Community Climate Change Local Action Plan – Phase 2

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Community Climate Change Local Action Plan – Phase 2
Regional Municipality of Durham
Progress Report:
Community Climate
Change Local Action
Plan – Phase 2
July 29, 2011
DRAFT - Version 2
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
CONTACT INFORMATION
Questions, comments and suggestions on this Progress Report may be directed to
Brian Kelly
Interim Advisor, Climate Change
Office of the CAO
Region of Durham
905 668-4113 ext. 3803
[email protected]
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LIST OF ACRONYMS
Acronym
Term
APC
Action Plan Concept
BAU
Business As Usual
CO2e
Carbon Dioxide Equivalents
DC
Development Charge
DIY
Do It Yourself
DLWC
Deep Lake Water Cooling
DRRCC
Durham Region Roundtable on Climate Change
EPR
Extended Producer Responsibility
EV
Electric Vehicle
FIT
Feed-In Tariff
GHG
Greenhouse Gas
HVAC
Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning
ICLEI
International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives
IC&I
Industrial Commercial and Institutional
IEAP
International Emissions Analysis Protocol
LAP
Local Action Plan
LEED
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
MPP
Member of Provincial Parliament
PCP
Partners for Climate Protection
PPG
Partners in Project Green
TDM
Transportation Demand Management
TRCA
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority
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PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section I
Introduction ............................................................................ 1
Local Overview ...................................................................................... 7
Corporate Overview ............................................................................... 8
Greenhouse Gas Overview ..................................................................... 8
Section II
Framework for GHG Reductions .............................................. 13
Vision and Targets ............................................................................... 13
Themes ............................................................................................... 13
Section III Durham’s Community Climate Change Local Action Plan ............ 14
Goals ................................................................................................. 14
Objectives ........................................................................................... 15
Action Plan Concepts............................................................................ 17
Section IV Implementation ..................................................................... 37
Oversight: Management and Governance ............................................... 37
Indicators ............................................................................................ 38
Finances and Decision-making ............................................................... 38
Education and Communication .............................................................. 38
Section V
Next Steps ........................................................................... 39
APPENDICES
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Contributors
Detailed Process Overview
Results of the Carbon Neutral Municipality Workshop (June 2, 2011)
Results of the Six Thematic Stakeholder Workshops (June 13 To 17, 2011)
Results of the Design Charette (June 27 & 28, 2011)
Detailed Action Plan Concepts (Including Suggested Enhancements from
the Design Charette)
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SECTION I
INTRODUCTION
OVERVIEW
Climate change is having an impact on not only the weather, but also on the economy,
the environment and the social structure of our planet. The Council of the Regional
Municipality of Durham has endorsed the following statements:
“Scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports the conclusion that human activities
are fundamentally altering the conditions for life on earth. Climate change and
associated global warming is recognized as a severe threat to global systems with
the potential for catastrophic outcomes.
The vast majority of the scientific community is steadfastly maintaining that the
dangers posed by a changing climate cannot be overstated, the danger is
immediate, and the implications for human society are truly catastrophic.
The only means to address the root cause of current human-induced climate
changes is to reduce the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.”
In order to address the local challenge of climate change, the Regional Municipality of
Durham (the Region) has partnered with the local community to develop a Community
Climate Change Local Action Plan (LAP). This document is a mid-course
progress report on that effort.
WHAT IS A LOCAL ACTION PLAN?
In Durham, a LAP is a strategic document that outlines how the Durham community will
achieve its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets.
The high-level objectives of the LAP are to:
•
Provide a framework for aligning, building on and integrating corporate and
community actions (plans, policies, programs, processes, and initiatives) that
are currently underway or being planned;
•
Engage the area municipalities and encourage them to identify and undertake
actions that reduce their GHG emissions through municipal partnerships;
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Engage citizens, local industries, corporations, businesses and institutions and
encourage them to identify and undertake measures that reduce their GHG
emissions through community partnerships;
•
Establish monitoring, reporting, and community consultation practices so that
local organizations, institutions, businesses, citizens, and visitors have up-to-date
information on climate change action being undertaken within the community;
•
Promote information sharing between the various industries, corporations,
businesses and institutions within the community regarding climate change
issues;
•
Provide strategic guidance for financial investment to address climate change
within the community; and
•
Act as a living plan, subject to reflection and change through an annual process
of community reporting, conferencing, and celebrating.
A LOCAL, COMMUNITY-BASED RESPONSE
The staff and Council of the Regional Municipality of Durham are committed to meeting
the needs of the community through leadership, co-operation and service excellence,
using sustainability principles as a guiding influence. As part of becoming a more
sustainable, prosperous and resilient community, the Durham Region Roundtable
on Climate Change (DRRCC) acts as an advisory committee to position Durham
Region as a leader in addressing climate change issues. This leadership role will serve
as a catalyst for ongoing action on climate change throughout the community. The
DRRCC has played a convening role to develop and support a community-based LAP to
reduce local GHG emissions.
Developing the LAP has been a collaborative experience involving the efforts and
contributions of many people. We would like to recognize the efforts of the DRRCC
members, the LAP Steering Committee, and all participating stakeholders whose support
and participation made have made this experience, to-date, a success. Please refer to
Appendix A for a full list of contributors.
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A PHASED APPROACH
Durham has taken a unique approach and has developed its LAP in two distinct phases,
as follows:
•
Phase 1 involved the identification of a vision, targets, themes, goals, draft
objectives and preliminary actions through a consultation process with key
stakeholders in the summer of 2010. This report was adopted by Regional
Council on March 9, 2011 and is available on-line.
•
Phase 2 involves analyzing the results of Phase 1, engaging a wider group
of stakeholders, developing partnerships for implementation, specifying
Action Plan Concepts, and suggesting a plan for governance and
implementation. This document is a progress report the LAP, representing a
mid-way point in Phase 2.
The development of the LAP is being led by the DRRCC and the process of finalizing the
plan will be supported through stakeholder input from the Steering Committee, area
municipalities, businesses, organizations, and members of the public. Ideas and input from
residents and stakeholders will help to develop the plan as it evolves over time. Success
depends to a large extent on the activities and involvement of stakeholders, especially in
forming partnerships.
One of the strongest – and most important – aspects of the LAP is its commitment to
community ownership. The DRRCC recognizes that a community-built and
community-owned plan will inspire sustainability plans and actions within community
groups, institutions, businesses, organizations and municipalities.
Additional details about the process to develop the LAP (Phase 1 and 2) are included
in the section below and in Appendix B.
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PROCESS OVERVIEW
An overview of the process to develop the LAP is presented in Figure 1. Durham has
followed a practical, thorough approach from the foundation steps established in Phase 1
(e.g. establishing high level thematic areas, goals, objectives, and preliminary actions),
which are detailed in Appendix B, through to Phase 2.
Figure 1. Durham’s Local Action Plan Process
Phase 1
(2010)
Early Action Plan
Identified Themes
Confirmed Goals
Determined
Objectives
Stated Early Actions
Phase 2 (2011)
Design, Prepare and Consult
Identified Benchmark Actions
Confirmed Evaluation Criteria
Evaluated and Prioritized APCs
Conducted Public Consultation
Initiated Collaboration
Planned Early Implementation
Progress Report
We are here
Plan Preparation and
Approval
Select High Leverage Projects
Confirm Implementation
Agents
Prepare and Analyze LAP
Discuss and Submit LAP
Present LAP for Approval
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Phase 2 was initiated in early-2011, to evaluate Phase 1 feedback and
recommendations1, and to move towards identifying and prioritizing practical steps
forward for the community. Action plan concepts (APCs) were identified from Phase 1
research and further best practices analysis and evaluation (highlighting effective
projects in other regions and municipalities).
A municipal workshop was hosted by the Regional Municipality of Durham, the
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the University of Toronto, to
review carbon neutrality. The results of the workshop illustrated that it is possible to
achieve the long-term target of 80% reduction in GHG emissions by 2050 in Durham
with proven technologies but only through aggressive intervention in current practices in
the economy.
The agenda for the workshop and the results (as a PowerPoint
presentation) are included in Appendix C.
Multi-sector stakeholder consultation (based on the thematic areas identified in
Phase 1) was conducted in six half-day workshops over the course of one week, to agree
upon and clarify thematic objectives; and develop, review and expand upon initial APCs
to ensure that they reflect the priorities, interests and capabilities of key community
stakeholders. The generic agenda for the workshops and the results are included in
Appendix D.
In order to encourage analysis, integration and prioritization of APCs – while promoting
early stage collaboration – further multi-sector stakeholder consultation was initiated by
way of a 1 ½ day design charette.
The design charette convened a variety of champions representing locally-based
organizations from commercial, government, education and community sectors. Following
an evaluation of the APCs (based on assessing the degree of effort and impact expected
from each), selected APCs were highlighted, preliminary action plans were developed,
necessary communications and collaborations were specified, and champions were
identified for future follow up. The agenda, results and a summary of the evaluation
forms from the charette are included in Appendix E. The drawings in this report (on page
3, etc.) were taken from a visioning visualization exercise at the design charette.
1
Full details of the Phase 1 process are available on-line
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Following the design charette, Stantec Consulting Ltd (Stantec) further evaluated the results
from the half-day thematic-focused workshops and the design charette, in order to revise
and identify high priority APCs for consideration by the community (see Table 1). This
analysis can support the later development of a comprehensive draft implementation plan,
which can be promoted, reviewed and supported by key stakeholders including potential
project partners, local municipalities and the Regional Municipality of Durham.
Suggestions are included in Section IV.
The report represents a status update on the progress to-date. The consultation and
engagement process to refine the Action Plan Concepts, form partnerships and flesh
out the implementation plan will continue over the summer and fall of 2011. It is
expected that as with the planning process, throughout the implementation of the LAP,
there will be an on-going process of feedback and alignment. The LAP should be
considered a living document, subject to reflection and change.
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LOCAL OVERVIEW
The Regional Municipality of
Durham is located within the
Golden Horseshoe, a portion of
Ontario
that
is
highly
developed
and
populated.
Durham has varied settled
areas,
including
densely
populated urban areas and
small farming-oriented hamlets.
The municipalities that make up
the Region include: Pickering,
Brock,
Uxbridge,
Whitby,
Oshawa, Ajax, Scugog, and
Clarington (Figure 2).
Figure 1. Region of Durham
The geographic region is known for its significant manufacturing sector focused on the
automobile sector and electricity generation. Durham has a young, skilled labour force. It
has all the utilities, transportation and social infrastructure associated with most modern
metropolitan communities. The single most significant factor in terms of economics and
emission levels for the Region has been the dramatic increase in residential development
over the past 10 years.
In 2008, the population was approximately 605,735. By 2020, the population is
estimated to grow to approximately 809,990. This represents a growth rate of 36%
(Durham Community GHG Inventory, 2009). Significant population growth often implies
more energy consumers and rising GHG emissions. However, growth can also provide
opportunities for improved alternative transportation choices to meet the increased
demands of a larger population, particularly if higher densities are achieved. Growth can
also provide opportunities to improve building codes and community design if such policies
are identified and implemented.
The Regional Municipality of Durham and its community partners have taken on a
leadership role to help mitigate increasing GHG emissions and have asked key
stakeholders from across the community to collectively support and develop a community
local action plan (LAP) in an effort to understand the extent of the community’s current and
expected GHG emissions and what initiatives should be implemented to reduce them.
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CORPORATE OVERVIEW
The Corporation of the Regional Municipality of Durham has had an ongoing program to
address both climate change mitigation and adaptation within its facilities and operations
since 2009. Current activities include:
•
•
•
•
•
Energy management initiatives identified within asset management programs and
business planning cycles;
Establishing a Corporate Carbon Data Collection Process;
Producing a Corporate GHG Emissions Inventory and Forecast from 2007 to 2015;
Identifying and pursuing green energy opportunities within Regional facilities;
o Establishing GHG emissions targets for the Corporation; and
Identifying climate-related risks to Regional infrastructure and related adaptation
requirements.
GREENHOUSE GAS OVERVIEW
COMMUNITY GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY
A community GHG emission inventory has been completed; it is based on four (4)
consecutive years (2005 to 2008 inclusive) and 2007 was selected as a baseline year for
future targets and monitoring of progress. The methodology that was used was the ICLEILocal Governments for Sustainability International Emissions Analysis Protocol (IEAP) as
prescribed by ICLEI and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ joint program, Partners
for Climate Protection (PCP). The intent of the inventory is to illustrate total community
GHG emissions by sector. The results of the inventory serve as the baseline for future GHG
emissions reductions that will be undertaken by the partners to achieve the community
vision.
BUSINESS AS USUAL FORECAST
A forecast of community GHG emissions communicates the extent to which emissions would
grow if no action was taken to mitigate them (i.e. if the community proceeded with business
as usual). A business as usual (BAU) forecast helps to demonstrate the impact that a
community can have as a result of its decision to take action.
The BAU forecast included in the Community Inventory Report states:
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“The business-as-usual forecast for 2020 assumes no further efforts to reduce energy
consumption from 2008 on resulting in an estimated rise in GHG emissions of 28%
from 3.8 million t in the baseline year of 2007 to 4.9 million t. The 28% increase in
forecasted GHG emissions by 2020 is significantly less than the forecasted 36%
population growth from the baseline year of 2007”
COMMUNITY GHG EMISSIONS, BY SECTOR
Figure 3 illustrates the total emissions, in tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents (t CO2e) and
the breakdown of emissions by community sector2 for 2005 to 2008.
Figure 3. Durham Region Community Emissions by Sector (extracted from the Durham Region Community
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory, 2009)
The community GHG inventory data reveals trends within emissions. Emission levels are
approximately 7.4% lower in 2008 as compared to 2005.
Residential,
industrial/commercial/institutional (IC&I), and waste sectors experienced emission
reductions, in contrast to transportation emission levels which have steadily increased.
2
Note that the PCP methodology includes four sectors: community waste, transportation, industrial,
commercial and institutional and residential emissions.
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The Durham Region Community Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory document3 indicates
that from 2005 to 2008, the population grew by 5.7% while the number of households
increased by 7.3%. Despite the increase in population and households, the energy
consumption has dropped by 3.8% and the GHG emissions have decreased by 7.4%.
This difference can be attributed to a change in the provincial electricity emission factor
between 2005 and 2008, reflecting the early years of coal phase –out in Ontario.
Durham Region’s Community GHG Inventory report further indicates that changes in
weather from one year to the next may also affect annual energy consumption and
emission levels. The report suggests that decreasing per capita energy consumption from
2005 to 2006 and from 2007 to 2008 may be partially due to relatively warmer winters
in 2006 and 2008 versus 2005 and 2007, respectively.
EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL OPERATIONS
The overall contribution of corporate emissions (from the Regional Municipality’s
operations, including waste management) and community emissions (from homes,
businesses and transportation, etc.) is presented in Figure 4.
Figure 4. Corporate and Community Emissions Comparison
Corporate
4%
Community
96%
The Corporation of the Municipality of Durham Region’s emissions represents
approximately 4% of the total community emissions. Therefore, focusing on community
emissions will help to achieve much greater long-term GHG emission reductions.
Community inventory available online at
http://www.durham.ca/community/climate_change/reports/CommunityInventoryQuadReport.pdf
3
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METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS
Throughout the process to develop the LAP, questions have arisen about the
methodology used to develop Durham’s community baseline GHG emissions and the
types of actions that will make a meaningful contribution to achieving Durham’s emission
reduction targets (as measured against the inventory base year – see Section II). For
example, although tree planting results in carbon sequestration, which is a mitigation
activity, the GHG reductions would not be captured through the current methodology
which measures only emissions. ICLEI’s IEAP methodology covers the sectors that are the
most commonly found in communities and their operating municipalities. The newest
version of the IEAP will incorporate other sectors, such as emissions from agriculture, land
use and forestry. However, as set methodologies and quantification protocols are not
fully developed for these sectors, many municipalities will not often report them. Some
municipalities, such as Caledon, have decided to report on agricultural emissions and
have developed customized methodologies that best suits their needs. The PCP and the
ICLEI IEAP encourages all local governments and their communities to account for
emissions that they feel are representative and significant in their local context. However,
it is recognized that not all local governments will take on these sectors, and those that do
may have a difficult time benchmarking those emissions. Indeed, it may be desirable for
to track progress on climate mitigation using the current PCP methods (based only on
emissions) and to create a “second set of books” which reflect sequestration, offsets,
upstream effects and a range of co-benefits.
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THE BENEFITS OF MITIGATION
In a climate change context, “mitigation” is the act of reducing greenhouse gas
emissions. The actions outlined within this LAP are primarily focused on mitigation.
However, many of the actions will have numerous co-benefits in terms of improving
quality of life, positive effects on regional economics and preparing the community for the
unexpected outcomes of climate change (adaptation). Some of these co-benefits include
but are not limited to:
• Improved air quality and a reduction of fine particulate matter through reduced
single occupancy vehicles and increased transit ridership;
• Increased shade for cooling through tree planting;
• Reduced costs for household transportation budgets through the creation of active
communities;
• Reduced transportation costs and emissions and local business stimulus due to
local purchasing of food, goods and services.
ADAPTATION TO FUTURE CLIMATE
One of the largest areas of concern surrounding climate change is the unexpected events
that may occur, such as extreme weather (heat waves, floods, drought, tornadoes etc.).
Through implementation of some of the actions outlined within this report, community
partners are taking a step towards climate change adaptation planning. Like many other
areas of Ontario, Durham is susceptible to drought, floods and other extreme weather
events. By adapting in advance to these types of events, such as improving infrastructure
(permeable pavement, considering alternative energy sources and relying more on local
food, the community is taking steps to become truly sustainable, despite the unknown
effects of climate change. At a later stage, the local municipalities and their partners may
consider the development of a climate change adaptation plan.
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SECTION II
FRAMEWORK FOR GHG REDUCTIONS
VISION AND TARGETS
The Durham Regional Council has endorsed a vision and provisional community emission
reduction targets as developed by the DRRCC. These are:
•
Vision: Durham region is a carbon neutral, sustainable, prosperous and
resilient community with a high quality of life.
•
Targets: 5% reduction by 2015, 20% reduction by 2020, and 80% reduction
by 2050 (absolute reductions as measured against 2007 baseline emission
levels).
The vision and targets were supported by stakeholders through participation in the LAP
development process.
THEMES
A theme is a sector or area of activity to be included in the LAP. Each theme is an
overarching description that helps stakeholders to organize their thoughts on climate
change. Themes were refined and endorsed through face-to-face group consultation with
stakeholders and meetings with the DRRCC. The Themes for the LAP are:
•
Built Environment
•
Energy
•
Food System
•
Natural Systems and Resources
•
Transportation
•
Waste
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SECTION III
DURHAM’S COMMUNITY CLIMATE
CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN
GOALS
Goals define our desired future and answer the question: where do we want to be?
Goals are intended to provide strategic guidance to the community partners. They are
not intended to be specific or measureable. The goals were developed, refined and
endorsed through meetings with the LAP Steering Committee and face-to-face consultation
with Stakeholder Working Groups in 2010. The Goals for the draft LAP are:
•
Built Environment: Support a sustainable built environment in ways that
reduce GHG emissions through design, technology, education and stewardship.
•
Energy: Reduce GHG emissions to sustainable levels through judicious
production, generation, transmission, delivery and use of energy.
•
Food System: To support a sustainable food system in ways which reduce
GHG emissions and increase food security.
•
Natural Systems and Resources: Protect, enhance, conserve, and/or
manage natural systems in ways that reduce GHG emissions and promotes wise
use of resources.
•
Transportation:
region.
•
Waste: Support a sustainable integrated waste management system that
reduces GHG emissions through prevention, reduction, reuse, recycling,
recovering and disposal.
Reduce GHG emissions from transportation in Durham
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OBJECTIVES
Goals are typically combined with long-term strategic objectives that provide more
information on how to achieve the goal. Draft objectives were developed through face-toface consultation with the Working Groups in mid-2010, and further refined throughout
the LAP process. The priority objectives developed for the LAP are:
BUILT ENVIRONMENT
•
Objective BE1 - Promote compact urban form and by extension sustainable
transportation through methods and approaches such as policy development,
increased density, infill development, Brownfield development, and urban design
•
Objective BE2 - Encourage sustainable building technologies in new projects and
retrofits
•
Objective BE3 - Engage and educate the community on the benefits of sustainable
built environment
ENERGY
Objective E1 – Replace the need for energy consumption through smart design and
planning
•
Objective E2 - Encourage, support and promote energy conservation in a
sustainable manner
•
Objective E3 - Maximize local, renewable, and low GHG emission energy
generation sources to promote resiliency, security, and self sufficiency
FOOD SYSTEM
•
Objective F1 - Prioritize and support food system practices that improve water
consumption, delivery, and recapture, reduce GHG emissions, improve energy
efficiencies, and increase carbon sequestration
•
Objective F2 - Provide education about the relationship between GHG emissions
and food choice and consumption
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•
Objective F3 - Implement key objectives of the food charter by increasing
community access to local food, and facilitating the participation of distributors
and retailers
NATURAL SYSTEMS AND RESOURCES
•
Objective NS1 - Increase local net carbon sequestration capacity in natural and
built environment by creating, restoring and re-mediating degraded natural and
built environments
•
Objective NS2 - Promote local and sustainable use and re-use of indigenous
natural resources
•
Objective NS 3 - Promote source water protection, conservation and re-use
TRANSPORTATION
•
Objective T1 - Promote low GHG emission transportation options that are
appealing to the public
•
Objective T2 - Improve/increase the frequency and integration of public transit
services
•
Objective T3 - Promote the adoption of innovative and intermodal transportation
technologies, best practices and policies
WASTE
•
Objective W1 - Encourage prevention through support of extended producer
responsibility
•
Objective W2 - Expand and improve recycling and recovery opportunities
•
Objective W3 - Promote the reuse of materials through programs and partnerships
•
Objective W4 - Improve and enhance waste management systems
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ACTION PLAN CONCEPTS
As discussed in Section 1 and Appendix B, Durham has taken an approach to develop a
series of Action Plan Concepts (APCs) to help achieve the GHG reduction targets. These
action plans have been elaborated and refined as follows:
•
Ideas for GHG reduction actions emerged from Phase 1 (refer to Appendix 4 of the
LAP, Phase 1);
•
A Best Practice Analysis of climate change plans from 22 other municipal/regional
jurisdictions and other sources was undertaken;
•
Some 65 Best Practice Programs were identified from these other
jurisdictions/sources and these were assessed for applicability to Durham using
the following evaluation criteria:
o Potential for GHG Reductions: This Action potentially reduces GHG
emissions by a significant amount in a sector where Durham has high
emissions (or high projected growth of emissions).
o Comprehensive: This Action helps to address more than one theme/goal
o Increases Resiliency: This Action builds individual and societal resilience by
building skills and infrastructure required for living well in a carbon-free
economy that is feeling the heat from climate change impacts.
o Flexible: This Action is a foundation for future actions and is easily
replicable throughout the Region
o Demonstrated Effective (GHG reductions and/or cost savings): This Action
has been tried somewhere else and is working
o Equitable: This Action mitigates GHGs and helps the least advantaged
o Green Jobs: The potential to create green jobs in Durham.
This research resulted in the development of 15 Action Plan Concepts
•
•
The 15 APCs were brought forward for discussion at the six thematic workshops in
mid-June (refer to Appendix D for results)
•
Based on suggested new programs or comments at the six thematic workshops, the
15 APCs were increased to 23 for discussion at the design charette (the full suite of
23 presented at the design charette are included in Appendix F)
•
A revised set of APCs, based on feedback from the design charette and the
consultant are included in Appendix G, and short summaries are provided in the
following section.
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SHORT DESCRIPTIONS OF THE ACTION PLAN CONCEPTS
No.
Action Plan Concept
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Durham Partners in Project Green
Smart Grid
Comprehensive Residential Retrofits
Offshore Wind Power Generation
Deep Lake Water Cooling
Transit Oriented Neighbourhoods
Local Food Hub
Permeable Pavement Program
Durham One Million Trees
Green Affordable Housing
Extended Producer Responsibility
Urban Agriculture
Green Building Code Program
Food Business Action Plan
Durham Biofuels Program
Durham Green Development Guidelines
Farm Friendly Regulation
Biomethane Production and Use
Durham Freecycle Program
Backyard Composter Program
Durham Locavore Education Program
Durham Green Procurement Guide
Community Projects Fund
More detailed descriptions of the enhanced and upgraded Action Plan Concepts are
included in Appendix F. The APCs in Appendix F include suggested changes based on
the outcomes of the Design Charette. Additions are noted in red text and deletions are
noted with strikethroughs.
During the Design Charette, attendees participated in a “dotmocracy” exercise to identify
personal interest in the APCs. Those results are included in Appendix E1 and are noted in
Table 1.
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PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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DURHAM PARTNERS IN PROJECT GREEN (DPPG) (# 1)
Develop a Durham Region version of Partners in
Project Green (PPG) for the industrial and
commercial business community in Durham. This
program would initially offer:
• Energy conservation assessments and
advisory services;
• Procurement assistance (Green
Purchasing Alliance);
• Training; and
• Networking opportunities.
The emphasis will begin on energy efficiency with local companies, but over time the
menu of available services may expand to cover other PPG services such as water
efficiency, transportation (goods and employees), solid waste reduction, by-product
synergies, renewable energy production, green procurement, green parking lots and
district energy facilities. Performance metrics for this initiative could be linked to the
carbon metrics and targets for the Regional Municipality of Durham; helping to align the
goals of this initiative with the Region’s corporate goals.
SMART GRID INITIATIVE (# 2)
Create a Durham Smart Grid Initiative to develop and demonstrate the key components of
smart grid technology, namely:
• Integration of dispersed local sources of
renewable and low-GHG generation;
• Improved end-use management of electrical
loads through IT;
• Optimized scheduling of sources, end-uses
and storage; and
• Integration of electric vehicles (EVs) and
charging systems.
Durham has the potential to become the Smart Grid and Electric Vehicle leader in
Ontario, thus reducing GHG emissions and stimulating economic development in the
community.
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PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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COMPREHENSIVE RESIDENTIAL RETROFIT PROGRAM (# 3)
Develop a comprehensive residential energy retrofit program for Durham involving five
key elements of:
• Energy audit and investment plan covering a wide range of building envelope,
HVAC, appliance, lighting, water heating and renewable energy retrofits;
• Financing plan combining existing federal/provincial grant programs together
with long-term, low-interest loans designed to produce positive cash flow from
the outset (thus eliminating the barrier of a payback period);
• Assistance with contractor selection and project management (thus reducing the
complexity factor);
• Repayment of loans via property taxes (or other mechanisms) on the home (thus
eliminating the barrier of continued debt repayments after home sale); and
• A home energy label to identify residences that have been significantly
retrofitted and their new utility costs (to assist in the eventual resale of the
home).
Such a comprehensive program would
overcome most of the barriers inhibiting
extensive energy retrofitting of residential
buildings in Durham and result in major energy
and GHG savings. For this program to be
successful, extensive homeowner education and
engagement must take place. Homeowners
who are informed about the measurable
benefits of the program will be much more
likely to participate.
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PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
OFFSHORE WIND POWER GENERATION (# 4)
Create an offshore wind farm with the capacity to
generate 100MW of electricity, sponsored by the
Regional Municipality of Durham (the Region) and
funded through private partnerships. This action has
the potential to be supported by the Ontario Power
Authority’s Feed-in Tariff (FIT) program – a guaranteed
pricing structure for renewable electricity production,
with stable long term contracts. The goal of the project
is to contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas
emissions to sustainable levels through judicious
generation, transmission, delivery and use of energy.
While this concept was written in the context of wind
energy, the strategy could be expanded to consider
other forms of renewable energy such as solar and could be adapted to include on-shore
energy projects.
DURHAM DEEP LAKE WATER COOLING (# 5)
The Regional Municipality of Durham (the Region) and
its community partners can reduce greenhouse gas
(GHG) emissions through the judicious production,
generation, transmission, delivery and use of sustainable
energy sources and technology. Such technology
includes deep lake water cooling (DLWC), a system that
uses cold lake water to air condition commercial or
industrial buildings (Figure 1). In Toronto, the Enwave
system works by drawing cool water (4C) from 5
kilometres off the shore of Lake Ontario and from a Image from City of Toronto:
depth of 83 metres. This cold water is transferred to the http://www.toronto.ca/environment/init
iatives/cooling.htm
City’s pumping station; there, heat exchangers facilitate
the energy transfer between the cold lake water and the Enwave closed chilled water
supply loop. The water that is drawn from the lake is used for the regular water supply.
The cool aspect of the lake water, not the actual water, provides the alternative to
conventional air-conditioning (City of Toronto, 2011). This initiative could reduce the
demand for electricity (and GHG emissions) by the commercial and industrial sectors
within the community.
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REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
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TRANSIT ORIENTED NEIGHBOURHOODS (# 6)
Develop transit oriented neighbourhood(s) to:
• Assist in the reduction of GHG emissions from the transportation sector;
• Create more accessible and livable neighbourhoods; and
• Provide alternative transportation options for residents.
In order to reduce transit related emissions,
investigation of opportunities to install bike lanes
could be investigated; as well as the creation of a
bike share program. For the purpose of this
Action Plan Concept, a TON is described as a
higher density neighbourhood that facilitates the
use of transit and other alternative modes of
transportation such as cycling and walking, by
providing accessibility and connectivity; in
essence, it provides residents with the ability to easily work, live and play within their
neighbourhood.
LOCAL FOOD HUB (# 7)
Develop a Local Food Hub that will serve local farmers,
restaurants, and consumers in Durham and Toronto. This is
an opportunity to use and implement the Durham Food
Charter. The local food hub would initially offer:
• A permanent market space where farmers can
store/sell their meats and produce wholesale or
retail;
• A processing facility with certified kitchens for
canning and other value added food preparation;
• Services such as education, community outreach,
and marketing.
The local food hub would give small farmers a chance to
channel their produce and meats into new markets by
combining their crops and connecting them with larger
purchasers. Thus, it will save farmers time and money by
allowing them to move beyond direct sales.
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The local food hub should also be used as the coordination and administrative centre for
all local food initiatives including, but not limited to: Urban Agriculture Programs,
Backyard Composting and Compost for Produce Programs, and the Locavore Education
Program.
PERMEABLE SURFACES PROGRAM (# 8)
Build on examples from Chicago, Vancouver, Seattle and Houston to develop a Durham
Region program to encourage a reduction in hard surfaces in the region, to improve flood
protection – and reduce urban temperatures – as per the objectives of the Chicago and
Houston programs, respectively. A made-in-Durham program could combine these ideas to
establish a permeable surfaces program that would address a number of Local Action Plan
(LAP) objectives.
The program would encourage the replacement
of traditional hard surfaces and paving with
permeable and porous surfaces, including
permeable pavers, pervious concrete and porous
asphalt, and to incorporate vegetation in road
ends, rights of way, between roads and
sidewalks, and on green roofs – all of which can
help the community to achieve the multiple
objectives listed above.
DURHAM ONE MILLION TREES (# 9)
Create a made-in-Durham version of
MillionTreesNYC through a variety of publicprivate partnerships throughout the community.
The goal of the program is to plant one million
trees throughout the community over a period
of 10 years, in an effort to reforest park land
as well as residential and commercial areas
and streetscapes – which can contribute to the
greenhouse gas emissions target of 80%
reduction by 2050.
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REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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GREEN AFFORDABLE HOUSING (# 10)
In partnership with Housing Services and other
stakeholders, develop a local version of the City of
Boston’s Green Affordable Housing program. This
program would help the community to develop
affordable housing that attains a LEED Gold ranking and
makes and full use of green building technologies. These
green buildings would have lower operating and
maintenance costs, more stable utility costs, and higher
levels of indoor environmental quality than conventional buildings. The program would
also educate the community about the benefits of green building through its training
sessions. Training sessions could be included as a vehicle for training youth in green
energy retrofit skills to prepare them for the green job market, similar to the Social
Housing Services Corporation’s Reducing Energy Demand with Youth program.
EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY (EPR) (# 11)
Support the creation of ambitious Provincial
legislation to implement a comprehensive Extended
Producer Responsibility (EPR) program. The Regional
Municipality of Durham would play a facilitating role
by gathering stakeholders from among regional
MPPs, municipal service providers across the region,
industry, business, and community stakeholders. The
stakeholders would create a mutually agreed upon
EPR regime emphasizing zero waste targets, job creation and a closed loop system and
take it to the province.
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URBAN AGRICULTURE (# 12)
Develop a thriving urban agriculture community in Durham’s municipalities with an
emphasis on sustainable agriculture, education, and community engagement. The Urban
Agriculture program would initially offer:
• Educational farming fields located onsite at partner elementary schools,
secondary schools, community centres, other community institutions, and
interested residents’ backyards
• Urban farming internships, workshops, and volunteer opportunities
• A local compost program
• The opportunity to buy shares in the
harvest
• Harvest Festivals, Open Farm Days
and other opportunities for broad
community engagement
The Urban Agriculture Program would also
increase the carbon sequestration capacity of
Durham’s built environment, reduce food miles,
and implement key provisions of the Food
Charter.
DURHAM GREEN BUILDING CODE (# 13)
Develop and adopt a Durham Green Building Code for all new construction in the
geographic region of Durham requiring:
• LEED Silver level of construction by Jan. 1, 2013
• LEED Gold level of construction by Jan. 1, 2015
This would ensure that all new buildings in
Durham move toward the goal of energy
neutrality and significantly reduce carbon
emissions and other impacts on the
environment. In most cases, the incremental
capital costs of such upgrades have proven
to be modest and to pay for themselves in a
few years given current and projected
energy costs. It is important to make the
distinction that construction will have
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REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
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attributes making it certifiable to LEED standards; however, buildings may not actually
become LEED certified so that the administrative costs associated with LEED certification
can be avoided.
The program should be created in collaboration with progressive developers. This is
because developers who feel they have had the opportunity to shape the program will be
much more willing to support it.
THE DURHAM SUSTAINABLE FOOD BUSINESS ACTION PLAN (# 14)
Draft a Sustainable Food Business Action Plan to
package existing policies and programs, and
propose new incentives as marketing mechanisms to
support existing sustainable business strategies
among food production, processing, wholesale, and
retail sectors and to attract new businesses to areas
in the community that face challenges to food
security.
DURHAM BIO-FUELS PROGRAM (# 15)
Develop a program to encourage farmers to grow
dedicated energy crops for the production of second
generation bio-fuels (cellulosic ethanol and bio-diesel)
and for business to develop industry clusters for the
refining of ethanol, bio-diesel fuels (and biochemical
feedstocks and byproducts). The bio-fuels would then
be fed into the gasoline and diesel fuel supply systems
in Durham and Ontario to reduce net GHG emissions.
The program might also encompass the possibility of algae-based bio-fuel production on
farms or in industrial and aquatic environments.
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REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
DURHAM GREEN DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES (# 16)
Develop an integrated decision-making framework
and model green development guidelines designed to
reduce GHG emissions and promote climate
adaptation in the strategic plans, official plans,
zoning bylaws, design standards, site plan approvals,
severances and other areas of municipal and regional
jurisdiction related to urban planning. Care must be
taken to ensure that this initiative encompasses all
relevant standards, plans and approval processes.
This program should include such known sustainable planning measures as higher
densities, complete streets, mixed uses, twenty minute neighbourhoods, bike and walking
lanes, district energy systems, light pavement, green space, green roofs, gray water
recycling and water use efficiency, conservation, etc.
FARM-FRIENDLY REGULATION (# 17)
Develop a clear, concise, one-window document
containing a set of guidelines that bring existing pieces of
legislation, regulations and policy as well as proposing
new measures to streamline the process for farmers to
continue their current practice and expand their business.
BIO-METHANE PRODUCTION AND USE (# 18)
Bio-methane can be generated from landfill gas, green bin
waste, sewage and agricultural waste. Gas can be
generated from these sources using anaerobic digesters
and then injected into the natural gas distribution system
for use (by displacement) at various sites as a
transportation fuel, especially in heavy duty vehicles.
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DURHAM FREECYCLE PROGRAM (# 19)
Expand opportunities for reusing and recycling products/materials through a threepronged approach:
• Expand present programs:
o The
Regional
Municipality
already has programs to deal
with
e-waste,
household
hazardous waste, and tires
o The
Regional
Municipality
should engage more businesses
to be drop-off locations and
advertise the programs more
thoroughly
• Freecycle Days and Freecycle Centres:
o Residents can leave their
unwanted items on the curb on Freecycle Days, which could be every the
first Saturday of every month (or alternate timing)
o If nobody takes their items from the curb, the residents must drop their items
off at conveniently located Freecycle Centres (could be located in recycling
centres, schools and community centres, for example)
• Freecycle online:
o User-friendly website/database that coordinates those who wish to dispose
of items with those who wish to re-use, and connects everyone with repair
services;
o Also gives DIY ideas for repairing or reusing something you were going to
throw out; and
o This is kind of like Craigslist, only with an educational component and
Durham-centric.
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DURHAM BACKYARD COMPOSTING PROGRAM (# 20)
Backyard compost systems will be distributed and
installed for residents willing to participate in the
program. This will reduce the amount of material entering
the Green Bin waste stream, allowing extra capacity
within the system for new residential growth. Participants
in the program will also have the opportunity to share the
compost they generate with participants in the Urban
Agriculture Program.
DURHAM LOCAVORE EDUCATION PROGRAM (# 21)
Develop and implement a multi-pronged educational
program with a significant hands-on component that will
teach Durham residents why and how to grow, preserve,
buy, and eat local food in Durham. The targeted
demographics will be children and their parents, but all
community members are welcome.
The program will involve:
o Expanded community gardens;
o Events that build awareness of food issues and strengthen Durham’s
community, i.e.:
ReelFood.org documentary screenings;
cooking/canning/gardening classes;
Local Food Parties (could be like Tupperware parties, or potlucks);
Doors Open Durham Farms; and
Harvest Festival educational outreach.
o Addition of Food Systems unit including a significant hands-on component
to the K-12 curriculum, or at least 8-12;
o Green Flag consumer card program for Durham restaurants and food
retailers that source more than a certain percentage (i.e. 50%) of their food
locally; and
o Conversion of Donevan Collegiate into a Green Living Demonstration and
Education Centre.
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DURHAM GREEN PROCUREMENT GUIDE (# 22)
Representatives from the Region and ICI sector will
draft and adopt green procurement policies. This
initiative could leverage the Partners for Project Green
initiative by making them preferred providers of
services, and sharing best practices for purchasing
from the experiences of Partners for Project Green
organizations. By promoting green procurement within
the community, a larger market for green products and
services will be created; this could help to drive increased success and expansion of the
Partners for Project Green initiative and other community-led initiatives.
COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENT FUND (# 23)
Create a community fund that disburses small amounts
of funding for environmental initiatives. For example,
the fund could be valued at $100,000 annually and
distributed in sums ranging from $1,000 to $5,000
per project. Groups would apply quarterly and be
judged according to a set of criteria; successful
projects could be shared with the community through
an appropriate website.
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SUGGESTED ACTION PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
In addition to listing and describing the 23 action plans, the consulting team has taken an
opportunity to develop a draft, staged implementation plan that builds upon the results of
the design charette and an understanding of GHG mitigation across Canada.
Table 1 includes suggestions for:
•
Immediate consideration and partnership building;
•
Secondary stage consideration;
•
Tertiary stage consideration;
•
Enhancements of actions that already underway; and
•
Removal of certain actions.
In addition, a list of suggested additional actions is included for consideration. These
suggestions form a starting point for discussion at later stages of the process.
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Table 1. Suggestion for an Action Plan Implementation Framework – Developed by the Consulting Team for Consideration by the Community
No
Themes Supported
Action Plan
Concept
Timeframe for
Initiation
BE E FS NSR T W Short Term Long Term
(<5 years) (>5 years)
1
3
Durham Partners
in Project Green
Comprehensive
Residential
Retrofits
x x7
x
23 Community
Projects Fund
x
9
x
Durham One
Million Trees
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Level of
Effort4
Level of Relative
Impact5 Support6
High/
Low
High/
Low
High/
Med/
Low
Low
High
High
High
High
High
Possible Implementing Partners
x
x
•
•
This Action Plan Concept is the most developed.
Suggest immediate launch in September, 2011
For immediate
consideration and
partnership building
•
•
Suggest adding an education/marketing campaign on
the benefits of conducting retrofits:
o Package and promote information on existing
programs that support energy efficiency
improvements in residential and commercial
buildings. This information can be made
available online and at the permit desk in an
effort to increase awareness around programs,
such as
Natural Resources Canada’s
EcoENERGY program: offers incentives
for energy efficient building
improvements, equipment and
appliances
Ontario Ministry of Energy home and
business grants and rebates programs
For immediate
consideration and
partnership building
The Region of Durham
Local Municipalities
•
The City of Vancouver recently launched a granting
program as part of their Greenest City Initiative.
• Suggest early implementation to capture the community
spirit of the LAP
Regional Municipality of Durham
• There a several Canadian examples as well: Kelowna,
Public Works Department
Surrey, Hamilton
• Consider the benefits of tree planting on shading:
Toronto and Region Conservation
Authority
Planting trees in areas that help cool buildings and
Durham Region Planning and
paved surfaces during warmer seasons helps minimize
Health Departments
cooling.
As discussed throughout the process, there may be jurisdictional
For immediate
consideration and
partnership building
•
•
x
Low
High
Medium
•
•
x
Low
High
High
•
•
•
x
High
High
4
Extrapolated from the results of the Design Charette group consensus activity
5
Extrapolated from the results of the Design Charette group consensus activity
6
Extrapolated from the community support exercise at the end of the two day Design Charette
7
Bolded “x”s indicate area of most support
High
Staggered Priorities
Durham Sustain Ability
Toronto and Region Conservation
Authority
Durham College
Planning and Economic
Development Department
Non-profit partners
•
•
•
13 Green Building
Comments/ Rationale/ Recommendation
For immediate
consideration and
partnership building
For immediate
32
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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No
Themes Supported
Action Plan
Concept
Timeframe for
Initiation
BE E FS NSR T W Short Term Long Term
(<5 years) (>5 years)
Level of
Effort4
High/
Low
Level of Relative
Impact5 Support6
High/
Low
x
x
x
x
High
High
Comments/ Rationale/ Recommendation
Staggered Priorities
High/
Med/
Low
Code Program
16 Durham Green
Development
Guidelines
Possible Implementing Partners
Medium
challenges with creating a separate building code, or by
extension requiring higher standards than the Ontario Building
Code. If the Region cannot, consider a “Green Building
Program” which could include:
• Develop Sustainable Design Guidelines that promotes
energy efficient development (e.g., orientation for solar
aspect and ventilation, high albedo roofing materials,
shading devices, maximum glazing, on-site renewable
energy production).
• Develop a Sustainability Checklist and provide fee
rebates for development that attains a certain score. A
checklist will enable staff and Council to evaluate
development applications against the Region’s/area
municipalities’ sustainability objectives. The
Region/area municipalities could look to establish
building fee rebates based on the levels of performance
(or scores) attained on the Sustainability Report Card.
Require higher energy efficiency standards for large
rezoning applications The Region can use the rezoning
application process to require higher standards of
energy efficiency for new commercial and multi-family
residential developments over a certain size. This may
be incorporated into the Sustainability Report Card. The
City of Vancouver has implemented a green rezoning
policy that requires eligible applicants to meet LEED®
Gold (with a minimum of 6 optimize energy
performance points).
In addition to the guidelines, consider other complimentary
programs such as:
• Offer ‘Energy Efficient Development Practices’
Workshops : Working in partnership with the local
municipalities and builder/developer associations, the
Region could offer learning sessions (workshops) to:
promote energy efficient development practices, build
awareness of the programs and incentives available,
outline the associated benefits and costs, and
communicate why these practices are important for the
future of the region.
• Consider establishing a Development Incentive
Program: The program would encourage higher
density, mixed use development (residential, office, and
commercial space) on lands designated as Urban
Nodes, Corridors and Neighbourhood Commercial
consideration and
partnership building
For immediate
consideration and
partnership building
33
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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No
Themes Supported
Action Plan
Concept
Timeframe for
Initiation
BE E FS NSR T W Short Term Long Term
(<5 years) (>5 years)
Level of
Effort4
High/
Low
Level of Relative
Impact5 Support6
High/
Low
Possible Implementing Partners
Comments/ Rationale/ Recommendation
Staggered Priorities
High/
Med/
Low
Centres. This type of program would improve the
distribution of population and services, thereby
reducing the distances traveled to get to work and to
access daily services. Emphasis would be placed on
integrating higher density; mixed-use developments into
existing neighbourhoods (i.e. encourage infill
development). Incentives may include: fast tracking
development applications, allow density bonuses for
large new green developments, and provide
development charge (DC) reductions.
6
Transit Oriented
Neighbourhoods
x
x
High
x
High
Medium
•
•
Planning Department
Transportation Department
•
•
20 Backyard
Composter
Program
x
7
x
Local Food Hub
x
x
Low
x
Low
Low
Low
Low
High
•
12 Urban
Agriculture
x
x
x
x
Low
Low
Medium
•
•
•
14 Food Business
Action Plan
17 Farm Friendly
Regulation
21 Durham Locavore
Education
Program
10 Green Affordable x
Housing
2 Smart Grid
x
High
High
Low
•
•
x
Low
Low
Low
•
x
Low
Low
Low
High
High
Medium
•
High
High
Medium
•
•
x
x
x
x
•
Friends of the Greenbelt
Foundation
Community Development Council
Durham
Durham Culinary Association
Friends of the Greenbelt
Foundation
Community Development Council
Durham
Durham Culinary Association
Durham Food Policy Council
Region of Durham: Planning and
Works
Durham Regional Local Housing
Corporation
Planning Departments
Economic Development
Department
Ontario Ministry of Energy
Already underway; education
program needed to support
APC
•
Backyard composters are currently for sale at Durham Already underway;
Recycling Centre
education needed to support
Consider enhancing promotion of backyard composters APC
•
Suggest grouping all local food initiatives together
•
Suggest grouping all local food initiatives together
•
Suggest grouping all local food initiatives together
•
Suggest grouping all local food initiatives together
•
Suggest grouping all local food initiatives together
•
•
Work already underway at regional and municipal
planning departments
Consider enhancing promotion of an active lifestyle
For secondary stage
consideration
For secondary stage
consideration
For secondary stage
consideration
34
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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No
Themes Supported
Action Plan
Concept
Timeframe for
Initiation
BE E FS NSR T W Short Term Long Term
x
18 Biomethane
Production and
Use
x
19 Durham
Freecycle
Program
11 Extended
Producer
Responsibility
x
8 Permeable
Pavement
Program
5 Deep Lake Water
Cooling
4
Offshore Wind
Power
Generation
22 Durham Green
Procurement
Guide
x
Possible Implementing Partners
High
High
Medium
x
High
High
Medium
x
Low
Low
Low
For tertiary consideration
x
High
Low
Low
For tertiary consideration
High
Low
Low
High
High
Low
•
•
•
•
Medium
•
•
x
x
High
High
•
•
•
x
x
Staggered Priorities
High/
Med/
Low
x
x
Comments/ Rationale/ Recommendation
High/
Low
x
x
Level of Relative
Impact5 Support6
High/
Low
(<5 years) (>5 years)
15 Durham Biofuels
Program
Level of
Effort4
x
Low
High
Low
Region of Durham Works
Department
Regional Municipality of Durham
Member municipalities
TRCA
Planning and Economic
Development Department
Private Partner (e.g. Enwave)
Planning and Economic
Development Department
Wind Developer
Durham Strategic Energy Alliance
•
A cautionary notes on the some of the difficulties
associated with producing biofuels:
o The production of biofuels could potentially
replace the production of food. It is therefore
important to use lands that are not suitable for
growing food to produce biofuels.
o Studies indicate that producing biofuels
requires more energy than they can generate.
For secondary stage
consideration
•
Land fill gas can also be used to generate heat and
electricity. Since 2003, the City of Vancouver has
captured its landfill gas and has been selling it for
electricity as well waste heat. Over the next 20 years
the City of Vancouver will receive $250,000 to
$300,000 in energy revenues each year, which will
offset the cost of operating the landfill gas control
system.
For secondary stage
consideration
For tertiary consideration
•
•
•
Suggest placing this as a low priority based on
feedback from participants about lack of required
density
Suggest placing this as a low priority given Ontario’s
moratorium on offshore wind development
Consider removing
Consider removing
Action seems out of scope for an energy plan. Also, the Consider removing
title of this APC varies from the intent in the write-up. If it
stays in the plan, it should be written to focus creating
procurement guidelines which will assist each
organization setting their own procurement policies.
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Potential Additional Action Plan Concepts for Consideration
1. The APCs include very little about transportation. Stantec would recommend putting some of the actions into the plan. In particular, one action emerging from the stakeholder consultations was to
expand bike and trail networks. Consider expanding the action to:
o Enhance the pedestrian and cycling environment: Priority should be placed on improving the pedestrian and cycling environment. These efforts could be focused on major
streets and at intersections along corridors, in urban nodes, and commercial centres. Activities might include: wider sidewalks with improved lighting, benches, etc; traffic calming
measures; cycle lanes and paths; creation/expansion of a greenway network; bicycle racks and secure lock-up facilities; and end-of-trip facilities at all civic buildings. It could also be
focused on improving street connectivity in the outer neighbourhoods, where streets often end at cul-de-sacs, which increases walking and cycling distances. To ensure strategic
improvements are made an Active Transportation Plan could be developed by the Region in collaboration with the municipalities.
o Promote commute trip reduction strategies through Transportation Demand Management (TDM) outreach: This could be modeled after something like TransLink’s
TravelSmart pilot program and might include:
Targeted efforts to reach out to: residents that live in higher density neighbourhoods and along frequent transit corridors, major employers in the Region, and schools.
Packaging and promoting information on existing programs, such as those available through Metrolinx (e.g., brochures and maps that label transportation choices and routes).
2. Consider discussion of waste heat recovery from large facilities as part of the Partners for Project Green action. Certain types of large facilities generate excess heat through their
operations. These facilities may provide opportunities to capture/recover waste heat to provide space heating to adjacent facilities.
3. Consider requiring an evaluation of alternative or district energy feasibility: New development presents the best opportunity for implementation of alternative energy supply and
district energy systems. The re-zoning application process provides a potential mechanism to trigger an investigation of these opportunities. As such, the Region can require alternative or
district energy feasibility studies for re-zoning approvals of all large, new developments. District energy feasibility studies should be encouraged in areas projected to have high thermal load
growth (high energy use). The City of Vancouver instituted such a policy in 2008.
4. Consider reporting on activities and programs for conservation demand management that are supported by local utility companies.
5. Consider developing an overall engagement, outreach and awareness building strategy, with a distinct focus on youth.
6. Consider inclusion of actions focused on behaviour modification to reduce GHG emissions (linked to suggestions #4 & #5).
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SECTION IV
IMPLEMENTATION
A proposed implementation approach is included in Section III. It includes suggested
priorities, responsible parties and a staggered timeframe for actions. In addition to
progressing on the implementation of discrete actions, a more robust framework for
implementation must be established. This will include:
•
Consideration of oversight, management and governance responsibilities;
•
Tracking of indicators;
•
A strong focus on education; and
•
Consideration for the costs and benefits of various action plans.
This section includes a series of considerations for discussion and more detailed planning
over the summer and fall of 2011 with stakeholders and municipal staff. During the
development of the implementation plan, consider reviewing the PCP program
Implementation Matrix template (for Milestone 4).
OVERSIGHT: MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE
The Community Climate Change Local Action Plan is a plan for the community and for the
entire geographic region of Durham. As described in Section III, many partners will be
involved in implementation of the Action Plan Concepts. However, there also needs to be a
central oversight body to coordinate activity and track progress towards the goals. It is
suggested that management and oversight be discussed during the fall 2011 public and
stakeholder consultation on the draft LAP.
One suggestion that was made at the design charette was to develop a series of working
groups to review the draft LAP and to coordinate actions, by theme, as the community
moves toward implementation.
In addition, it was recommended that a reporting and revision cycle be instituted. This may
include reporting on the progress of actions, updating the LAP as circumstances change,
and reporting on GHG reductions.
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INDICATORS
The main indicator to measure success for this Local Action Plan will be GHG reductions
relative to the baseline information found in the Durham Region Community GHG Report,
measured against the targets established in Section 1, as per the PCP methodology.
FINANCES AND DECISION-MAKING
Thus far in the Local Action Planning process, the majority of the effort has been in the form
of human capital, including municipal staff time, volunteered time by stakeholders and
community members, and some fees associated with consulting costs for the Community
Emissions Inventory, Phase 1&2 LAP. Going forward, some of the action plans will require
capital and operating funding. Over the summer and fall of 2011, it is suggested that the
related costs be developed for each of the priority APCs.
EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION
As discussed in Section III, education, awareness building and clear, consistent
communication about climate change and local action to mitigate its effects will be a
critical element to the successful implementation of the LAP. Community partners may wish
to consider a public relations/education working group in addition to the six (6) thematic
working groups.
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SECTION V
NEXT STEPS
The development of the LAP is being led by the DRRCC and the process of finalizing the
plan will be supported through stakeholder input from the Steering Committee, area
municipalities, businesses, organizations, and members of the public. Ideas and input from
residents and stakeholders will help to develop the plan as it evolves over time. Success
depends to a large extent on the activities and involvement of stakeholders, especially in
forming partnerships for implementation of the Action Plan Concepts.
The next steps in the process will be to review the Progress Report and finalize the
Community Climate Change Local Action Plan – Phase 2 by early 2012. The steps
involved may include:
• Review of the Progress Report by the Durham Region Steering Committee (July
2011)
• Revision cycle (August 2011)
• Additional engagement and information gathering over the summer and fall about:
o Implementation agents
o Action plan details
o Financing
• Presentation to the DRRCC (September 9, 2011)
• Revision cycle (September 2011)
• Public and stakeholder consultation (October 2011)
• Revision cycle (November 2011)
• Final Community Climate Change Local Action Plan (late 2011)
• Presentation to Regional Council (early 2012)
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APPENDIX A. CONTRIBUTORS
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
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APPENDIX A: CONTRIBUTORS
Thank you to all who participated in the Local Action Planning process.
DURHAM REGION ROUNDTABLE ON CLIMATE CHANGE (DRRCC) MEMBERSHIP
Name
Organization
Eric Bowman
Agricultural Industry
Brian Buckles
Richard Gauder
Todd Hall
Douglas Holdway
Barry Neil
Jeff Solly
Martin Vroegh
Bob Willard
Councillor Don Mitchell
Councillor Bobbie Drew
Councillor Amy England
Councillor Peter Rodrigues
Councillor John Aker
Councillor Joe Drumm
Councillor Jack Ballinger
Councillor Tito-Dante Marimpietri
Roger Anderson
Garry Cubitt
Alex Georgieff
Uxbridge Resident
Small Business
Energy Sector
Education
Ajax Resident
Land Development
Large Industry
Whitby Resident
Finance & Administration Committee
Alternate
Health & Social Services Committee
Alternate
Planning Committee
Alternate
Works Committee
Alternate
Regional Chair
Chief Administrative Officer
Alternate
LOCAL ACTION PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brian Bridgeman, Director Current Planning, Durham Region
Nestor Chornobay, Director Strategic Planning, Durham Region
Douglas Holdway, UOIT
Brian Kelly, Interim Advisor, Climate Change, Durham Region
Don Mitchell, Regional Councillor, Durham Region
Barry Neil, Citizen Member
Pauline Reid, Policy and Research Advisor, Durham Region
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PHASE 1 STAKEHOLDER CONTRIBUTORS
Name
Organization
Alex VanSteen
Regional Municipality of Durham
Amy England
Town of Whitby
Andrew Ross
Anne Edmonds
Green Diamond Industries
Town of Whitby
Anthony DiPietro
Regional Municipality of Durham
Barry Neil
Citizen member, DRRCC
Bob Singh
Hydro One
Bob Willard
Sustainable Advantage
Bonnie Littley
City of Pickering
Brian Bridgeman
Brian Kelly
Regional Municipality of Durham
Eco Pathways Consulting
Brianne McMullen
City of Oshawa (co-op Student)
Carlos Salazar
Clarington
Christine Dejan
Colleen Goodchild
Regional Municipality of Durham
Regional Municipality of Durham
Don Lovisa
Durham College
Don Mitchell
Regional Councillor, Durham Region
Doris Ho
Doug Lindeblom
Regional Municipality of Durham
DSEA
Ernie Davies
City of Oshawa
Eryn Wishnowski
Veridian
Gio Anello
Regional Municipality of Durham
Hida Manns
DEAC Clarington
Hubert Schillings
Durham Agricultural Advisory Committee
Ingrid Svelnis
Jeff Solly
Township of Uxbridge
Sorbara Group
Jessica Mueller
VIRCA
Joanne Paquette
Regional Municipality of Durham
Joe Worona
Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) Union Local 222
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Name
Organization
John Koke
Retirees
Rouge Valley Properties
Jonah Kelly
Regional Municipality of Durham
Kristy Kilbourne
Larry Hutzul
City of Pickering
Enbridge Gas Distribution
Larry O’Connor
Township of Brock
Mara Samardzic
BILD
Margo Sloan
Mark Peacock
Ontario Power Generation
Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority
Meg Cramer
CDCD
Michelle Pongracz
City of Pickering
Mike Tremayne
Enbridge Gas
Mike Walters
Lake Simcoe Regional Conservation Authority
Natalie Anderson
Township of Scugog
Natalie Lindell
Township of Scugog
Nestor Chornobay
Pam Lancaster
Regional Municipality of Durham
Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority
Paul Richards
Regional Municipality of Durham
Paul-André Larose
Oshawa Citizen
Perry Sisson
Rebecca Evans
Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority
Durham Region Home Builders Association
Rebecca Fortin
Community Development Council Durham
Richard Marceau
Scott Grieve
UOIT`
Durham Catholic District School Board
Sarah Clayton
Regional Municipality of Durham
Suzanne Elston
City of Oshawa
Tim Adamson
Enbridge Gas Distribution Inc.
Tim Robins
Durham Catholic District School Board
Tracey Curtis
Regional Municipality of Durham
Tracey Chala
Town of Ajax
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PHASE 2 CONTRIBUTORS, MUNICIPAL WORKSHOP (JUNE 2, 2011)
Name
Organization
Amanda Kennedy
Anne Edmonds
Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Town of Whitby
Anne Reesor
TRCA (Recorder)
Arlene Etchen
CMHC
Ashley Wallis
Town of Ajax
Bernie McIntyre
TRCA (Facilitator)
Brian Kelly
Region of Durham
Chris Kennedy
Chris Leitch
U of T (Facilitator)
Region of Durham
Christine Dejan
Region of Durham
David Bristow
U of T (Facilitator)
Don Mitchell
Regional Councillor, Town of Whitby
Erica Stahl
Region of Durham
Ernie Davies
City of Oshawa
Graeme Williamson
Town of Whitby
Joe Li
John Presta
Region of Durham
Region of Durham
Leo Coe
Region of Durham
Lori Riviere-Doersam
Region of Durham
Marlene Werry
Meera Vignarajah
Region of Durham
CMHC
Mirka Januszkiewicz
Region of Durham
Nancy Rutherford
Region of Durham
Pauline Reid
Peter Chatoff
Region of Durham
Region of Durham
Shailen Verma
Region of Durham
Suzanne Elston
City of Oshawa
Tracey Chala
Town of Ajax
Vidal Guerreiro
Region of Durham
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PHASE 2 CONTRIBUTORS, THEMATIC STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOPS (JUNE 13 TO 17,
2011)
Facilitators for the six thematic stakeholder workshops were:
• Brian Kelly, Region of Durham;
• Erica Stahl, Region of Durham; and
• Wesley Gee, Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Participants at each of the six workshops are listed below:
Energy - June 13/11 Morning
Name
Bob Willard
Christine Dejan
Deborah McCord
Don Mitchell
Ernie Davies
Greg Moran
Hida Manns
Jennifer Lanegger
Jonathan Wheatle
Lisa Backus
Martin Vroegh
Meera Vignarajah
Paul-André Larose
Peter Berg
Richard Gauder
Scott Grieve
Organization
The Sustainability Advantage
Region of Durham
Region of Durham
Regional Councillor, Town of Whitby
City of Oshawa
Durham College
DEAC
Region of Durham
Durham Sustain Ability
Municipality of Clarington
DRRCC - Large Industry Rep., St. Mary's Cement
Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Resident
UOIT
DRRCC - Small Business Rep.
Durham Catholic District School Board
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Built Environment - June 13/11 Afternoon
Name
Anne Edmonds
Anthony DiPietro
Ashley Wallis
Christine Dejan
Deborah McCord
Dewan Karim
Doris Ho
Ernie Davies
Greg Moran
Hida Manns
Jeff Solly
Jonah Kelly
Meaghan Harrington
Meera Vignarajah
Nestor Chornobay
Paul-André Larose
Tracey Chala
Town of Whitby
Region of Durham
Town of Ajax
Region of Durham
Region of Durham
City of Oshawa
Region of Durham
City of Oshawa
Durham College
DEAC
DRRCC
Region of Durham
City of Oshawa
Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Region of Durham
Resident
Town of Ajax
Waste - June 14/11 Afternoon
Name
Alex Van Steen
Ashley Wallis
Gioseph Anello
Hida Manns
Kerry Meydam
Michelle Whitbread
Paul-André Larose
Scott Grieve
Shawn Williamson
Tracey Chala
Organization
Organization
Region of Durham
Town of Ajax
Region of Durham
DEAC
Durham Environment Watch and EFWAC
City of Oshawa
Resident
Durham Catholic School Board
Durham Sustain Ability
Town of Ajax
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Food Systems - June 16/11 Afternoon
Name
Colleen Goodchild
Hida Manns
Joan Kerr
Michelle Whitbread
Paul-André Larose
Suzanne Elston
Tracey Werry
Region of Durham
DEAC
Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities
City of Oshawa
Private Citizen
City of Oshawa
Region of Durham
Transportation - June 17/11 Morning
Name
Anne Edmonds
Anthony DiPietro
Dewan Karim
Dhaval Pandya
Ernie Davies
Hida Manns
Jonah Kelly
Libby Racansky
Mike Tremayne
Nathan Emery
Paul-André Larose
Peter Chatoff
Organization
Organization
Town of Whitby
Region of Durham
City of Oshawa
City of Pickering
City of Oshawa
DEAC
Region of Durham
FOF
Enbridge Gas
City of Pickering
Resident
Region of Durham
Natural Systems and Resources - June 17/11 Afternoon
Name
Organization
Andrew Ross
Ernie Davies
Hida Manns
Libby Racansky
Margo Sloan
Mark Peacock
Michelle Pearce
Michelle Whitbread
Perry Sisson
Green Diamond Industries
City of Oshawa
DEAC
FOF
OPG
Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority
City of Pickering
City of Oshawa
Central Lake Ontario Conservation Authority
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PHASE 2 CONTRIBUTORS, DESIGN CHARETTE (JUNE 27 & 28, 2011)
Name
Amanda Kennedy
Organization
Stantec Consulting Ltd. (Facilitator)
Andrew Ross
Green Diamond Industries, Inc.
Anne Edmonds
Town of Whitby
Arlene Etchen
Canadian Mortgage and Housing
Corporation
Bob Willard
The Sustainability Advantage
Brian Bridgeman
Region of Durham
Brian Kelly
Region of Durham (Facilitator)
Chantal Whitaker
City of Pickering
Deborah McCord
Region of Durham
Denise Flores
Oshawa Power and Utilities Corporation
Don Mitchell
Doris Ho
Region of Durham
Region of Durham
Eric Andres
Oshawa PUC Networks
Erica Stahl
Region of Durham (Facilitator)
Ford Underwood
George Bereznai
Enertech Professionals Inc
UOIT
Greg Moran
Durham College
Hida Manns
DEAC
Iryna Shulyarenko
Kawartha Conservation
Jennifer Lanegger
Jonah Kelly
Durham Region
Region of Durham
Jonathan Wheatle
Durham Strategic Energy Alliance
Joseph Jedinak
Whitby Hydro Electric Corporation
Mahmoud Pejam
Margo Sloan
Kawartha Conservation
Ontario Power Generation
Martin Vroegh
St. Mary's Cement
Meera Vignarajah
Canadian Mortgage and Housing
Corporation
Michael Tremayne
Enbridge
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Name
Michelle Pearce
Organization
City of Pickering
Michelle Whitbread
City of Oshawa
Nathan MacDonald
Ajax-Pickering Board of Trade
Paul-André Larose
Perry Sisson
Resident
Central Lake Ontario Conservation
Authority
Peter Berg
UOIT
Rachael Wraith
Durham Sustain Ability
Richard Gauder
CMS Web Solutions
Sheraz Majid
Hydro One Networks Inc.
Suzanne Elston
City of Oshawa
Tim Adamson
Wesley Gee
Enbridge
Stantec Consulting Ltd. (Facilitator)
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APPENDIX B.
DETAILED PROCESS
OVERVIEW
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
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APPENDIX B: DURHAM LOCAL ACTION PLAN PROCESS
OVERVIEW
The following slides provide a detailed process overview of the present and expected
future developments linked to forming a Climate Change Local Action Plan for the Durham
region:
Phase 1 Progress – 2009/10
• GHG Emissions Inventory
• Vision Statement
• Community Targets
• Stakeholder Workshops over Summer
• Themes
• Goals
• Objectives
• Preliminary Actions
• Phase 1 Report
Phase 1 was conducted in 2009/10 and involved preparing a greenhouse gas(GHG)
inventory, to establish a baseline for the region, along with facilitating multi-sector
stakeholder consultation in establishing, revising and confirming a vision. A vision,
subsequent climate change targets and themes (e.g. transportation, waste, energy) were
established, along with goals and objectives for each theme, and preliminary actions.
Additional details about Phase 1 are included in the Draft Climate Change Local Action
Plan – Phase 1, November 2010. The Phase 1 report is available on-line at:
www.durham.ca/community/climate_change/reports/DurhamLAP.pdf
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Emissions Inventory
• 2007 chosen as baseline
The results from the GHG baseline study (developed by Durham SustainAbility, and
based on 2007 data) is based on the Partners for Climate Protection (PCP) methodology.
As such, it separates emissions based on waste, transportation, residential and
industrial/commercial activities.
Local Action Plan (LAP) Framework
Durham Region
Roundtable on
Climate Change
Phase 1 –
Stakeholder
Consultation
Vision
Targets
On-going
Feedback and
Alignment
Final LAP
Endorsement by
Council and
Implementation
Goals
Objectives
Draft LAP - Phase 1
Phase 2 –
Analysis and
Public
Consultation
On-going
Monitoring and
Reporting
Themes
Indicators
Community Action Inventory:
Actions, Leads, Targets, Timelines, and Status
Criteria
Priorities
Strategies
Implementation:
Community Partnerships and Citizen Commitments
The Local Action Plan (LAP) framework (above) was initiated by developing vision and
targets for the Durham region; and later followed by creating themes, goals and
objectives. Phase 2 involved establishing performance indicators form which to evaluate
potential community actions, from which local consultation evaluated and further specified
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local Action Plan Concepts (APCs); in advance of developing an action plan (with
specific APCs) which can be proposed to and endorsed by the Regional Municipality of
Durham Council and influencing and collaborating stakeholders.
Vision
“Durham Region is a carbon neutral,
sustainable, prosperous and
resilient community with a high
quality of life.”
The Vision for the Durham region is above, which was developed in Phase 1 and was
discussed and clarified during multi-stakeholder workshops in both Phases 1 and 2.
Provisional Community Targets
• 5% reduction in GHG emissions by 2015
• 20% reduction in GHG emissions by 2020
• 80% reduction in GHG emissions by 2050
(absolute targets, measured against 2007
baseline emissions)
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Absolute provisional community GHG emissions reduction targets were established in
Phase 1, which consider emissions reductions in 2015 (5%), 2020 (20%) and 2050
(80%).
Goals
• Built Environment: Support a sustainable built environment in
ways that reduce GHG emissions through design, technology,
education and stewardship.
• Energy: Reduce GHG emissions to sustainable levels through
judicious production, generation, transmission, delivery and use
of energy.
• Food System: To support a sustainable food system in ways
which reduce GHG emissions and increase food security.
• Natural Systems and Resources: Protect, enhance, conserve,
and/or manage natural systems in ways that reduce GHG
emissions and promotes wise use of resources.
• Transportation: Reduce GHG emissions from transportation in
Durham region.
• Waste: Support a sustainable integrated waste management
system that reduces GHG emissions through prevention,
reduction, reuse, recycling, recovering and disposal.
Goals were established in Phase 1 (and reviewed in Phase 2); the goals are linked to
each of the themes which are believed to most effectively contribute to reductions in
greenhouse gas emissions in the region.
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Objectives – Built Environment
Built Environment
• Objective BE1 - Promote compact urban form and by
extension sustainable transportation through
methods and approaches such as policy
development, increased density, infill development,
brownfield development, and urban design.
• Objective BE2 - Encourage sustainable building
technologies in new projects and retrofits.
• Objective BE3 - Engage and educate the community
on the benefits of sustainable built environment.
Objectives were established and later prioritized to 2-3 objectives for each thematic area.
The prioritized objectives linked to GHGs reductions for the built environment are listed
above.
Energy
Energy
• Objective E1 - Encourage, support and
promote energy consumption in a sustainable
manner.
• Objective E2 - Maximize local, renewable, and
low GHG emission energy generation sources
to promote resiliency, security, and self
sufficiency.
The prioritized objectives for energy in the Durham region are listed above.
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Food System
Food System
• Objective F1 - Prioritize and support food system
practices that improve water consumption, delivery,
and recapture, reduce GHG emissions, improve
energy efficiencies, and increase carbon
sequestration.
• Objective F2 - Provide education about the
relationship between GHG emissions and food choice
and consumption.
• Objective F3 - Implement key objectives of the food
charter by increasing community access to local food,
and facilitating the participation of distributors and
retailers.
The prioritized objectives for the food system in the Durham region are listed above.
Natural Systems and Resources
Natural Systems and Resources
• Objective NS1 - Increase local net carbon
sequestration capacity in natural and built
environment by creating, restoring and re-mediating
degraded natural and built environments.
• Objective NS2 - Promote local and sustainable use
and re-use of indigenous natural resources.
• Objective NS 3 - Promote source water protection,
conservation and re-use.
The prioritized objectives for the natural systems and resources in the Durham region are
listed above.
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Transportation
Transportation
• Objective T1 - Promote low GHG emission
transportation options that are appealing to
the public.
• Objective T2 - Improve/increase the frequency
and integration of public transit services.
• Objective T3 - Promote the adoption of
innovative and intermodal transportation
technologies, best practices and policies.
The prioritized objectives for transportation in the Durham region are listed above.
Waste
Waste
• Objective W1 - Encourage prevention through
support of extended producer responsibility.
• Objective W2 - Expand and improve recycling
and recovery opportunities.
• Objective W3 - Promote the reuse of materials
through programs and partnerships.
• Objective W4 - Improve and enhance waste
management systems.
The prioritized objectives for waste in the Durham region are listed above.
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REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
LAP Phase 1 Report
• Completed late
November 2010
• Released for public
comment in early
December 2010
• Adopted by Regional
Council on March 9,
2011
The LAP Phase 1 report was completed in November 2010, was released for public
comments in December, and adopted by Regional Council in March of the following
year. As Phase 1 did not yet specify specific actions for the Durham region, Phase 2
(below) incorporated a more specific and practical approach to the Local Action Plan
with an emphasis on implementation programs.
Purpose of LAP – Phase 2
To build on the results of the Phase 1 LAP to
produce a Local Action Plan for climate
protection in Durham Region that is:
• Comprehensive
• Strategic and high-leverage
• Consistent with the Vision and Targets
• Community-based
• Implementable
• Supported by the public and politicians
B-8
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Phase 2 required that actions be considered which can assist the region in meeting its
climate change (greenhouse gas) targets, which are aligned with the regional vision, are
strategic and high-leverage, comprehensive, community based, implementable and
supported by the public and key politicians.
PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROCESS-LAP-PHASE 2
2011
2010
CLIMATE
CHANGE LOCAL
ACTION PLAN
-PHASE 1
VISION
•
TARGETS (3)
•
THEMES (6)
GOALS (6)
OBJECTIVES(18)
PRELIMINARY
ACTIONS
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
DESIGN AND
PREPARATION
CONSULTATION
AND ANALYSIS
•
PLAN
PREPARATION
PUBLIC REVIEW
AND
COUNCIL
APPROVAL
The above chart highlights the main stages in the Phase 2 plan for (in Q1 and Q2,
2011), as well as subsequent steps that are required in advance of gaining Council
approval, which is expected to be achieved between the end of 2011 (Q4) and early
2012.
B-9
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Step 1
Design and Preparation
•
•
•
•
•
Budget approval
FCM Proposal
RFP for Consultants
Detailed Process Design
Research and Liaison
Step 1 of Phase 2 involved gaining budget approval before advancing forward and
considering potential project consultant partners. Following approval, an RFP was issued,
a detailed process design was developed and research and liaison undertaken to support
each step of the LAP process.
Step 2
Consultation and Analysis
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Award consultant contract
Review Phase 1 and identify gaps & needs
Refine evaluation criteria
Workshop on Carbon Neutral Municipalities
Best practice analysis
Develop Action Plan Concepts
Stakeholder Consultation Meetings (June 13-17)
Design Charette (June 27 &28)
B-10
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Based on a review of applicants, Stantec was awarded the consulting contract. During
Phase 2, the following activities were completed:
•
•
•
Identifying the gaps and needs from the Phase 1 report;
Refining evaluation criteria to be used in the evaluation of APCs;
Planning multi-stakeholder engagements, including:
o A Workshop on Carbon Neutral Municipalities (conducted by the
Toronto Regional Conservation Authority and the University of Toronto) – results
are included in Appendix C
o Six Thematic Stakeholder Workshops (to discuss and develop action
plan concepts linked to the thematic areas) – results are included in Appendix
D
o A design charette to further detail and prioritize APCs, and to consider
areas for further cross-sector collaboration – detailed results are included in
Appendix E
•
Refining the Action Plan Concepts:
o Based on the results of Phase 1 and a best practices review, 15 high
leverage Action Plan Concepts (APCs) emerged from a long list of over 65
potential actions. The evaluation criteria used to determine the 15
APCs were:
Potential for GHG Reductions: This Action potentially reduces GHG
emissions by a significant amount in a sector where Durham has
high emissions (or high projected growth of emissions).
Comprehensive: This Action addresses more than one theme
Increases Resiliency: This Action builds individual and societal
resilience by building skills and infrastructure required for living well
in a carbon-free economy that is feeling the heat from climate
change impacts.
Flexible: This Action is a foundation for future actions and is easily
replicable throughout the Region
Demonstrated Effective (GHG reductions and/or cost savings): This
Action has been tried somewhere else and is working
Equitable: This Action mitigates GHGs and helps the least
advantaged
B-11
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Potential to Create Green Jobs: This Action requires capital
investment, local labour, and an installation procedure.
o These 15 APCS were presented for revision, discussion and improvement at
the six thematic stakeholder workshops.
o Based on the outcomes of those workshops (available in Appendix D), the
15 APCs were refined for presentation and discussion at the design
charrette. In addition, 8 new APCs were added based on stakeholder
input. The suite of APCs that were presented at the design charette appear
in Appendix F.
o At the design charette, participants had an opportunity to enhance and
upgrade the APCs. The resulting set of revised APCs is included in
Appendix G.
o As the process to finalize the LAP continues, it is expected that the APCs will
be further refined and more detail will be added.
Step 3
Plan Preparation
• Package actions into ``implementable``
and high-leverage projects
• Engage stakeholders / implementers in
design of projects and programs
• Negotiate roles with implementation
agents
• Prepare comprehensive LAP
• Analyse expected impacts of LAP
Following submission of the Progress Report the expected next steps in the process are to
further specify high-leverage projects; further engage with stakeholders in their support
and development of the design of regional (multi-stakeholder) programs and projects; and
B-12
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
to prepare a comprehensive LAP which can be evaluated in the context of expected
impacts to come from prioritized actions.
Step 4
Public Review and Council Approval
•
•
•
•
•
•
Release Draft LAP and distribute widely
Hold public meetings
Record and respond to all inputs
Modify LAP accordingly
Produce attractive Draft Final Report
Present Draft Final LAP to Regional Council
for approval
A final step is required to ensure significant regional support and Council approval,
which is expected to involve a release and public review of the LAP; for modifications to
be made to the LAP based on public inputs; and for a final draft report to be developed,
presented and approved by Regional Council.
B-13
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX C. RESULTS OF THE
CARBON NEUTRAL
MUNICIPALITY
WORKSHOP (JUNE 2,
2011)
Outline of Workshop
Title: Durham Workshop on Carbon Neutral Municipalities
Date: Thursday, June 2, 2011; 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room LL-C, Durham Region Headquarters
Objectives: The objectives of this Workshop are to:
• Introduce participants to the notion of carbon neutral municipalities
• Introduce participants to the Carbon Neutral City Planner tool for
estimating impacts of selected mitigation strategies
• Identify a set of infrastructure and community initiatives capable of
achieving deep carbon cuts
• Provide regional and municipal program inputs to the LAP-Phase 2
process
Preparation: Each team is requested to bring a laptop computer
Each participant will be provided in advance with copies of:
• A detailed agenda
• Durham Climate Change Local Action Plan – Phase 1
• Climate Change Mitigation: a Strategic Approach for Cities (TRCA
• Getting to Carbon Neutral: a Guide for Canadian Municipalities (TRCA)
• A short workbook of data requirements to update the Baseline Scenario.
Presenters/Facilitators:
• Bernie McIntyre, TRCA
• Chris Kennedy, U of T
• David Bristow, U of T
• Brian Kelly, Region of Durham
Draft Agenda:
Time
8:30 AM
9:00 AM
9:15 AM
10:00 AM
10:30 AM
12 noon
Topic
Arrival and Refreshments
Welcome and Introductions
Introduction to the Carbon Neutral City Planner
and an overview of the Baseline Scenario
Break
Participants develop Business as Usual (BAU)
Scenarios and discuss
Lunch
Presenters
Brian Kelly, Bernie McIntyre
David Bristow, participants
David Bristow, participants
C1-1
1:00 PM
1:30 PM
2:15 PM
3:00 PM
3:30 PM
4:00 PM
4:30 PM
Results of BAU Scenarios and discussion
Introduction to Technologies and Programs for
Deep Carbon Cuts
Participants develop Aggressive Scenarios
and discuss
Break
Results of Aggressive Scenarios and
discussion
Conclusions
Wrap-up and next steps
David Bristow
Chris Kennedy
David Bristow, participants
David Bristow
Chris Kennedy, Bernie McIntyre
Brian Kelly
C1-2
7/29/2011
Results
Durham Workshop on Carbon
Neutral Municipalities
- June 2, 2011
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
1
Durham Community Targets
for GHG Emissions
Year
2007 baseline
2015 target: - 5%
2020 target: - 20%
2031 CNCP Projections
2050 target: - 80%
(absolute targets, measured against 2007 baseline emissions)
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
1
7/29/2011
Population
Pickering
Whitby
Oshawa
Clarington
Ajax
Uxbridge
Scugog
Brock
Aggressive
BAU
Baseline
0
50
100
150
200
250
Population (Thousands)
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
3
Population Change
Municipality
Population Change 2006-2031 (%)
Pickering 146
Whitby 73
Oshawa 33
Clarington 72
Ajax 46
Uxbridge 35
Scugog 13
Brock 24
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
4
2
7/29/2011
Region-Wide Energy Use
Aggressive
Aggressive
BAU
BAU
Buildings
Transportation
Baseline
Baseline
Services
0 25 50 75 100 125
0 20 40 60 80 100
Energy Use per Capita (GJ)
Energy Use (PJ)
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
5
Region-Wide Emissions
Aggressive
Aggressive
BAU
BAU
Buildings
Transportation
Baseline
Baseline
0
2
4
6
GHG Emissions (Mt CO2e)
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
Services
0
2.5
5
7.5
10
GHGs per Capita (t CO2e)
carboncityplanner.com
6
3
7/29/2011
Percent Changes from Baseline
BAU
Energy
Aggressive
Emissions
Energy
Emissions
Buildings
63
17
-7
-37
Transport
46
-1
-42
-76
Services
78
-93
71
-98
Total
57
-8
-19
-61
Aggressive Percent Changes from BAU
Energy
THE
Emissions
Buildings
-43
-46
Transport
-60
-76
Services
-3
-67
Total
-48
-58
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner
carboncityplanner.com
beta.
7
Energy Use by Municipality
Pickering
Whitby
Oshawa
Clarington
Ajax
Uxbridge
Scugog
Brock
Pickering
Whitby
Oshawa
Clarington
Ajax
Uxbridge
Scugog
Brock
0
10
20
30
Total Energy Use (PJ)
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
Aggressive
BAU
Baseline
0
50
100
150
Energy Use per Capita (GJ)
carboncityplanner.com
8
4
7/29/2011
GHG Emissions by Municipality
Pickering
Whitby
Oshawa
Clarington
Ajax
Uxbridge
Scugog
Brock
Pickering
Whitby
Oshawa
Clarington
Ajax
Uxbridge
Scugog
Brock
0
0.5
1
1.5
GHG Emissions (Mt CO2e)
THE
Aggressive
BAU
Baseline
0
5
10
GHGs per Capita (t CO2e)
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
9
Conclusions
• BAU Scenario results in a significant increase
in energy consumption (+ 57%) driven by
population growth despite assumed increases
in energy efficiency
• BAU Scenario results in a modest decrease in
GHG emissions (- 8%) due to coal phase-out,
transport fuel switching, efficiency increases
(and waste incineration) despite population
growth
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
5
7/29/2011
Conclusions
• Aggressive Scenario results in a significant
decrease in energy consumption (- 19%) due
to assumed program interventions in Durham
• Aggressive Scenario results in a major
decrease in GHG emissions (- 61%) due to
assumed program interventions in Durham
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
Durham Community Targets
for GHG Emissions
Year
2007 baseline (2006 baseline in CNCP)
2015 target: - 5%
2020 target: - 20%
2031 CNCP Projections
BAU Scenario: - 8%
Aggressive Scenario: - 61%
2050 target: - 80%
(absolute targets, measured against 2007 baseline emissions)
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
6
7/29/2011
Conclusions
• Business as Usual is not sufficient to achieve
Durham targets
• Aggressive program intervention appears to
be sufficient to reach – 80% by 2050
• Climate scientists tell us that 80% reduction is
necessary to avoid the worst effects of climate
change
THE
CarbonNeutral CityPlanner beta.
carboncityplanner.com
7
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX D. RESULTS OF THE SIX
THEMATIC
STAKEHOLDER
WORKSHOPS (JUNE
13 TO 17, 2011)
GENERIC AGENDA
Region of Durham LAP – Phase 2
Stakeholder Consultation Meetings
Week of June 13-17/11
Theme:
Date:
Time:
Venue:
AM
Time
PM
Time
Subject
8:30 AM
12:30 PM
9:00 AM
1:00 PM
Arrival and Registration
Light Refreshments
Introduction to the Meeting
9:10 AM
1:10 PM
The Vision to date*
9:15 AM
1:15 PM
Elaborating the Vision
9:30 AM
1:30 PM
Current Reality
10:00 AM
10:15 AM
2:00 PM
2:15 PM
Break
High-Leverage Actions
11:15 AM
3:15 PM
Current Action Plan
Concepts*
11:45 AM
3:45 PM
New Action Plan Concepts
12:15 PM
4:15 PM
Summary
12:30 PM
4:30 PM
Close
Content
Speaker
Progress report on
Phase 1
Phase 2 process
Nature of this event
Process for the meeting
Vision statement
Community targets
Theme goal
Theme objectives
Theme actions (Phase 1)
Adding to or refining the
vision, goals and
objectives
What are the key
elements of Current
Reality in relation to the
vision, goals and
objectives?
Brian Kelly
Identification of highleverage actions to close
the gap between current
reality and vision
Presentation of Action
Plans already being
developed
Review of program
evaluation criteria
Group identification of
preferred Action Plans
Review of session results
and preferred Action
Plans
Group
work
Brian Kelly
Group
work
Group
work
Various
Group
work
Brian Kelly
* Materials will be distributed in advance to registered participants.
D1-1
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX D: RESULTS OF SIX THEMATIC STAKEHOLDER
WORKSHOPS
At each of the six half-day thematic workshops, a number of ideas emerged to help
enhance the 15 Action Plan Concepts. In addition, many new APCs were suggested. A
high level summary of the results is included below, including how and where suggestions
were captured.
* Note that the numbers in the last two columns (“Assessment” and “Assigned to”) relate
to the Action Plan Concepts, as listed at the outset of Appendix F & G.
Energy - June 13/11 Morning
No.
1
5
6
Title
Incent Bullfrog electricity and
gas
Make Durham Region a
research and development
hotbed for sustainable energy
Green Bonds
MLS Rating System for new and
existing homes
Green Index
Individual GHG Targets
Hida Manns
N/A
7
Low energy sub-division design
N/A
8
9
Smart meter addition
Durham Green Branding
N/A
N/A
10
Green development building
industry
Durham Green Building Codes
N/A
Covered by #13 and #16
Peter Berg
This is a comment on #13
N/A
Part of #13
N/A
Covered by #1
N/A
Similar to #1 and #3
N/A
N/A
Comment on #5
Comment on #4
2
3
4
11
12
13
14
15
16
Institutional/Commercial
building code
Comprehensive education and
awareness programs
Community outreach and
education program
Deep Lake Water Cooling
Wind Energy
Author
Bob Willard
N/A
Assessment
Hold as a possible
backup program
Possible as a backup
strategy for
other energy strategies
N/A
Greg Moran
Assigned to
Added to #3
Added to #3
Covered by #3
Could be part of #3 or
a general education
program
Could be part of #3 or #17
Added to #3
This could be a backup
or fallback for #1, #3, or
#13
D2-1
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Built Environment - June 13/11 Afternoon
No.
1
Title
Government decision making
reform
Integrated planning
Author
Anne Edmonds
N/A
5
Green building initiative
program
Governmental decision making
and implementation
Municipal standards/guidelines
6
Urban Forest
7
8
9
Community Environment Fund
Building codes and standards
Private investment/lending to
brownfield developers
Financial and tax incentives for
ICI
and residential developers
Green affordable housing
Financing MicroFIT renewable
energy projects via bonds
Community engagement and
education program
Tracey Chala
N/A
Jonah Kelly
Modify the building code
Paul-André
Larose
2
3
4
10
11
12
13
14
Assessment
Doris Ho
N/A
Meaghan
Harrington
Ashley Wallis
Assigned to
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became #23
Covered by #13
Became part
of #16
Jeff Solly
Part of #13 or fallback for
#13
Greg Moran
Jonah Kelly
Part of #10
Part of #3
N/A
Could be part of a
new education
program
Part of #13
D2-2
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Waste - June 14/11 Afternoon
No.
1
2
Title
Green Procurement Policies for
the Region and businesses
Subsidized on-site composting
3
Partners in Waste Prevention
Shawn
Williamson
Ashley Wallis
4
Expanded/ Enhanced Programs
Kerry Meydam
5
Free days
Tracey Chala
6
Drop off centres #2
7
11
Joint nurturing of Private
Recycling Firms
Waste to Riches
DPPG add waste
Compost utilized at Building
Scale
Home Fuel Production
Paul-André
Larose
Paul-André
Larose
Ashley Wallis
Scott Grieve
Hida Manns
12
Better recycling for ICI
13
16
Convert collection fleets to nonGHG vehicles
Neighbourhood Rewards for
waste reduction
Financial incentives for waste
reduction at the individual level
(like grocery store coupons,
only
this time the consumer gets
paid)
Drop off centres #1
17
Landfill methane capture
Paul-André
Larose
N/A
18
Ban asphalt shingles as a
roofing material
Paul-André
Larose
8
9
10
14
15
Author
N/A
Assessment
Became #20
Part of #11
Paul-André
Larose
Hida Manns
Became
of #19
Became
of #19
Became
of #19
Became
of #19
part
part
part
part
Seems to be a suggestion
for #1?
Part of #1
Could be linked to #12
Hida Manns
Paul-André
Larose
Scott Grieve
Assigned to
Became #22
Added to #1
Became part
of #20
Became part
of #18
Part of #11, maybe #1
could pilot?
Hold, refer to Corp.
program
Became part
of #19
Could be a marketing
employed by #11 & #19
Became part
of #19
Hold, refer to Corp.
program
Could be part of #13
D2-3
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Food System - June 16/11 Afternoon
No.
1
Author
C. Goodchild
2
Title
Farm Friendly Development
Guidelines
Durham Locavore Program
3
Food Schools
Suzanne Elston
4
Green Flag consumers' guide
Suzanne Elston
5
Donevan Re-Born
Suzanne Elston
6
Local Food Systems
Joan Kerr
7
Reel Food
Joan Kerr
Part of #7
8
Integrated Food Systems
Part of #7
9
On-Farm Anaerobic Digestion
10
Biofuel on Marginal Lands
11
14
Food Processing Economic
Development
Agricultural Land Reserve and
Financial
Security for Farmers
Supportive regulation for
change
Impose tariffs on imported food
Suzanne
Elston/
Hida Manns
Michelle
Whitbread
Hida Manns/
Brian Kelly
Tracey Werry
15
Food-1
16
Food-2
12
13
Assessment
Assigned to
Became #17
N/A
Became
of #21
Became
of #21
Became
of #21
Became
of #21
Became
of #21
Became
of #21
Became
of #21,
Part of #7
part
part
part
part
part
part
part
#16
Became part
of #18
Became part
of #15
Part of #14
Paul-André
Larose
Became part
of #17
Hida Manns
Part of #7, #14
Paul-André
Larose
Paul-André
Larose
Paul-André
Larose
Not the Region's jurisdiction
Part of #14, #15
Part of #14, #15
Became part
of #17
Became part of
#17
Became part of
#17
D2-4
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Transportation - June 17/11 Morning
No.
1
Title
Fused grid road network system
Author
Dewan Karim
Assessment
Covered by #6
2
Bio-methane fuelled fleet
Mike Tremayne
3
Complete Street policy
Dewan Karim
4
Libby Racansky
Covered by #8, #6
5
6
7
Innovative ideas for road
construction
Infrastructure/technology
Community design
Urban planning and standards
Ernie Davies
Hida Manns
Dhaval Pandya
Parrt of #10
Part of #6
Part of #6
8
Bike trail networks
9
Reduced operating fares and
recovery
Paul-Andre
Larose
Peter Chatoff
10
Alternate fuels and technologies
Peter Chatoff
11
Hida Manns
12
New, more efficient, and home
produced fuels
Fare cards for Regional Staff
Peter Chatoff
13
Integrated GGH Transit System
N/A
14
Reduce Transit Emissions
Peter Chatoff
15
Durham Smart Commute 2.0
Erica Stahl
16
Smart Commute program
adoption by employers
Jonah Kelly
17
Anti-idling by-law
18
Smart Commute for schools
Anthony
DiPietro
Anne Edmonds
19
Public Awareness
Peter Chatoff
Assigned to
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #18
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Became part
of #16
Hold for future
consideration, perhaps as
part of DRT reform package
and refer to Corp. Program
Hold for future
consideration, perhaps as
part of DRT reform package
Became part
of #18
Hold for future
consideration, perhaps as
part of DRT reform package
Already underway via
Metrolinx
Hold for future
consideration, perhaps as
part of DRT reform package
Hold for future consideration
as part of Smart Commute
reform
Hold for future consideration
as part of Smart Commute
reform
Hold for future consideration
Hold as part of a
school transport/
school bus package
Possibly part of a general
education program
D2-5
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Transportation - June 17/11 Morning
No.
20
Author
Erica Stahl
21
Title
Adult bike riding and safety
classes
Education of the public
22
Municipal leadership
Mike Tremayne
23
True costing
24
Revenue generation
25
Electric vehicle charging
stations
Public and Active transportation
Paul-André
Larose
Paul-André
Larose
Brian Kelly
26
Nathan Emery
Paul-André
Larose
Assessment
Possibly part of a general
education program
Possibly part of a general
education program
Hold for future consideration
and refer to Corp. Program
Beyond Region's jurisdiction
Assigned to
Beyond Region's jurisdiction
Part of #2
Part of #6
Natural Systems and Resources - June 17/11 Afternoon
No.
1
Title
Regional invasive species ban
Author
N/A
2
Ernie Davies
6
Revised Durham Community
Targets
Naturalization of parks and
lawns
Regional property owner
certification
Science-based adaptation
plan
Soil-plant education
7
Green Strategy
Perry Sisson
8
Database for locally sourced
goods
Regional tree planting
strategy
Million Trees Improved
Zero Resource Footprint
Andrew Ross
3
4
5
9
10
11
Assessment
Not really related to CC,
refer to DEAC
Not possible at this point
Michelle
Whitbread
Michelle Pearce
Not really related to CC,
refer to DEAC
Libby Racansky
Hold for later, beyond
scope of LAP 2
Assigned to
Became part
of #16
Hida Manns
Became part
of #16
Hold as possible "Durham
Sequestration Program,"
which would include #9 as
a component. Should work
in partnership with #16.
Became part
of #22
Mark Peacock
Suggestion for #9
Libby Racansky
Hida Manns
Suggestion for #9
Add to #9
D2-6
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX E. RESULTS OF THE
DESIGN CHARETTE
(JUNE 27 & 28, 2011)
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
AM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY
MMUNITY CLIMATE CHAN
CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX E1: RESULTS OF DESIGN CHARETTE
On Monday, June 27 and on the morning of Tuesday, June 28, the Regional Municipality
of Durham hosted a design charette
charette.. The event was organized and facilitated by
Stantec Consulting Ltd., with the assistance of Regional staff.
The agenda for the design cha
charette is included as Appendix E2.
The list of participants for the design charette is included in Appendix A.
The purpose of the design charette was to bring together a wide range of stakeholders
and implementation partners from across Durham to determine an initial suite of initiatives
and an implementation plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that will advance the
vision and help move towards
ards ach
achievement of the targets.
The slide deck that was used to guide the charette is attached as Appendix E3.
E
VISIONING
The first exercise at the charette was for participants to illustrate their idea of the vision.
The results were placed at the entrance/exit to help make the desired outcomes of the
charette top of mind and more personal. A few of the visions are included below and in
the body of the Local Action Plan.
E1-1
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
AM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY
MMUNITY CLIMATE CHAN
CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
OVERVIEW OF THE PROCESS
ESS AND ACTION PLAN CONCEPTS
Participants were provided with an overview of the process (as seen in Appendix B and
E3).
). In addition, Durham Region staff and the consulting team reviewed the existing bank
of Action Plan Concepts (as seen in Appendix F).
SYNERGIES AND LINKAGES
Small, pre-assigned
assigned groups reviewed potential synergies, linkages and gaps amongst the
Action Plan Concepts, as presented. The high level results of this exercise have been
incorporated in the Local Action Plan and the resultant APCs in Appendix G.
G
The detailed results of this exercise are included in Table 1.
EVALUATION
The activity after lunch was focused on evaluating the 23 APCs using a simplified matrix.
mat
Figure E-1.
1. A simplified matrix for group evaluation of the Action Plan Concepts
E1-2
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Table E-1. Results of the Gaps and Synergies Exercise
Group #1
Insert any
general
comments
Gaps: Are
there
additional
actions you
would like to
recommend
and support?
Why?
-Sewage- not utilizing
what waste can be used
for (Guelph) – build into
biomethane.
-Food industry – don’t
want to lose them
-Renewable energy –
broaden #4 – Solar,
landfill gas, wind, PV
-Use wetlands forest as
source of renewable
energy.
Group #2
Group #3
#13 needs
enforcement;
need to account
for sequestration;
Combine all food
areas into one.
How each
program affects
carbon footprint
(2007) re:
quantification of
program.
-Managing
demand for
transportation
Groupings: 1 and 22; 2 and
4; 3 and 10; 7 and 14, 17
and 21; 15 and 18; 4 and 6;
13 and 16;
- FreeCycle: Programme must
avoid the possibility that
materials put for “freecycle”
are taken by resellers. (as this
often happens with other
recyclable materials)
- UOIT and DC should have
farmers markets – multiple
local food hubs; - recognition
for protection/conservation
#3 – true cost accounting
-Water conservation measures
– energy efficiency.
-Green building guidelines –
urban agriculture. – Protection
of existing systems. –
Adaptation for climate change
(1M trees program). – Science
based analysis on “pay-back
for energy efficiency upgrades
#13 – “code” is not within
region jurisdiction to change –
suggest remove “code word.
-Recognition programs
-Education /communication
-Trees(fruit) selected types for
food
Group #4
Group #5
Other/Unkn
own
Synergies
7,12,14,15,17,18,2
0,21 @ food system.
GAP- we need
representatives from
the food industry
such as Sobey’s.
Look to franchise
opportunities – get
agricultural agencies
to the table.
Synergies:
2,4,10,5,15,18 @
Energy. Find out how
we have an impact
on Peak Oil –where
we use oil (the
remainder) for the
most important uses.
Durham Partners in
Project Green –could
encompass food and
natural resources.
10-Tap into SHSC’s
REDy program (youth
trained in green Jobs)
15- Durham biofuels
program to include
bio-materials
22 – Durham green
procurement – use
Greening Greater
Toronto as model
8- Permeable
Pavement Programlook into education
program by CVC and
CSA
23 Community
environment fundadopt $ bag to help
fund
Water
Conservation
– 2.3 energy
in Durham
used is for
pumping/treat
ing water
Behavioural
Anaerobic
Digestion
Water
Conservation
is missing
from these
actions
-Expand
Locavore
concept to
include food
and
transportation
Can we link
with Kijiji for
freecycle or
just use
freecycles
website.
E1-3
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Group #1
Are there
actions you
believe we
can combine?
Food: 7+12+21+20 –
linkages, like all threethere are synergies
#5 not viable because
enough intensification,
best used for multi-story –
feasability.
#22 not enough teethneeds policies to favour
lower GHGs, include
transportation
#3+#23 –could be linked
– community could fund
residential retrofits
“Durham Green Bond”
#2 Need more
information –
collaboration with
Ontario and facilitate
initiative by OPA
Green Building –
13,16,3
Green Development –
Group #2
BE&E – 3-10; 1310; 16,6,8.
Transportation:6,
2,15,18
Group #3
- Watch conservation (drives
electricity)
-Hydro One’s ability to accept
energy into the grid
-Onshore wind turbines
-Adaptation to climate change
strategies for infrastructure,
natural environment
-Missing ‘solar’ based projectsless controversy then wind
-Overall awareness piece to
promote what Durham’s doing
Local Agriculture – reduced
packaging waste.
7,14,17,21,20,11-Food
linkages
13&16 –Housing dev.
2&10-Housing efficiency
1&22
15&18 – Renewable fuels
Group #4
Group #5
-Community Gardens
associated with
public schools.
-Educate consumers
to grow their own
food and to
understand where
store bought food
comes from.
-Start pilot projects
that will act as case
studies to work from
in the future.
-Make public aware
of the food product
policy
Make improvements
with legislative
practices
Promotion of
electrification of auto
industry.
1 and 22; 7, 12, 21,
20 and 10; 9 and
16; 14 Food business
links to food program;
16 and 6; 9 and 21.
Other/Unkn
own
E1-4
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Group #1
Group #2
Group #3
Group #4
Group #5
Other/Unkn
own
10,6,8
Environment- 9,17
Food – 7,12,21,
Gas Development –
18,15,(include landfill
and sewage)
Renewable Energy 4,5,2 (include solar,
wind and PV)
Green Consumer – 23,19
(include extended
consumer responsibility
and collaboration).
E1-5
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY
Y OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE
ANGE LOCAL ACTION PL
PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Participants worked in small groups on a consensus
consensus-based
based exercise to place each of the
APCs in one quadrant.
Figure E-2: Quadrants
Level of Impact
Level of Effort
Additional detail for each exercise was provided on colourful sheets. For this exercise,
additional descriptive information about “level of impact” and “level of effort” were
included:
This matrix is intended to assist the Region and its partners in selecting a diversity
of actions ranging from “quick wins” to “maj
“major
or transformational projects and
programs”, based on a common understanding of the effort involved in
implementing the action and the resulting impact that might be expected.
expected
While it would be desirable to quantify all impacts in numerical terms (e.g.,
(
tonnes
of GHG emissions reduced), this is not always possible. For example, the GHG
emissions reduced as a result of implementing an education program are not
quantifiable, yet it is recognized that education and awareness are an important
step towards action.
n. Similarly, assessing the level of effort required solely on the
basis of quantifiable costs is challenging. The nature of LAP actions is that they will
differ greatly, thereby affecting the operational and capital costs required for
implementation. To assist
ssist in putting the proposed actions into one of the four
quadrants, the following guidance is provided
provided:
E1-6
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
GHG
EMISSIONS
REDUCTIONS
AND OTHER
CO-BENEFITS
LOW IMPACT
GHG emissions reductions may affect a small part
of the total community-wide inventory.
GHG emissions reductions may depend on
individual behavioural change and as a result,
may not be guaranteed or lasting.
GHG emissions reductions cannot be directly
linked to the action (e.g., a home retrofit incentive
program is directly linked to GHG reductions,
whereas an education program will support
reductions, but cannot be linked to a specific
quantity of GHGs)
HIGH IMPACT
GHG emissions reductions are
large and represent a substantial
portion of either the total
community-wide GHG emissions or
of a sub-sector.
GHG emissions reductions are
based on a major technology or
policy change and cannot be easily
reversed.
Co-benefits are substantial.
Few co-benefits result from implementation of this
action.
TIME AND
COSTS
LOW EFFORT
The action does not require additional human
resource capacity to implement (i.e. time and/or
expertise already exists and can be allocated to
the effort)
HIGH EFFORT
Full time human resources are
required to implement the action
(e.g., one full-time equivalent for a
year or more).
Human resources required to implement the action
are limited (e.g., a one-time effort or a few hours
on an ongoing basis).
Outside expertise is required to
implement the action.
The Region and partners can fund the action from
existing budgets, or if additional funding is
required the likelihood of securing it is quite high.
Greater focus on operational costs and shorter time
frames for implementation.
Requires major financial support,
some of which may need to come
from other agencies or
stakeholders. These types of actions
frequently require extensive work to
compile a business case and seek
funding and may be multi-year
projects.
Greater focus on capital costs and
longer time frames for
implementation.
E1-7
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Five groups conducted the exercise to place each of the APCs in a quadrant.
example is illustrated below:
One
Figure E-3: One group’s evaluation matrix
Overnight, the consulting team compiled the results from all five groups to illustrate areas
of consensus. The results in Figure E-4 show a high degree of convergence amongst the
groups. The results of this exercise were used to develop the staged implementation plan
for the APCs in the Climate Change Local Action Plan.
E1-8
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Figure E-4: All groups’ evaluation results, showing degree of convergence
Legend:
Red – 5 out of 5 groups
placed the Action Plan
concept in this quadrant
Orange – 4 out of 5
groups placed the Action
Plan concept in this
quadrant
White – 3 out of 5 groups
placed the Action Plan
concept in this quadrant
Grey – No more than 2
groups placed the Action
Plan concept in the same
quadrant
The detailed results of the evaluation exercise are included in Table E-2.
E1-9
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Table E-2. Detailed results of the evaluation matrix
Big effort with Low effort with Big effort for a Low effort with
a big impact
a big impact limited impact limited impact
#
Action Plan Concept
(Top Right)
(Bottom Right)
(Top Left)
(Bottom Left)
1
Durham Partners in Project Green
1
3
0
1
2
Smart Grid
4
0
1
0
3
Comprehensive Residential Retrofits
4
0
1
0
4
Offshore Wind Power Generation
3
0
1
1
5
Deep Lake Water Cooling
3
0
2
0
6
Transit Oriented Neighbourhoods
3
2
0
0
7
Local Food Hub
1
0
0
4
8
Permeable Pavement Program
0
0
3
2
9
Durham One Million Trees
0
4
0
1
10
Green Affordable Housing
3
0
1
1
11
Extended Producer Responsibility
1
1
2
1
12
Urban Agriculture
0
0
1
4
13
Green Building Code Program
5
0
0
0
14
Food Business Action Plan
2
1
0
2
15
Durham Biofuels Program
3
0
1
1
16
Durham Green Development Guidelines
3
1
1
0
17
Farm-Friendly Regulation
1
1
1
2
18
Bio-methane Production and Use
4
1
0
0
19
Durham Freecycle Program
0
0
1
4
20
Durham Backyard Composting Program
0
1
0
4
21
Durham Locavore Education Program
1
1
0
3
22
Durham Green Procurement Guide
1
3
0
1
23
Community Environment Fund
1
3
0
1
E1-10
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY
Y OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE
ANGE LOCAL ACTION PL
PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
ENHANCE AND UPDGRADE
During the following exercise, groups were asked to two actions and “enhance and
upgrade.” Groups were asked to select two actions that required a high level of effort
and brainstormed ideas to reduce the level of effort
effort.. Groups then selected another action
that resulted in a low impact an
and brainstorm ideas to increase the level of impact.
impact The
ideas from this portion of the design charette were used to update the APCs that appear
in Appendix
ppendix F and in the body of the LAP.
Figure E-5. Ideas for enhancements and upgrades
IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING
ING
On the second day of the design charette
charette, small groups examined the questions around
implementation for up to three actions:
•
One transformational action (big effort, big impact);
•
One low hanging fruit (low effort, big impact); and
•
One stepping stone action (low effort, limited impact).
E1-11
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
The groups responded to questions about:
•
Who should be involved?
•
What are the timelines?
•
What are the funding sources?
•
What are the biggest opportunities associated with this action?
•
Are there any risks?
•
What would be the consequences of no action?
•
What are the next steps?
The results of this exercise have been used to update the APCs that appear in Appendix F
and in the body of the LAP.
SUPPORT
The final exercise of the
charette was designed to
solicit individual, rather than
group input.
For this
exercise, each Action Plan
Concept was represented by
a sheet on the wall around
the room. Participants were
given three dots to indicate
their
three
favourite
programs.
The results of this exercise assisted with priority setting for the APCs in the LAP.
In addition, each participant was given an unlimited number of yellow sticky notes with
which to affix their name or organization to the actions that they wanted to indicate an
interest in assisting to implement. The results of this exercise will help the Region to
identify partners and implementation agents.
E1-12
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 1
Table E-3. Results of the Action Plan Concept support exercise, sorted by preference
#
Action Plan Concept
Dot Count
Interest in Implementation
13
Green Building Code Program
12
3
Comprehensive Residential Retrofits
11
Martin Vroegh (St. Mary’s Cement)
1
Durham Partners in Project Green
10
7
Local Food Hub
10
9
Durham One Million Trees
6
2
Smart Grid
5
6
Transit Oriented Neighbourhoods
4
15
Durham Biofuels Program
4
23
Community Projects Fund
4
10
Green Affordable Housing
3
12
18
Urban Agriculture
Biomethane Production and Use
3
3
4
Offshore Wind Power Generation
2
George Bereznai (UOIT)
16
Durham Green Development Guidelines
2
Andrew Ross (Green Diamond Initiatives)
24
2
Tim Adamson/Mike Tremayne (Enbridge)
5
Others•
Promotion of Alternative
Transportation Fuels – NGU
Deep Lake Water Cooling
1
George Bereznai (UOIT)
11
Extended Producer Responsibility
1
Nathan MacDonald
17
Farm Friendly Regulation
1
19
Durham Freecycle Program
1
22
Durham Green Procurement Guide
1
8
14
20
Permeable Pavement Program
Food Business Action Plan
Backyard Composter Program
0
0
0
21
Durham Locavore Education Program
0
Sheraz Majid (Hydro One –Tentative);
Joseph Jedinak (Whitby Hydro); Andrew Ross (Green
Diamond Industries)
Michelle Pearce; Margo Sloan (Environmental
Stewardship Pickering – ESP)
Margo Sloan (OPG)
Joseph Jedinak (Whitby Hydro); George Bereznai
(UOIT); Jonathan Wheatle (DSEA)
PA Larose
Martin Vroegh (St. Mary’s Cement); Tim Adamson
(Enbridge); Hida Manns
Hida Manns
Hida Manns; Tim Adamson (Enbridge)
Andrew Ross (Green Diamond Initiatives)
COMMENTS AND EVALUATION
A comment form was distributed at the end of Day One and Day Two. The results have
been summarized in Appendix E4.
E1-13
Agenda
Region of Durham Climate Change Local Action Plan – Phase 2
Design Charette
Please join the Regional Municipality of Durham and a number of community partners at a
creative, interactive event to develop a suite of greenhouse gas reduction initiatives to move
Durham towards carbon neutrality and enhance our quality of life.
Date:
Monday, June 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and
Tuesday, June 28 from 9:00 a.m. to noon
Venue:
Regal Room, Centennial Building
416 Centre St South, Whitby, ON L1N 4W2
Contact:
For more information or questions, please contact Brian Kelly, Interim Advisor,
Climate Change, Office of the CAO, Region of Durham, 905 668-4113 ext.
3803 or [email protected]
Purpose:
The purpose of the design charette is to bring together a wide range of
stakeholders and implementation partners from across Durham to determine an
initial suite of initiatives and an implementation plan to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions that will advance the vision and help move towards achievement of the
targets:
Vision: Durham region is a carbon neutral, sustainable, prosperous and resilient
community with a high quality of life.
Targets: 5% reduction by 2015, 20% reduction by 2020, and 80% reduction by
2050
Desired
Outcomes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
To develop a short-list of high leverage initiatives that participants are
enthusiastic about moving forward with
To create synergies between thematic groups and seek cross-sectoral initiatives
To empower community members to take ownership for the implementation of
GHG reduction actions
To establish, as a group, a clear set of next steps and how participants would
like to be involved moving forward
To open dialogues between diverse groups
To help participants visualize and create linkages between GHG reduction
activities and an improved quality of life in Durham
E2-1
Agenda
Day 1: Monday, June 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
8:00
Breakfast and registration
8:30
Introductions
Review of process
Review of vision and targets
9:15
Awareness Building
A visual presentation to review the short-listed bank of action plans
Question and answer session
10:15
Break
10:30
Review - Identify Gaps and Synergies
Small group work to review the suite of action plans, in its entirety, giving consideration to a
series of guided questions about synergies, linkages and additional actions.
11:40
Reporting back
12:00
Lunch
1:00
Energizer and review the evaluation criteria
1:15
Evaluate
In smaller groups, participants will evaluate the suite of actions using an evaluation matrix.
2:30
Reporting back
2:45
Break
3:00
Enhance and Upgrade
Each group will have an opportunity to revisit two actions and provide ideas to enhance and
upgrade the effectiveness of those actions. The groups will provide suggestions for improving
the suite of actions.
3:45
Discuss
Open plenary session to discuss thoughts on synergies and areas for collaboration. Highlight
areas for overnight reflection, including enhancements.
4:30
Adjourn
E2-2
Day 2: Tuesday, June 28 from 9:00 a.m. to noon
8:30
Breakfast and registration
9:00
Introductions
Review overnight reflections
Review of evaluation results
9:30
Plan
Break into small groups to discuss implementation of the priority actions. Questions to
consider may include:
• Who should be involved?
• What are the timelines?
• What are the funding sources?
• What are the biggest opportunities associated with this action?
• Are there any risks?
• What are the next steps?
10:15
Break
10:30
Share
One member from each group will share with findings around next steps related the actions.
11:00
Support
A community support exercise to help illustrate support for initiatives that participants are
interested in contributing to.
11:15
Moving Forward
A facilitated discussion to review the results of the two days and to understand how and when
stakeholders want to be involved in the high priority items going forward. The Region will
address initial thoughts on governance and coordination of action plan implementation moving
forward.
12:00
Group photo
Evaluation forms
E2-3
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX E3: EVALUATION SURVEY SUMMARY
A two day Design Charette was held at the Region of Durham, where community partners
and various stakeholders came together for a creative and interactive event. The goal of
the event was to develop a suite of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction initiatives. The
initiatives will aim to move Durham towards carbon neutrality and enhance the quality of
life throughout the region.
To assess what participants felt about the event, and the design and effectiveness of the
charette process, a survey was distributed at the end of each day. This summary
overviews the questions asked on each day’s evaluation sheets, and comments or
suggestions disclosed by participants.
Day One Survey Results
The questions asked as part of the evaluation for Day One are summarized with
respondent’s results below. Eighteen (18) participants completed the Day One survey.
Overall there was a high level of satisfaction with the effectiveness and design of the first
day. Only one participant felt that they had not been given an opportunity to be heard
and state their opinion.
1. To what extent did you find the
worksheets and small group work
helpful?
2. To what extent did you find the
opening presentations helpful?
10
20
8
15
6
10
4
5
2
0
0
A Great Somewhat
Deal
A Little
Not At All
No
Response
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
Not At All
No
Response
E3-1
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
3. To what extent do you feel this
design charette is useful for discussing
your views on climate change for
Region of Durham?
4. To what extent did you have an
opportunity to be heard and state your
opinions?
15
15
10
10
5
5
0
0
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
Not At All
No
Response
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
Not At All
No
Response
5. To what extent did Day 1 of this
charette meet your expectations?
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
Not At All
No
Response
Many of the comments from Day One of the charette (Question 6), indicated that
participants enjoyed the process, and that enough time was allotted to work through the
various exercises. However, one participant did indicate that they felt pressed for time as
there was a lot to accomplish in one day.
Other comments included the essential need of political willingness to accomplish the
discussed initiatives. One person commented that there needed to be more of an
understanding concerning the benefits and costs of each initiative. And a comment was
also made that the evaluation criteria framework developed in Phase 1 of the LAP were
not utilized for Phase 2.
E3-2
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
Day One Survey Results
Twenty participants completed the survey on Day Two. The questions asked were the
same as Day One. Overall, the participants seemed very pleased with the effectiveness
and design of the workshop. Approximately 80% of the participants felt they the design
of the charette provided a useful platform to discuss their views on climate change in the
Region of Durham (Question 9).
7. To what extent did you find the
worksheets and small group work
helpful?
8. To what extent did you find the
opening presentations helpful?
12
20
10
15
8
6
10
4
5
2
0
0
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
Not At All
No
Response
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
9. To what extent do you feel this
design charette is useful for discussing
your views on climate change for
Region of Durham?
Not At All
No
Response
10. To what extent did you have an
opportunity to be heard and state your
opinions?
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
20
15
10
5
0
A Great Somewhat A Little
Deal
Not At All
No
Response
A Great Somewhat
Deal
A Little
Not At All
No
Response
E3-3
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
11. To what extent did Day 2 of this
charette meet your expectations?
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
A Great Somewhat
Deal
A Little
Not At All
No
Response
Question 12 asked the participants if they had any further comments or suggestions.
Many of the participants commented on a job well done, and how well the event was
organized, how strong the facilitation was, and how the layout and exercises really
fostered brainstorming.
In terms of future sessions, participants commented that continuing engagement of
stakeholders was very important, as well as the importance of doing a high level ‘cross
check’ so that there are suitable actions to address the main areas of GHG emission
creation (for example, ensuring that transportation actions are included to strengthen the
current actions inventory).
E3-4
REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM
PROGRESS REPORT: COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE LOCAL ACTION PLAN – PHASE 2
DRAFT - VERSON 2
APPENDIX F. DETAILED ACTION
PLAN CONCEPTS
(INCLUDING
SUGGESTED
ENHANCEMENTS
FROM THE DESIGN
CHARETTE)
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Partners in Project Green (DPPG)
Number: 1
Target Group: Industrial and commercial sector
Author: Brian Kelly and Chris Rickett
Program type: advisory/ audit,
retrofit
Version 4
Status: Proposed
Date: June 8/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Built Environment
Objectives: BE2
Energy
E1, E2
_______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
Develop a Durham Region version of Partners in Project Green (PPG) for the industrial
and commercial business community in Durham. This program would initially offer:
• Energy conservation assessments and advisory services,
• Procurement assistance (Green Purchasing Alliance),
• Training,
• Networking opportunities.
The emphasis will begin on energy efficiency with local companies, but over time the
menu of available services may expand to cover other PPG services such as water
efficiency, transportation (goods and employees), solid waste reduction, by-product
synergies, renewable energy production, green procurement, green parking lots and
district energy facilities. Performance metrics for this initiative could be linked to the
carbon metrics and targets for the Region, this will help to ensure that the goals of this
initiative are well aligned with the goals of the Region.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Overall the program aims to assist businesses in Durham improve the financial and
environmental performance. By focusing on low-cost energy efficiency projects, this
program will reduce energy consumption in the industrial and commercial sectors,
while strengthening the competitiveness of local businesses.
By adopting the proven and effective PPG programs that have been utilized by
businesses around Toronto Pearson, the Region of Durham will benefit from all of the
program development and learning that has been undertaken by TRCA over the last 3
years, allowing a quick ramp up and implementation timeline that focuses on assisting
businesses sooner rather than later. This initiative will serve as a demonstration of
leadership to other sectors in Durham region. The program will require local political
support and buy-in for it to succeed.
3. The Rationale
The industrial/commercial/institutional sector is responsible for 45% of Durham’s
energy consumption and 41% of its GHG emissions. Aside from a few major facilities
(OPG, GM, St. Mary’s Cement, Atlantic Packaging, Gerdau Ameristeel), the bulk of
Durham’s industry are small and medium sized businesses which often lack the
awareness and technical resources to identify and act upon energy efficiency
opportunities.
4. Similar Programs/Models
TRCA currently offers Partners in Project Green around Toronto Pearson in what is
called the Pearson Eco-Business Zone. This program has been in place for three years
and has proven to be highly effective in engaging businesses and leading them to
significant financial savings through energy efficiency. TRCA is willing to work with the
Region of Durham to transfer its program models and implementation experience to a
delivery agent in Durham Region.
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
Durham Sustain Ability (DSA) is proposed as the agency to deliver this program on
behalf of the Region of Durham. DSA will enter into a partnership with the TRCA to
access its program model and expertise. DSA will build upon its existing Eco-Business
Program and create partnerships with Durham College (and other community colleges
as necessary), community partners such as municipal economic development offices,
utilities, DSEA and small business associations to promote and deliver an initial core
set of services. The utility partners include Veridian Connections, Whitby Hydro,
Oshawa Public Utilities Commission (OPUC), Hydro One and Enbridge Gas
Distribution, all of which now have conservation mandates from the Ontario
government. Thus, DPPG can serve as marketing and prequalification for the utility
conservation programs which will subsequently provide funding to customers for full
audits and retrofit investments. The Chambers of Commerce, Boards of Trade and
Business Improvement Area Associations can be approached to obtain funding for the
program, and to provide additional ideas for reductions in energy use. As these groups
represent the businesses which will reap many of the economic benefits associated
with the program, they should be engaged for support during its implementation.
Once the program has been successfully established for energy efficiency, expansion
of services could be achieved through engagement of broader stakeholder groups. The
help of widely recognized non-profits and environmental organizations such as
Pollution Probe may be utilized to expand this program.
6. The Expected Impacts
Based on the experience in the Pearson Eco-Business zone, energy savings of about
20% can be expected without any significant investment from participating businesses.
The value of these energy savings goes right to the profit line of the company,
providing greater margins, business stability, job retention, and opportunity for
business expansion. Local air quality may also be enhanced, based on reduced onsite fuel consumption. If the program includes on-site renewable energy production
and district energy systems, further revenue and savings opportunities will be realized.
Consulting, manufacturing and distribution of these energy technologies will strengthen
the local economy in Durham.
7. The Next Steps
• Meet with Durham College to discuss its roles including the potential to provide
student interns for the program. (done April 27)
• Meet with potential utility partners and others to discuss and design their roles in
this program. (done May 18)
• Share program design with Steering Committee and solicit feedback.
• Secure seed funding to develop the program model. (target: June 30)
• Develop a formal proposal for utility partners and present to them (target: June 30)
• Meet with DSEA and other partners to discuss program roles (target: June 30)
• Conclude a transfer agreement between TRCA and DSA and (target June 30)
• Develop program processes, communications and staff over summer. An online
portal could be established and leveraged as an opportunity for cost effective
information and best management practice sharing and virtual communications.
• Launch in the Ajax business sector (target date September 15, 2011) and quickly
expand to all of Durham.
• Determine best practices and champions from the pilot businesses. Use these as
examples to promote expansion throughout the Region.
8. Budget
The current plan for DPPG has identified an annual budget of about $200,000 with the
program to be launched this fall and to run initially for 2012, 2013 and 2014 (to
coincide with the utilities’ current conservation mandates) before evaluation and
possible extension and expansion. The utilities consulted to date favour a contribution
arrangement rather than a contractual purchase of services and are open to proposals.
Each utility will be asked for about $25,000 a year and the Region of Durham will likely
be asked to support the program at a similar level of $25,000 per year. Other sources
of funding will also be pursued.
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Smart Grid Initiative
Target Group: LDCs, consumers, EV industry
Author: Brian Kelly
Status: Proposed
Number: 2
Program Type:
Version: 1
Date: June 23/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Energy
Transportation
Objectives: E1, E2
T1
1. The Concept
Create a Durham Smart Grid Initiative to develop and demonstrate the key
components of smart grid technology in Durham Region, namely:
• Integration of dispersed local sources of renewable and low-GHG generation;
• Improved end-use management of electrical loads through IT;
• Optimized scheduling of sources, end-uses and storage;
• Integration of electric vehicles (EVs) and charging systems.
Durham has the potential to become the Smart Grid and Electric Vehicle leader in
Ontario, thus reducing GHG emissions and stimulating economic development in the
Region.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The current policies and programs of the Ontario government related to green energy,
smart grid and electric vehicles provide multiple opportunities for Durham Region to
take a leadership role in these areas.
Durham offers a rare convergence of strategic assets:
• Energy supply – nuclear generation, renewable technologies, energy from
waste, bio-mass generation, DSEA
• Transportation – GM’s Volt electric vehicle, vehicle production, engineering
services, Automotive Centre of Excellence (ACE) at UOIT
• Information Technology – smart metering, internet security etc
• Industrial capacity – local companies specialized in electric metering and control,
DSEA
3. The Rationale
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
The implementing agents include the local electrical distribution utilities (Veridian,
Whitby Hydro, OPUC), Hydro One and local municipal and regional government
departments.
Partners include the Ontario Ministry of Energy and the Ontario Power Authority (for
policy direction and funding), UOIT, Durham College, DSEA, and private sector
companies.
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Comprehensive Residential Retrofit Program
Number: 3
Target Group: Householders
Program Type: Advisory/
Audit, Financing
Author: Brian Kelly
Draft: 1
Status: Working document
Date: June 9/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Built Environment
Objectives: BE2. BE3
Energy
E1
______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
Develop a comprehensive residential energy retrofit program for Durham involving five
key elements of:
• Energy audit and investment plan covering a wide range of building envelope,
HVAC, appliance, lighting, water heating and renewable energy retrofits;
• Financing plan combining existing federal/provincial grant programs together
with long-term, low-interest loans designed to produce positive cash flow from
the outset (thus eliminating the barrier of a payback period);
• Assistance with contractor selection and project management (thus reducing the
complexity factor);
• Repayment of loans via property taxes (or other mechanisms) on the home
(thus eliminating the barrier of continued debt repayments after home sale);
• A home energy label to identify residences that have been significantly
retrofitted and their new utility costs (to assist in the eventual resale of the
home).
Such a comprehensive program would overcome most of the barriers inhibiting
extensive energy retrofitting of residential buildings in Durham and result in major
energy and GHG savings. For this program to be successful, extensive homeowner
education and engagement must take place. Homeowners who are informed about the
measurable benefits of the program will be much more likely to participate.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Currently the scope and depth of residential energy efficiency retrofits is limited by
complexity, financial barriers, and institutional gaps. Most residents are simply
scratching the surface of the savings available in their homes. The Region of Durham
and the local municipalities have the ability to provide mechanisms (at little or no cost
to themselves) to overcome these barriers and release the deep potential for utility
savings to finance extensive retrofit actions and improve living conditions.
3. The Rationale
Durham’s residential sector accounts for 35% of the region’s energy use and 31% of its
CO2e emissions. Under business-as-usual (BAU), the sector’s emissions will rise 26%
from 2007 levels by 2020. In 2008, residential energy costs in Durham were about
$428,711,000. On a per capita basis, residents spent approximately $700 on heating
fuels and electricity. Average per household energy costs (excluding transportation)
were about $2,100 per year and could likely be lowered by a minimum of 20% in newer
homes and up to 80% in older untouched homes, public housing and homes heated by
electric resistance heating. Total retrofit costs (including auditor/advisor costs) may
range from $5,000 to as high as $25,000 per single family residence and higher for
multi-residential buildings.
4. Similar Programs/Models
The original model for this concept is the Berkeley Financing Initiative for Renewable
and Solar Technology (FIRST) Program which was aimed at stimulating solar retrofits
by attaching the financing to property taxes. Similar programs entitled Property
Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Programs were subsequently created by many US
cities. In Canada, Vancouver is developing a program in which it will finance energy
retrofits and allow homeowners to pay for them through property taxes. The entire
retrofit program is designed to be self-financing with no cost to city taxpayers.
Homeowners who participate will repay the loan with interest calculated to cover the
administration and financing. The NRCan ecoENERGY Retrofit grants program can
also be used as a model for this initiative.
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
Several key roles are required for this program to be successful:
• Energy auditors/advisors – private and/or NGO auditors/ advisors
• Financing – loan funds provided by municipal bonds or bank financing
• Assistance with contracting and project management – private and/or NGO
advisors
• Loan Repayment – on municipal property taxes (or alternately energy utility or
water bill financing)
• Home energy labelling – private and/or NGO advisors
• Business improvement organizations – Chamber of Commerce
• Auditors – Durham College
6. The Expected Impacts
Extensive retrofit of existing houses in Durham could result in energy and utility cost
savings ranging from 20 to 80% depending on original condition, technologies
employed, energy prices and other factors. This will this reduce householders’ utility
costs and increase the value of housing stock. It will also strengthen the Regional
economy and generate local employment in the construction trades through the
expenditures on equipment and installation. Furthermore, the increased disposable
income of householders will circulate more in the local economy than expenditures on
natural gas, fuel oil and electricity, thus contributing to local economic activity and
induced jobs. The program also has the potential to increase indoor air quality and the
quality of health of building occupants.
7. The Next Steps
• Investigate NRCan program
• Create Clean Development protocols
8. Notes To Come
Berkeley FIRST Program
View Program
http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/uploadedFiles/Planning_and_Development/Level_3__Energy_and_Sustainable_Development/Guide%20to%20Renewable%20Energy%20
Financing%20Districts2009.pdf
View Program Evaluation
http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/uploadedFiles/Planning_and_Development/Level_3__Energy_and_Sustainable_Development/Berkeley%20FIRST%20Final%20Evaluation
%20current.pdf
Research on FIRST and other options for Vancouver from UBC Sauder School of
Business
http://isis.sauder.ubc.ca/files/2010/08/Addressing-the-Barriers-to-Energy-Efficiency-inVancouver.pdf
View City of Vancouver policy report on establishment of FIRST-style pilot program,
May 2011
http://vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/cclerk/20110531/documents/rr1.pdf
9. Additional Suggestions From Charette
Participants in the discussion felt that this program would experience a larger uptake
by homeowners if further incentives were given for participation. These incentives
could take the form of retrofit funding provided by the Region for program participants.
To protect the Region from being exploited by homeowners with minimal participation
in the program, rigid criteria and minimum retrofit standards should be created to
determine eligibility for the program.
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Offshore Wind Power Generation
Number: 4
Target Group: Commercial Power Development Sector
Author: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Draft: Version 1
Status: Proposed
Date: June 9, 2011
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Energy
Objectives: E1, E 2
______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
To create an offshore wind farm with the capacity to generate 100MW of electricity,
sponsored by the Regional Municipality of Durham (the Region) and funded through
private partnerships. This action has the potential to be supported by the Ontario
Power Authority’s Feed-in Tariff (FIT) program – a guaranteed pricing structure for
renewable electricity production, with stable long term contracts. The goal of the
project is to contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to sustainable
levels through judicious generation, transmission, delivery and use of energy. While
this concept was written in the context of wind energy, the strategy could be expanded
to consider other forms of renewable energy such as solar and could be adapted to
include on-shore energy projects.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Assuming that Ontario’s current moratorium on offshore wind projects will be lifted, the
Region could sponsor the private development of an offshore wind farm of
approximately 50 turbines, each with 2MW of generation capacity. The Port of Oshawa
could be considered as a staging area for construction, as this could serve to stimulate
local business and position the Port as a staging area for future offshore wind
developments.
In order to solicit participation and support in this project, the Region should engage
relevant non profit organizations engaged in advancing energy initiatives in the region.
Groups involved in research and investment towards the creation of offshore wind
farms could also be contacted to request support. Large energy developers, who have
completed similarly sized projects in Ontario, could be targeted as private contributors
to the project. Funding could be provided in part by investments from the Clean Power
Income Fund (CPIF). Finally, a Feed-In-Tariff (power purchase agreement) contract
could be negotiated to help ensure the economic viability of the project.
3. The Rationale
In order to meet Local Action Plan targets for greenhouse gas emissions reductions,
the Region will need to encourage the development of a wide range of actions,
including large scale alternative energy projects. A large scale wind farm could serve to
replace a portion of energy generation that will be lost with the retirement of the
Pickering Nuclear Station – scheduled for 2020.
4. Similar Programs/Models
To date, there have been no offshore wind farms constructed in Canada. However,
there are many international examples of 100MW+ offshore wind farms including
Windpark Egmond aan Zee in the Netherlands and Lillgrund in Sweden; both of which
are both located ten kilometres offshore of their respective countries. By 2013, the first
Great Lakes offshore farm is planned to become operational in Lake Erie. This 20MW
farm will be located 8 to 15 kilometres offshore of Cleveland and is being developed by
Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation (LEEDCo, 2011).
There are a variety of examples of similarly sized onshore wind farms in Ontario
employing a comparable model to the proposed project. The Erie Shores Wind Farm
was a successful installation of 66 turbines each with a 1.5MW capacity along 29
kilometres of the north shoreline of Lake Erie. This project was a collaborative effort
between AIM PowerGen and the Clean Power Income Fund.
5. The Implementing Agents
Major parties that could be engaged as implementation agents include local non-profit
energy associations such as Durham Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA); the Region;
offshore energy research groups such as CanmetEnergy; known power developers
such as AIM PowerGen (or a similarly experienced wind farm developer); and an
investment source such as the Clean Power Income Fund. While the Region may not
wish to be a financial investor in this project, the work performed by the Region to
sponsor the initiative and to coordinate participating groups will be instrumental to its
success.
6. The Expected Impacts:
The successful completion of the project could result in the production of enough
electricity to power approximately 30,000 homes annually, contributing to a significant
reduction in greenhouse gas emissions associated with electricity use from other, nonrenewable sources, in the Region and Province. It will also establish the Region as a
staging point for future Great Lakes offshore wind projects, and act as a model for
future projects across North America.
It should be noted that as in other Ontario communities, this project may encounter
public opposition from select community groups and individuals due to perceived
health impacts from wind power turbines, as well as impacts on the natural habitat (e.g.
bird migration) and the natural aesthetic.
7. The Next Steps:
• Conduct a feasibility study to ensure offshore locations have appropriate wind power
• Engage various groups to garner support, expertise and financial backing for the
project. These may include local non-profit energy associations such as Durham
Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA); the Region; offshore energy research groups such
as CanmetEnergy; known power developers such as AIM PowerGen (or a similarly
experienced wind farm developer); and an investment source such as the Clean Power
Income Fund.
• Engage the community in the planning process. This should include the area
municipalities, relevant Aboriginal groups, agencies (federal/provincial/ municipal) and
other stakeholders
• Conduct a wind assessment – hire a team of engineers and scientists to determine the
optimal locations for the turbines. This assessment should be coupled with a
Renewable Energy Approval Application including the following reports:
o Construction Plan Report
o Consultation Report
o Decommissioning Plan Report
o Design and Operation Report
o Project Description Report
• Negotiate a FIT program contract
• Conduct detailed economic and financial analysis to demonstrate the economic
viability of the project and attract investors
• Wind farm design – including selection of turbines and engineering of grid connections
• Land acquisition and permitting
• Manufacturing, site preparation and construction
• Commissioning
• Operation and maintenance
8. Additional Suggestions From Charette
The discussion group expressed the need for investment in Conservation Demand
Management initiatives in combination with investments in renewable energy. By
reducing the energy use within the Region, renewable energy technologies will be able
to provide for the energy needs of a greater proportion of the Region’s needs.
References:
CanmetEnergy (2008). Wind Energy: Offshore Wind. Accessed on June 9th 2011 online:
http://canmetenergy-canmetenergie.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/eng/renewables/wind_energy/off_shore.html
DSEA (2011). About Us. Accessed on June 9th 2011 online:
http://www.dsea.ca/html/about_us.html
LEEDCo (2011). Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation. Accessed on June 9th 2011
online: http://www.leedco.org/
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Deep Lake Water Cooling
Number: 5
Target Groups: Municipal Governments, Developers, NGOs, Utility Providers
Author: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Draft: Version 1
Status: Proposed
Date: June 9, 2011
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes:
Energy
Objectives: E1, E2
Built Environment
BE2
______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
The Regional Municipality of Durham (the Region) and its partners
can
reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the judicious
production, generation, transmission, delivery and use of
sustainable energy sources and technology. Such technology
includes deep lake water cooling (DLWC), a system that uses cold
lake
water to air condition commercial or industrial buildings (Figure 1). In Figure 1. Deep Water
Toronto, the Enwave system works by drawing cool water (4C) from Cooling, City of
Toronto, 2011
5 kilometres off the shore of Lake Ontario and from a depth of 83
metres. This cold water is transferred to the City’s pumping station; there, heat exchangers
facilitate the energy transfer between the cold lake water and the Enwave closed chilled
water supply loop. The water that is drawn from the lake is used for the regular water supply.
The cool aspect of the lake water, not the actual water, provides the alternative to
conventional air-conditioning (City of Toronto, 2011). This initiative could reduce the
demand for electricity (and GHG emissions) by the commercial and industrial sectors within
the Region.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The Region’s overall strategy would be to assess the feasibility of DLWC and work with a
private partner to implement this new technology. The development of DLWC within the
Region could decrease reliance on non-renewable energy resources, and save the end user
money, as well as reduce the GHGs within the commercial and industrial sectors.
3. The Rationale
Durham’s two nuclear plants produce 30% of Ontario’s energy. The Industrial, Commercial
and Institutional (ICI) sector is responsible for 45% of Durham’s energy consumption and
41% of its GHG emissions. DLWC technology could allow the ICI sector within the Region
to reduce their dependency upon non-renewable energy resources, reduce costs (by
avoiding electricity purchases) and would reduce GHG emissions within those sectors, as
well as have a positive impact on air quality.
4. Similar Programs/Models
Enwave Energy Corporation (http://www.enwave.com/ ), through partial support from the City
of Toronto, developed the DLWC system that uses the cool energy in cold water to aircondition high-rise buildings in downtown Toronto. As noted on their website, “The system
benefits the City by:
• Reducing energy consumption by up to 90 per cent (compared to conventional
chillers);
• Reducing carbon dioxide emissions;
• Improving the water supply by using new intake pipes that are deeper; and
• Investing in a corporation in which the City is a shareholder” (City of Toronto, 2011).
5. The Implementing Agents
The development of a private public partnership (P3) between the Region and a company
(such as Enwave) would be an important step to evaluate the feasibility and implementation
of a DWLC project within the Region. Negotiating and entering into a long-term agreement
(15-20 years) on a single-source basis with a private company to provide the Region with
further sustainable and alternative energy sources, could lead to the successful
implementation of a DLWC system along Durham’s lakeshore. Engagement and education
of local businesses and community members on the benefits of utilizing the DLWC energy
source could be accomplished by the Region partnering with a non-profit organization (i.e.
Durham Strategic Energy Alliance).
6. The Expected Impacts
Based on the City of Toronto and Enwave deep water cooling program, the Region of
Durham can expect significant energy savings and GHG emission reductions within the
participating businesses. As noted above, the DLWC system has helped to reduce energy
consumption by up to 90% at the City of Toronto, when compared to conventional cooling
systems. Metro Hall, a 27-storey building in Toronto, started using the DLWC system in
2006. It has reduced its CO2 emissions by 732 tonnes per year and reduced its power
consumption by 3,000,000 kWh annually, enough to power 300 homes.
7. The Next Steps
• Meet with potential partners to discuss the possibilities of a partnership and
technologies available to the Region
• Feasibility study of Lake Ontario within the Region
• Meet with all significant stakeholders and partners to discuss roles and responsibilities
with this initiative
• Develop material to provide to Regional Council for budgetary support, if appropriate
• Select a highly dense area to launch the initiative
• Complete a detailed engineering study
References:
City of Toronto (2011). Deep Lake Water Cooling and the City. Accessed on June 9,
2001. Available at http://www.toronto.ca/environment/initiatives/cooling.htm
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Transit Oriented Neighbourhoods
Number: 6
Target Groups: Residents, Local Municipalities, Developers, Transit Providers
Author: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Draft: Version 1
Status: Proposed
Date: June 9, 2011
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes:
Transportation
Objectives: T1, T2, T3,
Built Environnent
BE1
__________________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
To develop transit oriented neighbourhood(s) in the Regional Municipality of Durham (the
Region) to: (1) assist in the reduction of GHG emissions from the transportation sector; (2)
create more accessible and liveable neighbourhoods; and (3) provide alternative
transportation options for residents. In order to reduce transit related emissions,
investigation of opportunities to install bike lanes could be investigated; as well as the
creation of a bike share program. For the purpose of this Action Plan Concept, a TON is
described as a higher density neighbourhood that facilitates the use of transit and other
alternative modes of transportation such as cycling and walking, by providing accessibility
and connectivity; in essence, it provides residents with the ability to easily work, live and
play within their neighbourhood.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The Region’s Transportation Master Plan identifies that a balanced approach to growth
and development within the area would meet the needs of a greater number of users. A
higher density within neighbourhoods would engage residents to utilize a multi-modal
transportation system (transit, cycling, and walking) and would provide a greater balance
between auto and other modes of transportation. Investigation of roadways which are
candidates for installation of bike lanes, or expansion of boulevards to include bike lanes,
could be considered as a method for promoting cycling; as could the creation of a bike
sharing program. A four-pronged approach to developing more transit-oriented
neighbourhoods within the Region would include: (1) consistent and coordinated policy
development at the Region and with area municipalities; (2) outreach to residents,
stakeholders and developers; (3) advocacy at the inter-municipal and provincial level to
encourage additional links between the Regional transit system and the GO Bus/Train and
VIA Rail systems; and (4) working with municipal, private and non-profit partners to create
incentives for residents and developers. Some creative incentives that have been used
around the world to encourage transit-oriented neighbourhoods include: parking
reductions, density bonuses, location efficient mortgages, property tax abatements and
planning for transit villages (Liveable Places, 2011).
3. The Rationale
The benefits of transit-oriented neighbourhoods are directly related to the overall vision of
Durham’s Local Action Plan, especially with respect to improving the quality of life and
reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Transit-oriented, higher-density
neighbourhoods have several personal and community-wide benefits, including:
• Reduced single occupancy vehicle trips and reduced vehicle ownership
• Increased mobility choices, including accessible transit systems, walking,
and cycling, especially for portions of the population that cannot, or prefer
not, to drive (such as the elderly and youth)
• Promotion of a healthier lifestyle by making it easier to walk, bike or take
transit, than to drive
• Increased transit ridership
• Conservation of land, and reduction of urban sprawl
o Redevelop and intensify existing urban areas
o Farm, park and wetland areas are protected
• Increased air quality due to lessening of traffic congestion
• Support of local economic development, support of local businesses
4. Similar Programs/Models
Many municipalities throughout North America are now adopting transit-oriented
neighbourhoods and a ‘smart growth’ approach to planning neighbourhoods, for example:
• The Portland Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Property Tax
Abatement Program:
http://www.portlandonline.com/phb/index.cfm?c=53036
• City of Winnipeg Transit Oriented Development and Handbook
http://www.winnipeg.ca/ppd/TOD/default.stm
The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) has developed a series of
case studies from across Canada: http://www.cmhcschl.gc.ca/en/inpr/su/sucopl/sucopl_007.cfm
In addition, “the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System integrates the
principles of smart growth, urbanism and green building into the first national system for
neighborhood design.” http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=148
5. The Implementing Agents
The Region, area municipalities, key departmental staff members (planning,
transportation), developers, and residents would be the key implementing agents for the
development of transit oriented neighbourhoods throughout the Region. The Region of
Durham may also wish to consult and develop additional partnerships and relationships
with other organizations such as GO Transit, VIA Rail, and various local businesses.
6. The Expected Impacts
The expected impacts can be evaluated by looking at other regions that have made a
concerted effort to implement transit-oriented design into their neighbourhoods. For
example, Portland, Oregon residents (as compared to those in other US cities) travel 20%
fewer miles by car, are twice as likely to commute by transit, are seven more times likely
to commute by bike. Residents in Portland also have the second lowest rate of spending
on transportation in the United States (15.1% of household budget vs. 19.1%).
7. The Next Steps
• Meet with area municipalities to discuss transit-oriented design (TOD), including
common priorities, needs, plans and policies.
• Meet with developers and key stakeholders to discuss challenges and opportunities
for transit-oriented neighbourhoods
• Review Master and Official Plans – ensure cohesion between plans and TOD
• Develop and implement cross jurisdictional strategies for TODs
• Support collaboration between developers and planning departments within the
municipalities
• Work with transit departments to implement incentive programs for cross
jurisdictional use (GO and VIA)
• Work with transit departments to ensure the right sizing of the transit fleet, and the
consideration of alternative fuel use in transit vehicles.
• Implement education and outreach program for residents and developers.
8. Notes
For additional information:
• http://www.livableplaces.org/policy/todincentives.html
• http://www.trca.on.ca/dotAsset/81361.pdf
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Local Food Hub
Target Group: Local farmers, restaurants,
consumers
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Proposed
Number: 7
Program Type:
Version 1
Date: June 8/2011
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Food System
Transportation
Objectives: F1, F2, F3
T1
1. The Concept:
Develop a Local Food Hub that will serve local farmers, restaurants, and
consumers in Durham and Toronto. This is an opportunity to use and
implement the Durham Food Charter. The local food hub would initially
offer:
• A permanent market space where farmers can store/sell their
meats and produce wholesale or retail;
• A processing facility with certified kitchens for canning and other
value added food preparation;
• Services such as education, community outreach, and marketing.
The local food hub would give small farmers a chance to channel their
produce and meats into new markets by combining their crops and
connecting them with larger purchasers. Thus, it will save farmers time
and money by allowing them to move beyond direct sales.
The local food hub should also be used as the coordination and
administrative centre for all local food initiatives including, but not limited
to: Urban Agriculture Programs, Backyard Composting and Compost for
Produce Programs, and the Locavore Education Program.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The Local Food Hub program aims to support local farmers, reduce foodmiles, increase food security, protect the greenbelt, provide education on
sustainable food systems to farmers and community members, and
position Durham to take advantage of the growing demand for local food.
The program should also be considered as an opportunity to disseminate
local food information to the public, such as the types of food that are in
season locally, and associated benefits of eating local.
The Local Food Hub program is a natural fit with the provisions of Durham
Region’s Food Charter, endorsed by Durham Regional Council in 2009.
The Local Food Hub program will work with Durham’s local food
movement to implement the Food Charter’s provisions. The program’s
establishment will also take advantage of the City of Toronto’s 2009 local
food procurement policy, which calls for 50% of food purchased by the
City to be locally sourced.
There is also opportunity to consult with members of the food retail
industry and grocery chains, to consider franchising opportunities for the
program.
3. The Rationale
Buying local food supports farmers, grows the region’s (and Toronto’s)
local food market, keeps dollars within the region, and helps preserve the
greenbelt. The Local Food Hub will facilitate these outcomes by increasing
access to local food.
Transportation is an important and growing part of the region’s emissions.
In 2007, transportation accounted for 24% of Durham’s eCO2 emissions
and its emissions are projected to grow by 36% by 2020 under business
as usual (BAU). The region is home to two supermarket distribution
centres which receive trucks 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Creating
a viable local alternative could result in large reductions in the emissions
associated with food transportation in the region.
However, a 2008 study by Weber and Matthews showed food production
itself accounts for the lion’s share of eCO2 emissions associated with the
food system. The Local Food Hub will provide education about the
relationship between GHG emissions, farming practices and food
consumption choices with the goal of significantly lowering the region’s
emissions and creating a more sustainable food system.
4. Similar Programs/Models
The Local Food Hub is a well-established Charlottesville, Virginia-based
non-profit organization with an excellent website explaining their services
and operations plan (see Notes). The organization has an educational
farm next to its warehouse, and donates 25% of the farm’s produce to
local food banks.
In Vancouver, the New Food Market was proposed in 2009. The proposed
local food hub has the full support of City Council and is currently finalizing
a business plan.
5. The Implementing Agents
Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation
Community Development Council Durham
Durham Culinary Association
Local Food Plus http://localfoodplus.ca/about
FoodShare Toronto http://www.foodshare.net/index.htm
Agricultural Agencies – Agriculture Canada
6. The Expected Impacts
Based on the Local Food Hub’s reports from Charlottesville, Virginia, if
Durham establishes a local food hub it can expect to see:
• An increase in sales for local farmers
• An increase in market share for local food products
• Increased access to local food in the community
• Savings in time and money for local farmers
• Increased community awareness of and enthusiasm for the benefits
of local food
• Increased resiliency of local food systems
• Healthier school lunch programs
• Decreased wastes
7. The Next Steps
• Enter into talks with community partners, see if anyone wants to
take the lead on this project
• Devise a business strategy
• Advertise to local farmers, restaurants in Durham and Toronto, and
the Toronto Local Food Procurement folks
• Procure a warehouse or donated office space through corporate
partnership
• Create a travelling farmers market program to advertise and
promote the hub
8. Notes
This Action Plan Concept overlaps somewhat with Urban Agriculture (#12),
Durham Locavore Education Program (#21) and Durham Backyard
Composting Program (#20).
Pickering Ward 1 Regional Councillor Bonnie Littley is a strong advocate
for the Food Charter and local food generally.
Resources:
Durham Region Food Charter:
http://www.cdcd.org/cms_lib/Durham%20Region%20Food%20Charter%2
005%2028%2009%20final.pdf
Local Food Hub, Charlottesville, VA: http://localfoodhub.org/
Weber, C. and H. Matthews. (2008). Food-Miles and the Relative Climate
Impact of Food Choices in the United States.
http://mmm.comuv.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/FoodMiles-and-the-relative-impacts-of-food-choices-Weber-and-Matthews2008.pdf
New Food Market, Vancouver, BC:
http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/westcoastnews/story.html?id
=2163b900-08bc-4623-a363-f241aed52cad
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Permeable Surfaces Program
Number: 8
Target Groups: Developers, Municipal governments
Program type:
Author: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Draft: 1
Status: Proposed
Date: June 9, 2011
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes:
Natural Systems and Resources
Objectives: NS1, NS3
Built Environment
B
_______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
To build on examples from Chicago, Vancouver, Seattle and Houston to develop a
Durham Region program to encourage a reduction in hard surfaces in the region, to
improve flood protection and reduce urban temperatures – as per the objectives of the
Chicago and Houston programs, respectively. A made-in-Durham program could
combine these ideas to establish a permeable surfaces program that would address a
number of Local Action Plan (LAP) objectives. The program would encourage the
replacement of traditional hard surfaces and paving with permeable and porous
surfaces, including permeable pavers, pervious concrete and porous asphalt, and to
incorporate vegetation in road ends, rights of way, between roads and sidewalks, and
on green roofs – all of which can help the Region of Durham to achieve the multiple
objectives listed above.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The overall strategy is to coordinate policies and approaches between the Region of
Durham, member municipalities and the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority
(TRCA) and other CAs. Approaches may include municipal design guidelines, bylaws
to establish development cost charge reductions, etc. Partners for this action plan
could also reach out to the local development community with a clear and consistent
message (by referring to shared municipal goals, policies, incentives, etc), to
encourage improved green spaces by increasing the presence of permeable surfaces.
3. The Rationale
Hard surfaces impact many different aspects of our communities, in ways we don’t
often consider, and actions can be taken to reduce hard surfaces to provide many
benefits to our communities including the following:
• Managing stormwater, including filtration, storage or infiltration of runoff
• Reducing the ‘urban heat island effect’, which can:
o Mitigate extreme weather events associated with climate change
o Reduce the costs and energy used to cooling buildings
o Minimize public health impacts associated with high temperatures
• Reducing the burden on municipal water/stormwater infrastructure
• Increasing green spaces in the region while encouraging tree planting, native
plantings, and edible landscaping (urban agriculture).
• Encouraging different transportation modes such as walking and biking as a
result of the changes that are made to our streets and sidewalks.
A program of this nature addresses numerous goals and objectives in the Durham
Region’s Local Action Plan and provides environmental, economic and social benefits
to its communities.
4. Similar Programs/Models
Several municipal governments have programs or models that can serve as examples
for Durham Region. The following programs/models tend to target a particular issue
(e.g., flood alleviation, air quality, etc); however, the opportunity for Durham Region is
to create a comprehensive program that would address a number of issues and deliver
on numerous Local Action Plan objectives.
• City of Chicago Green Alley Program and Handbook:
http://www.concretethinker.com/casestudies/Chicago-Green-Alleys.aspx
• City of Houston Cool Houston Plan:
http://files.harc.edu/Projects/CoolHouston/CoolHoustonPlan.pdf
• City of Vancouver Crown Street Sustainable Streetscape:
http://vancouver.ca/engsvcs/streets/design/crown.htm
• City of Seattle Streetscape Design Guidelines:
http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/rowmanual/manual/6_4.asp
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
The Regional Municipality of Durham, member municipalities and the TRCA could be
the key partners and implementing agents leading the development and delivery of this
program. Additional partners that will need to be consulted during program
development include: local builders and developers, development organizations, and
contractors that may provide paving and other infrastructure services to municipalities
in the region.
6. The Expected Impacts
The impacts that are to be expected as a result of reducing hard surfaces are difficult
to quantify. A 2001 report entitled, “Green Municipalities: A Guide to Green
Infrastructure for Canadian Municipalities,” provided a long list of qualitative benefits of
green infrastructure. Some of these benefits included: resilience, aesthetics and sense
of place, flexibility, lower costs, delayed capital outlays, security, efficiency, restoration,
biodiversity and productivity, etc. This supports the notion (as previously mentioned)
that the benefits of increased permeable surfaces are also felt in social, economic and
environmental spheres.
7. The Next Steps
•
•
•
•
•
•
Convene a committee with representation from the Region, area municipalities in
Durham Region, and the TRCA to develop program objectives and a plan for
moving forward with program development
Conduct a study to compile information on existing municipal policies and
approaches within the Region that support the implementation of permeable
surfaces and identify inconsistencies and gaps that need to be addressed to fulfill
program objectives
Revise/prepare policies and guidelines that will form the core of the program, and
(simultaneously) consult the local development community on proposed policies
and guidelines
Develop a program communications plan and other program processes (contacts,
monitoring framework, etc) to ensure community-wide understanding and uptake.
Launch program
Monitor challenges and effectives practices in program implementation, so to
ensure strong uptake and positive environmental impacts
8. Notes
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title:
Durham One Million Trees
Number: 9
Target Groups: Works Department, Planning Department, Community Groups, Developers
Author: Stantec Consulting Ltd.
Draft: Version 1
Status: Proposed
Date: June 9, 2011
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Natural Systems and Resources
Built Environment
Objectives: NS 1
BE 3
______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
To create a made-in-Durham version of MillionTreesNYC through a variety of publicprivate partnerships throughout the Regional Municipality. The goal of the program is
to plant one million trees throughout the Region over a period of 10 years, in an effort
to reforest park land as well as residential and commercial areas and streetscapes –
which can contribute to the Region’s target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by
80% by 2050.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
This program aims to increase the amount of forested green space within the Regional
Municipality of Durham (the Region). This could be accomplished by way of a publicprivate partnership in which the Region commits to planting 60% of the trees, and
private partners and donations which are engaged to fund and plant the remaining
40%. This percentage allocation is based upon the MillionTreesNYC program; and
depending on availability of funding, a different allocation may be more feasible in the
Region. Public sector contribution may consider leveraging the Oak Ridges Moraine
Conservation Plan and the Greenbelt Plan. Relationships with the Toronto Region
Conservation Authority, the Durham Region Health Department, Works Department,
Planning Department, and private developers could be leveraged to contribute to the
success of this program. A major potential contributor of funding and resources could
be Trees Ontario, as this organization has partnered with the Ministry of Natural
Resources and has been tasked with achieving Ontario’s commitment to plant 50
million new trees by 2020 (Trees Ontario). In this role, Trees Ontario is positioned to
provide funding and coordinate planting at eligible sites throughout the province.
It is likely that a lead time of 1 to 2 years will need to be given to nurseries in the
surrounding area, in order for them to grow enough saplings to meet the demands of
the program.
3. The Rationale
Planting trees has been identified as a cost effective method for rehabilitating urban
environments and providing a wide variety of benefits including carbon sequestration,
reduction in airborne pollutants known to cause asthma and respiratory diseases, and
reduction of ‘heat island effect’. The primary benefit for which this plan was proposed is
to increase the Region’s ability to reduce (and in this case absorb/sequester)
greenhouse gas emissions by creating, restoring and remediating degraded natural
environments. An additional secondary benefit of this program is the financial benefit to
local nurseries tasked with growing the saplings necessary for this initiative.
4. Similar Programs/Models
As part of 127 initiatives adopted in the PlaNYC program to increase sustainability in
New York City, an urban reforestation project named MillionTreesNYC was created. By
planting 1,000,000 trees in a decade throughout all 5 boroughs, the City estimated it
could increase its total urban forest by 20% and reap the associated economic,
environmental and health/social benefits (Million Trees NYC, 2011). This program has
been designed to utilize existing City departments and a public-private partnership
model to realize its goals. To date, the program has resulted in the successful planting
of more than 400,000 new trees. Similar initiatives are being undertaken in Los
Angeles, Salt Lake County, and a collaborative effort in Pennsylvania, Delaware and
New Jersey. A partnership between Trees Ontario and the Ministry of Natural
Resources has committed to plant 50 million trees throughout the province, in
partnership with municipalities and local land owners, by 2020.
5. The Implementing Agents
Responsibilities for successful implementation of this program will be expected to be
shared by both public and private organizations. Public contribution of 60% of total tree
planting could be shared between the Regional Municipality of Durham and the
Toronto Region Conservation Authority. This program will endeavour to plant 400,000
trees through reforestation of parkland sites. Additional urban reforestation could be
undertaken by Durham Region’s Works Department, contributing 200,000 trees
through street tree planting programs. Funding and expertise could be secured through
the engagement of Trees Ontario; this could be mutually beneficial as they have been
tasked with planting 50 million trees in the province by 2020.
Private partners such as non-profits should be engaged to solicit donations required to
fund the planting of trees on a variety of public lands. Collaboration between the Works
Department and community groups could be required to ensure proper planting and
stewardship of new trees. The Durham Region Planning Department could be utilized
to engage commercial and residential developers to ensure that specific tree planting
and maintenance goals are agreed upon for new developments. Finally, the Durham
Region Works and Health Departments may be needed to conduct homeowner
outreach programs to encourage homeowners to plant and maintain trees on their
property. Private landowners may be given further incentive to participate in the
program through tax rebates such as a managed forest tax incentive program.
6. The Expected Impacts
• Improved air quality – through the uptake of carbon dioxide and airborne pollutants.
1,000,000 trees will remove approximately 12 tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere
each year (Million Trees NYC, 2011).
• Water quality protection - through rainfall capture trees act as a natural buffer to
reduce storm water runoff and potential for flooding.
• Reduced urban heat island effect –by providing shade to concrete and buildings
• Wildlife habitat – increased nesting opportunities for bird species
• Improved health – decrease in asthma and respiratory diseases, resulting from
improved air quality
7.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Next Steps
Meet with all identified partners to discuss and outline roles in the program
Develop a staged implementation plan
Secure public budget and private funding
Take stock of areas where planting will occur
Divide areas of responsibility between partners, establish targets
Evaluate success of program, adjust if necessary
8. Additional Suggestions From Charette
The Region could investigate the potential for obtaining carbon credits for the
sequestration potential of the trees planted through this initiative. These credits could be
used to offset the emissions associated with Durham Region operations.
The types of trees selected for the project should be selected with future climate
projections in mind. Trees suited to warmer temperatures expected in climate change
scenarios for the region will be preferred.
References:
Million Trees NYC. (2011). About Million Trees NYC. Accessed June 9th 2011 online:
http://www.milliontreesnyc.org/html/about/about.shtml
Trees Ontario. 50 Million Trees Program. Accessed June 9th 2011 online:
http://www.treesontario.ca/programs/index.php/fifty_million
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Green Affordable Housing
Number: 10
Target Group: Durham Region Local Housing
Corporation (DRLHC), associated landlords, tenants
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Proposed
Program Type:
Version 1
Date: June 7/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Built Environment
Energy
Objectives: BE1, BE2, BE3
E1
1. The Concept:
In partnership with Housing Services and other stakeholders, develop a
Durham Region version of the City of Boston’s Green Affordable Housing
program. This program would help the Region to develop affordable
housing that attains a LEED Gold ranking and makes and full use of green
building technologies. These green buildings would have lower operating
and maintenance costs, more stable utility costs, and higher levels of
indoor environmental quality than conventional buildings. The program
would also educate the community about the benefits of green building
through its training sessions. Training sessions could be included as a
vehicle for training youth in green energy retrofit skills to prepare them for
the green job market, similar to the Social Housing Services Corporation’s
Reducing Energy Demand with Youth program.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The DRLHC has already taken independent steps to implement energy
efficient measures in its social housing units. The Green Affordable
Housing program aims to work with the DRLHC and other stakeholders in
improving the environmental, financial, and health indicators for Durham’s
social housing sector. By requiring LEED Silver equivalency from its social
housing units and by using integrated design teams when designing new
housing projects and renovating existing ones, the Region will encourage
creative, systems-based solutions to environmental problems associated
with buildings. As a result, the Region will realize cost savings in its social
housing sector that will significantly outweigh the initial “green premium”
on green buildings. Green buildings have better indoor environmental
quality than do conventional buildings, so the Region will also benefit from
healthier, more productive residents with higher levels of well-being.
In the medium term, mandatory training programs for all developers and
interested public will educate the community on the benefits of green
housing. Training could be included to give youth green energy retrofitting
skills to prepare them for the green job market, similar to the Social
Housing Services Corporation’s Reducing Energy Demand with Youth
program.
Additionally, this program will serve as a regional example of the benefits
of green building. As such, it will lay the groundwork for the Region’s
municipalities to cooperatively develop an ambitious harmonized Green
Building Code for private sector housing developments and renovations in
Durham region.
3. The Rationale
In 2008, residential energy costs were $428,711,000. Durham’s residential
sector accounts for 35% of the region’s energy use and 31% of its eCO2
emissions. Under business-as-usual (BAU), the sector’s emissions will
rise 26% from 2007 levels by 2020.
On average, green buildings have 20-50% lower energy bills and
significantly lower water expenses. In addition to their documented
financial benefits, the higher indoor environmental quality of green
buildings has been linked to higher worker productivity, better student
performance, and lower absenteeism.
4. Similar Programs/Models
The City of Boston implemented a Green Affordable Housing program in
2007, which has successfully reduced eCO2 emissions from Boston’s
social housing sector.
According to a 2009 data paper from the University of California - Davis,
early program results are:
• state, city and individual organizational policy and funding changes to
encourage renewable energy and green building practices;
• the creation of 2,195 green affordable housing units;
• the installation of 1,861 kW in renewable energy capacity (39
developments), sufficient to support almost 80 percent the total square
footage of all developments in the program; and,
• early cost savings ranging from $144 per multi-family unit to $511 for
single-family units, based on a small number of units reporting.
The program provides a model for integrating green building into preexisting regulatory structures, and illustrates the importance of training,
outreach, and resource coordination for program success.
5. The Implementing Agents
DRLHC, associated landlords, utilities, tenants, (others?)
6. The Expected Impacts
Based on Boston’s experience, significant reductions in eCO2 emissions
can be expected from the social housing sector. Durham’s social housing
sector can also expect lower electricity, fuel, and water bills, and healthier
homes. Arguably, the most significant impact in Boston was the
reorientation of the affordable housing market towards green development,
and with appropriate policy direction Durham can expect the same.
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
This program overlaps somewhat with the Radical Residential Retrofit
Program (#3) and the Green Building Code Program (#13).
References:
UC Davis Data Paper
http://eec.ucdavis.edu/ACEEE/2010/data/papers/2108.pdf
Burke, P. et al. (2008). Boston’s Green Affordable Housing Program:
Challenges and Opportunities.
http://ecmappdlv01.law.nyu.edu/ecm_dlv1/groups/public/@nyu_law_websi
te__journals__journal_of_legislation_and_public_policy/documents/docum
ents/ecm_pro_058112.pdf
Social Housing Services Corporation (2010). REDY (Reducing Energy
Demand with Youth)
http://www.globeservices.ca/index.php/initiatives/redy/
Sustain Ability. (April 2011). Durham Region Community Greenhouse Gas
Emissions Inventory.
http://www.durham.ca/community/climate_change/reports/CommunityInve
ntoryQuadReport.pdf
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)
Target Group: Provincial policy makers, the Region,
manufacturing and business sectors, community
stakeholders
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Proposed
Number: 11
Program Type:
Version 1
Date: June 9/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Waste
Objectives: W1, W3, W4
1. The Concept:
Support the creation of ambitious Provincial legislation to implement a
comprehensive Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) program. The
Region would play a facilitating role by gathering stakeholders from
among regional MPPs, municipal service providers across the region,
industry, business, and community stakeholders. The stakeholders would
create a mutually agreed upon EPR regime emphasizing zero waste
targets, job creation and a closed loop system and take it to the province.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
By entering into consultations with stakeholders and creating mutually
agreed upon EPR regulations, Durham could catalyze the necessary
Provincial legislation to implement EPR. Durham could utilize the
upcoming Provincial Elections as leverage to lobby provincial government
for support. As an early player, Durham would be an influential member of
provincial talks on EPR when they begin.
In order to increase the success of an EPR program once it has been
established, a number of elements will be necessary. In order to create a
market for recycled and post-consumer products, municipalities will need
to consider purchasing programs that favour these types of goods and
materials. Municipalities should also consider creating landfill bans on
products and materials that have been identified for EPR. Goods that have
been identified for EPR could be labelled with appropriate end of life
directions, such as the address of a depot or the contact information of the
producer if curb side pickup is necessary.
3. The Rationale
In 2007, waste accounted for 3.5% of total community GHG emissions.
Diversion programs introduced in 2005 were initially successful in
reducing volumes of waste to the landfill. Unfortunately, their results
appear to have started flat-lining in 2008 on a per capita basis and
absolute amounts of waste have gone up slightly. Emissions from waste
are projected to increase by 35% by 2020 under a business-as-usual
(BAU) scenario.
Furthermore, EPR creates lots of high-paying jobs. According to a recent
Friends of the Earth report, recycling creates ten times more jobs per
tonne of materials processed than do alternatives like landfilling or
incinerating waste. The report concludes that over 50,000 jobs could be
created in the UK by adopting ambitious recycling targets through EPR. In
a report prepared for King County, Washington State, the authors
concluded that individuals employed in the recycling industry had higher
reported average incomes than average disposal industry incomes and
state-wide average incomes.
4. Similar Programs/Models
• Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment’s Canada
Wide Action Plan for Extended Producer Responsibility
http://www.ccme.ca/assets/pdf/epr_cap.pdf
• Ontario Ministry of Environment discussion paper,“ Toward a Zero
Waste Future: Review of Ontario’s Waste Diversion Act, 2002”
http://www.downloads.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/env_reg/er/document
s/2008/010%2D4676.pdf
• Government of British Columbia’s Product Stewardship Programs
and Environmental Management Act
http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/recycling/
• Zero Waste BC
http://zerowastebc.org/category/the-zero-waste-solution
• Nova Scotia ENVIRO-DEPOTS Paint Recycling Program
http://www.ec.gc.ca/epr/default.asp?lang=En&n=CA910030-1
• Nova Scotia Used Oil Recovery Program
http://www.ec.gc.ca/epr/default.asp?lang=En&n=D29AD111-1
• Nova Scotia Used Tire Management Program
http://www.ec.gc.ca/epr/default.asp?lang=En&n=84AE8783-1
5. The Implementing Agents
• Durham Region
• Manufacturing and industry representatives
• Community organizations and environmental groups
• Ontario’s Ministry of the Environment
•
•
MPPs
Citizens
6. The Expected Impacts
• Increased waste diversion
• Decreased emissions from landfills and incineration
• Lower rates of per capita garbage production
• Decreased GHG emissions from landfill operations and landfill gas
releases.
7. The Next Steps
Extend invitations to stakeholder representatives.
8. Notes
Resources:
CASCADIA. (2009).Recycling and economic development: a review of
existing literature on job creation, capital investment, and tax revenues. King
Country Linkup.
http://your.kingcounty.gov/solidwaste/linkup/documents/recycling-economicdevelopment-review.pdf
Friends of the Earth. (2010). More Jobs, Less Waste: Potential for job
creation through higher rates of recycling in the UK and EU.
http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/reports/jobs_recycling.pdf
Howard, V.C. (2009). Statement of Evidence: Particulate Matter and Health.
Hearing for the proposed Ringaskiddy Waste-to-Energy Facility.
http://www.durhamenvironmentwatch.org/Incinerator%20Health/CVHRingaski
ddyEvidenceFinal1.pdf
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Urban Agriculture
Target Group: City and Regional Planners,
community groups, educational institutions
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Proposed
Number: 12
Program Type:
Version 1
Date: June 9/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Food System
Natural Systems and Resources
Transportation
Objectives: F1, F2, F3
NS1
T1
1. The Concept:
Develop a thriving urban agriculture community in Durham’s municipalities
with an emphasis on sustainable agriculture, education, and community
engagement. The Urban Agriculture program would initially offer:
• Educational farming fields located onsite at partner elementary
schools, secondary schools, community centres, other community
institutions, and interested residents’ backyards
• Urban farming internships, workshops, and volunteer opportunities
• A local compost program
• The opportunity to buy shares in the harvest
• Harvest Festivals, Open Farm Days and other opportunities for
broad community engagement
The Urban Agriculture Program would also increase the carbon
sequestration capacity of Durham’s built environment, reduce food miles,
and implement key provisions of the Food Charter.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
This program aims to meet every one of the LAP’s Objectives for the Food
System, as well as certain Objectives from Natural Systems & Resources
and Transportation. By focusing on organic ultra-local farming techniques,
it will prioritize and support food system practices that improve water
consumption, delivery, and recapture; reduce GHG emissions; improve
energy efficiencies; and increase carbon sequestration. The Durham Food
Policy Council could be utilized as an initial coordinating body for the
program, to engage and inform stakeholder groups and solicit support
from local businesses and community groups.
Events such as Pickering’s Seedy Saturday garden show are
opportunities for community education and outreach. These events could
be grown with the assistance of local tourism groups, increasing the
audience to which messages and information about urban agriculture and
local food can be disseminated.
In the medium and long-term, this program’s hands-on, highly visible
educational element will connect Durham’s youth with their food and
promote sustainable agriculture as a desirable career path. This would be
especially well-complemented by the creation of a Sustainable Agriculture
Degree Program at Durham College (see FS1.1 in the Best Practice
Analysis Table). In addition, high school students could be credited with
volunteer hours for their work in urban farms; simultaneously fulfilling a
requirement for graduation and fostering an understanding of local food
systems.
3. The Rationale
Durham’s urban areas are growing fast. Pickering alone has projected
population growth of 146% by 2031. Urban agriculture will play an ever
more important role in supplying the region’s food, as well as creating
important green space in urban areas. The educational programs will
connect Durham’s increasingly urbanized youth with the region’s
agricultural roots and promote farming as a desirable career path. At the
very least, it will help to create awareness of the importance of local
agriculture and create a youthful constituency that supports the Green Belt.
4. Similar Programs/Models
Vancouver’s not-for-profit Fresh Roots Urban Farm provided the model for
this program. Fresh Roots has been in place for about 18 months and
continues to expand its partnerships with schools and community centres
across the City of Vancouver.
5. The Implementing Agents
Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation
Community Development Council Durham
Durham Food Policy Council
http://www.cdcd.org/research/communitydevelopment/durhamfoodpolicyc
ouncil/
Durham Culinary Association
Local Food Plus http://localfoodplus.ca/about
FoodShare Toronto http://www.foodshare.net/index.htm
6. The Expected Impacts
• Implementation of key provisions in the Food Charter
• Achieving all Food System Objectives from the LAP
•
•
•
•
•
Increased enthusiasm for local organic food production and careers
among Durham’s youth
Increased food security
Increased food literacy
Decreased food transportation emissions
Increased urban green space and carbon sequestration capacity
7. The Next Steps
• Meet with local food community groups, Durham Region school
boards, to see if anyone want to take the lead on this program
8. Notes
This program overlaps with the Local Food Hub program (#7).
Debbie Field, the ED of FoodShare Toronto, has visited Fresh Roots
Urban Farm in Vancouver.
Pickering Ward 1 Regional Councillor Bonnie Littley would probably
support this program.
Resources:
Fresh Roots Urban Farm: http://freshrootsurbancsa.wordpress.com/about/
LAP- Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Green Building Code
Number: 13
Target Group: Developers and Builders
Program Type: Regulatory
Author: Brian Kelly
Draft: 1
Status: Working document
Date: June 9/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Built Environment
Objectives: BE2. BE3
Energy
E1
______________________________________________________________________
1. The Concept:
Develop and adopt a Durham Green Building Code for all new construction in Durham
Region requiring:
• LEED Silver level of construction by Jan. 1, 2013
• LEED Gold level of construction by Jan. 1, 2015
This would ensure that all new buildings in Durham move toward the goal of energy
neutrality and significantly reduce carbon emissions and other impacts on the
environment. In most cases, the incremental capital costs of such upgrades have
proven to be modest and to pay for themselves in a few years given current and
projected energy costs.
It is important to make the distinction that construction will have attributes making it
certifiable to LEED standards; however, buildings will not actually become LEED
certified so that the administrative costs associated with LEED certification can be
avoided.
The program should be created in collaboration with known developers. This is
because developers who feel they have had the opportunity to shape the program will
be much more willing to comply with it.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The basic strategy behind this measure is to incorporate energy efficiency and other
green features in buildings at the design and construction phase before they are built.
Achieving state-of-the-art energy efficiency at this stage is much more practical and
cost-effective than to attempt to retrofit buildings later in their life.
Moreover, designs, technologies and standards exist today to achieve over 50%
reductions in energy consumption in new buildings compared to the levels required by
federal and provincial building codes.
Experience over the last two decades has clearly shown that much greater levels of
energy efficiency are possible and cost-effective but that most new buildings are far
from that optimal point. Market barriers such as split incentives and first-cost decisionmaking have led to a market failure in this area which can most effectively be
addressed by increased regulatory standards.
3. The Rationale
Durham Region will be experiencing high levels of population and employment growth
over the next few decades, leading to the reality that a large portion of the building
stock in 20 or 30 years will be new construction (estimated at x% in 2031). Currently
the Ontario Building Code (OBC) prescribes minimal levels of energy efficiency in new
construction but the OBC (even the updated code expected in 2012) is far from optimal
in terms of insulation levels, HVAC efficiencies and other factors that determine energy
efficiency and utility costs. The integration of green building criteria into all new
developments will help to reduce the energy use of new structures while
simultaneously increasing the comfort and health of occupants.
4. Similar Programs/Models
There are many examples in Canada and the US of building standards that address
energy efficiency in new construction beyond the minimal levels required by national
building codes. Moreover, there are 30 years of experience with various technologies,
model codes and programs all of which have demonstrated the performance and costeffectiveness of energy efficient buildings. Such programs and standards include:
R2000, C2000, ASHRAE 189.1, Energy Star, and the LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design) set of standards. Various municipalities in Canada and the
USA have set standards for new green buildings in their jurisdictions and implemented
them through a combination of incentives on development charges, agreements with
the development industry and local codes. For example, Toronto offers a rebate on
development charges for new commercial buildings that go 35% beyond the OBC.
The Town of East Gwillimbury requires a minimum of Energy Star housing in its
residential construction sector and LEED for other buildings through an agreement with
builders. The Boston Redevelopment Authority requires that all new commercial
buildings over 50,000 sq. ft. be LEED certifiable. See Best Practice Analysis for
examples.
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
The lower-tier municipalities currently set and enforce building standards and codes.
Therefore, it will be necessary for all municipal governments in Durham to adopt the
proposed Durham Green Building Code in a uniform manner across all municipalities
in order to avoid varying codes and development “poaching”.
The development and construction industry can be expected to initially resist (if not
oppose) the implementation of a Durham Green Building Code. However, given the
size of the Durham development market, the movement in nearby jurisdictions toward
higher standards and the desirability of a level playing field across all municipalities
and all developers in Durham, the industry should support this measure, especially if
sufficient phase-in time is provided. During the phase-in period, financial incentives
could be considered as a method for promoting early adoption of Green Building
Codes.
A key to the success of this initiative is the early engagement of developers. By
bringing this group to the table early, a partnership can be formed where developers
feel that they have some ownership and meaningful input into the creation of the
initiative. Developers who have had an opportunity to shape the criteria of the initiative
will be much more willing to comply with new standards.
6. The Expected Impacts
• Increased property values
• Decreased energy use
• Strong return on investment
7.
1)
2)
3)
4)
The Next Steps
Talk to Roger Anderson (Martin and others from board of trade)
Talk to mayor of Clarington (Foster)
Engage with high end developers get joint chambers of commerce in region’s support
Convene players within six months
i. Position with change in government regime
ii. Build momentum
8. Notes
View City of Boston Green Zoning Bylaw
http://www.bostonredevelopmentauthority.org/pdf/ZoningCode/Article37.pdf
View City of Chicago Green Urban Infrastructure Plan
http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/zlup/Sustainable_Development/Publicatio
ns/Green_Urban_Design/GUD_booklet.pdf
View City of Vancouver Eco-Density Charter
http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/ecocity/pdf/ecodensity-charter-low.pdf
9. Additional Suggestions from Charette
The key to creation of a Durham Green Building Code will be the creation of enough
political will and support for Durham specific building codes. This can be accomplished
through education of both the public and political groups to illustrate successful
programs using similar models, and the benefits of a Green Building Code.
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: The Durham Sustainable Food Business
Action Plan
Target Group:
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Proposed
Number: 14
Program Type:
Version 1
Date: June 15/11
Relationships to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Food System
Objectives: F3
1. The Concept:
Draft a Sustainable Food Business Action Plan to package existing policies
and programs, and propose new incentives as marketing mechanisms to
support existing sustainable business strategies among food production,
processing, wholesale, and retail sectors and to attract new businesses to
areas in Durham Region that face challenges to food security.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Based on the model of the San Francisco Food Business Action Plan,
Durham will identify strategies, such as enterprise zones, permit expediting,
tax incentives, regulatory streamlining or other policies to recruit and incubate
new food businesses, and ensure existing food businesses are fully utilizing
economic incentives and technical support to advance the goals of Durham’s
LAP and the Durham Region Food Charter.
3. The Rationale
The Vancouver 2020 Plan reports that the provision of food creates 20-25%
of the carbon emissions of the average urban resident (page 60). Many of
these emissions are not captured in urban emission calculations because
they occur at the production and distribution stages. This Action Plan Concept
takes the purchasing power of food wholesalers and retailers into account. If
existing food retailers in the region take advantage of incentives to adopt
more sustainable practices, and if new food businesses are actively
encouraged towards adopting sustainable business plans, the effect could
ripple through the food supply chain.
4. Similar Programs/Models
San Francisco’s Mayor issued an Executive Directive on Healthy and
Sustainable Food in 2009 directing the SF Redevelopment Agency to
implement a Food Business Action Plan. The plan’s initial objectives were:
“1) to facilitate immediate change at SuperSave, leveraging the owner’s
investment and the Agency’s investment with this grant funding to position the
store to sell more produce and healthful food offerings as quickly as possible;
2) to provide longer-term technical assistance through a partnership with a
local grocery store consultant to enable SuperSave’s business to grow
successfully with the reformatted merchandising; and,
3) to pilot the policies outlined in the Food Business Action Plan and create a
grant and loan agreement with SuperSave that guarantees maintenance of
specific parameters in regards to the types of food that the store can and
should not sell.”
http://www.sfredevelopment.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=
864
See also:
http://www.sfgov3.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/sffood/policy_reports/MayorNewsomE
xecutiveDirectiveonHealthySustainableFood.pdf
5. The Implementing Agents
•
•
•
•
Regional politicians (Mayors, Councillors, others)
The Durham Food Policy Council
Food business, food security, and consumer stakeholders
Others?
6. The Expected Impacts
•
•
•
•
•
Interest and engagement in Durham’s LAP from existing food
businesses
Sustainable business plans emphasizing local food procurement from
start-up food businesses in the region
Increased market share for local farmers
Reduction of GHG emissions from production and distribution of food
Healthier and more nutritious food
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Bio-fuels Program
Target Group: Farmers, Business
Author: Brian Kelly
Status: Proposed
Number: 15
Program Type: Economic development
Version: 1
Date: June 22/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Energy
Transportation
Objectives: E2
T1
1. The Concept
Develop a program to encourage farmers to grow dedicated energy crops for the
production of second generation bio-fuels (cellulosic ethanol and bio-diesel) and for
business to develop industry clusters for the refining of ethanol, bio-diesel fuels (and
biochemical feedstocks and byproducts). The bio-fuels would then be fed into the
gasoline and diesel fuel supply systems in Durham and Ontario to reduce net GHG
emissions.
The program might also encompass the possibility of algae-based bio-fuel production
on farms or in industrial and aquatic environments.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Durham has a strong agricultural base combined with under-utilized and/or marginal
agricultural land (including the Pickering Airport lands). Federal and provincial
regulations require an increasing proportion of bio-fuels to be blended into gasoline
and diesel supplies.
This presents an opportunity for Durham Region to assume a leadership role in local
bio-fuel production, refining and use.
3. The Rationale
Bio-fuels remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in their growth stage and are
thus considered carbon neutral when they are combusted. By displacing a portion of
the conventional gasoline and diesel supply derived from petroleum, bio-fuels
contribute to climate protection as well as providing a source of economic activity and
job creation.
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Green Development Guidelines
Target Group: Planners, Developers, Builders
Author: Brian Kelly (based on ideas from stakeholders)
Status: Proposed
Number: 16
Program Type: Model
Guidelines
Version: 1
Date: June 22/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Built Environment
Objectives: B1, B2, B3
1. The Concept
Develop an integrated decision-making framework and model green development
guidelines designed to reduce GHG emissions and promote climate adaptation in the
strategic plans, official plans, zoning bylaws, design standards, site plan approvals,
severances and other areas of municipal and regional jurisdiction related to urban
planning. Care must be taken to ensure that this initiative encompasses all relevant
standards, plans and approval processes.
This program should include such known sustainable planning measures as higher
densities, complete streets, mixed uses, twenty minute neighbourhoods, bike and
walking lanes, district energy systems, light pavement, green space, green roofs, gray
water recycling and water use efficiency, conservation, etc.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The strategy for this program is to:
• Achieve complementarities and consistency among municipal and regional
development plans, guidelines and standards;
• Ensure that standards are consistently increasing, similar to LEED, creating
higher performance green development over time.
• Inform the development community at an early stage of the municipalities’
intentions with regard to sustainable urban planning and design;
• Lay the groundwork for future guidelines, incentives or regulatory approaches
for sustainable built environments.
• Early adopters of these guidelines could be eligible for a development bonus.
This bonus could be for a graduated amount, depending on the level to which
the development adopts the green development guidelines.
Note that his concept is separate from but complementary to the proposed Durham
Green Building Code (#13) which relates more to the internal design of buildings.
3. The Rationale
A key complaint in achieving more “sustainable” or innovative outcomes is the
government red tape and mis-alignment experienced when trying to make something
happen. If the barriers that create this situation were identified and a coordinated
decision-making framework established, there would be a more direct link between
desired outcome and methodology / decision-making.
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
Small developers can be engaged initially in order to create pilot projects to showcase
the potential and opportunities in using green development guidelines.
6. The Expected Impacts
Higher density of living and services, connected with transportation, will benefit an
aging community.
7. The Next Steps
• Municipal planners forum/charette
o Infill
o Green field
• Lobby provincial government
• Look for small pilot opportunities
• Staged increase of standards to make it more palatable and still progress towards the
goal
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Farm-Friendly Regulation
Target Group:
Author: Brian Kelly (based on stakeholder ideas)
Status: proposed
Number: 17
Program Type: Policy
Coordination
Version: 1
Date: June 23/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Food
Objectives: F1
1. The Concept
Develop a clear, concise, one-window document containing a set of guidelines that
bring existing pieces of legislation, regulations and policy as well as proposing new
measures to streamline the process for farmers to continue their current practice and
expand their business.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
This program aims to support local farmers to continue providing agricultural products
to the community. The program fits well with what the GTA AAC is attempting to do for
the GGH, as well as with Economic Development’s role of facilitating growth in the
agricultural sector.
3. The Rationale
Streamlining the development process for farmers means that they can focus their time,
energy and funds on their primary objective – producing food and other agricultural
products.
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
Region of Durham: Planning and Works
Municipalities: Planning, Building Officials, Works
Province: MMAH, MNR, Agriculture
6. The Expected Impacts
Improved output from farmers
Streamlined process
Education of government staff and officials
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Bio-Methane Production and Use
Target Group:
Author: Brian Kelly and Mike Tremayne
Status: Proposed
Number: 18
Program Type:
Version:1
Date: June 23/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Energy
Waste
Transportation
Objectives: E2
W3, W4
T6
1. The Concept
Bio-methane can be generated from landfill gas, green bin waste, sewage and
agricultural waste. Gas can be generated from these sources using anaerobic
digesters and then injected into the natural gas distribution system for use (by
displacement) at various sites as a transportation fuel, especially in heavy duty
vehicles.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Municipalities already collect organic waste which can be digested to produce methane.
Municipalities can work with Enbridge as gas supplier to move the bio-methane for
end-use, potentially in municipal heavy duty vehicles. Funding for this initiative would
be provided by private contracts with gas supply companies such as Enbridge and
waste companies such as the Miller Waste Company.
3. The Rationale
Bio-methane can be utilized as a vehicle fuel. Landfill gas can reduce GHG emissions
by 89% compared to diesel vehicles. Converting green bin waste to methane for use
in vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 93% compared to diesel. The Region could
also consider capturing methane from sewage for use as fuel.
4. Similar Programs/Models
The City of Toronto converts part of its green bin waste to bio-methane and is working
with Enbridge to inject the gas into the distribution system for use in refuse trucks.
5. The Implementing Agents and Partners
The Region and municipalities, waste handlers, Enbridge.
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
9. Additional Suggestions From Charette
Some participants in this discussion felt that increased Conservation Demand
Management efforts would produce a larger emissions reduction than this initiative and
may be a more effective use of resources.
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Freecycle Program
Number:19
Target Group: Community
Program Type:
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Prooposed
Version 1
Date: June 22/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Waste
Objectives: W2, W3, W4
1. The Concept:
Expand opportunities for reusing and recycling products/materials through
a three-pronged approach:
• Expand present programs
o The Region already has programs to deal with e-waste,
household hazardous waste, tires, and styrofoam
o The Region should engage more businesses to be drop-off
locations and advertise the programs more thoroughly
• Freecycle Days and Freecycle Centres
o Residents can leave their unwanted items on the curb on
Freecycle Days, which could be every the first Saturday of every
month (or alternate timing)
o If nobody takes their items from the curb, the residents must
drop their items off at conveniently located Freecycle Centres
(could be located in recycling centres, schools and community
centres, for example)
• Freecycle online
o User-friendly website/database that coordinates disposers with
re-users and connects everyone with repair services
o Also gives DIY ideas for repairing or reusing something you
were going to throw out
o This is kind of like Craigslist, only with an educational
component and Durham-centric
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Make it easy for residents to pass on unwanted articles and/or obtain used
products. The Freecycle system should be designed to complement the
current system of discrete garage sales, charity collections, recycling
services and repair facilities so as to protect the viability of these
operations.
3. The Rationale
This program will divert waste from the landfill and encourage a culture of
re-use and repair.
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
Strike three task forces to undertake each prong. Expand present
programs rapidly and use that expansion as an opportunity to promote the
coming Freecycle Program. Roll out the physical and virtual Freecycle
Program components simultaneously.
8. Notes
This program was developed by rolling together a number of separate but
complementary suggestions from the Waste Stakeholder Consultation
Meeting on June 14th, 2011.
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Backyard Composting Program
Number: 20
Target Group: Community
Program Type:
Author: Erica Stahl
Version 1
Status: Proposed
Date: June 23/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Waste
Objectives: W4
1. The Concept
Backyard compost systems will be distributed and installed for residents willing to
participate in the program. This will reduce the amount of material entering the
Green Bin waste stream, allowing extra capacity within the system for new
residential growth. Participants in the program will also have the opportunity to share
the compost they generate with participants in the Urban Agriculture Program. By
trading compost for produce the participants in both of these programs are
contributing to a closed loop local agricultural nutrient system.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The Region and community partners will purchase and distribute backyard
composters to interested residents.
3. The Rationale
Ninety percent of the organic material that goes into the Green Bin waste stream
could be equally well handled by back yard composters. With less organic matter
going into green bins, fewer trucks would be required to service the green bin
program.
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Locavore Education Program
Target Group: Community
Author: Erica Stahl
Status: Proposed
Number: 21
Program Type:
Version 1
Date: June 22/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Food System
Objectives: F2, F3
1. The Concept
Develop and implement a multi-pronged educational program with a significant
hands-on component that will teach Durham residents why and how to grow,
preserve, buy, and eat local food in Durham. The targeted demographics will be
children and their parents, but all community members are welcome.
The program will involve:
o expanded community gardens
o events that build awareness of food issues and strengthen Durham’s
community, i.e.:
ReelFood.org documentary screenings
cooking/canning/gardening classes
Local Food Parties (could be like Tupperware parties, or potlucks)
Doors Open Durham Farms
Harvest Festival educational outreach
o Addition of Food Systems unit including a significant hands-on component to
the K-12 curriculum, or at least 8-12
o Meatless Mondays in school cafeterias, voluntary participation by restaurants
o Green Flag consumer card program for Durham restaurants and food retailers
that source more than a certain percentage (i.e. 50%) of their food locally
o Conversion of Donevan Collegiate into a Green Living Demonstration and
Education Centre
2. The Strategy and Leverage
Strike three task forces:
1. One to work with Regional school boards (public and Catholic) to implement the
curriculum and cafeteria changes and establish community gardens as outdoor
classrooms on school property,
2. One to work with the community to implement awareness and education
programs for producers, consumers, and “prosumers”
3. One to work on converting the Donevan Collegiate into a Green Living
Demonstration and Education Centre
3. The Rationale
4. Similar Programs/Models
5. The Implementing Agents
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Durham Green Procurement Guide
Target Group:
Author: Erica Stahl
Status:
Number: 22
Program Type:
Version
Date:
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes: Waste
Objectives:
1. The Concept
Representatives from the Region and ICI sector will draft and adopt green
procurement policies. This initiative could leverage the Partners for Project Green
initiative by making them preferred providers of services, and sharing best practices
for purchasing from the experiences of Partners for Project Green organizations. By
promoting green procurement within the Region, a larger market for green products
and services will be created; this could help to drive increased success and
expansion of the Partners for Project Green initiative and other initiatives in the
Region.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
These policies could include, but should not be limited to:
eliminate excess packaging
buy materials that can be composted or reused
source food locally
source other products locally where possible
eliminate redundancies in the supply route
increase the amount of post-consumer material
consider the results of a product’s life-cycle analysis before making a
purchasing decision and:
• purchase the lowest GHG option
• purchase the most energy efficiency option
3. The Rationale
This initiative may result in the increased cost of some goods and services; however,
from a planning perspective this is a low cost method for reducing the environmental
impact associated with goods and services purchased by the Region. Failure to
create a green procurement guide will perpetuate a business as usual approach to
purchasing which could result in larger long term purchasing costs for the Region.
4. Similar Programs/Models
Greening Greater Toronto Green Procurement Program:
http://www.greeninggreatertoronto.ca/initiatives/procurement.asp
5. The Implementing Agents
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
• Study other green procurement guidelines
• Gather interested representatives from the Region and ICI sector for initial
discussions
• Show leadership
• Develop regional tool approach of science-based assumption of payback and
get approval
• Lifecycle costs that include carbon costs
8. Notes
LAP – Phase 2
Action Plan Concept
Title: Community Environment Fund
Target Group: Schools, NGOs, Community Groups
Author: Brian Kelly and Tracey Chala
Status: Proposed
Number: 23
Program Type: funding
Version: 1
Date: June 23/11
Relationship to Phase 1 LAP:
Themes:
Objectives:
1. The Concept
Create a community fund that disburses small amounts of funding for environmental
initiatives. For example, the fund could be valued at $100,000 annually and distributed
in sums ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 per project. Groups would apply quarterly and
be judged according to a set of criteria; successful projects could be shared with the
community through an appropriate website.
2. The Strategy and Leverage
The strategy would be to create education and awareness through a challenge /
competition approach with an emphasis on transferable lessons. The program would
help create a shared green vision between community groups that might not otherwise
be achieved.
3. The Rationale
Many community groups have the motivation and passion to implement environmental
initiatives, yet lack the resources to do so. A small amount of funding could be all they
need to help reduce GHGs in their areas.
4. Similar Programs/Models
The City of Toronto has one of two similar programs.
5.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Implementing Agents and Partners
The Region of Durham and the local municipalities.
Trillium Foundation
Big Companies
NGO
Service Clubs
College/University
6. The Expected Impacts
7. The Next Steps
• Build committee
• Develop criteria for evaluation and measurement of projects
8. Notes

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