Winter 2012

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Winter 2012
WINTER 2012
Inside:
Business Management in the
Wild World of Global Economics
2012 Designated as the
“International Year of Cooperatives”
Property for Sale Listings
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Leader
is published quarterly for stockholders, directors
and friends of AgGeorgia Farm Credit.
President
Jack C. Drew, Jr.
800.868.6404
www.aggeorgia.com
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Gerald D. Andrews
John W. Bagwell, Jr.
Edward M. Beckham II
Jack W. Bentley, Jr.
William L. Brown
James B. Carlton
Carroll C. Castleberry
Billy J. Clary
Dan N. Crumpton
Guy A. Daughtrey
J.E. “Bud” Jones
Howard Lawson
Ronney S. Ledford
Joseph M. Meeks
Robert G. (Bobby) Miller
Richard David (Dave) Neff
J. Dan Raines, Jr.
George R. Reeves
Anne G. Sisk
David H. Smith
J. T. Woodard Sr.
Franklin B. Wright
EDITOR & MARKETING MANAGER
Mary Kiley
PUblisher
AgFirst Farm Credit Bank
Publishing DIRECTOr
Donna Camacho
designers
Athina Eargle
Darren Hill
Amanda Simpson
Travis Taylor
PRINTER
Spectra True Colour
Circulation
Kathi DeFlorio
Address changes, questions, comments or
requests for copies of our financial reports
should be directed to AgGeorgia Farm Credit
by writing P.O. Box 1820, Perry, GA 31069 or
calling 800-868-6404. Our quarterly financial
report can also be obtained on our Web site:
www.aggeorgia.com
Email: [email protected]
AgGeorgia.2.winter 2012
Table of Contents
In my travels I frequently mention to
groups that the older I become and
the more I travel, the less I seem to
know. The world is a big place, and
it is often difficult to grasp and “get
your arms around” all the factors that
impact business and family decision
making. Let’s take some of the global ...
Page 4
As one of the youngest business owners
in Warren County Tyler Johnson has
taken a local feed and seed company
and expanded the business to include a
custom fertilizer operation that would
be the envy of many older, more experienced ag services providers.
Born and raised in Warrenton,
Tyler grew up working on the family’s
cattle farm. And, like most all the …
Page 8
4 Business Management in
the Wild World of Global
Economics
5 “Feed My School for a
Week” Pilot Program
Launched
6 AgGeorgia Farm Credit
Heifer Show
8 Tyler Johnson­—Small Town
Entrepreneur
10 2012 Designated as the
“International Year of
Cooperatives”
14 Association News
16 New Outdoor Recreation
Pass Needed at 32 State
Wildlife Areas
17 UGA’s Ag Leadership
Program Ready to Launch
18 Bringing Families Together
in the Kitchen
20 Property for Sale
An agricultural leadership program
in Georgia is scheduled to launch
in the fall of 2012 at the University
of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
The Advancing Georgia’s Leaders
in Agriculture (AGLA) program,
is designed to develop individuals
within agriculture and natural
resources to become more effective
spokespeople for their industry, …
Page 17
AgGeorgia.3.winter 2012
Business Management in the
Wild World of Global Economics
Dr. Dave Kohl
By Dr. David M. Kohl
In my travels I frequently mention to
groups that the older I become and the
more I travel, the less I seem to know. The
world is a big place, and it is often difficult
to grasp and “get your arms around” all the
factors that impact business and family
decision making. Let’s take some of the
global challenges and opportunities, and
bring them down to your kitchen table,
iPad, or board room.
Anyone involved in agricultural
decision making needs to keep the
emerging markets, often called the BRICS
nations of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and
South Africa on their radar screen. These
nations have represented 50 percent of
world economic growth since the year
2000, and therefore have contributed to
increased global demand for food, fiber
and fuel. The growth of these nations has
resulted in a “Swiss cheese” agricultural
economy. That is, certain segments and
enterprises that align with these nations’
demands have had growth and have become
“islands of prosperity.” However, others
in the agriculture industry, particularly
segments of the protein sector, have
experienced elevated input costs, margin
compression, or negative margins.
In your decision-making, remember,
the 8-5-3 Rule. If the GDP (gross domestic
product) of the BRICS nations grows
at approximately an 8 percent rate,
commodity prices will do well, everything
else equal. However, if they slide to a 5
percent growth rate, expect a 20 percent
reduction in commodity prices. If the
GDP growth of these nations falls to a 3
percent rate, it is an indicator of recession
for the BRICS, so expect major correction
of commodity prices.
A key variable that could impact the
BRICS’ growth rates is how the European
economy handles sovereign debt issues.
The European region is one of China’s
largest customers. Recently China eased
bank lending requirements in an attempt
to stimulate growth in response to the
slowing of its economy, partially due
to decreased exports. If the euro was to
break up, this could result in a ripple effect
through the world economy. Currency
valuations and trade agreements would
be in a turbulent mode.
Another factor one must weigh in
global economics is that the BRICS nations
have avoided a period of adversity so
far, unlike others around the world. For
example, the euro sector was doing fine
until the world economic collapse shocked
its nations and banking system, resulting
in discourse amongst the sector. If an
adverse political, military, or social event
was to descend on China and the rest of
the BRICS, surprising their economies, the
implications could be immense for U.S.
agriculture. History has shown the way a
nation handles adversities is similar to an
athletic team aspiring for championship.
An adverse event will either knock them
off track, or they will gather strength and
come back stronger. Only time will tell if
or when this will occur.
The ever-present “black swan” of
oil prices will be a factor in agricultural
decision-making for an extended period
of time. Maintain close surveillance on
issues in the Middle East, particularly
involving Israel, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.
Any disruption could result in a spike of
oil prices, possibly to as high as $200 per
barrel. While the probability is small, this
planning aspect needs to be considered.
Shifting focus to the developed
countries including the U.S., business
models and planning must be developed
for a 1 percent to 2 percent GDP growth
rate for these regions of the world, with
the constant threat of recession. Several
major headwinds to these countries are high
AgGeorgia.4.winter 2012
levels of federal debt, an aging population,
and expensive entitlement programs. These
factors, along with a dismal housing market
and high rates of unemployment, will be the
variables that contribute to slow to modest
growth at best for industries and enterprises
tied to developed countries’ economies.
While my comments thus far may
sound somewhat negative regarding global
economics, opportunity abounds for the
agricultural industry. One must conduct
financial scenario planning to outline strategies and actions given volatile times. Next,
if your operation is profitable, develop a
plan to allocate profits to their best uses,
and build reserves of working capital and
cash in case of financial adversity. Position
your business for the next opportunity with
a disciplined growth strategy. Yes, global
economics are intimidating and sometimes
difficult to comprehend; however, sound,
disciplined decision making in conjunction
with a strong relationship lender and team
of advisors will be critical in navigating the
global economic whitewaters. z
David Kohl received his M.S. and Ph.D.
degrees in Agricultural Economics from
Cornell University. For 25 years, Kohl
was Professor of Agricultural Finance and
Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship in the Department of Agricultural
and Applied Economics at Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, Virginia.
Kohl is currently President of AgriVisions, LLC, a knowledge-based consulting
business providing cutting-edge programs
to leading agricultural organizations
worldwide. He is also business coach and
part owner of Homestead Creamery, a
value added dairy business in the Blue
Ridge Mountains.
“Feed My School for a Week”
Pilot Program Launched
Bleckley, Colquitt, and Hall County Schools Slated to Participate
Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary W.
Black and State School Superintendent Dr.
John Barge have announced a partnership
aimed at increasing awareness about the
importance of proper nutrition and healthy
eating. The “Feed My School for a Week”
program will also teach Georgia students
more about where their food comes from.
Bleckley, Colquitt, and Hall counties
have been selected as the three school systems
to pilot the “Feed My School for a Week”
program during the 2011-2012 school year.
“This is a great leap forward to help
show young Georgians where the food they
eat is grown,” said Commissioner Black.
“Through this program, students will learn
about the processes taken to bring their
school meals from a local Georgia farm to
the cafeteria table, while simultaneously
receiving a healthy, delicious meal.”
“Georgia is second in the nation in
childhood obesity,” Superintendent Barge
said. “The ‘Feed My School for a Week’
program is a great first step in raising
students’ awareness of nutritional options
as well as promoting healthier meals in
our schools.”
The phrase “Farm-to-School” is
becoming increasingly popular in the U.S.
when it comes to offering healthy, fresh
produce options to students. To keep
Georgia a step above the rest, the State
Departments of Education and Agriculture
have combined their efforts to better assist
all school districts in this initiative.
The “Feed My School for a Week”
program aims to help bridge the gap in
the nutritional value and quality of food
served in Georgia schools, while providing
more farm to cafeteria opportunities. The
result will be healthier Georgia students,
decreased barriers in farm to school efforts
and increased awareness as students learn
and experience, both educationally and
nutritionally, where their food comes from.
Each of the three school systems will
be represented by an elementary school in
their district. During a one-week period
in the spring semester, all lunches served
out of each selected school’s cafeteria will
consist of 75-100 percent Georgia-grown
food. The schools will host an agriculture
guest speaker, hold “taste tests” for Georgia
commodities, and conduct an essay contest.
There will also be an art contest at each
school that is focused on a single Georgia
commodity, in addition to several other
educational activities throughout the
designated week. z
To learn more about the program, please visit:
http://agr.georgia.gov/feed-my-school-for-a-week.aspx
AgGeorgia.5.winter 2012
AgGeorgia Farm Credit Heifer Show
The 23rd annual Northeast Georgia Farm
Credit Heifer Show was held Saturday,
December 10, 2011, at the White County Ag
Center in Cleveland. More than 80 animals
were entered making for a long but exciting
show day. z
Results
Supreme Champion Female was shown by
Taylor Wheless, % Simmental Champion
Reserve Supreme Female was shown by
Olivia Minish, Hereford Champion
Third Overall Female was shown by
Samantha Allen, Angus Champion
Fourth Overall Female was shown by
Hanna Panter, Red Angus Champion
Fifth Overall Female was shown by Macy
Seagraves, % Simmental Reserve
Fancy Female Review:
1st Place: Jackson County
2nd Place: Oglethorpe County
3rd Place: Habersham County
Taylor Wheless, of the Oglethorpe FFA, took home the Supreme Champion Female award.
GCCPA:
1st Place:Taylor Wheless, GCCPA #234
2nd Place: Chyanne Pope, GCCPA #68
Superior Club/Chapter Award Division 1
1st Place: Jackson County 4-H
2nd Place: Banks County Middle FFA
Stockman’s Quiz Awards:
Junior: Landis Seagraves
Heidi Seagraves
Senior: Macy Seagraves
Johnathan Barrett
Chris Merk Showman Award:
Recipient: Garrett Whitworth
Stockman’s Quiz Award winners Heidi
Seagraves, Junior Second; Landis Seagraves,
Junior First; Johnathan Barrett, Senior Second;
Macy Seagraves, Senior First
AgGeorgia.6.winter 2012
Garrett Whitworth of the Madison County
FFA, winner of the Chris Merk Showman
Award, is shown with AgGeorgia Farm
Credit’s Patricia Fields
Experts in Ag Lending.
Meet our Sandersville staff—branch manager Kay Bedgood and her
staff work hard to make sure our members receive the newest loan
products available on the market, keep your interest rates low, keep
your patronage program strong and provide you with service beyond
compare. Call or come by the Sandersville branch office and let us
show you what our experience and knowledge can do for you.
We’ve got you covered—Row Crops, Equipment Loans, Land,
Operating Expenses. Call us today!
From the left, Renny Lindsey, Kay Bedgood, Christy Bryan, and Sarah Williams
775 Sparta Road
Sandersville, Georgia
478.552.6922
www.aggeorgia.com
Tyler Johnson­—
Small Town Entrepreneur
By Mary Kiley
As one of the youngest business owners
in Warren County, Tyler Johnson has
taken a local feed and seed company and
expanded the business to include a custom
fertilizer operation that would be the
envy of many older, more experienced ag
services providers.
Born and raised in Warrenton, Tyler
grew up working on the family’s cattle
farm. And like most all the farmers in the
area, he knew the owner of the local feed
and seed store, Mr. Gene Smith, who had
run Smith Farm Supply since the mid-1950s.
While Tyler was a junior in college, Mr.
Gene decided it was time to retire as he
was approaching the age of 70. He told
Tyler that he was ready to sell the store
and offered Tyler the opportunity to
purchase the business. So Tyler Johnson left
the halls of higher education and entered
the world of feed, seed, lawn and garden,
hardware, fencing, animal health supplies,
and fertilizer. For several months beginning
in the fall of 2007, he worked with Mr.
Smith and the staff of the store to learn
the business; at the age of 21, he became
the proud owner of Smith Farm Supply in
Warrenton, Georgia.
His first year in the business, Tyler had
five fertilizer spreaders; he bought a truck
and spreader for chicken litter and has in
succeeding years continued to expand the
custom fertilizer segment of the business.
There is now a fleet of 14 spreaders for litter,
liquid and granular fertilizer, herbicide
and pesticides as well as tender trucks,
nurse tanks, and portable storage tanks. “I
wanted to expand the original business to
emphasize the custom fertilizer operation
but still keep the local feed and seed store,”
says Tyler. Liquid nitrogen is one of their
biggest sellers; in 2010 he increased the
on-site storage from 36,000 to 250,000
gallons. “We do a lot of business trucking
and spraying liquid nitrogen.”
“Warrenton is a good location for a
custom fertilizer business. North of town
is mostly cow-calf operations; south of us
is mostly row crops, so we’re in a good
One of the biggest markets is liquid nitrogen.
In December of 2010 storage was increased to
250,000 gallons.
The custom fertilizer business now consists of a fleet of 14 spreaders as well as tender trucks, nurse
tanks and portable storage tanks.
AgGeorgia.8.winter 2012
At top: Smith Farm Supply still is the place to
go in Warrenton for hardware, fencing, feed,
seed, lawn and garden supplies and animal
health supplies.
“Whether a farmer needs liquid nitrogen or a custom blend of fertilizer
we have the resources to target their specific nutrient requirements.”
location to serve both worlds,” Tyler
continues, “We fertilize a lot of hay but
also cotton, corn, peanuts, and small grains
as well as some pecan groves and food plots
for hunters. Whether a farmer needs liquid
nitrogen or a custom blend of fertilizer, we
have the resources to target their specific
nutrient requirements.”
In 2008 the price of fertilizer soared,
making customized fertilizer plans even
more important for controlling input
costs for crops. Farmers depend on soil
sample reports to determine the necessary
balance of fertilizer inputs for each crop
and field. The employees at Smith Farm
Supply customize fertilizer blends based
on soil sample reports. They also can apply
chemicals, herbicides, and pesticides for
any size job. “We do it all, any size job from
a 1/10 of an acre deer food plot to 10,000
acres of row crops. It is a seasonal business.
April and May are crazy months,” says
Tyler, “We are busy with lime, granular
fertilizer, liquid fertilizer, and chicken
litter. During the summer months we
work mainly with liquid nitrogen, and
late summer through early fall we do a lot
of food plots for hunters.”
With the recent opening of a second
store in Lincolnton, the fertilizer and
chemical operation serves an area of a 50-60
mile radius from Warrenton, including
the counties of Wilkes, Lincoln, Greene,
“We do it all, any size job
from a 1/10 of an acre deer
food plot to 10,000 acres of
row crops. It is a seasonal
business. April and May
are crazy months.”
Oglethorpe, Oconee, Madison, Taliaferro,
McDuffie, Burke, Jefferson, Glascock,
Washington, Richmond, and the area
around McCormick, South Carolina.
Even though the custom fertilizer
business has grown in the past few years
the feed and seed side of the business
continues to be an important landmark
in the community. The building housing
the feed and seed store was originally
constructed in the 1930’s as a cotton
warehouse; Tyler’s grandfather helped
build the structure. As the name implies,
a lot of feed is warehoused and sold here;
feed for everything from cats and dogs,
goats, birds, horses, and cattle.
“None of this would have been
possible without the help of Farm Credit,”
says Tyler. He has been a member of
AgGeorgia for about two years now. “We
did most of the work for the loan over the
phone with Valda Tanner.”
“Tyler has a good head for business,
a good business plan, and works hard to
make his operation a success,” says Kay
Bedgood, Tyler’s Farm Credit loan officer
since Valda Tanner retired last year.
For more information about Smith
Farm Supply, their feed, or custom fertilizer
business, give Tyler Johnson a call at
706/465-3366. z
Tyler Johnson, with AgGeorgia loan officer Kay Bedgood, purchased Smith Farm Supply in 2008.
AgGeorgia.9.winter 2012
2012 Designated as the
“International Year of Cooperatives”
By James T. Midcap and Henry Clay, Extension Horticulturists, Retired
United Nations Resolution 64/136, adopted
by the General Assembly on December 18,
2009, designates the year 2012 as the “International Year of Cooperatives.”
During the first session of the 112th
Congress of the United States the Senate
passed resolution #87 designating the
year of 2012 as the “International Year
of Cooperatives.”
Just how important are cooperatives
in the United States? Take a look at these
statistics from the Senate resolution:
•There are more than 29,000 cooperatives with 120,000,000 members in
the U.S.
•Cooperatives in the U.S. generate
2,000,000 jobs and contribute substantially to the economy with annual
sales of $652,000,000,000 and assets
of $3,000,000,000,000.
What is a cooperative?
A cooperative is a user-owned and usercontrolled business that distributes
benefits on the basis of use. To understand
what these terms mean, let’s compare a
cooperative to other forms of business.
In the United States, most businesses
are owned by individuals, partnerships
or corporations.
•An individual who owns a business
is called a sole proprietor. The sole
proprietor controls the business
and receives all the profits the
business makes.
•In a partnership, the partners own
and control the business and share its
profits in proportion to each person’s
percent ownership in the business.
•In most corporations, stockholders
own the business. When people buy
stock in a corporation, they become
owners of the business. Usually, a
stockholder’s voting power or control
of the corporation is determined by
the number of shares of stock he
owns. When the corporation makes
a profit and declares a dividend, the
stockholders receive dividends. Each
stockholder’s share of the corporation’s profits is based on the number
of shares of stock they own. This
type of corporation is often referred
to as investor-owned or investororiented corporation, also called an
IOF (investor-owned firm).
Cooperatives are also organized
as corporations; however, they operate
differently than investor-oriented corporations in three fundamental ways. In a
cooperative corporation:
•The people who use the cooperative
own the business. In most cooperatives, that means that the only people
who can purchase stock in the
cooperative are those who are using
its services. For example, you must
borrow from a Farm Credit cooperative in order to own Farm Credit
stock or participation certificates.
•The people who use the cooperative
control the business. In most cooperatives, that means the only people who
can vote on cooperative matters are
those who use the cooperative (and,
thus, own stock in the cooperative).
•The profits of the cooperative are
distributed to the users of the
cooperative. Each user’s share of the
cooperative’s profits is based—not
on the amount of stock the member
owns—but on the amount of business
the member has done with the cooperative. In a Farm Credit cooperative,
only eligible borrowers stand to share
in the association’s profits, and each
borrower’s share is proportional to
the amount of interest the association
earned on the borrower’s loan.
AgGeorgia.10.winter 2012
Why are cooperatives
formed?
To understand why cooperatives are
formed, let’s go back in time to the birth
of the United States. In colonial times, there
wasn’t a lot of capital or money available
to farmers to finance their businesses.
There weren’t banks in rural areas where
farmers could borrow money to purchase
land. That’s why farmers organized their
own credit cooperatives wherein members
of the cooperatives pooled their money and
loaned it out to other members to finance
land purchases.
Why were these colonial cooperatives
formed? Because the marketplace was not
meeting the needs of the colonial farmer.
Market failure is one of the primary
reasons cooperatives are formed. Other
reasons include:
•To benefit from economies of size.
One farmer, acting on his own, may
not be able to afford the costs of
building and maintaining a vegetable
packing plant or cotton gin. But
several farmers can join together to
form a cooperative to own and operate
the packing plant or gin.
•To provide missing services. Rural
America was kept in the dark for 50
years after the invention of the electric
light bulb. By the mid-1930’s, only one
in 10 farms in the U.S. had electric
power. Why? The electric companies
could not provide electricity to rural
areas because farmers lived too far
apart and were unable to pay the rates
necessary to make service profitable.
With help from the Rural Electrification Administration, farmers and
others living in rural areas formed
electric cooperatives to bring
electricity to the farm.
A cooperative is a user-owned and user-controlled business
that distributes benefits on the basis of use.
•To achieve market power. Farmers
often join together to purchase
supplies in bulk. Doing so enables
them to lower the cost of supplies
to each individual farmer. Similarly,
by forming bargaining cooperatives,
farmers can negotiate with commodity
buyers to assure themselves of competitive prices for the sale of the products
they produce.
•To assure a source of supplies.
Farmers need sources and markets
they can depend upon. During the
energy crisis of the 1970’s, domestic
fertilizer prices were controlled.
Investor-owned U.S. fertilizer
companies sold their output to the
highest bidders on the world market,
creating fertilizer shortages at home.
However, farmers who belonged to
supply cooperatives had first call on
their cooperatives’ output.
•To assure markets for commodities
produced. Access to a market is a
major concern to farmers who produce
perishable crops, such as fruits or
vegetables. If a farmer loses his market,
he can lose all of his investment in
his crop. Therefore, membership in
a cooperative may offer farmers more
security than a year-to-year contract
with an investor-owned processor.
The Basic Cooperative
Principles
Soon after the Revolutionary War in the
United States, routes to the West opened
up to Americans. Farmers who needed
land simply picked up and moved west to
claim new land. As a result, the demand for
credit to finance land purchases abated, and
the Colonial cooperatives died out in the
U.S. But the ideas upon which they were
founded didn’t die. Instead, they traveled
across the Atlantic to Europe and were
used to develop a system of cooperative
Land Banks in Germany. This was called
the German Landschaft System.
President Woodrow Wilson (seated) signing the Federal Farm Loan Act on July 17, 1916.
AgGeorgia.11.winter 2012
In 1852, a group of 28 merchants
formed a cooperative in Rochdale, England.
The merchants, who came to be known as
the Rochdale Pioneers, formed a consumer
cooperative selling primarily consumer
goods such as food and clothing. The
group wanted their business to succeed,
so they studied the successes and failures
of several cooperatives that had preceded
them. From their studies, they formed a set
of rules for organizing and conducting their
cooperative. Today, these rules are known
as the Rochdale Principles.
The Rochdale Principles worked so
well that they were adopted by many of the
cooperatives that followed in time. Today,
Farm Credit and most other cooperatives
follow some of the Rochdale Principles.
These principles include:
•Service at cost. Service at cost doesn’t
mean non-profit. Cooperatives are
expected to earn profits. It’s what the
co-op does with its profits that distinguish it from other businesses. In the
Farm Credit philosophy, service at cost
means that our cooperative returns to
users (borrower/members) earnings
over and above the amount needed for
capital and operating expenses.
•Financial obligation and benefits
proportional to use. This means
that cooperative members have an
obligation to finance the cooperative—
that is, to provide capital for the
cooperative—and the amount of an
individual’s investment in the cooperative is determined by the amount of
business he does with the cooperative.
The more business a member does, the
greater the financial obligation. It also
means that the benefits the member
derives from the cooperative are based
on his use of the co-op’s services.
Continued on page 12
2012 Designated as the “international Year of Cooperatives” (continued from page 11)
In the Farm Credit philosophy,
this means that each member has an
obligation to capitalize the association, and his investment or stock
requirement is based on the amount
of money he borrows—to a point.
This principle is demonstrated
by your ACA’s Capitalization Plan
which requires members to purchase
stock in your ACA in an amount
equal to 2% of their loans. “To a
point” is demonstrated by the fact
that the stock requirement is capped
at a maximum of $1,000. The stock
requirement is capped at $1,000
because we believe that most of our
capital should come from earnings,
not from member investments.
Members receive benefits in a
cooperative according to their use
of the cooperative’s services. A Farm
Credit member’s primary benefit is
his patronage refund.
•Limited return on equity capital.
This principle means that the cooperative returns benefits to members
based on usage, not equity ownership.
Members should not join a cooperative
with the objective of getting a return
on their equity investment (stock)
in the cooperative. Instead, their
objective should be to obtain a service
at the lowest cost after the cooperative
meets its operating expenses and
capital needs.
•Democratic control. Democratic
control of the cooperative is the last
basic cooperative principle. In Farm
Credit and most other cooperatives,
this means “one man, one vote” or,
better said, “one member, one vote.”
Cooperative pioneers recognized
that a cooperative must be governed
by its members on their basis of their
status as member-users (C stock versus
A stock) and not as investors in the capital
structure of the cooperative. Voting
power, the voting process and director
selection rules and member rights to
participate in cooperative affairs express
the member-control principle.
Patronage Refunds
Patronage Refunds differentiate us in
the marketplace.
Other lenders can match us headto-head on rates, products and service.
However, it is our ability to share our
profits with our borrowers that distinguishes us in the marketplace and is often
the primary reason a borrower will choose
Farm Credit over the competition.
How does Farm Credit share its profits
with its member-users?
Most businesses return their profits
to their investors, not their customers.
However, because your association is
organized as a cooperative, it can return its
profits to its customers, or member-users.
One of the basic cooperative principles is
the “user-benefit principle”; that is, users
stand to benefit from a cooperative’s
successful operations.
Here’s how Farm Credit practices that
principle: At the end of each fiscal year,
your Farm Credit association determines
its total income and expenses. Income
Farm Credit puts our
profits in your pocket!
AgGeorgia.12.winter 2012
remaining after all expenses are deducted
(net income) can then be distributed in
accordance with the bylaws.
Your association’s board of directors
can elect to:
•retain all of the net income to
strengthen the association’s capital
position, or
•distribute some or all of the association’s net income to members by
declaring a dividend on stock or
declaring a patronage refund.
What is a patronage refund?
A patronage refund:
•is a way of distributing the association’s net income to borrowers. A
borrower’s refund is based on the
proportion of interest earned on his
loan to the total interest earned by
the association.
•may be paid in cash, allocated
surplus, stock, or any combination
of these items.
How do patronage refunds benefit your
Farm Credit association?
Patronage refunds can help your
association reduce its tax expense, and
maintain a strong capital position.
This helps the entire membership
because an association with a strong capital
position is better able to offer competitive
interest rates, ensure a constant supply
of credit and provide for the retirement
of member equity held in the form of
allocated surplus.
Unlike other corporations, where
profits are taxed twice—when earned
by the corporation and when distributed
to owners as dividends—a cooperative’s
profits are taxed only once when they’re
distributed as a patronage refund.
Your cooperative is allowed a tax
deduction for the amount of net income
that it distributes in the form of a qualified
patronage refund. Therefore, to effectively
manage the association’s tax expense and
maintain a strong capital position, your
association’s board may elect to distribute
taxable earnings to members as a qualified
patronage refund.
What is Allocated Surplus?
Members, through their boards,
usually elect to leave a portion of the
patronage refund in the cooperative
to help keep its operations on a sound
financial basis.
The retained portion of each member’s
patronage refund is recorded on the books
of the association, or allocated to each
member’s equity account. This retained
patronage refund is called Allocated
Surplus. Allocated Surplus can be either
Qualified or Non-Qualified.
Qualified Allocated Surplus
•is a portion of the patronage refund
your association retains for the
purpose of accumulating capital.
•can be retired only when approved by
the association’s board of directors.
The association’s goal is to operate
efficiently and maintain a strong
permanent capital base. It is the
board’s responsibility to continually
monitor the financial position of the
association. The board may vote to
retire Qualified Allocated Surplus
when it determines the association
does not need it for capital.
•is issued in annual series, with each
series being identified by the year
in which it was issued. Similarly,
allocated surplus can be retired only
by series, or portions thereof. Under
the by-laws, the association cannot
honor requests from members to retire
individual allocated surplus accounts.
The Internal Revenue Code allows
your association to claim a tax deduction
for a patronage distribution made in the
form of Qualified Allocated Surplus in
the year it is issued, as long as at least 20
percent of the total patronage refund is
paid in cash. Since the Internal Revenue
Code requires that patronage distributions
in the form of Qualified Allocated Surplus
be treated as taxable income in the same
manner as cash distributions, association
members must declare such patronage
refunds as taxable income in the year they
receive them.
Members do not have to pay tax on
Qualified Allocated Surplus when it is
retired since they paid tax on it when it
was issued.
Non-Qualified Allocated Surplus
•is another way your association can
distribute its net income. If your
association’s board declares part or
all of a patronage refund in the form
of Non-Qualified Allocated Surplus,
the association will pay tax on the
Non-Qualified Allocated Surplus
portion in the year it is issued.
•Members do not pay tax on this part
of the refund in the year it is issued.
However, when the association’s
board elects to retire Non-Qualified
Allocated Surplus, the association
may take a tax deduction on the
amount retired, and the amount
retired will become taxable income
to association members.
How does a board determine when to
revolve (or retire/redeem) Qualified or
Non-Qualified Allocated Surplus?
Just as a farmer needs an adequate
net worth or equity position to grow and
protect his business during lean years,
an association needs a strong permanent
capital base to grow and maintain a sound
financial condition. In accordance with
FCA Regulations and sound business
principles, each board has adopted a plan
to accumulate and maintain sufficient
permanent capital.
It is the board’s responsibility to
continually monitor the financial position
of the association. The board may vote to
retire Qualified Allocated Surplus when it
determines the association does not need
it for capital.
The board considers several factors,
many of which are outlined in its Capitalization Plan, before it decides to revolve
or retire Allocated Surplus. These include:
•Capability of management,
•Quality of operating policies, procedures and internal controls,
•Quality and quantity of earnings,
AgGeorgia.13.winter 2012
•Asset quality and the adequacy of
the allowance for losses to absorb
potential loss within the loan and
lease portfolios,
•Sufficiency of liquid funds,
•Needs of the ACA’s customer base,
and
•Other risks as the association’s operations may expose it to.
How do patronage refunds benefit Farm
Credit borrowers?
Patronage refunds benefit borrowers
by reducing their cost of borrowing. We
charge competitive rates on our loans—
rates comparable to those charged by other
lenders for similar loans—and we reduce
our borrowers’ effective cost of borrowing
when we pay patronage refunds.
How are patronage refunds issued?
The cash portion of a member’s
patronage refund may be issued by check
or recorded on the association’s books in
a special account. When any portion of a
patronage refund is paid in cash, the board
of directors may elect to set a minimum
check amount as a means of controlling
expenses. Cash distributions below the
minimum check amount are recorded in a
special account called Patronage Payable.
On the Notification of Patronage Refund,
refunds placed in Patronage Payable appear
under “Not Distributed.”
Members may request a check for
monies in their Patronage Payable accounts,
request that these amounts be applied to
their loans, or leave these distributions “on
account” with their association.
Patronage refunds issued in the form
of allocated surplus can only be retired,
or paid to members, upon approval of the
board. Under the bylaws, the association
cannot honor requests from members to
retire individual allocated surplus accounts.
Each time a patronage distribution is
issued, your Farm Credit association will
notify eligible members of their patronage
refunds. The notification will include a
breakdown of the amount paid in cash (by
check or Patronage Payable entry) and the
amount paid in allocated surplus or stock. z
Association News
New Employee
Christy Bryan has joined the Sandersville
branch office as a loan officer. A graduate of The
University of Georgia College of Agricultural and
Environmental Sciences with a BSA Degree in
Agribusiness, Christy is a director on the Georgia
Young Farmer Association State Board, a member
of the Georgia Cattlemen’s Association and active
in Georgia Farm Bureau.
Retirements
Tommy Davidson, branch manager of the Cordele
office, has retired after 33 years of service to
AgGeorgia Farm Credit. Congratulations and best
wishes, Tommy!
Wendell Breedlove has retired after 24 years as a
loan officer in the Cordele branch office and Special
Assets Department. Congratulations, Wendell, and
best wishes for retirement!
Promotions & Relocations
James Mock has been
promoted to branch
manager of the Cordele
office. James served
previously as a loan
officer in the Ocilla
branch office.
Rosanna Herren is
Regional Lending
Manager overseeing
the operations of the
Dublin, Montezuma,
Perry, Sandersville, and
Waynesboro branch
offices.
Jim Hodges is
Regional Lending
Manager overseeing
the operations of
the Clarkesville,
Gainesville, Royston,
and Washington branch
offices.
Nick Hartley has
been promoted to
branch manager of the
Perry office. Prior to
this assignment Nick
served as a loan officer
in the Special Assets
Department and in the
Washington branch
office.
Jim Agnew is
Regional Lending
Manager overseeing
the operations of
the Cartersville,
Chatsworth, LaFayette,
and Rome branch
offices.
Gordon Hughes is
Regional Lending
Manager overseeing
the operations of the
Cordele, Moultrie,
Nashville, Ocilla,
Quitman, Sylvester, and
Tifton branch offices.
AgGeorgia.14.winter 2012
Service Awards
Each year AgGeorgia recognizes staff
members who have reached milestones in
their years of service to Farm Credit. This
year we say thank you to the following
employees who have dedicated their careers
to the success of AgGeorgia Farm Credit.
35 Years of Service:
1.Sharon Childers – Cordele
2. Valda Tanner (Retired) – Sandersville
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
30 Years of Service:
3. Jack Drew – Perry Corporate
4.Donna Edwards – Washington
25 Years of Service:
5.Rickey Graham – Dublin
6. Christy Rowe – Nashville
7. Hal Ragan – Cartersville
8. Kay Bennett – Sylvester
9. Karen Norton – Moultrie
10. Linda Currie – LaFayette
11.Tom Teate – Cordele
12.Danny Thomas – Dublin
20 Years of Service:
13. Jamie Jones – Perry
14. Pat Thomas (Retired) – Perry Corporate
15 Years of Service:
15. Kay Bedgood – Sandersville
16.Ernie Ghee – Cartersville
10 Years of Service:
17. Pam Barry – Ocilla
18. Francis Reno – Royston
5 Years of Service:
19. Carrie McCall – Perry Corporate
20. Faith Howard – Dublin
21. Gene Kitchens – Perry
22.Steven Terrell – Royston
23. Michael Tankersley – Ocilla
24. John Peters – Moultrie
AgGeorgia.15.winter 2012
New Outdoor Recreation Pass
Needed at 32 State Wildlife Areas
The new Georgia Outdoor Recreation Pass
has been in effect a few weeks and will help
with much-needed maintenance on state
wildlife areas.
Thirty-two sites managed by the
Georgia Wildlife Resources Division
now require the Georgia Outdoor Recreation Pass (GORP) for visitors ages
16-64. Exempt from the requirement are
individuals who have a valid WMA License,
Honorary License, Sportsmen’s License,
Lifetime License, or Three-Day Hunting
and Fishing License.
In all, Wildlife Resources Division
manages more than 100 properties across
the state. However, GORP impacts only
about one-third of the areas—the spots
with the highest traffic by all users.
The GORP requirement began Jan. 1,
although communications outreach about
“The GORP revenue will be directed to long
overdue maintenance projects such as roadways,
trails, parking lots, and other facilities.”
the new pass going into effect began in fall
2011. Signs are posted on affected properties
and a complete list of sites is online at
www.georgiawildlife.com.
The new access pass provides for
users including hikers, birders, cyclists,
and horse-riders to help cover maintenance
at designated wildlife management areas,
public fishing areas, and natural areas. That
work has been funded mostly by hunters
and anglers.
“As budgets have become tighter over
the last few years, maintenance funds have
been stretched thin,” says Dan Forster,
director, Wildlife Resources Division.
“Hunters and anglers have been paying the bill
through state license fees and federal excise
taxes to maintain these properties. However,
other users contribute to the general wear
and tear of the sites too. The GORP revenue
will be directed to long overdue maintenance
projects such as roadways, trails, parking lots,
and other facilities.”
Quick Notes on GORP:
Forster explains that the 32 statemanaged properties were chosen through
extensive public involvement. GORP was
addressed in a total of 12 public meetings
in 2010 and 2011. The sites were identified
as experiencing the most impact by recreational visitors. Because GORP is a new
requirement, enforcement will be an educational process, Forster adds.
For individuals, a GORP costs $3.50
for three days or $19 for a year. For groups
of eight or fewer people, the pass is $10
(three days) and $35 (annual). A transaction fee applies ($2.50 online, $3 at retail
license agents or $5 by phone).
On sale since November 1, 2011, the
GORP is available at www.georgiawildlife.
com/recreational-licenses, by calling 1-800366-2661, or through retail license agents.
To learn more, see a map of the areas
or review frequently asked (and answered)
questions, please visit www.georgiawildlife.
com/Georgia-Outdoor-Recreational-Pass. z
•You can purchase a GORP at www.georgiawildlife.com, by phone
(1-800-366-2661) or at a license retail agent (agents are listed online).
•A GORP is $3.50 for three days, $19 for an annual pass. Group passes are
also available. Transaction fees apply.
•GORP requirements apply only to people age 16-64. Youth ages 15 and
under are exempt from GORP. Adults 65 and older are also exempt.
•People who have a valid WMA License, Honorary License, Sportsmen’s
License, Lifetime License or Three-Day Hunting and Fishing License.
These licenses already provide for access to the properties. Other hunting
and fishing licenses do not qualify for a GORP exemption.
AgGeorgia.16.winter 2012
UGA’s Ag Leadership Program
Ready to Launch
Dr. Rochelle Strickland
By Hannah McClain, Ag Communication Major
An agricultural leadership program in
Georgia is scheduled to launch in the
fall of 2012 at the University of Georgia’s
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The Advancing Georgia’s
Leaders in Agriculture (AGLA) program,
is designed to develop individuals within
agriculture and natural resources to
become more effective spokespeople for
their industry, establish strong allegiances
across the state and nation to work
together on issues, and further develop
their personal and professional leadership
development skills and abilities.
Director of the leadership program, Dr.
Rochelle Strickland, is a faculty member
within the Department of Agricultural
Leadership, Education, and Communication and has a strong interest in adult
leadership development, specifically
within the agricultural industry. Prior to
coming to UGA, Strickland worked with
the Wedgworth Leadership Institute for
Agriculture and Natural Resources at the
University of Florida and focused her
research on the outcomes and impacts of
similar programs. From these experiences,
Strickland is basing the program model
upon the successful and effective models
used throughout the U.S. in states such as
Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Washington,
just to name a few. Similar to many of the
other state programs, the UGA program
will include a national and international
study trip along with the in-state travel
throughout Georgia and consist of a
two-year period for each class.
The immediate focus for the program
is participant recruitment. Participants
will be selected through a nomination,
application, and interview process.
Nominations can be made by individuals
from within the state of Georgia that are
involved in Georgia’s agriculture and
natural resources industries. AGLA will
begin accepting nominations for the first
class in May 2012 with applications to be
accepted through July 2012.
“Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in
Agriculture is an opportunity to bring
together individuals from across the state
of Georgia to continue their growth as
leaders, provide them with a stronger
understanding of issues, and assist them in
becoming more effective advocates for the
agricultural industry as we are faced with
new challenges each day,” said Strickland.
The class will consist of approximately
25-30 diverse individuals to establish a
stronger, more in-depth level of discussion,
perspective, and expertise. The 22-month
long program will consist of approximately
“Advancing Georgia’s Leaders in Agriculture is
an opportunity to bring together individuals from
across the state of Georgia to continue their growth as
leaders, provide them with a stronger understanding
of issues, and assist them in becoming more effective
advocates for the agricultural industry as we are faced
with new challenges each day.”
AgGeorgia.17.winter 2012
50 days and utilize over 300 expert speakers,
discussion panels, tours and other adult
learning methods to enhance the participant’s experience. The locations and
topics of the program will be based upon
the current issues surrounding Georgia’s
agriculture and natural resources industries,
such as water, immigration, and regulation.
For more information or to become
a supporter of AGLA, please contact
Program Director, Dr. Rochelle Strickland
at [email protected] or (706) 542-1204. z
Director of the leadership program,
Dr. Rochelle Strickland, is a faculty
member within the Department of
Agricultural Leadership, Education,
and Communication and has a strong
interest in adult leadership development.
Bringing Families Together
in the Kitchen
Family Features
It’s not always easy to make healthy
food choices, particularly if it involves
changing your eating habits. Start by
bringing your loved ones together in the
kitchen - studies have proven that cooking
together as a family not only strengthens
the bond between parents and children, but
encourages healthy eating habits.
Allowing kids to help in the kitchen
and get their hands dirty by washing,
measuring and mixing teaches them where
their food comes from and builds a sense
of accomplishment. Cooking healthy meals
together is the perfect family activity to
encourage healthy habits and reinforce
family time. The trick is finding recipes
that encourage participation from children
of all ages and make parents happy with
good healthful nutrients and flavor.
“Cooking recipes that include whole
grain ingredients like rice can lead to
better meal options for your family as it
attracts healthier, more colorful foods such
as vegetables and fruits,” says Chef Chris
Skolmutch, Culinary Innovation Manager
for Mars Food USA and participant in the
Chefs Move to Schools campaign. “Rice
serves as the perfect kitchen ingredient
because kids enjoy making and eating meals
that are simple yet tasty, while parents
want to make sure they’re eating something
full of proteins, fiber and vitamins.”
For families looking for ways to get
together in the kitchen and start cooking,
here are a few tips provided by Rachael
Ray’s Yum-O, a non-profit which empowers
kids and their families to develop healthy
relationships with food and cooking:
• Measuring: Allow your kids to measure
ingredients using traditional tools (i.e.
cups and teaspoons), and nonconven-
tional methods (i.e. pinch and dash),
to build their own sense of taste.
• Knives and cutting: Instruct your
children on how to use kitchen shears
instead of knives to cut things like
herbs and soft fruits and vegetables
until they (and you) are comfortable
with them using knives.
• Clean up time: Teach your children
the importance of cleaning cutting
utensils and cutting boards after
finishing up, especially when
handling raw meat or poultry.
For more recipe ideas and information,
visit www.UncleBens.com or www.
Facebook.com/UncleBens. z
Chicken & Rice Pot Pie
Total Cook Time: 1 hour, 50 minutes
Makes: 8 servings
Ingredients:
1 cup Uncle Ben’s Converted Brand Rice, dry
3 1/2 cups frozen carrot, peas and corn blend
1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper
2 cans (15 ounces) cream of chicken condensed soup
2 cups water
1 cup milk
1/2 pound chicken breast, 1/2-inch dice
1 sheet puff pastry, commercially prepared
Instructions:
Preheat oven to 375°F.
Mix rice, vegetables, pepper, soup, water, milk and chicken
in a casserole dish.
Cover in foil and bake in oven for 45 minutes.
Uncover and top with puff pastry dough, and bake for another
30 minutes or until top is golden brown.
Serve warm and enjoy together.
Nutrition Information (per serving):
Calories: 210; Fat: 3 grams; Cholesterol: 25 mg; Carbohydrates:
32 grams; Dietary Fiber: 2 grams; Protein: 14 grams; Iron: 10% DV
AgGeorgia.18.winter 2012
Property for Sale
Properties for sale are listed as a service to our readers. Information is furnished by real estate agents and individuals and
AgGeorgia Farm Credit is not responsible for the accuracy of the listing contents. If you have property for sale in Georgia that
you wish to list in the Leader magazine please contact Mary Kiley for details at [email protected] or 770/536-3660 ext 374.
Appling County
LAKE!! $11,000.00, Call Phillip Chastain with
Southern Land Exchange, 706.614.4784 or
706.549.5050
Ben Hill County
52 acres Gorgeous riverfront property. Abundant
with deer and turkey. Boat dock for fishing,
beautiful campsite! Call Brenda @ Southern Traditions Realty & Development, Inc. 2295070622
CULTIVATION, BLUE BERRIES, AND ROAD
FRONTAGE! Nice 145 acre tract bordering Hwy
US 1 in Baxley, Ga. This tract offers 40 +/- acres of
established cultivation, 35 +/- acres of Blue Berries,
and 10 +/- acre corner with two-sided road frontage;
Commercial Potential. This property is in a great
location with endless opportunity. Contact Carter
Group Real Estate at (912) 530-9515, www.cartergroupland.com, or [email protected]
Barrow County
This beautiful 2,900 sq.ft.2 story home sits on 5
acres in Ben Hill County. This property is privacy
in a country setting nestled in among pine trees.
Large master suite down stairs with jetted tub,
large closets, custom cabinets in Kitchen, carpet
and tile floors,french doors. So many amenities
you just have to see to appreciate. MLS # 120169
$ 159,900 For more information call Judy Rood,
Associate Broker/Realtor today 229-425-1443
Berrien County
25 acres of mostly high and dry land with paved
road frontage within one mile of the city limits.
Barrow Co, Tanner’s Bridge, 110 Ac. Frontage on
Appalachee River, paved rd frontage, ideal family
estate, $3272/Ac, Call Mark Costello with Southern
Land Exchange, 706.207.5850 or 706.549.5050
Property is mostly in planted pines (not in CRP
program per owner)with a nice creek along the
eastern side. Rarely do tracts of this size come
available this close to town. This site is perfect
for mini-farm/estate living or as investment grade
property for future development. Site also includes
a 960 s.f. rental house. This house goes with the
property and is sold as-is with no warranties or
disclosure. Call John @ Southern Traditions Realty
& Development, Inc. 2295070395
143 acres Absolutely gorgeous farm with everything to offer. Planted pines varying in age from
10-30 years, beautiful homesite, breathtaking
pond, river frontage. This property is recreational
treasure with its pine forests and natural hardwoods
providing a perfect habitat for deer, turkey and
quail. Call Melissa Taylor @ Southern Traditions
Realty & Development, Inc. 2294451270
28.64 acres of high and dry land within 1.5 miles
of Nashville City limits. This tract is a portion of
the listed tax map & parcel and further described
as lots 7 through 17 per previously surveyed
development as recorded in P.C. 2 Page F-48C
and offered as one tract in this listing. Land is
+-85% in existing cultivation, great building site(s),
mini-farm, or future development. Call John Hogan
@ Southern Traditions Realty & Development,
Inc. 2295070395
Barrow Co, Barrow Lake, 45 Ac, paved rd
frontage, beautiful homesite, SIX ACRE
AgGeorgia.20.winter 2012
189 acres Absolutely gorgeous farm with rolling
hills and 2 ponds! Approx 175 acres in cultivation
with remainder in ponds and natural woods with
some merchantable pines. 2800 sq ft home with 7
acres can be purchased for an additional $100,000.
Call Brenda DeLoach @ Southern Traditions Realty
& Development, Inc. 2295070622
Moody and Valdosta! Must see! Call Ashley Green
@ Southern Traditions Realty & Development,
Inc. 2292513139
Brantley County
The tract can be subdivided into several smaller
parcels. Contact Carter Group Real Estate at (912)
530-9515, www.cartergroupland.com, or [email protected]
cartergroupland.com.
Cherokee County
Bank Owned – Cherokee County – 3 lots in
Lake Arrowhead Community. Gated, pool,
marina, clubhouse, buy one lot or all three lots. $
29,900 each. To schedule a preview call Kenneth
Savage 770-718 8297, Janie Savage 770-6543513 or Savage Real Estate & Auction Co. Inc.
770-983-0066
286 acres Absolutely gorgeous farm with everything to offer! Planted pines varying in ages from
10-30 years old, beautiful home site, breathtaking
pond, and river frontage! This property is a recreational treasure with its pine forests and natural
woodlands providing a natural habitat for deer,
turkey and quail. Historic barn would make a
great cabin! Absolutely gorgeous farm with rolling
hills and 5 ponds! Approx 175 acres in cultivation
with remainder in ponds and natural woods with
some merchantable pines. 2800 sq ft home and
cabin included with sale of property. 300 acres
River Tract check out this new listing has hwy
frontage, lots of river, great for hunting & fishing!
Call Brenda DeLoach @ Southern Traditions Realty
& Development, Inc. 2295070622
300 acres River Tract. Check out this new listing
has hwy frontage, lots of river, great for hunting &
fishing! Call Brenda DeLoach @ Southern Traditions Realty & Development, Inc. 2295070622
Coffee County
TWIN RIVER FRONTAGE! This double river tract
has miles of River Frontage on both the Satilla
River and the Little Satilla River with gorgeous
white sand beach areas. Showcasing 1607 acres,
this tract includes both large and small pines as
well as a large amount of hardwoods. There are
numerous beautiful locations on the rivers. This
peice is perfect for hunting. Great investment
potential. Contact Carter Group Real Estate at
(912) 530-9515, www.cartergroupland.com, or
[email protected]
Camden County
228 acres Price Reduced! Absolutely gorgeous
tract fronting the Satilla River and Wiggins Creek!
This is a hunter’s dream with areas perfect for quail
hunting, deer, turkey...you name it! 20-30 year old
planted pines perfect for future income, gorgeous
oaks, good interior roads. Can also be purchased
with an additional 117 acres and 4300+ sq ft brick
home!!! . Call Brenda DeLoach @ Southern Traditions Realty & Development, Inc. 2295070622
Cook County
382 acres Absolutely gorgeous farm with rolling
hills and 5 ponds! Approx 175 acres in cultivation
with remainder in ponds and natural woods with
some merchantable pines. 2800 sq ft home and
cabin included with sale of property. Call Melissa
Taylor @ Southern Traditions Realty & Development, Inc. 2294451270
HULL ISLAND - 31 acre gorgeous island on White
Oak River near Woodbine and I-95. 243 acres of
upland timber with live oaks, 166 acres marshland.
Own your own perfect recreational retreat that
has it all. Put the tract in a conservation easement
and enjoy the tax savings. Island plus 409 acres
priced at $2,000,000 with a 5% commission paid
to licensed seller. Bickley & Assoc. 478-214-0559.
[email protected]
Great 3 BR/2 BA home on 14.72 acres! Call
Ashley Green @ Southern Traditions Realty &
Development, Inc. 2292513139
Life in the country! Absolutely beautiful Southern
Living Home with split floor plan. 4 BR/3 BA
with optional finished BR or bonus room upstairs.
Gorgeous custom cabinets in kitchen, butler pantry,
and built-ins in den. Very livable home with a shop
to make any man’s dream come true! Convenient to
TIMBER INVESTMENT OR GENTLEMAN FARM! This
tract offers 740 acres of pine plantation, residential
cut pine plantation and pasture. It has good soils
and has great gentleman farm or future development
potential with frontage on paved Highway 110 and
Old Jefferson Hwy in Camden County, Georgia.
AgGeorgia.21.winter 2012
Dawson County
a nice size kitchen w/eating area and a spacious
deck off the back. A utility shed is locatd close
to the house for storage and equipment. Mixed
hardwood and pine offer grat deer and turkey
hunting. Located 10 miles from Elberton and only
1.5 miles to Broad River. Also, convenient to Lake
Thurmond and Lake Russell. Priced Reduced to
$289,000. Contact Eddie Drinkard, 706-318-3636,
emil:[email protected], or visit Web site:
www.DrinkardRealEstateSales.com
49 Hazel Drive - FOR SALE $119,900.00
RECENTLY REDUCED. Dawsonville, GA. Great
home for first time home buyers or investment
property, home is presently leased for $1000.00
per month. Conveniently located minutes from
Ga 400, Dahlonega and North Georgia Premium
Outlet Mall. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home on partial
basement with 2 car drive-under garage in Lake
Lanier neighborhood. Situated on .50 Acre level
lot. Lake access at Nix Bridge Park, Just minutes
away. This home has large kitchen with breakfast
bar and is open to living room and dining area.
Split bedroom plan works great for room-mates,
large master bath with double vanities. This is an
estate property and Sellers are very motivated.
Please call Kay Goodwin at Century 21 Walden
& Co at 678-223-5527 or 706-864-0146 for more
information.
Elbert County
Emanuel County
566 acres located on Hwy. 56 and Little Ohoopee
River. 158 acres of 23 yr. old pines, 115 acres 4 yr.
old pines, 293 acres hardwood, good roads with
food plots. Great Deer and Turkey hunting. 158
acres ready to thin for instant cash flow. Owner
financing. Tract has been pre-qualified for a conservation easement. $1500 per acre. Bickley & Assoc.
[email protected]
The Pond at Flatwoods. This 126 acre tract offers
hunting, fishing, timber investment, and recreation
opportunities! Located on Hester Road in Elbert
County, the property has a private gated entrance. A
3 acre stocked pond is surrounded by a wildlife food
plot. A 12 acre food plot llures the plentiful deer
and turkey on the tract. Good interior roads provide
easy truck and ATV acess through property. Priced
at $2950/AC. Contact Eddie Drinkard, 706-3183636, email:[email protected], or visit
Web site: www.DrinkardRealEstateSales.com
EMANUEL COUNTY 1077 acres. Land that features
Ogeecheee River frontage, 400 + acres of 25 year
old pines, 678 acres of hardwood. Great recreational timber investment. Highway 56 frontage.
Owner will offer owner financing. Tract has been
prequalified for a conservation easement. $2200 per
acre. Bickley & Assoc. 478-214-0559 [email protected]
comsouth.net
Floyd County
Elbert Co, Flatwoods Tract. 196 Ac, creek and
small pond, extensive roads, multiple food plots
and shooting lanes, $2500/Ac, Call Mark Costello
with Southern Land Exchange, 706.207.5850 or
706.549.5050
River Road Hide-A-Way Priced Reduced! A
Long Cove at Lake Russell. This property consists
of 186.29 acres with over 4,700 feet of Corps of
Engineers frontage. Some property lines are within
250 to 3200 feet of the shoreline. Individual tract
sizes are 91.94 acres priced at $325,000 and
94.35 acres priced at $425,000. The private gated
entrance fronts on Dry Fork Landing Road, and
is located 13 miles from Elberton. Property is 1
mile from public boat ramp and within sight of
Lake Russell Park and Arrow Head Point Golf
Course. Beautiful hardwoods with winding stream
through bottom provide an ideal habitat for deer,
turkey and small game. Several established wildlife
food plots. Merchantable pine timber provides for
present and future income. Graveled interior roads
provide easy access to property and good ATV
riding. Contact Eddie Drinkard, 706-318-3636,
email:[email protected], or visit Web
site: DrinkardRealEstateSales.com
Great Family or Hunter’s Retreat!! 62.48 acres
with 3 BRm, 2 Bath home in excellent condition!
A beautiful 2 acre spring fed pond stocked with
bass, bream, and catfish is scenically located in
front of the attractive home. The home also has
a living room with fireplace, central heat and air,
AgGeorgia.22.winter 2012
Willow Springs Farm-Located in Floyd County
near Cave Spring and Rome, Ga. Consists of
147.5 acres and is considered a working farm/
family retreat. Has mature natural stands of pine
and hardwood timber as well as hay fields and
planted pine stands. Improvements include a
new barn, and an absolutely beautifully restored
cabin, circa mid 1800s. Cabin which was used as
an early church also served as slave quarters. It
has an expansive front porch overlooking a 5 acre
fully stocked fishing lake, granite counter tops,
huge great room with exposed beams, state of the
art kitchen. Wild turkey and deer roam the farm.
Asking price is $900,000. contact Tom Ritch at
706-767-2749 [email protected]
Tina Turner, Prudential GA Realty, 706-499-6944
or Larry Copeland, 706-499-5088.
Hancock County
Franklin County
Franklin County – 280.91 Acres. Mostly wooded,
frontage on several creeks, easy access off paved
road, great location, perfect for hunting club.
$688,230. Schedule a preview, call Kenneth Savage
770-718 8297 or Savage Real Estate & Auction Co.
Inc. 770-983-0066
Glynn County
HORSE LOVERS - Habersham County. 25.1 acres
- pasture - paved road - county water - 160 X 250
riding arena - barn - mobile home - 2 additional
septic tanks in ground - owner/agent. $369,900.00
Ga. Licensed # 6866. Larry 706-499-5088
Hancock Co, Sandy Run, 387 Acres. 3 creeks,
Mature timber, close to Lake Sinclair, $1899/Ac,
Call Mark Costello with Southern Land Exchange,
706.207.5850 or 706.549.5050
BANK OWNED, BUFFALO CREEK WATERFRONT! This 1219 acre tract is perfect for a
conservation easement or future investment with
development potential as it offers over a mile of
Buffalo Creek frontage, miles of natural marsh
frontage, some pine plantation and numerous
gorgeous live oak hammocks. Not only does
this piece offer great natural beauty, but it also
includes highway frontage, bordering Ga Hwy
99. This property has so much to offer and could
be used for recreation, future development, or
conservation. This one won’t last long. Make an
offer. Contact Carter Group Real Estate at (912)
530-9515, www.cartergroupland.com, or [email protected]
cartergroupland.com.
Habersham County- Alto Mud Creek Road. 9.917
acres, pasture, fenced, pond, paved road, county
water, great building site. $149,900.00. owner/
agent Ga. license # 6866 Larry 706-499-5088. Road and 1,453 feet of frontage on Glen Harper
Road. 25X36 Pole Barn with electricity. Three
creek bottoms and good interior road system. Great
deer and turkey hunting. All marketable timber
has been sold and will be cut. $995/acre. Contact
Town and Country Real Estate 478-552-5681 www.
tandcrealestate.com
Hart County
Greene County
Bank Owned - Hart County, 194.8 acres. Gently
Greene County – 450 +/- Acres, wooded, varied
topo, creeks. $945,000 Call Kenneth Savage
rolling, partially wooded, partially pasture, creek
frontage, double road frontage. $481,250 To
schedule a preview call Kenneth Savage 770-718
8297, Janie Savage 770-654-3513 or Savage Real
Estate & Auction Co. Inc. 770-983-0066
770-718 8297 or Savage Real Estate & Auction
Co. Inc. 770-983-0066
Habersham County
68.95 Acres located 11 miles West of Sparta,
GA. Land has 500 +/- feet of frontage on Warren
HABERSHAM COUNTY LAKE FRONTAGE 5.86
acres. Private - Wooded - Demorest Area $49,900.00 - Owner/Agent Ga. License # 6866
Hall County
Hall Count y – 33.71 Acres. Wooded, great location
Hart County – 181 Acres. Lays well, rear property
line is Beaverdam Creek, lots of potential. $889,000
Call Kenneth Savage 770-718 8297 or Savage Real
Estate & Auction Co. Inc. 770-983-0066
Houston County
in desirable area, North Hall Schools, double road
frontage. $604,000 Call Janie Savage 770-6543513 or Savage Real Estate & Auction Co Inc
770-983-0066
Custom log home on 15.58 acres with creek in
Demorest. 3 bedroom, 2 baths, Great room boasts
rock FP, wide plank floors, country kitchen with
breakfast room, master suite features jetted tub &
separate closets, upstairs loft could be office/game
room, full basement, pool w/pool house that is
stubbed for a bath, huge back deck, acreage fully
wooded, circular drive. $339,900. MLS 3153825,
Catna Creek Tract ... - 158+/- acres Nice tract for
hunting/timber investment or homesite. The tract
has pine in various stages and hardwood along
Catna creek which forms the eastern boundary.
AgGeorgia.23.winter 2012
Located off GA Hwy 26 East of Elko in Houston
County. $2250/acre For more details, call Real
Estate Insider @478-988-1128
Irwin County
105 +/- acres in Irwin County. A 3/2 doublewide
Henderson Tract .... - This 307 acre tract is mostly
pasture that is fenced. It has a 19 acre lake and a
2 acre lake on the tract, planted pine as well. Elko
creek is the northern boundary. Several barns, shop,
6 inch and 4 inch well.etc are on the property.
Located on Hwy 26 just East of I 75 in Houston
County. $7500/acre For more details, call Real
Estate Insider @478-988-1128
and sits on the east corner of a pond with a screen
porch and a dock just outside the door. 30 acres
of the property are cultivated, estimated 6 acre
pond on property, underground electric on
property. Great hunting location. This is a real
MUST SEE to see its full beauty. MLS # 120362 $342,472.00 Call Judy Rood, Associate Broker/
Realtor 229-425-1443
Great 3/2 home in Irwin County sits on 5
acres,has a lean two barn,shop/machinery
bldg.&utility shed. Fire place in ever y
room,original part of house has bead board walls
and ceilings,huge wrap around porch w/swing. A
REAL MUST SEE to appreciate. MLS #120119.
$ 99,000.00. Call Judy Rood,Associate Broker/
Realtor 229-425-1443
Vacant lots to choose from in Harris Dill Estates in
Irwin County. Paved streets, curbing, gutter and city
Elko Plantation Tract ....1160+/- acres. Beautiful
plantation consisting of planted pines in various
stages with mature hardwood bottoms and dove
fields. Loaded with deer,quail,turkey, hogs and
dove. Has approximately 3 miles of frontage on
Gilbert and Sewell Rds. Flat to gently rolling
topography. Located between Perry and Elko, Ga
in Houston County. $5000/acre For more details,
call Real Estate Insider @478-988-1128
2 acre residential lot located in Pleasure
Lake area. Irwin County just 15 minutes from
Tifton. Great place to put mobile home for that
get away week end just to relax. MLS # 119783 $ 10,700.00 Call Judy Rood, Associate Broker/
Realtor 229-425-1443
water. Nice area to build that new home on. MLS
# 118391 $20,000.00 Call Judy Rood, Associate
broker/Realtor 229-425-1443
Jackson County
Bank Owned – Jackson County – 57 lots in prestigious The Heritage Subdivision. Lots are available
as a whole or individually. $313,500 for all lots.
Individual lot prices vary. To schedule a preview
call Kenneth Savage 770-718 8297, Janie Savage
770-654-3513 or Savage Real Estate & Auction
Co. Inc. 770-983-0066
Lumpkin County
Mobile Home lots in the city limits of Ocilla, Irwin
County. Property has city water, sewer and paved
Burnam Branch Tract .... (Houston County) 201+/-
acres. Nice hunting/investment tract with plenty of
road frontage. Creek frontage on Burnam Branch
forms the North Boundary. Perfect for homesites
or hunting. Located in south Houston County on
GA Hwy 26. $2500/acre For more details, call Real
Estate Insider @478-988-1128
road frontage. MLS #118404 $7,500.00 several
lots to choose from. Call Judy Rood, Associate
Broker/Realtor 229-425-1443
Approx 129 acres, valley surrounded with
7200 ft of national forest and unbelievble mtn
views. Level and rolling 7 acres pasture,35 acres
cleared,creek for fishing. Existing buildings 24x100
4 bay garage, 2 barns 40x40 with 14x40 shed
attached 7 stalls in barn.90X100 shop attached w/
2 gar doors. Old chicken house dwelling remodeled
in 2006. $1,194,000.00 Contact either Mike Divito
at (706) 974-5986 [email protected]
AgGeorgia.24.winter 2012
or Linda Walden at (706) 265-5960 [email protected]
c21waldenco.com
Contact O’Neal Properties at (478)743-6818 or
(888)743-6818 for more information.
3636, email: [email protected], or visit
Web site: www.DrinkardRealEstateSales.com
Oconee County
Peach County
Bank Owned – Oconee County – 70.73 Acres.
Includes home that is a 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath,
mostly woodlands, creek and pond. $463,980 To
schedule a preview call Kenneth Savage 770-718
8297, Janie Savage 770-654-3513 or Savage Real
Estate & Auction Co. Inc. 770-983-0066
Oglethorpe County
Gold Cove lots 23 and 24. 3.88 acres with great
year round views and even an old barn! Barn is a
2 story, 30x32. Great neighborhood! Minutes to
GA 400, hardwoods, long road frontage. This is 2
lots combined, build on one lot and sell the other.
Prices to sell at $125,000. Contact Mike Divito
706-974-5986 [email protected]
Also more acreage available call Mike!
Worthington Woods HomeSite .... 2+acre, wooded
Monroe County
Oglethorpe Co, Sandy Cross, 167 Acres. Great
homesite, stream, great interior road system,
$2400/Ac, Call Jesse Johnson with Southern Land
Exchange, 706.614.4855 or 706.549.5050
home sites located in growing subdivision. 1800 sf
minimum, all-brick/rock/stucco, etc homes, and
side-entry garage. Protective covenants, lighted
streets, and undergound utilities. DSL cable lines
available through ComSouth. Located off Clopine
lake road between Hwy 341 and Hwy 127 about
five miles west of Perry in Worthington Woods.
Call Real Estate Insider @ 478-988-1128 today for
personal tour, updated plat, and copy of protective
covenants!
Monroe County Middle Georgia Hunting Tract
located in Northern Monroe County. The tract
is 29.77 acres lying adjacent to the only Middle
Georgia tract of U.S. Forest Service in Monroe
County and in close proximity to the Ocmulgee
River. The land is rolling with several beautiful
house sites. Deer and wild game abound. Excellent
horse country with access to numerous riding trails.
Wooded with small food plots. Approximately
one hour from Hartsfield-Jackson International
Airport. $85,000. Contact O’Neal Properties
at (478)743-6818 or (888)743-6818 for more
information.
River Road Tract ... (Peach County) 10+/- acres
Oglethorpe Co, Barron’s Lake, 94 Acres. Paved
road frontage, merchantable pines, frontage on
watershed lake, $3450/Ac, Call J.R. Smith with
Southern Land Exchange, 706.207.0152 or
706.549.5050
Pickens County
Bank Owned – Pickens County – 153.9 Acres.
Mixture of woodlands and open land with gently
rolling topo, Several building sites, Spectacular
Views from every angle, Scarecorn Creek Frontage.
$684,100 To schedule a preview call Kenneth
Savage 770-718 8297, Janie Savage 770-6543513 or Savage Real Estate & Auction Co. Inc.
770-983-0066
Goosepond Creek Tract. This 279 acre tract offers
Monroe County This tract lies adjacent to the
only Middle Georgia tract of U.S. Forest Service
in Monroe County and in close proximity to the
Ocmulgee River. Containing a small weather creek
running through a wooded glade with several food
plots. With a total of 50.93 acres, this property
is gently rolling and boasts several excellent
residential sites. Private and Secluded. $127,325.
would make the perfect Homesite for anyone
wanting to live out in the country and enjoy peace
& quiet at its best. Just outside Fort Valley on River
road. Call Real Estate Insider @ 478-988-1128
today for personal tour!
hunting, timberland and investment opportunities. Beautiful hardwood hillsides overlooking
Goosepond Creek, which forms part of the
boundary and runs into Broad River. A winding
interior creek offers potential lake site. Excellent
stand of planted pines offer future income. A deer
camp stands in place ready for the season with
established food plots to sustain an outstanding
deer and turkey population. Property has 1000
feet of road frontage on Hwy. 77 Priced Reduced!
$1,975/AC. Contact Eddie Drinkard, 706-318-
AgGeorgia.25.winter 2012
Screven County
and good road system. There are approximately 90
acres of 15-20 year pine on the property. Adjacent
to the creek is a beautiful hardwood bottom with
large mature oaks. The property is wonderfully
maintained and is move in ready. Buy today and
start planning your hunt tomorrow! Contact
Carter Group Real Estate at (912) 530-9515, www.
cartergroupland.com, or [email protected]
com.
Turner County
52.58 Acres with beautiful Log Cabin. 2 BR, 1
BA with sleeping loft. All furniture and appliances
included. Mature Timber, good roads, irrigated
food plot, tower stand, and MANY EXTRAS.
PERFECT FAMILY RETREAT – A MUST SEE!
$299,900. Contact Town and Country Real Estate
478-552-5681 www.tandcrealestate.com
BANK OWNED, Price Reduced Quail Hunting
Plantation! This 963 acre dream piece offers a
2533 square foot stone-facade lodge with a kitchen,
meeting room, game room and master suite, along
with several one bedroom, one bath, kitchenette
cabins. It also includes a 10 station 3D archery
range, 12 station sporting clay range, an indoor
archery range with restrooms and kitchen, an
assortment of heated and cooled buildings and
open pavilions, barns and dog kennels. This parcel
is ideal for hunting and is a turn key quail preserve.
Additional acreage is available as well as frontage
on the Savannah River. Contact Carter Group Real
Estate at (912) 530-9515, www.cartergroupland.
com, or [email protected]artergroupland.com.
Sumter County
89.14 acres Gorgeous rolling hills with 2 ponds
and 2322 sq ft. brick home with pool & shed.
80+ acres in cultivation with underground pipes
and rizors for irrigation. House and 8+ acres
may be sold seperately. Call Brenda [email protected]
Southern Traditions Realty & Development, Inc.
2295070622
Twiggs County
15.71 Acres of open and wooded land with 3BR,
2BA mobile home. Located at 2263 Edwards Ford
Road, Tennille, Georgia. Mobile home has central
heat/air with living, dining, den, and kitchen.
$62,500. Contact Town and Country Real Estate
478-552-5681 www.tandcrealestate.com
570 acres located in Sumter county, GA. Beautiful
lake frontage. Working farm with 230 acres under
three pivots. 200 acre working dairy. 78 acres in crp
longleaf pines. Pond,barns,houses,fences,deer,duc
ks,doves.$51,000 per year rental income. Excellent
location in the heart of Georgia agriculture.
$1,600,000. John Bickley with Bickley & Assoc.
478-214-0559 [email protected]
Telfair County
Twiggs County Rolling 14.82 acre tract with
approximately one and one-half acre pond.
Located in the country but less than 10 miles from
downtown Macon. Paved road frontage. $63,720.
Contact O’Neal Properties at (478)743-6818 or
(888)743-6818 for more information.
Washington County
30.214 Acres located approximately 8.2 miles
Northeast of Sandersville, GA. 2,374 feet of paved
road frontage on Sparta-Davisboro Road. 2 wells
on property. $65,000. Seller will divide property.
Contact Town and Country Real Estate 478-5525681 www.tandcrealestate.com
HUNTER’S PARADISE, PRICE REDUCED, MAKE
OFFER! This 130.75 acre tract. The property is
loaded with amenities, including a 1,750 sq ft Two
Story Cabin, several outbuildings, pond, creek,
irrigated food plots, multiple hunting condos,
AgGeorgia.26.winter 2012
2060 N Indian Trail Road, Sandersville, GA. 3 BR,
2BA mobile home on 24.8 acres! Above ground
pool with full surround decking, covered front
porch, and new roof. Land has approx 1525 feet of
road frontage, deer stands, pine and hardwood mix,
and creek. GREAT HUNTING TRACT! $138,000.
Contact Town and Country Real Estate 478-5525681 www.tandcrealestate.com
White County
Wilkes County
Wilkinson County
360 Old Clarksville Hwy, Cleveland, Ga 30528.
Broad River Bluff, A Sportman’s Paradise!! This
1,094.96+/- Acre Recreation Tract in Wilkinson
County on Oconee River. The tract is located
White County. List Price $98,900.00 Lovely,
well maintained cottage within walking distance
to downtown Cleveland and Truitt McConnell
College. Ranch home has 2 Bedrooms and 1.5
Baths, living room open to kitchen and dining area
with french doors that lead to back deck. All appliances are included with the sale of home and also
includes new hotwater heater and washer and dryer.
One car garage with interior entrance, and level
yard – MOVE IN READY with NO HOA FEES.
Owner is Motivated. Please call Kay Goodwin at
Century 21 Walden & Co., cell phone 678-2235527 or office 706-864-0146 for more information.
Bank Owned – White County – 227 Acres. Gently
rolling topo, great location, paved road frontage,
ponds. $2,059,750. To schedule a preview call
Kenneth Savage 770-718 8297, Janie Savage
770-654-3513 or Savage Real Estate & Auction
Co. Inc. 770-983-0066
154.35 acre tract has 4300 ft. of frontage on Broad
River, making it a super recreational tract offering
canoeing, fishing, hunting, and camping opportunities. Located on Hwy. 17 on the Wilkes/Elbert
County line, this property has easy access with a
private gated fence entrance. Good interior roads
make all areas of the property easily accessible
which include established wildlife food plots for
deer and turkey, unusual open water duck pond,
cleared and planted food plots. A cleared home/
cabin site is situated high above flood plain.
BARGAIN!! Price Reduced to $2,395/AC. Owner/
Broker. Contact Eddie Drinkard, 706-318-3636,
email: [email protected], or visit Web site:
DrinkardRealEstateSales.com
Bank Owned – White County – 292.1 Acres.
Several Ponds, Beautiful views, pasture and
woodlands, River frontage and waterfalls, Plenty
of wildlife to hunt or watch, development potential.
$2,249,830 To schedule a preview call Kenneth
Savage 770-718 8297, Janie Savage 770-6543513 or Savage Real Estate & Auction Co. Inc.
770-983-0066
Wilcox County
662.991 Acres located approx 11 miles South
of Abbeville, GA. 410+/- acres in 1999-2000
longleaf pines, 14+/- acres in 2003 loblolly pines,
95+/- acres in 2008 longleaf pines and 134+/- acres
in cypress ponds and drains. Great for hunting,
pinestraw production, or family recreation. GREAT
INVESTMENT. $1500/acre. Contact Town and
Country Real Estate 478-552-5681 www.tandcrealestate.com
Long View Tract. This tract contains 202 acres. A
hunting, timberland and recreation tract. Abeautiful 360 degree view at the height of the property
presents an awesome cabin site. The property
borders Clarks Creek which is a major Wilkes
Coutny stream. Interior creeks and lake site on
property. Approx. 50 acres of mature upland and
bottom land hardwoods. Part of property is in
5 yr. and older planted pines which provide for
investment opportunities. Super deer, turkey, hog
and small game habitat. Excellent interior roads
throughout property make it a grat recreation tract
for ATV riding. Located 4 miles west of Tignall on
Mallorysville Road. Private gated entrance into
property. Price Reduced, $1,950/AC. Contact Eddie
Drinakrd, 706-318-3636, email: [email protected]
gmail.com, or visit Web site: DrinkardRealEstateSales.com
AgGeorgia.27.winter 2012
approximately 10.6 miles southeast of Toomsboro,
GA. Acreage consists of 2 different tracts: The Pond
Tract and River Tract. The Pond tract contains
approximately 350 acres of planted pines, an
approximate 13 acre fully stocked pond, and an
approximate 10 acre dove field. The River tract is a
mixture of hardwoods, cypress and cut over and has
approximately 1.5 miles of frontage on the Oconee
River. Electrical power, deep well and septic field
are in place. There is an approximate 3,600 square
foot metal storage building on slab. Additional
chattel is included. Contact Bruce Elliott at Bruce
Elliott & Associates, Inc., 478-746-0700 or [email protected]
BruceElliottAssociates.com.
PRSRT STD
U.S. POSTAGE
AgGeorgia Farm Credit
P.O. Box 1820
Perry, GA 31069
PAID
COLUMBIA SC
PERMIT 1160
Office Locations
Cartersville
Gainesville
Ocilla
Sandersville
1300 East Main Street
Cartersville, GA 30120
(770) 382-3637
501 Broad Street
Gainesville, GA 30501
(770) 534-5395
302 S. Cherry Street
Ocilla, GA 31774
(229) 468-5900
775 Sparta Road
Sandersville, GA 31082
(478) 552-6922
Chatsworth
LaFayette
Perry
Sylvester
19 Woodlake Drive
Chatsworth, GA 30705
(706) 695-0020
700 East Villanow
Street
LaFayette, GA 30728
(706) 638-1940
468 Perry Parkway
Perry, GA 31069
(478) 987-1434
105 Dexter Wilson Blvd
Sylvester, GA 31791
(229) 776-5599
Quitman
Tifton
504 E. Screven Street
Quitman, GA 31643
(229) 263-7551
1807 King Road
Tifton, GA 31794
(229) 382-4300
Rome
Washington
701 East 2nd Avenue
Rome, GA 30162
(706) 291-6340
U.S. 78, 311 North
Bypass Washington,
GA 30673
(706) 678-7088
Clarkesville
102 Blacksnake Road
Mt. Airy, GA 30563
(706) 754-4158
Cordele
Montezuma
317 Walnut Street
Montezuma, GA 31063
(478) 472-5156
Moultrie
1207 South Greer
Street Cordele, GA
31010
(229) 273-3927
22 5th Avenue., SE
Moultrie, GA 31768
(229) 985-3893
Dublin
Nashville
826 Bellevue Avenue
Dublin, GA 31021
(478) 272-3255
707 N. Davis Street
Nashville, GA 31639
(229) 686-5081
Royston
675 Church Street
Royston, GA 30662
(706) 245-6142
Waynesboro
176 Highway 80 West
Waynesboro, GA
30830
www.aggeorgia.comwww.landbanksolutions.com