checklist-2: A Pilot Initiative from India S. S. Meera1,
S. C. Girimaji1, S. P. Seshadri1, M. Philip1 and N. Shivashankar2,
(1)NIMHANS, Bangalore, India, (2)Dept. of Speech Pathology and
Audiology, NIMHANS, Bangalore, India
194 140.194 Testing the Validity of the Pictorial Infant Communication
Scale in Preschool-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
M. V. Parlade1, C. S. Ghilain1, T. D. Owen1, H. L. Schneider1, A. Gutierrez2
and M. Alessandri1, (1)Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL,
(2)Psychology, Florida International University, Miami, FL
195 140.195 Thai Lexical Tones in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder T. Thongseiratch1, J. Chuthapisith2 and R. Roengpitya3,
(1)Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Sonkla
University, Songkla, Thailand, (2)Department of Paediatrics, Ramathibodi
Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, (3)Department of English,
Faculty of Arts, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
196 140.196 The Ability to Use a Picture As a Symbol in Children
with ASD J. Maljaars1, E. M. Scholte2, I. A. van Berckelaer-Onnes3 and
I. Noens1, (1)Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven,
Leuven, Belgium, (2)Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands, (3)Social and
Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – AM
197 140.197 The Autism Inpatient Collection (AIC): Problem Behaviors
and Communication Difficulties D. L. Williams1, K. A. Smith2,
C. A. Mazefsky3, R. Gabriels4, C. Peura5 and M. Siegel6, (1)Duquesne
University, Pittsburgh, PA, (2)Maine Medical Center Research Institute,
Portland, ME, (3)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,
Pittsburgh, PA, (4)Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO, (5)Spring
Harbor Hospital, Westbrook, ME, (6)Maine Medical Center Research
Institute, Westbrook, ME
198 140.198 The Development of Co-Speech Gesture and Its
Semantic Integration with Speech in Six- to 12-Year-Old Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorders W. C. So1, M. K. Y. Wong1, M. M. K. Chan2
and R. H. Y. Au2, (1)Department of Educational Psychology, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (2)The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
199 140.199 The Effects of a Comprehensive Intervention Model on
Functional Communication, Speech, and Language in Preschoolers with
ASD S. Booker1, S. Woodall1,2 and K. Van Skiver1, (1)Society for Treatment
of Autism, Calgary, AB, Canada, (2)Prairie Valley School Division, Regina,
SK, Canada
201 140.201 The Function of Gesture: Socially-Oriented Vs.
Process-Oriented Gestures in Autism Spectrum Disorder A. R. Canfield1,
I. M. Eigsti2 and A. de Marchena3, (1)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(2)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (3)Center for Autism
Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
202 140.202 The Impact of Child Variables on the Amount of
Teacher Verbal Input on Children with Autism X. Qian1 and J. Qian2,
(1)University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, (2)College of Education and
HumanDevelopment, Univerisity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
203 140.203 The Language-Cognition Interface in ASD: Complement
Sentences and False-Belief Reasoning M. Burnel1, A. Reboul2 and
S. Durrleman2, (1)Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, Grenoble,
France, (2)Laboratoire sur le Langage le Cerveau et la Cognition, Bron,
France
204 140.204 The Local Bias in ASC: Weak Central Coherence or a
Deficit in Executive Control? R. Booth1, A. W. Paciorek2 and F. Happe3,
(1)Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, United
Kingdom, (2)Institute of Modern Languages, Pedagogical University
of Krakow, Krakow, Poland, (3)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
205 140.205 The Origins of the SLI Phenotype in the Early Language
Development of Children with ASD L. Naigles1, S. Ozonoff2, S. J. Rogers3
and A. M. Mastergeorge4, (1)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(2)MIND Institute and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA,
(3)University of California at Davis, Sacramento, CA, (4)Family Studies
and Human Development, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
207 140.207 Voice Patterns in Adult English Speakers with Autism
Spectrum Disorder R. Fusaroli1, A. Lambrechts2, K. Yarrow3, K. L. Maras4
and S. B. Gaigg5, (1)Center of functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus
University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, (2)City University London, London,
England, United Kingdom, (3)Psychology, City University London, London,
United Kingdom, (4)Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom,
(5)Autism Research Group, City University London, London,
United Kingdom
Poster Session
141 - International and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
208 141.208 A Collaborative Community Awareness Screening
Program on Autism in Lagos Nigeria: Lessons Learnt Y. O. Oshodi1,
A. T. Olagunju1, C. S. Umeh1, O. F. Aina2, W. Oyibo3, A. Lamikanra4,
F. E. A. Lesi5 and J. D. Adeyemi1, (1)Psychiatry department, College of
Medicine University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria, (2)Department of Psychiatry,
College of Medicine University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria, (3)Department of
Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine University of Lagos,
Lagos, Nigeria, (4)Blazing trails international Center, Texas, TX,
(5)Paediatrics department, College of Medicine University of Lagos,
Lagos, Nigeria
FRIDAY – AM
200 140.200 The Effects of an Interactive Robot on Increasing
Communication Skills for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
J. Musolff1, D. Portenier1, J. J. Diehl2, M. Villano3 and C. R. Crowell3,
(1)Barber National Institute, Erie, PA, (2)Psychology, University of Notre
Dame, Notre Dame, IN, (3)University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
206 140.206 The Temporal Structure of the Autistic Voice:
A Cross-Linguistic Investigation R. Fusaroli1,2,3, R. B. Grossman4,
C. Cantio5, N. Bilenberg6 and E. Weed7,8,9, (1)Center of functionally
Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark,
(2)Center for Semiotics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, (3)Interacting
Minds Center, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, (4)FACElab, Emerson
College, Boston, MA, (5)Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark,
(6)Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense,
Denmark, (7)Linguistics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, (8)Interacting
Minds Centre, Aarhus, Denmark, (9)Center for Functionally Integrative
Neuroscience, Aarhus, Denmark
209 141.209 A Cross-Cultural Study of Self- and Other-Descriptions
By Individuals with ASD in New Delhi, India and Los Angeles, USA
R. S. Brezis1, N. Singhal2, T. C. Daley3, T. Weisner4 and M. Barua2,
(1)Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Jerusalem, Israel, (2)Action For Autism,
New Delhi, India, (3)Westat, Durham, NC, (4)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
210 141.210 A Parent-Implemented Autism Intervention Among
Underserved Families in Taiwan P. F. Chen1, P. C. Tsai2, Y. T. Wu3,
A. C. Stahmer4, S. R. Rieth5, C. M. Chang6, C. C. Wu7, C. L. Chu8,
F. W. Lung9 and L. C. Lee2, (1)Calo Psychiatric Center, Pingtung county,
Taiwan, (2)Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD, (3)School and Graduate Institute of Physical
Therapy, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan,
(4)Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA,
(5)Child and Family Development, San Diego State University, San Diego,
CA, (6)Calo Psychiatric Center, Pingtung County, Taiwan, (7)Department
of Psychology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan,
(8)Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital,
College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan,
(9)Songde Branch, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
211 141.211 ASD Knowledge and Stigmas in Tanzania
A. J. Harrison1, B. L. Cochran1 and K. K. Blane2, (1)University of Georgia,
Athens, GA, (2)Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI
212 141.212 Challenges to the Development of Culturally Sensitive
ASD Interventions for Latino Families S. R. Cohen1 and J. Blacher2,
(1)University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (2)University of
California - Riverside, Los Angeles, CA
63
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
213 141.213 Changing College Students’ Conceptions of ASD:
Benefits of an Online Training for Undergraduates in the United States
and Lebanon R. Obeid1, C. Shane-Simpson2, D. DeNigris3, N. Daou4,
P. J. Brooks5 and K. Gillespie-Lynch6, (1)The Graduate Center - CUNY,
Staten Island, NY, (2)The Graduate Center at the City University of New
York, New York, NY, (3)The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY,
(4)Psychology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon,
(5)Department of Psychology, The Graduate Center - CUNY, New York,
NY, (6)Department of Psychology, College of Staten Island - CUNY,
Staten Island, NY
214 141.214 Cross-Cultural Comparison of College Students’
Stigmatizing Attitudes Towards ASD Between the United States and Japan
F. Someki1, M. Torii2, P. J. Brooks3,4, R. Obeid3 and K. Gillespie-Lynch3,4,
(1)Educational Studies, College of Staten Island, City University of New
York, Staten Island, NY, (2)Human Developmental and Environment,
Graduate School of Kobe University, Kobe, Japan, (3)Department of
Psychology, The Graduate Center - CUNY, New York, NY, (4)Department
of Psychology, College of Staten Island - CUNY, Staten Island, NY
215 141.215 Cross-Cultural Comparisons of Children’s Theory-ofMind and Executive-Function Development in Typical and Atypical (ASD)
Samples A. Pushparatnam and C. Hughes, Centre for Family Research,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
216 141.216 Distribution of Autism-Associated Behaviors in a
General School-Aged Population: Findings from a Population-Based Study
in Taiwan P. C. Tsai1, R. A. Harrington1, I. T. Li2, F. W. Lung3 and
L. C. Lee1, (1)Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD, (2)Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial
Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, (3)Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
217 141.217 Faith and Respect: Parenting the Urban African
American Child with Autism K. W. Burkett1, E. Morris2 and
P. M. Manning-Courtney3, (1)Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics,
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, (2)Nursing
Research, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH,
(3)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
218 141.218 Increasing Awareness of Autism and Other
Developmental Disorders Among Rural Ethiopian Community Health
Workers: Impact of a Brief Training R. A. Hoekstra1, D. Tilahun2,
Y. Baheretibeb2, B. Tekola Gebru1, I. Roth1, B. Davey1, A. Fekadu2 and
C. Hanlon2,3, (1)Department of Life, Health and Chemical Sciences, The
Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, (2)Department of
Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa
University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, (3)Centre for Global Mental Health,
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
219 141.219 Physiological Monitoring during PEERS®: A “CultureFree” Method of Understanding Intervention Response N. Jain1,
S. Ahamed1, S. Stevens1, K. A. Schohl2, B. Dolan1, A. J. McVey1, S. Potts1,
C. L. Casnar3, C. Caiozzo1, E. M. Vogt2 and A. V. Van Hecke4, (1)Marquette
University, Milwaukee, WI, (2)Clinical Psychology, Marquette University,
Milwaukee, WI, (3)University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI,
(4)Psychology, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
220 141.220 Spirituality in Latino Families of Children with Autism
Spectrum Disorder K. Salkas1, I. G. Marques2 and S. Magana1, (1)Disability
and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL,
(2)Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
221 141.221 The Analysis of Korean Urban High School Students’
Awareness on Autism Spectrum Disorder C. J. Shin, Korea International
School, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, South Korea
64
222 141.222 Understanding Parents’ and Professionals’ Knowledge
and Awareness of Autism in Nepal A. Alexander1, E. Pellicano1,
E. Medeiros2, K. Man Tumbahangphe3, F. Gibbons4, M. Wickenden2,
M. Shrestha5, A. Costello2 and M. Heys2, (1)Centre for Research in Autism
and Education (CRAE), Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom,
(2)University College London Institute for Global Health, London, United
Kingdom, (3)Mother and Infant Research Activities, Kathmandu, Nepal,
(4)King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Autism Care Nepal,
Kathmandu, Nepal
223 141.223 What about the Adults? C. Hoffner Barthold, Special
Education, Graduate School of Education, George Masson University,
Fairfax, VA
Oral Session – 6A
142 - Preterm Birth and ASD Risk
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: L. Zwaigenbaum, University of Alberta, Edmonton,
AB, Canada
1:45
142.001 Detection of Early ASD Risk in Preterm Infants
M. Yaari1, N. Yirmiya1, B. Bar-Oz2, S. Eventov-Friedman3,
D. Mankuta4, E. Friedlander1, A. Harel1 and N. Yitzhak1,
(1)Psychology Department, Hebrew University, Jerusalem,
Israel, (2)Department of Neonatology, Hadassah Medical Center,
Jerusalem, Israel, (3)Neonatology Unit, Hadassah Ein-Kerem
University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel, (4)Department of Obstetrics
and Gynecology, Hadassah Ein Kerem University Hospital,
Jerusalem, Israel
1:57
142.002 Social Cognitive Atypicalities Associated with Preterm
Birth: A Challenge to the Early Diagnosis of Autism
S. Fletcher-Watson1, E. Moore1 and J. Boardman2, (1)University
of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, (2)Child Life and Health,
University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
2:09
142.003 Early Brainstem Dysfunction in Preterm Infants
Increases Risk for ASD: Findings from Parent Report Measures
J. M. Gardner1, B. Z. Karmel1, I. L. Cohen1, H. T. T. Phan1,
P. M. Kittler1, E. M. Lennon1, S. Parab2 and A. Barone2, (1)Infant
Development, New York State Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY, (2)Pediatrics,
Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY
2:21
142.004 Quality of Interaction Between Very Preterm Infants and
Their Mother in the First Year of Life Predicts General Development
and Autism Features at 18 Months J. Vermeirsch1, L. Verhaeghe1,
E. Demurie1, L. De Schuymer2 and H. Roeyers1, (1)Department of
Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University,
Ghent, Belgium, (2)Kind&Gezin, Brussels, Belgium
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
1:57
144.002 Right Place, Wrong Time: Delayed Amygdala and Insula
Activation in ASD during Classical Fear Conditioning and Extinction
D. N. Top1, K. Stephenson2, M. South3 and C. B. Kirwan3, (1)Giant
Steps Program, Wasatch Mental Health, Provo, UT,
(2)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo,
UT, (3)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT
2:09
144.003 Association of Cognitive Factors and Anxiety with Math
Achievement in Adolescents with ASD J. Beck1, T. Oswald1,
A. M. Iosif1, J. C. Matter1, L. Gilhooly1 and M. Solomon2, (1)UC
Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (2)Department of Psychiatry
& Behavioral Sciences, University of California-Davis,
Sacramento, CA
2:21
144.004 Effectiveness of CBT in Changing Attention Biases in
Children with ASD and Comorbid Anxiety A. T. Meyer1,
P. S. Powell1, M. R. Klinger2, J. Reaven3, A. Blakeley-Smith3 and
L. G. Klinger4, (1)Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
NC, (2)Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel
Hill, NC, (3)Psychiatry, JFK Partners/University of Colorado School of
Medicine, Aurora, CO, (4)TEACCH Autism Program; Department of
Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Oral Session – 6B
143 - Early ASD Surveillance and Screening
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: L. Zwaigenbaum, University of Alberta, Edmonton,
AB, Canada
2:40
143.001 Broadband and Autism-Specific Screening Using the
Early Screening for Autism and Communication Disorders (ESAC):
Moving from Paper to the Smart ESAC for Children 12 to 36 Months
of Age A. M. Wetherby1, W. Guthrie1, E. Petkova2,
J. Woods1, C. Lord3, D. Voccola4, B. Hall4 and L. Rozenblit4,
(1)Florida State University Autism Institute, Tallahassee, FL, (2)New
York University, New York, NY, (3)Weill Cornell Medical College,
White Plains, NY, (4)Prometheus Research, LLC, New Haven, CT
2:52
143.002 Universal Developmental Surveillance for Autism
Spectrum Disorders in Infants and Toddlers Using the Social
Attention and Communication Study-Revised (SACS-R) J. Barbaro1
and C. Dissanayake2, (1)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, (2)Olga
Tennison Autism Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia
3:04
143.003 Parents’ Concerns Predict a Later Autism Spectrum
Disorder Outcome: A Prospective Study of High-Risk Siblings from
6 to 36 Months L. A. Sacrey1, L. Zwaigenbaum1, S. E. Bryson2,
J. A. Brian3, I. M. Smith4, W. Roberts5, P. Szatmari6, C. Roncadin7,
N. Garon8, T. Vaillancourt9 and C. Novak1, (1)University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, (2)Autism Research Centre, Dalhousie/
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)Autism Research
Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital/ U of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Dalhousie University / IWK
Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)Pediatrics, University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (6)University of Toronto, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (7)Kinark Child and Family Services, Markham, ON,
Canada, (8)Psychology, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB,
Canada, (9)University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Oral Session – 7B
145 - Repetitive Behaviors and Interests
2:40
145.001 Repetitive and Restricted Behaviours in the General
Population: Validation and Heritability of Two New Instruments for
Parents and Children D. W. Evans1 and M. Uljarevic2, (1)Bucknell
University, Lewisberg, PA, (2)Olga Tennison Autism Research
Centre, School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University,
Bundoora, Australia
143.004 Social but Not Repetitive Scores on the Quantitative
Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT) Predict Later Autism
Spectrum Diagnosis in a Prospective High-Risk Sibling Study
G. Pasco1, C. Allison2, S. Baron-Cohen3, M. H. Johnson4 and
T. Charman1, (1)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Autism
Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Autism Research
Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
(4)Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck,
University of London, London, United Kingdom
2:52
145.002 Repetitive and Restricted Behaviors in Infants at Risk for
ASD: Comparing Caregiver Report and Observational Measurement
K. Berry, C. Harrop and L. Huynh, University of California, Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
3:04
145.003 Measuring Commitment to Special Interests in Adults
on the Autism Spectrum I. A. Roth1, M. T. Roelfsema2 and
R. A. Hoekstra1, (1)Department of Life, Health and Chemical
Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom,
(2)Dutch Knowledge Centre on Mild Intellectual Disabilities, Utrecht,
Netherlands
3:16
145.004 Examining Patterns of Restricted and Repetitive
Behaviors in Angelman Syndrome and Idiopathic Autism Using the
Behavior and Sensory Interests Questionnaire J. Love-Nichols1,
S. Maisel2, D. Peterson1 and E. Hanson2, (1)Division of
Development Medicine and Program in Genomics, Boston
Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, (2)Boston Children’s Hospital,
Boston, MA
Oral Session – 7A
144 - Conditioning and Anxiety
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: D. M. Bowler, Autism Research Group, City University
London, London, United Kingdom
1:45
Session Chair: D. M. Bowler, Autism Research Group, City University
London, London, United Kingdom
FRIDAY – PM
3:16
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
144.001 Neural Networks for Anxiety? Decreased Integration
in ASD of Sensorimotor and Emotional Pathways That Support
Classical Fear Conditioning M. South1, C. Doxey2, D. N. Top3,
K. Stephenson2 and C. B. Kirwan1, (1)Psychology and
Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(2)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo,
UT, (3)Giant Steps Program, Wasatch Mental Health, Provo, UT
65
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
3:04
147.003 Older Adults with ASD: Executive Functioning Deficits,
Functional and Structural Connectivity Differences, and Accelerated
Cortical Thickness Atrophy B. B. Braden1, C. J. Smith2,
T. K. Glaspy1, C. T. Elrod1, K. D. Steinke1, V. J. Amaya1,
H. Ciccone1,2 and L. C. Baxter1, (1)Neuroimaging, Barrow
Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ, (2)Research, Southwest
Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ
3:16
147.004 Ageing and Psychological Functioning in Autism
Spectrum Disorder A. Roestorf1, D. M. Bowler1 and P. Howlin2,
(1)Autism Research Group, City University London, London,
United Kingdom, (2)Department of Psychology, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom
Oral Session – 8A
146 - Adult Outcome: Influence of Family and
School Contexts and Psychopathology
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: L. G. Klinger, TEACCH Autism Program; Department
of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
1:45
1:57
2:09
2:21
146.001 Family and School Contexts Predict Patterns of Change
in Functioning over 10 Years Among Adolescents and Adults
with Autism Spectrum Disorders A. C. Woodman1, L. E. Smith2,
J. Greenberg2 and M. R. Mailick2, (1)University of Massachusetts
Amherst, Amherst, MA, (2)University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI
146.002 Association Between Psychiatric Comorbidity and
Employment in Adults with ASD K. J. Cottle1, D. A. Bilder1,
J. Viskochil1, A. V. Bakian1, H. Coon1, M. Farley2 and W. M.
McMahon1, (1)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(2)Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
146.003 Longitudinal Associations Between Social Experiences
and Depression for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders
S. L. Bishop1, R. E. Adams2, K. Gotham3 and C. Lord4,
(1)Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA, (2)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, (3)Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
TN, (4)Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY
146.004 Major Life Events and Their Role in Psychopathology
Among Transitioning Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder
J. L. Taylor1 and K. Gotham2, (1)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,
Nashville, TN, (2)Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
Oral Session – 8B
147 - Cognitive Aging in ASD
Oral Session – 9A
148 - From Mice to Monkeys: New Approaches to
Dissecting the Neurobiology of ASD
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: J. Veenstra-Vander Weele, Columbia University /
New York State Psychiatric Institute, Psychiatry, New York, NY
1:45
148.001 Convergent Excitability Defects in Prefrontal
Corticothalamic Pyramidal Neurons Link Genes to Behavior in
Mouse Models of Autism A. C. Brumback1 and V. S. Sohal2, (1)Mail
Code 0444, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco,
CA, (2)Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, CA
1:57
148.002 Cognitive Impairments in a Mouse Model of
16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome M. Yang1, F. L. Lewis1, G. Foley1,
T. Portmann2,3, R. Dolmetsch2,4 and J. N. Crawley1, (1)MIND
Institute and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento,
CA, (2)Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University School
of Medicine, Stanford, CA, (3)Drug Discovery Program, Circuit
Therapeutics Inc, Menlo Park, CA, (4)Novartis Institutes for
Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA
2:09
148.003 Oxytocin Reverses Social Deficits in the Shank3Deficient Rat, a First Genetically Modified Rat Model for Autism
H. Harony-Nicolas1,2, O. B. Gunal1,2, M. Kay3, L. Klei4, A. Browne1,
S. A. Dick1, A. N. O’Toole5, Y. Kou1,2, A. Ma’ayan6, K. Roeder7,
S. Wagner3 and J. D. Buxbaum1,2,8,9,10,11, (1)Psychiatry, Icahn School
of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (2)Seaver Autism
Center for Research and Treatment, New York, NY,
(3)Neurobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel, (4)Psychiatry,
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA,
(5)Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin,
Ireland, (6)Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics,
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY,
(7)Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA,
(8)Fishberg Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (9)Genetics and Genomic Sciences,
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY,
(10)Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (11)The Mindich Child Health and
Development Institute,, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,
New York, NY
2:21
148.004 Assessment of Social Behavior in Non-Human Primate
Infants Following Administration of Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines
L. Hewitson1, B. Curtis2, N. Liberato2, C. Kenney2, V. Yutuc2,
C. Ferrier2, C. N. Marti3 and G. P. Sackett2, (1)The Johnson Center
for Child Health and Development, Austin, TX, (2)Washington
National Primate Research Center, Seattle, WA, (3)Abacist
Analytics, LLC, Austin, TX
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: L. G. Klinger, TEACCH Autism Program; Department
of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
2:40
147.001 Do Cognitive Challenges of Adults with Autism Persist,
Abate or Increase into Old Age? A. G. Lever1 and H. M. Geurts1,2,
(1)Dutch Autism & ADHD Research Center, Brain & Cognition,
University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands, (2)Dr. Leo
Kannerhuis (autism clinic), Amsterdam, Netherlands
2:52
147.002 Working Memory Across the Adult Lifespan: Do
Individuals with and without Autism Show Differential Age-Related
Decline? A. G. Lever1, M. Werkle-Bergner2, A. M. Brandmaier2,
K. R. Ridderinkhof3 and H. M. Geurts1,4, (1)Dutch Autism & ADHD
Research Center, Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam,
Amsterdam, Netherlands, (2)Center for Lifespan Psychology,
Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany,
(3)Amsterdam Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam,
Amsterdam, Netherlands, (4)Dr. Leo Kannerhuis (autism clinic),
Amsterdam, Netherlands
66
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
Oral Session – 9B
149 - Metabolomic and Genetic Factors in ASD
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: J. Veenstra-Vander Weele, Columbia University /
New York State Psychiatric Institute, Psychiatry, New York, NY
149.001 Effects of Metabolism Changes during Development on
the Plasma Profile of ASD in Children R. Burrier1, E. Donley1,
P. R. West1, A. M. Smith1, S. J. James2, B. Fontaine1 and
R. Alexandridis1, (1)Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Madison, WI,
(2)University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
2:52
149.002 Epigenetic Dysregulation of microRNA-142 and
Upregulation of Multiple microRNAs That Target Oxytocin Receptor
in the Frontal Cortex of Individuals with Autism E. Elliott, M. Easton
and S. Nardone, Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, Safed,
Israel
3:04
149.003 Upregulation of Phospho-S6 and Dendritic Overgrowth
of Developing Layer V Neurons Are Phenotypes in Common
Between Pten+/- and Fmr1-/y Mice W. C. Huang1,2 and D. T. Page2,
(1)The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, FL,
(2)Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida,
Jupiter, FL
3:16
149.004 Engrailed Expression in Hippocampus and Its Effects
on Dendritic Complexity: Implication for Autism Spectrum Disorders
A. Soltani1, S. Lebrun1, R. Joshi2, F. Castagner2, G. Carpentier3,
G. Zunino4, Z. Jaffal1, S. Chantepie-Laborde3, C. Desnos1,
Y. Bozzi4, F. Darchen1 and O. Stettler3, (1)Centre Universitaire des
Saints-Pères, Neurophotonics Laboratory - Synaptic trafficking team
CNRS/Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France, (2)Development
and Neuropharmacology Group, Centre for Interdisciplinary
Research in Biology (CIRB), CNRS UMR 7241, INSERM U
1050, Collège de France, Paris,, Paris, France, (3)Laboratoire
CRRET, EAC CNRS 7149, Faculté des Sciences et Technologie,
Université Paris Est Créteil, France, Créteil, France, (4)Molecular
Neuropathology Laboratory, Centre for Integrative Biology (CIBIO),
University of Trento, Italy, Trento, Italy
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: C. Ecker, The Sackler Institute for Translational
Neurodevelopment, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom
1:45
150.001 Cortical Surface Anatomy in Adult Females with
Autism M. Gudbrandsen1, E. Daly2, D. Andrews3,
S. Baron-Cohen4, M. C. Lai5, M. V. Lombardo6, A. N. Ruigrok4,
M. AIMS Consortium7, D. G. Murphy2, M. C. Craig8,9 and C. Ecker3,
(1)The Sackler Institute for Translational Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London,
England, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology
& Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(3)The Sackler Institute for Translational Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (4)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, (5)Department of Psychiatry, National
Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan,
(6)Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia,
Cyprus, (7)MRC AIMS Consortium, London, United Kingdom,
(8)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College
London and National Autism Unit, Royal Bethlem Hospital, SLAM
NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom, (9)Bethlem Royal
Hospital, SLAM NHS Foundation Trust, National Autism Unit, Kent,
United Kingdom
1:57
150.002 On the Question of Brain Overgrowth in ASD: An in
Depth Methodological Analysis Using the Large Abide Dataset
A. Michael1 and G. J. Katuwal1,2, (1)Autism and Developmental
Medicine Institute, Geisinger Health System, Lewisburg, PA,
(2)Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology,
Rochester, NY
2:09
150.003 Older Adults with Autism: So Much for the Gray Matter?
P. C. M. Koolschijn1 and H. M. Geurts2, (1)Brain & Cognition,
Dutch Autism & ADHD Research Center, University of Amsterdam,
Amsterdam, Netherlands, (2)Dutch Autism & ADHD Research
Center, Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam,
Netherlands
2:21
150.004 Persistence of Megalencephaly in Early Childhood in a
Subset of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder L. Libero1,
C. W. Nordahl2, D. D. Li2, S. J. Rogers3 and D. G. Amaral2,
(1)UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, AL, (2)MIND Institute
and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University
of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (3)Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis MIND Institute,
Sacramento, CA
FRIDAY – PM
2:40
Oral Session – 10A
150 - Brain Anatomy in ASD
Oral Session – 10B
151 - Brain Connectivity in ASD
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: C. Ecker, The Sackler Institute for Translational
Neurodevelopment, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom
2:40
151.001 Connectivity Differences in a Heterogeneous Sample of
Mice from Multiple Mouse Models of Autism Y. Yee1, J. Ellegood2
and J. P. Lerch2, (1)Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON,
Canada
67
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
2:52
151.002 Abnormalities in Large-Scale Brain Network Architecture
in Autism B. A. Zielinski1, M. D. Prigge2, J. E. Lainhart3,
A. Alexander4, E. D. Bigler5, N. Lange6 and G. Gerig7, (1)Division
of Pediatric Neurology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(2)Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (3)Psychiatry,
Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI,
(4)Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison,
WI, (5)Psychology, Neuroscience Center, Brigham Young
University, Provo, UT, (6)McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, (7)School
of Computing & Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute SCI,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
3:30
152.001 The Transition to Secondary Education for Young
People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Controlled Trial
of the Systemic Transition in Education Programme for ASD
(STEP-ASD) W. Mandy1, M. Murin2, O. Baykaner2, J. Hellriegel3,
S. Staunton4, S. Anderson5 and D. H. H. Skuse6, (1)Behavioural
and Brain Sciences Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London,
United Kingdom, (2)Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United
Kingdom, (3)UCL, london, United Kingdom, (4)Institute of Child
Health, Dublin, Ireland, (5)Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit,
Institute of Child Health, UCL, London, United Kingdom, (6)Institute
of Child Health, London, United Kingdom
3:04
151.003 Distinctive Developmental Pattern of Functional and
Structural Connectivities within Default Mode Network in ASD
H. Y. Chien1, S. S. F. Gau2, Y. J. Chen1, Y. C. Lo1, H. Y. Lin2,
Y. C. Hsu1 and W. Y. I. Tseng1, (1)Center for Optoelectronic
Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei,
Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan, (2)Department of Psychiatry, National
Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
3:55
3:16
151.004 Ultrastructural Analysis of Axons in Temporal Lobe
White Matter in Autism T. A. Avino1, X. B. Liu2 and
C. M. Schumann1, (1)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (2)Cell Biology and
Human Anatomy, UC Davis, Davis, CA
152.002 Impact of a Preventive Intervention on the Relationship
Between Teachers and Adolescent Students with Autism Spectrum
Disorder J. Hopman1,2, N. Tick1,2, J. van der Ende2, P. van Lier3,
T. Wubbels4, F. C. Verhulst2, L. Breeman1,2 and A. Maras1, (1)Yulius
Academy, Yulius Mental Health Care, Barendrecht, Netherlands,
(2)Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry/psychology,
Erasmus MC - Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands,
(3)Department of Developmental Psychology, VU University
Amsterdam, Amsterdan, Netherlands, (4)Utrecht University, Faculty
of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Utrecht, Netherlands
4:20
152.003 Using Parent-Assistance and Teacher-Facilitation to
Teach Social Skills in the Classroom: Treatment Outcome for the
PEERS® School-Based Curriculum E. A. Laugeson1,
R. Ellingsen2, L. C. Tucci3, Y. Bolourian4 and S. Bates5,
(1)Psychiatry, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human
Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (2)University of California Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA, (3)The Help Group/UCLA Autism Research
Alliance, Redondo Beach , CA, CA, (4)The Help Group - UCLA
Autism Research Alliance, Moorpark, CA, (5)Psychiatry, UCLA
PEERS Program, Los Angeles, CA
4:45
152.004 A Randomized Controlled Trial to Investigate the Effects
of a Psychosexual Training Program for Adolescents with Autism
Spectrum Disorder: Results of the Tackling Teenage Training
Program K. Visser1, K. Greaves-Lord2, F. C. Verhulst3, N. Tick3,
A. Maras4 and E. van der Vegt1, (1)Erasmus MC-Sophia, Rotterdam,
Netherlands, (2)Yulius Autisme Expertisecentrum, Rotterdam/
Dordrecht, Netherlands, (3)Department of Child & Adolescent
Psychiatry/psychology, Erasmus MC - Sophia Children’s Hospital,
Rotterdam, Netherlands, (4)Yulius Academy, Yulius Mental Health
Care, Barendrecht, Netherlands
5:10
Discussant
Panel Session
152 - Tackling Teenage Troubles: Interventions
Aimed at Guiding Adolescents with ASD through
the Challenges in the Domains of School, Peers
and Psychosexual Development
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: D. H. Skuse, Institute of Child Health, London,
United Kingdom
Discussant: K. Greaves-Lord, Yulius Autisme Expertisecentrum,
Rotterdam/Dordrecht, Netherlands
Adolescence can be a challenging period for individuals with autism spectrum
disorder (ASD), because of the physical, emotional and social changes that
occur simultaneously. The change from primary to secondary education
entails a large environmental change in location, daily schedule, and social
context. Therefore, guidance in this transition is important. It is also crucial to
foster a save relation with the teachers, to enhance the learning environment
and facilitate optimal academic achievement. In order to have positive peer
interactions and develop and maintain friendships, social skills become
increasingly important. Training social skills, while involving the parents who
can additionally coach these skills in the home and community environment,
is therefore also important. Finally, due to hormonal changes, psychical
changes occur that usually concur with increased sexual awareness and
interest. Since sexuality and intimate relations require regulation of emotions,
behaviours and social-communication, guidance in the area of psychosexual
development can also be of importance. Given these challenges, the current
panel will discuss research on interventions that are aimed at guidance for
adolescents with ASD regarding 1) the transition from primary to secondary
school, 2) a positive teacher-pupil relation, 3) social skills for interaction with
peers, and 4) a healthy psychosexual development.
68
Panel Session
153 - Integrating Human Genetics, Functional
Genomics, and Model Systems to Illuminate the
Etiology of ASD
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: M. W. State, Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, CA
Gene discovery via next generation sequencing is paramount to
understanding the underlying biology of autism spectrum disorder
(ASD). However, interpretation of genetic variation is confounded by the
heterogeneity of ASD, as well as the difficulty understanding the functional
role of non-coding regions. This panel outlines a paradigm for translating
findings from whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to testable
hypotheses of ASD neurobiology. In the first talk, recent findings from
whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing studies are presented with
an emphasis on using maps of regulatory regions to interpret non-coding
variation. Next, specific chromatin modifiers, associated with ASD risk via
these DNA sequencing studies, are investigated with ChIP-seq in order
to build regulatory networks that may be perturbed in ASD. The third talk
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
in this panel uses a novel framework to integrate the data from the first
two talks with gene expression data from the developing human brain in
order to increase our power to detect genes associated with ASD. Finally,
in the fourth talk, we highlight recent efforts to translate genetic findings to
functional biology and pharmacological screening using zebrafish as a model
system.
3:30
4:00
5:00
153.002 Chromatin Remodelers in Autism: Deciphering
Regulatory Networks That Contribute to Autism Risk J. Cotney1,
R. A. Muhle2, S. J. Sanders3, L. Liu4, A. J. Willsey3, W. Niu1, W. Liu1,
L. Klei5, J. Lei4, J. Yin1, S. Reilly1, A. Tebbenkamp6, C. Bichsel6,
M. Pletikos6, N. Sestan6, K. Roeder4, M. W. State3, B. Devlin5 and
J. Noonan1, (1)Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT, (2)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT,
(3)Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (4)Statistics, Carnegie
Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)Psychiatry, University of
Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (6)Neurobiology,
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
153.003 Gene Expression, Regulatory Elements and Rare
Sequence Variation Identify Genes and Subnetworks Underlying
Autism Risk A. E. Cicek1, L. Liu2, S. J. Sanders3, A. J. Willsey3,
J. Cotney4, R. A. Muhle5, N. Sestan6, J. Noonan4, M. W. State3,
B. Devlin7 and K. Roeder2, (1)Ray and Stephanie Lane Center for
Computational Biology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA,
(2)Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA,
(3)Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (4)Genetics, Yale
University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (5)Yale Child Study
Center, New Haven, CT, (6)Neurobiology, Yale University School of
Medicine, New Haven, CT, (7)Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh
School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
153.004 Zebrafish Mutants of the Autism Risk Gene Cntnap2
Identify Gabaergic Defects and Estrogens As Phenotypic
Suppressors E. J. Hoffman1, K. J. Turner2, J. M. Fernandez1,
S. W. Wilson2, J. Rihel2, M. W. State3 and A. J. Giraldez4, (1)Child
Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT, (2)Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University
College London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Psychiatry, UCSF,
San Francisco, CA, (4)Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, CT
Panel Session
154 - Meaningful Social Outcomes in Real World
Settings: Targets, Interventions, and Change
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: J. J. Locke, University of Pennsylvania, Seattle, WA
Discussant: D. S. Mandell, Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) usually face complex social
challenges in schools. Although placing children with ASD with their typically
developing peers is a common practice in public school settings, inclusion
alone may not be sufficient to increase social ability. Studies of included
children with ASD demonstrate that they have poorer social outcomes
than their typically developing peers, and these differences worsen with
3:30
154.001 Social Network Analysis of Children with ASD:
Predictors of Fragmentation and Connectivity in Elementary School
Classrooms A. Anderson1 and C. Kasari2, (1)UCLA, Los Angeles,
CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood,
CA
3:55
154.002 What Are They Doing at Recess? Examining
Playground Behavior Between Elementary School Children with
and without Autism Spectrum Disorder J. J. Locke1, W. Shih2 and
C. Kasari3, (1)University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA,
(2)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)UCLA Center for Autism Research &
Treatment, Westwood, CA
4:20
154.003 Gender Differences in the Social Behaviors of Children
with ASD M. Dean1 and R. Harwood2, (1)University of California Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)HRSA, Rockville, MD
4:45
154.004 Does Peer Composition and Intervention Approach
Matter for Improving Peer Engagement during Recess for Children
with ASD? M. Kretzmann1, F. Orlich2, B. H. King3, R. J. Landa4,
C. Lord5 and C. Kasari6, (1)University of California Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)Seattle Children’s Research Institute,
Seattle, WA, (3)Psychiatry and behavioral sciences, University
of Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)Department of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore,
MD, (5)Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY, (6)UCLA
Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
5:10
Discussant
FRIDAY – PM
4:30
153.001 Whole-Genome Sequencing in ASD Quartets and
Integration with Regulatory Elements Active during Human Brain
Development A. J. Willsey1, S. Reilly2, M. Walker1, R. A. Muhle3,
J. Cotney2, S. J. Sanders1, B. Devlin4, K. Roeder5, N. Sestan6,
J. Noonan2 and M. W. State1, (1)Psychiatry, UCSF, San Francisco,
CA, (2)Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT, (3)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (4)Psychiatry,
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, (5)
Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA,
(6)Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
age. Interventions to address social challenges typically occur outside of
school settings and rarely generalize. This symposium will address these
challenges by: a) presenting data from measures of social connectedness
and peer engagement of elementary aged children with ASD and their typical
classmates in public schools; b) exploring the role of age and gender in these
connections; and c) comparing changes in peer engagement in response
to different interventions. These data represent the large multi-site efforts of
researchers engaged in community-based research designed to introduce
effective social skills interventions and testing meaningful social outcome
measures in community settings.
Panel Session
155 - Neuronal Migrational Abnormalities in Autism
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair & Discussant: M. F. Casanova, Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
There are many neuropathological findings in autism spectrum disorder
(ASD). Some of the reported findings can be accounted by either
methodological flaws, the effects of preagonal/agonal conditions, artifacts of
postmortem tissue, or as being secondary to comorbidities. A few findings
remain that by themselves are abnormal and symptomatic, e.g., heterotopias,
cortical malformations (dysplasias). The presence of heterotopias and cortical
dysplasias in ASD suggests abnormalities of germinal cell division and their
subsequent migration to the cortical plate. In this panel we will discuss and
illustrate the available evidence for a neuronal migratory disturbance in
ASD. The lectures will summarize the following findings in the brains of ASD
individuals: 1) Computerized image analysis studies will provide quantitative
evidence of increased neuronal cellularity within the white matter of the brain,
especially the subplate region, 2) Serial sections of whole brain specimens
will detail the presence of heterotopic clusters of cells and cortical dysplasias,
3) Immunocytochemical staining of the cerebral cortex will illustrate
abnormalities of specific interneurons in regards to their location within the
laminae of the cerebral cortex, and 4) We will summarize genetic evidence
for the roles of disturbed neurogenesis and network desynchronization in
autism.
69
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
3:30
155.001 Neuronal Profiles within the Subplate and Their Potential
Contributions to Cortical Organization in Autism J. J. Hutsler1 and
T. A. Avino2, (1)Cognitive and Brain Sciences, University of Nevada
Reno, Reno, NV, (2)MIND Institute, University of California, Davis,
Sacramento, CA
3:55
155.002 Patterns of Neuronal Migration Abnormalities in
Autism of Unknown Etiology and Autism Caused By Chromosome
15q11.2-q13 Duplications, and Their Contribution to Clinical
Phenotype J. Wegiel1, I. Kuchna1, J. Wegiel1, K. Nowicki1,
S. Y. Ma2, H. Imaki1, E. B. London3, T. Wisniewski3 and
W. T. Brown3, (1)Developmental Neurobiology, New York State
Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten
Island, NY, (2)Developmental Neurobilogy, New York State Institute
for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY,
(3)New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities, Staten Island, NY
4:20
155.003 Parvalbumin Stained Cells Are Reduced in the Cerebral
Cortex of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders
V. Martinez-Cerdeno, Pathology, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA
4:45
155.004 Genetics Studies Indicate That Disturbances in
Premigratory Neuroblast Maturation Are a Core Feature in
the Pathology of Autism Spectrum Disorders E. L. Casanova,
Psychiatry, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
5:10
3:30
156.001 A Longitudinal Examination of Parent-Child Interaction
in the Context of Toddlers at High-Risk of Autism K. Hudry1,
M. Grant2, R. Bedford3, G. Pasco4, V. Slonims5, J. Green6,
M. Elsabbagh7, M. H. Johnson8 and T. Charman4, (1)Olga Tennison
Autism Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia, (2)La Trobe
University, Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, Melbourne,
Australia, (3)King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(4)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Guy’s and St
Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, England, United Kingdom,
(6)Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, University
of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, (7)Department of
Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (8)Centre for
Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of
London, London, United Kingdom
3:55
156.002 Mother-Child Interaction in 5- and 10-Month Old Infants
at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder E. Demurie1, P. Warreyn1,
L. Verhaeghe1, J. Vermeirsch1, L. De Schuymer2 and H. Roeyers1,
(1)Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology,
Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, (2)Kind&Gezin, Brussels,
Belgium
4:20
156.003 Understanding the Parental Interactive Behaviours of
at-Risk Infants: What We Have Learned from Basis and Ibasis
M. W. Wan1, J. Green1, A. Brooks1 and T. B. Team2, (1)Institute
of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, University of Manchester,
Manchester, United Kingdom, (2)BASIS, UK, United Kingdom
4:45
156.004 What Does the Autism Community Think of Research
with Infants with Higher Likelihood of Later Autism Diagnosis?
Results of a Large International Survey S. Fletcher-Watson1
and M. COST ESSEA Action Group2, (1)University of Edinburgh,
Edinburgh, Scotland, (2)Institute of Psychiatry, London, United
Kingdom
5:10
Discussant
Discussant
Panel Session
156 - Understanding Early Dyadic Interaction in ASD
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: K. Hudry, Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
Melbourne, Australia
Discussant: M. Siller, Psychology, Hunter College of the City
University of New York, New York, NY
The early emergence of ASD is characterized by progressive difficulties in
social communication. These early emerging symptoms are likely to perturb
the dyadic interactions between caregivers and their children. However,
very little is known about how this process unfolds, and what implications
it may have for a child’s ongoing trajectory of development. For example,
many caregivers may adapt to their child’s communicative style to maximize
a child’s learning opportunities. Identifying the caregiver adaptions that can
promote optimal socio-communicative development in children can thus help
us design more effective parent-mediated interventions for young children
with ASD. In this symposium, we present data that illuminates the effects
of child symptomatology on caregiver-child interactions in the first years of
life. We identify caregiver adaptations and behaviors that may be optimal for
promoting positive socio-communicative trajectories. Finally, we present the
results of a large survey of parents, service providers and individuals with
ASD that illuminates the thoughts of the wider community on research in
early ASD. We will discuss the implications of this work for harnessing the
dynamic interactions that shape the developmental course for individuals with
ASD.
Poster Session
157 - Interventions - Non-pharmacologic School Age, Adolescent, Adult
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
1 157.001 A Brief Behavioral Sleep Intervention Improves Sleep and
Irritability in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders W. A. Loring1,
R. L. Johnston1, L. Gray2 and B. A. Malow1, (1)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center,
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt University
Medical Center, Nashville, TN
2 157.002 A Randomized Clinical Trial on Promoting Face Recognition
Skills in Children with ASD Using the Facestation Video Game Curriculum
G. Kohls1, S. Faja2, F. Baguio3 and R. T. Schultz3, (1)Department of Child
and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, RWTH
Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, (2)Boston Children’s Hospital/
Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, MA, (3)Center for Autism Research,
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
3 157.003 A Randomized Controlled Study into the Efficacy of Social
Skills Training in Autism (ESTIA) for Preadolescent Children V. Dekker1,
M. H. Nauta2, E. J. Mulder1 and A. de Bildt1, (1)Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands,
(2)Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology,
University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
4 157.004 Adapted Cognitive Behavior Therapy to Treat the Anxiety
of Children with Autism and Low Verbal Ability J. Danial, UCLA,
Woodland Hills, CA
70
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
5 157.005 An Exploratory Analysis of Intolerance of Uncertainty in the
Response to CBT Intervention for Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with
Autism Spectrum Disorder A. Keefer1, N. L. Kreiser1, V. Singh1,
A. Blakeley-Smith2, A. W. Duncan3, L. G. Klinger4, A. T. Meyer5, J. Reaven2
and R. A. Vasa1,6, (1)Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Kennedy
Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (2)Psychiatry, JFK Partners/University
of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (3)Div of Developmental
and Behavioral Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center,
Cincinnati, OH, (4)TEACCH Autism Program; Department of Psychiatry,
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)Psychology, University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (6)Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Baltimore, MD
6 157.006 Assessment of Social Skills Training Needs in a Disability
Community L. Buckley1, C. M. Taylor2 and M. W. Mitchel3, (1)Bucknell
University, Lewisburg, PA, (2)Geisinger Health System, Lewisburg, PA,
(3)Geisinger Autism & Developmental Medicine Institute, Lewisburg, PA
7 157.007 Assessment-Based Peer-Mediated Social Competence
Interventions for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder J. R. Martinez1,
D. A. Prykanowski1, M. A. Conroy1, B. Werch2, K. Reese2 and K. Marsh2,
(1)College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, (2)School
Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
8 157.008 Associations of Health Related Quality of Life and
Adaptive Skills Functioning in Children Diagnosed with ASD:Implications
for Treatment Planning T. A. Hall1, A. P. Hill2 and E. J. Fombonne2,
(1)Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR,
(2)Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
10 157.010 Can Robotic Interaction Improve Nonverbal
Communication and Social Anxiety of Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorders? H. Kumazaki1,2, Y. Yoshikawa3, Y. Matsumoto4, S. Mizushima5,
T. X. Fujisawa1, H. Kosaka1, A. Tomoda1, S. Nemoto6, M. Nakano7,
M. Miyao7, T. Maeda2, H. Ishiguro3, T. Muramatsu2 and M. Mimura2,
(1)Research Center for Child Mental Development, University of Fukui,
Yoshida-gun, Fukui Prefecture, Japan, (2)Department of Neuropsychiatry,
School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan, (3)Graduate School of
Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Japan, (4)The National
Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan,
(5)Research Center for Child Mental Development of University of Fukui,
University of Osaka, Yoshida-gun, Fukui Prefecture, Japan, (6)Donguri
clinic for developmental disorders, Tokyo, Japan, (7)National Center for
Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan
11 157.011 Change in Expressed Emotion As a Marker for
Intervention Effectiveness in the Parents of Individuals with High
Functioning Autism M. B. Steinfeld1, I. N. Leckliter2, D. J. Tancredi3,
K. Singh4, I. Jalnapurkar5, A. Schneider6, J. Gunther7, D. Roa8 and
M. Solomon9, (1)UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (2)Pediatrics,
UC Davis School of Medicine MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA,
(3)Pediatrics, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, (4)Private
Practice, Sacramento, CA, (5)Psychiatry, University of Texas Health
Sciences Center, Houston, TX, (6)Pediatrics, University of California at
Davis, Sacramento, CA, (7)University of California Davis MIND Institute,
Sacramento, CA, (8)MIND Institute, UC Davis School of Medicine,
Sacramento, CA, (9)Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences,
University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, Sacramento, CA
13 157.013 Clinical Trials of Deep Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic
Stimulation (rTMS) to Bilateral Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex in Autism
Spectrum Disorder P. G. Enticott, Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, School of
Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Australia
14 157.014 Component Analysis of Pivotal Response Training: Child
Preferred-Materials and Reinforcement Strategies H. S. Lee1, T. Wang1,
J. Suhrheinrich1, N. Chan1 and A. C. Stahmer1,2, (1)Psychiatry, University of
California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)Rady Children’s Hospital,
San Diego, San Diego, CA
15 157.015 Determining Appropriateness of a Mobile Technology
Application to Treat Prosodic Deficits in ASD E. Schoen Simmons1,
C. A. Wall1, R. Paul2 and F. Shic1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (2)Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT
16 157.016 Does Compass Improve Common Elements of
Instructional Quality? L. A. Ruble1, W. H. Wong1, A. D. Rodgers1,
J. Grisham-Brown2, M. Moon1 and J. H. McGrew3, (1)University of Kentucky,
Lexington, KY, (2)Early Childhood,k Special Education, & Rehabilitation
Counseling, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, (3)Psychology, Indiana
University - Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN
17 157.017 Does Pivotal Response Training Moderate the Effect of
Social Anxiety Symptoms on Student Outcomes? M. Pellecchia1,
J. Miller2, M. Xie1 and D. S. Mandell1, (1)Psychiatry, University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Center for Autism
Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
18 157.018 Driving Simulator Performance in Adolescents with Autism
Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Executive Functions and Basic Motor Skills
S. M. Cox1, D. J. Cox2, M. J. Kofler1, M. A. Moncrief2, R. E. Reeve1,
R. J. Johnson2 and A. E. Lambert2, (1)Curry School of Education, University
of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, (2)Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
FRIDAY – PM
9 157.009 CPRT Fidelity of Implementation: An Examination of
Antecedent and Consequence Strategies in Relation to Student Active
Engagement S. F. Vejnoska1, S. R. Rieth2, J. Suhrheinrich3, T. Wang4
and A. C. Stahmer4, (1)Child and Adolescent Services Research Center,
University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)Child and Family
Development, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, (3)University of
California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, (4)Psychiatry, University of California,
San Diego, San Diego, CA
12 157.012 Characterizing Change in Social Skills and Executive
Functioning after Social Competence Intervention in Youth with ASD
K. Bellesheim1, J. Stichter1, R. M. O’Donnell2 and M. Herzog1, (1)University
of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (2)Educational, School, and Counseling
Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
19 157.019 Efficacy of the Multi-Media Social Skills Project for
Adolescents with ASD M. Murray, A. M. Pearl, S. M. Minnick,
A. N. Heintzelman and K. C. Durica, Department of Psychiatry,
Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
20 157.020 Enhancing Cognitive Processing of Complex Emotional
Cues in Young Adults on the Autism Spectrum through an Online
Intervention C. I. Mitchell1, J. Zeman2, C. L. Dickter3, J. Burk4, K. Chaney5,
J. D. Ball6 and M. R. Urbano6, (1)College of William & Mary, Williamsburg,
VA, (2)College of WIlliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (3)College of Wiliam
and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (4)College of William and Mary, Williamsburg,
VA, (5)Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, (6)Eastern Virginia Medical
School, Norfolk, VA
21 157.021 Establishing Predictors of Outcomes of the Social
Competence Intervention for Adolescents (SCI-A) R. M. O’Donnell1 and
J. Stichter2, (1)Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University
of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (2)Special Education, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO
22 157.022 Everything They Wanted to Know about Sex but Were
Afraid to Ask: Assessing Knowledge of Sexuality and Relationships with
Parents and Children with ASD L. G. Anthony1, Y. Granader1, A. Bowen2,
K. M. Dudley1, C. E. Pugliese1, A. B. Ratto1 and C. Baker2, (1)Center for
Autism Spectrum Disorders, Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville,
MD, (2)Danya International, Inc, Silver Spring, MD
71
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
23 157.023 Examining Therapeutic Alliance in an Emotion Regulation
Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder P. Burnham
Riosa1, M. Khan2, K. M. Thomson3 and J. A. Weiss4, (1)York University,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Department of Psychology, York University,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Centre for Applied Disability Studies, Brock
University, St Catharines, ON, Canada, (4)Psychology, York University,
Toronto, ON, Canada
24 157.024 Examining Treatment Implementation in Secondary
Education Settings S. L. Odom1, K. Hume2, J. R. Dykstra Steinbrenner3,
E. Carter4, L. E. Smith5, C. K. Reutebuch6, D. Test7, D. Browder7,8,
S. Vaughn9 and S. J. Rogers10, (1)University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
NC, (2)University of North Carolina at Chapel HIll, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)Frank
Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, Carrboro, NC, (4)Special Education, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, (5)University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (6)The
Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk, The University of Texas
at Austin, Austin, TX, (7)University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte,
NC, (8)Department of Special Education, University of North Carolina at
Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, Albania, (9)The Meadows Center, University
of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, (10)University of California at Davis,
Sacramento, CA
25 157.025 Exploring the Role of Child Ethnicity on Community
Therapist Delivery of a Mental Health Intervention for ASD
L. Brookman-Frazee, Child and Adolescent Services Research Center,
San Diego, CA
26 157.026 GREAT Expectations: The Influence of Parent Outcome
Expectancies on Social Skills Gains in Children with Autism Spectrum
Disorder K. Tang1, A. Dammann2, M. Won1, N. Hartman3, A. J. Flatley1,
K. Kawalec1, H. N. Van Steenwyk1, C. R. Crowell1, M. Villano1, K. G. Wier1,4
and J. J. Diehl5, (1)University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, (2)Feinberg
School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, (3)St. Mary’s
College, Notre Dame, IN, (4)Sonya Ansari Center for Autism, St. Joseph,
MI, (5)University of Notre Dame, LOGAN Community Resources, Inc.,
Notre Dame, IN
27 157.027 Hyperthermia and the Improvement of Autism Spectrum
Disorder (ASD) Symptoms C. J. Ferretti1, B. P. Taylor2, R. Noone3,
E. Racine3, E. Doernberg3 and E. Hollander4, (1)Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (2)Dept. Of Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (3)Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, (4)Dept. of Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein
College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
28 157.028 Implementation of a Computer-Assisted Intervention with
Preschool and School-Aged Children Who Have Autism in Public Schools
J. Simon1 and K. R. MacDonald2, (1)TeachTown, Boulder, CO,
(2)TeachTown Inc., Seattle, DC
29 157.029 Improvements in Block Design Task Following Flexibility
Intervention Related to Increased Time Spent on Items C. Luong-Tran1,
L. G. Anthony2, M. Wills3, J. Sokoloff3, K. M. Dudley2, A. C. Armour2,
Y. Granader2, J. F. Strang2, M. A. Werner4, J. L. Martucci2, L. Mohamed5,
C. Haake6 and L. Kenworthy7, (1)Children’s National Medical Center,
Rockville, MD, (2)Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Children’s National
Medical Center, Rockville, MD, (3)CNMC, Rockville, MD, (4)Model Asperger
Program, Ivymount School, Rockville, MD, (5)Children’s National Health
System, Rockville, MD, (6)Department of Neuropsychology, Children’s
National Medical Center, Rockville, MD, (7)Children’s Research Institute,
Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC
30 157.030 Improvements to Subjective Social Impression Ratings
Associated with Participation in the START Social Skills Program for
Adolescents with ASD A. R. Miller, T. W. Vernon, V. L. Wu, R. Arellano,
C. Simson, M. Shields, T. Schick, M. Rosen, H. Palmer, J. Love, B. Fell and
J. De Jesus, Koegel Autism Center, University of California Santa Barbara,
Santa Barbara, CA
72
31 157.031 Improving Fidelity Measurement of Pivotal Response
Training to Increase Systematic Use N. Chan1, J. Suhrheinrich2, T. Wang2,
H. S. Lee2 and A. C. Stahmer2, (1)University of California, San Diego,
San Diego, CA, (2)Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego,
San Diego, CA
32 157.032 Improving Oral Hygiene in Children with ASD Using Video
Modeled Social Stories: A Pilot Study B. S. Popple1, C. A. Wall2, L. Flink3,
K. K. Powell2, D. B. Keck1, F. R. Volkmar2 and F. Shic3, (1)Dentistry, Yale
University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center, Yale
University, New Haven, CT, (3)Child Study Center, Yale University School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT
33 157.033 Improving Reaction Time, Static Balance Control, and
Gait in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and an Intellectual Disability:
An Exercise Intervention Study N. R. Azar, K. Carr, S. Horton and
C. A. Sutherland, Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada
34 157.034 Inclusive Education of Children with ASD in Argentina.
Support Teachers and Support Devices D. Valdez1 and L. A. Gomez2,
(1)FLACSO, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina,
(2)FLACSO, Buenos Aires, Argentina
35 157.035 It’s Not Just a Guy Thing: Identifying Socially Valid
Interventions to Address the Complex Needs of Adolescent Girls with ASD
R. Jamison1 and J. Schuttler2, (1)Pediatrics, CCHD, KU Medical Center,
Kansas City, KS, (2)Center for Child Health and Development, University
of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS
36 157.036 Meta-Analysis of Parent Skills Training for Parents of
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder B. Reichow1 and C. Servili2,
(1)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, (2)World Health Organization,
Geneva, Switzerland
37 157.037 Mindfulness in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
M. Lense1,2, N. Miodrag3 and E. Dykens2, (1)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
(2)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Nashville, TN, (3)California State University,
Northridge, Northridge, CA
38 157.038 Movement and Synchrony in Interactions By Adolescents
and Adults in Dance/Movement Therapy E. Manders1, S. C. Koch2,
S. Goodill1, M. Polansky3, K. Fisher4, E. Giarelli5 and T. Fuchs6,
(1)Creative Arts Therapies, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Faculty
for Therapeutic Sciences, SRH Hochschule Heidelberg, Heidelberg,
Germany, (3)Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University, Philadelphia,
PA, (4)Nursing, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (5)Doctoral Nursing,
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (6)University of Heidelberg Medical
Clinic, Heidelberg, Germany
39 157.039 Neural Predictors of Treatment Response to Social
Skills Training in Children with Autism—Findings from a Randomized,
Comparative Study K. Ibrahim1,2,3, L. V. Soorya4, S. Soffes1, D. B. Halpern1,
A. Kolevzon1, J. D. Buxbaum1 and A. T. Wang1, (1)Seaver Autism Center
for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,
New York, NY, (2)Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, CT, (3)University of
Hartford, West Hartford, CT, (4)Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center,
Chicago, IL
40 157.040 Novel Music Intervention Model and Its Effects on
Transition from Minimally Verbal to Verbal in Autism Spectrum Disorders
T. Kuddo, Thea Kuddo M.D., North Bethesda, MD
41 157.041 Novel Neuromodulation Therapy Integrating rTMS and
Neurofeedback for the Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders
M. F. Casanova1, E. M. Sokhadze1, A. S. El-Baz2, A. Tasman1, Y. Wang1
and L. L. Sears3, (1)Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of
Louisville, Louisville, KY, (2)Bioengineering, University of Louisville,
Louisville, KY, (3)University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
42 157.042 PEERS® in New York City: An Initial Feasibility Effort
R. Shalev1, S. Kuriakose1, M. Gordillo1, R. Doggett1, H. R. Brown2,
K. Campos1, M. N. Park3, E. A. Laugeson4 and A. Di Martino5, (1)NYU
Child Study Center, New York, NY, (2)Child Psychiatry, NYU Child Study
Center, New York, NY, (3)UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience &
Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Psychiatry, UCLA Semel Institute
for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (5)Room 8-416,
NYU Child Study Center, New York, NY
43 157.043 Parent Perspectives on the Impact of a Sexuality and
Relationships Group Education Program for Adolescents with ASD and
Their Parents L. L. Corona1, S. A. Fox1 and K. V. Christodulu2, (1)University
at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, (2)Center for Autism and Related Disabilities,
University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY
44 157.044 Parent Variables in Responder Status in a CBT for
Children with ASD R. S. Factor, H. Gordon, D. Swain and A. Scarpa,
Virginia Polytechnic Institution and State University, Blacksburg, VA
45 157.045 Participation in a Social Competence Intervention
in a Private Clinical Setting and the Impact of Anxiety and Emotion
Dysregulation in ASD S. I. Habayeb1, B. Rich1 and M. Alvord2,
(1)Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America,
Washington, DC, (2)Alvord, Baker, & Associates, Rockville, MD
46 157.046 Peer-Mediated Pivotal Response Treatment for Young
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder at School A. Boudreau1,
P. Corkum1, K. I. Meko2 and I. M. Smith3, (1)Dalhousie University, Halifax,
NS, Canada, (2)IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)Dalhousie
University / IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada
48 157.048 Performance Feedback Procedures for Sleep Protocol
J. E. Connell1 and M. C. Souders2, (1)AJ Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel
University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
49 157.049 Physical Activity Among Children with Intellectual and
Developmental Disabilities K. L. Staples, University of Regina, Regina, SK,
Canada
50 157.050 Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial of a Wireless Moisture
Pager for Toileting Training Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
D. W. Mruzek1, S. McAleavey2, W. A. Loring3, E. Butter4, T. Smith5,
C. Aponte6, L. Levato6, R. E. Aiello7, R. P. Travis8 and K. Zanibbi6,
(1)University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, (2)Biomedical
Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, (3)Vanderbilt University
Medical Center, Nashville, TN, (4)Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Westerville,
OH, (5)601 Elmwood Ave, Box 671, University of Rochester, Rochester,
NY, (6)Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY,
(7)TEACCH Autism Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Charlotte, NC, (8)Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
51 157.051 Pilot Study of a Tailored Behavioral Intervention for
Insomnia in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder M. C. Souders1,
W. T. Eriksen2, C. M. Kerns3, S. Zavodny4, A. Ellison5, R. Sinko6, R. Schaaf7,
L. Guy8, B. A. Malow9 and J. E. Connell10, (1)Behavioral Sciences, University
of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (2)University of Pennsylvania School of
Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, PA, (3)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA,
(4)University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (5)Center for the Urban
Child, St. Christophers Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA,
(6)Occupational Therapy, Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA,
(7)Occupational Therapy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA,
(8)TEACCH, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC,
(9)Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center,
Nashville, TN, (10)AJ Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University,
Philadelphia, PA
53 157.053 Predicting Treatment Outcome of the PEERS® SchoolBased Curriculum for Adolescents with ASD C. C. Bolton1, L. Tucci2,
Y. Bolourian3 and E. A. Laugeson4, (1)The Help Group/UCLA Autism
Research Alliance, Sherman Oaks, CA, (2)The Help Group - UCLA Autism
Research Alliance, Sherman Oaks, CA, (3)The Help Group - UCLA Autism
Research Alliance, Moorpark, CA, (4)Psychiatry, UCLA Semel Institute for
Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA
54 157.054 Predictors of Companionship for Adolescents with ASD
Following the School-Based PEERS® Curriculum J. W. Yang1, J. Sanchez2,
Y. Bolourian3 and E. A. Laugeson2, (1)The Help Group - UCLA Autism
Research Alliance, Sherman Oaks, CA, (2)Psychiatry, UCLA Semel Institute
for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA, (3)The Help
Group - UCLA Autism Research Alliance, Moorpark, CA
55 157.055 Preliminary Outcomes of an Emotion Regulation
Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder K. M. Thomson1,
P. Burnham Riosa2 and J. A. Weiss2, (1)Centre for Applied Disability
Studies, Brock University, St Catharines, ON, Canada, (2)Psychology,
York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
56 157.056 Psycho-Education for High-Functioning Adults with
Autism Spectrum Disorder: Summary and Outcomes from a Novel
Intervention H. L. Hayward1, C. E. Wilson2, N. Gillan3, E. L. Woodhouse4,
D. Spain2, G. Roberts5, J. E. Faulkner6, N. Hammond3, D. G. Murphy7, C.
M. Murphy3 and D. M. Robertson8, (1)Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, England, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Forensic
and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Behavioural Genetics Clinic,
South London and Maudsley NHS trust, London, United Kingdom,
(4)Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(5)Bristol Autism Spectrum Service, Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health
Partnership NHS Trust, BRISTOL, United Kingdom, (6)Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(7)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute
of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (8)Behavioural Genetics Clinic, South London and
Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom
FRIDAY – PM
47 157.047 Perceptions of Friendships in School-Aged Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder L. Huynh1, Y. C. Chang2, W. Shih3 and
C. Kasari4, (1)University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(2)Semel Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)University of California
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (4)UCLA Center for Autism Research &
Treatment, Westwood, CA
52 157.052 Postural Control Outcomes Following Taekwondo and
Videogame Activities in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder J. C. Lim1,
Y. Kim1, T. Todd2, K. Vrongistinos1, M. A. Mache3 and T. Jung1,
(1)Kinesiology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA,
(2)Kinesiology, California State University,Northridge, Northridge, CA,
(3)Kinesiology, California State University, Chico, Chico, CA
57 157.057 Reaching the Unreachable: Providing an Intentional Staff
Training on Naturalistic Behavioral Assessment for Challenging Behaviors
F. Alnemary, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
58 157.058 Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Executive
Function Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Effects on Brain Structure
and Function S. Ameis, Center for Addiction and Mental Health, University
of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
59 157.059 Self-Esteem Predicting Changes in Friendship Quality
for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The UCLA PEERS® for
Adolescents Program D. C. Missler1, E. Veytsman1, R. Ellingsen2 and
E. A. Laugeson3, (1)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA Semel
Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA,
(2)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Psychiatry,
UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior,
Los Angeles, CA
60 157.060 Sensorimotor Enrichment As an Autism Treatment
M. Leon1 and C. C. Woo2, (1)Neurobiology and Behavior, University of
California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, (2)Neurobiology and Behavior, University of
California Irvine, Irvine, CA
73
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
61 157.061 Sensory Adapted Dental Environments: Reducing Distress
during Dental Cleanings in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
S. A. Cermak1, L. Stein1, C. J. Lane2, M. E. Williams3, M. E. Dawson4 and
J. C. Polido5, (1)Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy,
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Preventive Medicine Biostatistics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (3)University
Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Keck School of Medicine
of USC, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA, (4)Psychology, University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA, (5)Dentistry, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA
62 157.062 Sensory Processing and Insomnia R. Schaaf,
Thomas Jefferson University, Phildalphia, PA
63 157.063 Social Skills Group Training for Children and Adolescents
with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Kontakt: A Qualitative Responder Analysis
N. Choque Olsson1,2, D. Rautio2, J. Asztalos2, U. Stoetzer3,4 and S. Bolte1,2,
(1)Center of neurodevelopmental disorders, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,
Sweden, (2)Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm County
Council, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)Institute of Environmental Medicine,
Karolinska Institutet, Sotckholm, Sweden, (4)Stockholm County Council,
Stockholm, Sweden
64 157.064 Social Skills Groups for Children with Developmental
Disabilities: Issues of Providing Care in Rural Communities
M. W. Mitchel1, L. Buckley2, N. Soares3 and C. M. Taylor3, (1)Geisinger
Autism & Developmental Medicine Institute, Lewisburg, PA, (2)Bucknell
University, Lewisburg, PA, (3)Geisinger Autism & Developmental Medicine
Institute, Geisinger Health System, Lewisburg, PA
65 157.065 Social-Emotional Development for Adolescents with Autism
through Video Modeling M. McCubbin1, J. Hood2 and D. Armstrong2,
(1)G.R.O.W. Program, Carmen B. Pingree Autism Center of Learning,
Salt Lake City, UT, (2)Carmen B. Pingree Autism Center of Learning,
Salt Lake City, UT
66 157.066 Tailored Behavioral Intervention for Children with ASD and
Insomnia M. C. Souders1, W. T. Eriksen2, S. Zavodny1 and A. Ellison3,
(1)University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (2)University of Pennsylvania
School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, PA, (3)Center for the Urban Child,
St. Christophers Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA
67 157.067 The Advancing Social-Communication and Play (ASAP)
Intervention in Elementary School Settings: A Single Case Design Study
J. R. Dykstra Steinbrenner1 and C. Sethi2, (1)Frank Porter Graham Child
Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carrboro,
NC, (2)Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
68 157.068 The Effectiveness of Interventions for Adults with ASD: A
Meta-Analysis T. M. Belkin1, A. D. Rodgers2 and J. H. McGrew3, (1)Indiana
University- Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, (2)Department
of Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, University of Kentucky,
Lexington, KY, (3)Clinical Psychology, Indiana University- Purdue University
Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN
69 157.069 The Effects of Auditory Integration Training (AIT) on
Mismatch Negativity in Children with Autism E. M. Sokhadze1,
S. M. Edelson2, L. L. Sears3, M. F. Casanova4, A. Tasman5 and S. Brockett6,
(1)Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of Louisville, Louisville,
KY, (2)Autism Research Institute, San Diego, CA, (3)University of Louisville,
Louisville, KY, (4)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of
Louisville, Louisville, KY, (5)Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University
of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (6)IDEA Training Center, North Haven, CT
74
70 157.070 The Effects of Embodied Rhythm and Robotic Interventions
on the Repetitive and Negative Behaviors of Children with Autism Between 5
and 12 Years of Age M. Reiss1, S. Srinivasan2 and A. N. Bhat1,2,3,
(1)Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(2)Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE,
(3)Center for Health, Intervention & Prevention, Department of Psychology,
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
71 157.071 The Effects of Rhythm Interventions on Social Attention
and Verbalization Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
C. O’Hara1, S. Srinivasan2, C. Korgaonkar1, I. Park1, L. P. Neelly3 and
A. N. Bhat1,2,4, (1)Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs,
CT, (2)Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark,
DE, (3)Music Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (4)Center for
Health, Intervention & Prevention, Department of Psychology, University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT
72 157.072 The Effects of Robot-Child Interactions on Social Attention
and Verbalization Patterns of Children with Autism Between 5 and 12 Years
of Age C. Korgaonkar1, S. Srinivasan2, C. O’Hara1, M. Kaur2, T. Gifford3 and
A. N. Bhat1,2,3, (1)Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs,
CT, (2)Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE,
(3)Center for Health, Intervention & Prevention, Department of Psychology,
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
73 157.073 The Impact of the PEERS® Intervention on Social Phobia in
Young Adults with ASD A. J. McVey1, B. Dolan1, K. A. Schohl1, S. Stevens1,
J. S. Karst1, A. M. Carson2, C. L. Casnar3, S. Timmer-Murillo1, E. Vogt1,
S. A. Chesney1, K. Reiter1, N. Gordon1 and A. V. Van Hecke1, (1)Marquette
University, Milwaukee, WI, (2)Psychology, Baylor College of Medicine/Texas
Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, (3)University of Wisconsin Milwaukee,
Milwaukee, WI
74 157.074 The Relationship Between Social Communication and
Social Anxiety in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder J. Sanchez1,
Y. Bolourian2, L. C. Tucci3 and E. A. Laugeson4, (1)UCLA Semel Institute for
Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Sherman Oaks, CA, (2)The Help Group
- UCLA Autism Research Alliance, Moorpark, CA, (3)The Help Group/UCLA
Autism Research Alliance, Redondo Beach , CA, CA, (4)Psychiatry, UCLA
Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA
75 157.075 Training Paraprofessionals to Improve Social Skills in
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders S. Kim1, R. L. Koegel2 and
L. K. Koegel2, (1)Education, University of California, Santa Barbara,
Santa Barbara, CA, (2)Koegel Autism Center, University of California
Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
76 157.076 Training Social Workers: Implementing Social Skills
Programming within Schools C. S. Flint, K. Johnsen, S. Lamontagne and
J. Salt, HAVE Dreams, Park Ridge, IL
77 157.077 Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Provides a Means to
Investigate Cortical Excitability and Plasticity in Autism Spectrum Disorder
L. M. Oberman, Brown University, Providence, RI
78 157.078 Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Treatment: Focusing on
Core Pathological Features of Autism Spectrum Disorders M. F. Casanova,
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
79 157.079 Transition to University: An Intervention for Students with
Autism Spectrum Disorder A. J. Russell1, S. Lambe2, S. K. Fletcher1,
C. Ashwin3 and M. Brosnan1, (1)University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom,
(2)Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom, (3)Dept. of
Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
80 157.080 Treatment Compliance As a Predictor of Treatment
Outcome in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder Following the
PEERS® Social Skills Intervention E. Veytsman1, D. C. Missler1,
R. Ellingsen2 and E. A. Laugeson3, (1)Psychiatry and Biobehavioral
Sciences, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(3)Psychiatry, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior,
Los Angeles, CA
81 157.081 Usability Testing of ADD.It, a Technology Based
Intervention for Children with HFA and/ or ADHD J. Morstein1 and D. Groot2,
(1)Pediatrics/Behavioral Healht, University of Utah School of Medicine,
Salt Lake City, UT, (2)Social Work, Wichata State, Wichata, KS
82 157.082 Using a Summer Robotics Camp to Reduce Social Anxiety
and Improve Social/Vocational Skills in ASD J. J. Diehl1, J. Kaboski2,
J. Beriont2, M. Villano2, K. Tang3, H. Miller3, A. J. Flatley3, N. Hartman4,
K. Kawalec3, M. Prough3, L. T. Simon5, H. N. Van Steenwyk3, W. McWherter2,
M. Won3 and C. R. Crowell3, (1)University of Notre Dame, LOGAN
Community Resources, Inc., Notre Dame, IN, (2)Psychology, University of
Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, (3)University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN,
(4)St. Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN, (5)Saint Mary’s College,
Notre Dame, IN
Poster Session
158 - Adult Outcome
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
84 158.084 A Longitudinal Examination of Adaptive Behavior in Youth
with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Contributions of Executive Function
C. E. Pugliese1, L. G. Anthony2, J. F. Strang2, K. M. Dudley2, G. Wallace3,
D. Q. Naiman4, A. B. Ratto5 and L. Kenworthy6, (1)Children’s National
Medical Center, Washington, DC, (2)Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders,
Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville, MD, (3)NIMH Intramural
Research Program, Bethesda, MD, (4)Applied Mathematics and Statistics,
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (5)Children’s National Health
System, Silver Spring, MD, (6)Children’s Research Institute, Children’s
National Medical Center, Washington, DC
85 158.085 A Mixed Methods Study of Physician Knowledge and
Experience with Autism in Adults M. L. Massolo, O. Zerbo, Y. Qian and
L. A. Croen, Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California,
Oakland, CA
86 158.086 A Multi-Method Approach to Examining Correlates of Sleep
Quality, Individual Well-Being, and Mother-Child Relationship Quality in
Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder J. Phung1, M. M. Abdullah2,
V. E. Custodio3 and W. A. Goldberg4, (1)University of California Irvine,
University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, (2)University of California, Irvine,
Irvine, CA, (3)Department of Informatics, University of California, Irvine,
Irvine, CA, (4)Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California,
Irvine, Irvine, CA
87 158.087 Adaptive Functioning during the Transition to Adulthood
and Beyond N. L. Matthews1, C. J. Smith2, E. Pollard3, S. E. Ober-Reynolds4,
J. Kirwan1 and A. M. Malligo1, (1)Southwest Autism Research and Resource
Center, Phoenix, AZ, (2)Research, Southwest Autism Research & Resource
Center, Phoenix, AZ, (3)Research, SARRC, Phoenix, AZ, (4)Southwest
Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC), Phoenix, AZ
89 158.089 Conceptualizing an Effective Mentorship Program for
University Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder N. K. Roberts1 and
E. Birmingham2, (1)Educational Psychology, Simon Fraser University,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (2)Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University,
Burnaby, BC, Canada
90 158.090 Cross-Cultural Comparison of Everyday Participation
in Males and Females with Asperger’s Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism
Living in Australia and Taiwan Y. W. Chen1, A. C. Bundy1, R. Cordier2,
Y. L. Chien3 and S. L. Einfeld4, (1)Faculty of Health Sciences, The University
of Sydney, Lidcombe NSW, Australia, (2)Curtin University, Faculty of Health
Sciences, Perth WA, Australia, (3)National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan,
(4)Faculty of Health Sciences and Brain and Mind Research Institute,
University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW, Australia
91 158.091 Diagnostic Specificity of Motor Impairments: Comparison of
Adults with ASD, ADHD, and Healthy Controls H. M. Digby1, A. F. Mischel1,
S. Youngkin1, E. Anagnostou2 and L. V. Soorya1, (1)Psychiatry, Rush
University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, (2)Bloorview Research Institute,
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
92 158.092 Education and Employment Experiences of Adults with
Autism Spectrum Disorder: Individual and Parent Perspectives R. Y. Cai1,
M. Uljarevic2 and A. L. Richdale3, (1)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
Melbourne, VIC, Australia, (2)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
Melbourne, Australia, (3)Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism
Spectrum Disorders (Autism CRC), Brisbane, Australia
93 158.093 Embracing Neurodiversity in Higher Education: Creating
an Inclusive College Campus for Neurodiverse Students J. E. Robison1,
J. Burk2, J. Zeman3, C. L. Dickter4 and K. Wulf5, (1)The College of William
and Mary, Springfield, MA, (2)College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA,
(3)College of WIlliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (4)College of Wiliam and
Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (5)The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA
FRIDAY – PM
83 157.083 Who Responds to Cognitive-Behavioral Group Treatment?
Associations Between Anxiety Symptom Reduction and Autism Symptom
Domains P. Schoultz1, J. Reaven2, A. Blakeley-Smith2 and S. L. Hepburn3,
(1)JFK Partners, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, (2)Psychiatry,
JFK Partners/University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO,
(3)Psychiatry & Pediatrics, JFK Partners/University of Colorado School of
Medicine, Aurora, CO
88 158.088 Characterizing the Daily Life, Needs, and Priorities of
Adults with ASD K. Gotham1, A. R. Marvin2, J. L. Taylor3, Z. Warren1,
C. M. Anderson4, P. A. Law5, J. K. Law6 and P. H. Lipkin7, (1)Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (2)3825 Greenspring Avenue/Painter Building
1st Floor, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (3)Vanderbilt Kennedy
Center, Nashville, TN, (4)Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD,
(5)Congo Protestant University, Baltimore, MD, (6)Department of Pediatrics,
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (7)Pediatrics/
Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
94 158.094 Executive Function, Anxiety, and Depression and Their
Relationship to Core Social Difficulty in College Students with an ASD
Diagnosis S. M. Ryan1, M. B. Davis1, L. K. Baker1 and H. Noble2,
(1)The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, AL, (2)University
of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
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95 158.095 Introducing the OBS-LDASC: An Innovative Tool to Monitor
Behaviour That Challenges in Autism Spectrum Conditions and Learning
Disability D. Coton1, S. Parker1 and S. Da Silva Ramos2, (1)Autism Spectrum
Partners, The Disabilities Trust, West Sussex, United Kingdom, (2)The
Disabilities Trust, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Wit
96 158.096 Learner and Novice Drivers with Attention Deficit
Hyperactive Disorder or Autism Spectrum Disorder T. Falkmer, Curtin
University, Perth, WA, Australia
97 158.097 Life Satisfaction of College Students with Autism Spectrum
Disorders L. K. Baker1, S. M. Ryan2 and T. S. Tomeny1, (1)Department of
Psychology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, AL, (2)The
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, AL
75
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
98 158.098 Longitudinal Associations of Social Problem-Solving
and Emotion Regulation on Depression and Anxiety in Adults with
High-Functioning Autism S. L. Jackson1 and B. Dritschel2, (1)School of
Psychology & Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United
Kingdom, (2)University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom
99 158.099 Marital Disagreements and Behavior Problems in Youth
with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Natural Unfolding of Associations from Dayto-Day S. L. Hartley1, L. M. Papp2, P. M. Bussanich2, I. Mihaila2, H. Schultz3
and S. Blumenstock2, (1)Waisman Center and Human Development and
Family Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (2)Human
Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison,
WI, (3)University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
100 158.100 Mediators of Problem Behaviors and Psychosocial
Outcomes in Siblings of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Down
Syndrome Y. Yu1, T. M. Belkin2 and J. H. McGrew3, (1)Clinical Psychology,
Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN,
(2)Clinical Psychology, Indiana University- Purdue University Indianapolis,
Carmel, IN, (3)Psychology, Indiana University - Purdue University
Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN
101 158.101 Mixed Methods Study with Latent Class Analysis on
Identity and Post-Secondary Outcomes for Adults on the Autism Spectrum
T A M. McDonald, University of Wisconsin- Madison, Madison, WI
102 158.102 Opening an Adult Autism Clinic: Understanding Patient
Needs D. Tolson1, S. J. Webb2, G. A. Stobbe3, M. G. Elrod1,
M. M. Dommermuth2 and Z. Z. Shechter Nissim2, (1)Pediatrics, Madigan
Army Medical Center, JBLM, WA, (2)University of Washington, Seattle, WA,
(3)Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
103 158.103 Parent Vs. Self-Report of Social Difficulty in College
Students with an ASD Diagnosis S. M. Ryan1, H. M. Davenport1 and
A. B. Barber2, (1)The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, AL,
(2)Communicative Disorders, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
104 158.104 Parents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder:
A Dyadic Study of Parent-Child Sexuality Communication L. Graham
Holmes, M. B. Himle and D. S. Strassberg, Department of Psychology,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
105 158.105 Predictors of Sexual Victimization and Perpetration in
Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders M. Hooper1, M. A. Viecili1,
S. M. Brown-Lavoie1 and J. A. Weiss2, (1)York University, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (2)Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
106 158.106 Preliminary Results of the Multi-Media Social Skills Project
for Young Adults with ASD A. M. Pearl, M. Murray, A. Layton, S. M. Minnick,
P. Ulmen, D. Tiberie, K. C. Durica and A. N. Heintzelman, Department of
Psychiatry, Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
107 158.107 Profiles and Outcomes of Comorbid ASD and ADHD
from Childhood to Adulthood (From ages 6 through 25) J. Kaboski1,
B. Greenawalt2, M. Clark2, N. Hartman3, K. Kawalec4, A. J. Flatley4 and
J. J. Diehl5, (1)Psychology, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN,
(2)Center for Social Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN,
(3)St. Mary’s College, Notre Dame, IN, (4)University of Notre Dame, Notre
Dame, IN, (5)Psychology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
108 158.108 Quality of Life in Emerging Adults with Autism Spectrum
Disorder S. Carr, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
109 158.109 Research on Community Integration in Autism Spectrum
Disorder: Lessons from Research on Psychosis A. M. Scheeren and
H. M. Geurts, Dutch Autism & ADHD Research Center, Brain & Cognition,
University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
76
110 158.110 Self-Determination Skills in Transition-Age Youth with
Autism Spectrum Disorder T. Oswald1, N. S. McIntyre2, L. E. Swain-Lerro3,
M. C. Zajic2, M. Solomon4 and P. C. Mundy5, (1)2825 50th Street, UC Davis,
Sacramento, CA, (2)UC Davis, Davis, CA, (3)School of Education, UC
Davis, Santa Rosa, CA, (4)Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences,
University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, Sacramento, CA, (5)2825
50Th Street, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA
111 158.111 Self-Determination and Quality of Life in Young Adults
with Autism Spectrum Disorders K. White1, T. D. Flanagan2 and A. Nadig3,
(1)McGill University, Lasalle, QC, Canada, (2)Educational and Counselling
Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, (3)School of
Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal,
QC, Canada
112 158.112 Self-Reported Interpersonal Violence Victimization in
Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders M. A. Viecili1 and J. A. Weiss2,
(1)York University, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Psychology, York University,
Toronto, ON, Canada
113 158.113 Sensory Processing Sensitivities and Personality in Adults
with and without ASD B. Schwartzman1, S. K. Kapp2 and J. J. Wood3,
(1)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)University of California, Los Angeles,
Culver City, CA, (3)Departments of Education and Psychiatry, University of
California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
114 158.114 Sexual Orientation and Gender-Identity in HighFunctioning Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder R. George1 and
M. A. Stokes2, (1)Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Australia,
(2)Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia
115 158.115 Speed-Dating with Autism: Initial Romantic Attraction with
Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder S. Whitham, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
116 158.116 The Impact of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Higher
Education: An Exploratory Study T. A. Jones1, D. Olympia2 and E. Clark3,
(1)Ogden School District, Ogden, UT, (2)Department of Educational
Psychology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (3)University of Utah, Salt
Lake City, UT
117 158.117 The Importance of Social Support for Young Adults with
High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder Transitioning to Adulthood
A. K. Senland, Psychology, University of Saint Joseph, West Hartford, CT
118 158.118 The Montreal Cognitive Assessment Is a Superior Office
Cognitive Screening Exam for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders
B. K. Woodruff1, D. E. Locke2, J. G. Hentz3, Y. E. Geda4 and C. J. Smith5,
(1)Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ, (2)Neuropsychology, Mayo Clinic
Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ, (3)Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ,
(4)Psychiatry and Neurology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ,
(5)Research, Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center, Phoenix, AZ
119 158.119 The Prevalence and Correlates of Involvement in the
Criminal Justice System Among Youth on the Autism Spectrum J. Rava1,
P. T. Shattuck2, A. M. Roux2 and J. Rast3, (1)Drexel University, Glenmoore,
PA, (2)AJ Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA,
(3)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
120 158.120 Two-Year College Students on the Autism Spectrum:
Characteristics and Services Experiences A. M. Roux1, P. T. Shattuck1,
X. Wei2, J. W. Yu3, M. McCracken3, J. Rast4 and J. Rava1, (1)AJ Drexel
Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Education, SRI
International, Menlo Park, CA, (3)SRI International, Menlo Park, CA,
(4)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
121 158.121 Viewpoints on Driving of Individuals with and without
Autism Spectrum Disorder T. Falkmer, Curtin University, Perth, WA,
Australia
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
Poster Session
159 - Social Cognition and Social Behavior
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Imperial Ballroom
122 159.122 A Dynamic Systems Approach to Mother-Child Emotion
Co-Regulation in Relation to Adaptive Functioning in Children with ASD
Y. Guo1, M. A. Garcia2, S. Gutierrez2, S. Kim2, S. Merrell2, C. Garibay3,
P. Martinez3, S. Davia2, V. Valentovich2 and W. A. Goldberg2, (1)Department
of Nursing Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, (2)Psychology
and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, (3)University
of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA
123 159.123 A Multi-Method Study of Empathic Responding in HighRisk Siblings at Preschool Age N. M. McDonald1, H. Gordon2 and
D. S. Messinger3, (1)Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New
Haven, CT, (2)Virginia Polytechnic Institution and State University,
Blacksburg, VA, (3)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL
124 159.124 A Novel Measure of Social Metaperception for
Adolescents with and without High Functioning Autism: Reliability and Validity
L. V. Usher1, C. A. Burrows1 and H. A. Henderson2, (1)Psychology, University
of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (2)University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
125 159.125 A Pilot Study – Better Performance of Autism Spectrum
Disorder Girls Compared to Boys in a Theory of Mind Test H. Nagar
Shimoni, Maarot Center, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Hod-Hasharon, Israel
127 159.127 Adolescent Judgments and Reasoning about the Failure to
Include Peers with Social Disabilities K. M. Bottema-Beutel and Z. Li,
Lynch School of Education, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA
128 159.128 Adolescent Peer Inclusion in Community Settings Versus
Social Skills Group Training J. K. Mabey1 and T. P. Gabrielsen2, (1)Brigham
Young University, Provo, UT, (2)Counseling, Psychology and Special
Education, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
129 159.129 Age and Cognitive Functioning Moderate Sex Differences
in School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder J. Moriuchi1,2, A. Klin2
and W. Jones2, (1)Emory University, Atlanta, GA, (2)Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine,
Atlanta, GA
130 159.130 Attention to Emotional Faces in Adults As a Function of
Autism-Related Attention Switching Abilities C. L. Dickter1, S. C. Taylor2,
J. Burk2 and J. Zeman3, (1)College of Wiliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA,
(2)College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (3)College of WIlliam and
Mary, Williamsburg, VA
131 159.131 Atypical Theory of Mind in Children with Autism and Their
Siblings K. R. Dobkins1, S. J. Cohen1, L. J. Carver1, D. Liu2, M. J. McIntire1
and N. Akshoomoff3, (1)Psychology, University of California, San Diego,
La Jolla, CA, (2)Psychology, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK,
(3)Psychiatry and Center for Human Development, University of California,
San Diego, La Jolla, CA
132 159.132 Autism Spectrum Disorder Profile in Neurofibromatosis
Type 1 S. K. Garg1, E. Plasschaert2, E. Legius3 and J. Green4, (1)Institute of
Brain Behaviour and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester,
United Kingdom, (2)Centre of Human Genetics, Leuven, Belgium, (3)Human
Genetics, KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium, (4)Institute of Brain, Behaviour and
Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
134 159.134 Characterizing Social Cognitive Deficits in HighFunctioning Autism Spectrum Disorders and Schizophrenia S. Brocke1,
K. Cook2, C. Winters1, S. Corbera1,2, G. Pearlson1,2, K. Pelphrey3, M. D. Bell2,4
and M. Assaf1,2, (1)Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living,
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, (2)Department of Psychiatry, Yale School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (3)Child Study Center, Yale University, New
Haven, CT, (4)VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT
135 159.135 Clinical Utility of the Relationship Development
Assessment - Research Version (RDA-RV) for Children with Autism in a
Preschool Setting J. A. Hobson1, M. Garlington2, L. Hollaway3 and
J. A. Moore4, (1)Institute of Child Health, UCL, London, United Kingdom,
(2)Pediatrics Plus, Conway, AR, (3)Pediatrics Plus, Little Rock, AR,
(4)Occupational Therapy, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
136 159.136 Concurrent Validity Evidence Supporting the Theory of
Mind Inventory K. J. Greenslade and T. E. Coggins, Department of Speech
and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
137 159.137 Context Effects on Facial Affect Recognition in Autism and
Schizophrenia K. E. Morrison1, J. R. Shasteen1, D. J. Faso2, A. E. Pinkham1
and N. J. Sasson2, (1)The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX,
(2)University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX
138 159.138 Correlates of Emotion Recognition Task Performance
in Autism: A Meta-Analysis D. A. Trevisan and E. Birmingham, Faculty of
Education, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada
139 159.139 Depression As a Predictive Factor of Emotion Recognition
in High-Functioning Autism M. A. Lecheler1, G. Allen2 and A. R. NealBeevers3, (1)Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX,
(2)Department of Educational Psychology, University of Texas at Austin,
Austin, TX, (3)Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin,
Austin, TX
FRIDAY – PM
126 159.126 Acceptance of Emotions As a Buffer for the Negative
Effects of Inconsistent Discipline on Externalizing Behaviors in Children
with ASD K. J. Hamilton1, J. Sparrow2, T. Ward2, H. Dauterman2,
B. J. Wilson2 and K. Ebadat1, (1)Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA,
(2)Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA
133 159.133 Characterizing Play in Children with ASD: Differences
in Joint Attention and Requesting Across Play Levels H. Gould1,
J. Panganiban2, Y. C. Chang3, S. Y. Shire1 and C. Kasari4, (1)Semel Institute
of Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)University
of California, Los Angeles, Arcadia, CA, (3)Semel Institute, UCLA, Los
Angeles, CA, (4)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood,
CA
140 159.140 Developmental Trajectories in Attention to Socially
Relevant Information Differs for Infants at Risk for ASD T. Tsang1,
T. Hutman2, C. Ponting2, S. S. Jeste3, M. Dapretto4 and S. Johnson5,
(1)University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Psychiatry and
Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)UCLA, Los Angeles,
CA, (4)Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA,
(5)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
141 159.141 Differences in Processing Emotional Facial Stimuli in
Young Adults with High Versus Low Autism Quotient Scores T. Kozikowski1,
J. Burk1, C. L. Dickter2 and J. Zeman3, (1)College of William and Mary,
Williamsburg, VA, (2)College of Wiliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA,
(3)College of WIlliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
142 159.142 Differences in Social Conversation Structure and
Behaviors for Adolescents with ASD As Compared to Typically Developing
Peers K. C. Durica, A. M. Pearl, A. N. Heintzelman, S. M. Minnick and
M. Murray, Department of Psychiatry, Penn State Hershey, Hershey, PA
143 159.143 Differential Physiological Responses to Appropriate Vs
Non-Appropriate Social Stimuli in Neurotypical Adults with Different Level of
Autistic and Empathy Traits A. Truzzi1 and G. Esposito1,2, (1)Department of
Psychology and Cognitive Science, University of Trento, Rovereto, Italy,
(2)Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
77
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
144 159.144 Differing Patterns of Emotional Intelligence in Teens with
and without Autism Spectrum Disorders R. Boily1, J. M. Montgomery1 and
B. M. Stoesz2, (1)Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB,
Canada, (2)University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
145 159.145 Dissociable Components of Imitation Underlie Learning
Abilities in Autism Versus William Syndrome and Mediate Treatment
Outcomes D. R. Hocking1 and G. Vivanti2, (1)La Trobe University,
Melbourne, Australia, (2)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, Northcote,
Australia
146 159.146 Diverse Population of Young Children with Autism: Play
and Language Y. C. Chang1,2, S. Y. Shire3, W. Shih4, H. Gould2 and
C. Kasari5, (1)Charter College of Education, California State University,
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Semel Institute of Neuroscience and
Human Behavior, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)University of California
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Department of Biostatistics, University
of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (5)UCLA Center for Autism
Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
147 159.147 Do Abnormal Eye Movements Account for Impaired
Social Cognition in Adults with ASD? J. C. Bush, P. C. Pantelis,
X. Morin Duchesne, S. A. Kagemann and D. Kennedy, Psychological
and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
148 159.148 Dyspraxia and Autistic Traits in Adults with and without
Autism Spectrum Conditions S. Cassidy1,2, P. Hannant1, T. Tavassoli3,
C. Allison2, P. L. Smith2 and S. Baron-Cohen4,5, (1)Centre for Research in
Psychology, Behavior and Achievement, Coventry University, Coventry,
United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Seaver Autism
Center, New York, NY, (4)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, (5)CLASS Clinic, Cambridgeshire and
Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom
149 159.149 Emotion Recognition Trajectories in Autism Spectrum
Disorders: Effects of Internalizing and Externalizing Comorbidities
T. E. Rosen1, R. J. Weber1, J. A. Rankin1, E. Kang1, K. Levine2 and
M. D. Lerner1, (1)Psychology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY,
(2)Helping Children With Challenges (HCC), Lexington, MA
150 159.150 Emotion Recognition and Mentalising Impairments in
Adolescents with ASD and Co-Occurring Alxithymia B. Milosavljevic1,
F. Happe2, C. Jones3, E. Simonoff4, G. Baird5 and T. Charman6,
(1)Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Institute
of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (3)School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff,
United Kingdom, (4)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Guy’s Hospital, London,
United Kingdom, (6)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
151 159.151 Emotion Recognition in Children with and without
Autism Spectrum Conditions: Cross Cultural Findings S. Fridenson-Hayo1,
S. Berggren2, S. Tal1, A. Lassalle3, D. Pigat3, S. Bolte2,4, S. Baron-Cohen3,5
and O. Golan1, (1)Department of Psychology, Bar-Ilan University, RamatGan, Israel, (2)Center of neurodevelopmental disorders, Karolinska
Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)Autism Research Centre, University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (4)Division of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden, (5)CLASS
Clinic, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge,
United Kingdom
152 159.152 Emotional Understanding and Perception in Cognitively
Able 6-8 Years Old Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
E. Ben Itzchak1, C. Amsalem2, O. Barel-Eini2 and D. A. Zachor3, (1)Ariel
University/ Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Givat Shmuel, Israel, (2)Ariel
University, Ariel, Israel, (3)Pediatrics, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Tel Aviv
University, Zerifin, Israel
78
153 159.153 Ensemble Perception of Emotions in Children with Autism
T. Karaminis1, L. E. Neil2, C. Manning2,3, M. Turi4, C. Fiorentini5, D. Burr4
and E. Pellicano2, (1)Centre for Research in Autism & Education, Institute of
Education, London, United Kingdom, (2)Centre for Research in Autism and
Education (CRAE), Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom,
(3)Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford,
United Kingdom, (4)University of Florence, Florence, Italy, (5)Faculty of
Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva,
Switzerland
154 159.154 Evidence for Specificity of Visuomotor Sequencing Deficits
and Relation to Cognitive Outcomes in Autism and Williams Syndrome
D. R. Hocking1 and G. Vivanti2, (1)Bundoora, La Trobe University,
Melbourne, VIC, Australia, (2)Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre,
Northcote, Australia
155 159.155 Examination of an Imitation-Based Intervention for
Adolescents with ASD and Significant ID B. Ingersoll, Psychology,
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
156 159.156 Examining and Comparing Social Perception Abilities
in Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder D. A. Baribeau1,
K. A. R. Doyle-Thomas2, A. Dupuis3, A. Iaboni4, H. C. McGinn5, J. Crosbie5,
P. D. Arnold6, J. A. Brian7, A. Kushki4, R. Nicolson8, R. Schachar5, N. Soreni9,
P. Szatmari10 and E. Anagnostou2, (1)Department of Psychiatry, University
of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Bloorview Research Institute, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada, (3)Clinical
Research Services, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(4)Autism Research Centre, Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (5)Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (6)Psychiatry, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(7)Bloorview Research Institute/ Paediatrics, Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehab/ University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (8)Psychiatry, Western
University, London, ON, Canada, (9)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON,
Canada, (10)University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
157 159.157 Examining the Relationship Between Oxytocin and Cortisol
in a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomly Assigned Hydrosome
Challenge Study in Autism Spectrum Disorder B. A. Corbett1, K. L. Bales2,
K. B. Sanders3, D. Swain4 and L. Muglia5, (1)Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
TN, (2)Psychology Department, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA,
(3)Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Virginia Polytechnic
Institution and State University, Blacksburg, VA, (5)University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH
158 159.158 Examining the Relationship Between Social
Communication on the ADOS and Real-World Reciprocal Social
Communication in Children with ASD L. R. Qualls1 and B. A. Corbett2,
(1)Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
159 159.159 Exergaming to Improve Physical and Mental Fitness in
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders C. L. Hilton1, D. M. Collins2 and
T. A. Reistetter2, (1)University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX,
(2)Occupational Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX
160 159.160 Eye-Tracking Differences in Social Stimuli in Patients
with Rett Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders J. S. Schwartzman1,
R. D. Velloso1, M. E. F. D`Antino2, C. P. Duarte1, T. F. Cicuti3, J. G. Negrao3
and S. Santos4, (1)Presbyteryan Mackenzie University, Sao Paulo, Brazil,
(2)Presbyteryan Mackenzie University, São Paulo, Brazil, (3)Presbyteryan
Mackenzie University, sao paulo, Brazil, (4)Brazilian Rett Syndrome
Association, Sao Paulo, Brazil
161 159.161 Face Recognition Accuracy, Response Time and Visual
Search Strategies of Adolescents with and without Autism Spectrum
Disorders T. Falkmer, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
162 159.162 Facial Emotion Recognition from Videos with Varying
Intensity in Autism T. S. Wingenbach1, C. Ashwin2 and M. Brosnan3,
(1)Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom,
(2)Dept. of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom, (3)
University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom
163 159.163 Firm Evidence for Facial Identity Recognition Deficits in
ASD Using a Task with No Memory Component L. Latterner1, J. Pandey1,
J. Wolf2, C. Klaiman3, J. D. Herrington1,4 and R. T. Schultz1,5, (1)Center for
Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(2)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)Marcus Autism
Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School
of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, (4)Child Psychiatry and Behavioral Science,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (5)Departments of Pediatrics
and Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
164 159.164 Friends for Foes: How Friendship May Buffer the Effects
of Victimization on Depression in Adolescents with High Functioning Autism
M. Jankowski1, L. Sperle2, B. G. Davidson3 and A. R. Neal-Beevers4,
(1)Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, (2)University of
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (3)Dept of Psychology, University of Texas at
Austin, Austin, TX, (4)Department of Psychology, University of Texas at
Austin, Austin, TX
166 159.166 Impact of Perceived Gaze Direction and Duration on
Fixations during an Impression Formation Task in High-Functioning Autism
A. L. Georgescu1, R. Kulbida1, B. Kuzmanovic2, R. Tepest3, G. Bente4 and
K. Vogeley5, (1)University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany,
(2)Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - Ethics in the Neurosciences,
Research Center Juelich, Juelich, Germany, (3)Department of Psychiatry,
University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany, (4)Department of
Psychology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany, (5)Institute of
Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3), Research Center Jülich, Jülich,
Germany
167 159.167 Implicit Social Evaluations in Toddlers with Autism
Spectrum Disorder A. R. Gonsiorowski1, R. A. Williamson1 and
D. L. Robins2, (1)Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, (2)AJ Drexel
Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
168 159.168 Insight in Social Relationships in Cognitively-Able 6-8
Years Old Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
E. Ben Itzchak1, O. Barel-Eini2, C. Amsalem2 and D. A. Zachor3, (1)Ariel
University/ Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Givat Shmuel, Israel, (2)Ariel
University, Ariel, Israel, (3)Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Tel Aviv University,
Zerifin, Israel
169 159.169 Interoceptive Awareness, Alexithymia and Empathy in
Autism C. L. Mul, S. D. Stagg and J. E. Aspell, Psychology, Anglia Ruskin
University, Cambridge, United Kingdom
170 159.170 Interpersonal Sensory-Motor Synchrony in Adults with and
without ASD during an Open-Ended, Joint Motion Game: A Pilot Study
R. S. Brezis1, L. Noy2, N. Levit-Binnun3 and Y. Golland4, (1)Interdisciplinary
Center, Herzliya, Jerusalem, Israel, (2)Weizmann Institute of Science,
Rehovot, Israel, (3)School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya,
Herzliya, Israel, (4)Sagol Center for Applied Neuroscience, School of
Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Herzliya, Israel
171 159.171 Intimate Relationships and the Broad Autism Phenotype in
Young Adults S. Robinson, M. A. Viecili and J. A. Weiss, Psychology, York
University, Toronto, ON, Canada
173 159.173 Longitudinal Stability of Social Interaction Styles in
Children and Adolescents with Autism S. Begeer1, A. M. Scheeren2,
C. Zieremans3 and H. M. Koot3, (1)Van der Boechorststraat 1, VU
University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands, (2)Dutch Autism & ADHD
Research Center, Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam,
Netherlands, (3)Developmental Psychology, VU University Amsterdam,
Amsterdam, Netherlands
174 159.174 Miss Alida M Acosta Ortiz A. M. Acosta Ortiz1,
S. B. Gaigg2 and S. Reimers3, (1)Psychology, Autism Research Group, City
University London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Psychology, City University
of London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Psychology, City University London,
London, United Kingdom
175 159.175 Moral Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum
Disorders M. J. Liu1 and L. Y. Ma2, (1)National Kaohsiung Normal University,
Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, (2)National Kaohsiung Normal University,
Kaohsiung, Taiwan
176 159.176 No Evidence of Emotion Dysregulation or Aversion to
Mutual Gaze in Pre-Schoolers with Autism – an Eye-Tracking Pupillometry
Study H. J. Nuske, G. Vivanti and C. Dissanayake, Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia
177 159.177 Perceptions of Playground Engagement with Peers: How
Do Child Reports Compare to Recess Observations for Children with ASD?
A. Schlink, M. Wirga, A. Dominguez, M. Kretzmann and C. Kasari, UCLA
Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
178 159.178 Playing with Peers at Recess: Are Children with Autism
Playing Their Favorite Games? C. McCracken, M. Kretzmann, C. Kasari and
M. Mattos, UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
179 159.179 Positive Bias for Eye Contact in Adolescents with
Autism Spectrum Disorders during Conversation with an Android Robot
Y. Yoshikawa1, H. Kumazaki2,3, Y. Matsumoto4, Y. Wakita4, S. Mizushima5,
S. Nemoto6, M. Miyao7, M. Nakano7, M. Mimura2 and H. Ishiguro1,
(1)Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka,
Japan, (2)Department of Neuropsychiatry, School of Medicine, Keio
University, Tokyo, Japan, (3)Research Center for Child Mental Development,
University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui Prefecture, Japan, (4)The National
Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan,
(5)Research Center for Child Mental Development of University of Fukui,
University of Osaka, Yoshida-gun, Fukui Prefecture, Japan, (6)Donguri clinic
for developmental disorders, Tokyo, Japan, (7)National Center for Child
Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan
FRIDAY – PM
165 159.165 Imitation Abilities in 12-Month-Old Infants at High Risk
for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Parents Provide a Vital Perspective
S. Macari1, J. Rowberry2, D. J. Campbell3, G. Chen4, J. Koller5 and
K. Chawarska1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT, (2)Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center, Nellis Air
Force Base, NV, (3)Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, (4)Stanford University,
Stanford, CA, (5)The School of Education, The Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel
172 159.172 Linking the Emotional Self-Control of Children with ASD
to ADHD Symptomology: A Moderated Mediation Analysis T. Ward,
H. N. Davis, H. Dauterman, A. Lee, R. Kramer, W. Mason and B. J. Wilson,
Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA
180 159.180 Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia: A Moderator of Emotion
Regulation and Social Motivation Deficits in ASD E. E. Condy1, M. Patriquin2,
A. Scarpa3 and B. H. Friedman1, (1)Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute
and State University, Blacksburg, VA, (2)Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, TX, (3)Virginia Polytechnic Institution and State University,
Blacksburg, VA
181 159.181 Revealing Sub-Categorization Strategies Used By
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Decode Facial Expressions
of Emotion K. Ainsworth1, D. R. Simmons1, O. Garrod1, I. Delis1, B.
Heptonstall2, P. Schyns1 and J. Tanaka3, (1)The University of Glasgow,
Glasgow, United Kingdom, (2)University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada,
(3)Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
182 159.182 Social Anosimia: Altered Social Chemosignaling in
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Y. Shapira, A. Eisen and
N. Sobel, Department of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science,
Rehovot, Israel
79
FRIDAY May 15, 2015 – PM
183 159.183 Social Attention As a Baseline Measure of Social
Motivation in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder J. Bradshaw1,
T. W. Vernon2, A. D. Navab2, E. J. Horowitz3 and T. C. German3, (1)Clinical,
Counseling, and School Psychology, University of California Santa Barbara,
Santa Barbara, CA, (2)Koegel Autism Center, University of California Santa
Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, (3)Psychological and Brain Sciences,
University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
184 159.184 Social Skills, IQ, and Depression Among Boys
Aged 8-12 with ASD J. Mendelson1, P. A. Thomas2, A. Benson-Greer2 and
R. Nelson-Gray3, (1)University of North Carolina - Greensboro, Greensboro,
NC, (2)Psychology, UNCG, Greensboro, NC, (3)Psychology, UNCGreensboro, Greensboro, NC
185 159.185 Spontaneous Goal Attribution in Children with ASD:
A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study E. J. Horowitz1, J. Bradshaw2,
A. D. Navab3, T. C. German1 and T. W. Vernon3, (1)Psychological and Brain
Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA,
(2)University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, (3)Koegel
Autism Center, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
186 159.186 Strong Emotions Cause Social Problems; Or Is This the
Other Way Around in Children and Adolescents with ASD? C. Rieffe1,2,
J. A. de Ruiter1, C. E. Stevenson3, L. Stockmann4 and M. G. Bos1,
(1)Developmental Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands,
(2)Foundation for the deaf and hard of hearing child, Amsterdam,
Netherlands, (3)Methodology and Statistics, Leiden University, Leiden,
Netherlands, (4)Centrum Autisme Rivierduinen, Leiden, Netherlands
187 159.187 Taking a Dimensional Measurement Approach to Test
the Imitation Impairment Hypothesis in Autism J. H. G. Williams, Clinical
Research Centre, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
188 159.188 Temperament Similarities and Differences: A Comparison
of Factor Structures from the Behavioral Style Questionnaire in Children with
ASD, DD and Typical Development E. Moody1, S. Rosenberg2 and
L. D’Abreu3, (1)13121 E 17th Avenue, JFK Partners/University of Colorado
School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (2)Psychiatry, University of Colorado School
of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (3)Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO
189 159.189 The Broad Autism Phenotype Predicts Relationship
Outcomes in Previously Unfamiliar College Roommates D. J. Faso,
N. J. Sasson, C. A. Corretti and R. Ackerman, School of Behavioral and
Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX
190 159.190 The Effects of Violent Video Games on Adults with and
without Autism Spectrum Disorder C. R. Engelhardt1, M. O. Mazurek1,
J. Hilgard1, B. Bartholow1 and J. Rouder2, (1)University of Missouri, Columbia,
MO, (2)Psychological Science, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
191 159.191 The Mediating Role of Empathy on Broader Autism Traits
and Prosocial Behavior D. Swain1, H. Gordon1, A. Scarpa1 and L. Cooper2,
(1)Virginia Polytechnic Institution and State University, Blacksburg, VA,
(2)Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA
192 159.192 The Relation Between Theory of Mind and SelfPerceptions in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders R. Furlano,
E. A. Kelley, L. Hall and D. E. Wilson, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON,
Canada
193 159.193 The Relationship Between Adaptive Functioning and
Social Responsiveness in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
and Caregiver Quality of Life (QoL) K. Davis, L. Dewey and K. Read,
Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
194 159.194 The Relationship Between Discourse Processing and
Autistic Symptomatology in Adolescents with ASD K. E. Bodner, J. Stichter,
K. Bellesheim, J. Sokoloff, M. Herzog and S. E. Christ, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO
80
195 159.195 The Role of Language in Second-Order Theory of Mind
Reasoning in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Children with
Optimal Outcomes I. Chin1, E. Troyb2, E. A. Kelley3, I. M. Eigsti1, D. A. Fein1
and L. Naigles1, (1)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(2)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (3)Queen’s University, Kingston,
ON, Canada
196 159.196 The Strange Stories Film Task: A New Measure of
Social Cognition K. Murray1, K. Johnston1 and F. Happe2, (1)King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
197 159.197 An Intense World? Heightened Affective Empathy for Pain
in ASD M. Robberts-Hoogenhout and S. Malcolm-Smith, Department of
Psychology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
198 159.198 Trait Anxiety in ASD: Implications for Empathic
Understanding E. Trimmer, S. McDonald and J. A. Rushby, Psychology,
University of NSW, Sydney, Australia
199 159.199 Understanding the Relationship Between Social Anxiety
and Bullying Against Others in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
E. N. Santos, J. Hopkins and E. A. Laugeson, Psychiatry, UCLA Semel
Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA
200 159.200 University Students’ Explicit Stereotypes of Peers on the
Autism Spectrum J. Zeman1, C. L. Dickter2, S. Borowski3, J. Johnson4,
A. Gadre1 and J. Burk5, (1)College of WIlliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA,
(2)Psychology, College of Wiliam and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, (3)University
of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (4)College of Williamm and Mary, Williamsburg,
VA, (5)Psychology, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
201 159.201 Using Interactive Eye-Tracking and fMRI to Investigate
Joint Attention in Children and Adolescents with and without Autism
Spectrum Disorder E. Oberwelland1,2,3, L. Schilbach4, I. Barisic4,5,
S. C. Krall1,2, K. Vogeley2,4, G. R. Fink2,6, B. Herpertz-Dahlmann1, K. Konrad1,2,3
and M. Schulte-Rüther1,2,3, (1)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Psychosomatics, and Psychotherapy, University Hospital RWTH Aachen,
Aachen, Germany, (2)Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3),
Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany, (3)Translational Brain Medicine,
Jülich Aachen Research Alliance - JARA Brain, Aachen, Germany,
(4)Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital
Cologne, Cologne, Germany, (5)Department of Humanities, Social and
Political Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, (6)Department of
Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
202 159.202 Visual Orientation during Game Play: Using Eye-Tracking
and Conversation Analysis to Examine the Interactional Use of Eye-Gaze in
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders K. Tuononen1, T. Korkiakangas2,
A. Laitila1 and E. Kärnä1, (1)School of Educational Sciences and Psychology,
University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland, (2)Department of Culture,
Communication and Media, Institute of Education (University of London),
London, United Kingdom
203 159.203 Who Believes in (Bayesian) Ghosts? a Study of
Interpersonal Predictive Coding in High-Functioning Autism T. von der
Luehe1, V. Manera2, I. Barisic3, C. Becchio4, K. Vogeley5 and L. Schilbach5,
(1)Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne,
Germany, (2)EA CoBTeK Cognition Behaviour Technology, University of
Nice Sophia Antipolis,, Nice, France, (3)Cognitive Science Department, ETH
Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland, (4)Department of Psychology, University of Turin,
Torino, Italy, (5)Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University
Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
204 159.204 Young Autistic Children in a Stimulating Play Situation:
Nature and Frequency of Emotions C. Jacques1,2, V. Courchesne2,
S. Mineau2, S. Lajeunesse2, S. Ferguson2, C. Cimon-Paquet2, V. Bilodeau2,
M. Dawson2 and L. Mottron3, (1)Universite du Quebec en Outaouais,
Gatineau, QC, Canada, (2)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants
du développement de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montréal, QC,
Canada, (3)Centre d’excellence en Troubles envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM), Montreal, QC, Canada
• IMFAR ANNUAL MEETING Salt
Lake City, Utah, U S A
•
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
www.a u ti s m - i n s a r .o r g
Special Interest Groups (SIGs)
Saturday, May 16, 2015: 07:15 AM - 08:45 AM
Location listed under each session
160 - ASD and Sex Offenses: Guidance for the
Criminal Justice System
Room: Envoy
Session Chair: Dr. Laurie Sperry
Co-Chairs: Dr. Rachel Loftin, Dr. Philip O’Donnell, Dr. Alexander
Westphal, Hannah Heyward, Ph.D. candidate
Oftentimes education related to sexual/romantic functioning does not
occur until after an individual with ASD been victimized or has committed a
social error that meets the criteria for a sex offense (Griffiths, 1999). These
behaviors may include undesired touching, public masturbation and other
illegal activity (Hellemans, et al., 2007). Even when problem behaviors are
not illegal or harmful to others, inappropriate sexual behaviors can limit
employment and inclusion opportunities for individuals with ASD
(Sullivan & Caterino, 2008).
One of the biggest challenges in developing appropriate sexuality education
for people with ASD has been bridging the gap between people who
know about sexuality education and people who know about ASD
(Mesibov, 2012). The goal of this interactive panel discussion is to
summarize what is known from published investigations and case studies
of people with ASD through an examination of information about the criminal
justice system, the characteristics and life circumstances of people with
ASD that are implicated. This presentation will provide case examples and
cover the findings from an investigation of a sexuality education curriculum
developed by ASD specialists and Planned Parenthood. Preliminary data will
be presented regarding the psychiatric and behavioral profiles of adolescents
with histories of interpersonal violence, including sexual offending, who have
been admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit. Practical applications
for community and educational settings will be discussed.
Room: Savoy
Session Chairs: Dr. Kristelle Hudry and Dr. Giacomo Vivanti
The standard of autism early-intervention research has increased
substantially, allowing us to judge the efficacy of particular therapy models
under optimal delivery conditions. If the field is to have a real impact on
the lives of children with autism and their families, however, we need to
progress our evaluation of the effectiveness of early intervention, conducting
rigorous studies within community-based settings. Such a move brings
significant methodological challenge, and researchers in different parts of
the world will benefit from the opportunity to have for dedicated discussion
on the topic at this new SIG. We will consider existing progress made in
conducting community-based studies of ASD early-intervention, with a focus
on methodological difficulties and successes encountered, and aiming to plan
a strategic way forward for the field.
Room: Murano
Session Chais: Sue Fletcher-WatsonCommittee: Alyssa Alcorn,
Renae Beaumont, Ouriel Grynszpan,
Mari MacFarland, Helen Pain, Katharina Spiel
The theme of the 2015 SIG will be dissemination. The main part of the
meeting will be a chaired expert panel discussion. The multi-disciplinary
panel will be asked to respond to questions submitted in advance by
members of the ASDtech mailing list, permitting a focused discussion,
followed by open comments from the floor. Topics may include:
• Open sourcing: both data and programs, including online
versions of autism clinical and research tools
• Technological solutions for the developing world – cultural
differences in design and application
• Procedural integrity in technology research and practice
• Learning analytics and implementation science:
what lessons are relevant for autism research?
• Expectations of technology: it could be free so it should be free?
Time and resources required to make technology accessible
and to support users
• Challenges of, and guidelines for, bringing technologies
to the market
• Supporting evidence-based ASD interventions to keep pace
with latest innovations
As this will be the closing meeting of the SIG we will also invite specific
suggestions from members about how to build on the work of the SIG,
drawing on existing tools such as the mailing list and international expertise
map and identifying further opportunities for meetings.
163 - Approaching Adulthood: Transitional and
Vocational Issues in ASD
Room: Grand Salon
Session Chairs: Dr. David Nicholas, University of Calgary, Canada;
Dr. Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, University of Alberta, Canada
Aims (1) To continue to facilitate networking for substantive priority planning
and research development (2) To work toward specific research plans and
galvanization of international networks for addressing gaps and opportunities
for transitional and vocational research in ASD.
SATURDAY – AM
161 - Implementing and Evaluating CommunityBased Early Intervention
162 - Technology and Autism: Developing a
Framework for Best Practice in Design, Development,
Evaluation and Dissemination of Autism-Specific
Technologies
Welcome Address and Sponsor Update
8:45 AM - Welcome from IMFAR Organizers
8:50 AM - Autism Speaks Update, Robert H. Ring, Ph.D.
Grand Ballroom
81
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
Keynote Address
164 - Pathways to New Treatments for Autism
Spectrum Disorder
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM - Grand Ballroom
Speaker: Jeremy Veenstra-Vander Weele, Columbia University /
New York State Psychiatric Institute, Psychiatry, New York, NY
Two main approaches are being pursued to identify new medication
treatments that may benefit children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The
first and most common approach is to evaluate a treatment in the total group
of people affected by ASD, usually with a small number excluded due to
the presence of a known genetic syndrome. This strategy is challenged by
the lack of support for common genetic or environmental risk factors that
contribute substantially to risk in the entire group of children with ASD.
Therefore, treatment studies in the overall group of children with ASD are
largely tied to brain systems and pathways that may modulate social function
or repetitive behavior but that are not necessarily implicated in autism risk.
The second approach is almost the exact opposite, to study a medication
for ASD-related symptoms in a defined genetic syndrome that confers
substantial risk of ASD but comprises <2% of individuals with ASD. Since
animal models are providing an understanding of the underlying neurobiology
that leads to autism-related symptoms in these populations, treatments
targeted the root cause of these syndromes is possible. Transformative
treatments, though possibly not “cures,” seem most likely to emerge from
the second approach, but in a small group of children. In contrast, if the first
approach is successful, we can expect a treatment that benefits a larger
group of children, but likely benefits them less. With emerging knowledge of
brain systems and intersections with genetic data, we can hope for a third
approach that is somewhere in the middle, with a treatment being studied in
a larger subgroup of individuals with ASD that share a common biomarker.
This could result from extension outward from treatments studies in rare
genetic syndromes, or it could result from identification of subgroups that
benefit from treatments studied in ASD as a whole. I will discuss current
challenges and opportunities as we seek new treatments in autism, including
specific examples of each approach.
Keynote Panel Session
165 - On the Road to Translational Treatments in
Autism-Related Genetic Syndromes
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair & Discussant: Jeremy Veenstra-Vander Weele / New
York State Psychiatric Institute, Psychiatry, New York, NY
Our understanding of autism risk factors has grown exponentially in the past
few years. Cellular and animal models based upon some of these risk factors
are providing clues to the underlying neurobiology. The most advanced work
has emerged in rare genetic syndromes that often include autism symptoms:
tuberous sclerosis, fragile X, Rett, and Phelan-McDermid syndromes. In each
syndrome, hypothesized neurobiological mechanisms are now being tested
in human treatment studies. This panel will outline insights from specific
studies in these rare syndromes, but it will also provide a perspective on the
pathway from risk factor to mechanism to potential treatment. Presentations
in this panel will highlight (1) candid evaluations of model systems for
dissecting the biology of neurodevelopmental disorders and testing potential
treatments; and (2) perspectives on assessing potential benefits and risks
in the context of developmental change and the placebo effect. These
rare syndromes offer the first opportunity to test treatments based upon an
understanding of neurobiological mechanisms. By finding treatments that
show benefit in these rare syndromes, we may also gain an understanding
of how to develop and test treatments in neurodevelopmental disorders more
broadly. Potentially, some treatments may even benefit a larger subgroup of
children with ASD.
82
10:30 165.001 Progress and Hurdles in Development of Targeted
Treatments for Fragile X Syndrome E. Berry-Kravis, Pediatrics,
Neurological Sciences, Biochemistry, Rush University Medical
Center, Chicago, IL
10:55 165.002 Translational Studies in Tuberous Sclerosis M. Sahin,
Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
11:20 165.003 Initial Trials of Translational Medicine in Rett Syndrome
W. E. Kaufmann, Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital,
Boston, MA
11:45 165.004 Novel Findings in Phelan-Mcdermid Syndrome and
Their Translation into Therapeutics J. D. Buxbaum, Seaver Autism
Center for Research and Treatment, Department of Psychiatry,
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
12:10 Discussant
Panel Session
166 - Translational Developmental Research in
Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors: From Basic
Mechanisms to Intervention
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: C. Harrop, University of California, Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA
Discussant: J. W. Bodfish, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Nashville, TN
Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors (RRBs) are a core symptom of autism
spectrum disorders (ASD) (ICD-10, World Health Organization 1992;
DSM-5, American Psychiatric Association, 2013). While research into this
symptom domain has grown in recent years, considerably less is known
about the function and etiology of RRBs relative to the social-communication
impairments of ASD. This hinders researchers ability to develop effective,
targeted interventions for this core deficit. This panel will address these
issues and present a series of innovative studies with the overarching
goal of providing a comprehensive and translational update on the current
state of the field. The panel brings together talks spanning neuroscience,
early detection and intervention and the use of novel technologies to study
RRBs. Our four panelists will discuss a) the trajectories of RRBs and their
neural correlates in early development, b) explore novel methodologies for
quantifying the presence of RRBs as well as their response to intervention,
and c) the effect of targeted interventions on behavioral changes in RRBs.
10:30 166.001 Exploring the Neural Correlates of Repetitive Behavior
in Babies with Autism J. J. Wolff1, J. T. Elison2, M. R. Swanson3,
G. Gerig4, M. A. Styner5, K. N. Botteron6, S. Dager7, A. M. Estes8,
H. C. Hazlett9, R. T. Schultz10, L. Zwaigenbaum11, J. Piven5 and
The IBIS Network12, (1)Department of Educational Psychology,
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, (2)Institute of Child
Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN,
(3)University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, Carrboro, NC,
(4)School of Computing & Scientific Computing and Imaging
Institute SCI, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (5)University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (6)Washington
University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO,
(7)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (8)Speech and Hearing
Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (9)Carolina
Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (10)Departments of Pediatrics and
Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA,
(11)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (12)Autism
Center of Excellence, Chapel Hill, NC
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
10:55 166.002 Eye-Tracking Restricted Behaviors and Interests in
Autism N. J. Sasson1, K. Unruh2 and J. W. Bodfish3, (1)School
of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas,
Richardson, TX, (2)Vanderbilt Brain Institue, Nashville, TN,
(3)Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Nashville, TN
11:20 166.003 Automated Detection of Stereotypical Motor Movements
in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Wireless 3-Axis
Accelerometers and Computerized Pattern Recognition Algorithms
M. S. Goodwin, Northeastern University, Boston, MA
11:45 166.004 Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Toddlers with
ASD: The Impact of Caregiver-Mediated Jasper on Child Behaviors
and Caregiver Strategies C. Harrop1, A. Gulsrud2, W. Shih3,
L. Hovsepyan3 and C. Kasari4, (1)University of California, Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Semel Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles,
CA, (3)University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(4)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
12:10 Discussant
Panel Session
167 - The Value of Registries and Biobanking
to the ASD Community within the Social and
Cultural Landscape
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: L. Gallagher, Department of Psychiatry, Trinity
College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Discussant: A. Reichenberg, Psychiatry and Preventive Medicine,
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
10:30 167.001 Recruitment of Families to ASD Research Databases
through the UK Publicly Funded Healthcare System J. R. Parr1 and
H. McConachie2, (1)Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University,
Newcastle, England, (2)Newcastle University, Newcastle upon
Tyne, United Kingdom
10:55 167.002 International Registry Models: Phelan-Mcdermid
Syndrome International Registry M. O’Boyle1 and S. Lomas2,
(1)Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Foundation, Arlington, VA,
(2)Phelan McDermid Syndrome Foundation, Venice, FL
11:45 167.004 National Stakeholder Consultation for a National Registry
for Autism and Related Neurodevelopmental Disorders G. Leader1,
J. O’Reilly2, A. M. M. Daniels3, A. Shih4 and L. Gallagher5,
(1)Psychology, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway,
Ireland, (2)Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, (3)Science,
Autism Speaks, New York, NY, (4)Autism Speaks, New York, NY,
(5)Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
12:10 Discussant
Panel Session
168 - Investigating Multiple Components of
Language Development in the Same Children:
The Uconn Early Language Study
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: L. Naigles, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Studies of language in children with ASD usually target just one linguistic
component (e.g., pragmatics, maternal interaction, grammar, word learning,
expressive/receptive language, joint attention, gesture); however, actual
language development/use involves all of these simultaneously. The
UCONN Early Language Study includes a unique dataset in which multiple
components of language were assessed at multiple visits over a 2-year
span, in >30 children with ASD plus >30 TD children who were matched on
language at study onset. This panel presents four different analyses of this
dataset, carried out by different researchers focusing on different language
components in the same children, revealing how language components
interact during development. Included are (1) analyses of the children’s
gestures during mother-child play sessions early in the study, and which
gestures predict speech and language abilities 2 years later; (2) reports
on the general lexical and grammatical growth rates of the children’s
speech over time, and how these rates are influenced by—and reciprocally
influence—the mothers’ speech; (3) analyses of the children’s verb
development, comparing emergence of e.g., action, mental, and social verbs;
(4) data on the children’s comprehension of words and grammar, especially
considering how early comprehension abilities impact later language use.
Cross-paper integration will be highlighted.
10:30 168.001 The Role of Gestures in Early Language Development
in Children with ASD A. Goodwin1, S. Goldin-Meadow2,
D. A. Fein3 and L. Naigles4, (1)Waisman Center, University of
Wisconsin, Madison, WI, (2)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL,
(3)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (4)University
of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
SATURDAY – AM
ASD registries and biobanks provide critical support for research and
clinical service development. Different models exist reflecting varied social
and cultural contexts. For example national registries, e.g. in Scandinavian
countries, integrate publicly available health data while elsewhere other
registries have been driven by a specific research agenda, e.g. genetics
research. Important insights have already been obtained from registries
and linking phenotypic data with biological data, can potentiate biomedical
research. However successful registries/ biobanks rely on engagement
by the ASD community and are as much about necessity as are trust,
engagement and ethical considerations. Here we discuss four experiences
of registries/ biobanking. A successful researcher led UK registry, ASD UK
has leveraged engagement with clinical services. A parent advocacy group
for a rare ASD related condition, Phelan McDermid Syndrome, showed
that parents could inspire scientists to research the condition. A national
consultation with ASD Stakeholders in Ireland revealed strong support but
also mistrust that a registry/ biobank could be used prejudicially. In China
a biobank/ registry project will enhance autism awareness and research
but faces huge geographical challenges. We will discuss the challenges
encountered and how social and cultural contexts has been influential in
shaping these initiatives.
11:20 167.003 Creating an Interactive National Registry for ASD
in China X. Zou1, H. Guo2, X. Wang3, B. Chen4 and P. H. Lipkin5,
(1)Pediatrics, Child Developmental & Behavioral Center, The 3rd
Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU), Guangzhou,
MD, (2)China Women’s Development Foundation(CWDF), Beijing,
China, (3)School of Mathematics & Computational Science, Sun
Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China, (4)Child Developmental &
Behavioral Center (CDBC), The 3rd Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yatsen University (SYSU), Guangzhou, China, (5)Pediatrics/Neurology
and Developmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
11:00 168.002 Language Development in Context: A Longitudinal
Study of Typically-Developing Children and Children with ASD
R. Fusaroli1, E. Weed2, D. A. Fein3 and L. Naigles4, (1)Center of
functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital,
Aarhus, Denmark, (2)Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark,
(3)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (4)University
of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
83
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
11:30 168.003 Growth Trajectories of Longitudinal Naturalistic Verb
Use in ASD: Verb Category Matters J. Parish-Morris1, D. A. Fein2
and L. Naigles3, (1)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia,
PA, (2)Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT,
(3)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
12:00 168.004 Form Is Easy, Meaning Is Hard: What Language
Comprehension Reveals about Language in Autism L. Naigles1 and
D. A. Fein2, (1)University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (2)Psychology,
University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Panel Session
169 - You Want Me to Eat What? Novel Treatment
Approaches for Food Selectivity and Feeding
Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
10:30 AM - 12:30 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: E. S. Kuschner, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA
Food selectivity and feeding problems are highly prevalent in children with
ASD, yet few empirically supported interventions are available. Behavioral
interventions are widely used in clinical feeding programs and show promise
in preliminary studies; however, these time-intensive treatments are generally
limited to inpatient or day treatment settings and have not been rigorously
examined via randomized clinical trials. This symposium will present current
efforts in the field aimed at establishing evidence-based treatments for the
heterogeneous array of food selectivity and feeding problems in ASD. Three
novel treatments at different stages of rigorous intervention development and
evaluation will be presented: Autism MEAL Plan, Parent Training Program for
Feeding Problems, and the BUFFET Program. These programs aim to bring
feeding treatments to an outpatient setting and incorporate novel treatment
components, including greater parental involvement, closer collaboration
across disciplines (behavior specialists and nutrition experts), utilization of
a group therapy model, and cognitive behavioral strategies tailored for older
and cognitively higher functioning individuals. A final presentation will discuss
co-occurring factors (i.e., obesity and physical activity) that may be key
mediators or moderators to treatment response and merit consideration for
integration into feeding treatment programs.
10:30 169.001 The Autism Meal Plan: A Parent-Training Curriculum
to Manage Eating Aversions and Low Intake Among Children with
ASD T. L. Burrell1 and W. G. Sharp2, (1)Research, Marcus Autism
Center, Atlanta, GA, (2)Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program,
Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA
11:00 169.002 Parent Training for Feeding Problems in Young Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder C. Johnson1, T. Smith2 and
S. L. Hyman3, (1)University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, (2)601
Elmwood Ave, Box 671, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY,
(3)Department of Pediatrics and Clinical and Translational Science
Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY
11:30 169.003 The Buffet Program: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy
Approach to Food Selectivity in School Age Children with ASD
E. S. Kuschner1, A. de Marchena2, B. Maddox3, H. Morton3 and
J. Worley3, (1)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia,
PA, (2)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (3)The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
12:00 169.004 Obesity As a Modifiable Risk Factor in the Treatment
of Feeding Problems in Children with ASD L. Bandini, Pediatrics,
University of Massachusetts Medical School/Eunice Kennedy
Shriver Center and Boston University, Boston, MA
84
Poster Session
170 - Animal Models
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
1 170.001 A Monoclonal Brain-Reactive Antibody Leads to ASD-like
Phenotype in Male Mice L. Brimberg1, S. Mader2, V. Jeganathan3,
P. T. Huerta4, R. Berlin5, P. K. Gregersen6, B. T. Volpe5 and B. Diamond7,
(1)Center fro Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Disease, The Feinstein
Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, (2)Center fro Autoimmune
and Musculoskeletal Disease, Feinstein Institute for medical Reaserch,
Manhasset, NY, (3)Center for Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Diseases,
The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, (4)Laboratory
of Immune and Neuronal Networks, Feinstein Institute for medical
Reaserch, Manhasset, NY, (5)Functional Neuroanatomy, Feinstein Institute
for medical Reaserch, Manhasset, NY, (6)Center for Genomics and Human
Genetics, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY,
(7)Center for Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Diseases, The Feinstein
Institute For Medical Research, Manhasset, NY
2 170.002 Anterior Cerebellum Purkinje Cells-Restricted Expression
of Mutant DISC1 Produces Neurobehavioral Abnormalities Relevant to
Autism Spectrum Disorders A. V. Shevelkin1,2, B. N. Abazyan1, C. Yang1,
O. A. Mychko1, G. L. Rudow3, J. C. Troncoso3 and M. V. Pletnikov1,4,
(1)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Division of System
Neurobiology and Functional Neurochemistry, P.K.Anokhin Research
Institute of Normal Physiology, Moscow, Russia, (3)Department of
Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD,
(4)Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
3 170.003 Bidirectional Changes in UBE3A Gene Dosage Reciprocally
Regulate Aggression in Mouse Models of Angelman Syndrome and Idic15
M. P. Anderson1,2,3,4, D. Stoppel5 and Y. Nong5, (1)Pathology/Neurology,
Harvard Medical School/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston,
MA, (2)Pathology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, (3)Autism
BrainNET, Boston, MA, (4)Children’s Hospital Boston Intellectual and
Developmental Disabilities Research Center, Boston, MA, (5)Harvard
Medical School/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA
4 170.004 Decreased Akt/mTOR Pathway Is Associated with
Reduced Excitatory Synaptic Marker PSD-95 and Autistic-like Behavior
in Valproic Acid-Exposed Mice C. Nicolini1, V. Aksenov2, E. Rosa1 and
M. Fahnestock1,2, (1)Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster
University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (2)Biology, McMaster University,
Hamilton, ON, Canada
5 170.005 Deletion of Pten in Oxytocinergic Cells Leads to Social
Behavioral Deficits and Decreased Oxytocinergic Cell Number
A. E. Clipperton-Allen, Y. Chen and D. T. Page, Neuroscience,
The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, FL
6 170.006 Developmental, Behavioral, and Neurobiological
Consequences of Maternal Allergic Asthma: A Mouse Model in Support of
Clinical Findings J. Schwartzer1, M. Careaga2, C. Chang3, C. E. Onore4 and
P. Ashwood5, (1)Neuroscience and Behavior, Mount Holyoke College, South
Hadley, MA, (2)UC Davis/MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (3)University of
California, Davis, Davis, CA, (4)MIND Institute, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA,
(5)UC Davis, Sacramento, CA
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
7 170.007 Effects of Acute N-Acetylcysteine Administration on Striatal
Glutamate Concentrations and Behaviour in C57BL/6J Adult Mice
A. Durieux1, C. Fernandes2, D. G. Murphy3, M. Labouesse4, S. Giovanoli4,
J. Horder1, U. Meyer4, P. W. So5 and G. M. McAlonan3, (1)Department
of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (2)Social, Genetic
and Developmental Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (3)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (4)Physiology and Behaviour Laboratory, Swiss
Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland, (5)Department of
Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom
8 170.008 Estrogen Receptor Beta Signaling and Transglutaminase
2 in Sex Specific ASD-like Behavior in Mice A. M. Crider1 and A. Pillai2,
(1)GRU, Augusta, GA, (2)Psychiatry, GRU, AUGUSTA, GA
9 170.009 Impaired Decision Making in Mice Lacking Met Receptor in
the Cerebral Cortex E. M. Powell1, J. M. Smith2 and R. F. Martin3, (1)HSF II
S251, 20 Penn St, University of Maryland - Medicine, Baltimore, MD,
(2)University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, (3)University of
Maryland - Medicine, Baltimore, MD
10 170.010 Increased Proinflammatory Cytokines Associated with
Increased Abnormal Behaviors in a Non-Human Primate Model of Maternal
Immune Activation D. Rose1, M. Careaga1, H. Yang1, A. K. McAllister2,
C. S. Carter3, D. G. Amaral4, M. D. Bauman1 and P. Ashwood1, (1)UC Davis/
MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (2)Center for Neuroscience, UC Davis,
Davis, CA, (3)Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University
of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, Sacramento, CA, (4)MIND Institute
and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of
California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
12 170.012 N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation Prevents
Adult Brain Biochemistry and Behavioral Changes Elicited By Prenatal
Exposure to Maternal Inflammation Q. Li1, Y. O. Leung2, W. Kong2,
I. Y. Zhou3, L. C. Ho2, B. Paul4, R. Wei5, S. Lam2, X. F. Zhang2, A. Law2,
E. Chen2, S. Chua2, P. C. Sham6, E. X. Wu7 and G. M. McAlonan8, (1)The
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (2)HKU, HK, Hong Kong,
(3)Department of Radiology, Athinoula. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical
Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School,
Charlestown, MA, (4)The University of hongkong, sasoon road, HKU, Hong
Kong, Hong Kong, (5)Institute of Basic Medicine, Shandong Academy of
Medical Sciences, Jinan, China, (6)Centre for Genomic Sciences, The
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (7)HKU, Hong Kong,
China, (8)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom
14 170.014 Norepinephrine Fiber Innervation Is Increased in
the Amygdala of the Engrailed-2 (En2) Knock out Mouse Model of
Neurodevelopmental Disorders J. W. Lunden1, M. Genestine1, C. C. Peng2,
S. Prem1, V. R. Mirabella3 and E. DiCicco-Bloom4, (1)Neuroscience and
Cell Biology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway,
NJ, (2)Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, (3)Rutgers University, Child
Health Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, (4)Department of
Neuroscience & Cell Biology/Pediatrics (Neurology), Rutgers Robert Wood
Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ
15 170.015 Pharmacological Treatment of Repetitive Behavior in the
Context of Development A. M. Muehlmann and M. H. Lewis, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL
16 170.016 Pten Mutations Alter Brain Growth Trajectory and
Allocation of Cell Types through Elevated Beta-Catenin Signaling
Y. Chen, W. C. Huang, J. Sejourne, A. E. Clipperton-Allen and D. T. Page,
Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, FL
17 170.017 Regulation of Seizure Susceptibility in Shank3 Deficiency
E. Drapeau, O. B. Gunal, J. Hanks and J. D. Buxbaum, Psychiatry, Icahn
School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
18 170.018 Striking Differences in the Neuroanatomical Phenotype
of the Neuroligin3 R451C Knock-in and the Neurexin1α Knock-out
J. Ellegood1, F. Espinosa2, M. Kouser3, Z. Xuan3, C. M. Powell4 and
J. P. Lerch5, (1)Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (2)Neurology, U of T Southwestern, Dallas, TX, (3)U of
T Southwestern, Dallas, TX, (4)Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, The
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, (5)Hospital
for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
19 170.019 Unusual Adult Reciprocal Social Interactions, Ultrasonic
Vocalizations, Self-Grooming, Seizure Activity and EEG Gamma-Power in
Shank3B Knockout Mice: Replications and New Discoveries
J. L. Silverman1, M. C. Pride1, N. A. Copping1, J. E. Hayes1,
S. H. Lammers2, S. C. Dhamne2, A. Rotenberg2, E. Chadwick3,
D. G. Smith4, M. Sahin2 and J. N. Crawley1, (1)MIND Institute and
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California
Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, (2)Neurology, Boston
Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, (3)Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA,
(4)Autism Speaks, Boston, MA
20 170.020 Zebrafish mbd5 Loss of Function Mutation Affect
Embryonic Neuron Differentiation and Maturation Y. Wang1, H. Zhou2,
X. Du2 and Y. Wang1, (1)Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai,
China, (2)Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China
21 170.021 • Maternal Immune Activation in Mice: A Longitudinal
Analysis in the C57 Strain L. Ricceri, D. Vigli and M. L. Scattoni, Dept.
Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy
SATURDAY – AM
11 170.011 Loss of MeCP2 in the Rat Uniquely Models Regression,
Impaired Sociability, and Transcriptional Deficits of Rett Syndrome
R. C. Samaco1,2, S. Veeraragavan1, S. M. Hamilton1, C. S. Ward2,3,
S. Soriano1,2, Y. W. Wan2,4, M. R. Pitcher2,5, C. M. McGraw2,6,7, W. Yan1,2,8,
J. R. Green1, L. Yuva1, A. J. Liang1,2, J. L. Neul2,3,9, D. H. Yasui10,
J. M. LaSalle10,11, Z. Liu2,3 and R. Paylor1, (1)Molecular and Human Genetics,
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (2)Jan and Dan Duncan
Neurological Research Institute, Houston, TX, (3)Pediatrics, Section of
Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (4)Obstetrics and
Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, (5)Program in
Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine,
Houston, TX, (6)Medical Scientist Training Program, Baylor College of
Medicine, Houston, TX, (7)Neurology, University of California,
San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, (8)Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central
South University, Changsha, China, (9)Neurosciences, Division of Child
Neurology, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, (10)Medical
Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA,
(11)MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA
13 170.013 Neuropathology of Maternal Immune Activation in a
Nonhuman Primate Model R. K. Weir1, R. Forghany2, C. M. Schumann3 and
M. D. Bauman4, (1)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, MIND Institute, UC
Davis, Sacramento, CA, (2)MIND Institute, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA,
(3)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis MIND Institute,
Sacramento, CA, (4)UC Davis/MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA
Poster Session
171 - Brain Structure
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
22 171.022 Activation Likelihood Estimation Guided Investigation
into the Anatomy of the Social Brain in Autism T. DeRamus1, M. Patriquin2
and R. K. Kana1, (1)Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at
Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (2)Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
85
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
23 171.023 Age Related Differences in White Matter Diffusion
Measures in Autism Spectrum Disorder A. Thompson1, A. Shahidiani1,
J. O’Muircheartaigh2, L. Walker3, V. D’Almeida4, C. M. Murphy5, E. Daly6,
D. G. Murphy6, S. Williams7, S. Deoni3 and C. Ecker8, (1)Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, London, United Kingdom,
(2)Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom, (3)Brown University,
Providence, RI, (4)Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute
of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (5)
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(6)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (7)Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (8)The Sackler Institute for Translational Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
24 171.024 Age-Related Decline in Neuron Number in the Amygdala
in ASD N. Barger1, M. V. Vargas2 and C. M. Schumann1, (1)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA, (2)UC
Davis MIND Institute, Sacramento, CA
25 171.025 Altered Hippocampal-Cortical Gray-Matter Structural
Covariance in Males with Autism Spectrum Disorder H. Y. Lin1, Y. C. Chen1,
J. O. Goh2, W. Y. I. Tseng3 and S. S. F. Gau1, (1)Department of Psychiatry,
National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei,
Taiwan, (2)Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, National Taiwan
University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, (3)Center for Optoelectronic
Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan,
Taipei, Taiwan
26 171.026 An Investigation of the Microstructural Organisation
of the Fronto-Parietal Branches of the Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus
Using Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Based Tractography in Autism
Spectrum Disorders J. E. Fitzgerald, L. Gallagher and J. McGrath, Trinity
College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
27 171.027 Anomalous Anatomical Connectivity Networks in Children
with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder D. J. Peterson1,
R. A. Vasa2,3 and S. H. Mostofsky1,3, (1)Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore,
MD, (2)Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (3)Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
28 171.028 Atypical Cortical Gyrification but Not Autism Spectrum
Disorder Diagnosis Predicts Differences in White-Matter Wiring D.
Andrews1,2, E. Daley1,2, C. Murphy1,2,3, M. Gudbrandsen1,2, MRC AIMS
Consortium1, D. G. Murphy1,2 and C. Ecker1,2, (1)Department of Forensic
and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology &
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(2)The Sackler Institute for Translational Neurodevelopment, Institute of
Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Behavioral
and Developmental Psychiatry Clinical Academic Group, South London and
Maudsley Foundation NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom
29 171.029 Atypically Rightward Cortical Asymmetry in Both Children
and Male Adults with Autism D. L. Floris1, M. C. Lai2, M. V. Lombardo3,
C. Ecker4, B. Chakrabarti5, E. Bullmore6, M. AIMS Consortium7,
D. G. Murphy8, J. Suckling6, A. D. Barber9, M. B. Nebel9, S. H. Mostofsky9
and S. Baron-Cohen7, (1)Kennedy Krieger Institute, Cambridge, England,
United Kingdom, (2)Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University
Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, (3)Department of
Psychology, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus, (4)The Sackler Institute
for Translational Neurodevelopment, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Centre for Integrative Neuroscience
and Neurodynamics, School of Psychology and Clinical Language
Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom,
(6)Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, (7)Autism Research Centre, University of
Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (8)Department of Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology &
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (9)Center
for Neurodevelopmental and Imaging Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD
30 171.030 Brain Volumes Associated with High Levels of Aggression
in ASD S. N. Tass1, K. Stephenson2, M. D. Prigge3, R. Lundwall2, J. C. Cox4,
M. South5, M. E. Maisel2, R. Kellems6, B. D. Hansen6, E. Bigler5 and
T. P. Gabrielsen6, (1)Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT, (2)Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University,
Provo, UT, (3)University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (4)Counseling
and Psychological Services, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(5)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT,
(6)CPSE, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
31 171.031 Co-Occurring Anxiety Disorders Are Uniquely Associated
with Decreased Amygdala Volume in ASD J. D. Herrington1,2, J. Pandey2,
K. Rump2, J. Worley3, C. M. Kerns4, R. T. Schultz2,5 and J. Miller1,2,
(1)Department of Child Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University
of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Center for Autism Research, The
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (3)SPIN, Philadelphia,
PA, (4)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (5)University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA
32 171.032 Correlations Between Depression and Anxiety Scores and
Subcortical Regional Volumes in Autism Spectrum Disorder R. Wichers1,
E. Daly1, M. R. C. A. I. M. S. Consortium1,2,3, D. G. Murphy1 and C. Ecker1,
(1)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Autism Research Group, University of
Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
33 171.033 Different Patterns of Cortical Brain Alterations in
Preschool-Aged Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder with and without
Intellectual Disability Y. Feng1, H. Ota2,3, S. J. Rogers3, D. G. Amaral3,
F. Hoeft4 and C. W. Nordahl3, (1)University of California Davis Medical
Center, Health Informatics Program, Sacramento, CA, (2)Psychiatry,
Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, (3)MIND Institute and
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California
Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (4)Psychiatry, University of
California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
34 171.034 Group Differences in Head Motion May Confound
Anatomical Connectivity Findings from DWI S. Solders, R. Carper and
R. A. Müller, Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
86
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
35 171.035 Immunophenotype of Activated Astrocytes Associated with
Brain-Region-Specific Neuronal Migration Abnormalities in Idiopathic Autism
and Autism Caused By Chromosome 15q11.2-q13 Duplications J. Wegiel1,
G. LaFauci2, T. Adayev2, R. J. Kascsak3, R. Kascsak3, W. Kaczmarski1,
T. Wisniewski4, W. T. Brown4 and J. Wegiel1, (1)Developmental
Neurobiology, New York State Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY, (2)Developmental
Biochemistry, Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities,
Staten Island, NY, (3)Monoclonal Antibody Facility, New York State Institute
for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY, (4)New
York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten
Island, NY
36 171.036 Impaired White Matter Integrity in Unaffected Siblings of
Probands with Autism Spcectrum Disorders Y. L. Chien1, S. S. F. Gau2,
Y. J. Chen3 and W. Y. I. Tseng3, (1)National Taiwan University, Taipai,
Taiwan, Taiwan, (2)Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University
Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, (3)Center for
Optoelectronic Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine,
Taipei, Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan
37 171.037 Influence of Speech Onset Delay on Cortical Gyrification
in Adolescent and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders
P. Duret1,2, B. Pinsard3,4,5,6, A. Boré3, F. Samson1, E. B. Barbeau1,
I. Soulières7,8 and L. Mottron1, (1)Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement de l’Université de Montréal (CETEDUM),
Montreal, QC, Canada, (2)Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon,
France, (3)Unité de neuroimagerie fonctionnelle, Centre de recherche de
l’institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada,
(4)UMR 7371, UMR_S 1146, Laboratoire d’Imagerie Biomédicale, Sorbonne
Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Paris, France, (5)Laboratoire d’Imagerie
Biomédicale, CNRS, UMR 7371, Paris, France, (6)Laboratoire d’Imagerie
Biomédicale, INSERM, UMR_S 1146, Paris, France, (7)Centre d’excellence
en Troubles envahissants du développement de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM), Montréal, QC, Canada, (8)Department of Psychology,
Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
39 171.039 Longitudinal Cortical Thickness Development in Relation
to Changes in SRS Scores over Time in Autism M. D. Prigge1, N. Lange2,
E. D. Bigler3, K. Zygmunt4, B. G. Travers5, T. Abildskov6, A. Froehlich1,
P. T. Fletcher1, A. Alexander7, B. A. Zielinski8 and J. E. Lainhart9,
(1)University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (2)McLean Hospital, Belmont,
MA, (3)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (4)Computer
Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (5)Kinesiology, Program of
Occupational Therapy, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI, (6)Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, (7)
Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (8)Pediatrics
and Neurology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (9)Psychiatry, Waisman
Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
40 171.040 Maturational Differences in Auditory Event-Related
Potentials According to Presence Versus Absence of Language Impairment
in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder E. Kwok1, L. M. Archibald2,
M. Joanisse3, R. Nicolson4, R. E. Smyth5 and J. Oram Cardy6,
(1)Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western University, London,
ON, Canada, (2)Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western
University, Canada, London, ON, Canada, (3)Psychology, University of
Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, (4)Psychiatry, Western University,
London, ON, Canada, (5)Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Western
University, London, ON, Canada, (6)Communication Sciences and
Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
42 171.042 Neuroanatomical Abnormalities Are Shared By Males with
Autism and Their Unaffected Brothers S. S. F. Gau1, H. Y. Lin1 and
W. Y. I. Tseng2, (1)Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University
Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan, (2)Center for
Optoelectronic Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine,
Taipei, Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan
43 171.043 Probing the Neural Circuits Underlying the Social Brain
Using Diffusion Tractography and Graph Theory L. Li1, J. Bachevalier2,
X. Hu3, S. Shultz1 and W. Jones1, (1)Department of Pediatrics, Marcus
Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta,
GA, (2)Developmental and Cognitive Neuroscience Division, Yerkes
National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
(3)Department of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA
44 171.044 Repetitive Behavior Symptoms Associated with
Hippocampus and Amygdala Volumes in ASD C. B. Kirwan1, C. Finuf2,
N. Muncey2 and M. South1, (1)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham
Young University, Provo, UT, (2)Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
45 171.045 Structural Connectivity Between Orbitofrontal Cortex
and Amygdala and Its Association with Socio-Emotional Skills in Autism
Spectrum Disorder A. C. Samson1, J. J. Gross1, Y. Enav1, R. F. Dougherty2,
J. M. Phillips3 and A. Y. Hardan3, (1)Department of Psychology, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA, (2)Stanford Center for Neurobiological Imaging,
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, (3)Psychiatry
and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford,
CA
46 171.046 Temporal Lobe over-Connectivity Differentiates Autism
Spectrum Disorder from Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Toddlers:
A Hardi Diffusion MRI Study E. Conti1,2, J. Mitra3, S. Calderoni2, G. Cioni1,2,
S. Mazzotti2, F. Muratori1,2, S. Rose4, K. K. Shen4 and A. Guzzetta1,2,
(1)Developmental Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy, (2)Stella
Maris Scientific Institute, Pisa, Italy, (3)Digital Productivity Flagship, The
Australian eHealth Research Centre, CSIRO, Herston, Australia, (4)The
Australian eHealth Research Centre, CSIRO, Brisbane, Australia
47 171.047 The 16p11.2 Locus Modulates Brain Structures Common
to Autism, Schizophrenia and Obesity A. M. Maillard1, A. Ruef2,
F. Pizzagalli3, E. Migliavacca4, L. Hippolyte3, S. Adaszewski3, J. Dukart3,
C. Ferrari3, P. Conus3, K. Männik4, M. Zazhytska4, V. Siffredi3, P. Maeder3,
Z. Kutalik3, F. Kherif3, N. Hadjikhani5,6,7, J. Beckmann3, A. Reymond8, B.
Draganski3,9 and S. Jacquemont1, (1)Service of Medical Genetics, Lausanne
University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland, (2)LREN - Département
des neurosciences cliniques, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne,
Switzerland, (3)Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland,
(4)University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, (5)Massachussetts
General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, (6)Brain Mind Institute, EPFL,
Lausanne, Switzerland, (7)University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden,
(8)Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne,
Switzerland, (9)Max Plank Institute, Leipzig, Germany
SATURDAY – AM
38 171.038 Intrainsular White Matter Connectivity and Sensory
Profiles in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
B. R. Peters1, L. E. Mash2, H. Karbasforoushan3, K. B. Schauder4 and
C. J. Cascio2, (1)Vanderbilt Childrens Hospital, Nashville, TN, (2)Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (3)Northwestern University, Chicago, IL,
(4)Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester,
Rochester, NY
41 171.041 Microstructural Covariance of White Matter in Autism
Spectrum Disorder D. C. Dean1, B. G. Travers2, E. D. Bigler3, M. D. Prigge4,
A. Froehlich4, N. Lange5, A. Alexander1 and J. E. Lainhart6,
(1)Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI,
(2)Kinesiology, Program of Occupational Therapy, Waisman Center,
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (3)Psychiatry, University
of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (4)University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(5)McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, (6)Psychiatry, Waisman Center,
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
87
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
48 171.048 The Effect of Demographic and Clinical Features on
the Volume of Corpus Callosum in Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum
Disorder: A Case-Control Study S. Calderoni1, I. Saviozzi2, A. Giuliano3,
P. Brambilla4, E. Veronese5, A. Retico3 and F. Muratori6, (1)Magnetic
Resonance Laboratory, Division of Child Neurology and Psychiatry
University of Pisa; Stella Maris Scientific Institute, Pisa, PI, Italy, (2)
IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation, Pisa, Italy, (3)Istituto Nazionale di Fisica
Nucleare; Sezione di Pisa, Pisa, Italy, (4)Department of Experimental &
Clinical Medicine, University of Udine, Udine, Italy, (5)IRCCS Eugenio
Medea Scientific Institute, Udine, Italy, (6)Stella Maris Scientific Institute,
Calambrone (Pisa), Italy
49 171.049 White Matter Integrity Associated with Symptoms of
Co-Occurring Mood and Anxiety Disorder in Autism Spectrum Disorder:
A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics and Tractography Analysis
J. L. Findon1, A. Thompson2, H. Howells3, D. M. Robertson4, C. M. Murphy3,
F. Dell’Acqua5, M. R. C. A. I. M. S. Consortium6, E. Daly7, M. Catani5
and D. G. Murphy7, (1)Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London,
London, England, United Kingdom, (2)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology &
Neuroscience, London, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (4)Behavioural Genetics Clinic,
South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United
Kingdom, (5)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom,
(6)Autism Research Group, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom,
(7)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom
50 171.050 Widespread White Matter Diffusivity Changes in Autism:
A Tract Based Statistical Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study
M. Alshikho1,2,3, N. Shetty1,2,3, S. Ghosh1,2,3, E. M. Ratai2,3,4 and
M. R. Herbert2,3,5, (1)Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital/
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (2)MGH/HST Martinos Center for
Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA, (3)Massachusetts General Hospital/
TRANSCEND, Charlestown, MA, (4)Radiology, Massachusetts General
Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, (5)Neurology, Massachusetts
General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA
Poster Session
172 - Brain Function
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
51 172.051 A Proton 7T MR Spectroscopy Study of ASD: Altered
Creatine Levels M. Ravishankar1, A. Remington2, S. Braeutigam1,
U. Emir1, C. Newton3 and S. Chance4, (1)University of Oxford, Oxford,
United Kingdom, (2)Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom,
(3)Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, (4)Clinical
Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
52 172.052 Abnormal MEG Gamma Oscillations Induced By Visual
Motion in Children with ASD T. A. Stroganova1, A. Butorina1,
O. V. Sysoeva1 and E. Orekhova1,2, (1)MEG Centre, Moscow State
University of Psychology and Education, Moscow, Russia, (2)Gillberg
Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
53 172.053 Age-Associated Changes in Functional Networks in ASD:
Is There a Shift from Overconnectivity in Childhood to Underconnectivity in
Young Adulthood? N. Ray1, A. Jahedi1, C. P. Chen1, I. Fishman1 and
R. A. Müller2, (1)Brain Development Imaging Laboratory, Dept. of
Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, (2)San Diego
State University, San Diego, CA
88
54 172.054 Altered Neural Responses to Familiar and Unfamiliar
Speech in Six-Week Old Infants at High Risk for ASD M. Dapretto1,
C. Ponting2, T. Tsang3, R. McCarron2 and S. Y. Bookheimer2, (1)AhmansonLovelace Brain Mapping Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Psychiatry and
Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)University of California,
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
55 172.055 Altered Resting State Functional Network Topology Across
Neurological Conditions: A Comparison of Autism Spectrum Disorder with
Phenylketonuria and Traumatic Brain Injury R. M. Zamzow1, J. D. Johnson2,
J. P. Hegarty II1, G. Yao3, D. Q. Beversdorf4 and S. E. Christ5,
(1)Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program, University of Missouri, Columbia,
MO, (2)Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO,
(3)Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO,
(4)Radiology, Neurology, Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO, (5)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
56 172.056 An Integration of fMRI Neural Effects of Oxytocin in
Children with ASD: Insights from Three Paradigms of Social Processing
I. Gordon1,2, B. C. Vander Wyk1, A. Jack1, C. M. Pretzsch3, R. H. Bennett4,
M. V. Lucas5, C. Cordeaux1, J. A. Eilbott5, R. Feldman6, J. F. Leckman1 and
K. Pelphrey1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Psychology, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel, (3)Yale Child Study
Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, (4)Yale Child Study
Center, New Haven, CT, (5)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (6)Bar-Ilan
University, Ramat-Gan, Israel
57 172.057 An fMRI Exploration of Atypical Multisensory Perception
in Autism Spectrum Disorders S. M. Brown-Lavoie1, R. A. Stevenson2,
M. T. Wallace3, J. M. Bebko4 and W. D. Stevens1, (1)York University,
Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Vanderbilt University School of Medicine,
Nashville, TN, (3)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Psychology, York
University, Toronto, ON, Canada
58 172.058 Atypical Generalization of Learning in Adolescents with
Autism Spectrum Disorders: An fMRI Study of Transitive Inference
M. Solomon1, J. D. Ragland2, T. A. Niendam1, T. A. Lesh1, J. Beck3 and
C. S. Carter1, (1)Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences,
University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA, Sacramento, CA,
(2)Psychiatry, Imaging Research Center, Sacramento, CA, (3)UC Davis
MIND Institute, Davis, CA
59 172.059 Auditory Event-Related Potentials As a Function of Clinical
Sensory Subtype in Autism Spectrum Disorder A. E. Lane1, J. Eldridge2,
B. N. Hand3, K. Harpster4 and S. J. Dennis1, (1)University of Newcastle,
Callaghan, Australia, (2)The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH,
(3)Health and Rehabilitation Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus,
OH, (4)Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
60 172.060 Auditory Evoked Electrophysiological Response
Component “M100” Is Delayed in 16p11.2 Deletion but Not Duplication
Carriers T. P. Roberts1, J. Jenkins1, L. Blaskey1, J. I. Berman1, S.
Nagarajan2, P. Mukherjee3, R. L. Buckner4, J. E. Spiro5, W. Chung6 and
E. H. Sherr7, (1)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(2)Univeristy of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, (3)UCSF,
San Francisco, CA, (4)Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, (5)Simons
Foundation, New York, NY, (6)Pediatrics and Medicine, Columbia University
Medical Center, New York, NY, (7)University of California, San Francisco,
San Francisco, CA
61 172.061 Auditory Stream Segregation in Verbal and Minimally
Verbal Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder L. Wang1, S. Meyer1,
E. Sussman2, H. Tager-Flusberg1 and B. Shinn-Cunningham3, (1)Boston
University, Boston, MA, (2)Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, Bronx, NY, (3)Biomedical Engineering, Boston University,
Boston, MA
62 172.062 Autonomic Nervous System Function in Response
to Social Judgment in Adolescents with and without Autism Spectrum
Disorder K. Edmiston, B. Valencia and B. A. Corbett, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – AM
63 172.063 Behavioral, but Not Neural Differences in Face
Recognition in Adults and Elderly with Autism P. C. M. Koolschijn1 and
H. M. Geurts2, (1)Dutch Autism & ADHD Research Center, University
of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, NH, Netherlands, (2)Dutch Autism & ADHD
Research Center, Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam,
Netherlands
64 172.064 Beta-Adrenergic Antagonism Modulates Default Mode
Network Coherence in Autism Spectrum Disorder J. P. Hegarty II1,
B. Ferguson2, R. M. Zamzow3, L. J. Rohowetz4, J. D. Johnson5,
S. E. Christ3 and D. Q. Beversdorf6, (1)Interdisciplinary Neuroscience
Program, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (2)Radiology, University
of Missouri, Columbia, MO, (3)University of Missouri, Columbia, MO,
(4)Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia,
MO, (5)Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO,
(6)Radiology, Neurology, Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO
65 172.065 Biomarkers for Psychosis Risk Prediction C. E. Bearden,
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
66 172.066 Biomarkers of Outcome with Intervention in Toddlers
at Risk for ASD S. S. Jeste1, A. Gulsrud1 and C. Kasari2, (1)UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment,
Westwood, CA
67 172.067 Brain Chemistry in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
N. M. Kleinhans1, N. M. Corrigan2, M. A. Reiter3, T. L. Richards3 and
S. Dager1, (1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Department of
Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Radiology, University
of Washington, Seattle, WA
68 172.068 Brain Connectivity during a High-Level Visual Perceptual
Task in Young ASD Children: A MEG Investigation M. Kikuchi1, L. Mottron2,
N. Takesaki3, T. Takahashi1, T. Hirosawa3, Y. Yoshimura1, N. Furutani3,
H. Hiraishi1, C. Hasegawa1, S. Kitagawa1 and Y. Minabe1, (1)Research
Center for Child Mental Development, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa,
Japan, (2)Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Montréal,
QC, Canada, (3)Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, Kanazawa
University, Kanazawa, Japan
74 172.074 Dynamic Systems Imaging in Adolescents with ASD of
Lower and Higher Cognitive Ability N. M. Kleinhans1, T. Madhyastha2,
M. A. Reiter2, A. M. Estes3, D. W. Shaw4, T. J. Grabowski2 and S. Dager1,
(1)University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)Radiology, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)Department of Radiology MA7.220, Seattle
Children’s Hospital/University of Washington, Seattle, WA
75 172.075 EEG Coherence: A Potential Predictive Neonatal
Biomarker for Identification of Autism Risk and Prediction of Severity in
30 Month Olds K. M. Martien1, J. R. Isler2, M. Ptak3, S. B. Golas3,
M. L. Bauman4 and M. R. Herbert3,5, (1)Pediatrics, TRANSCEND Mass Gen
Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Charleston, MA, (2)Pediatrics, Columbia
University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY, (3)Neurology,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, (4)Pathology and
Neurology, Boston University, Boston, MA, (5)MGH/HST Martinos Center
for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA
76 172.076 EEG Connectivity in Infants at High Risk for Autism
E. Orekhova1, M. Elsabbagh2, E. Jones1, G. Dawson3, T. Charman4,
M. H. Johnson1 and &. BASIS Team1, (1)Centre for Brain and Cognitive
Development, Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United
Kingdom, (2)Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC,
Canada, (3)Autism Speaks, UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (4)Institute
of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom
77 172.077 Effect of Familiarity on Reward Anticipation in Children
with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders K. K. Stavropoulos1 and
L. J. Carver2, (1)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Psychology, University
of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
78 172.078 Effective Connectivity of Mirror System Brain Areas in
Autism Spectrum Disorder M. Schulte-Rüther1,2,3, P. Harindranathan1,
A. Pohl4, G. R. Fink1,5, B. Herpertz-Dahlmann2 and K. Konrad1,2,3,
(1)Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3), Research Center Jülich,
Jülich, Germany, (2)Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry,
Psychosomatics, and Psychotherapy, University Hospital RWTH Aachen,
Aachen, Germany, (3)Translational Brain Medicine, Jülich Aachen Research
Alliance - JARA Brain, Aachen, Germany, (4)Department of Psychiatry,
Psychosomatics, and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Aachen, Aachen,
Germany, (5)Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne,
Cologne, Germany
70 172.070 Changes in Functional Brain Network and White Matter
Connectivity Underlying Language Comprehension in Children with Autism
after a Reading Intervention D. Murdaugh1, L. Libero2, J. O. Maximo1,
H. D. Deshpande3, A. R. Lemelman4, S. E. O’Kelley1, C. E. Crider4 and
R. K. Kana1, (1)Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at
Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (2)Department of Psychology, University
of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (3)Department of Radiology,
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (4)University of
Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
79 172.079 Effects of a Novel Behavioral Intervention for Irritability in
Autism on Neural Circuitry of Emotion Regulation D. G. Sukhodolsky,
S. A. McCauley, P. Ventola, K. Pelphrey and B. C. Vander Wyk, Child
Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT
71 172.071 Conscious and Nonconscious Emotional Processing and
Level of Autistic Traits K. K. Stavropoulos1, M. Viktorinova2, A. Naples1 and
J. C. McPartland1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(2)Prague Psychiatric Centre, Prague, Czech Republic
80 172.080 Electrophysiological Endophenotypes in Autism: A Family
Study A. Clawson1, M. J. Larson2 and M. South1, (1)Brigham Young
University, Provo, UT, (2)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young
University, Provo, UT
72 172.072 Dissociating Neural Response to Gaze Cues in ASD and
Schizophrenia Using Simulated Face-to-Face Interaction J. H. Foss-Feig1,
A. Naples1, E. J. Levy1, R. Tillman1, H. S. Reuman1, K. Law1, V. Srihari2,
A. Anticevic2 and J. C. McPartland1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (2)Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT
81 172.081 Emotion Attribution from Dynamic Faces: Bold Differences
Pre- and Post- Decision in ASDs L. S. McKay1, R. S. Brezis2, T. Wong3,
L. Bidaut4 and J. Piggot5, (1)University of Dundee, Dundee, United
Kingdom, (2)Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel, (3)Department of
Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, (4)Clinical Research
Imaging Facility (CRIF), University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom,
(5)Psychiatry, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom
SATURDAY – AM
69 172.069 Brain and Behavioral Responses to a Flanker Task Differ
for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders S. Faja1, T. Clarkson2 and
S. J. Webb3, (1)Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard School of Medicine,
Boston, MA, (2)Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience, Boston Children’s Hospital,
Boston, MA, (3)University of Washington, Seattle, WA
73 172.073 Distributed Hypoconnectivity As a Neural Endophenotype
of Autism R. L. Moseley1, R. Ypma1, R. Holt2, J. Suckling1,2, E. Bullmore3
and M. Rubinov1, (1)Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge,
Brain Mapping Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Autism Research
Centre, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)Department
of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Behavioural and Clinical
Neurosciences Institution, Cambridge, United Kingdom
89
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
82 172.082 Epigenetic and Neural Correlates of the Broad Autism
Phenotype M. H. Puglia, J. P. Morris and J. J. Connelly, Psychology,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
83 172.083 Evaluation of Mismatch Negativity As Biomarker for
Language Impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorder H. L. Green,
L. Goodwin and K. Froud, Biobehavioral Sciences, Columbia University,
New York, NY
84 172.084 Eye Gaze and ERP Correlates of Emotion Processing
Across Adults with ASD and Schizophrenia E. J. Levy1, A. Naples1,
J. H. Foss-Feig1, R. Tillman1, H. S. Reuman1, K. Law1, H. Samson2,
V. Srihari3, A. Anticevic3 and J. C. McPartland1, (1)Child Study Center,
Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Yale University, New Haven, CT,
(3)Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT
85 172.085 Eye Movement Abnormalities in Individuals with ASD and
Their Unaffected Biological Parents L. M. Schmitt, S. P. White, K. Conroy,
J. A. Sweeney and M. W. Mosconi, Center for Autism and Developmental
Disabilities, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
86 172.086 Face Processing in Infants Demonstrating Early Signs of
ASD A. J. Sanders1, E. Baker1, C. DiStefano2, S. S. Jeste3, A. Gulsrud3 and
C. Kasari4, (1)Psychiatry, UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment,
Los Angeles, CA, (2)Center for Autism Research and Treatment, UCLA
Semel Institute for Neuroscience, Los Angeles, CA, (3)UCLA, Los Angeles,
CA, (4)UCLA Center for Autism Research & Treatment, Westwood, CA
87 172.087 Face-Selective Activation in Orbitofrontal Cortex
Correlates with Social-Motivation in the Broader Autism Phenotype
V. Troiani1 and I. R. Olson2, (1)Geisinger-Bucknell Autism & Developmental
Medicine Institute, Lewisburg, PA, (2)Psychology, Temple University,
Philadelphia, PA
88 172.088 Facial Processing in Low-Functioning Individuals
with Autism: An N170 Event-Related Potential Study M. Chernenok1,
E. L. Coderre1, B. Gordon2 and K. Ledoux1, (1)Cognitive Neurology/
Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University,
Baltimore, MD, (2)Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore, MD
89 172.089 Facial Response to Visual Stimuli: Using Pupil Response
As an Indicator for Phenotype in ASD G. T. Lynch1, N. L. Potter1 and
S. James2, (1)Speech and Hearing Sciences, Washington State University,
Spokane, WA, (2)Criminal Justice, Sleep Research and Performance
Center, Washington State University, Spokane, WA
90 172.090 Functional Lateralization of the Cerebral Cortex in 16p11.2
Deletion and Duplication Carriers J. A. Nielsen1, A. Y. Qureshi1,
P. Mukherjee2, J. I. Berman3, T. P. Roberts3, S. S. Nagarajan2,
J. E. Spiro4, W. Chung5, E. H. Sherr6 and R. L. Buckner1, (1)Harvard
University, Cambridge, MA, (2)UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (3)Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, (4)Simons Foundation, New York,
NY, (5)Pediatrics and Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New
York, NY, (6)University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
91 172.091 GABA(A) Receptors in Autism - a Multicenter Positron
Emission Tomography Study M. A. Mendez1, J. Borg2, J. Horder3, M.
Veronese4, J. Lundberg2, J. F. Myers5, M. Andersson2, I. Mick6, Ä. Tangen7,
L. Farde2, C. Halldin2, S. Selvaraj8,9, A. Lingford-Hughes10, O. Howes11,
D. J. Nutt10 and D. G. Murphy12, (1)Forensic and Neurodevelopmental
Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (2)Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, (3)De Crespigny
Park, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, England,
United Kingdom, (4)Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (5)Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Imperial College
London, London, United Kingdom, (6)Imperial College London, London,
United Kingdom, (7)Dept. of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm,
Sweden, (8)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, The
University of Texas Health Science Centre, Houston, TX, (9)MRC Clinical
Sciences Centre, Institute of Clinical Sciences, London, United Kingdom,
(10)Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology, Division of Brain Sciences,
Dept of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom,
(11)Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom, (12)Department of Forensic
and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology &
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
92 172.092 Granger Causality Estimation of Brain Connectivity in
Autism Spectrum Disorders C. E. Stevens1, G. Deshpande2, Y. Wang3,
H. D. Deshpande4, C. L. Klein5, M. R. Klinger6, L. G. Klinger7 and
R. K. Kana8, (1)Psychology, University of Alabama Birmingham, Vestavia
Hills, AL, (2)Electrical engineering and psychology, Auburn University,
Auburn, AL, (3)Auburn University, Auburn, AL, (4)Department of Radiology,
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (5)Psychology,
Marietta College, OH, Marietta, OH, (6)Allied Health Sciences, University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (7)TEACCH Autism Program; Department
of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, (8)Department
of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
93 172.093 Hemispheric Differences in Language Processing in
Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies
A. J. Herringshaw, C. J. Ammons, T. DeRamus and R. K. Kana,
Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at Birmingham,
Birmingham, AL
94 172.094 How Do Children with and without Autism Perceive the
Passage of Time?: fMRI Reveals Differences in Neural Systems Recruited
for Time Perception M. J. Allman1, F. P. Loomis1, W. H. Meck2 and M.
B. Denckla3, (1)Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, (2)Duke
University, Durham, NC, (3)Kennedy Krieger Institute/JHUSOM, Baltimore,
MD
95 172.095 Investigating the Neural Mechanisms Underpinning Theory
of Mind Processes in ASD Using a Reinforcement Learning Framework
J. H. Balsters1, M. A. Apps2,3, R. Lehner1, D. Bolis1, L. Gallagher4 and
N. Wenderoth1, (1)Department of Health Sciences and Technology,
ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland, (2)Nuffield Department of Clinical
Neuroscience, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, (3)Department
of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom,
(4)St. James’s Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
96 172.096 Local Brain Connectivity Across the Lifespan in Autism
Spectrum Disorder and Typical Development D. R. Dajani and L. Q. Uddin,
University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL
97 172.097 Longitudinal Changes in M100 Latency in Children with
ASD and Neurotypical Controls R. G. Port1, J. Jenkins2, J. C. Edgar2
and T. P. Roberts2, (1)Neuroscience Graduate Group, Perelman School
of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
90
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
98 172.098 MMN and Glutamatergic E-I Imbalance in Children and
Adults with ASD and Phelan-Mcdermid Syndrome A. San Jose Caceres1,
L. Mason2, D. Crawley3, J. E. Faulkner4, H. L. Hayward5, J. Sabet6,
B. Oranje7, J. K. Buitelaar8, D. G. Murphy9 and E. Loth10, (1)Department
of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (2)Birkbeck College, University of London,
London, United Kingdom, (3)Forensics and Neurodevelopmental Sciences,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (4)Forensic and
Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and
Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Institute
of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, England, United Kingdom,
(6)Forensics and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, King’s College London,
london, United Kingdom, (7)Psychiatry, UMC Utrecht Brain Center Rudolf
Magnus, Utrecht, Netherlands, (8)Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboudumc,
Donders Institute, Nijmegen University, Nijmegen, Netherlands,
(9)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of
Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (10)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental
Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom
99 172.099 Measures of Signal Complexity in Resting-State EEG
Recordings from Young Children with ASD J. Frohlich1, A. Irimia2 and
S. S. Jeste3, (1)University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
(2)Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Psychiatry and Neurology, UCLA, Los
Angeles, CA
100 172.100 Mirror Neuron System Response to Action Simulation
in Children with Autism H. M. Wadsworth1, H. D. Deshpande2 and
R. K. Kana1, (1)Department of Psychology, University of Alabama at
Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, (2)Department of Radiology, University of
Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
101 172.101 Modulation of Simon Interference Inhibition Processing
By Serotonin in Autism: A Pharmacologic Functional MRI Study with Acute
Tryptophan Depletion E. Daly1, C. Ecker2 and D. G. Murphy3,
(1)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College
London, London, United Kingdom, (2)The Sackler Institute for Translational
Neurodevelopment, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London,
United Kingdom, (3)Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental
Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom
103 172.103 Neural Response to Interactive Faces Is Associated
with Clinical Characteristics in ASD and Typical Development K. Law1,
A. Naples1, E. Levy1, H. S. Reuman1, R. Tillman2, Z. Williams1, D.
Czemerinski1 and J. C. McPartland1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (2)Clinical Psychology, University of Maryland, College
Park, MD
104 172.104 Neural Sensitivity to Live Social Interaction Captures
Developmental Variability in ASD Traits K. Rice and E. Redcay, University
of Maryland, College Park, MD
105 172.105 Neural Signatures of Discrepant Nonverbal and Verbal
IQ in Youth with ASD C. M. Keifer, D. Yang, P. Ventola, J. Wolf and
K. Pelphrey, Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT
106 172.106 Neural, Behavioral and Parent-Reported Indices of
Executive Attention in Younger Siblings of Children with Autism
C. A. Burrows1, L. Mohapatra2, L. V. Usher1, D. N. Gangi3, D. S. Messinger3
and H. A. Henderson4, (1)Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables,
FL, (2)Neuropsychology, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD,
(3)University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, (4)University of Waterloo,
Waterloo, ON, Canada
108 172.108 Neurophysiological Markers of ASD in Tuberous
Sclerosis Complex K. J. Varcin1, S. S. Jeste2 and C. A. Nelson3,
(1)Developmental Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical
School, Boston, MA, (2)UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Education, Harvard
Univesity, Cambridge, MA
109 172.109 Plasticity of Brain Networks for Social Cognition in Adults
with ASD D. Yang1, T. Allen2, S. B. Chapman2, F. R. Volkmar1, B. C. Vander
Wyk1 and K. Pelphrey1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven,
CT, (2)Center for BrainHealth, University of Texas, Dallas, TX
110 172.110 Prefrontal Neurofeedback Training Approaches in
Children with Autism Based on the Relative Power of EEG Rhythms
Analysis Y. WANG1,2, E. M. Sokhadze2, L. L. Sears3, A. EI-Baz4, A. Tasman2
and M. F. Casanova2, (1)State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience
and Learning,Beijing Normal University, BEIJING, China, (2)Psychiatry and
Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (3)Department
of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, (4)Department of
Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
111 172.111 Preserved Configural Processing in High-Functioning
Adults with Autism: An EEG/ERP Study M. Castelo-Branco1,2,
G. G. Oliveira3, S. Mouga4 and P. Tavares2, (1)ICNAS Produção, Coimbra,
Portugal, (2)Visual Neuroscience Laboratory, Institute of Biomedical
Research on Light and Image (IBILI), Faculty of Medicine, University of
Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (3)Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento e
Autismo do Serviço do Centro de Desenvolvimento da Criança, Pediatric
Hospital, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal,
(4)Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
112 172.112 Reciprocal Alterations of White Matter Microstructure
in Carriers of Deletions Versus Duplications at the 16p11.2 Chromosomal
Locus Are Associated with Cognitive and Behavioral Impairments
Y. Chang1, J. Owen1, T. Thieu2, N. Pojman3, P. Bukshpun4, M. Wakahiro4,
E. Marco5, J. I. Berman6, J. E. Spiro7, W. Chung8, R. L. Buckner9,
T. P. Roberts6, S. Nagarajan10, E. H. Sherr5 and P. Mukherjee4,
(1)Radiology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (2)Neurology, UCSF, San
Francisco, CA, (3)Neurology, Radiology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA,
(4)UCSF, San Francisco, CA, (5)University of California, San Francisco,
San Francisco, CA, (6)Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,
(7)Simons Foundation, New York, NY, (8)Pediatrics, Columbia University,
New York, NY, (9)Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, (10)Univeristy of
California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
113 172.113 Reduced Prefrontal Cortical Responses and Atypical
Connectivity to Join Attention in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
(ASD): A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study H. Zhu1, J. Li2,
Y. Fan3, X. Li4, D. Huang5 and S. He6, (1)Panyu District, Centre for Optical
& Electromagnetic Research, School of Psychology, South China Normal
University, Guangzhou, China, (2)Centre for Optical and Electromagnetic
Research, ZJU-SCNU Joint Research Center of Photonics, South China
Normal University (SCNU), Guangzhou, 510006, P. R. China, Guangzhou,
China, (3)Guangzhou Cana School, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province,
China, (4)School of Psychology, Guangzhou, China, (5)Guangzhou Cana
School, Guangzhou, China, (6)School of Electrical Engineering, Royal
Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden
SATURDAY – PM
102 172.102 Neural Response to Biological Motion in Males and
Females with ASD A. Naples1, J. C. McPartland2, K. Pelphrey2 and
S. J. Webb3, (1)Yale University, New Haven, CT, (2)Child Study Center,
Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)University of Washington, Seattle, WA
107 172.107 Neurochemical and Neuroanatomical Changes in
Children, Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
A. C. Pereira1, I. R. Violante2, S. Mouga1,3, G. G. Oliveira1,3,4,5 and
M. Castelo-Branco1,6, (1)Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences,
Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal,
(2)Medicine, Imperial College London, London, England,
(3)Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento e Autismo do Serviço do Centro
de Desenvolvimento da Criança, Pediatric Hospital, Centro Hospitalar
e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (4)University Clinic of
Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal,
(5)Centro de Investigação e Formação Clínica, Pediatric Hospital, Centro
Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, (6)ICNAS
Produção, Coimbra, Portugal
91
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
114 172.114 Refining EEG Biomarkers in ADHD for Diagnosis and
Treatment Response Monitoring S. Loo, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral
Sciences, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA
115 172.115 Relationship Between Neural Coherence and Social
Functioning in Autism Spectrum Disorder T. M. Andersen1, C. Swick1,
A. M. Flores1, K. Lengu1, R. Goodcase1, K. McFarlane1, S. M. Bowyer2 and
R. Lajiness-O’Neill1, (1)Psychology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti,
MI, (2)Neurology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI
116 172.116 Replicable Network-Based Diagnostic Classification of
ASD in the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange J. A. Richey1, M. Ghane2,
M. Coffman2, A. Valdespino2 and P. Du3, (1)Virginia Tech, Blackbsurg, VA,
(2)Psychology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, (3)Statistics, Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, VA
117 172.117 Resting State Functional Connectivity of Social Brain
Regions in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Correlate with Social Symptom
Severity in ASD M. Jung1,2, D. N. Saito1,3,4, A. Sasaki5, T. Munesue1,6,
H. Okazawa1,4 and H. Kosaka3,7,8, (1)Department of Child Development,
United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University,
Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba
University and University of Fukui, Osaka, Japan, (2)The Japan Society
for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan, (3)Research Center for Child
Mental Development, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Japan, (4)Biomedical
Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Eiheiji, Japan, (5)RIKEN
Center for Life Science Technologies, Kobe, Japan, (6)Kanazawa
University, Kanazawa, Japan, (7)Research Center for Child Mental
Development, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui Prefecture, Japan,
(8)Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University
of Fukui, Eiheiji, Japan
118 172.118 Sensory Processing Abnormalities, ASD Features, and
Modulation of Auditory Evoked Potentials in Fragile X Syndrome
L. E. Ethridge1, S. P. White2, M. W. Mosconi2, J. Wang3, M. J. Byerly4 and
J. A. Sweeney2, (1)Dept of Psychology, University of Oklahoma, Norman,
OK, (2)Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, UT Southwestern
Medical Center, Dallas, TX, (3)Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical
Center, Dallas, TX, (4)Psychiatry, Center for Autism and Developmental
Disabilities, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
119 172.119 Sensory over-Responsivity and Amygdala Response
to Emotional Faces in Youth with and without ASD K. Krasileva1,2,
R. McCarron2,3, S. A. Green2,3, S. Y. Bookheimer3,4 and M. Dapretto2,3,
(1)Department of Neurology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (2)AhmansonLovelace Brain Mapping Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (3)Psychiatry and
Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Center for Cognitive
Neuroscience, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
122 172.122 Specificity of Atypical Neural Development for Language
in Infants at Risk for ASD J. F. Yang1, H. S. Reuman2, E. D. Brooks1,
P. Hashim1, R. Travieso1, E. J. Levy2, K. Law2, L. Mayes2, J. A. Persing3
and J. C. McPartland2, (1)Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT, (2)Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, (3)Section of
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT
123 172.123 Transient Visual Evoked Potentials in Monogenic and
Idiopathic ASD P. M. Weinger1, S. M. Lurie1, A. Kolevzon1, V. Zemon2,
J. Gordon3, J. M. Jamison1, J. Zweifach1, L. V. Soorya4 and J. D. Buxbaum1,
(1)Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of
Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, (2)Ferkauf Graduate School of
Psychology, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY, (3)Psychology, Hunter College,
New York, NY, (4)Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
124 172.124 What Do We Currently Know about Resting State EEG
Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder? T. M. Heunis1, C. Scheffer1,
C. Aldrich2 and P. J. de Vries3, (1)Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering,
Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa, (2)Department of
Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology,
Perth, Australia, (3)Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape
Town, Cape Town, South Africa
125 172.125 Young Adults with ASD Have a Higher Rate of
Epileptiform Eegs Than Young Children in a Clinical Sample D. U. Menon1
and J. B. Ewen2, (1)Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (2)Kennedy
Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Poster Session
173 - Epidemiology
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
126 173.126 A Large-Scale Analyses of ASD Cases Using
Electronic Medical Records N. Connolly1, K. W. Burkett2 and K. A.
Bowers3, (1)Biomedical Informatics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical
Center, Cincinnati, OH, (2)Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics,
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, (3)Division
of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical
Center, Cincinnati, OH
120 172.120 Sex Differences in Autism: A Resting-State fMRI
Investigation of the Intrinsic Neural Circuitry in Males and Females
K. Alaerts1 and N. Wenderoth2, (1)KU Leuven - University of Leuven,
Leuven, Belgium, (2)Department of Health Sciences and Technology,
ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
127 173.127 A Prospective Birth Cohort Study on the Independent
and Joint Effect of Maternal Preconception Obesity/Diabetes, and
Gestational Diabetes in the Development of ASD, ID and Other DD
M. Li1, M. D. Fallin1,2, A. W. Riley1, R. J. Landa3,4, D. Caruso1, C. Pearson5,
S. Kiang5 and X. Wang1,2, (1)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD, (2)Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore,
MD, (3)Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Baltimore, MD, (4)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (5)The Boston
University Medical Center, Boston, MA
121 172.121 Sex Differences in Biological Motion Perception Among
Youth with ASD: An fMRI Investigation A. Jack1, C. M. Keifer1, D. Gulliford2,
C. Torgerson3, E. H. Aylward2, S. Y. Bookheimer4, M. Dapretto5, N. Gaab6,
J. Van Horn3 and K. Pelphrey1, (1)Child Study Center, Yale University,
New Haven, CT, (2)Seattle Children’s Research Institute, Seattle, WA,
(3)University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, (4)Psychiatry and
Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (5)Ahmanson-Lovelace
Brain Mapping Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, (6)Dept. of Medicine,
Division of Developmental Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, MA
128 173.128 Assisted Conception and Risk of Autism Spectrum
Disorders in a Large Commercially Insured Population A. Wallace1,2,
B. Lee3, L. Tabb1, M. Yudell4, R. Turchi4 and C. J. Newschaffer5,
(1)Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University School of Public Health,
Philadelphia, PA, (2)Government and Academic Research, HealthCore, Inc,
Wilmington, DE, (3)Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia,
PA, (4)Community Health and Prevention, Drexel University School of
Public Health, Philadelphia, PA, (5)A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel
University, Philadelphia, PA
92
129 173.129 Association of Induced and/or Augmented Labor with
Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Gestational Age-Stratified Utah Cohort
E. Clark1, D. A. Bilder2, M. Varner1, S. Esplin3, H. Coon2 and A. V. Bakian2,
(1)Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(2)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, (3)Intermountain
Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
130 173.130 Autism Risk in Children Born to Women with Perinatal
Psychiatric Diagnoses B. M. Wieckowski1, Y. Mukhtar2, J. J. Lee1, G. Xing3
and C. Walker4,5, (1)Psychology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA,
(2)Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA,
(3)Center for Health Care Policy and Research, University of California,
Davis, Sacramento, CA, (4)Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of
California - Davis, Sacramento, CA, (5)MIND Institute, University of
California - Davis, Sacramento, CA
131 173.131 The Development of Chinese Norms for the Autism
Spectrum Rating Scale W. Yan1, L. Zhang1, H. Zhou1, Y. Wang1, X. Xu1,
X. Zou2, L. Wu3, X. Luo4 and E. J. Fombonne5, (1)Children’s Hospital of
Fudan University, Shanghai, China, (2)Pediatrics, Child Developmental &
Behavioral Center, The 3rd Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University
(SYSU), Guangzhou, MD, (3)Department of Children’s and Adolescent
Health, Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China, (4)Central
South University, Changsha, China, (5)Oregon Health & Science University,
Portland, OR
132 173.132 Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) in
a School-Aged Population in Korea G. Yim1, B. Leventhal1, Y. J. Koh2,
M. M. Desai3, V. Hus Bal1, P. S. Hong1 and Y. S. Kim1, (1)Dept of
Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA,
(2)Korea Institute for Children’s Social Development, Seoul, South Korea,
(3)Yale University, School of Public Health, New Haven, CT
133 173.133 Autism-Specific Maternal Autoantibodies Associated
with Metabolic Conditions P. Krakowiak1,2, C. Walker2,3, I. Hertz-Picciotto1,2
and J. Van de Water2,4, (1)Public Health Sciences, University of California
- Davis, Davis, CA, (2)MIND Institute, University of California - Davis,
Sacramento, CA, (3)Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, (4)Division of Rheumatology/Allergy and Clinical
Immunology, University of California - Davis, Davis, CA
134 173.134 Autisme and Crime: Is Prevention Possible?
A. van der Reijken1 and I. A. van Berckelaer-Onnes2, (1)NIFP, The
Netherlands, Sassenheim, Netherlands, (2)Social and behavioral sciences,
Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands
136 173.136 Differential Gene Expression in Children with Autism
Born to Mothers with Obesity and Diabetes Y. Mukhtar1, C. Walker2,
B. Durbin-Johnson1, P. Krakowiak3 and I. Hertz-Picciotto3, (1)Public Health
Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, (2)University of
California - Davis, Sacramento, CA, (3)Public Health Sciences, University
of California - Davis, Davis, CA
137 173.137 Differentiating the Role of Autism Spectrum Disorder
and Intellectual Disability in Challenging Behaviors M. Kurzius-Spencer,
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Arizona,
Tucson, AZ
138 173.138 Digit Ratio and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Results
from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Birth
Cohort A. L. Guyatt1, J. Heron1, B. Knight1, J. Golding1 and D. Rai2,
(1)School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol,
United Kingdom, (2)Avon and Wiltshire Partnership NHS Mental Health
Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom
140 173.140 Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses of the
Chinese Version Autism Spectrum Rating Scales H. Zhou1, L. Zhang1,
L. Wu2, X. Zou3, X. Luo4, W. Yan1, Y. Wang1 and E. J. Fombonne5,
(1)Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China, (2)Department
of Children’s and Adolescent Health, Public Health, Harbin Medical
University, Harbin, China, (3)Pediatrics, Child Developmental & Behavioral
Center, The 3rd Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU),
Guangzhou, MD, (4)Central South University, Changsha, China, (5)Oregon
Health & Science University, Portland, OR
141 173.141 Gene Expression By Pesticide Exposures During
Gestation in the Charge Study, a Case-Control Investigation of Autism
Spectrum Disorder I. Hertz-Picciotto1, B. Durbin-Johnson1, L. Delwiche1
and S. Letovsky2, (1)Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis,
Davis, CA, (2)Boston University, Boston, MA
142 173.142 Interaction Between Maternal 5-HTT Genotype and
Prenatal Stress Exposure, Confirmation in Two Independent Samples
P. Hecht1, X. Liu2, M. Tilley3, M. L. Hudson4, S. L. Connors5 and
D. Q. Beversdorf6, (1)University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, MO,
(2)Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada, (3)Central
Methodist University, Fayette, MO, (4)Psychiatry, Queen’s University,
Kingston, ON, Canada, (5)Pediatrics and Medicine, MGH Lurie Center for
Autism, Lexington, MA, (6)Radiology, Neurology, Psychological Sciences,
University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
143 173.143 Laying the Foundation for Policy: Measuring Local
Prevalence for Autism Spectrum Disorder L. Ghali1, C. Dudley2,
D. J. Dutton3, J. Zwicker3, C. A. McMorris4, D. B. Nicholas5, M. Clarke6 and
H. Emery7, (1)Sinneave Family Foundation, Calgary, AB, Canada, (2)School
of Public Policy, Calgary, AB, Canada, (3)The School of Public Policy,
Calgary, AB, Canada, (4)York University, Toronto, ON, Canada,
(5)University of Calgary, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (6)Pediatrics, University
of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, (7)University of Calgary, Calgary, AB,
Canada
144 173.144 Maternal Use of Prenatal Nutritional Supplements
and Risk of Autism in the Stockholm Youth Cohort E. DeVilbiss1,
C. Magnusson2 and B. Lee1,3, (1)Drexel University School of Public Health,
Philadelphia, PA, (2)Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden,
(3)A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Philadelphia, PA
SATURDAY – PM
135 173.135 Changes in Age of First Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum
Disorder in Children Born Between 1992 and 2000 A. Boan1, C. C. Bradley1,
K. Fender2, A. P. Cohen1, J. Charles1, W. Jenner1 and L. A. Carpenter1,
(1)Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC,
(2)Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
139 173.139 Examining Factors Associated with Trajectories of Daily
Living Skills in Preschool Children with ASD in Canada B. M. Di Rezze1,
E. K. Duku2, P. Szatmari3, S. Georgiades2, J. Volden4, P. Mirenda5,
I. M. Smith6, S. E. Bryson7, E. J. Fombonne8, W. Roberts9, T. Vaillancourt10,
C. Waddell11, L. Zwaigenbaum12, T. A. Bennett2 and M. Elsabbagh13,
(1)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (2)Offord Centre for Child
Studies & McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (3)University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Communication Sciences and Disorders,
University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (5)University of British
Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, (6)Dalhousie University / IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (7)Autism Research Centre, Dalhousie/
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (8)Psychiatry, Institute on
Development and Disability, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland,
OR, (9)ISAND, Toronto, ON, Canada, (10)University of Ottawa, Ottawa,
ON, Canada, (11)Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (12)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada,
(13)McGill University, Montreal, PQ, Canada
145 173.145 Meconium Exposure, but Not Meconium Aspiration
Syndrome, Is Associated with Autism K. Miller1, G. Xing2 and C. Walker3,
(1)University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA, (2)Center for Health
Care Policy and Research, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA,
(3)Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of California - Davis,
Sacramento, CA
146 173.146 Medical Home and Insurance Adequacy Among Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Psychiatric Conditions B. Zablotsky
and S. J. Blumberg, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD
93
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
147 173.147 Mid-Pregnancy Glucose Intolerance, Gestational
Metabolic Conditions and Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental
Delay C. Walker1, P. Krakowiak2, Y. Mukhtar3, D. J. Tancredi4, L. Delwiche3
and I. Hertz-Picciotto3, (1)Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of California
- Davis, Sacramento, CA, (2)MIND Institute, University of California - Davis,
Sacramento, CA, (3)Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis,
Davis, CA, (4)Pediatrics, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA
148 173.148 Of Decrements and Disorders: Assessing Quantitative
Traits Related to Autism Spectrum Disorders in Prospective Epidemiologic
Studies of Environmental Toxicant Exposures S. K. Sagiv1,2,
A. E. Kalkbrenner3 and D. C. Bellinger4,5, (1)Epidemiology, University
of California, Berkeley School of Public Health, Berkeley, CA,
(2)Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston,
MA, (3)Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
Milwaukee, WI, (4)Neuorology, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA,
(5)Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
149 173.149 Parental Exposure to Occupational Asthmagens and
Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Danish Population-Based CaseControl Study A. B. Singer1, I. Burstyn2, M. D. Fallin1,3 and D. E. Schendel4,
(1)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD,
(2)Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA, (3)Johns
Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (4)Department of Public
Health, Section of Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
150 173.150 Patterns and Characteristics of Adult Autism Spectrum
Disorders (ASD) Related Hospitalizations: A 10 Year Nationwide Trend
Analysis R. Vohra1, M. Ajmera2, S. Madhavan1 and U. Sambamoorthi1,
(1)Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, School of Pharmacy, West Virginia
University, Morgantown, WV, (2)RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle
Park, NC
151 173.151 Prenatal PBDE Exposure and Early ASD-Related
Phenotype in a Risk-Enriched Pregnancy Cohort N. L. Lee1, D. H. Bennett2,
I. Burstyn3, E. Schriver3, J. Pandey4, L. A. Croen5, M. D. Fallin6,
I. Hertz-Picciotto7 and C. J. Newschaffer1, (1)Drexel University School
of Public Health, Philadelphia, PA, (2)Public Health Sciences, UC Davis,
Davis, CA, (3)A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia,
PA, (4)Center for Autism Research, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA, (5)Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern
California, Oakland, CA, (6)Mental Health & Wendy Klag Center for Autism
and Developmental Disabilities, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD, (7)Public Health Sciences, University of California,
Davis, Davis, CA
152 173.152 Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Conditions in
Mainland China: Pilot and a Whole Population Study X. Sun1,2,3, C. Allison4,
B. Auyeung5, S. Baron-Cohen5 and C. Brayne1, (1)Cambridge Institute of
Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
(2)Department of Psychiatry, Autism Research Centre, Cambridge,
United Kingdom, (3)The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong,
Hong Kong, (4)Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (5)Autism
Research Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
153 173.153 Prevalence of Regressive Autism from 2000 to 2010:
Findings from a Population-Based System J. Shenouda1, M. Rajan2,
K. Oldewurtel3 and W. Zahorodny4, (1)Rutgers New Jersey Medical School,
Newark, NJ, (2)Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health,
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, (3)Pediatrics, Rutgers
- New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, (4)Pediatrics, Rutgers New
Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
154 173.154 Rates and Predictors of Psychotropic Medication Use in
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Ages 2-18 Years Old in a National
Population-Based Sample: 1994-2009 K. I. Kamimura-Nishimura,
R. E. Adams, P. M. Manning-Courtney and T. Froehlich, Cincinnati
Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
94
155 173.155 Reliability and Validity of a Short Dietary Intake
Questionnaire for Retrospective Collection of Nutrients during Gestation in
Autism Studies R. J. Schmidt1, A. M. Widaman2, D. E. Deines3 and
D. J. Tancredi4, (1)Public Health Sciences, MIND Institute, University of
California at Davis, Davis, CA, (2)University of California Davis, Davis, CA,
(3)Office of Research and Methodology, Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD,
(4)Pediatrics, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA
156 173.156 Risk Factors for Autism Spectrum Disorder and
Intellectual Disability R. Gott1, S. Nibras2, S. Grover3, A. Mehanovic4 and
H. Matsuo5, (1)Saint Louis University, Clayton, MO, (2)Pediatrics, Saint
Louis University School of Medicine, St.Louis, MO, (3)Saint Louis
University, Saint Louis, MO, (4)Pediatrics, Saint Louis University,
St.Louis, MO, (5)Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
157 173.157 Risks of Non-Affective Psychotic Disorder and Bipolar
Disorder in Young People Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, a
Population-Based Study J. P. Selten1,2, M. Lundberg3, D. Rai4 and
C. Magnusson5, (1)Psychiatry and psychology, University of Maastricht,
the Netherlands., Amsterdam, Netherlands, (2)Rivierduinen, Leiden,
Netherlands, (3)Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet,
Stockholm, Sweden, (4)Avon and Wiltshire Partnership NHS Mental Health
Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom, (5)Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
158 173.158 Sensory Processing Abnormalities of Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorder M. Donnelly1, K. Sidwell1, J. Shenouda2 and
W. Zahorodny3, (1)Pediatrics, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, (2)Rutgers
New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, (3)Pediatrics, Rutgers New
Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
159 173.159 Short and Long Inter-Pregnancy Interval Increases Risk
of Autism Spectrum Disorders O. Zerbo, C. K. Yoshida, E. P. Gunderson
and L. A. Croen, Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern
California, Oakland, CA
160 173.160 Synergic Effect of GSTP1 and Blood Manganese
Concentrations in Autism Spectrum Disorder M. H. Rahbar1,2,
M. Samms-Vaughan3, J. Ma4, J. Bressler4, A. S. Dickerson5,
M. Ardjomand-Hessabi5, K. A. Loveland6, M. L. Grove4,
S. Shakespeare-Pellington3, C. Beecher7, W. McLaughlin8 and E.
Boerwinkle2,4, (1)Division of Clinical and Translational Sciences,
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at
Houston, Houston, TX, (2)Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and
Environmental Sciences (EHGES), University of Texas School of Public
Health at Houston, Houston, TX, (3)Department of Child & Adolescent
Health, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston,
Jamaica, (4)Human Genetics Center, University of Texas School of Public
Health at Houston, Houston, TX, (5)Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Research
Design (BERD) Core, Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences
(CCTS), University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston,
TX, (6)Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of
Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, (7)Department of Basic
Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus,
Kingston, Jamaica, (8)Caribbean Genetics (CARIGEN), The University
of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
161 173.161 Autism Spectrum Disorder Prevalence and Proximity to
Industrial Facilities Releasing Arsenic, Lead, or Mercury A. S. Dickerson1,
M. H. Rahbar2, I. Han3, D. A. Pearson4, L. A. Moye5, A. Bakian6,
D. A. Bilder7, R. A. Harrington8, S. Pettygrove9, M. S. Durkin10,
R. S. Kirby11, M. Slay Wingate12, L. H. Tian13, W. Zahorodny14 and
J. Baio13, (1)Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Research Design (BERD) Core,
Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences (CCTS), University of Texas
Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, (2)Division of Clinical
and Translational Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, University
of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, (3)Epidemiology and
Disease Control, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,
Houston, TX, (4)University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Houston,
TX, (5)Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,
Houston, TX, (6)Psychiatry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt
Lake City, UT, (7)Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,
(8)Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (9)Epidemiology
and Biostatistics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, (10)Population Health
Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, (11)Community
and Family Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, (12)Healthcare
Organization and Policy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham,
AL, (13)National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities,
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (14)Pediatrics,
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
162 173.162 The Medical Home and Healthcare Transition in Youth
with Autism J. Rast1, C. J. Newschaffer2, R. Turchi3,4, J. Plumb2 and
P. T. Shattuck5, (1)Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (2)A.J. Drexel
Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, (3)St. Christopher’s
Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, (4)School of Public Health, Drexel
University, Philadelphia, PA, (5)AJ Drexel Autism Institute,
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
163 173.163 Three-Generation Family-Wide Morbidity Patterns in
Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study
D. E. Schendel1, M. Overgaard2 and E. T. Parner3, (1)Department of Public
Health, Section of Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark,
(2)Department of Public Health, Section of Biostatistics, Aarhus University,
Aarhus, Denmark, (3)Department of Public Health, Section of Biostatistics,
Aarhus University, Århus, Denmark
165 173.165 Utility of Documented Special Education Exceptionality
Categories for ASD Prevalence Estimation Among Children Identified with
ASD in the ADDM Network E. Rubenstein1, C. E. Rice2, G. Yenokyan3,
L. Schieve4, D. Christensen5, M. S. Durkin6, A. Bakian7, R. S. Kirby8,
J. Daniels9, S. A. Rosenberg10, J. Preskitt11 and L. C. Lee12, (1)Epidemiology,
UNC Gillings School of Public Health, Carrboro, NC, (2)National Center on
Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, (3)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, MD, (4)Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Atlanta, GA, (5)Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities,
CDC, Atlanta, GA, (6)Population Health Sciences, University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, WI, (7)Psychiatry, University of Utah School of
Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, (8)Community and Family Health, University
of South Florida, Tampa, FL, (9)UNC Gillings School of Public Health,
Chapel Hill, NC, (10)Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado
School of Medicine, Aurroa, CO, (11)Health Care Organization and Policy,
University Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham,
AL, (12)Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
Baltimore, MD
Poster Session
174 - Molecular and Cellular Biology
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
167 174.167 A Metabolic Profile of Autism Spectrum Disorder from
Autism Phenome Project Patient Plasma R. Burrier1, D. G. Amaral2,
A. M. Smith1, P. R. West1, D. D. Li2, B. Fontaine1, E. Donley1 and
S. J. Rogers3, (1)Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Madison, WI, (2)MIND
Institute and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University
of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, (3)University of
California at Davis, Sacramento, CA
168 174.168 A Novel Cost-Effective Approach to Derivation of
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalized
Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines A. L. Wagoner1,2, D. L. Mack3, E. E. McKee1
and S. J. Walker1,2, (1)Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine,
Winston-Salem, NC, (2)Neuroscience Graduate Program, Wake Forest
University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, (3)Institute for Stem Cell
and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
169 174.169 A Systems Biology Approach to Drug Discovery in
Autism A. Browne, E. Drapeau and J. D. Buxbaum, Seaver Autism Center
for Research and Treatment, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of
Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
170 174.170 Abnormal Expression of a SERT-Binding Protein, NSF,
in Autism: Implications for Pathophysiology in Autism K. Iwata1,
H. Matsuzaki2, K. Nakamura3, T. Katayama4 and N. Mori5, (1)Research
Center for Child Mental Development, Fukui Univ., Fukui, Japan,
(2)Research Center for Child Mental Development, University of Fukui,
Fukui, Japan, (3)Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of
Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Japan, (4)Osaka University United
Graduate School of Child Development, Suita, Japan, (5)Research Center
for Child Mental Development, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine,
Hamamatsu, Japan
171 174.171 Autism Spectrum Disorder and the Brain-Gut-Microbiome
Axis N. E. Furland2,3 and M. T. Sindelar3, (2)INIBIBB-CONICET-UNS, Bahia
Blanca, Argentina, (3)Emily Fenichel Foundation, Bahía Blanca, Argentina
172 174.172 Dynamic Gene Network Analysis of Neuronal
Differentiation Identifies Novel Gene-Network Clusters Specifically Enriched
for Autism Risk Genes A. G. Chiocchetti1, D. Haslinger1, S. Lindlar1,
R. Waltes1, S. Fulda2 and C. M. Freitag1, (1)Department of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, JW Goethe
University, Frankfurt a. M., Germany, (2)Institute for Experimental Cancer
Research in Paediatrics, JW Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main,
Germany
SATURDAY – PM
164 173.164 Use of Medicare Claims As a Source for Research
Prevalence and Utilization of Medical Care Services in Persons with Autism
Spectrum Disorder over and Under Age 65 H. J. Carretta1, K. Graves2
and T. Benevides3, (1)1155 West Call Street Suite 3200-C, Florida State
University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, FL, (2)Sociology, Florida
State University, Tallahassee, FL, (3)Department of Occupational Therapy,
Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
166 173.166 Validity and Reliability Analysis of Chinese Parent
Version of the Autism Spectrum Rating Scales Y. Wang1, H. Zhou1,
L. Zhang1, L. Wu2, X. Luo3, X. Zou4, W. Yan1 and E. J. Fombonne5,
(1)Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China, (2)Department
of Children’s and Adolescent Health, Public Health, Harbin Medical
University, Harbin, China, (3)Central South University, Changsha, China,
(4)Pediatrics, Child Developmental & Behavioral Center, The 3rd Affiliated
Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU), Guangzhou, MD, (5)Oregon
Health & Science University, Portland, OR
173 174.173 Epigenetic Alterations in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Following the Use of Fertility Treatments M. T. Siu1, D. Grafodatskaya1,
D. T. Butcher1, S. Choufani1, Y. A. Chen1, A. Pietrobon1, Y. Lou1 and
R. Weksberg1,2,3, (1)Genetics and Genome Biology, Hospital for Sick
Children, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (3)Dept. of Paediatrics and the Institute of Medical Science,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
95
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
174 174.174 Involvement of Human Endogenous Retrovirus–H
(HERV-H) in Autistic Spectrum Disorder E. Balestrieri1, C. Cipriani1,
I. Bucci1, C. Matteucci1, A. Benvenuto2, A. D. Argaw1, P. Curatolo2 and
P. Sinibaldi-Vallebona1,3, (1)Dept. Experimental Medicine and Surgery,
University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, (2)Pediatric Neurology Unit,
Neuroscience Department, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy,
(3)Institute of Translational Pharmacology, CNR, Rome, Italy
175 174.175 Modeling Enteric Nervous System Function in Children
with Phelan Mcdermid Syndrome A. L. Wagoner1,2, D. L. Mack3,
E. E. McKee1 and S. J. Walker1,2, (1)Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative
Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, (2)Neuroscience Graduate Program, Wake
Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, (3)Institute for Stem
Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
176 174.176 Serum Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
(BDNF), Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator (tPA) and Its Inhibitor (PAI-1) in
Children with Autism K. Wu1, Z. Peng1, W. Xia2, C. Sun2 and L. Wu2,
(1)Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health,
Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China, (2)Department of Children Health
and Hygiene, School of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin,
China
Oral Session – 11A
176 - New Treatments for Early Intervention
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: L. R. Watson, Division of Speech and Hearing
Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
1:45
176.001 Early Intervention Improves Social Processing in Infants
at High Familial Risk for ASD E. Jones1, K. M. Burner2, K. Venema3,
R. K. Earl4, R. T. Lowy4, J. Kelly4, G. Dawson5 and S. J. Webb6,
(1)Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United
Kingdom, (2)Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA, (3)Palo Alto
University, Palo Alto, CA, (4)University of Washington, Seattle,
WA, (5)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University,
Durham, NC, (6)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
1:57
176.002 Early Intervention Improves the Flexibility and Focus
of Visual Attention in Infants at High Risk for ASD T. B. Team1,
E. Jones2, M. W. Wan3, T. Charman4, M. H. Johnson5 and J. Green3,
(1)BASIS, UK, United Kingdom, (2)Birkbeck College, University of
London, London, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of Brain, Behaviour
and Mental Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United
Kingdom, (4)Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London, London, United Kingdom, (5)Centre for
Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck College, University of
London, London, United Kingdom
2:09
176.003 Managing Repetitive Behaviours in Young Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): New Parent Group Intervention
V. Grahame1, L. Dixon2, J. Rodgers3, H. McConachie4, D. Brett5
and A. S. Le-Couteur5, (1)Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS
Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom,
(2)Regional Complex Neurodevelopmental Disorder service, NTW
NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of
Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom,
(4)Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle,
United Kingdom, (5)Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle
University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
2:21
176.004 Design and Outcomes of a Large-Scale Randomized
Trial of Parent Training for Children with ASD and Disruptive
Behavior K. Bearss, Pediatrics, Emory University School of
Medicine, Atlanta, GA
177 174.177 Synaptic Protein Interaction Network Disruptions
Suggest Convergence Among Autism Mouse Models S. E. Smith1,
S. C. Neier1, T. R. Davis2 and A. G. Schrum1, (1)Mayo Clinic, Rochester,
MN, (2)Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Poster Session
175 - Other
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM - Imperial Ballroom
178 175.178 An Overview of the Basic Genetic, Epigenetic, and
Environmental Factors Relevant to ASD D. L. Coury, Nationwide Children’s
Hospital, Columbus, OH
179 175.179 Emerging Tools and Techniques Using Computational
Pipelines and Results with NDAR C. Craddock1 and D. Obenshain2,
(1)Center for the Developing Brain, Child Mind Institute, New York, NY,
(2)NDAR, NIMH, Rockville, MD
180 175.180 Lessons Learned in Performing Secondary Analysis
Using NDAR J. M. Tilford, Dept. of Health Policy and Management,
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
181 175.181 Age-Related Improvements in Mind-Reading but Not
Parent Reported Empathy in Autism Spectrum Disorders I. Nagar1 and
A. Gupta2, (1)Delhi University, New Delhi, Delhi, India, (2)Delhi University,
New Delhi, India
182 175.182 Do EF Deficits Ameliorate with Age in Individuals High
Functioning Autism? Examining Cognitive Flexibility, Planning, and Working
Memory Across Childhood and Adolescence I. Nagar1 and A. Gupta2,
(1)Delhi University, New Delhi, Delhi, India, (2)Delhi University,
New Delhi, India
Oral Session – 11B
177 - Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices
in Routine Care Settings: Feasibility, Acceptablity,
and Provider Fidelity
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom B
Session Chair: L. R. Watson, Division of Speech and Hearing
Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
2:40
96
177.001 A Pilot Study of an Innovative Service Delivery Model
for Training Intervention Providers: Combining Web-Based
Learning, Live Instruction and Remote Consultation A. L. Wainer1,
B. Ingersoll2 and K. Pickard3, (1)Michigan State University/JFK
Partners, Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, (2)Psychology,
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, (3)Michigan State
University, East Lansing, MI
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
2:52
177.002 Measuring the Impact of Training Community Mental
Health Providers to Deliver a Package of Evidence-Based
Strategies for ASD on Provider Behavior and Attitudes
C. Chlebowski1,2, W. Ganger2 and L. Brookman-Frazee1,2,
(1)Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA,
(2)Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, San Diego, CA
3:04
177.003 Community Mental Health Therapist Perspectives on
Changes in Clinical Practice Associated with Training and Delivery
of a Mental Health Intervention for ASD M. Dyson1, C. Chlebowski2,
N. Stadnick2 and L. I. Brookman-Frazee2, (1)University of California,
San Diego, San Diego, CA, (2)Psychiatry, University of California,
San Diego, San Diego, CA
3:16
177.004 Factors Associated with Intervention Uptake in
Community Practice: Acceptability, Feasibility, and Implementation
Climate C. Harker1, S. R. Edmunds2, L. V. Ibanez1, C. Froehlig1,
S. Nanda1, A. Penney1, R. Talley1 and W. L. Stone3, (1)University
of Washington, Seattle, WA, (2)UW Mailbox 357920, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA, (3)Psychology, University of Washington,
Seattle, WA
Oral Session – 12A
178 - Psychiatric Comorbidities in ASD
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: S. J. Spence, Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital,
Boston, MA
1:45
1:57
178.002 Risk Factors for Self-Injurious Behaviors in Autism
Spectrum Disorders G. N. Soke1, C. DiGuiseppi2, T. Fingerlin3,
C. Robinson4, S. A. Rosenberg5, R. F. Hamman6 and
A. M. Reynolds1, (1)University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO,
(2)Epidemiology/Colorado School of Public Health, University of
Colorado - Denver, Aurora, CO, (3)National Jewish Health, Denver,
CO, (4)Pediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Colorado School
of Medicine, Aurora, CO, (5)Department of Psychiatry, University
of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurroa, CO, (6)Epidemiology,
Colorado School of Pubic Health, Aurora, CO
178.003 Relations Between Anxiety and Executive Function in
Youth with ASD C. E. Pugliese1, L. G. Anthony2, C. Haake3,
J. L. Martucci4, Y. Granader2 and L. Kenworthy5, (1)Children’s
National Medical Center, Washington, DC, (2)Center for Autism
Spectrum Disorders, Children’s National Medical Center, Rockville,
MD, (3)Department of Neuropsychology, Children’s National
Medical Center, Rockville, MD, (4)Children’s National Medical
Center, Rockville, MD, (5)Children’s Research Institute, Children’s
National Medical Center, Washington, DC
178.004 An International Multi-Site Investigation of the
Measurement Properties of the Spence Children’s Anxiety
Scale – Parent Version (SCAS-P) to Report Anxiety Symptoms
in Children and Adolescents with ASD I. Magiati1, J. Rodgers2,
H. McConachie3, M. South4, M. J. Hollocks5, A. Ozsivadjian6 and
E. Simonoff7, (1)National University of Singapore, Singapore,
Singapore, (2)Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University,
Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, (3)Institute of Health
and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United
Kingdom, (4)Psychology and Neuroscience, Brigham Young
University, Provo, UT, (5)Department of Clinical Neurosciences,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (6)Guy’s
Hospital, London, United Kingdom, (7)Department of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom
Oral Session – 12B
179 - Medical Comorbidities in ASD
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom A
Session Chair: S. J. Spence, Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital,
Boston, MA
2:40
179.001 Ambulatory Care Sensitive Hospitalizations Among
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder P. S. Carbone1, P. Young1,
G. Stoddard1, J. Wilkes1 and L. Trasande2, (1)University of Utah,
Salt Lake City, UT, (2)NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY
2:52
179.002 Pattern of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Co-Occurring
Symptoms in Adopted Children J. Ezell1, A. M. Shui2,
K. B. Sanders3 and J. Veenstra-Vander Weele4, (1)Psychiatry,
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, (2)Biostatistics
Center, Massachussetts General Hospital, Boston, MA,
(3)Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, (4)Columbia
University, New York, NY
3:04
179.003 Predictors of Epilepsy in Children with ASD from a
Large National US Sample J. B. Ewen1, A. R. Marvin2, J. K. Law2,
P. A. Law3 and P. H. Lipkin4, (1)Neurology and Developmental
Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins School of
Medicine, Baltimore, MD, (2)Medical Informatics, Kennedy Krieger
Institute, Baltimore, MD, (3)Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, (4)Pediatrics/Neurology and
Developmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins
School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
3:16
179.004 The Behavioural Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale
in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Psychometrics
and Associations with Child and Parent Variables S. L. Allen1,
I. M. Smith2, E. K. Duku3, T. Vaillancourt4, P. Szatmari5,
S. E. Bryson6, E. J. Fombonne7, J. Volden8, C. Waddell9,
L. Zwaigenbaum10, W. Roberts11, P. Mirenda12, T. A. Bennett13,
M. Elsabbagh14 and S. Georgiades15, (1)Clinical Psychology,
Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada, (2)Dalhousie University /
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)Offord Centre for Child
Studies & McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada,
(4)University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, (5)University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (6)Autism Research Centre,
Dalhousie/IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (7)Oregon
Health & Science University, Portland, OR, (8)Communication
Sciences and Disorders, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB,
Canada, (9)Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (10)University of Alberta, Edmonton,
AB, Canada, (11)Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON,
Canada, (12)University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC,
Canada, (13)Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, Offord
Centre for Child Studies, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON,
Canada, (14)Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal,
QC, Canada, (15)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
SATURDAY – PM
2:09
178.001 Cognitive and Biological Pathways to Anxiety in
Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders
M. J. Hollocks1,2, A. Pickles3, P. Howlin4 and E. Simonoff2,
(1)Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, (2)Department of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, United
Kingdom, (3)Department of Biostatistics, King’s College London,
London, United Kingdom, (4)Department of Psychology, King’s
College London, London, United Kingdom
2:21
97
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
2:52
181.002 Language and Learning Abilities in ‘Unaffected’ SchoolAged Siblings of Children with ASD E. E. Drumm1, S. E. Bryson2,
L. Zwaigenbaum3 and J. A. Brian4, (1)University of Toronto, Toronto,
ON, Canada, (2)Autism Research Centre, Dalhousie/IWK Health
Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (3)University of Alberta, Edmonton,
AB, Canada, (4)Bloorview Research Institute/ Paediatrics, Holland
Bloorview Kids Rehab/ University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
3:04
181.003 Audiovisual Integration of Speech and Gesture in
Adolescents with ASD L. B. Silverman1, N. Gebhard1,
A. R. Canfield2, J. T. Foley1 and A. P. Salverda3, (1)University
of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, (2)University of
Connecticut, Storrs, CT, (3)University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
3:16
181.004 Reading Comprehension, Language Disturbance, and
the Social Communication Phenotype of ASD N. S. McIntyre1,
P. C. Mundy2, M. Solomon3, T. Oswald4, L. E. Swain-Lerro5 and
M. C. Zajic6, (1)UC Davis, Davis, CA, (2)2825 50Th Street, UC
Davis, Sacramento, CA, (3)Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral
Sciences, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA,
Sacramento, CA, (4)2825 50th Street, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA,
(5)School of Education, UC Davis, Santa Rosa, CA, (6)School of
Education, UC Davis, Davis, CA
Oral Session – 13A
180 - Language Interventions in Young Children with
ASD: Effectiveness and Impact
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: A. M. Mastergeorge, Family Studies and Human
Development, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
1:45
180.001 Does Intelligibility Change As a Function of Increased
Spontaneous Communicative Utterances M. Mladenovic1,
A. C. Holbrook2 and C. Kasari3, (1)Semel Institute, University of
California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)Graduate School of
Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (3)UCLA Center for Autism Research &
Treatment, Westwood, CA
1:57
180.002 Assessment of Early Social Communication and
Play Skills in Toddlers with Autism By Community Teaching
Professionals: The Short Play and Communication Evaluation
S. Y. Shire1 and C. Kasari2, (1)University of California Los
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, (2)UCLA Center for Autism Research &
Treatment, Westwood, CA
2:09
180.003 Exploring the Impact of Language Facilitation Strategies
on Verbal Language in Two Year-Old, Minimally Verbal Children
with ASD C. R. Chiarelli1, A. B. Barber2 and R. W. Saffo3, (1)The
University of Alabama, Marlton, NJ, (2)Communicative Disorders,
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, (3)Communicative
Disorders, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL
2:21
180.004 Spoken Communication Outcomes for Young Children
with Autism: A Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression
L. H. Hampton1, A. P. Kaiser2 and E. Fuller2, (1)Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN, (2)Special Education, Vanderbilt
University, Nashville, TN
Oral Session – 14A
182 - Complex Genetic Variants and Models of Autism
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: T. N. Turner, Genome Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
1:45
182.001 Large-Scale Exome Analyses Reveal Novel ASD Genes
Impacted By Genetic Variation at All Scales S. De Rubeis, for
the Autism Sequencing Consortium, Psychiatry, Icahn School of
Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
1:57
182.002 Somatic Mosaicism in Simplex Autism Spectrum
Disorder D. Krupp1, Y. Duffourd2, S. Evans1, R. Bernier3,
E. J. Fombonne4, S. J. Webb3, J. B. Riviere2 and B. J. O’Roak1,
(1)Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science
University, Portland, OR, (2)Génétique des Anomalies du
Développement, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France,
(3)Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington,
Seattle, WA, (4)Psychiatry, Institute on Development and Disability,
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
2:09
182.003 Function Based GWAS Identifies Novel Candidate
Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorders L. K. Davis1, E. R. Gamazon1,
E. O. Kistner-Griffin2, E. H. Cook3, J. Sutcliffe4 and N. J. Cox1,
(1)University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, (2)Medical University of
South Carolina, Charleston, SC, (3)University of Illinois at Chicago,
Chicago, IL, (4)Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
2:21
182.004 Identifying Non-Protein Coding Autism Risk Variants By
Computational Analysis of a Large Case Control Sequencing Cohort
A. J. Griswold1, D. Van Booven1, N. D. Dueker1, M. L. Cuccaro1,2,
E. R. Martin1,2, J. L. Haines3, J. R. Gilbert1,2, J. P. Hussman4 and
M. A. Pericak-Vance1,2, (1)John P. Hussman Institute for Human
Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami,
FL, (2)Dr. John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human
Genetics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL,
(3)Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western
Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, (4)Hussman Institute for
Autism, Baltimore, MD
Oral Session – 13B
181 - Language and Learning Abilities in School-Age
Children and Adolescents with ASD
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom C
Session Chair: A. M. Mastergeorge, Family Studies and Human
Development, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
2:40
98
181.001 Beyond Sentences: Using the Expression, Reception
and Recall Instrument (ERRNI) in School-Aged Children with
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) J. Volden1, E. Dodd1, K. Engel2,
P. Szatmari3, S. E. Bryson4, E. J. Fombonne5, P. Mirenda6,
I. M. Smith4, T. Vaillancourt7, C. Waddell8, L. Zwaigenbaum9,
T. A. Bennett10, S. Georgiades11, E. K. Duku10 and M. Elsabbagh12,
(1)Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Alberta,
Edmonton, AB, Canada, (2)Communication Sciences and Disorder,
University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (3)University of
Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (4)Dalhousie University / IWK
Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada, (5)Oregon Health & Science
University, Portland, OR, (6)University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC, Canada, (7)University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON,
Canada, (8)Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada,
(9)University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, (10)Offord Centre
for Child Studies & McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada,
(11)McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada, (12)Department of
Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
SATURDAY May 16, 2015 – PM
2:21
Oral Session – 14B
183 - Epigenetics of Autism
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Ballroom D
Session Chair: T. N. Turner, Genome Sciences, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
184.004 Longitudinal Study of Children’s Sensory Response
Patterns: Stability, Change and Treatment Effects G. T. Baranek1,
A. V. Kirby2, L. R. Watson3, K. Williams2, J. C. Bulluck4 and
J. Sideris5, (1)Allied Health Sciences, University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (2)Division of Occupational Science
and Occupational Therapy, The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (3)Division of Speech and Hearing
Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel
Hill, NC, (4)Department of Allied Health Sciences, The University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, (5)Frank Porter
Graham Child Development Institute, Chapel Hill, NC
2:40
183.001 Using Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines to Investigate
Altered DNA Methylation in a Subtype of ASD V. Hu, The George
Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences,
Washington, DC
2:52
183.002 Enrichment of Methylation Quantitative Trait Loci
Among Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder
S. V. Andrews1, C. Ladd-Acosta1, A. P. Feinberg2 and M. D. Fallin3,
(1)Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (2)Medicine, Johns
Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, (3)Mental Health & Wendy Klag
Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Oral Session – 15B
185 - Sex Differences: Assessment and Measurement
3:04
183.003 Epigenomics of ASD R. Weksberg1, D. T. Butcher2 and
S. Choufani2, (1)Dept. of Paediatrics and the Institute of Medical
Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2)Genetics
and Genome Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON,
Canada
2:40
185.001 Sex Differences in Social Impairment in Preschool-Aged
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder R. T. Johnson, D. D. Li,
D. G. Amaral, S. J. Rogers, S. Ozonoff and C. W. Nordahl, MIND
Institute and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences,
University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA
3:16
183.004 Epigenetic Alterations Tied to Brain Enlargement in
Autism Spectrum Disorder C. K. Deutsch1, F. Momen Heravi1,2,
R. W. Francis1 and S. Akbarian3, (1)Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center,
Worcester, MA, (2)Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA,
(3)Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount
Sinai, New York City, NY
2:52
185.002 Gender Differences in Age of ASD Diagnosis and
Social Characteristics of Children with ASD: From a US National
Registry B. Chen1, A. R. Marvin2 and P. H. Lipkin3, (1)Pediatrics,
Child Developmental and Behavioral Center, 3rd Affiliated Hospital
of Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU), Guangzhou, China, (2)Medical
Informatics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, (3)Pediatrics/
Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute/
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
3:04
185.003 Profile of Girls Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum
Disorder in a Clinical Setting C. Hall, T. Aronson and S. Hoffenberg,
Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory
University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
3:16
185.004 The ADOS-2 and ADI-R: Are There Sex Differences?
M. Huerta1, S. L. Bishop2 and C. Lord1, (1)Weill Cornell Medical
College, White Plains, NY, (2)Psychiatry, University of California,
San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Oral Session – 15A
184 - Assessment and Measurement of
Sensory Issues
1:45 PM - 2:35 PM - Grand Salon
Session Chair: M. Huerta, Weill Cornell Medical College,
White Plains, NY
184.001 An Altered Olfactory Profile in Children Diagnosed
with Autism Spectrum Disorder L. Rozenkrantz1, I. Heller1,
A. Plotkin1, A. Weissbrod1, D. Zachor2 and N. Sobel1, (1)Department
of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel,
(2)Autism Center, Asaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin, Israel
1:57
184.002 Sensory Subtypes and Heart Rate Variability in Children
with Autism Spectrum Disorder A. E. Lane1 and R. Schaaf2,
(1)University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia, (2)Thomas
Jefferson University, Phildalphia, PA
2:09
184.003 Classifying Patterns of Preschool Aged Children with
Autism S. D. Tomchek1,2, L. Little3 and W. Dunn4, (1)Pediatrics,
University of Lousiville Weisskopf Center, Louisville, KY,
(2)Occupational Therapy Education, Kansas University Medical
Center, Kansas City, KS, (3)Occupational Therapy Education,
Kansas Univeristy Medical Center, Kansas City, KS,
(4)Occupational Therapy, University of Kansas Medical Center,
Kansas City, KS
Session Chair: M. Huerta, Weill Cornell Medical College,
White Plains, NY
SATURDAY – PM
1:45
2:40 PM - 3:30 PM - Grand Salon
99
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
A
Email Address
Abstract
Ainsworth, K.
The University of Glasgow
[email protected]
159.181
Ajmera, M.
RTI Health Solutions
[email protected]
173.150
125.192
Ajram, L. A.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Kings College London
[email protected]
140.160
Akbarian, S.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai
[email protected]
183.004
[email protected]
106.043
125.186
Akers, J.
Thompson Center for Autism &
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
[email protected]
171.039
Aksenov, V.
McMaster University
[email protected]
170.004
Able, H.
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
107.087
Akshoomoff, N.
[email protected]
University of California, San Diego
138.119
[email protected]
122.005
Al Balkhi, S.
Offord Centre for Child Studies &
McMaster University
[email protected]
Ables, A.
University of Louisville
Abowd, G.
Georgia Institute of Technology
[email protected]
Al-Dahlaan, H.
King Faisal Specialist Hospital
and Research Center
[email protected]
116.004
Abraham, A.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Al-Taie, S.
McMaster University
[email protected]
109.102
Abrams, D. A.
Stanford University
[email protected]
Abramson, R.
University of South Carolina,
School of Medicine
Abazyan, B.
Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
170.002
Abbacchi, A.
Washington University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Abdelaziz, A.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
Abdullah, M. M.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
Abel, T.
University of Pennsylvania
[email protected]
Abildskov, T.
Brigham Young University
122.029, 124.098,
158.086
137.035, 138.054
124.145
133.004, 139.140
140.172, 159.131
Alaerts, K.
[email protected]
KU Leuven - University of Leuven
172.120
140.178
Alamri, Y.
[email protected]
University of Otago, New Zealand
107.060
[email protected]
140.171
Albaum, C.
York University
106.038
Absoud, M.
Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS
Foundation Trust
[email protected]
106.005
Ackerman, R.
University of Texas at Dallas
[email protected]
[email protected]
Albert, P.
[email protected]
National Institute of Mental Health
140.157
Alcorn, A.
University of Edinburgh
[email protected]
137.023
159.189
Aldred, C.
University of Manchester
mailto:[email protected]
117.002
Ackermann, J.
[email protected]
Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main
125.207
Aldrich, C.
Curtin University of Technology
[email protected]
172.124
Acosta Ortiz, A. M.
City University London
[email protected]
159.174
Alessandri, M.
University of Miami
[email protected]
Adachi, J.
Hokkaido University of Education
[email protected]
122.014
[email protected]
Adams, J.
Arizona State University
[email protected]
139.139
Alexander, A.
Centre for Research in Autism
and Education (CRAE),
Institute of Education
Adams, R.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
Alexander, A.
Waisman Center,
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
Adaszewski, S.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
Alexandridis, R.
Stemina Biomarker Discovery
[email protected]
149.001
Adayev, T.
Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities
[email protected]
125.200, 171.035
[email protected]
109.123
Adeyemi, J.
College of Medicine University
of Lagos
[email protected]
141.208
Allen, C.
Centre for Research in Autism
and Education (CRAE),
Institute of Education
Allen, G.
University of Texas at Austin
[email protected]
159.139
Adini, Y.
Vision Research Inst.
[email protected]
109.156
Allen, H.
University of Nottingham
[email protected]
109.158
Agarwal, P.
[email protected]
KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital
124.102
Allen, S.
Dalhousie University
[email protected]
179.004
Agbese, E.
Penn State Hershey College
of Medicine
[email protected]
107.075
Allen, T.
University of Texas
[email protected]
172.109
[email protected]
125.180
Allison, C.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
Aguena, M.
University of Sao Paulo
Ahamed, S.
Marquette University
[email protected]
141.219
Allman, M.
Michigan State University
[email protected]
Aiello, R.
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
[email protected]
157.050
AIMS Consortium, M.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
Almeida, J.
[email protected]
Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento
e Autismo do Serviço do
Centro de Desenvolvimento da
Criança, Pediatric Hospital,
Centro Hospitalar e Universitário
de Coimbra
Aina, O.
[email protected]
College of Medicine University of Lagos
100
Author Name
146.003, 173.154
150.001, 171.029
141.208
Alnemary, F.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
122.013, 140.194
141.222
134.002, 151.002,
171.039, 171.041
109.160, 109.162,
138.083, 143.004,
159.148, 173.152
172.094
138.122
107.060, 116.004
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Alnemary, F.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
107.060, 157.057
Alpers, N. S.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
140.173, 140.192
Alshikho, M.
Massachusetts General Hospital/
Harvard Medical School,
MGH/HST Martinos Center for
Biomedical Imaging,
Massachusetts General Hospital/
TRANSCEND
[email protected]
Alstein, L.
Massachusetts General Hospital
[email protected]
Alvarez, S.
University of Washington
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Anderson, M.
[email protected]
Harvard Medical School/
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,
Boston Children’s Hospital,
Autism BrainNET,
Children’s Hospital Boston Intellectual
and Developmental Disabilities
Research Center
170.003
Anderson, S.
Institute of Child Health, UCL
[email protected]
152.001
Andersson, M.
Karolinska Institute
[email protected]
172.091
106.043
Andreae, L.
King’s College London
[email protected]
133.002
[email protected]
124.143
Andrew, M.
[email protected]
Liverpool John Moores University
Alvarez-Fernandez, S.
Child Psychiatry,
NYU Child Study Center
[email protected]
121.001
Alvizurez, A.
College of Staten Island
[email protected]
113.001
Alvord, M.
Alvord, Baker, & Associates
[email protected]
157.045
Andrews, D.
[email protected]
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London,
The Sackler Institute for Translational
Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
Aman, M.
Ohio State University
[email protected]
138.055, 138.071,
139.127, 139.128
Andrews, J.
University of Arizona
[email protected]
138.056
Amaral, D.
University of California Davis
Medical Center
[email protected]
125.212, 150.004,
170.010, 171.033,
174.167, 185.001
Andrews, S. V.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
183.002
106.033
[email protected]
147.003
Andridge, R.
The Ohio State University,
College of Public Health
[email protected]
Amaya, V.
Barrow Neurological Institute
Ameis, S.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
157.058
Ankeny, L.
University of Denver
[email protected]
138.068
Ammons, C.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
172.093
Anney, R.
Trinity College Dublin
[email protected]
125.193
Amoss, R.
Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
123.094
Antar, L.
[email protected]
Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
[email protected]
159.152, 159.168
Antezana, L.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
Amsalem, C.
Ariel University
106.014, 109.172,
118.002
Amso, D.
Brown University
[email protected]
140.153
Anthony, B.
Georgetown University
[email protected]
Amthor, F.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
137.013
Anthony, L.
[email protected]
Children’s National Medical Center
106.022, 109.153,
158.084, 178.003
Anagnostou, E.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
Anthony, L.
[email protected]
Children’s National Medical Center
106.001, 157.022,
157.029
Anticevic, A.
Yale University
172.072, 172.084
171.050
106.008, 106.011,
106.031, 106.052,
107.064, 109.148,
125.199, 138.069,
138.077, 139.126,
140.184, 158.091,
159.156
[email protected]
106.046
Ander, B.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
Anderberg, E.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
109.146
Andersen, T.
Eastern Michigan University
[email protected]
172.115
Anderson, A.
University of Washington
[email protected]
140.150
Anderson, A.
UCLA
[email protected]
154.001
Anderson, C.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
158.088
125.181, 125.185
Anderson, G.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
106.027
Anderson, K.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
138.072
Anderson, L. C.
University of Maryland
[email protected]
124.120, 140.169
Apelian, T.
[email protected]
UCLA Semel Institute CAN Clinic
150.001, 171.028
106.022
139.134, 139.144
Apicella, F.
“Fondazione Stella Maris”
Scientific Institute
[email protected]
109.142
Aponte, C.
University of Rochester
Medical Center
[email protected]
157.050
Apps, M.
University of Oxford
[email protected]
172.095
Arango, C.
Hospital General Universitario
Gregorio Marañón
[email protected]
139.131
Arbiv, S.
UNC Frank Porter Graham Child
Development Institute
[email protected]
123.093
Archibald, L.
Western University, Canada
[email protected]
171.040
Ardel, C.
Stanford University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
105.004
Ardjomand-Hessabi, M.
University of Texas Health
Science Center at Houston
[email protected]
173.160
Arellano, G.
UNC Frank Porter Graham
Child Development Institute
[email protected]
123.093
Arellano, R.
University of California
Santa Barbara
[email protected]
157.030
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Anbalagan, E.
University of California at
San Diego
[email protected]
109.109
101
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Argaw, A.
University of Rome Tor Vergata
Email Address
[email protected]
Armour, A.
[email protected]
Children’s National Medical Center
174.174
106.022, 157.029
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
B
Bachevalier, J.
[email protected]
Yerkes National Primate
Research Center, Emory University
171.043
Baguio, F.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
157.002
Baheretibeb, Y.
Addis Ababa University
[email protected]
141.218
Bailey-Wilson, J.
National Human Genome
Research Institute,
National Institutes of Health
[email protected]
125.194
Armour, A. C.
[email protected]
Children’s National Medical Center
106.050
Armstrong, D.
[email protected]
Carmen B. Pingree Autism Center
of Learning
157.065
Armstrong, K.
Simon Fraser University
[email protected]
109.164
Arnold, C.
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
123.071
107.088
[email protected]
139.127, 139.128
Bains, P.
BCBA
[email protected]
Arnold, L.
The Ohio State University
173.161
[email protected]
125.199, 138.077,
159.156
Baio, J.
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention
[email protected]
Arnold, P.
Hospital for Sick Children
Aronson, T.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
124.146, 185.003
Baird, G.
Guy’s Hospital
[email protected]
159.150
Bak, S.
Michigan State University
[email protected]
137.008
Arriaga, R.
Georgia Institute of Technology
[email protected]
137.035
Baker, B.
UCLA
[email protected]
Ashton, A.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
106.054
Baker, C.
Danya International, Inc
[email protected]
Ashwin, C.
University of Bath
[email protected]
157.079, 159.162
Baker, D. B.
[email protected]
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
122.028
Ashwood, P.
UC Davis
[email protected]
114.001, 170.006,
170.010
Baker, E.
[email protected]
UCLA Center for Autism Research
and Treatment
172.086
Askren, M.
University of Washington
[email protected]
109.132
Asman, A.
University of Utah
[email protected]
107.058
Aspell, J.
Anglia Ruskin University
[email protected]
159.169
Assaf, M.
Institute of Living,
Hartford Hospital,
Yale School of Medicine
[email protected]
159.134
Asztalos, J.
Division of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry,
Stockholm County Council
[email protected]
157.063
Atwood, S.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
109.146
Au, R.
The Chinese University of
Hong Kong
[email protected]
140.198
Audhkhasi, K.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
138.081
Auguste, E.
Mt. Holyoke College
[email protected]
118.004
Augustyn, M.
Boston Medical Center
[email protected]
Ausderau, K. K.
[email protected]
University of Wisconsin - Madison
102
Abstract
107.085, 122.053
122.031
Auyeung, B.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
109.162, 138.083,
173.152
Avino, T. A.
MIND Institute,
University of California,
Davis
[email protected]
151.004, 155.001
120.002, 122.044
157.022
Baker, E.
[email protected]
Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre, La Trobe University
106.013, 106.047
Baker, L. K.
[email protected]
122.006, 122.042,
122.045, 158.094,
158.097
Baker-Ericzen, M.
Rady Children’s Hospital,
San Diego
[email protected]
107.083, 110.181,
139.130
Bakian, A.
University of Utah
[email protected]
106.004, 123.059,
125.191, 125.198,
138.098, 146.002,
173.129, 173.161,
173.165
Bakulski, K. M.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
114.004
Balatti, V.
Villa Santa Maria Institute
[email protected]
110.187, 110.189
Baldus, G.
BalCor s.n.c.
[email protected]
109.119, 109.126
Bales, K.
University of California, Davis
[email protected]
159.157
Balestrieri, E.
University of Rome Tor Vergata
[email protected]
174.174
Ball, J.
Eastern Virginia Medical School
[email protected]
157.020
Ballatore-Weinfeld, M.
Rady Children’s Hospital,
San Diego
[email protected]
110.181
Balsters, J. H.
ETH Zürich
[email protected]
172.095
The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa
Aylward, E.
[email protected]
Seattle Children’s Research Institute
172.121
Baltrusaitis, T.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
137.020
Azad, G.
University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine
[email protected]
122.012
Banaschewski, T.
University of Heidelberg
[email protected]
133.003
169.004
[email protected]
Bandini, L.
University of Massachusetts
Medical School/
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center
and Boston University
[email protected]
Azar, N.
University of Windsor
Bani-Hani, H.
McGill University
[email protected]
109.152
113.004, 157.033
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Banken, L.
Roche Innovation Center Basel
[email protected]
Bar-Oz, B.
Hadassah Medical Center
[email protected]
142.001
Barale, F.
University of Pavia
[email protected]
106.034
Baranek, G. T.
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
Baranger, A.
Autism Europe
[email protected]
Barbaro, J.
La Trobe University
[email protected]
Barbeau, E.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
Barber, A. B.
University of Alabama
[email protected]
Barber, A.
[email protected]
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Kennedy Krieger Institute
139.132, 139.145
102.001, 110.184,
123.096, 140.151,
184.004
137.020
107.080, 138.113,
143.002
171.037
122.042, 158.103,
180.003
119.002, 171.029
Barczykowski, A.
State University of NY at Buffalo
[email protected]
107.071
Barel-Eini, O.
Ariel University
[email protected]
Barense, M.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
Barger, N.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
Baribeau, D. A.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
Barisic, I.
ETH Zürich
[email protected]
159.201, 159.203
Barnum, S.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
107.082
Baron-Cohen, S.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
159.152, 159.168
140.183
125.181, 125.185,
171.024
159.156
101.004, 109.111,
109.160, 109.162,
124.106, 124.156,
125.168, 125.183,
133.003, 137.020,
138.083, 143.004,
150.001, 159.148,
159.151, 171.029,
173.152
[email protected]
142.003
Barrett, D.
Autism Society Alberta
[email protected]
107.072
Barrionuevo, B.
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine
[email protected]
106.039
Barry, T.
The University of
Southern Mississippi
[email protected]
Barstein, J.
Northwestern University
[email protected]
Bartholow, B.
University of Missouri
Email Address
Bastian, A.
[email protected]
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,
Kennedy Krieger Institute
Bateman, L.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Abstract
137.037
138.049, 140.190
Bates, S.
UCLA PEERS Program
[email protected]
152.003
Baudouin, S.
Cardiff School of Biosciences
[email protected]
133.001
Baum, R.
The Ohio State
University College of Medicine
[email protected]
139.141
Bauman, M.
Boston University
[email protected]
172.075
Bauman, M.
UC Davis / MIND Institute
[email protected]
170.010, 170.013
Bauminger, N.
Bar-Ilan University
[email protected]
124.137
Baxter, L.
Barrow Neurological Institute
[email protected]
147.003
Baykaner, O.
Great Ormond Street Hospital
[email protected]
152.001
Bayliss, A.
University of East Anglia
[email protected]
104.001
Bayon, B.
Indiana University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
126.215
Bazile, C.
FAM-La Lendemaine
[email protected]
137.014
Bean Ellawadi, A.
The Ohio State University
[email protected]
140.161
Bearden, C.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
172.065
Bearss, K.
Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
138.057, 138.071,
176.004
Bebko, J.
York University
[email protected]
122.027, 172.057
Becchio, C.
University of Turin
[email protected]
Beck, J.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
Beckmann, J.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
Bedford, R.
King’s College London
[email protected]
156.001
Beecher, C.
[email protected]
The University of the West Indies,
Mona Campus
159.203
109.113, 144.003,
172.058
173.160
Begeer, S.
VU University Amsterdam
[email protected]
Belardi, K. M.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
140.151
Belardi, K.
University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
102.001
138.041
Belding, A.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
124.149
[email protected]
159.190
[email protected]
Bartley, G.
[email protected]
Center for Autism Research,
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
103.001, 138.049
Belkin, T. M.
Indiana University- Purdue
University Indianapolis
Bartolo, A.
[email protected]
Université de Lille Nord de France
122.006, 122.045
109.166
Barton, M.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
123.087, 124.117,
124.141, 138.072
Barua, M.
Action For Autism
[email protected]
111.002, 141.209
Bashir, N.
Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
123.063
BASIS Team, &.
Birkbeck College,
University of London
N/A
172.076
Bell, M.
[email protected]
VA Connecticut Healthcare System,
Yale School of Medicine
122.004, 159.173
122.005, 157.068,
158.100
159.134
Belle, K.
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine
[email protected]
125.176, 125.195
Bellesheim, K.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
157.012, 159.194
Bellinger, D.
Children’s Hospital Boston,
Harvard School of Public Health
[email protected]
Ben Itzchak, E.
Ariel University/ Assaf Harofeh
Medical Center
[email protected]
173.148
106.019, 123.091,
159.152, 159.168
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Barone, A.
Richmond University
Medical Center
Author Name
103
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
[email protected]
Benevides, T.
Thomas Jefferson University
[email protected]
173.164
Bennett, D.
UC Davis
[email protected]
173.151
Bennett, E.
Goldsmiths College,
University of London
[email protected]
109.129
Bennett, R.
Yale Child Study Center
[email protected]
172.056
Bennett, S.
[email protected]
Liverpool John Moores University
124.136, 124.144,
138.115
109.109
Bennett, T.
Offord Centre for Child Studies
& McMaster University
[email protected]
Bensinger-Brody, Y.
Touro College
[email protected]
124.124
Benson, B.
Nisonger Center
[email protected]
138.074
Benson, M.
Utah State University; CPD
[email protected]
125.179
Benson-Greer, A.
UNCG
[email protected]
159.184
Bent, C. A.
La Trobe University
[email protected]
107.080
Bente, G.
University of Cologne
[email protected]
159.166
Benvenuto, A.
University of Rome Tor Vergata
[email protected]
174.174
Beresford, C.
Children’s Hospital Colorado
[email protected]
139.142
Berger, N. I.
Michigan State University
[email protected]
107.067
Berggren, S.
Karolinska Institutet
[email protected]
Beriont, J.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
157.082
Berkovits, L.
UCLA
[email protected]
120.002
Berlin, G.
Albert Einstein College
of Medicine
[email protected]
Berlin, R.
[email protected]
Feinstein Institute for Medical Reaserch
Berman, J.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Berman, J.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Bernabe, E.
[email protected]
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital
for Children
104
Abstract
Ben-Sasson, A.
University of Haifa
122.033, 124.126,
138.119, 140.168,
173.139, 179.004,
181.001
137.020, 138.116,
159.151
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
170.001
103.004, 172.060,
172.090, 172.112
107.082
107.074
Bernal, P.
Children Health Council
[email protected]
139.136, 139.138
Bernier, R.
University of Washington
[email protected]
103.003, 105.003,
109.132, 125.203,
125.210, 135.003,
138.052, 140.150,
182.002
Bernstein, J.
University of California, Davis
[email protected]
Berquist, K.
Stanford University
[email protected]
105.001, 105.003,
123.077
Berry, K.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
124.135, 145.002
Berry, L.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
106.028, 123.086,
124.127
Berry-Kravis, E.
Rush University Medical Center
[email protected]
109.112
165.001
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Berthiaume, C.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
109.115
Bertone, A.
Perceptual Neuroscience
Laboratory for Autism and
Development (PNLab),
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM), McGill University
[email protected]
Best, L.
Cleveland Clinic,
Center for Autism
[email protected]
Beversdorf, D.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
106.027, 106.043,
172.055, 172.064,
173.142
Bhat, A. N.
University of Delaware,
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
124.122, 124.155,
140.158, 157.070,
157.071, 157.072
Bian, D.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Biasini, F.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
Bice, J.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
138.061
Bichsel, C.
Yale University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
153.002
Bidaut, L.
University of Dundee
[email protected]
172.081
Biemans, B.
F. Hoffmann-La Roche, pRED,
Pharma Research &
Early Development
[email protected]
115.004
Bigler, E.
University of Utah
[email protected]
134.002, 151.002,
171.030, 171.039,
171.041
Bilder, D.
University of Utah
[email protected]
106.004, 107.065,
123.059, 125.175,
125.191, 138.098,
146.002, 173.129,
173.161
Bilenberg, N.
University of Southern Denmark
[email protected]
140.206
Billeci, L.
National Research Council
of Italy (CNR)
[email protected]
109.142
Bilodeau, V.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
159.204
Birmingham, E.
Simon Fraser University
[email protected]
158.089, 159.138
Bishop, S. L.
University of California,
San Francisco
[email protected]
121.001, 146.003,
185.004
Bittker, S.
Sole Researcher
[email protected]
139.133
Blacher, J.
[email protected]
University of California - Riverside
120.002, 122.044,
122.051, 141.212
109.115, 109.127
138.078
137.009
122.034, 137.013
Black, M.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
138.081
Blakeley-Smith, A.
JFK Partners/
University of Colorado School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Blane, K.
Alpert Medical School
of Brown University
[email protected]
141.211
Blaser, E.
University of Massachusetts
Boston
[email protected]
109.159
123.090, 144.004,
157.005, 157.083
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Blasi, A.
Birkbeck,
University of London
Email Address
[email protected]
Blaskey, L.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Blenner, S.
Boston Medical Center
[email protected]
Abstract
124.114
103.004, 119.003,
172.060
122.053
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Borg, J.
Karolinska Institute
[email protected]
172.091
Bornstein, M.
Eunice Kennedy Shriver
National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
[email protected]
122.022
Borowski, S.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
159.200
Bos, M.
Leiden University
[email protected]
159.186
Bosley, L.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
140.170
Bossolani-Martins, A.
Federal University of
Mato Grosso do Sul
[email protected]
125.180
Boterberg, S. D.
Department of Experimental
Clinical and Health Psychology,
Ghent University
[email protected]
138.125
[email protected]
159.127
Bloy, L.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
119.003
Blumberg, S.
[email protected]
National Center for Health Statistics
173.146
Blumenstock, S.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
158.099
Boak, L.
F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG
[email protected]
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
Boan, A.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
173.135
Boardman, J.
University of Edinburgh
[email protected]
142.002
Boccanfuso, L.
Yale University
[email protected]
140.167, 140.171
Bottema-Beutel, K.
Lynch School of Education,
Boston College
[email protected]
110.173, 138.073,
166.002
Botteron, K.
Washington University School
of Medicine in St. Louis
[email protected]
Bodfish, J.
Vanderbilt Brain Institute,
Vanderbilt University School
of Medicine
118.003, 124.143,
140.190, 166.001
Boudreau, A.
Dalhousie University
[email protected]
107.092, 157.046
Bodner, K.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
159.194
Boulware, G.
PEERS Play
[email protected]
123.070
Boeckers, T.
Institute for Anatomy and
Cell Biology, Ulm University
[email protected]
133.001
Bourgeron, T.
Pasteur Institute
[email protected]
133.003
Boerwinkle, E.
University of Texas School of
Public Health at Houston,
University of Texas School of
Public Health at Houston
[email protected]
173.160
Bowen, A.
Danya International, Inc
[email protected]
157.022
Bowen, D.
Cambridge University
[email protected]
109.162
Boily, R. M.
University of Manitoba
[email protected]
159.144
Bowers, K. A.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
173.126
Bolis, D.
ETH Zürich
[email protected]
172.095
Bowers-Campbell, J.
Georgetown College
[email protected]
112.002
Bolognani, F.
F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG
[email protected]
115.002, 139.144
Bowler, D.
City University London
[email protected]
Bolourian, Y.
The Help Group UCLA Autism Research Alliance
[email protected]
152.003, 157.053,
157.054, 157.074
Bowyer, S.
Henry Ford Hospital
[email protected]
Bolte, S.
Karolinska Institutet
[email protected]
124.133, 124.152,
133.003, 137.020,
138.111, 138.116,
157.063, 159.151
Boyd, B.
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
[email protected]
Bolton, C.
The Help Group/
UCLA Autism Research Alliance
[email protected]
157.053
Boyd, L. E.
UCI
[email protected]
137.011
149.004
[email protected]
138.081
Bozzi, Y.
Centre for Integrative
Biology (CIBIO),
University of Trento, Italy
[email protected]
Bone, D. K.
University of Southern California
Bonifacio, H.
St.Michael’s Hospital,
Hospital for Sick Children,
University of Toronto
[email protected]
137.027
Bradbury, K.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
124.141
147.003
[email protected]
109.156
Braden, B. B.
Barrow Neurological Institute
[email protected]
Bonneh, Y. S.
University of Haifa
173.135
[email protected]
140.199
Bradley, C.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
Booker, S.
Society for Treatment of Autism
Bookheimer, S.
UCLA
[email protected]
Bradshaw, J.
University of California
Santa Barbara
[email protected]
124.116, 159.183,
159.185
Boom, J.
Texas Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
124.132
Braeken, M. A.
Hasselt University
[email protected]
110.186, 124.123,
138.076
Booth, R.
University College London
[email protected]
140.204
Braeutigam, S.
University of Oxford
[email protected]
172.051
Boré, A.
Centre de recherche de
l’institut universitaire de gériatrie
de Montréal
[email protected]
171.037
Brambilla, P.
Department of Experimental &
Clinical Medicine,
University of Udine
[email protected]
171.048
Borenstein, E.
University of Washington
[email protected]
135.002
Brandmaier, A.
Max Planck Institute for
Human Development
[email protected]
147.002
Brane, N. R.
Marcus Autism Center,
[email protected]
110.177
172.115
123.071, 124.164
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
108.098, 118.001,
172.054, 172.119,
172.121
109.101, 109.141,
109.167, 140.176,
147.004
105
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
106
Author Name
Email Address
Brooks, W. T.
UNC
[email protected]
Abstract
138.074
Brasher, S. N.
College of Nursing University
of Florida
[email protected]
107.061
Brosnan, M.
University of Bath
[email protected]
109.155, 122.038,
157.079, 159.162
123.086
[email protected]
125.179
Broton, S.
Baylor College of Medicine/
Texas Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
Bray-Ward, P.
Utah State University
Brayne, C.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
173.152
Browder, D.
University of North Carolina
at Charlotte
[email protected]
157.024
Breeman, L.
Yulius Mental Health Care,
Erasmus MC Sophia Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
152.002
Brown, H.
Child Psychiatry,
NYU Child Study Center
[email protected]
Breetvelt, E.
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus
UMC Utrecht
[email protected]
106.010
Brown, R.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
Brennan, L.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Kings College London
[email protected]
133.004, 139.140
Bressler, J.
University of Texas School of
Public Health at Houston
[email protected]
173.160
Brett, D.
Newcastle University
[email protected]
Brezis, R. S.
Interdisciplinary Center
[email protected]
Brian, J. A.
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehab/
University of Toronto
[email protected]
121.001, 157.042
106.046
Brown, S.
[email protected]
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of Public Health
114.004
Brown, W.
Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities
125.200
[email protected]
Brown, W.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities
155.002, 171.035
108.099, 141.209,
159.170, 172.081
Brown-Lavoie, S. M.
York University
[email protected]
158.105, 172.057
106.031, 124.097,
124.101, 124.115,
124.153, 138.069,
139.126, 143.003,
159.156, 181.002
Browne, A.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai
[email protected]
148.003, 174.169
[email protected]
176.003
Brijs, K.
Hasselt University
[email protected]
109.130, 109.135
Brumback, A.
University of California,
San Francisco
Brijs, T.
Hasselt University
[email protected]
109.130, 109.135
Bryson, S.
Dalhousie/IWK Health Centre
[email protected]
Brimberg, L.
The Feinstein Institute for
Medical Research
[email protected]
170.001
124.097, 124.101,
124.126, 140.168,
143.003, 173.139,
179.004, 181.002
[email protected]
122.033, 138.119,
181.001
Brocke, S. A.
Institute of Living,
Hartford Hospital
[email protected]
159.134
Bryson, S.
Dalhousie University /
WK Health Centre
Buac, M.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
109.131
Brockett, S.
IDEA Training Center
[email protected]
157.069
Bucci, I.
University of Rome Tor Vergata
[email protected]
174.174
Brodai-Meir, I.
Ariel University
[email protected]
123.091
Buchan-Page, K.
The Ohio State University
[email protected]
139.128
broder-Fingert, S.
Boston University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
107.079
Buckley, C.
Royal College of General
Practitioners
[email protected]
120.001
Broderick, N.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
122.016, 122.024,
123.074
Buckley, L.
Bucknell University
[email protected]
157.006, 157.064
Brodeur, D.
Acadia University
[email protected]
104.003
Buckner, R.
Harvard University
[email protected]
108.096, 172.060,
172.090, 172.112
Broekman, B.
Singapore Institute for
Clinical Sciences
[email protected]
124.102
Buitelaar, J.
[email protected]
Radboud University Medical Center
109.165, 133.003,
172.098
Brondino, N.
University of Pavia
[email protected]
106.034
Bukshpun, P.
UCSF
[email protected]
108.096, 172.112
Brooker Lozott, E.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
107.069
Bullmore, E.
Behavioural and Clinical
Neurosciences Institution
[email protected]
171.029, 172.073
[email protected]
110.184, 184.004
Brookman-Frazee, L.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
107.083, 157.025,
177.002
Bulluck, J.
The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
Bundy, A.
The University of Sydney
[email protected]
158.090
Brookman-Frazee, L.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
139.130, 177.003
Burack, J.
McGill University
[email protected]
104.003
124.158
[email protected]
156.003
Brooks, E.
Yale University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
172.122
Burger-Caplan, R.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine, Emory University
[email protected]
Brooks, A.
University of Manchester
[email protected]
Brooks, P. J.
The Graduate Center - CUNY,
College of Staten Island - CUNY
[email protected]
Burk, J.
College of William and Mary
138.096, 157.020,
158.093, 159.130,
159.141, 159.200
Burkett, K. W.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
141.217, 173.126
122.055, 141.213,
141.214
148.001
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Author Name
Email Address
Burnel, M.
Laboratoire de Psychologie
et NeuroCognition
Email Address
[email protected]
Abstract
140.203
Campbell, D.
St.Michael’s Hospital,
University of Toronto
[email protected]
137.027
Burner, K.
Seattle Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
176.001
Campbell, J.
University of Kentucky
[email protected]
112.002, 138.048
Burnham Riosa, P.
York University
[email protected]
Campe, K.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
110.174
Burns, R.
Chapman University
[email protected]
137.033
Campos, K.
NYU Child Study Center
[email protected]
157.042
Burr, D.
University of Florence
[email protected]
159.153
Camurri, A.
University of Genova
[email protected]
137.020
Burrell, T. L.
Marcus Autism Center
[email protected]
138.057, 169.001
Canfield, A.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
Burrier, R.
Stemina Biomarker Discovery
[email protected]
149.001, 174.167
Cantio, C.
Odense University Hospital
[email protected]
140.206
Burrows, C. A.
University of Miami
[email protected]
172.106
[email protected]
106.018
Burrows, C.
University of Miami
[email protected]
159.124
Capal, J. K.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
106.011
[email protected]
114.003, 173.149,
173.151
Capano, L.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital,
University of Toronto
[email protected]
Burstyn, I.
Drexel University
Bush, J. C.
Indiana University
[email protected]
121.004, 159.147
Carbone, P.
University of Utah
[email protected]
106.004, 179.001
Bush, L.
Northwestern University
[email protected]
108.100, 125.205,
138.041
[email protected]
109.120, 109.154
Bussanich, P.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
Cardinaux, A.
Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
[email protected]
Cardozo, P.
Sangath
[email protected]
Butcher, D.
Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
Careaga, M.
UC Davis/MIND Institute
[email protected]
Butorina, A.
Moscow State University of
Psychology and Education
[email protected]
106.018
Butter, E.
Nationwide Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
124.104, 157.050
Carosella, C.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
173.135
[email protected]
108.100, 138.046,
138.099, 148.003,
157.039, 165.004,
170.017, 172.123,
174.169
Carpenter, L. A.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
Buxbaum, J.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai
Buyske, S.
Rutgers University
[email protected]
122.035, 157.023,
157.055
158.099
174.173, 183.003
172.052
125.184
Byerly, M.
[email protected]
Center for Autism and
Developmental Disabilities,
UT Southwestern Medical Center
172.118
Byers, S.
University of New Brunswick
110.176
[email protected]
138.122
Cai, R.
Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre
[email protected]
158.092
Caiozzo, C.
Marquette University
[email protected]
141.219
Calderoni, S.
[email protected]
Magnetic Resonance Laboratory,
Division of Child Neurology and
Psychiatry University of Pisa;
Stella Maris Scientific Institute
106.026, 171.046,
171.048
Caldwell, E.
University of Kentucky
[email protected]
112.002
Callahan, K.
University of North Texas
[email protected]
112.004
Calvo Escalona, R.
Hospital Clinic of Barcelona
[email protected]
139.131
Camp, N.
University of Utah
[email protected]
125.191, 137.001
Campbell, D.
Amgen, Inc.
[email protected]
124.097, 159.165
117.002
170.006, 170.010
149.004
Carper, R.
San Diego State University
[email protected]
171.034
Carr, K.
University of Windsor
[email protected]
113.004, 157.033
Carr, S.
[email protected]
Virginia Commonwealth University
158.108
117.003, 124.135
Carretta, H. J.
Florida State University College
of Medicine
he[email protected]
173.164
Carrington, S.
Wales Autism Research Centre
[email protected]
122.017
Carroll, C.
Autism Nova Scotia
[email protected]
107.072
Carson, A.
Baylor College of Medicine/
Texas Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
157.073
Carter, A.
University of Massachusetts
Boston
[email protected]
109.159, 124.156,
138.058, 138.085
Carter, C.
Department of Psychiatry &
Behavioral Sciences,
University of California-Davis,
Sacramento, CA
[email protected]
109.113, 170.010,
172.058
Carter, E.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
157.024
Carter, G.
University of Newcastle
[email protected]
106.049
Carter, R.
State University of New York
at Buffalo
[email protected]
107.071
Cartwright, J.
UT Southwestern
[email protected]
124.138
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Café, C.
[email protected]
Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento
e Autismo do Serviço do Centro
de Desenvolvimento da Criança,
Pediatric Hospital, Centro Hospitalar
e Universitário de Coimbra
140.201, 181.003
Carpentier, G.
[email protected]
Laboratoire CRRET,
EAC CNRS 7149,
Faculté des Sciences et Technologie,
Université Paris Est Créteil, France
Carr, T.
[email protected]
University of California Los Angeles
C
Abstract
107
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
173.127
Carvalho, P.
[email protected]
Center for Informatics and Systems,
University of Coimbra
137.007
Carver, L.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
Casale, M.
West Health Insitute
[email protected]
Casanova, E. L.
University of Louisville
[email protected]
125.174, 155.004
140.172, 159.131,
172.077
Casanova, M. F.
University of Louisville
[email protected]
125.174, 157.041,
157.069, 157.078,
172.110
Cascio, C.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Casey, J.
University of Ulster
Cash, J.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
137.012
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Chaney, K.
Rutgers University
[email protected]
157.020
Chang, C.
University of California, Davis
[email protected]
170.006
Chang, C.
Calo Psychiatric Center
[email protected]
141.210
Chang, Y.
California State University,
Los Angeles,UCLA
[email protected]
Chang, Y.
UCSF
[email protected]
123.092, 157.047,
159.133, 159.146
172.112
Chantepie-Laborde, S.
[email protected]
Laboratoire CRRET,
EAC CNRS 7149,
Faculté des Sciences et Technologie,
Université Paris Est Créteil, France
149.004
171.038
Chapman, S.
University of Texas
[email protected]
172.109
[email protected]
110.183
Chappell, R.
Sheppard Pratt
[email protected]
[email protected]
138.062
Charach, A.
The Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
138.077
Charles, J.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
173.135
Charman, T.
King’s College London
[email protected]
123.085, 124.097,
124.112, 124.114,
124.115, 132.004,
133.003, 143.004,
156.001, 159.150,
172.076, 176.002
Chaspari, T.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
107.093
Chau, T.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital,
University of Toronto
[email protected]
106.024
Casnar, C.
[email protected]
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
108
Abstract
Caruso, D.
[email protected]
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of Public Health
141.219, 157.073
Cassidy, S. A.
Coventry University,
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
159.148
Castagner, F.
Development and
Neuropharmacology Group,
Centre for Interdisciplinary
Research in Biology (CIRB),
CNRS UMR 7241,
INSERM U 1050,
Collège de France, Paris,
[email protected]
149.004
Castelhano, J.
Institute for Biomedical Imaging
and Life Sciences,
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra,
ICNAS, University of Coimbra
[email protected]
138.122
Castelo-Branco, M.
Institute for Biomedical Imaging
and Life Sciences,
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra,
ICNAS, University of Coimbra,
ICNAS Produção
[email protected]
137.007, 138.122,
172.107, 172.111
Catani, M.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Cavalari, R.
State University of NY
at Binghamton
Chawarska, K.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
122.020, 138.091
123.095, 124.097,
124.099, 124.103,
124.109, 124.111,
124.115, 124.121,
124.128, 124.130,
124.142, 124.150,
124.156, 124.160,
124.161, 138.093,
159.165
Cheak-Zamora, N.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
107.062
Chee, V.
Autism Research Centre
[email protected]
125.168
171.049
Chen, B.
The 3rd Affiliated Hospital of
Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU)
[email protected]
[email protected]
107.071
Chen, C.
Dept. of Psychology,
San Diego State University
[email protected]
172.053
Cejas, G.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
106.046
Chen, E.
HKU
[email protected]
170.012
Ceponiene, R.
UCSD Medical Center
[email protected]
103.002
Chen, G.
Stanford University
[email protected]
159.165
Cermak, S.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
[email protected]
124.102
Chadwick, E.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
Chen, H.
Department of Psychological
Medicine
141.210
[email protected]
Chen, P.
Calo Psychiatric Center
[email protected]
Chakrabarti, B.
University of Reading
Chen, T.
Stanford University
[email protected]
140.178
Chamberlain, S.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
Chen, Y.
Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
174.173
Chan, M.
The Chinese University
of Hong Kong
[email protected]
140.163, 140.198
Chen, Y.
The Scripps Research Institute,
Scripps Florida
[email protected]
Chan, N.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
157.014, 157.031
Chen, Y.
[email protected]
National Taiwan University
Hospital and College of Medicine
171.025
Chance, S.
University of Oxford
[email protected]
172.051
151.003, 171.036
Chand, C.
University of Manitoba
[email protected]
138.080
Chen, Y.
[email protected]
Center for Optoelectronic Medicine,
National Taiwan University College
of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
107.093, 157.061
170.019
121.003, 125.168,
171.029
125.171
167.003, 185.002
170.005, 170.016
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Chen, Y.
The University of Sydney
[email protected]
158.090
Cheng, K.
Stanford University
[email protected]
Cheng, S.
University of Hong Kong
[email protected]
Chernenok, M.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
Chesney, S.
Marquette University
[email protected]
157.073
Cheung, C. H.
King’s College London
[email protected]
124.112
Cheung, S. S.
University of Kentucky
[email protected]
Chevalier, P.
ENSTA ParisTech
[email protected]
137.014
Chevallier, C.
Center for Autism Research,
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
109.172
Chevallier, J.
UT Houston
[email protected]
Chiang, C.
National Chengchi University
[email protected]
Chiarelli, C. R.
The University of Alabama
[email protected]
180.003
Chichon, S.
University of Bonn, Germany.
[email protected]
125.207
Chien, H. S.
[email protected]
Center for Optoelectronic Medicine,
National Taiwan University College
of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Email Address
Abstract
[email protected]
140.178
Christie, P.
Nottingham Regional Society for
Adults and Children with Autism
(NORSACA)
109.149
Christodulu, K.
University at Albany, SUNY
[email protected]
107.086, 110.188,
157.043
Chu, C.
National Cheng Kung
University Hospital,
College of Medicine,
National Cheng Kung University
[email protected]
138.104, 141.210
Chua, S.
HKU
[email protected]
170.012
Chudnovskaya, D.
The Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia
[email protected]
119.003
Chui, H.
The Chinese University
of Hong Kong
[email protected]
140.163
Chukoskie, L.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
109.150
Chung, W.
Columbia University
Medical Center
[email protected]
Chuthapisith, J.
Ramathibodi Hospital,
Mahidol University
[email protected]
140.195
Ciccone, H.
Barrow Neurological Institute,
Southwest Autism Research &
Resource Center
[email protected]
147.003
Cicek, A.
Carnegie Mellon University
[email protected]
153.003
Cicuti, T.
Presbyteryan Mackenzie
University
[email protected]
159.160
Cimon-Paquet, C.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
159.204
Cioni, G.
University of Pisa,
Stella Maris Scientific Institute
[email protected]
171.046
Cipriani, C.
University of Rome Tor Vergata
[email protected]
174.174
140.170, 172.088
137.010, 137.029
124.098
109.168, 138.104
151.003
[email protected]
158.090, 171.036
Chin, I.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
Chiocchetti, A.
JW Goethe University
[email protected]
Chittams, J.
University of Pennsylvania
[email protected]
138.124
Chiu, H.
The Chinese University of
Hong Kong
[email protected]
140.163
Chiu, T.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
137.025
Chlebowski, C.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
Cholemkery, H.
JW Goethe University
[email protected]
Chong, Y.
National University of Singapore
[email protected]
Choque Olsson, N.
Karolinska Institutet,
Division of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry,
Stockholm County Council
[email protected]
159.195
125.207, 174.172
106.023
108.096, 125.210,
172.060, 172.090,
172.112
Clampitt, M.
[email protected]
Cleveland Clinic, Center for Autism
138.078
107.083, 139.130,
177.002, 177.003
Clark, E.
University of Utah
[email protected]
158.116
138.053, 138.100
Clark, E.
University of Utah
[email protected]
173.129
Clark, M.
La Trobe University
[email protected]
138.113
Clark, M.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
158.107
Clarke, M.
University of Calgary
[email protected] 107.072, 173.143
Clarkson, T.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
172.069
Clawson, A.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
172.080
Clayton, E.
Autism Speaks
[email protected]
137.003
Clements, C. C.
University of Pennsylvania
[email protected]
138.049
Clesi, C.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
137.013
Cline, J. I.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
138.108
Clipperton-Allen, A. E.
The Scripps Research Institute,
Scripps Florida
[email protected]
170.005, 170.016
Cochran, B.
University of Georgia
[email protected]
141.211
124.102
109.139, 138.116,
157.063
107.056
Choufani, S.
Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
174.173, 183.003
Chow, S.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
138.069
Chowdhury, M.
Allegheny College
[email protected]
138.071
Chowdhury, R.
Université de Montréal
[email protected]
109.148, 140.184
Christ, S.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
159.194, 172.055,
172.064
Christensen, D.
CDC
[email protected]
173.165
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Chien, Y.
National Taiwan University
Choueiri, R.
[email protected]
University of Massachusetts
Memorial Children’s Medical Center
Author Name
109
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Cocks, G.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology and Neuroscience,
King’s College London
Email Address
[email protected]
133.002
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Constantino, J.
Washington University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
138.116
Contaldo, A.
Stella Maris Scientific Institute
[email protected]
109.142
140.170, 172.088
Conti, B.
Southwest Autism Research &
Resource Center
[email protected]
123.084
Conti, E.
University of Pisa,
Stella Maris Scientific Institute
[email protected]
171.046
Conturo, T. E.
Washington University
[email protected]
140.189
Conus, P.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
Cook, E. H.
University of Illinois at Chicago
[email protected]
182.003
120.003, 122.010
Cook, K.
Yale School of Medicine
[email protected]
159.134
Cohen, I. L.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities
124.097, 138.070,
142.003
Coombes, S.
University of Florida
[email protected]
119.001
122.051, 141.212
Coon, H.
University of Utah
[email protected]
Cohen, S. R.
[email protected]
University of California, San Diego
Cooper, L.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute &
State University
[email protected]
159.191
Copping, N.
University of California Davis
School of Medicine
[email protected]
170.019
Corbera, S.
Institute of Living,
Hartford Hospital,
Yale School of Medicine
[email protected]
159.134
Corbett, B. A.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Coco, C.
[email protected]
Child and Youth Psychiatry KIND
Coderre, E. L.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
Coe, B.
University of Washington
[email protected]
135.003
Coffman, M.
Virginia Tech
[email protected]
172.116
Coggins, T.
University of Washington
[email protected]
159.136
Cohen, A.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
173.135
Cohen, C.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
Cohen, S.
[email protected]
University of California, San Diego
159.131
Cohen-Silver, J.
The Hospital for Sick Children
122.035
[email protected]
Colatat, P.
[email protected]
Washington University in St Louis
107.063, 107.077
Cole, L.
Washington University
School of Medicine
[email protected]
138.094
Collignon, O.
Clinique spécialisée de l’autisme
N/A
109.136
118.003, 125.182,
125.192, 138.094
107.065, 125.175,
125.191, 125.198,
137.001, 138.098,
146.002, 173.129
112.001, 122.050,
159.157, 159.158,
172.062
Collins, D.
[email protected]
University of Texas Medical Branch
159.159
[email protected]
122.032
Corbett-Dick, P.
University of Rochester
Medical Center
[email protected]
Compare, A.
Bergamo University
Condy, E. E.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
State University
[email protected]
159.180
Corda, D.
BalCor s.n.c.
[email protected]
109.119, 109.126
138.072, 172.056
[email protected]
Cordeaux, C.
Yale University
[email protected]
Congiu, S.
Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu
158.090
[email protected]
140.168
Cordier, R.
Faculty of Health Sciences
[email protected]
Conlon, O.
University of Alberta
157.046
[email protected]
157.048, 157.051
Corkum, P.
Dalhousie University
[email protected]
Connell, J.
Drexel University
109.166
[email protected]
172.082
Corley, M.
University of Edinburgh
[email protected]
Connelly, J.
University of Virginia
[email protected]
173.126
Corona, L.
University at Albany, SUNY
[email protected]
Connolly, N.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
Corretti, C.
University of Texas at Dallas
[email protected]
159.189
Connolly, S.
Trinity College Dublin
[email protected]
Corrigan, N.
University of Washington
[email protected]
172.067
Connors, S.
MGH Lurie Center for Autism
[email protected]
Conroy, K.
[email protected]
Center for Autism and
Developmental Disabilities,
UT Southwestern Medical Center
110
Abstract
Conroy, M. A.
University of Florida
[email protected]
Consortium, M.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London,
Autism Research Centre,
University of Cambridge,
Autism Research Group,
University of Oxford
[email protected]
109.119, 109.126
125.193
139.127
107.086, 157.043
139.129, 173.142
Corrigan, S.
[email protected]
Seattle Children’s Research Institute
109.134
106.045, 172.085
COST ESSEA Action Group, M.
Institute of Psychiatry
[email protected]
156.004
Costa, A.
University of Luxembourg
[email protected]
122.018
Costello, A.
University College London
Institute for Global Health
[email protected]
141.222
157.007
171.032, 171.049
Cotney, J.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
Coton, D. A.
Autism Spectrum Partners,
The Disabilities Trust
[email protected]
Cottle, K. J.
University of Utah
[email protected]
153.001, 153.002,
153.003
158.095
107.058, 138.098,
146.002
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Courchesne, V.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
Coury, D.
Nationwide Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
106.015, 106.037,
139.136, 139.138,
139.141, 175.178
Cowen, J.
UCLA
[email protected]
139.134, 139.144
Cox, D.
University of Virginia
[email protected]
157.018
Cox, J.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
106.003, 106.017,
138.108, 171.030
Cox, N.
University of Chicago
[email protected]
182.003
Cox, S.
University of Virginia
[email protected]
157.018
Coyte, P.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
123.063
Craddock, C.
Child Mind Institute
[email protected]
Craig, M.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London and
National Autism Unit,
Royal Bethlem Hospital,
SLAM NHS Foundation Trust,
National Autism Unit
[email protected]
Crais, B.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
Crais, E.
The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
[email protected]
Cranwell, M. B.
Newcastle University
[email protected]
Crawley, D.
King’s College London
[email protected]
Crawley, J.
University of California Davis
School of Medicine
[email protected] 148.002, 170.019
Crider, A. M.
GRU
[email protected]
170.008
Crider, C.
[email protected]
University of Alabama at Birmingham
172.070
Croen, L.
Kaiser Permanente
Northern California
[email protected]
138.050, 138.117,
159.204
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Curatolo, P.
University of Rome Tor Vergata
[email protected]
174.174
Curtin, S.
University of Calgary
[email protected]
Curtis, B.
Washington National Primate
Research Center
[email protected]
148.004
Custodio, V.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
158.086
Czemerinski, D.
Yale University
[email protected]
172.103
[email protected]
159.188
124.110, 124.124,
140.172
D
D’Abreu, L.
University of Denver
D’Agostino, E.
[email protected]
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
124.166
[email protected]
171.023
175.179
D’Almeida, V.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
150.001
D’Entremont, B.
University of New Brunswick
[email protected]
110.176
D’Onofrio, J.
College of Staten Island
[email protected]
113.001
D’souza, T.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
109.118
Da Silva Ramos, S.
The Disabilities Trust
[email protected]
158.095
Dager, S.
University of Washington
[email protected]
109.117
Dajani, D.
University of Miami
[email protected]
172.096
172.098
Dale, C.
UCSF
[email protected]
108.096
Dale, P.
University of New Mexico
[email protected]
140.172
Daley, E.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London,
The Sackler Institute for
Translational Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
171.028
Daley, L.
Advocate Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
138.066
Daley, T.
Westat
[email protected]
141.209
Dalman, C.
Karolinska Institutet
[email protected]
136.004
Dalrymple, K.
University of MInnesota
[email protected]
109.128
Daly, E.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Dammann, A.
Northwestern University
[email protected]
157.026
Damron, M.
University of Utah
[email protected]
106.004
Danial, J.
UCLA
[email protected]
157.004
Daniell, C.
Yale University
[email protected]
137.016
Daniels, A.
Autism Speaks
[email protected]
167.004
Daniels, J.
UNC Gillings School of
Public Health
[email protected]
Danis, É.
University of Quebec at Montreal
[email protected]
138.050
Daou, N.
American University of Beirut
[email protected]
141.213
140.151
102.001, 123.096
106.025, 107.063,
107.077, 114.001,
114.002, 114.003,
114.004, 125.189,
138.124, 158.085,
173.151, 173.159
[email protected]
119.004
Crosbie, J.
The Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
159.156
Cross, S.
Middletown Centre for Autism
[email protected]
110.183
Crowell, C.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
Crowley, M.
Yale University
[email protected]
108.097
Cuccaro, M.
University of Miami Miller School
of Medicine
[email protected]
106.039, 124.107,
125.173, 125.176,
125.195, 125.213,
182.004
Cukier, H.
University of Miami Miller School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Cukier, S.
PANAACEA
[email protected]
123.075
Cunniff, C.
Weill Cornell Medical College,
University of Arizona
[email protected]
138.056
Cunningham, R.
Texas Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
124.132
140.200, 157.026,
157.082
125.176, 125.195,
125.213
124.114, 150.001,
171.023, 171.032,
171.049, 172.101
106.025, 173.165
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Crone, N.
Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine
118.003, 124.143,
166.001, 172.067,
172.074
111
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Dapretto, M.
UCLA
112
Email Address
[email protected]
Abstract
108.098, 118.001,
159.140, 172.054,
172.119, 172.121
Author Name
Email Address
de Ruiter, J.
Leiden University
[email protected]
De Schuymer, L.
Kind&Gezin
[email protected]
Abstract
159.186
142.004, 156.002
Darchen, F.
Neurophotonics Laboratory Synaptic trafficking team CNRS/
Université Paris Descartes
[email protected]
149.004
Dare, J.
State University of NY at Buffalo
[email protected]
107.071
Darlington, T. M.
University of Utah
[email protected]
Das, S.
McGill University
[email protected]
118.003
Dean, M.
[email protected]
University of California Los Angeles
154.003
Daston, M.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
134.004
[email protected]
173.155
Dauterman, H.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
Deines, D.
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, National Center for
Health Statistics
Davenport, H.
The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa
[email protected]
158.103
Deka, D.
Rutgers, The State University
of New Jersey
[email protected]
122.008
Davey, B.
The Open University
[email protected]
141.218
Dekker, V.
University Medical Center
Groningen
[email protected]
157.003
Davia, S.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
159.122
Del Rosario, M.
UCLA
[email protected]
124.157
Davidson, B. G.
University of Texas at Austin
[email protected]
del Valle Rubido, M.
Roche
[email protected]
Davidson, M.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
Delahaye, J.
Massachusetts General Hospital
[email protected]
106.015
Davis, H. N.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
138.079, 159.172
Delavenne, A.
Hunter College
[email protected]
122.046
Davis, J.
Pennsylvania State University
[email protected]
122.021
Delis, I.
The University of Glasgow
[email protected]
159.181
Davis, K.
Nemours/Alfred I duPont
Hospital for Children
[email protected]
159.193
Dell, J.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
119.003
Davis, L. K.
University of Chicago
[email protected]
182.003
[email protected]
171.049
Davis, M. A.
University of Kentucky
[email protected]
Dell’Acqua, F.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
173.141, 173.147
[email protected]
158.094
Delwiche, L.
University of California, Davis
[email protected]
Davis, M.
The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa
[email protected]
124.132
Davis, S.
St.Michael’s Hospital
[email protected]
137.027
Dempsey, A.
University of Texas Health
Sciences Center
123.086
[email protected]
174.177
Dempsey, J.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
Davis, T.
Mayo Clinic
[email protected]
109.170
Demurie, E.
Ghent University
[email protected]
Davletshina, M.
Moscow State University of
Psychology and Education
Daws, L.
The University of Texas Health
Science Center at San Antonio
[email protected]
139.149
Dawson, G.
Duke University
[email protected]
123.078, 140.179,
172.076, 176.001
Dawson, M.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
Dawson, M.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
Day, T. N.
Florida State University
Autism Institute
[email protected]
de Bildt, A.
University Medical Center
Groningen
125.175, 125.191,
125.198, 137.001
159.126, 159.172
124.129, 124.138,
159.164
109.131
112.002, 138.048
de Vries, B.
[email protected]
Radboud Universtiy Medical Center
de Vries, P.
University of Cape Town
[email protected]
Dean, D.
Waisman Center,
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
135.004
116.001, 172.124
171.041
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
142.004, 156.002
Denckla, M.
[email protected]
Kennedy Krieger Institute/JHUSOM
172.094
DeNigris, D.
The Graduate Center, CUNY
[email protected]
141.213
Dennis, S.
University of Newcastle
[email protected]
172.059
107.093, 157.061
Deoni, S.
Brown University
[email protected]
171.023
138.050, 159.204
DePolo, L.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
138.049, 140.190
Deptula, D.
Roche Innovation Center
New York
[email protected]
139.132, 139.145
124.125
DeRamus, T.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
171.022, 172.093
[email protected]
157.003
Dereu, M.
Ghent University
[email protected]
124.134
125.176, 125.195
[email protected]
157.030
DeRosa, B.
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine
[email protected]
De Jesus, J.
University of California
Santa Barbara
109.101, 109.167
[email protected]
Derwent, C. T.
City University London
[email protected]
de Marchena, A.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
173.132
De Rubeis, S.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai
[email protected]
Desai, M.
Yale University,
School of Public Health
Descamps, M.
Université du Québec à Montréal
[email protected]
138.050
106.014, 109.172,
140.201, 169.003
182.001
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
DesChamps, T.
University of Washington
[email protected]
Deshpande, G.
Auburn University
[email protected]
Deshpande, H.
[email protected]
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Abstract
103.003, 105.003
172.092
172.070, 172.092,
172.100
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Divan, G.
Sangath
[email protected]
117.002
Dixon, L.
NTW NHS Foundation Trust
[email protected]
176.003
Dobkin, C.
Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental DIsabilities
[email protected]
125.200
Dobkins, K.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
124.156, 140.172,
159.131
Desnos, C.
Neurophotonics Laboratory Synaptic trafficking team CNRS/
Université Paris Descartes
[email protected]
149.004
Detre, J.
University of Pennsylvania
[email protected]
103.001
Dodd, E.
University of Alberta
[email protected]
181.001
Deutsch, C. K.
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center
[email protected]
183.004
Dodson-Lavelle, B.
Mind and Life Institute
[email protected]
122.011
DeVilbiss, E.
Drexel University School of
Public Health
[email protected]
173.144
Doernberg, E.
[email protected]
Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Devlin, B.
University of Pittsburgh School
of Medicine
[email protected]
153.001, 153.002,
Devlin, K.
Boston University School of
Public Health
153.003
[email protected]
Dewey, L.
[email protected]
Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital
for Children
107.085
107.074, 159.193
Dhamne, S.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
170.019
Di Martino, A.
NYU Child Study Center
[email protected]
Di Rezze, B. M.
McMaster University
[email protected]
173.139
Diamond, B.
The Feinstein Institute For
Medical Research
[email protected]
170.001
Dichter, G.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
DiCicco-Bloom, E.
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson
Medical School
[email protected]
Dick, A.
RAND
[email protected]
Dick, S.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai
[email protected]
121.001, 157.042
109.116, 137.006
170.014
107.075, 107.089
148.003
173.160, 173.161
Dickter, C.
College of Wiliam and Mary
[email protected]
138.096, 157.020,
158.093, 159.130,
159.141, 159.200
DiCriscio, A. S.
University of North CarolinaChapel Hill, Geisinger-ADMI
[email protected]
Diehl, J. J.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
Digby, H.
Rush University Medical Center
[email protected]
DiGuiseppi, C.
University of Colorado - Denver
[email protected]
Dijkstra, T.
Radboud University Nijmegen
[email protected]
Dimitropoulos, A.
[email protected]
Case Western Reserve University
109.116
140.200, 157.026,
157.082, 158.107
158.091
106.032, 178.002
109.165
122.001
DiNicola, L.
Yale University
[email protected]
124.103, 124.109,
124.121, 124.128
Dirlikov, B.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
Dissanayake, C.
Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre
[email protected]
107.080, 122.041,
122.054, 138.113,
143.002, 159.176
DiStefano, C.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
125.209, 138.075,
172.086
DiTacchio, L.
University of Kansas
Medical Center
[email protected]
137.037
125.178
[email protected]
Dolan, B.
Marquette University
[email protected]
157.042
113.003, 141.219,
157.073
Dolmetsch, R.
[email protected]
Novartis Institutes for
Biomedical Research,
Stanford University School of Medicine
148.002
Dominguez, A.
UCLA Center for Autism
Research & Treatment
[email protected]
159.177
Dominick, K.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
106.018
Dommermuth, M.
University of Washington
[email protected]
158.102
Donachie, A.
College of Staten Island
[email protected]
113.001
Doneddu, G.
Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu
[email protected]
109.119, 109.126
Donelan, K.
Massachusetts General Hospital
[email protected]
107.079
Donley, E.
Stemina Biomarker Discovery
[email protected]
149.001, 174.167
Donnelly, M.
Rutgers University
[email protected]
173.158
Dorado, M.
Hospital General Universitario
Gregorio Marañón
[email protected]
139.131
Dorn, O.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
138.079
Dougherty, R.
Stanford University
[email protected]
171.045
Dowd, A.
University of Texas at Austin
[email protected]
Doxey, C.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
Doyle-Thomas, K.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
Draganski, B.
Lausanne University Hospital,
Max Plank Institute
[email protected]
Drapeau, E.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai
[email protected]
Dritschel, B.
University of St Andrews
[email protected]
158.098
Drumm, E. E.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
181.002
Du, P.
Virginia Tech
[email protected]
172.116
Du, X.
Children’s Hospital of
Fudan University
[email protected]
170.020
Duarte, C. P.
Presbyteryan Mackenzie
University
[email protected]
159.160
124.128, 124.129
144.001
109.148, 140.184,
159.156
171.047
170.017, 174.169
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Dickerson, A. S.
[email protected]
University of Texas Health Science
Center at Houston
Doggett, R.
NYU Child Study Center
139.148, 157.027
113
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
[email protected]
121.002
Dykens, E.
Vanderbilt Kennedy Center
[email protected]
Dudley, C.
School of Public Policy
[email protected]
173.143
[email protected]
157.024, 157.067
Dudley, K.
Children’s National
Medical Center
[email protected]
106.022, 109.153,
157.022, 157.029,
158.084
Dykstra Steinbrenner, J.
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
125.176, 125.195
Dueker, N.
University of Miami Miller School
of Medicine
[email protected]
106.039, 125.173,
125.213, 182.004
Dykxhoorn, D.
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine,
University of Miami Miller School
of Medicine
Duffourd, Y.
Université de Bourgogne
[email protected]
182.002
Dyson, M.
University of California,
San Diego
[email protected]
107.083, 139.130,
177.003
Duhaime, S.
The Redpath Centre
[email protected]
107.072
[email protected]
Duijff, S.
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus
UMC Utrecht
[email protected]
106.010
D`Antino, M.
Presbyteryan Mackenzie
University
Dukart, J.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
139.134, 171.047
Earl, R. K.
University of Washington
[email protected]
Duku, E.
Offord Centre for Child Studies &
McMaster University
[email protected]
122.033, 124.126,
138.119, 140.168,
173.139, 179.004,
181.001
Easton, M.
Bar Ilan University
[email protected]
149.002
159.126
[email protected]
Ebadat, K.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
Dull, C.
UCLA
115.001
[email protected]
134.004, 157.005
Ebstein, R.
National University of Singapore
[email protected]
Duncan, A.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
Dunn, N.
BCBA
[email protected]
107.088
124.139
Dunn, W.
[email protected]
University of Kansas Medical Center
184.003
Duplan, S. M.
Rivière-des-Prairies Hospital,
Centre de recherche de l’Institut
universitaire en santé mentale
de Montréal
[email protected]
138.117
Dupuis, A.
The Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
Durbin-Johnson, B.
University of California, Davis
157.037
159.160
E
Duque, F.
[email protected]
University Clinic of Pediatrics,
Faculty of Medicine,
University of Coimbra,
Unidade de Neurodesenvolvimento
e Autismo do Serviço do Centro
de Desenvolvimento da Criança,
Pediatric Hospital,
Centro Hospitalar e Universitário
de Coimbra
114
Abstract
Dubey, I.
University of Nottingham
[email protected]
106.008, 106.031,
138.069, 138.077,
139.126, 159.156
138.122
173.136, 173.141
Duret, P.
[email protected]
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM),
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon
109.136, 171.037
Durica, K.
Penn State Hershey
[email protected]
106.006, 106.009,
106.055, 157.019,
158.106, 159.142
Durieux, A.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Durkin, M.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
Durrleman, S.
Laboratoire sur le Langage
le Cerveau et la Cognition
[email protected]
170.007
101.001, 123.059,
138.056, 173.161,
173.165
140.203
Ecker, C.
[email protected]
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology
& Neuroscience,
King’s College London,
The Sackler Institute for Translational
Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
Edelson, S.
Autism Research Institute
109.132, 125.203,
176.001
150.001, 171.023,
171.028, 171.029,
171.032, 172.101
[email protected]
157.069
Edgar, J.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
103.004, 172.097
Edmiston, E.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
112.001
Edmiston, K.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
172.062
Edmunds, S. R.
University of Washington
[email protected]
122.036, 124.159,
124.163, 177.004
Edwards, J.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
140.180, 140.181
Edwards Leger, S.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
123.069
Eggebrecht, A. T.
Washington University
School of Medicine
[email protected]
118.003
EI-Baz, A.
University of Louisville
[email protected]
172.110
Eichler, E.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
[email protected]
125.203, 135.001,
135.002, 135.003,
135.004
Eigsti, I.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
140.155, 140.201,
159.195
Eilbeck, K.
University of Utah
[email protected]
125.175, 125.198
Eilbott, J.
Yale University
[email protected]
124.120, 172.056
Einfeld, S.
University of Sydney
[email protected]
158.090
Eisen, A.
Weizmann Institute of Science
[email protected]
159.182
Durston, S.
[email protected]
Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus,
University Medical Center Utrecht
133.003
Eisenberg, M.
Stanford University
[email protected]
124.106
Dutt, A.
National Institute of Education
[email protected]
123.067
Eisenhower, A.
University of Massachusetts,
Boston
[email protected]
122.051
Dutton, D.
The School of Public Policy
[email protected]
173.143
Duvekot, J.
Erasmus MC Sophia Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
138.120
Eitan, D.
[email protected]
ALUT the Israeli National
Organization for children with ASD
106.019
Eitan, S.
Ariel University
123.091
[email protected]
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Ekas, N.
Texas Christian University
[email protected]
122.013
El-Baz, A.
University of Louisville
[email protected]
157.041
Elbaum, B.
University of Miami
[email protected]
107.071
Elder, J.
College of Nursing University
of Florida
[email protected]
107.061
Eldridge, J.
The Ohio State University
[email protected]
Elfert, M.
Reach Child and Youth
Development Society,
Douglas College
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Eriksen, W.
University of Pennsylvania
School of Nursing
[email protected]
Esclassan, F.
Eli Lilly
[email protected]
133.001
Escobedo, L.
Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana
[email protected]
137.011
Esler, A.
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
116.003
172.059
Espinosa, F.
U of T Southwestern
[email protected]
170.018
[email protected]
122.019
Esplin, S.
Intermountain Healthcare
[email protected]
173.129
Elgin, J.
Seattle Children’s Autism Center
[email protected]
109.132
Esposito, G.
[email protected]
University of Trento,
Nanyang Technological University
Elia, J.
Yale University
[email protected]
137.016
Estes, A.
University of Washington
[email protected]
140.190
Eliez, S.
[email protected]
University of Geneva Medical School
124.131
Estes, A.
University of Washington
[email protected]
Elison, J.
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
118.003
118.003, 123.078,
124.124, 124.143,
140.182, 166.001,
172.074
[email protected]
122.026, 138.079
Elison, J.
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
104.004, 109.128,
166.001
Estrada, T.
Seattle Pacific University
172.118
[email protected]
125.190, 151.001,
170.018
Ethridge, L.
University of Oklahoma
[email protected]
Ellegood, J.
Hospital for Sick Children
118.003
[email protected]
152.003, 157.059,
157.080
Evans, A.
McGill University
[email protected]
Ellingsen, R.
University of California
Los Angeles
Evans, A.
University of Alabama
[email protected]
122.042
Evans, D.
Bucknell University
[email protected]
145.001
Elliott, D.
[email protected]
McMaster University,
Liverpool John Moores University
109.109
157.051, 157.066
122.022, 159.143
Elliott, E.
Bar Ilan University
[email protected]
126.214, 149.002
Evans, K.
University of Rochester
Medical Center
[email protected]
106.016
Ellis-Weismer, S.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
109.131, 140.174,
140.180, 140.181
[email protected]
182.002
Ellison, A.
St. Christophers Hospital
for Children
[email protected]
157.051, 157.066
Evans, S.
Oregon Health & Science
University
[email protected]
142.001
Elmund, A.
Prima Child and Youth
Psychiatry AB
[email protected]
138.116
Eventov-Friedman, S.
Hadassah Ein-Kerem
University Hospital
119.004, 172.125,
179.003
Elrod, C.
Barrow Neurological Institute
[email protected]
147.003
Ewen, J. B.
[email protected]
Kennedy Krieger Institute/
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Elrod, M.
Madigan Army Medical Center
[email protected]
158.102
Elsabbagh, M.
McGill University
[email protected]
[email protected]
Embacher, R.
[email protected]
Cleveland Clinic Children’s Hospital
125.187
138.042
Emery, H.
University of Calgary
[email protected]
107.072, 173.143
Emir, U.
University of Oxford
[email protected]
172.051
Emsley, R.
University of Manchester,
Manchester Academic Health
Science Centre
[email protected]
117.002
Enav, Y.
Stanford University
[email protected]
171.045
Engel, K.
University of Alberta
[email protected]
181.001
Engelhardt, C. R.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
Enticott, P.
Deakin University
[email protected]
Erickson, C.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
107.062, 159.190
157.013
126.215, 138.105,
139.142
[email protected]
179.002
Factor, R. S.
Virginia Polytechnic Institution
and State University
[email protected]
157.044
Fadda, R.
University of Cagliari
[email protected]
Fahnestock, M.
McMaster University,
McMaster University
[email protected]
Faja, S.
Boston Children’s Hospital/
Harvard School of Medicine
[email protected]
138.052, 140.150,
157.002, 172.069
Falck-Ytter, T.
Uppsala University,
Karolinska Institute
[email protected]
124.133, 124.152
Falkmer, M.
Curtin University
[email protected]
Falkmer, T.
Curtin University
[email protected]
Falkmer, T.
Curtin University
[email protected]
Fallin, M.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
School of Public Health
[email protected]
Fan, J.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
F
109.119, 109.126
170.004
109.166
109.104, 122.048,
158.096, 158.121,
159.161
109.166
106.025, 106.035,
114.003, 114.004,
125.189, 138.124,
173.127, 173.149,
173.151, 183.002
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Elsea, S.
Baylor College of Medicine
107.068, 116.001,
122.007, 122.015,
122.033, 124.126,
138.119, 140.168,
156.001, 172.076,
173.139, 179.004,
181.001
Ezell, J.
Vanderbilt University
Medical Center
137.009
115
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
[email protected]
172.113
Ferguson, R.
Middletown Centre for Autism
[email protected]
110.183
Farach, F.
Prometheus Research, LLC
[email protected]
137.004
[email protected]
159.204
Farde, L.
Karolinska Institute
[email protected]
172.091
Ferguson, S.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
Fernandes, C.
King’s College London
[email protected]
170.007
Farley, M.
[email protected]
University of Wisconsin - Madison
116
Abstract
Fan, Y.
Guangzhou Cana School
Farmer, C.
NIH
[email protected]
Farrell, C.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai Hospital
[email protected]
Faso, D. J.
University of Texas at Dallas
[email protected]
146.002
125.205, 138.055,
138.089
138.106
159.137, 159.189
Fernandez, J.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
153.004
Fernandez, L.
Montreal Children’s Hospital McGill University Health Centre
107.068
[email protected]
Fernandez-Carriba, S.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine
122.011
Fernandez-Pastrana, I.
Boston Medical Center
[email protected]
122.053
[email protected]
171.047
Faulkner, J.
[email protected]
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology
and Neuroscience,
King’s College London
138.101, 157.056,
172.098
Fecteau, S.
[email protected]
Université du Québec en Outaouais
112.001
Ferrari, C.
Lausanne University Hospital
Feczko, E.
Emory University
[email protected]
118.003
Fedele, A.
Autism Speaks
[email protected]
138.107
Ferretti, C. J.
[email protected]
Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
115.002, 139.134,
139.144, 139.148,
157.027
109.119, 109.126
[email protected]
122.008
Ferretti, L.
Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu
[email protected]
Feeley, C.
Rutgers University
148.004
[email protected]
Ferrier, C.
Washington National Primate
Research Center
[email protected]
Fein, D.
University of Connecticut
Ferrone, C.
Lurie Center for Autism
[email protected]
107.079
109.118, 123.087,
124.117, 124.141,
138.067, 138.072,
140.160, 140.161,
140.191, 159.195,
168.001, 168.002,
168.003, 168.004
124.132
Fett-Conte, A.
[email protected]
School of Medicine in
São Jose do Rio Preto- FAMERP
125.180
Fichtenholtz, H. M.
Yale School of Medicine
[email protected]
124.120
Fields, N.
Kent State University
[email protected]
124.104
Fiksinski, A.
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus
UMC Utrecht
[email protected]
106.010
Fein, R.
University of Houston
[email protected]
Feinberg, A.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
114.004, 183.002
Feinberg, E.
Boston University School
of Medicine,
Boston University School of
Public Health
[email protected]
107.085
Feinberg, J.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
114.004
Filipek, P. A.
University of Texas Health
Science Center at Houston
[email protected]
124.098
Fekadu, A.
Addis Ababa University
[email protected]
141.218
Filliter, J. H.
IWK Health Centre
[email protected]
109.133
Feldman, B. H.
Case Western Reserve
University Dept. of Psychological
Sciences
[email protected]
122.001
Findlay, A.
UCSF
[email protected]
108.096
171.049
[email protected]
124.147
Findon, J. L.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Feldman, M.
Brock University
Feldman, R.
Bar-Ilan University
[email protected]
172.056
Fingerlin, T.
National Jewish Health
[email protected]
106.032, 178.002
Fell, B.
University of California
Santa Barbara
[email protected]
157.030
Fink, G.
University Hospital Cologne,
Research Center Jülich
[email protected]
159.201, 172.078
Fender, K.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
173.135
Finke, E. H.
Pennsylvania State University
[email protected]
122.021
[email protected]
171.044
Feng, C.
Sun Yat-sen University
[email protected]
109.124
Finuf, C.
Brigham Young University
Feng, H.
University of Denver
[email protected]
137.015
Feng, Y.
University of California Davis
Medical Center,
Health Informatics Program
[email protected]
171.033
Ferber, S.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
140.183
Ference, J. D.
University of Calgary
[email protected]
124.110
Ferguson, B.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
106.027, 106.043,
172.064
Fiorello, K.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine
110.177
Fiorentini, C.
University of Geneva
[email protected]
159.153
Fisher, K.
Drexel University
[email protected]
157.038
Fishman, I.
Dept. of Psychology,
San Diego State University
[email protected]
172.053
Fisk, C.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
119.003
Fitch, M.
[email protected]
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego
110.181
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Fitzgerald, J. E.
Trinity College Dublin
[email protected]
171.026
Flanagan, T.
McGill University
[email protected]
158.111
Flatley, A.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
Fletcher, P.
University of Utah
[email protected]
171.039
Fletcher, S.
University of Bath
[email protected]
157.079
Fletcher-Watson, S.
University of Edinburgh
[email protected]
Flick, L.
St. Louis University
[email protected]
Flink, L.
Yale University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Flint, C.
HAVE Dreams
[email protected]
Flis, T.
Sheppard Pratt
[email protected]
Flores, A.
Eastern Michigan University
[email protected]
Floris, D. L.
Autism Research Centre,
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
Foley, G.
University of California Davis
School of Medicine
[email protected]
148.002
Foley, J.
University of Rochester
Medical Center
[email protected]
181.003
Fombonne, E.
Oregon Health & Science
University
[email protected]
157.026, 157.082,
158.107
137.023, 138.084,
142.002, 156.004
140.189
124.109, 124.121,
124.128, 124.130,
124.160, 124.161,
157.032
157.076
122.020, 138.091
172.115
119.002, 171.029
106.021, 122.033,
124.126, 138.119,
140.168, 157.008,
173.131, 173.139,
173.140, 173.166,
179.004, 181.001,
182.002
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Frazier, T. W.
Cleveland Clinic Children’s
[email protected]
105.001, 105.004,
123.077, 138.042,
138.060, 138.078
Freeth, M.
University of Sheffield
[email protected]
Freitag, C. M.
JW Goethe University
[email protected]
Freyberg, J.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
Fridenson-Hayo, S.
Bar-Ilan University
[email protected]
137.020, 159.151
Friedlander, E.
Hebrew University
[email protected]
115.001, 138.110,
142.001
Friedman, B.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
and State University
[email protected]
Friedman, H.
Yale University
[email protected]
Frishkoff, G.
Georgia State University
[email protected]
Froehlich, A.
University of Utah
[email protected]
Froehlich, T.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
173.154
Froehlig, C.
University of Washington
[email protected]
177.004
122.052
125.207, 138.053,
138.100, 174.172
109.111
159.180
108.097, 122.030,
123.066, 123.081,
124.120
123.094
134.002, 171.039,
171.041
Frohlich, J.
[email protected]
University of California, Los Angeles
172.099
Froud, K.
Columbia University
[email protected]
172.083
Ftaiha, M.
Abu Dhabi University
[email protected]
139.146
Fu, Q.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
137.018
Fuchs, T.
University of Heidelberg
Medical Clinic
[email protected]
157.038
Fuhrmeister, S.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine
107.069
Fujisawa, T.
University of Fukui
[email protected]
157.010
Fulceri, F.
IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation
[email protected]
Fulda, S.
JW Goethe University
[email protected]
170.013
Fuller, E.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
140.164, 180.004
[email protected]
110.179
Fung, L. K.
Stanford University
[email protected]
139.136, 139.138
Foss-Feig, J.
Yale University
[email protected]
123.082
Furland, N. E.
INIBIBB-CONICET-UNS,
Emily Fenichel Foundation
[email protected]
174.171
Foss-Feig, J.
Yale University
[email protected]
172.072, 172.084
Furlano, R.
Queen’s University
[email protected]
159.192
Fossum, K.
IWK Health Centre
[email protected]
Furutani, N.
Kanazawa University
[email protected]
Foster, N.
Université de Montréal
[email protected]
109.148, 140.184
Fusar-Poli, L.
University of Pavia
[email protected]
Fox, S. A.
University at Albany,
State University of New York
[email protected]
110.188, 157.043
Fusaroli, R.
Aarhus University Hospital,
Aarhus University
[email protected]
Franchini, M.
University of Geneva
[email protected]
124.131
Francis, E.
University of Utah
[email protected]
107.058
G. Marques, I.
University of Illinois at Chicago
[email protected]
141.220
Francis, L.
University of Utah
[email protected]
107.065
Gaab, N.
Harvard University
[email protected]
172.121
Francis, R.
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center
[email protected]
183.004
Gabis, L.
Child Development Center
[email protected]
138.090
Franklin, C.
Healthy African American
Families, Phase II
[email protected]
117.003
[email protected]
115.003
Fonnesbeck, C.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
123.057
Fontaine, B.
Stemina Biomarker Discovery
[email protected]
149.001, 174.167
Fontoura, P.
Roche Innovation Center Basel
[email protected]
115.002, 139.132,
139.134, 139.144,
139.145
Forghany, R.
MIND Institute, UC Davis
[email protected]
Forsythe, M.
New Jersey Medical
School- Rutgers University
123.083
106.026, 109.142
174.172
109.145, 172.068
106.034
140.186, 140.206,
140.207, 168.002
G
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Fonagy, P.
University College London
117
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
[email protected]
106.012, 138.059,
138.105, 139.142,
140.197
Gabrielsen, T. P.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
124.154, 159.128,
171.030
Gadow, K.
Stony Brook University
[email protected]
106.012,
107.091, 136.001
Gadre, A.
College of WIlliam and Mary
[email protected]
Gaetz, W. C.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
Gagliano, A.
University of Messina
[email protected]
Gaigg, S.
City University London
[email protected]
109.141, 109.167,
140.176, 140.186,
140.207
Gaigg, S.
City University of London
[email protected]
109.101, 159.174
Galanopoulos, A.
Behavioural and Developmental
Clinical Academic Group,
King’s Health Partners
[email protected]
Galanopoulos, A.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Kings College London
[email protected]
139.140
Galili, T.
Tel Aviv University
[email protected]
Gallagher, K.
UNC Frank Porter Graham
Child Development Institute
[email protected]
Gallagher, L.
Trinity College Dublin
[email protected]
Gamazon, E.
University of Chicago
[email protected]
182.003
Gan, D.
National University of Singapore
[email protected]
124.102
Gandhi, T.
Defence Institute of Physiology
and Allied Sciences
[email protected]
Gangemi, C.
Family First, LLC
[email protected]
Ganger, W.
Child and Adolescent Services
Research Center
[email protected]
Gangi, D. N.
University of Miami
[email protected]
Gangopadhyay, I.
Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
109.131
Garcia, M. A.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
159.122
Gardner, J.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities
118
Abstract
Gabriels, R.
Children’s Hospital Colorado
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Gavidia-Payne, S.
RMIT University
[email protected]
120.004
Gazieva, K.
Behavior Imaging Solutions
[email protected]
137.034
Gebhard, N.
University of Rochester
Medical Center
[email protected]
181.003
Geda, Y.
Mayo Clinic Arizona
[email protected]
158.118
Geib, E. F.
Clinical Psychology,
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
122.026
Genestine, M.
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson
Medical School
[email protected]
170.014
Gengoux, G.
Stanford University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Gengoux, G.
Stanford University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
105.004
Genore, L.
Bloorview Research Institute
[email protected]
139.126
Gentaz, E.
University of Geneva
[email protected]
124.131
108.099
George, R.
Deakin University
[email protected]
158.114
123.093
Georgescu, A. L.
University Hospital of Cologne
[email protected]
159.166
Georgiades, S.
McMaster University
[email protected]
122.033, 124.115,
124.126, 138.077,
138.119, 140.168,
173.139, 179.004,
181.001
Gerdts, J.
University of Washington
[email protected]
125.203, 135.003
Gerig, G.
University of Utah
[email protected]
118.003, 151.002,
166.001
159.200
103.004, 119.003
124.106
133.004
125.193, 167.004,
171.026, 172.095
109.120, 109.154
105.001, 105.003,
123.077
Germain, E.
[email protected]
International Laboratory for
Brain Music and Sound Research
(www.brams.org),
University of Montreal
109.148, 140.184
139.130, 177.002
German, T.
University of California,
Santa Barbara
159.183, 159.185
124.107, 172.106
Geschwind, D.
[email protected]
Department of Neurology,
David Geffen School of Medicine,
UCLA
118.001, 125.201
Geurts, H.
University of Amsterdam
[email protected]
138.088, 147.001,
147.002, 150.003,
158.109, 172.063
Ghali, L.
The Ability Hub
[email protected]
107.072, 173.143
Ghane, M.
Virginia Tech
[email protected]
Ghilain, C. S.
University of Miami
[email protected]
Ghods, S.
Seattle Children’s
Research Institute
[email protected]
109.134
Ghosh, S.
Massachusetts General Hospital/
Harvard Medical School,
MGH/HST Martinos Center for
Biomedical Imaging,
Massachusetts General Hospital/
TRANSCEND
[email protected]
171.050
Giannola, M.
The College of Staten Island
[email protected]
113.001
Giarelli, E.
Drexel University
[email protected]
157.038
Gibbons, F.
King’s College London
[email protected]
141.222
Gidaya, N.
Drexel University
[email protected]
125.189
123.060
124.124, 142.003
Gardner, L.
University of Tennessee Health
Science Center
[email protected]
138.048
Garg, S.
University of Manchester
[email protected]
159.132
Garibay, C.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
159.122
Garlington, M.
Pediatrics Plus
[email protected]
159.135
Garon, N.
Mount Allison University
[email protected]
Garrod, O.
The University of Glasgow
[email protected]
159.181
Gates, J.
Stony Brook University
[email protected]
107.091
Gau, S.
National Taiwan University
Hospital and College of Medicine
[email protected]
151.003, 171.025,
171.036, 171.042
Gavaletz, A.
Yale University
[email protected]
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
124.101, 143.003
[email protected]
172.116
122.013, 140.194
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Gifford, T.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
Gilbert, J.
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine
[email protected]
Gilhooly, L.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
Gilkerson, J.
University of Colorado
Abstract
157.072
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Golding, J.
University of Bristol
[email protected]
173.138
Golembski, R.
The Children’s Hospital
of Philadelphia
[email protected]
119.003
144.003
Golland, Y.
Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya
[email protected]
159.170
[email protected]
102.004
Gomez, L. A.
FLACSO
[email protected]
157.034
Gillan, N.
South London and Maudsley
NHS trust
[email protected]
157.056
Gomez, L.
UCLA
[email protected]
124.157
Gillberg, C.
Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre
[email protected]
106.023
Gonsiorowski, A. R.
Georgia State University
[email protected]
159.167
110.177
Gonzalez Barrero, A.
McGill University
[email protected]
109.125
González-Mora, J.
University of La Laguna
[email protected]
138.051
Good, J.
University of Sussex
[email protected]
137.023
Goodcase, R.
Eastern Michigan University
[email protected]
172.115
Goodill, S.
Drexel University
[email protected]
157.038
Goodman, M.
St.Michael’s Hospital
[email protected]
137.027
Gillespie, S.
[email protected]
Emory University School of Medicine
106.039, 125.173,
125.195, 125.213,
182.004
Gillespie-Lynch, K.
College of Staten Island - CUNY,
The Graduate Center - CUNY
[email protected]
113.001, 122.055,
141.213, 141.214
Gilmour, G.
Eli Lilly
[email protected]
133.001
Ginn, N.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
138.103
Giovanoli, S.
Swiss Federal Institute of
Technology
[email protected]
170.007
Giraldez, A.
Yale University
[email protected]
153.004
Goodwin, A.
University of Wisconsin
[email protected]
168.001
Giraldez, M.
Hospital General Universitario
Gregorio Maraññon
[email protected]
139.131
Goodwin, L.
Columbia University
[email protected]
172.083
[email protected]
140.193
Goodwin, M.
Northeastern University
[email protected]
Girimaji, S.
NIMHANS
[email protected]
107.068, 122.015
Gordillo, M.
NYU Child Study Center
[email protected]
Girouard, L.
McGill University Health Centre Research Institute
Gordon, B.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
140.154, 140.170,
172.088
[email protected]
157.044, 159.123,
159.191
137.036, 138.081,
166.003
157.042
Giserman Kiss, I.
[email protected]
University of Massachusetts Boston
138.058
Gisin, E.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
124.128
Gordon, H.
Virginia Polytechnic Institution
and State University
[email protected]
171.048
Gordon, I.
[email protected]
Yale University, Bar Ilan University
172.056
Giuliano, A.
Istituto Nazionale di Fisica
Nucleare; Sezione di Pisa
Gordon, J.
Hunter College
[email protected]
172.123
Giuliano, K.
Cleveland Clinic Children’s
[email protected]
138.078
Gordon, N.
Marquette University
[email protected]
Glaser, B.
University of Geneva
Medical School
[email protected]
124.131
Gordon, P.
University of North CarolinaChapel Hill
[email protected]
Glaspy, T.
Barrow Neurological Institute
[email protected]
147.003
Gorman, K. B.
[email protected]
Oregon Health & Science University
140.187
Gliga, T.
Birkbeck College,
University of London
[email protected]
Goss, A.
Purdue University
[email protected]
137.022
Glod, M.
Newcastle University
[email protected]
110.182
Gotham, K.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Glowinski, A.
Washington University
[email protected]
138.094
Gott, R.
Saint Louis University
[email protected]
173.156
Gluckman, P.
University of Auckland
[email protected]
124.102
Gould, G. G.
The University of Texas Health
Science Center at San Antonio
[email protected]
139.149
Goh, D.
National University of Singapore
[email protected]
124.102
Gould, H.
UCLA
[email protected]
123.092, 159.133,
159.146
Goh, J.
National Taiwan University
College of Medicine
[email protected]
171.025
Gould, J.
National Autistic Society
[email protected]
106.023
Goin-Kochel, R. P.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
123.086, 124.127,
124.132, 125.210,
138.087
Grabowski, T.
University of Washington
[email protected]
139.131
[email protected]
137.020, 159.151
Graell, M.
Hospital Niño Jesús.
Servicio de Psiquiatría.
[email protected]
Golan, O.
Bar-Ilan University
Golas, S.
Massachusetts General Hospital
[email protected]
Grafodatskaya, D.
Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
174.173
Goldberg, W.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
Graham Holmes, L.
University of Utah
[email protected]
158.104
Goldin-Meadow, S.
University of Chicago
[email protected]
124.112, 132.004
122.029, 158.086,
159.122
168.001
Grahame, V.
[email protected]
Northumberland,
Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
140.152
146.003, 146.004,
158.088
109.132, 172.074
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
172.075
113.003, 157.073
176.003
119
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Granader, Y.
[email protected]
Children’s National Medical Center
120
Abstract
106.050, 109.153,
157.022, 157.029,
178.003
Author Name
Email Address
Grossman, R. B.
Emerson College
[email protected]
Abstract
140.165, 140.166,
140.206
Granath, S.
The Swedish National Council
for Crime Prevention
[email protected]
136.004
Grossman, X.
Boston Medical Center
[email protected]
122.053
173.160
[email protected]
156.001
Grove, M.
University of Texas School of
Public Health at Houston
[email protected]
Grant, M.
Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre
[email protected]
173.156
Graves, K.
Florida State University
[email protected]
173.164
Grover, S.
Saint Louis University
[email protected]
106.054
Grawemeyer, B.
Birkbeck College
[email protected]
109.155
Grow, A.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
115.004
Gray, L.
Vanderbilt University
Medical Center
[email protected]
157.001
Grundschober, C.
Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
Guardado, K.
UCLA
[email protected]
122.055
Gray, S.
Nuance Communications
[email protected]
Gudbrandsen, M.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London,
The Sackler Institute for
Translational Neurodevelopment,
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
102.003, 102.004
Greaves-Lord, K.
[email protected]
Yulius Autisme Expertisecentrum,
Erasmus MC Sophia Children’s Hospital
138.120, 152.004
Greco, G.
Yale University
[email protected]
124.109, 124.121,
124.128
Gredebäck, G.
Uppsala University
[email protected]
124.133, 124.152
Green, H. L.
Columbia University
[email protected]
172.083
Green, J.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
170.011
Green, J.
University of Manchester
[email protected]
Green, L. L.
RMIT University
[email protected]
120.004
Green, S.
UCLA
[email protected]
108.098, 118.001,
172.119
Green-Snyder, L.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
125.210
Greenawalt, B.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
158.107
Greenberg, J.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
146.001
Greenblatt, A.
The Hospital for Sick Children
[email protected]
122.035
117.002, 132.004,
156.001, 156.003,
159.132, 176.002
Greene, R.
[email protected]
University of Texas Southwestern
Medical Center
106.045
Greenslade, K. J.
University of Washington
[email protected]
159.136
Greenson, J.
University of Washington
[email protected]
123.078
Greenway, R.
University of Washington
[email protected]
123.068
Gregersen, P.
Feinstein Institute for
Medical Research
[email protected]
170.001
Grinker, R. R.
George Washington University
[email protected]
100.001
Grisham-Brown, J.
University of Kentucky
[email protected]
157.016
Griswold, A. J.
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine
[email protected]
Grodberg, D.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai
[email protected]
138.106
Grondhuis, S.
The Ohio State University
[email protected]
106.036
Groot, D.
Wichata State
[email protected]
157.081
Gross, J.
Stanford University
[email protected]
139.137, 171.045
Grossi, E.
Villa Santa Maria Institute
[email protected]
110.187, 110.189,
122.032
125.195, 125.213,
182.004
Guevara, J.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Guffey, D.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
Guha, T.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
Gulliford, D.
[email protected]
Seattle Children’s Research Institute
150.001, 171.028
138.102
124.127, 124.132
140.166
172.121
Gulsrud, A.
UCLA
[email protected]
Gumpert, C.
Karolinska Institutet
[email protected]
Gunal, O.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai,
Seaver Autism Center
for Research and Treatment
[email protected]
148.003, 170.017
Gunderson, E.
Kaiser Permanente
Northern California
[email protected]
173.159
Gunther, J.
University of California Davis
MIND Institute
[email protected]
157.011
Guo, H.
China Women’s Development
Foundation(CWDF)
N/A
167.003
Guo, Y.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
Gupta, A. R.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
117.003, 124.135,
125.204, 166.004,
172.066, 172.086
136.004
122.029, 159.122
125.208
Gupta, A.
Delhi University
[email protected]
175.181, 175.182
Guthrie, W.
Florida State University
Autism Institute
[email protected]
123.064, 124.125,
138.123, 143.001
Gutierrez, A.
Florida International University
[email protected]
137.015, 140.194
Gutierrez, S.
Hospital Niño Jesús.
Servicio de Psiquiatría.
[email protected]
139.131, 159.122
Gutmann, D.
[email protected]
Washington University in St Louis
Guy, J.
[email protected]
Perceptual Neuroscience
Laboratory for Autism and
Development (PNLab),
Integrated Program in Neuroscience,
McGill University
125.182
109.115, 109.127
Guy, L.
The University of North Carolina
[email protected]
157.051
Guyatt, A. L.
University of Bristol
[email protected]
173.138
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Guzzetta, A.
Stella Maris Scientific Institute,
University of Pisa
Email Address
[email protected]
Abstract
171.046
H
Haake, C.
[email protected]
Children’s National Medical Center
157.029, 178.003
Habash, M.
Leeds Becket University
137.030, 137.031,
139.146
[email protected]
Author Name
Hammond, N.
South London and Maudsley
NHS trust
Email Address
[email protected]
Abstract
157.056
Hamner, T.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine
107.082
Hampton, L. H.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
180.004
[email protected]
116.003
Habayeb, S. I.
[email protected]
The Catholic University of America
157.045
Hamre, K.
University of Minnesota
Habib, S.
Ministry of Health
[email protected]
138.115
Han, I.
[email protected]
University of Texas Health Science
Center at Houston
173.161
Hadjikhani, N.
[email protected]
Massachussetts General Hospital,
Brain Mind Institute, EPFL,
University of Gothenburg
171.047
Hancock-Howard, R.
Unviersity of Toronto
[email protected]
123.063
Hand, B.
The Ohio State University
[email protected]
172.059
Handen, B.
University of Pittsburgh
Medical Center
[email protected]
Hanks, J.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai
[email protected]
170.017
141.218
Haebig, E.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
Hagenmuller, F.
Psychiatric University
Hospital Zurich,University of
Zurich and ETH Zurich
[email protected]
Haines, J.
[email protected]
Case Western Reserve University
109.131, 140.181
109.163
125.195, 125.213,
182.004
122.020, 138.091,
139.127, 139.128
[email protected]
123.087
Hanlon, C.
King’s College London,
Addis Ababa University
[email protected]
Haisley, L. D.
University of Connecticut
Haker, H.
University of Zurich and
ETH Zurich
[email protected]
109.163
Hanna, E.
Duke University
[email protected]
159.148
125.186
Hannant, P.
Coventry University
[email protected]
Hakonarson, H.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
122.037
140.171
Hannes, K.
KU Leuven
[email protected]
Hall, A.
[email protected]
SC Department of Disabilities and
Special Needs
Hannon, S.
LENA Research Foundation
[email protected]
102.003
Hall, B.
Prometheus Research, LLC
[email protected]
143.001
Hansen, B.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
171.030
Hall, C.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
138.062, 185.003
Hanson, E.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
110.174, 125.210,
138.043, 145.004
Happe, F.
King’s College London
[email protected]
106.023, 140.204,
159.150, 159.196
Hall, D.
Omnitec Solutions Inc.
[email protected]
137.002
[email protected]
Hall, L.
Queen’s University
[email protected]
159.192
Haraguchi, H.
National Center of Neurology
and Psychiatry
Hardan, A.
Stanford University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
105.001, 105.003,
105.004, 123.077,
138.042, 139.136,
139.137, 139.138,
171.045
Harel, A.
Hebrew University
[email protected]
115.001, 138.110,
142.00
Harindranathan, P.
Research Center Jülich
[email protected]
Harker, C.
University of Washington
[email protected]
Harmon, K.
Children’s National
[email protected]
109.153
Harony-Nicolas, H.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai,
Seaver Autism Center for
Research and Treatment
[email protected]
148.003
172.059
157.008
Hall-Lande, J.
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
116.003
Hallac, R.
Children’s Health
[email protected]
106.045
Halladay, A.
Autism Science Foundation
[email protected]
122.025
Halldin, C.
Karolinska Institute
[email protected]
172.091
Hallett, M.
NIH/NINDS
[email protected]
119.004
Halpern, D.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai
[email protected]
157.039
Hamada, M.
Hamamatsu University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
106.044
Harpster, K.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
Hamdani, U.
Human Development
Research Foundation
mailto:[email protected]
117.002
Harrington, R.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
Hamilton, A.
UCL
[email protected]
121.002
Harris, B.
Southwest Autism Research
and Resource Center
[email protected]
Hamilton, K. J.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
159.126
Harris, J.
Children’s Specialized Hospital
[email protected]
Hamilton, S.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
170.011
Harrison, A. J.
University of Georgia
[email protected]
Hamman, R.
Colorado School of Pubic Health
[email protected]
Harrop, C.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
106.032, 178.002
122.014
172.078
122.036, 124.159,
177.004
141.216, 173.161
123.084
107.078, 124.105
141.211
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Hall, T. A.
[email protected]
Oregon Health & Science University
109.116, 137.006
145.002, 166.004
121
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
[email protected]
158.099
Hartman, N.
St. Mary’s College
[email protected]
157.026, 157.082,
158.107
Hartnett, K.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
106.043
Harwood, R.
HRSA
[email protected]
154.003
Hasegawa, C.
Kanazawa University
[email protected]
Hashim, P.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
109.145, 172.068
172.122
Email Address
Heintzelman, A.
Penn State Hershey
[email protected]
Heller, I.
Weizmann Institute of Science
[email protected]
Hellings, J. A.
[email protected]
The Ohio State University
Nisonger Center McCampbell Hall
Abstract
106.006, 106.009,
106.055, 157.019,
158.106, 159.142
184.001
106.033, 139.127
Hellriegel, J.
UCL
[email protected]
152.001
Helsmoortel, C.
University of Antwerp
[email protected]
135.004
Henaff, M.
Lyon Neuroscience
Research Center
[email protected]
109.106
Henderson, H.
University of Waterloo
[email protected]
[email protected]
Hattersley, C.
Providence Row,
The National Autistic Society
[email protected]
120.001
Hauck, J.
Michigan State University
[email protected]
123.065
Henkel, L.
University of Calgary
[email protected]
140.172
Hauschild, K. M.
The University of Pittsburgh
[email protected]
109.121
Hensel, C.
Lineagen, Inc.
[email protected]
125.177
Haut, J.
Indiana University
[email protected]
110.175
Hentz, J.
Mayo Clinic Arizona
[email protected]
158.118
124.165
Hepburn, S.
JFK Partners/University of
Colorado School of Medicine
[email protected]
123.090, 138.068,
157.083
Heptonstall, B.
University of Victoria
[email protected]
159.181
Hayes, G.
UCI
[email protected]
Hayes, J.
University of California Davis
School of Medicine
[email protected]
Hayes, S. J.
[email protected]
Liverpool John Moores University
125.207, 174.172
Author Name
Haslinger, D.
JW Goethe University
Haworth, J. L.
[email protected]
Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
122
Abstract
Hartley, S.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
137.011, 137.019
170.019
109.109
Herbert, M.
[email protected]
Massachusetts General Hospital/
Harvard Medical School,MGH/
HST Martinos Center for Biomedical
Imaging,Massachusetts
General Hospital/TRANSCEND
159.124, 172.106
171.050, 172.075
Herguner, A.
Konya Reseach and
Training Hospital
[email protected]
106.007
Herguner, S.
Necmettin Erbakan University
[email protected]
106.007
Herlihy, L.
Yale School of Medicine
Child Study Center
[email protected]
138.067
140.183
Hernandez, B.
YAI
[email protected]
138.046
He, J.
[email protected]
National Institute of Mental Health
106.035
Hernandez, L. M.
UCLA
[email protected]
He, S.
[email protected]
School of Electrical Engineering,
Royal Institute of Technology (KTH)
172.113
Heron, E.
Trinity College Dublin
[email protected]
125.193
173.138
109.134
Heron, J.
University of Bristol
[email protected]
Healy, C.
[email protected]
Seatle Children’s Research Institute
Heaton, P.
Goldsmiths College,
University of London
[email protected]
109.129
Herpertz-Dahlmann, B.
[email protected]
University Hospital RWTH Aachen
[email protected]
Hecht, P.
University of Missouri- Columbia
[email protected]
173.142
Herringshaw, A. J.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected] 138.041, 140.152
Herrington, C.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Heckel, N. M.
Northwestern University
122.016, 122.050,
123.074
[email protected]
138.116
Herrington, J.
University of Pennsylvania,
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
Hedfors Moretti, Å.
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Sollentuna
103.001, 159.163,
171.031
Hedges, S.
UNC Chapel Hill
[email protected]
122.047
Herrington, K.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Hedley, D.
Emerson College
[email protected]
Hertz-Picciotto, I.
University of California, Davis
[email protected]
Heeramun, R.
Avon and Wiltshire Mental
Health Trust
[email protected]
136.004
114.003, 114.004,
124.115, 173.133,
173.136, 173.141,
173.147, 173.151
157.012, 159.194
[email protected]
172.055, 172.064
Herzog, M.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
Hegarty II, J. P.
University of Missouri
124.165
[email protected]
140.164
Hess, C.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
Heidlage, J.
Vanderbilt University
109.156
108.096
Hetzroni, O.
University of Haifa
[email protected]
Heiken, K.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Heuer, L.
University of California
[email protected]
114.001
Hayward, H. L.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Hazlett, H.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
Hazlett, H.
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
[email protected]
Hazlett, N.
University of Toronto
[email protected]
157.056, 172.098
118.003
109.128, 124.143,
140.190, 166.001
124.104, 140.165,
140.166
108.098, 118.001
159.201, 172.078
172.093
122.024
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Author Name
Email Address
Heunis, T.
Stellenbosch University
Email Address
[email protected]
Abstract
172.124
Holt, R.
Cambridge University
[email protected]
Hewitson, L.
The Johnson Center for
Child Health and Development
[email protected]
148.004
Homewood, T.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
106.054
Hewitt, A.
University of Minnesota
[email protected]
116.003
Honey, E.
Newcastle University
[email protected]
110.182
Heys, M.
University College London
Institute for Global Health
[email protected]
141.222
Hong, P.
University of California
San Francisco
[email protected]
106.049, 173.132
Hilgard, J.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
159.190
Hood, J.
Carmen B. Pingree Autism
Center of Learning
[email protected]
157.065
Hill, A.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
124.149
Hooper, M.
York University
[email protected]
158.105
Hill, A. P.
Oregon Health & Science
University
[email protected]
106.021, 157.008
Hopkins, J.
[email protected]
UCLA Semel Institute for
Neuroscience and Human Behavior
Hopkins, M.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
Abstract
109.162, 172.073
140.159, 159.199
[email protected]
137.013
Hopman, J.
[email protected]
Yulius Mental Health Care,
Erasmus MC - Sophia Children’s Hospital
152.002
Hilton, C.
[email protected]
University of Texas Medical Branch
159.159
Himle, M.
University of Utah
[email protected]
158.104
Hiniker, A.
University of Washington
[email protected]
109.151
Hinkley, L.
UCSF Autism &
Neurodevelopment Program
[email protected]
108.096
Horder, J.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Hippolyte, L.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
Horlin, C.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
106.052
Hiraishi, H.
Kanazawa University
[email protected]
Hormozdiari, F.
University of Washington
[email protected]
135.002
Hirano, S.
UCI
[email protected]
Horner, P.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
124.098
Hirosawa, T.
Kanazawa University
[email protected]
[email protected]
159.183, 159.185
Hixon, J.
University of Texas at Austin
[email protected]
124.129
Horowitz, E. J.
University of California,
Santa Barbara
113.004, 157.033
[email protected]
125.177
Horton, S.
University of Windsor
[email protected]
Ho, K. S.
Lineagen, Inc.
113.001, 122.046
[email protected]
170.012
Hotez, E. R.
The Graduate Center at the
City University of New York/
Hunter College
[email protected]
Ho, L.
HKU
Hobson, J.
Institute of Child Health, UCL
[email protected]
159.135
Hocking, D. R.
La Trobe University
[email protected]
Hoeft, F.
University of California at
San Francisco
[email protected]
Hoekstra, R. A.
The Open University
[email protected]
109.145, 172.068
137.011
109.145, 172.068
133.003, 133.004,
138.101, 139.140,
170.007, 172.091
106.029
Hou, Y.
Chia-Yi Christian Hospital
[email protected]
138.104
Houghton, K.
Lancaster University
[email protected]
123.075
141.218, 145.003
Hovsepyan, L.
[email protected]
University of California Los Angeles
166.004
124.113, 124.146,
138.062, 185.003
Howells, H.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
171.049
172.091
153.004
Howes, O.
Institute of Psychiatry,
King’s College London
[email protected]
Hoffman, E. J.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
Hoffner Barthold, C.
George Masson University
[email protected]
141.223
Howlin, P.
King’s College London
[email protected]
Holbrook, A. C.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
Holl, E.
YAI
[email protected]
Hoffenberg, S.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine
Hollander, E.
[email protected]
Montefiore Medical Center,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
171.033
140.159, 180.001
138.046
115.002, 139.134,
139.144, 139.148,
157.027
159.135
147.004, 178.001
Hsieh, M.
[email protected]
Children’s National Health System
124.106
Hsu, N.
Purdue University
137.022
[email protected]
Hsu, Y.
[email protected]
Center for Optoelectronic Medicine,
National Taiwan University College
of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
151.003
Hu, V.
The George Washington
University School of Medicine
and Health Sciences
[email protected]
183.001
[email protected]
171.043
Hollaway, L.
Pediatrics Plus
[email protected]
Hollocks, M. J.
King’s College London
[email protected]
106.005, 178.001,
178.004
Holm, A.
Karolinska University Hospital
[email protected]
138.116
Hu, X.
Emory University School
of Medicine
109.168
[email protected]
106.005
Huang, C.
National Chengchi University
[email protected]
Holmes, E.
Cambridge University
Huang, D.
Guangzhou Cana School
[email protected]
172.113
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Hottinger, K.
[email protected]
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
159.145, 159.154
123
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Huang, W.
The Scripps Research Institute,
Scripps Florida
[email protected]
Huang, Y.
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
[email protected]
Abstract
149.003, 170.016
139.143
Huang, Y.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
138.102
Huber, J.
St.Michael’s Hospital,
Hospital for Sick Children,
University of Toronto
[email protected]
137.027
Hudac, C. M.
University of Washington
[email protected]
103.003, 125.203
Hudry, K.
Olga Tennison Autism
Research Centre
[email protected]
Hudson, M.
Queen’s University
[email protected]
Hudson, R.
University of Washington
[email protected]
123.068
Huerta, M.
Weill Cornell Medical College
[email protected]
Huerta, P.
Feinstein Institute for
Medical Reaserch
156.001
Email Address
Abstract
Iarocci, G.
Simon Fraser University
[email protected]
109.164, 138.086
Ibanez, L. V.
University of Washington
[email protected]
122.036, 124.107,
124.148, 124.159,
124.163, 177.004
Ibrahim, K.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai,
Yale Child Study Center,
University of Hartford
[email protected]
157.039
Imaging Group, N.
[email protected]
http://www.neurodevnet.ca/research/asd
140.184
Imaki, H.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities
155.002
Ingersoll, B.
Michigan State University
[email protected]
107.067, 107.084,
122.039, 123.061,
123.080, 159.155,
177.001
Ingham, R.
Oregon Health &
Science University
[email protected]
140.187
185.004
[email protected]
170.001
Inoue, M.
Tottori University
[email protected]
122.014
144.003
[email protected]
109.165
Iosif, A.
UC Davis MIND Institute
[email protected]
Huettig, F.
Max planck Institute for
Psycholinguistics
Iossifov, I.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
[email protected]
135.001
Hughes, C.
Centre for Family Research,
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
Irimia, A.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
172.099
Hughes, H.
University of North Texas
[email protected]
Isableu, B.
Université Paris Sud
[email protected]
137.014
Hume, K.
University of North Carolina
at Chapel HIll
[email protected]
Ishiguro, H.
Osaka University
[email protected]
107.089
[email protected]
109.168
Iskandarani, K.
Penn State Hershey College
of Medicine
[email protected]
Hung, C.
National Chengchi University
Hung, J.
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
[email protected]
139.143
Islam, T.
RIKEN Brain Science Institute
[email protected]
122.022
Huntington, N.
Boston Children’s Hospital,
Harvard Medical School
[email protected]
140.172
Isler, J.
Columbia University College
of Physicians & Surgeons
[email protected]
172.075
Hurlbert, A.
Newcastle University
[email protected]
109.117
Isomura, T.
Primate Research Institute
[email protected]
109.110
Hus Bal, V.
University of California
San Francisco
[email protected]
106.049, 173.132
Israel, A.
University at Albany,
State University of New York
[email protected]
110.188
Hussman, J.
Hussman Institute for Autism
[email protected]
125.213, 182.004
Ito, H.
Hamamatsu University
School of Medicine
[email protected]
Hutman, T.
The Semel Institute for
Neuroscience and
Human Behavior
[email protected]
122.046, 124.097,
124.115, 124.124,
124.139, 124.157,
159.140
Iuculano, T.
Stanford University
School of Medicine
[email protected]
109.114
Hutsler, J. J.
University of Nevada Reno
[email protected]
Iverson, J.
University of Pittsburgh
[email protected]
140.172
Huynh, L.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
124.135, 145.002,
157.047
Iverson, J.
University of Pittsburgh
[email protected]
124.115, 124.124
174.170
[email protected]
109.148, 140.184
Iwata, K.
Fukui Univ.
[email protected]
Hyde, K.
Montreal Neurological Institute,
McGill University,
Université de Montréal
Iyengar, U.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
115.003
Hyman, S.
University of Rochester
School of Medicine
[email protected]
106.016, 139.127,
139.128, 169.002
124.147, 173.142
117.001, 141.215
112.004
123.071, 124.164,
157.024
155.001
I
124
Author Name
Iaboni, A.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
139.126, 159.156
Iadarola, S.
University of Rochester
Medical Center
[email protected]
138.112
Iao, L.
Nottingham Trent University
[email protected]
109.149
157.010, 159.179
106.044, 106.051,
122.043
J
Jack, A.
Yale University
[email protected]
123.066, 172.056,
172.121
Jackman, T.
Autism Society Canada/
Autism Society Newfoundland
and Labrador
[email protected]
107.072
Jackson, S. L.
University of St Andrews
[email protected]
158.098
Jacob, R.
University of Kentucky
[email protected]
112.002
Jacquemont, S.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Jacques, C.
Universite du Quebec
en Outaouais,
Centre d’excellence en
Troubles envahissants
du développement de
l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
138.050, 159.204
Jaffal, Z.
Neurophotonics Laboratory Synaptic trafficking team CNRS/
Université Paris Descartes
[email protected]
149.004
Jahedi, A.
Dept. of Psychology,
San Diego State University
[email protected]
172.053
Jain, N.
Marquette University
[email protected]
141.219
Jain, S.
The Ohio State University
College of Medicine
[email protected]
106.033
Jalnapurkar, I.
University of Texas Health
Sciences Center
[email protected]
157.011
James, S.
University of Arkansas for
Medical Sciences
[email protected]
James, S.
Sleep Research and
Performance Center,
Washington State University
[email protected]
Jamison, J. M.
Icahn School of Medicine at
Mount Sinai
[email protected]
Jamison, R.
KU Medical Center
[email protected]
157.035
Jankowski, M.
University of Texas at Austin
[email protected]
159.164
Janvier, Y.
Children’s Specialized Hospital
[email protected]
124.105
Author Name
Email Address
Johnson, C.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
Johnson, C.
[email protected]
University of Pittsburgh
Abstract
125.187
138.057, 138.071,
169.002
Johnson, H.
University of Bath
[email protected]
109.155
Johnson, J.
College of Williamm and Mary
[email protected]
159.200
Johnson, J.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
172.055, 172.064
Johnson, M.
Birkbeck, University of London
[email protected]
124.112, 124.114,
132.004, 133.003,
143.004, 156.001,
172.076, 176.002
Johnson, N. L.
Marquette University
[email protected]
109.147
Johnson, R.
[email protected]
Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc.
125.179
Johnson, R.
University of Virginia
[email protected]
157.018
149.001
Johnson, R.
University of California Davis
Medical Center
[email protected]
185.001
172.089
Johnson, S.
University of California
Los Angeles
[email protected]
Johnson, S.
Dalhousie University
shannon.jo[email protected]
109.133
Johnson, W. G.
Rutgers University
[email protected]
125.184
Johnston, K.
King’s College London
[email protected]
159.196
Johnston, K.
Simon Fraser University
[email protected]
138.086
108.100, 138.046,
138.106, 172.123
124.097, 124.124,
159.140
Johnston, R.
[email protected]
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
157.001
Jones, C.
Cardiff University
[email protected]
159.150
139.149
Jones, D.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
112.001
[email protected]
[email protected]
170.001
Jones, E.
Birkbeck College,
University of London
[email protected]
137.027
Jones, F.
Healthy African American
Families, Phase II
[email protected]
117.003
Jones, K. L.
University of California
[email protected]
114.001
Jones, K.
University of Utah
[email protected]
106.004
Jones, L.
Healthy African American
Families, Phase II
[email protected]
117.003
Jones, T.
Ogden School District
[email protected]
158.116
Jones, W.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta,
Emory University
[email protected]
109.107, 124.119,
124.140, 124.145,
124.158, 124.162,
138.121, 159.129,
171.043
Jongen, E.
Hasselt University
[email protected]
109.130, 109.135
[email protected]
Jarzabek, E.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
and Emory University School of Medicine
122.011
Javors, M.
The University of Texas Health
Science Center
[email protected]
Jeganathan, V.
The Feinstein Institute for
Medical Research
Jegathesan, T.
St.Michael’s Hospital
Jenkins, J.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
172.060, 172.097
109.101, 109.134,
124.112, 124.115,
132.004, 133.003,
140.176, 172.076,
176.001, 176.002
[email protected]
173.135
Jennings, S.
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
123.071
Jeste, S. S.
UCLA
[email protected]
Jiang, L.
University of Utah
[email protected]
125.198
Jifält, I.
Child and School Health
services Norrtälje
[email protected]
138.116
Jimenez de Espinoza, C. D.
University of La Laguna
[email protected]
138.051
Jin, D.
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
[email protected]
109.154
Jo, B.
Stanford University
[email protected]
139.138
Joshi, R.
Development and
Neuropharmacology Group,
Centre for Interdisciplinary
Research in Biology (CIRB),
CNRS UMR 7241,
INSERM U 1050,
Collège de France, Paris,
Joanisse, M.
University of Western Ontario
[email protected]
171.040
Jou, R.
Yale University
[email protected]
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
Johnsen, K.
HAVE Dreams
[email protected]
157.076
Juárez, A.
Vanderbilt Kennedy Center
[email protected]
122.016, 122.024,
123.074
125.204, 139.134,
139.144, 159.140,
172.066, 172.086,
172.099, 172.108
149.004
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Jenner, W.
Medical University of
South Carolina
125
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Jung, J.
Harvard Medical School,
Stanford University
[email protected]
125.202
Jung, K.
University of Texas Health
Science Center at Houston
[email protected]
124.098
Jung, M.
United Graduate School of
Child Development,
Osaka University,
Kanazawa University,
Hamamatsu University School
of Medicine, Chiba University
and University of Fukui,
The Japan Society for the
Promotion of Science
[email protected]
172.117
Jung, T.
California State University,
Northridge
[email protected]
157.052
Jyotishi, M.
University of Connecticut
[email protected]
140.191
Kaale, A.
Oslo University Hospital
[email protected]
138.084
Kaat, A.
Ohio State University
[email protected]
138.055
Kaboski, J.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
Kaczmarski, W.
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities
[email protected]
Kagemann, S.
Indiana University
Author Name
Email Address
[email protected]
159.153
Karbasforoushan, H.
Northwestern University
[email protected]
171.038
Karmel, B.
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities
[email protected]
124.124, 142.003
Karp, E.
University of Washington
[email protected]
122.036, 124.148,
124.159
Karst, J.
Marquette University
[email protected]
Kasari, C.
UCLA Center for Autism
Research & Treatment
[email protected]
K
157.073
117.003, 122.040,
123.092, 124.135,
125.204, 125.209,
138.075, 140.159,
140.164, 154.001,
154.002, 154.004,
157.047, 159.133,
159.146, 159.177,
159.178, 166.004,
172.066, 172.086,
180.001, 180.002
Kascsak, R.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities
125.200, 171.035
Kascsak, R.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for
Basic Research in Developmental
Disabilities
125.200, 171.035
171.035
109.157
159.147
Kashino, M.
NTT Communication
Science Laboratories,
Tokyo Institute of Technology
[email protected]
[email protected]
Kainz, K.
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
[email protected]
123.071
Katagiri, M.
Hamamatsu University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
106.044
Kaiser, A.
Vanderbilt University
[email protected]
157.082, 158.107
138.075, 140.164,
180.004
Kaldy, Z.
[email protected]
University of Massachusetts Boston
109.159
Katayama, T.
[email protected]
Osaka University United Graduate
School of Child Development
173.148
Kates, W.
[email protected]
SUNY Upstate Medical University
104.002
Kalkbrenner, A.
[email protected]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
173.154
Kathuria, A.
Institute of Psychiatry,
Psychology and Neuroscience,
King’s College London
133.002
Kamimura-Nishimura, K.
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center
[email protected]
Kamio, Y.
[email protected]
National Center of Neurology
and Psychiatry, Japan,
National Institute of Mental Health
140.177
108.095, 138.061,
171.022, 172.070,
172.092, 172.093,
172.100
[email protected]
174.170
Kato, N.
[email protected]
Medical Institute of Developmental
Disabilities Research,
Showa University
109.157
Katuwal, G.
[email protected]
Geisinger Health System,
Rochester Institute of Technology
150.002
Katz-Nave, G.
University of Haifa
[email protected]
109.156
Kaufmann, W.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
165.003
Kaur, M.
University of Delaware
[email protected]
Kana, R.
University of Alabama
at Birmingham
[email protected]
Kandala, S.
Washington University
School of Medicine
[email protected]
118.003
Kang, C.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
122.040
Kang, E.
Stony Brook University
[email protected]
159.149
Kaushanskaya, M.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
Kang, V. Y.
University of Washington
[email protected]
140.150
Kawalec, K.
University of Notre Dame
[email protected]
Kanne, S.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
110.181
Kay, M.
University of Haifa
[email protected]
148.003
125.186
Keck, D.
[email protected]
Yale University School of Medicine
157.032
Keefer, A.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
157.005
Keehn, B.
Purdue University
[email protected]
124.108
Keen, D.
Griffith University
[email protected]
107.070
Keifer, C.
Yale University
[email protected]
Kao, C.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
126
Abstract
Karaminis, T.
Centre for Research in
Autism & Education,
Institute of Education
Kaplan, D.
[email protected]
Child and Adolescent
Neuropsychiatric Inpatient Unit at
138.105, 139.142
Kapp, S.
University of California,
Los Angeles
[email protected]
122.055, 158.113
Karaminis, T.
Centre for Research in
Autism and Education (CRAE),
Institute of Education
[email protected]
109.122
124.122, 124.155,
157.072
109.131
157.026, 157.082,
158.107
108.097, 122.030,
123.066, 124.120,
172.105, 172.121
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Kellems, R.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
171.030
Keller, R.
Adult Autism Center,
ASL TO2, Turin, Italy
[email protected]
106.034
Kelley, E.
Queen’s University
[email protected]
159.192, 159.195
Kelly, G.
University of Ulster
[email protected]
110.183
Kelly, J.
University of Washington
[email protected]
Kendall, P.
Temple University
[email protected]
Kennedy, D.
Indiana University
[email protected]
Kenney, C.
Washington National Primate
Research Center
[email protected]
Kenny, L.
Centre for Research in Autism
and Education (CRAE),
Institute of Education
[email protected]
Kenworthy, L.
Children’s National
Medical Center
[email protected]
Kern, S.
Child Psychiatry,
NYU Child Study Center
[email protected]
Kerns, C. M.
Drexel University
[email protected]
109.108, 136.003,
157.051, 171.031
Kerr, M.
Mount Saint Vincent University
[email protected]
107.092, 109.133
Kerwin, M.
Rowan University
[email protected]
123.060
Ketcheson, L. R.
Sunfield Center for Autism,
ADHD and Behavioral Health
[email protected]
Key, A.
Vanderbilt University
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Kim, S.
Yale University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Kim, S.
Baylor College of Medicine
[email protected]
115.003
Kim, S.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
159.122
Kim, S.
University of California,
Santa Barbara
[email protected]
157.075
176.001
109.108
Kim, T.
Yale University
[email protected]
124.150
[email protected]
125.194
148.004
Kim, Y.
National Human Genome
Research Institute,
National Institutes of Health
[email protected]
106.049, 173.132
120.001
Kim, Y.
University of California
San Francisco
Kim, Y.
California State University,
Northridge
[email protected]
157.052
Kinard, J.
The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
[email protected]
Kindt, C.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
King, B.
University of Washington &
Seattle Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
King, G.
Bloorview Research Institute
[email protected]
107.064
Kinnear, M.
Rady Children’s Hospital,
San Diego
[email protected]
110.181
123.065
Kinsella, B.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
137.028
[email protected]
112.001
[email protected]
110.184, 184.004
Khan, M.
York University
[email protected]
157.023
Kirby, A. V.
The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill
173.161, 173.165
[email protected]
138.102
Kirby, R.
University of South Florida
[email protected]
Khan, S.
Drexel University School of
Public Health
Kirwan, C.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
109.146, 144.001,
144.002, 171.044
Khan, S.
CHOP
[email protected]
108.096
[email protected]
158.087
Kharrazi, M.
California Department of
Public Health
[email protected]
114.002
Kirwan, J.
Southwest Autism Research
and Resource Center
[email protected]
182.003
Kherif, F.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
Kistner-Griffin, E.
Medical University of
South Carolina
[email protected]
115.002, 139.134,
139.144
Kitagawa, S.
Kanazawa University
[email protected]
Khwaja, O.
F. Hoffmann - La Roche AG
109.145,
172.068
Kiang, S.
The Boston University
Medical Center
[email protected]
173.127
Kikuchi, M.
Kanazawa University
[email protected]
109.145, 172.068
Kilgus, S.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
138.097
Kille, B.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
106.043
Kilmer, C.
University of Calgary
[email protected]
122.035
Kilner, J.
University College London,
Institute of Neurology
[email protected]
109.122
Kim, E. S.
Yale University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Kim, J.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
122.026
Kim, M.
Temple University
[email protected]
122.012
121.004, 159.147
106.001, 106.022,
106.050, 109.153,
157.029, 158.084,
178.003
121.001
Kjelgaard, M. M.
MGH Institute of Health
Professions
[email protected]
Klaiman, C.
[email protected]
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and
Emory University School of Medicine
123.079, 123.096
106.054
123.094, 138.071,
154.004
142.003
109.120, 109.154
124.113, 138.062,
159.163
Klauck, S.
[email protected]
Cancer Genome Research Group,
German Cancer Research Center
(DKFZ)
125.207
Kleberg, J. L.
Uppsala University
[email protected]
124.152
Klei, L.
University of Pittsburgh School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Klein, C.
Marietta College, OH
[email protected]
Kleinhans, N.
University of Washington
[email protected]
148.003, 153.002
172.092
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
124.121, 124.142,
137.016, 138.093,
139.134, 140.167
Kittler, P.
[email protected]
New York State Institute for Basic
Research in Developmental
Disabilities
124.128, 124.130,
124.142, 124.150,
124.160, 124.161,
125.210, 138.093
172.067, 172.074
127
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
109.107, 124.097,
124.119, 124.140,
124.145, 124.156,
124.158, 124.162,
138.121, 159.129
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
[email protected]
Klingemier, E.
Cleveland Clinic
[email protected]
Klinger, L. G.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
106.030, 109.161,
134.001, 134.004,
138.103, 144.004,
157.005, 172.092
Klinger, M.
University of North Carolina
[email protected]
106.030, 109.161,
134.001, 134.004,
144.004, 172.092
Knight, B.
University of Bristol
[email protected]
173.138
Knoch, K.
MassGeneral for Children at
North Shore Medical Center
[email protected]
138.067
Knoflach, F.
F. Hoffmann-La Roche, pRED,
Pharma Research &
Early Development
[email protected]
115.004
Kostopoulos, P.
Montreal Neurological Institute
[email protected]
[email protected]
148.003
Kobak, K.
Center for Psychological
Consultation
[email protected]
137.024
Kou, Y.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai,
Seaver Autism Center for
Research and Treatment
Koch, I.
Goethe-University Frankfurt
am Main
[email protected]
125.207
Kouser, M.
U of T Southwestern
[email protected]
170.018
109.116, 137.006
[email protected]
157.038
Koch, S.
University of Alabama at
Birmingham
[email protected]
137.013
Kovac, M. L.
Carolina Institute for
Developmental DisabilitiesUNC Chapel Hill
[email protected]
Koch, S.
SRH Hochschule Heidelberg
Kover, S.
University of Washington
[email protected]
140.174
Koegel, L.
University of California
Santa Barbara
[email protected]
124.116, 157.075
Kozikowski, T.
College of William and Mary
[email protected]
159.141
[email protected]
124.116, 157.075
Krakowiak, P.
University of California - Davis
[email protected]
Koegel, R.
University of California
Santa Barbara
173.133, 173.136,
173.147
[email protected]
106.025
Koek, W.
The University of Texas Health
Science Center at San Antonio
[email protected]
139.149
Kral, T.
University of Pennsylvania
School of Nursing
159.201
Kofler, M.
University of Virginia
[email protected]
157.018
Krall, S.
[email protected]
Research Center Jülich,
University Hospital RWTH Aachen
[email protected]
173.132
Kramer, I.
[email protected]
University of Maryland Baltimore Country
125.169
Koh, Y.
Korea Institute for Children’s
Social Development
Kohls, G.
RWTH Aachen University
[email protected]
118.002, 157.002
Kolevzon, A.
Icahn School of Medicine
at Mount Sinai
[email protected]
108.100, 125.205,
138.046, 138.099,
157.039, 172.123
Koller, J.
The Hebrew University
of Jerusalem
[email protected]
124.130, 124.160,
124.161, 138.118,
159.165
138.060
Koot, H.
VU University Amsterdam
[email protected]
Kooy, F.
University of Antwerp
[email protected]
135.004
Kopelman, T.
University of Iowa Hospitals
and Clinics
[email protected]
123.062
Korgaonkar, C.
University of Connecticut
chai[email protected]
Korkiakangas, T.
Institute of Education
(University of London)
[email protected]
Kosaka, H.
Research Center for
Child Mental Development,
University of Fukui
[email protected]
Kosieradzki, R.
[email protected]
Child and Youth Psychiatry Malmö
Kramer, R.
Seattle Pacific University
[email protected]
Krasileva, K.
[email protected]
Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain
Mapping Center, UCLA,
Department of Neurology,
David Geffen School of Medicine,
UCLA
122.004, 159.173
157.071, 157.072
159.202
157.010, 172.117
138.116
118.003, 140.190
122.026, 159.172
118.001, 172.119
Krasner, A.
Columbia University
[email protected]
139.138
Krata, J.
YAI
[email protected]
138.046
Kraus, L.
Rush University Medical Center
[email protected]
107.094
157.005
Komine, Y.
[email protected]
Medical Institute of Developmental
Disabilities Research,
Showa University
109.157
Kondo, A.
Tokyo Gakugei University
[email protected]
140.177
Kreiser, N. L.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
Kong, N.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
138.069
Kresse, A.
Seattle Children’s
Research Institute
[email protected]
103.003, 105.003,
140.150
Kong, W.
HKU
[email protected]
170.012
[email protected]
154.004, 159.177,
159.178
Konishi, T.
Waseda University
[email protected]
140.177
Kretzmann, M.
University of California
Los Angeles
Konrad, K.
[email protected]
University Hospital RWTH Aachen,
Jülich Aachen Research Alliance JARA Brain,Research Center Jülich
128
Abstract
Klin, A.
Marcus Autism Center,
Children’s Healthcare of
Atlanta and Emory University
School of Medicine
Konwar, K.
University of British Columbia
[email protected]
Koolschijn, P. M.
Dutch Autism & ADHD
Research Center,
University of Amsterdam
[email protected]
159.201, 172.078
140.167
150.003, 172.063
Krigsman, A.
[email protected]
Pediatric Gastroenterology
Resources of New York and Texas
125.167, 125.170,
125.211
Krumm, N.
University of Washington
[email protected]
135.001
Krupp, D.
Oregon Health & Science
University
[email protected]
182.002
Ku, M.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
119.003
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Kuchna, I.
New York State Institute
for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities
[email protected]
155.002
Kuddo, T.
[email protected]
157.040
Kuhl, P.
University of Washington
[email protected]
132.001
Kuhlthau, K.
Massachusetts General Hospital
[email protected]
Kuklisova-Murgasova, M.
King’s College London
[email protected]
Kulbida, R.
University Hospital of Cologne
Kumar, G.
Janssen Pharmaceuticals
Author Name
Email Address
Abstract
Laitila, A.
University of Eastern Finland
[email protected]
159.202
Lajeunesse, S.
Centre d’excellence en Troubles
envahissants du développement
de l’Université de Montréal
(CETEDUM)
[email protected]
159.204
Lajiness-O’Neill, R.
Eastern Michigan University
[email protected]
172.115
124.114
Lakes, K.
University of California, Irvine
[email protected]
122.029
[email protected]
159.166
Lakshmanan, B.
Kennedy Krieger Institute
[email protected]
119.004
[email protected]
133.001
Lam, C.
The Chinese University of
Hong Kong
[email protected]
140.163
137.005, 157.010,
159.179
Lam, G.
University of South Florida
[email protected]
109.149
Kumazaki, H.
[email protected]
Research Center for
Child Mental Development,
University of Fukui, Keio University
106.015, 106.037,
107.079
119.003
[email protected]
124.102
Lam, P.
The Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia
[email protected]
Kung, J.
National University of Singapore
Kuo, S. F.
Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine
[email protected]
140.154
Lam, S.
HKU
[email protected]
170.012
157.079
[email protected]
157.042
Lambe, S.
University of Bath
[email protected]
Kuriakose, S.
NYU Child Study Center
157.018
[email protected]
139.132
Lambert, A.
University of Virginia
[email protected]
Kurian, A.
Roche Innovation Center
New York
Lambrechts, A.
City University London
[email protected]
Kurzius-Spencer, M.
University of Arizona,
College of Medicine
[email protected]
Lamikanra, A.
Blazing trails international Center
[email protected]
141.208
Lammers, S.
Boston Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
170.019
Lamontagne, S.
HAVE Dreams
[email protected]
157.076
Lancaster, A.
Harvard Medical School,
Stanford University
[email protected]
125.202
Landa, R.
Kennedy Krieger Institute,
Johns Hopkins School
of Medicine
[email protected]
123.059, 138.056,
173.137
140.186, 140.207
Kuschner, E. S.
[email protected]
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
119.003, 138.109,
169.003
Kushki, A.
Holland Bloorview Kids
Rehabilitation Hospital
[email protected]
106.024, 106.031,
137.025, 137.028,
138.069, 138.077,
159.156
Kutalik, Z.
Lausanne University Hospital
[email protected]
171.047
Kutlu, M.
Anadolu University
[email protected]
112.004
Kuzmanovic, B.
Juelich Research Center
[email protected]
109.103, 159.166
Kwedar, K. S.
University of Missouri
[email protected]
107.062
Landolfi, P.
PANAACEA
[email protected]
Kwek, K.
KK Women’s and
Children’s Hospital
[email protected]
124.102
Landry, O.
La Trobe University
[email protected]
104.003, 109.102
[email protected]
171.040
Lane, A. E.
University of Newcastle
[email protected]
Kwok, E.
Western University
110.185, 172.059,
184.002
[email protected]
159.202
Lane, C.
University of Southern California
[email protected]
Kärnä, E.
University of Eastern Finland
Lange, N.
McLean Hospital
[email protected]
134.002, 151.002,
171.039, 171.041
125.211
[email protected]
124.139
Labouesse, M.
Swiss Federal Institute of
Technology
[email protected]
170.007
Langefeld, C.
Wake Forest Health Sciences,
Center for Public Health
Genomics and Department of
Biostatistical Sciences
[email protected]
La-Vu, M.
UCLA
Langhorne, P.
Prometheus Research, LLC
[email protected]
137.004
Ladd-Acosta, C.
Johns Hopkins University
[email protected]
125.189, 183.002
[email protected]
LaFauci, G.
Institute for Basic Research in
Developmental Disabilities
[email protected]
125.200, 171.035
Lansiquot, S. S.
Yale University School
of Medicine
Larson, M.
Brigham Young University
[email protected]
172.080
Lahiri, D.
Indiana University School
of Medicine
[email protected]
Lartseva, A.
[email protected]
Donders Centre for Neuroscience
109.165
Lai, M.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
109.162, 124.156,
125.183, 150.001,
171.029
LaSalle, J.
University of California, Davis,
MIND Institute
[email protected]
170.011
Lainhart, J.
Waisman Center,
University of Wisconsin-Madison
[email protected]
134.002, 151.002,
171.039, 171.041
Lassalle, A.
University of Cambridge
[email protected]
Laird, E.
Common Threads