AugThymes 10use.indd - First Alternative Co-op

Comments

Transcription

AugThymes 10use.indd - First Alternative Co-op
The Throwback Issue!
FIRST ALTERNATIVE
CO-OP COMMUNITY
MONTHLY
AUGUST 2010 • VOLUME 31 ISSUE 8
40 YEARS & STILL
SCOOPIN’
Celebrating 40 years
in 2010
CHAPTER 1
by Chris Peterson, Thymes original editor!
As we whisk through either of the well-lit,
well-stocked First Alternative stores with
a metal shopping cart and grocery list that
might include local meat, wine, or a meal from
the deli, it’s easy forget the Co-op’s humble
beginnings.
Conceived in the minds of OSU students, soon
an unlikely collection of townsfolk coalesced
to bring the store to reality. Early members
had more of a sense of ownership than we
do today. Everyone volunteered, including
managers.
Not only would you not have meat, wine or
deli items on your list, there wasn’t even a
produce department at the start.
Those who built the Co-op, both physically
and by establishing its principles, deserve
recognition and gratitude. Countless hours—
years, even—of uncompensated work are behind
its success today. Many co-ops of that era
didn’t survive, let alone thrive, as First
Alternative has.
When preparing for the 20th anniversary
celebration, we felt an urgency to document
the history of the Co-op’s beginning while we
could still find key players. But, months of
following leads and doing interviews still
hadn’t revealed anyone who was there at the
very beginning. Then, I discovered an article
in the Corvallis Gazette-Times archives dated
November 18, 1970, mentioning Dr. William
Denison, then associate professor of botany at
OSU (and, yes, farmer Tom Denison’s father).
I phoned him. It felt like I’d found the pot
of gold at the end of the rainbow.
Continued, page 14
In This Issue
Board’s Month in Review: 2
Annual Owner Rendezvous & Eat
Local America Challenge: 3
South Store Manager Report & GM
Report: 4
Letters: 5
Buyer’s Briefs: 6
Good Beer in Cans, GM Search &
Budget Bites: 7
Community Outreach News: 8
Specials: 9-12
All About Staff: 13
40th Anniversary Party: 15
Health Services Guide &
Art at the Co-op: 16
Unclassifieds: 17
Calendar: 18
Flashback Recipes &
Random News: 19
Off the Shelf & Out on the
Town-Feast Alternative: 20
firstalt.coop
FIRST ALTERNATIVE CO-OP
1007 SE THIRD ST.
CORVALLIS, OR 97333
PRSRT STD
US POSTAGE PAID
SALEM, OR
PERMIT #178
CELEBRATE
WITH
US!
August 7th, 4-6pm, South Co-op
see page 15 for details!
the board’s
month in review
by Dan Shapiro, Board Member
A newspaper of First
Alternative
The Co-op Thymes is published on the 1st of
each month. Correspondence and submissions
are welcome. Send by e-mail or ‘snail mail’
to addresses listed below. Deadline for
all submissions is the 15th of the prior
month. Opinions expressed in The Co-op
Thymes are strictly those of the writers
and do not represent an endorsement by, or
official position of, First Alternative Coop, its Board, managers, or owners, unless
specifically identified as such. The same is
true of claims made by paid advertisers.
The Co-op Thymes is a free publication
available at First Alternative and at other
locations in the Corvallis area. Owners may
receive the paper via mail. It can also be
viewed online at www.firstalt.coop.
Editors: Emily Stimac & Donna Tarasawa
Production: Emily Stimac & Jessica Brothers
Design/layout: Emily Stimac & Jessica
Brothers
Photographers: Emily Stimac & Jessica
Brothers
STORE LOCATION
AND HOURS
SOUTH STORE:
1007 SE 3rd St., Corvallis, OR 97333
Phone: (541) 753-3115 Fax: (541) 753-8401
Open 7 days a week, 7am-9pm
NORTH STORE:
2855 NW Grant Ave., Corvallis, OR 97330
Phone: (541) 452-3115 Fax: (541) 758-4257
Open 7 days a week, 7am-9pm
Web site: www.firstalt.coop
Email address: [email protected]
Editor’s email: [email protected]
FA Board’s email: [email protected]
VISION STATEMENT
First Alternative aspires to be a
cooperative model, providing high quality
natural and organic products in a
community oriented store.
MISSION STATEMENT
First Alternative is a community market
aspiring to be a model for environmental
sustainability through our purchasing and
workplace practices We:
� seek to honor our traditions and build
upon our potential.
� are committed to cultivating tolerance
and diversity in our operations.
� strive for excellence in our products
and services, including wholesome
organic foods, innovative education and
community outreach, while offering high
quality, local, Organic and minimally
packaged products whenever possible.
� will act ethically and appropriately in
our pricing practices.
� seek to provide a democratic business
climate, fostering worker and Owner
participation, according to cooperative
principles.
THE INTERNATIONAL
COOPERATIVE PRINCIPLES
Voluntary And Open Membership
Democratic Member Control
Member Economic Participation
Autonomy And Independence
Education, Training, And Information
Cooperation Among Cooperatives
Concern For The Community
2 The Co-op Thymes
“Community”
is
a
word
that
appears quite frequently in First
Alternative’s mission statement and
guiding principles. We are a community
market for the greater Corvallis area,
as well as a cooperative community of
owners, directors, managers, and staff. Our commitments to
our families, friends, and neighbors about food safety, local
agriculture, and other issues make us so much more than just
another grocery store.
But do some people feel excluded from the Co-op community? How
might we reach out to them? Would that mean selling products
that haven’t appeared on our shelves before? Do our current
owners feel they have an adequate voice in how the Co-op’s
directors and managers are guiding and operating our two
stores?
The attendance was low but the energy was high at this year’s
Annual Owner Rendezvous in June, when we addressed these
and other questions. Many people commented that it was one
of the best annual meetings ever, with a refreshing spirit
of cooperation and consensus. On the opposite page you will
find facilitator Lysbeth Borie’s summary of what was gleaned
from our World Café conversation that evening. We hope the
conversation will continue in other ways, from informal chats
in the aisles of the stores to perhaps more organized community
gatherings. Picnics? Potlucks? Community forums? We’re eager
to hear how you’d like to keep the conversation going.
The Board itself is embarking on a series of study topics that
may generate further conversations with owners. Each month,
one director will make a brief presentation and facilitate a
discussion that helps the Board to focus on the “big picture”
issues in its charge. Our private conversations may develop
into public forums in order to bring a wider range of voices
into the discussion. At last month’s meeting we chose the
first set of topics: food issues, future growth/expansion
of our stores, and the differences between co-operative and
corporate business models.
“Community” and “communication” share the same Latin root, and
each is essential for the other to succeed. Two of the ways
in which you communicate with the Board are the annual owner
survey and Board election. Responses to this year’s survey
were more than three times greater than last year, thanks
to the Co-op staff’s successful efforts to encourage email
participation in the survey. The number of ballots cast in
this year’s election was up about 12 percent over last year’s,
but still represents less than one percent of eligible owners.
No one knows whether this represents satisfaction with the
status quo, or apathy. When Yogi Berra was asked what to do
about low attendance at Yankees games he replied, “If people
don’t want to come out to the ball park, nobody’s gonna stop
‘em.” If voting isn’t your preferred way to communicate with
the Board, consider these alternatives:
your comments with the entire board.
Come to our monthly Board meetings, held on the third Tuesday
of the month at 6:30 p.m. in the South Store Meeting Room. We
set aside 10 minutes at the start of every meeting for owners
to address the directors in person.
In other notes from our July meeting:
Alan Fudge, the director of the Linn-Benton Community College
Small Business Development Center, conducted the Board’s annual
financial training. Among his topics was how to interpret
the Co-op’s balance sheet, which shows FA’s assets (what we
own) and liabilities (what we owe). This information will be
especially helpful as the Board plans for major projects, such
as replacing a large portion of the roof on the South Store
within the next few years.
Newly elected director Joel Hirsch was welcomed to his first
official meeting.
Committee assignments were announced, including the four
directors who have volunteered to conduct the renewed search
for a new general manager: Chris Bentley, Camille Freitag,
Bettina Schempf, and myself. 
WELCOME, NEW
CO-OP OWNERS!
Between mid-May and mid-June, 28 new
people became owners of the Co-op,
totaling 7191 active owners.*
Thank you for supporting the Co-op
by purchasing a share!
*Most inactive owners are those not current on their
payments.
The Benefits of Ownership...
-
Monthly Owner Sale Day Discounts
Electing Co-op Board of Directors
Voting for Donation Recipients
Receiving Co-op Thymes via mail
Patronage Dividends as profitability allows
Community-owned business investment
Support Owner Worker opportunities
- And much more!
To buy an owner share please stop by Customer Service
or call 541-753-3115 or 541-452-3115.
�Fill out a comment card and drop it in the box on the “Board’s
Board” at the South or North Stores.
�Come to our monthly “Chats with the Board,” which alternate
between the two stores. The director who has written that
month’s Thymes column is available for two hours of informal
conversation about Co-op issues that matter to you, and shares
August 2010
40 years and still scoopin ’
ANNUAL OWNER RENDEZVOUS
By Lysbeth Borie
This was not just any meeting, it was a World Café.
On this lovely June evening, the room was a scene of
lively engagement: about 40 owners, staff and board
members deeply engrossed in a conversation about the
Co-op, brainstorming, sharing ideas in small groups,
each group seated around a table with papers spread, a
vase of flowers, markers scribbling. All were focused
on the question:
Many people, including the City, have indicated a need
for a grocery store in South Corvallis. We want to
retain our current customers AND include other parts
of the community despite the increased competition.
We want to come up with a strategy to accomplish this
and would like your ideas. What could the Co-op do to
retain our customer base in the face of competition AND
encourage an expanded community of shoppers?
After a while, people got up and moved to other tables,
stirring the creative mix while the table hosts stayed
behind to carry the thread of the conversation. The
next groups looked at pros and cons of the first groups’
ideas, keeping in mind the core values and philosophy
of the Co-op. After posting their ideas for everyone
to see, the large group came together in a whole-group
conversation to share insights and reflections on the
conversation.
This was the community participation segment of the
Annual Owner Rendezvous on June 22 at the Chintimini
Senior Center, which began with live music and yummy
desserts made by Feast Alternative, the Co-op kitchen.
The evening also included introductions of the board
members, a presentation of the Co-op’s annual financial
report, and the third annual Golden Scoop awards. During
the moments to socialize, guests enjoyed catching up
with friends. The World Café seemed to capture people’s
imagination.
Throughout the conversations, there was a creative
tension as people imagined ways to keep the Co-op
strong, maintaining its unique market niche while
Owner Appreciation Sale Day:
TUESDAY,
AUGUST 10TH
reaching out to new communities. The importance of
community building and outreach was a recurring
theme.
More than a hundred creative ideas were shared, from
guerrilla cooking demos to private labeling to city
council outreach. After selecting the top four ideas
from each table, most ideas fit into seven clusters,
with approximate numbers following:
• Expanding/improving face-to-face interactions,
partnerships and events (8)
• Marketing and education on the Co-op’s strengths—
“Promoting our value” (6)
• Increasing outreach to the Hispanic community (5)
• Remodeling the physical appearance of the South Store
(5)
• Advertising strategically reduced prices (3)
• Expanding product selection (2)
• Listening to South Town (2)
In closing comments about where these ideas will go
next, Marketing Manager Donna (Kaiser) Tarasawa said,
“The facilitator’s report will be reviewed by General
Manager Michele Adams and suggestions will be passed
to the Board and managers, as deemed appropriate. From
there, the Board and the managers will decide which items
are feasible to do both economically and physically,
and which ones they feel will be most effective, and
we will move forward from there. The remaining workable
ideas will be put aside to potentially be used in the
future.”
Copies of the full report may be obtained by contacting
Donna Tarasawa. 
WHY DOES YOUR
CO-OP ROCK?
The My Co-op Rocks Video
Contest is back! You can
show the world why First
Alternative Co-op rocks by making an original
online video. Starting Sept 1st, submit, rate, and
comment on contest videos at www.MyCoopRocks.coop.
Visit the website for contest details, and get those
cameras rolling!
FIND
US ON
FACEBOOK
TO SEE LAST YEAR’S VIDEO!
Eat local
America
CHALLENGE
First Alternative Co-op has joined in a nationwide
effort to eat local for a third year! With the help of
the National Cooperative Grocer’s Association, co-ops
across the nation are participating in the Eat Local
America challenge. There is a great website set up at
www.eatlocalamerica.coop. Also, be sure to visit our
blog at elacorvallis.blogspot.org.
How do I get involved?
1. Sign up at either Co-op location
between August 1st & 14th.
2. Eat 80% or more local food
from August 15-31. (‘Local’ is
defined by our Local 6 Program*.
Food does not have to be from the
Co-op.) This is on the honor system, so you need
to keep track on your own and be honest! You will
receive great ideas and stories during the challenge
via email.
3. We will hold a raffle on August 31st for four amazing
gift boxes overflowing with Local 6 goodies!
Why Eat Local?
There are many benefits to eating local food. It’s
good for the economy, because more money from each
transaction stays in the region. It connects community
members to the people who produce their food, while
helping to support family farms.
Since food doesn’t travel far from where it was produced,
eating local helps protect the environment by reducing
carbon dioxide emissions. Local food is more nutritious
and simply tastes better because it’s often harvested or
processed the same day it arrives at the Co-op.
“Local” may be a buzzword, but First Alternative has
cultivated truly reciprocal, long-term relationships
with local growers and producers for years, offering a
convenient connection to fresh and delicious food of
the highest quality. The Local 6 program celebrates our
dedication and commitment to local food for consumers
and our suppliers.
*Find a list of Local 6 products and meal ideas at
www.firstalt.coop or pick up a brochure in the store. 
All day at both stores...
Shop on Owner Appreciation Sale
Day and you can save:
- 5% on purchases under $25
- 7% on purchases $25 to $70
- 10% on purchases over $70
- Also receive a 10% case discount in addition
to your owner discount when you special
order a product by the case in advance, then
pick it up and purchase it on Owner Sale Day.
Case discounts are not applicable on sale
prices.
Sign up for an email reminder at:
www.firstalt.coop
August 2010
SERVING THE GREATER CORVALLIS AREA
WITH
EVALUATIONS/PRUNING/REMOVAL
STUMP GRINDING/THINNING/PLANTING
GIFT CERTIFICATES
WWW.LIMBWALKER.COM
(541) 929-3109
CCB# 95954
The Co-op Thymes 3
the throwback issue!
south store
manager report
general manager
report
AFTER 40 YEARS, IT’S THE BEST TIME TO
STILL BE SCOOPIN’!
OVER HALF WAY THROUGH 2010 ALREADY!!
HOW CAN THAT POSSIBLY BE?
As the interim South Store Manager I feel
like I am getting to lead this store
during the best time! We are celebrating
40 great years of cooperative food buying
and looking forward to a “face lift” for
the South Store this fall.
will be a great
time to catch
up with your
Tamra Wiggins-Wahlert,
Co-op friends Interim South Store
and meet some
Manager
new ones.
By the time school is back in session we
will have a new & improved seating area,
customer-friendly entry and a check out
area that doesn’t interfere with the
Feast Alternative hot bar. The
bulk area is getting a new
cooler, a freezer for
frozen veggies like
the North Store and
a better layout
for the rest of
their goods. The
deli staff’s work
area is also being
remodeled, so the
staff will be able
to serve you better.
There will be a few
tweaks to the hot/salad bar
area and a friendly new cheese
case.
People talk about the good old days of
scooping flour out of trashcans, when
First Alternative started as a buyers
club in a little house in downtown.
They speak of it as the best
time to have started a
co-op.
It
will always
be the best time
to be a part of
First Alternative
Cooperative.
A time line will be posted listing when
projects will happen so you can decide
if you want to come in and see the fun
or opt to go to the North Store to avoid
the construction.
Also new: a delightful new picnic area
located behind Fireworks- just south of
the store. We are adding picnic tables
and a play structure. Enjoy a snack in
the great outdoors after you shop.
Don’t forget the party! August 7th we
are hosting a great First Alternative
celebration at the South Store. Come by
between 4-6pm for food, fun and music. It
LA FLAUTA MAGICA
BILINGUAL PRESCHOOL
I remember when
I moved into
the area and
found the Coop about 11
years ago. It
was familiar
and welcoming.
I didn’t miss my
home and friends
in Chico as much when
I was shopping at First
Alt. It was the best time to
have been a funky old house looking at
growing into a real store.
When I started working here 7 years ago,
the South Store had just finished its big
remodel and the North Store was newly
opened. It was the best time to become a
two-store co-op.
This is the way it has always been
with our First Alternative Cooperative.
Cooperating with each other to reach our
goals, growing and spreading information
about alternatives to make our food and
life choices healthier. It will always
be the best time to be a part of First
Alternative Cooperative. 
The Co-op is participating in a water
conservation project along with the
Sustainability Coalition and the City of
Corvallis. The planners have brainstormed
many water saving ideas that we can do
around the store both to save water and
to educate the community about watersaving techniques they can try at home.
A part of the project is to re-use the
water that lands on our property so it
doesn’t have to go into the Corvallis
storm drain system. The asphalt next
to Purple Moon was taken out as part
of this project. We will be putting in
a permeable surface there with a rain
garden, infiltration trench and perhaps a
water catchment system (this could catch
10,000 gallons of water at a time). Keep
watching for more news on this project
in the months ahead. We are excited about
all that we can do to save water.
My office window looks south towards
FireWorks and the old garden area. Just
a month ago I was sadly looking out at
the overgrown garden area that used to
be full of wonderful produce that was
used for the Calzone Booth and decided
I couldn’t take the ugly weed patch any
longer. I called up Gaia and had them
clean it up for us.
I thought this space would make a great
park area for picnic tables and a kids’ play
structure. I got some drought-tolerantground cover mix that will have flowers and
low maintenance grass that won’t need much
water and Gaia did the rest. Now we just
wait for the ground cover to grow enough to
be walked on and then we can open the area
up for everyone to use.
article on this
page.
Michele Adams,
We love to do
General Manager
these
little
remodels to make things more efficient
and it gives us a great reason to clean
under things and put the sparkle back on
our store.
With the weather being nice don’t forget
about our outside eating areas. We have
tables by the Purple Moon Coffee cart,
up on the deck on the south side of
the store and new ones in the park area
behind FireWorks (coming soon). Enjoy
a yummy lunch or dinner from our Feast
Kitchen and this great summer weather.
COMMUNITY RECYCLING
CENTER ANNOUNCEMENT!
NEW STYROFOAM RECEIVING HOURS
Monday through Thursday
2pm to 7pm
Friday, Saturday & Sunday
9am to 7pm
Other recycling services are
unaffected by this change.
Thank you for your patience!
Also in the works is a South Store
remodel that you can read about in Tamra’s
�����DREAM PIZZA
AMERICAN
This dynamic SpanishEnglish curriculum is based
on literature, music, and art.
Activities are fun, interactive,
and engaging.
La Flauta Magica provides
a warm, safe, open &
educationally stimulating
atmosphere in which children
are nurtured and supported.
Teachers work with parents to help children develop
the habits, attitudes, and skills necessary for a lifetime
of creative learning.
CALL 541 602-4140
4 The Co-op Thymes
FREE DELIVERY!
CAMPUS 757-1713 • 2525 NW Monroe
DOWNTOWN 753-7373 • 214 SW 2nd
www.adpizza.com
August 2010
40 years and still scoopin ’
letters
Letter to the Editor Policy
� Not all letters will be published.
- Letters over 250 words will be edited for length. All letters are
subject to editing for length, spelling, grammar and clarity.
- All letters must include the author’s name, street address and
daytime telephone number.
- The decision regarding the appropriateness of the topic will lie
with the Editor.
- Letters concerning First Alternative Cooperative issues will take
priority over those concerning more general issues.
- Letters regarding local food, environment and sustainability
issues will take priority over national issues.
- Letters regarding political issues as they pertain to local food,
environment and sustainability issues will take preference over
those that do not (see Limitation Statement 3).
- Letters concerning timely issues or events will take priority
over those that are in regard to past events.
- Letters containing personal attacks, or containing offensive or
inappropriate language will not run.
- A limit of one letter per person per discussion item will be
upheld.
- Owners are given priority over non-owners.
- Opinions expressed are not necessarily supported by the Co-op
board, staff, or owners.
Send letters by email to [email protected] Handwritten letters
will not be accepted. Deadline for submissions is the 15th of the
month prior to the publication date.
THE CO-OP: A SPECIAL PLACE
Our co-op has been going for 40 years now and I’ve
been around for about 70 percent of those. I’m a north
door, four-digit member. Some of us old-timers just
can’t get used to that new main entrance on the south
end of the building.
While First Alternative was forming in the seventies,
I was hangin’ out (and getting groceries) at the
Sunbow Food Co-op in Phoenix, Arizona, the sandy
beaches of Puerto Penasco, Mexico, and the redwoods
of Northern California (with a bunch of other naked
hippies). When I finally got here in ‘79, the Co-op
was going strong.
I met my future wife in ‘80 and we shared a membership.
I think it was ten bucks back then, a lot of money
August 7 & 8th • 10-5 pm
Art & Wine in the Garden
Over 20
Oregon
Artists!
5470 NE Hwy 20, Halfway between
Corvallis and Albany • Open 7 days a week
541-753-6601 • www.garlandnursery.com
for students living on “work study wages.” It was a
time when a person could work full time during the
summer, part time during the year, and put yourself
through college. But I digress. Barbara started her
first volunteer shift with Pat Hazelton in produce.
I recall Jim Dobis was always there, and one day I
remember asking him why we didn’t have a drinking
fountain. His answer: “That’s a good idea; why don’t
you put one in?” That was my first special project
and I was hooked.
Barbara and I got married and left Oregon for a couple
of years and came back in ‘84 with two baby daughters.
The south store building underwent it’s first addition
while we were away and we returned to a much larger
building staffed by very dedicated, organized, and
hardworking volunteers and staff.
I can’t imagine life without our Co-op. The food is
lifesaving, but it’s the people that really make it
a special place.
- Cam Johnson, Co-op Owner
ASK BOARD ABOUT GROWTH, DIVIDENDS
Some members are confused about the responsibility
for decision making at our Co-op. To my understanding,
First Alternative “operates under the policy governance
model” to delineate the responsibility for making
decisions (‘Policy Governance: Delineation of Board
Roles and Responsibilities,’ Candidate Packet, p. 4;
2010)
With policy governance the General Manager “focuses
on the day-to-day operations of the retail business”
– the Board of Directors “make[s] general long-range
plans committing resources” and “long-term, big
picture decisions” (ibid).
Consequently, decisions to declare dividends, open
new locations, purchase property, etc. are solely
made by the Board. These decisions are made with
only consultation from the General Manager. This
“distinction�is crucial to the success of the
organization” (ibid).
Therefore, members inquiring about growth or dividends
should direct their questions to FA’s Board (see
General Manager’s Report, ‘Why Do We Grow?’ July
Thymes; p 4). The GM reported that “the Board and
management decided to take on the new [North] location”
and “the Board and management decided to buy [Evanite
property]’ and the Board and management decided�to
expand the [North] store” (ibid). Nonetheless, the
Board was solely responsible – or at least should have
been solely responsible – for making these decisions
about growth, expansions and purchasing property.
I suspect the Board would be most helpful to any
member with questions about growth, dividends, or
policy governance.
- Will Hormann, Co-op Owner
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CO-OP!
I’ve always thought that a birthday is a good time to
let someone know how much you appreciate them being
in your life. Gratitude is what I feel when I think
about the First Alt. turning 40. I just can’t imagine
Corvallis without the First Alt. Can you?
My Co-op journey began in 1995 as an owner-worker
in produce. At that time the produce was where the
present supply of yummy cheese is displayed. I loved
learning about fruits and vegetables and sharing that
knowledge with customers. Years later, I worked
in the deli while slowly manifesting Purple Moon
Espresso as my first business. The General Manager,
Michele Adams, encouraged and supported us through
the process. Purple Moon would not have survived
without the Co-op as a partner.
My partnership with the Co-op has continued with
my new business, Earth & Sea Salts. From every
perspective (customer, volunteer, employee, partner),
my experience with the First Alt. has been incredibly
enriching, educational and inspiring.
I also turned 40 this year, and the years have
taught me many things: wisdom, strength, gratitude,
happiness, perseverance and peace of mind. I see
these attributes in the First Alt. too, and that is
why I know it will prosper for at least another 40
years. Thank you for setting a strong and beautiful
example of what a business can be and thank you to
everyone who makes the First Alt. possible! I know
I’m a healthier person because the First Alt. is in
my town.
- Brigitte McBride, Co-op Owner


 























August 2010
The Co-op Thymes 5
the throwback issue!
Buyers’ Briefs
produce by Bill
40 years and still scoopin’! Crazy to think about where
we’ve come as an organization in that time. I’ve only
been here for 11 years but we’ve certainly had some
changes in Produce during these years. One thing that
hasn’t changed is our desire to provide the highest
quality produce and to support local, organic, and
sustainable agriculture.
The dedication and talents of numerous local growers
have been a huge part of our success over the years. We
don’t have the space here to list them all individually
but collectively I’d like to thank them all for their
efforts.
Get briefed by the
Co-op’s Buyers on news
from their departments!
Products are at both stores unless mentioned otherwise
and fed no soy or corn. They run free with the cattle,
by Michele C.
which are rotated daily to numerous plush green pastures
Happy 40th Birthday Co-op! First Alternative Co-op: throughout their peaceful farm.
home grown, owner-guided and still growing to meet the If you haven’t had a chance try McK Ranch products, now
demands of customers. The Feast Alternative kitchen is the time! Have your family and guests raving about
at the South Store is where our staff put together your next barbeque. A great meal starts with quality
delicious and uniquely local food tailored especially all-natural great food!
for Corvallis. Over the years many things have changed;
we now have soup, hot food and salad bars at both stores
by Silly Jeannie
in addition to an expanded Grab & Go and bakery section.
You can also special order your favorite Feast dishes It all started with a bucket of bulk feta and a forty(depending on ingredient availability) and pick up your pound block of cheddar...and after 40 years, First
special order from either store, making parties almost Alternative’s cheese experts are still cutting and
effortless!
wrapping your favorite cheeses to order. As our range of
feast
Cheese
Here are some special items to look for in August • This month we are featuring a returning favorite choices has expanded over the years, we’ve been able to
Emerald Sesame Kale, on sale at $7.19/lb (reg. $7.99). balance labor costs by selling pre-cut cheeses alongside
brought to us by longtime local providers:
Local kale is blanched and dressed with a garlic-y the classic we-cuts that many associate with the Co-op.
 Sam Rachele has been supplying us with figs and lemon
sesame tamari dressing. Simple, as delicious things Now we boast Oregon’s best cheese selection outside of
cucumbers since the very beginning in 1970!
Portland, and we intend to keep it that way!
often are.
 Pete Caday and his family have provided us with sweet • At the other end of the spectrum we have Oregon Mud • Self-serve, bulk cheeses are still some of our top
corn since 1984.
sellers. Provvista’s domestic Ciliegine Mozzarella
Puddle Pie – layers of chocolate! The first layer is
(pronounced “silly Jeannie”) is a new addition to the
a rich fudge brownie. Next is a light creamy chocolate
 Denison Farm supplies us with an assortment of
delicious melons and tomatoes and has sold a wide
bulk category that’s going over very well with even
layer topped with whipped cream and chocolate
variety of produce to us since the early 1980’s.
the most loyal mozzarella buyers. These little cherryshavings. On sale this month for $14.39 each (reg.
sized beauties are the perfect new best friend for
$15.99).
Also
available
by
the
slice
in
Grab
&
Go.
 Spring Hill Farm has also been a significant source
the bounty of tomatoes that will soon be appearing in
for us since 1988. Some of our August favorites from
a garden near you. We’ve even put Ciliegine on sale
them include shiny, perfect, eggplants and sweet
by
Amber
for the month of August, just to make sure you don’t
bell peppers.
miss out.
McK Ranch is located on the
 Gathering Together Farm’s beautiful summer squashes, outskirts of Dallas, OR. This is
• As you head out to late summer picnics and
lettuces, and cucumbers should be plentiful throughout
family owned and operated with
parties, stop in the cheese department for a
Smoked Chicken and
the month. They have been a valued provider for us
the highest standards involved
wedge of Fromage d’Affinois Double Cream. (Double
Smoked Roast Beef. Slow
since 1987.
in raising and processing their
creams are made by adding cream to whole milk
smoked to perfection.
Again, thanks to all the area growers who have grown delicious grass-fed beef. One
to create a butterfat content of about 60%.)
Available in the deli or
all this glorious food for the past 40 years. Cheers to visit to their beautiful ranch
Mild
and slightly tangy, Fromage d’ Affinois is
grab & go.
the next 40 years!
gives you a glimpse of how much
lovely with a crusty hunk of bread and a crisp
$5.29/lb.
love and hard work is put into
Chardonnay. Both the plain and original varieties
giving us access to their fine
are
on sale in August.
by Gabe
products.
• Another favorite of mine, also on sale, is Uniekaas
Are the dog days of summer making you sluggish? Check
Currently, we carry a variety of their beef,
5-Year Aged Gouda. This Dutch classic, aged to
out the rock bottom prices on all Pacifica Coffee this
including, but not limited to, ground beef, various
crystalline delightfulness, makes a pretty decent
month. You don’t need to drink it hot, or even boil any
steaks, and short ribs. We are super EXCITED to tell
snack - but it’s even better shaved over whatever
water to enjoy some delicious iced coffee; you just need
you that we will soon have McK Ranch free-range whole
salad, risotto, or sautéed greens you happen to have
to plan ahead. Simply put your regular coffee to water
chickens! A few will be available fresh and some frozen.
in your fridge. Stop by and see us for a taste; I
ratio together, let sit overnight and strain. This makes
The price will be somewhat higher than you may be used
think you’ll agree that age is not a bad thing!
a potent cold coffee without the acidity of hot brewed
to seeing. The number of chickens they process is very
coffee. Put just a little in the bottom of your cup and
Happy 40th, First Alternative family, and here’s wishing
low, which raises the cost per bird above that paid by
add more cold (or hot) water to the desired strength of
you many more. 
huge commercial processors. Also, these birds are local
your brew and enjoy.
meat
NEW!
Bulk
Tax Return Preparation
Personal • Corporate • Estate • More!
Since 1973
757-1945
316 SW Washington
Corvallis
6 The Co-op Thymes
LLING
NOW ENRO
Fall Prescho
ol Class
es
“A magical place for all children!”
541 757-8068 • [email protected]
August 2010
40 years and still scoopin ’
GOOD BEER IN CANS
by Karen Mayo
Just a few years ago we might not be using
those words together. Recent technology,
however, has allowed small craft brewers
to can their own brews. Cans make a lot
of sense. They require less energy to
ship and use more recycled materials than
glass. They can be recycled many times in
their lifetime. Cans get colder quicker,
are lighter to carry, and crush easily.
Enjoy your favorite beverage while you
pursue your active life. Pack a couple
in your duffle. Throw them in your bike
basket. Tow a few behind your canoe.
Caldera Brewing in Ashland was the
first craft brewery in Oregon to brew
and can its own beer. Their Pale Ale is
a brilliant golden color with flowery
citric hop aromas and flavors in a light
to medium body clean, crisp ale. $10.19/6
pack
piney hop flavor starts big and finishes
clean. $9.49/6 pack
Anderson Valley Brewing, a long time
First Alternative favorite from Northern
California has a growing line of can
options. Their Boont Amber Ale offers
flavors of malt, soft bread and dark
fruit balanced by a flowery hop presence.
$8.59/6 pack
Murphy’s Stout, a classic Irish import is
very dark with a touch of red and a creamy
white head. It has a nice sweetness with
a perfect balance of bitterness and a
creamy/velvety mouth feel. $1.99/16 oz
Young’s Double Chocolate Stout from
England is dark and thick with a creamy
tan head. Roasted malt dominates, with
just a hint of bitter chocolate and
nuttiness. $2.49/14.9 oz 
BUDGET BITES
DINNER FOR 2 ADULTS,
6 NIGHTS, EATING WELL
ON A BUDGET!
MENU:
Saturday: Grilled Sunburgers
Sunday: Tomato Alfredo Pasta
Monday: Stuffed Eggplant
Tuesday: Mediterranean Tuna Subs
Wednesday: Creamy Cauliflower
Thursday: Super Tofu Salad
- Emily Stimac, Marketing Coordinator
Caldera IPA is well balanced and smooth
with controlled hop bitterness and a
touch of malt. $10.19/6 pack
21st Amendment Brew Free or Die IPA from
a brew pub in the heart of San Francisco
is a deep golden color. The citrus and
FIRST ALTERNATIVE GENERAL MANAGER POSITION OPENS
First Alternative Co-op seeks an experienced General Manager (GM) to manage
its recently expanded two-store operation in Corvallis, Oregon. Candidates
with proven leadership, managerial and planning capabilities, extensive
financial background, experience in the grocery industry, and a positive
record of people and personnel skills are encouraged to apply.
The GM will work with a cohesive and experienced board of directors and
seasoned staff of 150 to build the business and ensure continued financial
success and fiscal responsibility. We value experience in cooperatives, the
natural foods industry, multi-store management, and policy governance.
Budget Bites shopping & recipes are
scaled for two adults. Increase or
decrease as needed to allow for your
household. I shopped this list at the
Co-op on July 22, 2010. We assumed you
had a few things in the pantry, which
were not included in the shopping
total. Our total: $49.67.
With the Eat Local America Challenge
running from August 15-31st, I chose
local products over the cheaper national
brands and still came out under $50,
which was a revelation for me. With
produce at it’s most affordable in
August, you can expect the total to
be even lower as we get closer to the
harvest.
The flyer includes
a complete
shopping list,
great tips, and
recipes for a
fantastic week of
budget bites.
Take a peek
at Monday’s
Recipe:
Stuffed
Eggplant
First Alternative Co
-op
BU
BUDGET
BITES
In the fridge for
future meals:
2 Sunburgers
1 grilled eggpla
nt
Issue #8:
August 2010
Menu:
SHOPPING &
RECIPES
1 eggplant, halved and grilled
2 Nearly Normal’s Sunburgers, crumbled
1/2 cup onion, fine dice
1/2 cup feta cheese
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp oregano
Salt & pepper
Carefully scoop out the inside of the
eggplant and set the shell aside. Sauté
the eggplant, Sunburger, onion and garlic
until onions are translucent. Stir in
feta, paprika, oregano, salt and pepper.
Pile back into the shell. Bake at 350°
for 20 minutes or until browned.
PICK UP YOUR COPY AT
CUSTOMER SERVICE OR
GO TO OUR WEBSITE.
������������������
������������������

�
Six stunning wines,
one cool jazz trio, one little cabin,
one mighty big view…and you.
TRY THE WEDNESDAY
FARMERS’ MARKET!
2 Downtown markets!
$5 tasting fee
24000 Cardwell Hill Drive
Philomath, Oregon
www.lumoswine.com
Wednesdays:
2nd & B, 3-7 PM
(3-6 PM starting Oct. 6)
April 17-Nov. 24
Saturdays:
1st & Jackson, 9 AM-1 PM
�
August 2010
�
�
Taking care of our
people and our planet.
In the fridge
future meals:
cooked gree
beans
Budget Bites shop
ping & recipes
are scaled for two
adults. Increase
or decrease as need
ed to allow for
your household
. I shopped this
list at the Co-o
p on July 22, 2010
.
We assumed you
had a
in the pantr y, which few things
were not
included in the
shopping total.
Our total: $49.6
7.
IN THE PAN
TRY:
salt
dried herbs:
pepper
bay, basil, orega
no
olive oil
& dill
D
balsamic vinegar
salad dressing
_
garlic
smoked paprika _
garlic granules
First Alternative currently serves 7,000 owners and generates annual sales
of about $15 million. For more information about the Co-op, a complete
job description, application process, and contact information, visit
www.firstalt.coop and go to the Employment tab.
�����������������������������������
Sunda
 Pasta wit
tomato
alfredo
 Green be
Tip: While the
Tip: Steam t
grill is going,
green beans
cook the eggpla
nt while the
pas
for Monday
night. Cut in half is cooking.
lengthwise, score,
and grill until
slightly tender.
Dinner for 2
adults,
6 nights,
under $50!
Saturday: Grilled
Sunburgers
Sunday: Tomato Alfr
edo Pasta
Monday: Stuffed Egg
plant
Tuesday: Mediterrane
an Tuna Subs
Wednesday: Creamy
Cauliflower
Thursday: Super
Tofu Salad
August 2
Saturday
 Nearly Norm
al’s
Sunburgers
 Grilled Zucch
ini
Also Saturdays in Downtown Albany!
www.locallygrown.org
The Co-op Thymes 7
the throwback issue!
community outreach news
GREENBELT LAND TRUST - PROTECTING OUR NATURAL AREAS
This is an update from one of 12 Beans for Bags
Recipients. These organizations are chosen by owners in
November and receive a nickel for every bean shoppers
put in their slot on the bean towers. Additional stories
from other recipients are coming in future issues.
Enjoy!
Carts For Corvallis
This month’s recipient:
Mary’s River
Gleaners
Mary’s River Gleaners aims to provide food and wood
to low-income, disabled, and elderly people, as
well as adoptees, as needed. Donations of clothing
and furniture welcome.
Want to help support Mary’s River Gleaners? Each time
you shop, bring in your reusable bags; we’ll give
you a bean for each bag you use, which is worth
5¢. You can then use your beans to support the
organization of your choice by placing them in our
bean towers, located at each entrance to the Co-op!
The top slot is for Carts for Corvallis recipients,
like the Mary’s River Gleaners. These beans are
counted at the end of the month, and donations of
up to $1000 are made to each organization. Results
are printed in the Thymes each month.
The Greenbelt Land Trust is a Corvallis-based nonprofit, celebrating 21 years of conservation work.
Greenbelt protects special lands - from native habitats
and working farms to recreational areas and streamsides.
If you have visited Fitton Green, Bald Hill Natural
Area, Owens Farm, or Beazell Memorial Forest, then you
have been on land that Greenbelt has been involved in
protecting. Greenbelt currently is responsible for the
perpetual protection and stewardship of 1300 acres of
amazing land in the mid-Willamette Valley, a number that
is set to double within the next 2 years as landowners
continue to seek creative solutions to protecting and
enhancing their heritage lands. Greenbelt works to
restore these lands to their native habitats, enriching
sites for imperiled wildlife and plant species. They
ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTER
OF THE MONTH!
Janet enjoys commuting around
town on her bike and doing her
shopping at the North Store.
She’s a music teacher, so you
may see her with a violin or
viola on her back as she rides
to give lessons. Janet enjoys
the convenience of biking and
how easy it is to get around
town on a bike. Way to go
Janet!
Janet Throop
Co-op Donations June 2010
The 7th Cooperative principle is “Concern for the
Community.” First Alternative fulfills this principle
in its role as a cooperative by donating to a variety of
organizations in our community. In June, donations
were given to these worthy groups or causes:
are a member-based organization,
with a strong educational,
volunteer, and outreach component,
Ashley Ottombrino,
as the cultivation of future land Outreach Assistant
stewards should be a priority for
us all. Greenbelt shares this community’s belief
that the Willamette Valley is an incredibly important
and beautiful place, and that our future livability
is dependent on us being committed to valuing and
protecting our natural resources.
Do you want to become involved with Greenbelt Land
Trust? Come on a property tour, sign up for monthly
emails, become a member, or a restoration volunteer.
They would love to talk to you, give them a call at
(541) 752-9609 for more information! 
Calling All
Nominees...
Our annual Beans for Bags and Carts for
Corvallis ballot will be coming out in
October! If your non-profit organization
would like to be a nominee, pick up an
application at either customer service
desk and return it to either store
by September 15th. Winners will be
announced in the December Thymes.
GEAR UP FOR CAR FREE DAY!
Throughout the world, September 22 is celebrated as
Car Free Day – a time for individuals and communities
to come together to explore the benefits of walking,
biking, and using public transit to get us where we
need to go. During September, Corvallis area residents,
businesses, and organizations are gearing up to
participate.
Participate in Car Free Day! There will be activities
throughout the day, culminating in a celebration at the
Wednesday Farmers’ Market (3-7pm at 2nd and B), with
food, music, information, and entertainment. Mark your
calendar and start now to plan how you will participate
in Car Free Day. Visit www.sustainablecorvallis.org
for event details & to register, make a pledge or
volunteer. 
Beans for Bags
Chintimini Wildlife Rehab Center................. $1,006.00
Greenbelt Land Trust ......................................... $546.00
Co-op Recycling Center...................................... $673.00
Carts for Corvallis
Ten Rivers Food Web.. ........................................ $269.00
Total Donated: $2,494.00
* We are not able to grant small $30 donations due to budget
cuts in 2010. We do plan to restore funds to this program in the
future. Our Beans for Bags and Carts for Corvallis programs will
continue as normal. We apologize for any inconvenience this
may cause you.
8 The Co-op Thymes
family cycling / accessories / fun / cargo bikes /
tuneups & repair / low-stress / commuting /
confidence / transportation / electric assist /
Xtracycle
Fuji
Breezer Xootr Yuba
YOUR NW CORVALLIS BIKE SHOP!!
541-740-0497 / www.csbikestowork.com
968 NW Circle Blvd / Corvallis, Or 97330
August 2010
August Specials
feel good about the food you eat!
All products
marked with the
Local 6 coin logo
are grown, made
or processed by a business
owned and located within the
six counties closest to Corvallis:
Benton, Lane, Lincoln, Linn,
Marion & Polk.
Pair mozzarella
with pesto for the
perfect summer
appetizer.
Look inside for
this delicious
summer recipe!
Sale items
labeled as Market
Bargains are sold as a service,
not for profit. The mark-up on
these items is just enough to
cover the Co-op’s expenses and
overhead. They are products
that help meet basic nutritional
or personal hygiene needs.
MARKET
BARGAIN !
Provvista
Weekly produce
specials run
from Wednesday
to Tuesday
Bulk Ciliegine
Mozzarella
$679 lb.
reg. $7.49
Cherry-sized fresh
mozzarella. Pronounced “Silly
Jeannie”
Many of our
sales are made
possible by
the Co-op Advantage Program
(CAP). This program allows
us and other member co-ops
to purchase products in large
quantities so we can sell them at
lower prices.
FRESH • LOCAL • ORGANIC • GOOD-FOR-YOU FOOD
Blue Horizon
Alo
Salmon Cake Bites
49
Time for local treats!
$4
Aloe Vera Drink
49
$1
6 oz reg. $5.69
16.9 oz reg. $1.99
Wheat Grass or Mangosteen
Delivered directly from
local farms!
Grower Direct
bunch carrots, bunch
beets and corn!
Santa Cruz
Organic Ginger Ale
Spritzer
$2.99
So
refreshing
on a hot,
summer day!
Living Right
No preservatives,
antibiotics, or hormones!
Bicycle
delivered!
Beginning September 1st, 2010 our monthly specials will switch to a twoweek schedule. This is part of a program called Co+op Deals. The items
we are switching will be those we buy through the National Cooperative
Grocer’s Association, NCGA. The sales will run for two weeks starting
Wednesday through Tuesdays, with two three week periods.You will notice
new flyers in the Thymes and deeper discounts on these items. Go Co-op!
$7
20 oz reg. $9.69
Wild Carrot
All Lotions
15% off
Pacifica Coffee
4 pk. reg. $4.99
Fish Fillets
99
All Natural! No
preservatives,
artificial coloring,
or artificial
flavors!
Organic French
Roast
69
$6
1 lb reg. $8.39
Rosewood & Aloe, Firefly
Sparkle, Mountain Man and
(our favorite!) Lord! My Hands
Are So Dry!
Nutrient-dense, joyful
products that are
reasonably priced for
the entire family.
We have many more items on sale than shown here! Sale items are marked in store with pink signs.
First Alt Brand
Assorted Multis
15% off
High-quality multivitamins for
the whole family!
QuickSnacks
Sunset Valley Organics
Organic Dried
Blueberries
99
$19
Bulk Goodies
It takes 7 lbs of fresh
blueberries to make 1 lb
of Sunset Valley Organics
dried berries.
These dehydrated organic
blueberries have all the flavor
and nutrition, packed into a
portable, shelf stable package.
Great for trail mixes, oatmealblueberry cookies, granola bars,
baking, or just plain snacking!
Organic Yellow
Popcorn
Organic Flax Seed
49
lb. reg. $1.59
$1
99¢ lb.
$7
Grizzlies
Organic Low Fat
Berry Granola
89
lb. reg. $5.89
Organic Pearled
Barley
19
lb. reg. $1.49
$4
$1
$1
$1
Organic Raisins
89
$1
Organic French
Green Lentils
49
lb. reg. $1.69
Organic Garbanzo
Beans
39
lb.
Organic
Macadamia Nuts,
Raw
59
lb. reg. $17.59
reg. $2.19
$16
lb. reg. $2.79
Bulk
Organic
Sunflower
Seeds
59
lb.
MARKET
BARGAIN !
Chuck Eye Steaks
69
lb.
$7
$7
$7
Organic Komodo
Blend
49
lb. reg. $7.79
$6
Pacifica Coffee
Pacifica Coffee
Pacifica Coffee
$9
$7
Pacifica Coffee
Pacifica Coffee
Pacifica Coffee
6
$8
$7
Boneless Breasts
69
$7
$13
Similar to rib eye; great for the
lb. reg. $8.59
Uniekaas
5-year Aged
Gouda
69
lb.
$14
reg. $16.29
Garlic & Herb
Fromager
d’Affinois
Willamette Valley Cheese
39
lb. reg. $15.99 Dill Havarti
Double Cream with Garlic
49
$12
$7
Feast Alternative
$7
$14
A returning Co-op Favorite!
Our FA deli serves breakfast, lunch,
and dinner! Make sure to stop in for
some local, tasty treats!
Featured Cheese
Provvista
Bulk Ciliegine
Mozzarella
79
lb. reg. $7.49
$6
Perfect for
making iced
coffee in the
summertime!
Organic
Ethiopian
69
lb. reg. $8.89
Emerald Sesame
Kale Salad
19
lb. reg. $7.99
lb.. reg. $15.39
light,
fresh
flavor!
$7
Feast Alternative
Great for grilling or fish tacos.
Jeannie’s favorite!
barbecue or with a marinade!
Organic Black
Rocks, Mountain
Clouds
69
lb. reg. $8.89
Feast Alternative
Opah
99
Pacifica Coffee
Organic River Mud Organic Sumatra
79
69
lb. reg. $9.99
lb. reg. $9.99
Island Wild Seafoods
reg. $8.59
From Nutrition Action (July/August 2010): Arch. Intern.
Med. 170:961, 2010 and Circulation 121:2162, 2010
Pacifica Coffee
Ranger
Lonely Lane
What to do: Switch from refined to whole
grains. Brown rice may protect against
diabetes because it has more fiber, vitamins
and magnesium and other minerals than
white rice, and because it raises blood sugar
less than white rice does. However, other
whole grains, like bulgur and whole-grain
pasta, raise blood sugar even less than
brown rice.
Organic Moka
Java
19
lb. reg. $8.59
Organic Bali
Organic Decaf
Harmony Blend Blue Moon
19
39
lb. reg. $9.19
lb. reg. $10.69
Deli Delights
Researchers tracked
nearly 200,000 men and
women for 14 to 22 years.
Those who ate at least 5 servings of white
rice per week had a 17 percent higher risk
of Type 2 diabetes than those who ate less
than one serving a month. In contrast, people
who ate at least two servings of brown rice
a week had an 11 percent lower risk of Type
2 diabetes that those who ate less that one
serving a month.
Pacifica Coffee
Organic
Colombian
89
lb. reg. $9.19
Brown
Rice
RULES!
Why choose brown
rice over white?
Pacifica Coffee
Organic Uganda
99
lb. reg. $8.19
& Herbs
$1
reg. $1.49
Organic French
Roast
99
lb. reg. $9.99
reg. $2.99
$14
Organic Roasted
Buckwheat
79
lb. reg. $2.39
Equal Exchange
$2
Guilloteau
$1
reg. 99¢
Packed with flavor and nutrition
with no sugar added!
Sunset Valley Organics’ dried
organic blueberries are picked
fresh and very ripe. The
plump, sweet blueberries go
straight from the bushes to the
dehydrator. They are dehydrated
one batch at a time with no
additives. NO SUGAR, NO OILS, NO
SULFUR.
Organic Golden
Rose Brown Rice
59
lb. reg. $1.89
Organic Rolled
Oats
89¢ lb.
1 lb. reg. $24.29
Lundberg
Cherry-sized fresh mozzarella.
Pronounced “silly Jeannie”
Woolwich
Madame Chevre
Goat Feta
29
7 oz. reg. $4.79
$4
Oregon Mud Puddle
Pie
39
ea. reg. $15.99
Dark fudge and milk chocolate
layers, topped off with whipped
cream & chocolate shavings. Yum!
Guilloteau
Fromager d’Affinois
99
lb. reg. $15.49
$13
Double Cream Plain
Organic Creamery
Parmesan Wedge
29
lb.
$13
reg. $14.69
Tillamook
Medium Cheddar
!
89
1 lb. reg. $5.89
$4
lb. reg. $13.89
Sale items are limited to stock on hand and are not eligible for case discounts.
MARKET
BARGAIN
Grocer’s Corner
Living Harvest
Tempt Hempmilk
99
$2
Do you know about
SPECIAL ORDERS?
Great addition to
any breakfast!
Order products we do or do not carry!
Save 10% by purchasing a case!
(sale items are not eligible for case discounts)
32 oz. reg. $3.99
This month’s special order
deadline: August 26
Call or visit our Customer Service desk
for more info or to place an order.
So Delicious
Coconut Milk
Beverage
99
$1
MARKET
BARGAIN !
32 oz. reg. $2.69
original, vanilla or unsweetened
Nature’s Path
Organic Toaster
Pastries
49
$2
11 oz. reg. $3.39
select varieties
Ciliegine Mozzarella & Pesto
Serves 4-6
* 1/4 cup pine nuts
* 1 large garlic clove, skin removed
* 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan-Reggiano or
Romano cheese
Quench your
thirst with a
natural treat!
* 1/2 cup olive oil
* 2 cups fresh basil leaves
* 2 - 8oz containers ciliegine Mozzarella
Combine pine nuts, garlic, Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino Romano in a food
processor. With the food processor running, add olive oil. Pulse until a paste is
formed, about 30-40 seconds. Add basil leaves. Pulse until basil leaves are roughly
choppped and blended into the nut paste. Be careful not to overprocess the pesto.
The texture should be slightly chunky, not completely smooth.
Drain the liquid from the Mozzarella and put the cheese in the middle of a serving
plate. Dollop the pesto around the cheese. Drizzle olive oil over the cheese and
finish with a very light sprinkle of salt.
Annie’s Homegrown
Shells & Cheese
29
$1
6 oz. reg. $2.19
$3
6-pack reg. $5.89
select varieties
Westbrae
Tinkyada
$1
$1
$2
Organic Tomato
Paste
69
Vine ripened and
hand harvested.
No calcium
chloride added.
Organic Fava
Beans
49
15 oz. reg. $1.99
A super
BEAN...
high in fiber
and iron!
R.W. Knudsen
Natural Diet Soda
99
Bionaturae
7 oz. reg. $2.59
Quick and
easy to
prepare!
Zevia
Organic GlutenFree Pasta
!
99
MARKET
BARGAIN
12 oz.
reg. $4.19
Fast-cooking
and perfect
for pasta
salads!
Juices
89
$2
32 oz. reg. $3.89
selected varieties
Pamela’s
Gluten Free
Cookies
69
$2
7.25 oz. reg. $4.19
Aromatic ginger kissed
with molasses!�
Kettle
Garden of Eatin
Boulder
Golden Temple
Nature’s Path
$1
$2
$2
$2
$2
Kettle Chips
69
5 oz. reg $2.79
Crunchy and
all-natural!
Blue Corn Chips
49
9 oz. reg. $3.89
Perfect snack
for a BBQ and
always good
with salsa!
Adzuki Chips
49
5 oz. reg. $3.59
Gluten
free and
packed with
irresistible
flavor!
Peace Cereal
99
10.5 oz.
reg. $4.99
Peace Cereal
donates 10%
of their profits
to community
efforts!
Envirokidz Cereal
99
10 oz.
reg. $4.39
Crunchy &
delicious,
perfect for
your little
Gorillas!
We have many more items on sale than shown here! Sale items are marked in store with pink signs.
from the cooler...
Nancy’s
Fruit on Top
Nonfat Yogurt
89¢
Turtle Island
Organic
Marinated
Tempeh Strips
79
8 oz. reg. $1.19
Assorted varieties
Organic Tea
Organic 1% Milk,
Lactose Free
MARKET
99 BARGAIN
!
Organic Meal
Replacement Drink
29
$2
64 oz. reg. $4.89
69¢
Full of active
cultures! No
preservatives,
artificial
sweeteners,
colors, or
additives.
11 oz. reg. $3.19
Vanilla or Chocolate
Organic Ice Cream
49
$3
16 oz. reg. $4.59
Assorted varieties
$2
4 oz. reg. $3.29
Assorted varieties
$2
$3
$3
32 oz. reg. $3.99
24 oz. reg. $4.39
4 ct. reg. $5.49
Dark Chocolate or naked coconut
$3
99
11 oz. reg. $4.69
Gluten free or original
Organic Tampons
10 ct. reg. $2.99
Select varieties
Hyland
Teething Tablets
49
125 tabs reg. $6.69
Soy Toilet Scrub
Assorted Herbal
Supplements
$4
49
30% off
Herb Pharm
Assorted Children’s
Extracts
15% off
Start early with back-to-school immune
support for your child!
Avalon
Lavender Shampoo
& Conditioner
11 oz. reg. $8.79
Organic Liquid
Soap
$129
2 oz. reg. $2.39
Assorted varieties
32 oz. reg. $6.29
Soy Lubricant SL-100
Amazing Grass
Kidz SuperGreen
Powder Drinks
25% off
$349
4 oz. reg. $4.79
Bio-Kleen
Bac-Out
69
Both Berry and Chocolate flavors.
$4
Natural Factors
Aura Cacia
Assorted Formulas
25-35%
High quality supplements from a family
owned business.
New Chapter
One Daily
25% off
Men’s and Woman’s One a Day Multi’s.
New Formulas!
Bio-Kleen
16 oz. reg. $6.79
South Store only.
Calm Nursery
Diffuser
49
$11
ea. reg. $14.89
Boiron
Allergy & Sport
Remedies
30% off
Get out and enjoy the dog days of summer.
North Store
All-Purpose
Cleaner
49
452-3115 • 29th & Grant
Open 7-9 daily
$5
South Store
753-3115 • 1007 SE 3rd St
Open 7-9 daily
www.firstalt.coop
32 oz reg. $7.59
Cuts through tough
grease and dirt
without the use of
toxic chemicals.
MARKET
BARGAIN !
Bio-Kleen
NEW! Oral and Digestive Remedies
Dr. Bronner’s
Natracare
Homeopathic
relief for baby
(and parent)!
California Veggie
Burgers
59
Bio-Kleen
Canfo
$629
Toothpaste
$4
Organic Coconut
Bars
99
Made with organic
blueberries with
billions of live
probiotics in every
sip!
Delectable
flavor and
creamy texture!
$229
12 oz. reg. $4.69
Gluten-free Burritos
49
$3
Kiss My Face
More omega3s in fewer
servings. That’s
ideal!
$2
Glutenfreeda
Straus
Organic
Blueberry Kefir
99
Plain Greek
Style Yogurt
29
Many scents to choose from and
try out! Get clean & smell good.
As part of their environmental
mission, Oregon Soap Company
has planted over 11,000 trees
and other native plants since
November 2007.
Select varieties
Organic Frozen
Concentrate Juice
99
Dr. Praeger’s
20% off
15% off
Cascadian
Larry & Luna’s
Bulk Soap Bricks
Ultimate Oils
16 oz. reg. $3.79
Assorted varieties
Nancy’s
Oregon Soap Company
Nordic Naturals
$2
Greek Gods
Health & Home
3.4 oz. reg. $5.59
Select varieties
Soy Cream
79
$2
Orgain
$3
6 oz. reg. 99¢
Assorted varieties
Double Rainbow
99¢
Organic Valley
Yogurt
Organic Frozen
Potatoes
49
The balance of
protein,
omega-3s,
16 oz. reg. $1.69
and 23 vitamins and
Assorted varieties
minerals make Orgain a
nutritional slam dunk!
7 oz. reg. $3.69
Assorted flavors
Cascade Fresh
from the freezer...
16 oz. reg. $3.69
Assorted varieties
Honest Tea
$2
Cascadian
40th Anniversary Party!
August 7th • 4-6pm • South Store
food - fun - music - prizes!
Sale items are limited to stock on hand and are not eligible to case discounts.
40 years and still scoopin ’
Staff Favorites
Bulk
ble inbottle!
a
l
i
a
v
A
the
and by
Holden Goetzinger
Kettle BBQ Chips
"Best BBQ chips ever!!"
Jessica Brothers
Wild Carrot
Rosewood & Aloe Lotion
Emily Stimac
Sesmark Mini Rice
Crackers
"A bulk favorite! A light, nongreasy lotion with a wonderful,
natural scent."
"40 crackers per serving? You
can’t beat that."
Staff Anniversaries
Blueberry, 1 Year
Nathan McGhee & Kara McQueen
Cherry, 3 Years
Valori George
Blackberry, 4 Years
Emily Stimac, Geoff Powell &
Julie Burlock
Kumquat, 5 Years
Amy Dawson
Fig, 9 Years
Tom Ryan
Kiwi, 10 Years
Kirsten Nugent
ANNIVERSARY FRUITS
Every year a staff member
works is represented by
a different fruit that
increases in size...
1. Blueberry
14. Peach
2. Raspberry
15. Pear
3. Cherry
16. Apple
4. Blackberry
17. Orange
5. Kumquat
18. Grapefruit
6. Strawberry
19. Pomegranate
7. Plum
20. Mango
8. Apricot
21. Papaya
9. Fig
22. Cantaloupe
10. Kiwi
23. Honeydew
melon
11. Lime
24. Pineapple
12. Tangerine
25. Watermelon
13. Nectarine
After 25 years watermelons are
designated with a hat containing
the above fruits, starting with
the blueberry for the 26th year.
etc.
You make the Co-op a Natural Foods Wonder!
downtown dental
$100
Clinic Credit
for coop Members
coupon required; one per person with
your coop member card.
must be redemed by 9/19/10
no cash value
call for details
downtown dental
most insurances accepted
payment plans for those without
Oregon Heath Plan through ODS
exclusively partnered with O’Brien
Dental Lab in Corvallis for superior
results and service.
August 2010
Beautiful Smiles, Lasting Impressions
Free
Implant &
Invisalign
Consultations
10am-10pm Tuesday-Saturday
142 SW 2nd Street Corvallis
541 908 4988
Dr. Chris Martel
Eagle Scout from rural Missouri
UMKC trained on Navy Scholarship
6 years experience in Kansas City;
California; Camp Arifjan, Kuwait
opened downtown dental in 2008
member Corvallis AM Rotary, DCA
loves to fish and enamel silver
Staff Spotlight
JIM DOBIS
What do you do at the Co-op and
how long have you been working
here?
My current job is retail
operations manager and I’ve been
here for 34 years in September.
What brought you to the Co-op?
Good food and a connection to the
alternative lifestyle community.
What do you like best about your
job?
Wonderful people! I like retail
sales and particularly natural
foods- and my job has a lot of
variety and challenges.
How has working at the Co-op
affected your life?
It is what my life is all about.
In the beginning we were fighting
for people to take us seriously,
not just call us that “hippie
place across the river.” Organics
were more of a dream than a
reality. Now, we are considered
a leader in the community when
there are food issues. I see
natural and organics thriving all
across the retail food sector.
Small independent natural foods
and organic manufacturers are
big businesses now and little
ole First Alternative has had
something to do with that growth
and success.
What are some of your favorite
products at the Co-op?
The decaf coffee is swell for a
dollar with your own cup. Grab
and Go selection. The blue cheese
section. Bulk foods in general
(the first department I managed).
Fresh and local fruit and
veggies. Local packaged products.
Our magazine selection. Bulk
garden seeds. Bulk personal care
products. I better stop now!
What do you like to do outside of
work?
I like to garden. We moved in from
the hills about 3 years ago and
my goal is to get rid of all the
grass on our acre place and turn
it into flower beds. I try to
get out once or twice a year for
a sea kayaking adventure. Still
smacking racquetballs around. And
woodturning has become my artistic
passion.
Where did you grow up/where have
you lived in your life?
Born in Chicago, raised in San
Diego and moved to Benton County
in the 70’s.
Tell us something about yourself
others might not know?
I was crowned Mr. Corvallis at a
fake men’s beauty contest at OSU
in the 80’s~now that‘s a story!
Where are some of your favorite
travel destinations?
Lake Powell-kayaking in the
slots, Hawaii-snorkeling, Baja
California-laid back life style,
Columbia gorge
Where do you see yourself in 10
years?
Still at the Co-op! But as a
customer, I’m sure my employee
shelf life will be expired by
then! I really like this area, and
see myself growing old gracefully
and staying active and fit.
What music is playing in your car,
home, or head?
Uh-oh, this will really age
me, I’ve been humming Michael
Jackson songs since I watched his
documentary, This is it. At home,
on my ipod, Hewey Lewis and the
News, The Who, AC/DC, the Scorps,
Police, well you get the picture,
70’s Rock and Roll.
What are your top 5 favorite
things about Corvallis?
Incredibly friendly people, the
river, educational opportunities,
great area for gardening and of
course, First Alternative.
What is one thing you would change
at the Co-op?
More owner and community
involvement- that’s the connection
that makes this place hum.
The Co-op Thymes 13
the throwback issue!
Continued from front page
I’m grateful for that wonderful interview; Dr. Denison
passed away in 2005.
Here is the story of First Alternative’s beginnings in
voices recorded in 1990:
AN UNLIKELY COMMUNITY IS BORN
“Yes, I was there,” Dr. Denison said, then described the
birth of First Alternative.
In the late 1960s a handful of OSU students wanted to
form an umbrella organization to give student groups
access to campus facilities and equipment. They asked
Dr. Denison to be their requisite faculty advisor. Thus
was born the Association of Conscientious, Thoughtful
Students (ACTS). Only two groups used the ACTS umbrella
in its four-year lifespan. One lasted a month; the
other was a group of four students who wanted to start
a cooperative grocery store.
“Co-ops were the coming thing on the west coast at
that time,” Dension said. “There was one in Eugene,
one in Portland, and one in Seattle, as well as food
conspiracies and collective buying groups in other
parts of the country.” The students wanted a place to
buy things that weren’t available elsewhere in town,
especially bulk items and whole grains. In his business
travels up and down the coast, Denison visited co-ops
for ideas and advice.
No one, not even Dension, remembered who proposed the
name First Alternative, though he thought it emerged
at the first meeting. Due to the diversity of members
over the years, the name has meant different things to
different people, but it’s always been appropriate.
Posters and word spread well beyond campus, inviting
townspeople as well as students to organizing meetings.
An interesting mix of backgrounds, professions and ages
showed up.
Peggy McKimmy, then a young wife and mother, described
the motley group of students, alternative types,
housewives and professionals best: “We were unlikely
soul mates brought together through a common interest.
I found I really liked the interaction with people who
looked a lot different from each other on the outside,
but who found that, on the inside, they cared about
the same things. We probably never would have begun to
communicate otherwise. But here it didn’t matter what
you looked like. Families were welcome. It wasn’t just
women, or just men, or just students. Everyone was
accepted and accepting. I learned so much about new ways
of eating. We had regular potlucks—wonderful potlucks.
That’s where I learned about vegetarian foods. For me,
it was a true adventure.”
Hildred Rice, one of the more senior members attending
the first meetings, recalled a notice about a meeting
or fund-raising dinner at OSU’s Memorial Union. “When
these people began talking about starting a grocery
store, I thought they were crazy. What did they know
about a grocery store? Well, I found they’d given it a
lot of thought and had formed committees to look for a
building and find food for the store. The goal from the
very beginning was to provide healthful, nourishing food
at good prices—and still is,” she said.
“It was a very political act, even for such a diverse
group,” said Joyce Nesson, who joined the group with her
husband, Michael, at the second meeting. “We were taking
control—seizing economic power—over what we bought and
from whom we bought the things necessary to sustain the
most basic human need: for food. It was telling the
status quo, ‘thank you, but we’ll do this ourselves.’ We
were surely fueled by the various boycotts of that era,
but our politics were even broader than that. It was the
old American grass roots doing it and I think some of us
were startled by just how much power we could take.”
TECHNICALLY NOT A CO-OP
By early 1970, First Alternative had incorporated - not
as a true cooperative, but as a non-profit corporation.
The reasons are unclear, but the intent and spirit were
certainly cooperative and the result has always been
called “the Co-op.”
Meanwhile, the building committee was having trouble
finding an affordable place. They had raised just
$1000 through $5 memberships or “shares.” Rents in the
preferred downtown area were out of reach. Among sites
considered and rejected (or withdrawn by owners, perhaps
leery of renting to such an unlikely group) were what
is now the Old World Deli Center, Blackledge Furniture’s
warehouse on 1st Street, a building across from the Post
Office on SW 2nd Street, and the classic wood and tin
building on the south end of 2nd Street.
Finally, in August 1970, a realtor
located a wood frame house on NW
4th Street. “It was an enormous
relief,” Denison recalled. At
the time I interviewed him, his
business, Northwest Mycological
Consultants, was in a neighboring
house-turned-offices and his
employee, Paul Przybylowicz, was
Computer Problems?
Hal Harding
Attorney, Mediator & Arbitrator
RESOLVE FAMILY LAW QUESTIONS
WITH MEDIATION
I offer fast accommodating solutions
for IBM and Mac systems
“We really appreciate your prompt and thorough service.”
-Lisa Morrison, Sierra Club office manager
“You have brightened my day through your expertise.”
vil
-Andy Dufner, Director, Nestucca Sanctuary
“Thanks so much for helping us...I really appreciate it!”
-Louise Tippens, Director, Environmental Federation of Oregon
FAST
PRIVATE
LESS
EXPENSE
and
STRESS
36 years of experience in helping
you resolve parenting plans,
property, debt and support issues
without appearing in Court.
541-757-7594
�������������������������������
[email protected]
14 The Co-op Thymes
YOU
CONTROL
OUTCOME
Superior PC Service
Repairs
• Upgrades
• Networking
• Virus removal
•
First Alternative’s board president.
THE DREAM BECOMES REALITY
That fall students returned with new energy to reinforce
those who had worked through the summer seeking a site
and food suppliers. The house needed much work to turn
it into a store. The group became a humming machine,
fueled by enthusiasm and sheer determination to turn
their dream into “the Co-op.” Folks began making food
runs to Eugene, Salem, Portland, and even as far as
Vancouver, B.C. and San Fransisco.
But, energy and enthusiasm weren’t legal tender for
paying bills and money was still scarce. Westminster
House (or maybe the Unitarian Church, some suggested)
donated $500, enough
to cover rent for two
months. “That made a big
difference,” said Michael
Nesson, a key organizer
and post-doc at OSU at
the time. “It allowed us
to concentrate on getting
the store running without
having to worry about
fund-raising for the moment.” They scraped together more
capital by selling $25 and $100 promissory notes, and
asking members to pre-pay their grocery bills. Credit
accounts were kept on 3 x 5 cards, stored in a metal
box.
“First Alternative’s initial supplier was the Willamette
People’s Co-op in Eugene,” Nesson said. “We didn’t have
the capacity even to buy a full sack of grain at first.
Several of us would go to Eugene in the evening, after
their Co-op closed, and they’d allow us to shop for
our store. First Alternative had a straight ten percent
mark-up and we calculated we’d have to sell our entire
inventory ten times each month just to cover expenses.”
And they did just that, thanks not only to all-day
volunteer efforts inside the store, but to volunteer
food runs up and down the valley. Eventually, suppliers
and distributors decided the fledgling business was
stable enough to add to their delivery
routes.
TA-DA!
Opening day was November 23, 1970.
Corvallis’s newest grocery store was
well-scrubbed, if not well-stocked. “I
think there were three burlap sacks – one
each of beans, wheat and rice – in the
little 10 x 10-foot grain room,” recalled
Enrolling for Fall 2010
Philomath Montessori
Offering a
small-school atmosphere
929-2672
www.philomathmontessori.org
John Madsen
Serving
Corvallis-Philomath
For over 26 years
Established 1988
Call for
appointment today!
929-4054
August 2010
40 years and still scoopin ’
Nesson, “their sides rolled down for easy scooping.”
“That was in what had been a downstairs bedroom,” added
Joyce. “The other bedroom became the cheese room. I
think later a small produce cooler stood against the
back wall of the main room.”
Don Marquis, one of the first managers, recalled that
most of the produce came from peoples’ gardens.
“Our scale, the platform kind with a magnified rolling
dial, was up front by the cash register,” Joyce Nesson
said. Mary Lou Magers worried about the wheat germ, kept
in a dark closet since refrigeration was limited. Peggy
McKimmy donated an old refrigerator from her garage.
Hildred Rice remembered a dirt-floor basement where a
freezer held honey ice cream from California. She also
remembered how hot the house got in summer.
No one was in a hurry when they shopped, recalled
McKimmy. “We were all learning and the old cash register
was big and slow, so if you were in a hurry you didn’t
shop there. But there was a friendliness that didn’t
exist elsewhere.”
Gene Newcomb remembered the house being small, cramped
and gray. “The building we’re in now seems so grand by
comparison, with all its windows,” he said of the south
store in 1990.
Rose Marie (Nichols) McGee appreciated the “breadth of
ages” she encountered at First Alternative. Her husband,
Keane, traveled to Salem for goods from a wholesale
foods outlet. “If the Co-op couldn’t sell something
cheaper than other stores,” she said, “we didn’t carry
it.” She and her sister Gloria helped launch the herb
section. Because their parents owned Nichols Garden
Nursery in Albany, they were able to buy herbs through
the nursery’s distributors.
McGee also felt Co-op members were special because they
acted on moral beliefs, listing senior discounts, the
children’s play area, and how they handled a street
person who became a “heavy grazer.” “Rather than confront
him, we looked at what we could do to help him.”
Don Marquis remembered that as the start of the Free
Soup Pot. “We made it out of marginal produce and
miso. It was both practical—so we wouldn’t lose a lot
of food—and compassionate: we wanted to feed the truly
hungry.”
Margo Denison remembered going to shop and being greeted
with a broom. “Whoever was in charge that day said,
‘I’m not going to open this place until it gets cleaned
up. Do you want a broom?’” Margo swept. Her shopping
excursions were frequently extended by stints at the
cheese counter. “As a teacher, I’d had a tuberculosis
test, which was also required for a food handler’s
permit in those days. Sometimes I was the only one in
the store qualified to cut cheese.”
In all likelihood it was Joyce Nesson who handed Margo
the broom. “Sometimes whoever was responsible for
cleaning up didn’t do it, so some of us refused to open
until the job got done. Those who came from a long way
and found us closed weren’t too pleased, but we felt it
was necessary.”
Many of the original members found themselves putting
in far more than the standard two hours a week. Jack
Wolcott, co-owner of Grass Roots Bookstore today, was a
student then who tried, for the sake of his studies, not
to get too involved at first. “Soon I was going to class
only for tests,” he admitted. “I was learning so much at
the Co-op and was gaining a lot of self-esteem. I found
there was something better to do than just work for a
living, that you could have value in what you did.”
Mike Nesson was often called from his lab at OSU to
write a check for a supplier. “I intended to get right
back to the lab, but often a trip at 10 a.m. lasted
until 4 or 5 p.m. I obviously enjoyed being there more
than at school.”
Denis DeCourcey, an early manager who later moved to
Portland, was heavily involved for several years. “The
Co-op provided very real spiritual nourishment for
me,” he said. “I think it’s been that way for a lot of
others, too. People would come to shop, but knew they’d
see someone they wanted to talk to, as well. Being in
the middle of that in the heady days of the early-tomid-1970s was really great. As a manager who spent most
of my time there, I was in touch with everybody. I felt
mine was a very privileged position in a very privileged
spot.”
“It was probably the Co-op that taught us that we could
do unexpected things,” said Joyce Nesson. “The mystique
of the business world was totally stripped away and we
learned we were capable, competent people. We found
personal power as well as group power.”
Sales increased steadily; soon floor and parking space
became squeezed. Something had to give.
THE SEARCH WAS ON
Among the sites considered for a bigger store was
a former drive-in restaurant on Third Street, just
south of the river. A group of members checked it out,
meetings were held and consensus reached to rent the
little building. It, too, needed a lot of work. Once
again, folks pitched in and transformed it into a whole
foods emporium, the antithesis of the fast-food burger
joint it had been.
Stay tuned for the
second chapter
of the Co-op
History, coming
in September.
Loismae Howard
August 2010
541.224.4047
August 7th, 4-6pm,
South Co-op
Enjoy an afternoon of good food
& good people as we celebrate 40
years and still scoopin’.
EVENT HIGHLIGHTS:
- Tasty samples
- Taste comparison game with over 70
amazing prizes...GRAND PRIZE: a Trek
Classic Cruiser!
- Co-op history display
Double
Alternative
- Photo booth
Transporation
card punches!
- Scrap book
No purchase
necessary.
- Kinetic Sculpture Rides
- Music
Don’t miss the
fun! See you
there!
CCB #93128
�������������������
�������
�����������������������������
�������������
����������������������
������������������������
Piano Lessons
Beginning through Intermediate
Classical  Jazz  Popular
All ages welcome
CELEBRATE
WITH US!
Celebrating 21 years of great service.
Our day camp provides a wonderful opportunity for your child to learn
important lessons about agriculture and learn valuable life skills. Your
child will experience real life on a biodiverse family farm. For more
information about our camp go to www.midwayfarmsoregon.com/camp
or contact us at [email protected]
235 NW 2nd St.  541-753- 8039
����������������������
Linoleum, Cork, Bamboo and more!
The Co-op Thymes 15
the throwback issue!
HEALTH SERVICES GUIDE
Advertise your health service for only $35 per ad. Maximum 50 words. Please email your ad to [email protected] by the 15th of the month.
COLON HYDROTHERAPY BY APPOINTMENT. FDA registered
equipment with disposables for your safety
and comfort. Call Marty - Certified Colon
Hydrotherapist. (541) 757-1454.
DOWNTOWN DENTAL, DR CHRIS MARTEL Open 10am-10pm
Tuesday-Saturday. Accepts most insurance plans,
offers payment plans for those without insurance.
Also accepts Oregon Health Plan through ODS for
children < 21. Enjoy an Oregon Trail Ale, glass
of Tyee wine, local pear cider, or a mimosa
before your appointment.
DR. VIRGINIA SHAPIRO, HOLISTIC CHIROPRACTOR
24 years experience resolving the causes of
chronic and acute pain, fatigue, mood and
sleep disorders, and other conditions. Specific
diagnosis, gentle chiropractic care, Applied
Kinesiology, Frequency Specific Microcurrent
(resolving scar tissue and inflammation),
clinical nutrition, Functional Medicine. 915 NW
36th Street, Corvallis. (541) 738-2711, www.
virginiashapiro.com.
Art
at
the
Co-op
NORTH STORE
Brynna Kinney will be displaying her unique and
joyful art at the North Co-op during the month of
August. Brynna says she is inspired by “happy, humorous
people and silly situations.” She enjoys working with
a variety of different mediums, especially pen and
ink, acrylic paint and collage. Come visit soon, and
let Brynna’s art brighten your day with a smile!
HEALING PEOPLE, ANIMALS AND SPACES. Fiona Moore,
naturally gifted Healer, Dowser and experienced
Sedona Method Coach offers in-person and
distance healing sessions. Specializing in health
and well being, clearing and unblocking. Free
initial consultation to determine healing needs.
(541)758-2033, www.fionamoore.com.
LYMPHATIC DRAINAGE * VISCERAL MASSAGE *
CRANIOSACRAL THERAPY These modalities rejuvenate
and strengthen the body’s natural immune system
and promote vibrant health and well being.
Specializing in: Detoxification, Cancer Therapy
Support, Breast Health, Lymphedema Management and
Self-care. Heart in the Valley Massage - Piper
Jones LLCC, LMT 8032. Now at Blue Heron Healing
Arts, 564 SW 3rd St., Corvallis. (541) 740-3698.
MARCIA A. LIBERATORE, MD PC, of Corvallis
Integral Medicine is accepting new patients. She
offers general medical care with an interest in
Functional Medicine and Medical Acupuncture. She
offers SimpleCare, a program allowing reduced
SOUTH STORE
Poppy Olson has had a wide range of experience
with her art, starting as a hobby and evolving into
an important part of her practice as a therapist. She
mostly uses acrylic paints and sometimes incorporates
an air brush technique in her creations. Her work can
be seen at the Mystic Mountain Center for Healing
Arts. If you are interested in her art and dream
therapy, contact the Mystic Mountain Center for
Healing Arts.
costs for cash paying patients and those with
high deductible insurance policies. For an
appointment, please call (541) 753-1172, www.
drintegral.com.
TWO CRANES ACUPUNCTURE AND MASSAGE Let
Acupuncture and Massage nourish your body,
mind and spirit. Return to a natural state of
balance and harmony, using Japanese and Chinese
acupuncture, herbs, nutritional and exercise
counseling, or therapeutic massage. Leesa
Walters, L.Ac., LMT #13160, Randall Davis, L.Ac.
1723 NW Kings Blvd. (541) 738-6117.
WHOLE HEALTH CLINIC Focusing on Body, Mind,
Spirit to maintain health and well-being. Dean
Johnson, Acupuncture, Supplements & Nutrition;
Peter Eschwey, Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture; Dr.
Cinda Flynn, Naturopathy; Catherine VanWetter,
Counselor; Mimi Shawe, Quantum Biofeedback;
Joan Clapper, Feldenkrais Teacher; Emily Barry,
Counselor; Alan Silverstein, Massage; Isaac
Hendler, Acupuncture & Oriental Therapeutics.
1220 NW Kings Blvd. Corvallis. (541) 753-5152,
www.wholehealthclinic.com.
Available at the Co-op...KNOW YOUR FISH!
OPAH - ON SALE THIS MONTH!
Perfect fish for your summer BBQ.
Fresher than fresh
Caught, packaged,& processed in USA
islandwildseafoods.com - find us on facebook
www.corvalchemist.com
If you would like to display your art at the Co-op call
(541) 452-3115 x 300
Natural Choice Directory
The Healthy Green Pages
An Independent Weekly dedicated to
promoting the Arts and Minds of Corvallis
™
Willamette Valley
Thank you for Two Years of
Contributed Art, Photography, and Writing
FREE Every Tuesday since 01.01.08
New Specials!
Beginning September 1st, 2010 the Co-op will be
switching some of our monthly specials to a twoweek schedule. This is part of a program called
Co+op Deals. The items we are switching will be
those we buy through the National Cooperative
Grocer’s Association, NCGA. The sales will run for
two weeks starting Wednesday through Tuesdays, with
two three week periods.
You will notice new flyers in the Thymes and deeper
discounts on these items. Go Co-op!
New!
Available
NOW!
FMI: Jim Dobis, 541-753-3115 x 322
16 The Co-op Thymes
August 2010
40 years and still scoopin ’
U N CLASSIFIEDS
Unclassifieds are only 20¢ per word. Simply fill out a form at the
Customer Service desk by the 15th of the month prior to the month
in which you would like your ad to run. Payment is due at that time.
Ads must be no longer than 100 words.
CALL KORI THE SPOILER for your pet’s good time! Will
stay overnight with pets. 541-750-0006.
questions. Zane Maser 541-757-3479 http://chrismaser.
com/zanebiog.htm.
Devon, OSU Horticulturist, 541-760-8727 barefootgarde
[email protected] LCB#8925. Free estimates.
LA FLAUTA MAGICA: BILINGUAL PRESCHOOL PROGRAM, MondayFriday 8:30-12:30 and 1-4. Now offering an after
school program for kindergarten students beginning
in September. For more information please call (541)
602-4140.
HEALING TREE MASSAGE. Wonderful new Massage Therapist
in town! I practice Therapeutic and Deep Tissue
massage at Blue Heron Healing Arts. I am offering an
introductory rate of $50 for 60 minutes and $80 for 90
minutes. Gift certificates available! Looking forward
to meeting you! Aimee Murphy, LMT #13870 – 541-6029444 – www.healingtree2012.com.
YARDWORK, WEEDING, PRUNING, SCYTHING, Lawns to gardens,
general clean-up, recycling, other misc. labor. Ken
541-929-4296.
PIANO LESSONS. New student special: first 3 months at
half price. All ages; all styles. Loismae 541-2244047.
COME TO THE NORTHWEST GLUTEN FREE CONFERENCE on
November 5th and 6th, 2010! Bringing together health
care professionals, patients, manufacturers, business
owners, chefs, food suppliers and families to learn more
about celiac disease and gluten intolerance directly
from the experts. Go to www.NWGlutenFreeSummit.com for
more info.
CONCEPTUAL PAINTING Workshops/Retreats - 18th Year!
Beautiful, inspiring hilltop setting overlooking
the valley, Cascades and Coast Range in Monroe.
Personalized instruction. Materials. Lunch. Diane
Hoff-Rome, BFA, MFA, 541-847-2257 www.artistlife.
com.
ISLE OF SKYE SCOTLAND. Beautifully appointed vacation
cottage. Stunning westerly views over the sea and
Outer Hebrides. Garden. Fireplace. Welcome basket. 10%
reduction for Co-op owners. 541-847-2257. www.skyeselfcateringcottage.com.
HOUSE SITTING Long Term or Short Term. Call Kori - 541750-0006.
RELAX AT OUR LINCOLN CITY BEACH HOUSE. Spacious 2
bedroom/1927 era character and a great view of the
ocean. Sleeps 6 and has easy beach access. Nicely
stocked/luxuries. $105/night. 10% discount for Co-op
owners. 541-757-1104.
WATERFRONT SUITES ON ORCAS ISLAND. Private beach with
rowboat, organic garden, farm animals, hammocks, hot
tub and play area. We welcome children and pets. Ask
for Co-op discount. pebblecovefarm.com 360-376-6161.
PARENT COOPERATIVE PRESCHOOLS in Albany, Corvallis,
Halsey, Philomath and Scio offered by Linn-Benton
Community College. For information call 541-9174897 or visit www.linnbenton.edu/familyresources/
parenteducation.
ASTROLOGICAL CONSULTATIONS: Astrology is a selfaffirming mirror to understand your purpose and
potential. Natal and progressed charts. Horary
astrology: Clear answers to serious, precise
FISHER’S FIX-IT. Small Job Shop and Home Repair
CCB83407. 45 years experience in quality repair &
renewal of most household items. Reliable service
and reasonable rates. In the current economy, don’t
buy new when you just need a fix. Cash, barter or
Hours accepted. Call Josiah at 541-231-1895 or email
[email protected]
TAL CARMI REPAIRS AND REMODELS CCB #174846. Household
repairs, remodels, window installations, decks,
additions. No job too small. 541-753-0460.
CERTIFIED HAKOMI THERAPIST Margot Vance-Borland, MS
Counseling, LMT (#1623) has been a healing arts
professional for over 25 years. Her sessions are
powerful and nurturing, and designed to access the
body and soul’s deep healing wisdom. Reiki-Seichim
classes are held regularly. Call 541-754-3595 to
schedule.
SPIRIT OF PLACE ~ Home Makeovers, Meditative Art &
Garden Design. Create tranquil, beautiful and sensual
places for your daily reflection�Immerse yourself
into pastel landscapes that soothe your interior
meditations. Traci McMerritt 541-760-8557 www.
spiritofplacedesign.net.
TRUST THE CLEANING OF YOUR HOME, SMALL OFFICE, RENTAL
OR MOVE IN/OUT SITUATION TO AWESOME CLEAN. Owner
operated, providing efficient, detailed, dependable
service with reasonable rates. Non-toxic products
and pet friendly! Excellent references - Call Tracy
541-730-1625.
CLEANING!
www.LadyJayneCleaning.com
Bondable,
dependable, efficient, Organic safe cleaning home and
office. 503-743-2318. Corvallis and Albany. Jayne.
GOOD HOUSE CLEAN HOUSE – Natural house cleaning. Jorah,
541-752-1249.
JESSICA’S GREEN CLEANING: Experienced, Reliable, Ecofriendly. Reasonable Rates, Excellent References. Call
today for a free estimate! [email protected]
or 541-602-5195
FULL SERVICE LANDSCAPING COMPANY Specializing in
sustainable and organic practices call or email:
NATURAL FORCES LANDSCAPING is focused on sustainable
and environmentally conscious landscaping. It is our
goal to assist the home owner or landscape manager
in reducing the amount of time and money spent on
maintaining a traditional landscape. Because we design
and install plants well suited to the conditions of
the site, consumption of water, fertilizer and routine
mowing or weeding tasks are greatly reduced. Owner
holds a B.S. in Horticulture, OSU. Lic# 15358. Contact
Brigid at 541-602-8707.
CORRECT PRUNING on ornamental and fruit trees. 12
years local experience. Call David, 541-758-7432.
NORTHWEST REALTY CONSULTANTS has many listed and byowner services for people interested in buying or
selling their homes. Call us at 541-753-4567 or 541928-8440 or visit us at northwestrealtyconsultants.
com for more details.
FOR A BEAUTIFUL BIRTH, HIRE A DOULA. Corvallis Doula
Network. www.corvallisdoulas.net.
BIRTHING WELL. Personal support during pregnancy,
birth and postpartum. Irma Kapsenberg, Certified
Birth Doula 541-745-3928.
TAYLOR GUITAR XXXKE Special Edition Acoustic $5,000.
Louismae, 503-623-7907.
FOR SALE 7’ GRAND PIANO, Hobart Cable 2006 $13,900.
541-224-4047.
ORGANIC FACIALS--- New G.M. Collin Bio Organique skin
care products and facials. 20% off your first organique
facial at Image Makers, 308 SW Monroe Ave Corvallis,
541-754-0355, imagemakers2.com.
er
m
m
u
S
beer s!
ng
tasti
TRY
BEF IT
YOU ORE
BU
IT! Y
EVERY FRIDAY 5-7PM
SOUTH STORE
A GREAT WAY TO GET THE
WEEKEND STARTED!
Corvallis Montessori School
an alternative approach for the real world
Where children become
Co-op Owner since 1978
Realtor since 1988
just what they need to become
naturally and optimally.
Visit us and discover how we do it.
www.corvallismontessori.org
August 2010
753.2513
The Co-op Thymes 17
August '10 HAPPENINGS
40th Anniversary
New Hours!
Our South Store location is now
open from 7am-9pm daily! We serve
tasty hot breakfast options along
with our delicious muffins and
scones from 7-11am every day. We
also offer coffee and tea all day!
Owner Appreciation Sale Day
Save 5% to 10% on your purchases!
Receive the 10% case discount in addition to
your owner discount when you special order
a product by the case in advance, then pick it
up and purchase it on Owner Sale Day. Case
discount not applicable on sale prices.
COMMUNITY
EVENTS
EVENTS THIS MONTH
VW Treffen 12 Cruise Kickoff Party
Sunday, Aug. 1st., 6 p.m. Corvallis Albany KOA
campground, 33775 Oakville Rd. South, Albany,
OR. Dozens of Vintage VW’s will be stopping for
the night so if you own one or just appreciate them
come on down and join the fun. Food and drinks
provided. FMI: 541-967-8521
Culture-Face to Face Tuesday, Aug. 3rd,
7-9 p.m. Corvallis-Benton County Public Library.
Come meet and share culture face to face with
teachers from around the world: Afghanistan,
Algeria, Kazakhstan, Indonesia,Senegal, Tajikistan,
Timore-Leste, Usbekistan, Uruguay, Kenya, Libya,
Egypt, China and Russia to name a few. FMI: 541766-6928
Free Noon Concerts Wed. Aug. 4th &
Aug. 11th at noon. Located on the Brick Mall,
outside the OSU bookstore. This summer take it
easy and enjoy the fun with free noon concerts
here on the beautiful OSU campus! FMI: Laura
Collins, 541-737-9608
First alternative 40th Anniversary
party Saturday, August 7th 4-6 p.m. Come
celebrate 40 years of cooperative community support
with games, vendors, music, prizes, and more! FMI:
Emily Stimac, 541-753-3115x321
Fun on the Family Farm at Midway
Farms Sunday, August 15th 1-4 p.m. Come
see the bouncing bunnies and darling ducklings
at Midway Farms. Say moo to Heidi and hay to
Abigail, her beautiful calf. Dutch, our Welsh pony,
will be available for the kids to ride. The family
will be sure to have a fun day on the farm! Come
out to Midway Farms! FMI: Jennifer Gillette, www.
midwayfarmsoregon.com
Guided Art Walk Thursday, Aug. 19th, 5:30
p.m. Meet at The Arts Center, 7th & Madison.
Explore downtown Corvallis’ hidden art treasures.
Arts Center curator, Hester Coucke will guide you
through the abundance of Corvallis’ public art
from the waterfront otters to the alley frogs. No
registration required. FMI: 541-766-6918
Still scoopin’ after 40 years! Let’s celebrate
40 years of cooperative community support!
We wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for such
a wonderful, sustainable community! Come
to our South Store August 7th, 4-6pm, to
celebrate with games, vendors, music, prizes,
and more!
Beer Tasting & Appetizers
South Store: Every Friday in August, 5-7pm.
North Store: 1st and 3rd Thursdays, 5-7pm
with live music.
Wine Tasting & Appetizers
North Store: 2nd & 4th
Co-op Experience Tours
Get an inside look at your store. . .
• Learn about the variety of Co-op products
• Get the scoop on bulk shopping & shopping with
an eco & social conscience
• Gain knowledge about the cooperative philosophy
South Store Tour: Sun., Aug. 8th, 7 p.m.
North Store Tour: Sun. Aug. 22nd, 7 p.m.
Reservations required. Call Customer
Service at 541-753-3115 to reserve your
place on the tour. Tours with no advance
sign ups will be cancelled.
Jenn Verdries will be your dynamic and fun tour
guide!!
Thursdays, 5-7pm, with live music.
CORvallis Farmers Market Saturday
Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., First & Jackson St. Wednesday
Market, 3-7 p.m, 2nd & B St. Our goal is to provide
highly visible, centralized locations in Corvallis for
mid-Willamette Valley and Coast Range farmers and
gardeners to market high-quality produce directly to
consumers.
Corvallis Parents & Friends A place for
parents and their kids to make new friends, and get
support for parenting and pregnancy. Happy Parents
and Happy Children! FMI: www.corvallisparentsnetwork.
ning.com.
live music @ ‘fireworks’ Fri and Sat
nights. 1115 SE 3rd St. FMI: 541-754-6958, www.
fireworksvenue.com
TAI CHI PUSH HANDS PRACTICE GROUP
Meets weekly. Some experience with a Tai Chi form
recommended. FMI: Jo 541-745-5253.
Baha’i Devotional programs The Baha’i
communities offer many devotional gatherings
throughout the county in English & Spanish.
Locations vary. FMI: 541-745-7916, www.bahaibenton.
org.
The Bike Co-op Wed. 4-8 p.m., Fri-Sun, 12-4 p.m.,
OSU Student Sustainability Center, 738 SW 15th St.
We share tools and expertise to empower everybody to
use efficient and clean human powered transportation.
All are welcome! FMI: the Sustainability Center, 541753-4072 or 541-829-9034.
vigil for peace Every day, 5-6 p.m. Alternatives
to War sponsors a vigil for peace at the Benton County
Courthouse, 120 NW 4th St. FMI: Ed, 541-752-3152.
vegan dine-outs at local restaurants. FMI:
[email protected]
Vipassana as taught by SN Goenka Group sits
weekly, Tuesdays and/or Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. FMI:
Jay 541-745-7315.
Traditional Shotokan karate Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 7-9 p.m., Fingerboard Extension 120
NW 2nd St. Learn the forms. Non-aggressive. FMI:
Reed, 541-754-3254, www.geocities.com
SUNDAY EVENTS
Mindfulness Meditation in the
tradition of Zen Buddhist Master
Thich Nhat Hanh Every Sunday, 5:30-7 p.m.
Meditation Room behind Mystic Mountain Bookstore,
435 NW 4th St. Mindfulness Meditation in the
ONGOING EVENTS AND SERIES tradition of Zen Buddhist Master Thich Nhat Hanh:
Five Stones Sangha, welcomes visitors and newcomers.
Volunteer Work Parties Every Tuesday,
FMI: Ken at 541-760-9760 or Bob at 541-738-2528.
4-7 p.m. SAGE garden (In Bruce Starker Arts
[email protected], www.fivestonessangha.org
Park), 45th Place off Country Club Drive. Come
Naturalist Adventures Tracking, wild
volunteer and help the SAGE garden grow!!
Additional volunteer opportunities available! FMI: edibles, native plants, and birding: Third Sunday
Travis Witmer, 541-753-9211, [email protected] every month, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Meet at Avery Park
mentalcenter.org or www.corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org Rose Garden, 1210 SW Avery Drive. FMI: www.
neighborhood-naturalist.com.
Annual Historic Homes Trolley Tour
Trolley tours are on select Saturdays during the Avery House Nature Center Open
months of July and August. Call for dates and House 2nd Sundays, noon-4 p.m. Avery House
reservations; seating is limited. FMI: 541-757-1544. Nature Center, 1200 Avery Park Lane. Drop by for
activities, art, and live animals. Ages 3-10
CORVALLIS FIRST FRIDAY ARTWALK Held on hands-on
Suggested donation: $5 FMI: Anne Yemaya,
the first Friday of every month, Downtown Corvallis w/parent.
.
fills with art lovers and innovators. With art studio 541-752-9311 or [email protected]
Falun
Dafa
Group
Sundays,
9-11
a.m.
A
walk-throughs, musical events, film viewings, culinary
arts and art exhibitions, this casual atmosphere meditation practice based on principles of Truthfulnessshowcases both local artists and downtown/southtown Compassion-Tolerance. FMI: Hong 541-754-9938.
Corvallis retail & restaurant scene.
Co-op Board & Committee
Meetings
OWNER RELATIONS COMMITTEE
Tuesday 3rd, 12 - 1:30pm
BOARD RECRUITMENT
AND
ELECTIONS COMMITTEE
Thursday, 5th, 6:30-8p.m.
FINANCE COMMITTEE
Wednesday 4th, 5:30 - 7:00pm
BOARD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Tuesday 10th, 5:15 - 6:30pm
BOARD
OF
DIRECTORS MEETING
Tuesday 17th, 6:30pm
Owner comments welcomed in first 10 minutes
Co-op owners are welcome to attend all meetings, held in
South Store Meeting Room, unless otherwise noted.
Corvallis Zen circle sits weekly on Sundays GLUTEN FREE SUPPORT GROUP Last
10-noon. FMI: Abby 541-754-4124.
Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Chintimini Senior
SUNDAY HIKES IN BENTON COUNTY Center, 2601 NW Tyler Ave. Learn more about gluten
OLD-GROWTH FORESTS Come and join us intolerance, share ideas and sample products. FMI:
in flagging potential new trails on our BLM Public 541-602-1065.
Land. Discover amazing groves of large trees and Heart of the Valley Birth Network
ancient forest ecosystems. FMI: Reed Wilson, 541- Every 3rd Wednesday 6-7:30 p.m., Reproductive
754-3254 or Mahogany/Sole, 541-847-5434, www. Health Lab in Waldo Hall (rm 272) at OSU. Open to
bentonforestcoalition.org.
anyone interested in mother-friendly maternity care.
Self
realization
fellowship FMI: www.valleybirthnetwork.org.
Meditation Circle 435 NW 4th St. Sundays, La Leche League Support meetings
10 a.m.-12 p.m. All Are Welcome! FMI: 541-231-5508, For women who are breastfeeding or pregnant and
www.corvallismeditation.org.
interested in breastfeeding. Call for meeting times.
First Congregational Church, 4515 West Hills, Rm 7.
FMI: 541-766-0055.
MONDAY EVENTS
Veterans For Peace Chapter Meeting
Every 4th Monday, 7-8:30 p.m. UUFC, 2945 NW
Circle Blvd. All are welcome. You need not be a
veteran to join. Come help us “Wage Peace.” FMI:
Bart Bolger, [email protected], www.vfpcorvallis.org
Science Pub Corvallis every 2nd Monday, 6-8
p.m., Old World Deli, 341 SW 2nd St. Learn about
cutting-edge topics in science and technology from
leading researchers and scientists, while enjoying food
and drinks. FMI: 503-797-4517, [email protected]
amnesty int’l writers group 2nd Monday,
7pm, First United Methodist Church, 11th & Monroe
Rm #1066. Write letters to prisoners of conscience.
FMI: 541-753-7431.
TUESDAY EVENTS
Summer concerts in the park
Concerts every Tuesday, 8 p.m., June 15 - August
24. Central Park Gazebo. The Corvallis Community
Band provides a free activity for families and a relaxed
atmosphere in which parents can introduce their
children to enjoyable music that allows them the
freedom to come and go.
MEDITATION Tuesdays 5:30 to 6:30 pm. Friends
Meeting House, 3311 NW Polk St. Learn meditation
techniques to relax and recharge body and mind.
Free. FMI: Carolyn, 541-207-3020, [email protected]
com
Mary’s River Watershed Council
Meeting Second Tuesday, 6:30-8 p.m. Philomath
City Council Chamber, 980 Applegate St., Philomath.
Monthly board meeting. All welcome! FMI: Xan
Augerot, 541-758-7597 or email: [email protected]
Free Introduction to The Sedona
Method First Tuesday, 6:15 p.m., The Home
School House, 410 NW 5th St. Learn to let go
of unwanted feelings/patterns easily, and open
up to well-being, health and success. Stay as a
guest for the monthly support group, 7-8.30 p.m.
FMI: Fiona 541-758-2033, www.fionamoore.com.
WEDNESDAY EVENTS
Wednesday Farmers Market 3-7p.m.
Second and B St. Come enjoy the mid-week market!
Pick up some local goods and enjoy the live music!
Corvallis Belly Dance Performance
Guild Performing Wednesday Nights, 8 p.m. Old
World Deli, 341 Southwest 2nd St. FMI: Lyanna,
[email protected]
Tai Chi classes Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m., Oddfellows
Hall. Ages 16 and older. Instructor: Andy Bennett, 30
years martial arts experience. Class cost: free. Class
fee: commitment to practice. FMI: 541-926-8962.
THURSDAY EVENTS
BLUSH! First ThursdayS at Magenta
RESTAURANT Every first Thursday. Come enjoy
delicious food and drink while listening to the
electronic beats of local DJ Doctor Ellis. Dine. Drink.
Dance. Enjoy. FMI: [email protected]
Self realization fellowshiP world
wide prayer circle 435 NW 4th St. Thursdays,
7-8 p.m. All Are Welcome! FMI: 541-231-5508, www.
corvallismeditation.org.
Corvallis Dharma Group Thursdays 7-8:20
p.m., Friends Meeting House, 3311 NW Polk Ave.
Readings, meditation and other practices from the
Tibetan Buddhist tradition. Everyone is welcome.
FMI:[email protected]
reiki healing circle 2nd Thurs., 7-9:30 p.m..
New day and new location. Call Margot for directions.
All initiates and interested parties welcome. Small
donation requested. FMI: Margot, 541-754-3595.
conscious exploration Thurs. evenings.
FMI: 541-757-6305.
SATURDAY EVENTS
FREE wine tasting Every Saturday, 9 a.m.- 6
p.m. Wineopolis, 151 NW Monroe, Suite 103 (in the
Water Street Market on the Riverfront) Sample two or
three wines from around the world. Try something new
that’s often hard to find elsewhere, and learn the story
behind its production! FMI: Jerry Larson, 541-7381600, [email protected]
Saturday Farmers Market Every Saturday,
9 a.m.-1 p.m., First & Jackson St. Come down to the
river front for some local goods and live music!
Audubon Field Trips 2nd Saturdays. 7:30 a.m.
The trips are great for beginner birders and birders
new to Oregon’s mid-valley area. We spend time
identifying local birds by sight and song. We visit
the valley National Wildlife Refuges as well as other
birding areas locally. FMI: www.audubon.corvallis.or.us/
field_trips.shtml.
Corvallis Secular Society 3rd Saturdays.
Meet 2-4 p.m., Corl House in Woodland Meadows
Park. FMI: 541-754-2557, CorvallisSecular.org.
All listed events are free or donation only • Submit your event information by the 15th for the next month’s issue at www.firstalt.coop/6_ThymesCalendar.html
18 The Co-op Thymes
August 2010
40 years and still scoopin ’
LOCAL 6 LUNAR LANDER
Flashback!
and
the
Hello Co-op Friends! This
is your old pal, Jenn V.
the demo diva! You probably
already know that summer
is my favorite season. All
winter long I write about
longing for summer in my
column. For the month of
August, my favorite month of
all, I am sharing some of my favorite
summer recipes from days of yore that
are perfect for you and your loved ones
sharing in the local delights of the
summer months. Peppered throughout these
recipes are memories of family, friends,
food, fun and more! In ten years of
working at the Co-op, I have developed
relationships and had experiences that
truly shape who I am today. From my deli
days to my time here in the marketing and
outreach department, I have learned so
much about the food I eat, where it comes
from and how it is made. Local, organic,
sustainable; words that at one point had
no meaning to me now define how I live
my life. Summertime not only means warmer
weather and sunshine, but good things to
eat and drink that are as close as a step
outside your back door and as fresh as a
spring rain. Dig through these flashbacks
to find the recipes that suit your garden
and local produce collection. I recommend
enjoying them in an outdoor space with
friends or family and sharing in the
bounty of summer.
Great Greek Salad
1 cup Sicilian green olives, sliced
1 block Valbresso feta cheese, crumbled
2 tomatoes, chopped
2 cucumbers, chopped
1 onion, chopped
Other local veggies you love raw,
chopped
1 bunch Moss parsley, chopped
Super Simple Dressing:
the remaining coconut milk and curry
paste together with a fork. Pour into the
other sauce mixture and stir well.
1/2 c olive oil
1/4 c lemon juice
1/4 c red wine vinegar
salt and pepper to taste
Mix all vegetables, parsley, olives and
feta together in a large bowl.
Pour dressing
lightly.
over
salad
and
toss
Serve chilled or at room temperature with
your favorite Greek foods.
Garlic Green Curry Chicken
with Basil
1 1/2 lbs. Ranger chicken thighs
1/2 onion, chopped
6 garlic cloves, diced
1 bunch fresh basil, chopped
1 piece ginger root, diced
1 bunch Italian black kale, green kale,
or chard, chopped
1/2 lb. oyster & elm mushrooms, chopped
1/4 cup tamari
1-2 Tbsp. sugar
2 cans Thai Kitchen Coconut Milk
1-2 Tbsp. Green Curry Paste
�
Wash chicken and put in a large baking
�
dish. Add the mushrooms, kale, and basil
�
and set aside.
In a pourable container, mix �
together onion, garlic, ginger, �
tamari, sugar and 1/2 of the �
coconut milk.
Pour sauce over chicken and bake covered
in a 350° oven for 1 hour or until chicken
reaches 165° and pulls apart easily.
First Alternative’s sculpture, the Local
6 Lunar Lander, raced in the Graand
Kinetic Challenge at daVinci Days 2010.
The machine did well on the road, powered
up the sand hill and moved along without
a hitch in the mud. Our generator powered
propeller failed in the water and the
sculpture had to be hand paddled down the
river, but the pilots, Erica and Marshall,
were still successful in completing that
portion of the race. We received a
coveted Leo Award for completing every
aspect of the race with the pilots doing
all of the work propelling the sculpture
forward, 2nd place for Art and a very
respectable race time of 3 hours and 53
minutes, putting us in 4th place!
Three Bean Salad
1 can each of kidney, black and pinto
beans
2 pints cherry tomatoes
Juice of 2 limes
1 bunch green onion, chopped
1/2 red onion, chopped
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
2 ears corn, cut kernels off cob
1 jalapeno, diced
1 Tbsp cumin
Salt and pepper to taste
Mix all ingredients
big bowl. Serve
with chips for a
cool, summer meal
packed
with
protein. 
together
in
Photo by Chris Johnson
Summertime,
living is easy...
Did you love the kinetic race this year?
Get involved as a volunteer in 2011!
Contact Cheryl at [email protected]
or call the daVinci Days office at 541757-6363. You won’t regret it!
a
AUGUST IN MOTION
August In Motion is a month of activities
designed to encourage citizens to get out
of their cars and onto their bikes and
feet. The goal is to entice and inspire
folks to ride and walk more during this
month as a jumpstart to a healthier,
active and more economical way of getting
around Corvallis and Benton County.
First Alternative will be offering double
punches on our Alternative Transporation
cards on Wednesdays during August.
�
In a separate container, whip
Ride on! 
One ���� Middle School.
ENROLLING NOW
�
������������
Pre-K – 8th Grade
™
�
�
�
�
�
�
����������������������������������
Corvallis Waldorf School
����������������������������������������������������������������������
��������� �������� ������� ����� ���������� ���� ��������� ��� ������ �����
����������������������������������������������������������������������
���������������������������������������
August 2010
����� ������� � ���� ����
�������������� �������� ��������
�������� ���������� �������
������������� �������� ��������
����� �� ������� � �������������
�������� ���������� ��� � �����
Inspiring a life-long love of learning.
Pre-K — 8th Grade • corvalliswaldorfschool.org • 541-758-4674
�
The Co-op Thymes 19
- Emily Stimac
From humble beginnings the Co-op kitchen, dubbed
Feast Alternative, has become one of the most
important departments at the Co-op and a very popular
destination for a tasty meal in the community.
Feast Alternative started in 2001 in a former body
shop located behind Fireworks. In those days the
offerings were much more limited and carted over the
gravel to the store in small batches throughout the
day. Now in a commercial kitchen adjacent to the South
Store, Feast is producing over $4000 worth of Fresh •
Local • Organic • Good-for-you food every day!
Today it’s hard to say what the kitchen doesn’t do.
From delicious hot breakfast every day at the South
Store to amazing Grab & Go offerings that fly off the
shelf, Feast is feeding busy people who care about
their health.
Using mostly organic produce, loads of local
ingredients, and lots of Co-op love, Feast Alternative
walks the walk and makes it taste better along the
way!
Michele Castle, Prepared Foods Manager, started at the
Co-op five years ago. After her past experiences with
clinical nutrition at nursing homes and hospitals,
she is happy to be working in a progressive kitchen
that isn’t afraid to try something new.
The staff is the best part of the job, says Michele,
“We have very talented chefs and cooks. When they
are turned loose to do their thing it turns out
delicious.”
Please enjoy these delicious recipes and stop by the
deli to sample any of our delicious offerings next
time you’re in! 
CURRY CHICKEN SALAD
TURKEY FLORENTINE
SALAD
MEATLOAF
MIX TOGETHER IN A LARGE BOWL:
2/3 cup green onion, small dice �
1/2 cup carrots, grated
1 Tbsp potato flour
1/2 cup garlic, minced
1/2 tsp sage, dried
1/2 tsp thyme, dried
1 1/2 egg whites, beaten
8 oz frozen chopped spinach, drained well
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
1 1/2 tsp Toffuti sour cream
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
ADD TO VEGETABLE MIXTURE AND MIX GENTLY:
1 lb. ground turkey
PREPARE THE PAN:
Spray a loaf pan with a nonstick pan spray, line
pan with turkey bacon with each slice of bacon
laying across the width of the pan and up the
sides. Pack the turkey mixture into the pan and
Garnish with the remaining carrots and green
onion.
6 slices turkey bacon
1/8 cup carrots, shredded
1 Tbsp green onion, thinly sliced
Baking Directions:
Cook at 350° until center reaches 165°, approximately
45 minutes to 1 hour.
20 The Co-op Thymes
BLUEBERRY CRUNCH
COFFEE CAKE
3 eggs
1/2 cup sour cream
1 1/4 cups oil
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup white sugar
1 cup brown sugar
3 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1/2 Tbsp baking soda
1/2 Tbsp cinnamon
1 1/2 cups blueberries
3/4 cups Crunch Mix
CRUNCH MIX
1/3 cup oatmeal
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 Tbsp butter
pinch of salt
Preheat oven to 325°.
Mix eggs, sour cream,
oil, and vanilla
together in using a
mixer, or whisk til
foamy.
In a large bowl mix
white sugar, brown
sugar, flour, salt,
baking soda, and
cinnamon completely.
Pour well-mixed wet
ingredients into bowl
with dry ingredients.
Stir gently until
completely mixed.
Gently stir in
blueberries.
2.25 lbs. chicken
thighs
3/4 cup diced celery
2 Granny Smith
apples, medium dice
DRESSING
1 1/2 cups canola
mayonnaise
2 Tbsp mango chutney
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp white wine
1/2 tsp curry powder
1/4 tsp cayenne
1/4 tsp black pepper
salt to taste
Bake or poach chicken
till it reaches 165°.
When done, dice thigh
meat.
Prepare dressing
by combining all
ingredients.
When chicken has
cooled, mix with
celery, apples, and
dressing.
Put mixture in a
well-greased 9 x 13
rectangle pan or two 9
inch rounds. Top with
3/4 cup Crunch Mix.
Bake 35 to 45 minutes
or until knife gently
inserted in the middle
cones out clean. Cool
and serve.
August 2010

Similar documents

March - First Alternative Co-op

March - First Alternative Co-op started, First Alternative has saved 1.5 million bags (and At our February meeting, we started initial review of the delighted lots of younger customers who love to deposit L-2 Statement on Code of...

More information

February - First Alternative Co-op

February - First Alternative Co-op • seek to honor our traditions and build upon our potential. • are committed to cultivating tolerance and diversity in our operations. • strive for excellence in our products and services, includin...

More information