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the magazine as a pdf
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our style is legendary
Edge 1/4
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
credits
LeftLion Magazine Issue 4
April-May 2005
Guest Editor
Al Needham
Editor At Large
Jared Wilson
Sub Editors
Alan Gilby
Timmy Bates
Nathan Miller
Cristina Chapman
Distribution
Breakin’ Media
Tim Evans
Design
David Blenkey
[email protected]
Photographers
Ben Dennis
David Bowen
Dom Henry
Ed Walsh
Illustrators
David Blenkey
Ricky Marr
Rob White
Contributors
Bones
Emily Hynd
Guy Gooberman
Jem Shaw
Miles Hunt
Roger Mean
Dan Gardner
Global Affairs Desk
Yemi Akinpelumi
”I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol,
violence, or insanity to anyone, but
they’ve always worked for me.”
Hunter S. Thompson
LeftLion
349a Mansfield Road
Nottingham, NG5 2DA
[email protected]
For advertising enquiries
please contact:
[email protected]
office/fax: 0115 9623676
mobile: 07866 312044
8,000 copies distributed in over 50
venues around Nottingham
contents . . .
04
05
06
07
08
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
18
19
29
30
Local News For Local People
R.I.P. H.S.T.
Nottingham Branded
Assassination City
Bent interview
Miles Hunt
Amusement Parks On Fire interview
Gotham
Notts What I Call Music
Opportunity Notts
Round Table
Nottingham Music History
New Section: Out & About
Listings
Notts Tens / Nottsword
Horrorscopes / Bones’ Fun Cave
editorial
Ayup. I’m Guest Editor of LeftLion for this issue,
and a very enjoyable experience it’s been,
working with a crew of youngbloods who have
skills for days and as much love for Hood Town as
I have. Yeah, so their office is a bit crufty, loads of
random people keep dropping in and gas on while
you’re trying to work and the nearest chippy is
rubbish, but you can’t have everything. We hope
you enjoy gnawing upon the fruits of our labour
until the juice all dribbles down your chin.
Since the last issue came out, our dear owd
taan has had a bastard of an identity crisis. One
day, we’re a city of culture about to be on a par
with Barcelona. The next, we’re all supposed to
be shooting each other in a never-ending turf
war. Unless you’re currently reading this whilst
rampaging through a tapas bar with an Uzi,
you know too well that both views are absolute
bob. You’ll find our take on the slanty ‘N’ and
‘Assassination City’ a few pages away.
Local music will always have a home in LeftLion,
but this issue the boat has been well and truly
pushed out. Not only have we had the usual
chit and chat with the local talent, we’ve also
taken a very long look at why we’ve never been
able to produce massively successful bands. As
someone old enough to remember seeing Paper
Lace waving from a limo on Midlands Today (in
1974!) It was absolutely skill to have a pint with
Phillip Wright in Brownes as part of our massive
feature on the Trent Tempo. Many thanks to him
and all the other people who chipped in.
Finally, this issue sees the debut of Out And
About, a guide to local emporiums that neatly
completes the circle and makes the newspaper
you’re holding in your hands the only local
publication that covers all bases in this batchy
town we hold so dear in our scabby little hearts.
Like the advert used to say, the ‘Lion goes from
strength to strength.
Word to your Nana,
Al Needham
[email protected]
3
4
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
local news for
local people
Nottingham
Voices
things people have said
on the leftlion forum
with Guy Gooberman our correspondent in London
2005 Election
“Labour have made huge improvements since
1997, it takes many years to undo the damage done
by poor investment in infrastructure and public
services. I disagreed with Tony on going to war, but
on the whole I feel that Labour are a good choice for
the future of this country.”
Denz
“I would consider voting Labour if two things were
true: a) it was to make sure the Conservatives didn’t
get in; b) Tony wasn’t in charge. But it doesn’t look
like “b” is going to happen now, and I don’t think
“a” is an issue.”
contractor
“I have voted Lib Dem on a regular basis at local
level and in the last election. Basically, they are the
least worst option.”
Guy Gooberman
“I just can’t trust Tony anymore, Bush has seriously
got him wrapped around his little finger. As for the
Conservatives, it might be a wee bit better if they
regained power, if it was without Howard. The Lib
Dems always give a good speech/show but can they
clean up the mess of Labour?”
Armaddeo
“People who don’t vote: Don’t moan in earshot of me,
you had a chance to make a difference, and you just
held open the doors for the inhuman power grabbers
to come in and do as they like. Only by being
actively involved can you make a difference.”
mr.reason
“All this talk about immigrants and asylum seekers
makes me sick, especially considering the fact that
they contribute so much to our national economy.
Why do the right wing press make out that they are
leeches and why are people so willing to believe it?”
Baron_of_Carlton
“What the current system needs is a complete
rehash and a movement away from adversarial
politics. It is no longer the case that there are two
strongly opposed ideologies that dominate our
political system, as there has been since beginning
of the labour movement.”
Mr Ead
Please note that Guy Gooberman is a fictional character
and therefore only as real as the news he writes
for more painful laughs visit www.lunch-break.co.uk
Dance Like Twats!
Mansfield is to be burnt down
and its occupants gassed like
badgers so it can be transformed
into one massive uber-nightclub.
The club - ‘The Palace of the
Sucking Chest Wound’ - will be
“the largest in the world and a
bit like a shopping centre but
a discothèque instead” said the
venue’s spokesman Len ‘Cheeks’
Danzig.
The mouthpiece for this
posturing bit of consumerism
added: “We’re envisaging some
people never leaving our club
and dying from a heady cocktail
of booze, pills and semen.
But that’s OK, we’ll just use
their bodies as fuel for the air
conditioning.”
Mansfield residents Kelly Grimes and Joanna Floibert saying they’re staying
loyal to their beloved Mansfield and are going to defy the killer gas.
KWS To Reform
The Mayor of Bestwood has
arranged for KWS to reunite for
the opening of his own private
harem, somewhere in Bulwell.
A bearded troupe of Morris
dancers are also being flown
in from Lincolnshire and are
set to team up with our local
favourites, promising all the
allure of a modern-day Pan’s
People but without the women
or the dancing. The Mayor said
to me via a plastic beaker on
a string; “Hurrah! I get to wear
a short skirt, pointy-toed shoes
and hit another man with my
stick.”
Students used
A confidential report from
Government Office East Midlands
fell into the hands of Guy
Gooberman and the shocking
findings will shock you. For
the past five years, students
in Nottingham have been used
as a fleshy buffer between the
rich and the poor - a bit like a
human shield that can be robbed
and attacked instead of those
who live in the posh areas.
Matthew Holler explained:
“Students are perfect fodder
for the poor people to steal
from and distract the plebs from
stealing off the really rich, and
therefore unbalancing the status
quo. That’s why all student
housing is in rough-arse areas.”
Well done that man!
Forest go
voodoo
In a dramatic attempt to ward
off relegation, a team that
once won the greatest trophy
in European soccer (the County
Cup) has turned to the ancient
art of Voodoo, getting leading
exponent Swagga Tik-Tac to put
a great big bloody hex on all
of their up coming opponents.
The Haitian Lord of Voodoo has
targeted Gillingham at home on
the 8th May as a key fixture,
and players have already
reported that their genitals are
shrinking to the size of a child’s
eye and their left feet are
becoming yeasty.
LeftLion “Exclusive”
This month Guy Gooberman
received a confidential document
from a hairy tailed mole in the
Council; the original designs for
the infamous slanty N campaign...
2.
“I think I’ll vote Labour this time, all the other
times I just voted for whoever’s name was the most
comical. Now I am older perhaps I should take this
more seriously.”
Kelly
1.
4.
make your voice heard
www.leftlion.co.uk/forum
3.
5.
1. ‘Rustic Local Delicacy’; 2. ‘Sophistication
Personified’; 3. ‘Friendly Welcome’; 4. ‘Scenic
Landmarks’; 5. ‘This’ll do for Derby’.
R.I.P.
H.S.T.
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
5
He was there during some of the most turbulent and
historic moments of the 60s and 70s. Sometimes,
when he wasn’t scoffing a veritable Pick ‘n’ Mix of
drugs or shooting at things, he actually wrote about
it. Ladies and Gentlemen, the one and only Doctor
of Journalism, Hunter S. Thompson...
words: Jared Wilson drawing: David Blenkey
Hunter S. Thompson, author
of Fear and Loathing in Las
Vegas and the founder of gonzo
journalism, died on 20th February
2005 in his Colorado home from a
self-inflicted gunshot wound.
Hunter, aged sixty-seven, was a
bizarre journalist who led a bizarre
life. His wild writing style lost him
numerous jobs and assignments, but
gained him admirers the world over,
not least here at LeftLion.
His first published book, Hell’s
Angels (1966), was an inside look at
the notorious biker community. In the
interests of journalism, he rode across
America alongside the gang, drinking,
racing and generally living the life of
an outlaw. He took to it fairly well, but
the inevitable fall-out came eventually
and he was literally ‘kicked’ out by
the Angels and into mainstream
journalism. His next two books were
serialized by Rolling Stone magazine.
The first, Fear and Loathing in
Las Vegas, is a first-person account
by Thompson himself (under the
pseudonym Raoul Duke) of a trip to
Vegas with a Dr Gonzo (a 300-pound
Samoan attorney) to cover a narcotics
officers’ convention and the Fabulous
Mint 400 motorbike race.
During the trip, they become
sidetracked by the search for the
American dream, particularly after
trashing their hotel room and taking
copious amounts of LSD, ether,
cocaine, adrenochrome, marijuana and
anything else they can get their hands
on. British artist Ralph Steadman,
who would go on to collaborate with
Thompson on many projects, offered
surreal illustrations to a mix that would
become an iconic work and ultimately
a call to arms for casual drug users
worldwide.
Fear and Loathing on the Campaign
Trail was a detailed look at the 1972
US election campaign pitching George
McGovern against Richard Nixon.
As a combination of Thompson’s eagleeyed reporting and his Burroughs-like
ramblings, it carries a lot more political
weight than Las Vegas, but is equally
amusing and insulting. Thompson’s
best and most infamous attacks were
reserved for the ‘Grendal-like beast’
that was Nixon. Upon his death in
1994, Hunter offered his nemesis a
final indignity, saying “He was queer
in the deepest way. His body should
have been burned in a trash bin,” in an
obituary titled He Was A Crook.
Even as an older man, Hunter’s
political coverage was aggressive.
In a piece on the 2004 presidential
campaign, he referred to George W
Bush as a “treacherous little freak,”
saying “I almost felt sorry for him,
until I heard someone call him Mister
President. Then I felt ashamed.”
Thompson once threatened to run
for the US presidency himself and
narrowly lost an election in 1970
for Sheriff of the Aspen area on
the Freak Power party ticket. He
set up on a platform promoting the
decriminalisation and sale of drugs,
of tearing up the streets and turning
them into bike paths and renaming
Aspen, Colorado ‘Fat City’. To him
politics was a blood sport and all US
politicians were fair game.
He was reclusive and often
unintelligible in conversation, a
persona ready-made for caricature.
His mumbling incoherence, big yellow
sunglasses, fishing hats and cigarette
holders all made for a larger-than-life
presence. Both Bill Murray and Johnny
Depp portrayed him in Hollywood
(Murray in 1980’s Where the Buffalo
Roam, Depp in Terry Gilliam’s 1998
adaptation of Fear and Loathing in
Las Vegas).
The last piece that he wrote before
his death was about Shotgun Golf, a
new sport that he had invented whilst
on the telephone to Bill Murray (who
by then had become his friend).
As the title suggests, it involved
livening up the sport by bringing live
weapons into play, firing at the ball
shortly after tee-off.
Hunter was always very fond of
his weapons. It was one of many
characteristics that were at odds with
his success in documenting the era
of hippies and free love. The iconic
cover to Songs of the Doomed: More
Notes on the Death of the American
Dream (1990) portrayed him shooting
his typewriter in frustration and there
were many other photos taken of him
in his life with weapons. It was clear
that the Doctor, a proud member of
the National Rifle Association, always
did like the feel of a gun…
He once said to Ralph Steadman; “I
would feel real trapped in this life if I
didn’t know I could commit suicide at
any time.” Though these words may
seem morbid after his suicide, nothing
should really surprise us about the
Doctor’s proactive stance on his own
life. Steadman said after hearing the
news “I have always known that one
day I would know this journey, but
yesterday I did not know that it would
be today.”
Hunter’s death remains as fascinating
as his life and will ensure that the
legend of Dr Gonzo lives on into new
centuries. An act of insurance against
growing older and less relevant? In his
early career Hunter had chastised the
writing establishment, but by the time
of his death he may have felt that he
was becoming part of it…
What we do know is that one of the
great writers of the twentieth century
killed himself and left no suicide note.
Maybe he felt his work would already
outlive him and that there was little
left to say. Actions speak louder than
words and, if nothing else, it was
definitely the way he would have
wanted it…
HST on the Fear & Lothing trail in Las Vegas
and on the bear hunt trail in Colorado.
(pics: HST archives)
6
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
Nottingham Branded
words: Nathan Miller
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Nottingham Voices: Things People Have Said On The LeftLion Forum
“A nice generic ‘N’ should really
help the city to stand out and be
instantly recognisable from say
Newcastle, Norwich or Northampton. Giving the city a modern feel in
its branding just makes me think of
Milton Keynes. Nice and bland.”
Stavros
“I have no problem with the idea
that we should be promoting the
good things about Nottingham to
increase tourism and get money
coming in, but I haven’t encountered many attractions. There are
other good things about Nottingham (the music scene, the people),
but not much tourist stuff.”
Hipster K
“The big bold slanty letter N is
unfortunate because it’s so easy
to mock it/tear it down/be unimpressed by it. The photographic
Ns look quite good though, and I
can’t fault the reasoning behind the
whole thing. Also, the amount of
national coverage that was generated was impressive.”
Nottingham Florist
“Personally I fail to see the need
for the logo except as a gesture of
bowing to market forces in the hope
of attracting investment. I don’t
understand why a town and district
needs a logo. Industry is logo crazy
but most of the time you don’t need
one. It seems to be a bit of a cop
out.”
mr.reason
“Frankly, I’m glad we’ve not got
Robin Hood in our logo. Isn’t it
time we were recognised for other
things? Is that really all we have to
offer? Now all we need to do is back
up the logo with some substance.
Show people what we really have
to offer.”
Joe
“The campaign is really aimed at
people outside of Notts: I don’t see
that it makes any difference to our
lives. I get the impression we are
being used very politically at the
moment and it doesn’t surprise
me that the Post are involved in
that.”
Alan
“A city is a city, nothing more
nothing less. If you don’t like the
branding, it wouldn’t be the first
time a council has spent money on
shit people don’t need. If you’ve
been involved in the process, good
luck for trying something, but it
wouldn’t be the first time people
have dismissed creative branding. I
can’t understand all this. But then,
I’m from Ipswich, a town so crap
that no amount of fancy symbols
can rescue it.”
pandapad
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
7
Assasination City
words: Al Needham
I’m not an aggressive person, but
the next time I see Steve Green
on the telly coating our town off, I
swear I shall murder something.
You all know Steve. Whenever the
terrorist threat is low and the media
are looking for something else to
scare people with, he’s the go-to
guy for the BBC, ITN and Sky News.
Want to terrify people while they’re
having their tea with tales of bingedrinkers on the rampage? Steve will
take your camera crew round town on
a Saturday night and point out where
this fight happened or that girl passed
out in her own vomit.
Haven’t done a story on gun crime
this week? Up pops Steve, only too
happy to tell the world we’re all
wetting each other and he can’t do
much about it. Want to do a piece
about the possibility of zombies
ripping themselves from the grave and
chewing on people’s heads? Hell, give
Steve a call, he’d only be too happy to
stand in Viccy Centre and say “Well,
if zombies ever invaded this shopping
centre, with their arms in front of
themselves and their skin all green
and dropping off, I’d have to say that
Nottingham Constabulary would find it
hard to cope”.
Gun crime, well, that’s another matter,
and one incident a year is too much.
But consider this;
in 2001, the
average
number
of fatal
shootings
in Notts
was two a
year. Then
someone
decided that
Notts didn’t
really need a
drug squad, and
also cut back the
major crimes unit. By
2003, there were over
400 gun-related incidents.
OK, so the local coppers are
having success with Operation
Stealth, but during the period
between the formation of
that and the disbanding
of the drugs squad
(because there’s no
link at all between
drugs and crime,
right?) our friendly
neighbourhood
crackslingers
were
It’s bad enough having to read the
ludicrous bollocks in the paper
about Nottingham being a
lawless violence-hole, but when
the head of the police force
is instigating it - well, that
takes the biscuit, if not
the whole packet. Yes,
every Saturday night
Nottingham turns
into Mad Max 1
and 2 (but not
3, that was
shit).
But you
could say the
same for Cardiff,
Doncaster, Basildon and
every other city in the country.
It’s always been like that, and it
always will be. Rest assured that in the
year 3067, after we’re long dead and
gone, people will be putting in the hoverboots after too many pills of Stella.
because they
go there to work
and visit. However, they
don’t want to miss out on
reading about councilly rat-boys
shooting each other, because it’s
entertaining. A place like Nottingham
fills the bill perfectly for their vicarious
kicks, because it’s not somewhere they
ever intend to visit.
inadvertently given the message that
they could police themselves. Three
guesses whose idea that was.
As for the media? The newspapers who
have gone big on the ‘Assassination
City’ story (The Times, Telegraph, Mail,
and Express) are all right-wing rags
whose readership mainly resides in the
Home Counties. The last thing they
want to read about is the eminently
worse gun crime situation in London,
You have to laugh at the reportage
the journos have come out with. For
example, according to the Times,
Bestwood has changed its name to
‘Notorious No-Go Area Bestwood’, an
NWA video come to life. Hmm, seeing
as I go into or through Bestwood every
day, that must make me a G-down,
loc’ed-out Ghetto chieftain who has
much juice in the Barrio. Or the papers
are talking out their arses.
with an image that’s
hard to shake off, and
Steve Green is not helping
at all. How many potential new
jobs go for a toss every time he
appears on telly? How many tourists
and students have changed their
mind about coming here this summer
because he hasn’t been in the papers
for a month or so? How much money
has been lost to the city because
Steve Green is intent on slagging off
Nottingham to cover his own arse?
More importantly, how many kids
growing up on estates in Notts are
going to be encouraged to take up
crime because, according to our own
Chief Constable, you’re more likely to
get away with it here than anywhere
else?
Yes, the Notts Constabulary are
under-funded. So is the LAPD, the
Met, and every other police force in
the democratic world. But what their
leaders do is knuckle down and get
on with the job to the best of their
abilities, highlighting the progress
they’ve made and attempting to make
the people under their jurisdiction feel
as safe as possible. If Steve Green
can’t do that, he ought to step down.
Quietly.
But when the media find something
new and more interesting to scare
people with, Nottingham will be left
Nottingham Voices: Things People Have Said On The LeftLion Forum
“This makes me so angry with
Notts police. This should not have
come into the public domain at this
time, it is a private and governmental matter and admitting this
publicly has done more harm than
good.”
Fossy
“Nottinghamshire Constabulary
tries to be too media-friendly. If
we really are living in a lawless
no-go area, perhaps at some point
the Chief Constable might like to
take some responsibility for that,
instead of continually demanding
more cash whilst the problems get
worse?”
NJM
“The point about Notts police being
underfunded is valid. Although
the counter argument that Steve
Green’s had hundreds of extra officers and not managed to make a
dent in crime with them is pretty
convincing too.”
Adrian
“People are being a bit harsh.If
the force is being under funded he
has a right to demand more. Notts
police have a tough job to do, if
people supported them instead of
blaming them, we might start to
get somewhere.”
Pisces J
“Many of the police forces throughout this (apparently) once great
nation are also under-funded to the
same degree as Nottingham, but
are not suffering the same ill conse-
quences. Nor are they made to look
like fools on national news by their
top man.”
Cash Mark
“In 2001 Green disbanded the
drugs squad, ignoring the link between drugs and crime. Before this
monumental cock-up, fatal shootings averaged around a maximum
of 2 a year, by 2002 they were up
tenfold. Could the timings of these
be linked in any way?”
mr.reason
“You can see from the crime figures
Nottingham gets unfairly treated in
many areas. We are genuinely better than some places and certainly
not as bad as many make out. The
problem is that we seem to be on
the wrong side of the press.”
John Lyle
www.leftlion.co.uk/forum
8
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
A Day In
The Country
I write this on St. Patrick’s
Day. Most of my friends are
out in Dublin, witnessing
a two night stand by the
mighty Damien Dempsey.
I had a plane ticket and
a hotel booked to go myself, but after getting off
the road from a Wonder
Stuff tour, my constitution
isn’t what it needs to be to
handle that wonderful city.
Call me lightweight…
Instead I celebrate with
a week in the country,
Shropshire to be precise.
I’ve owned a little house here
for ten years now, it’s my bolthole, particularly for times of
recuperation.
The idea was to come here
to cool my boots before The
Wonder Stuff take to the road
again, later this month, all
over North America for five
weeks.
On arriving back at the house
I discovered that my boiler
was on the blink and my fridge
had also died. A steady stream
of engineering type folk have
been in and out since, when
all I desired was solitude. I
wouldn’t describe myself as a
misanthrope, but as I get older
I find that if I spend a week
in company then I require the
same amount of time of pure
isolation to readdress the balance. Thankfully with the lifestyle I’ve been blessed with,
I get to do just that. Failing
household appliances aside…
Today was the first day that I
ventured away from my doorstep. A trip to the dry cleaners
in a local town and to pick up
some more supplies. A newspaper (I live without television
in the country, I tend to shout
at it too much), wine, fags
and a bed tray (the kind of
thing you have in hospital to
eat your food off). I’ve written before about my inherent
idleness, the more that can
be achieved from my mattress, the happier I am. But
the hardware store was out of
stock. Knickers....
As I was making the ten or
fifteen mile trip over the hill I
got stuck behind an old couple
in a small red car. They were
averaging twenty-five miles
an hour and I was fighting irritation. At the bottom of the
hill is a level crossing, right
before you pull onto the A49.
As I approached, still stuck
behind Ma and Pa, I heard the
alarm sound that the barriers
were lowering as a train approached. There are two level
crossings I regularly deal with
around here, this particular
one is my least favourite.
The operator always waits
two or three minutes after the
train has passed before raising
the barrier. This is not so with
the crossing further down the
A49, where the guy appreciates we’ve all got things to
do and has the things up as
soon as the train has passed.
So I sat there cursing the old
couple in front of me for being
so slow up the hill. Had the
old bugger put his pedal to
the metal and achieved say,
thirty mile a feckin’ hour, I’d
be on my way. I reminded
myself to be calm (for that is
why I come to the country)
and turned off the engine. As
it was, sitting there, I received
a text message from Damien
Dempsey himself, wishing
me a happy St. Paddies Day!
I eased back and found my
smile.
The barrier finally lifted and
the old boy pulled away.
Twenty yards after the rail
tracks is the junction onto the
A49. There was nothing coming, but Pops played his waiting game. Finally a shiny new
Volvo came around the corner
and just as it was passing Ma
and Pa, their little red vehicle pulled out and belted it in
the passenger side, careering
it across the road. Holy shit
methinks....
The Volvo righted itself and
carried on another fifty yards
before eventually pulling to
the side of the A49. The little
red vehicle pulled up behind
it, with me behind them both.
I was the first out of the cars.
I ran up to the Volvo and saw
a fella in his late fifties struggling to get out. He was struggling because he was disabled,
his right hand was almost
turned completely back on itself and his body shape was all
off to the left. He didn’t look
particularly distressed, in fact
he looked incredibly serene.
I liked him. I threw a glance
back to the Old Boy who was
now exiting his idiot little car.
“Sir, you need to stop driving
and consider some other form
of transport, you coulda killed
this gentleman.” I amazed
myself at my composure,
I hated the silly old
fucker. He’d delayed me on the
hill, sent my blood pressure
up another few notches at the
barrier and now was intent on
a one-man killing spree!
“What happened? My wife said
it was clear....” he pleaded.
His wife... good grief... It
turned out the disabled guy
in the Volvo was on his way
to hospital. His mother was in
the passenger seat and suffered with Alzheimer’s. The
front of his car was trashed
and he was upset. If it had to
go away for repairs, he’d have
no form of transport to ferry
his ageing mother around,
because the Volvo had been
modified for his disabilities. I
woulda handed him the keys
to the old boy’s little red thing
had this not been the case.
The old boy muttered and
reprimanded his wife, Joan, for
walking too close to the road.
He began asking me if the
police needed to be involved,
to which I responded in a much
less benevolent manner. They
swapped insurance details, I
called the hospital to let them
know the Volvo’s passenger
would be late for her appointment, gave them my details in
case they needed a witness and
went on about my business.
What was my business....?
Oh yeah, a quiet day in the
countryside.
I strolled around the little
supermarket in town, noticing that Twix now do a bite
size, not as good as the KitKat
bites, but no great disappointment all the same. As
I queued with my basket I
encountered another elder
couple, faffing about at something that could’ve waited until
I was safely home. The Mrs.
headed toward the magazine
rack, looking uncannily like
Molly Sugden and as soon as
she was out of earshot her
husband asked the kid on the
till for some cashback.
Apparently the card that he’d
offered up didn’t ‘do’ cashback
and the cashier said it so loud
that Molly heard,
“You don’t need cash back,
why do you want cash? You’ve
got enough!” she howled at
him from the magazine rack.
Poor fucker.... humiliated in
the local shop, for all to see.
I imagined him making secret
trips to the bookies or the
pub. Not today, my friend.
Not today.
As they departed, the cashier and I rolled our eyes and
laughed. A lady behind me
said,
“You’ll be that old one day!”
she reprimanded.
“I certainly hope not,” I
responded “Gimme a diet
of wine, fags, chocolate and
cheese and may The Gods
take me early!”
On arriving home my neighbour was in our yard with a
huge fishing net, attempting
to catch an injured bird. It
looked like a hell of a job, too
much energy required.
I’m seriously thinking of
heading back to the city for
a nice rest…
Read more from Miles at www.leftlion.co.uk/miles
R
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
9
They’re arguably the hottest local band we’ve seen in recent times and in Mike Feerick,
Amusement Parks On Fire have their own in-house genius (according to the music press,
who raved about their self-titled debut LP). As a result, Mike, a wee sprog of just nineteen, has assembled a quality quintet which is set to take it to the next level..
words: Jem Shaw
In spite of his incredibly full calendar,
tendency to inflict serious punkflavoured noise on unsuspecting
crowds, and aforementioned
genius, Mike is an exceptionally
mild mannered, unpretentious and
extremely likeable lad, who found
the time to tell us what the band and
their belief-beggaringly loud show
have been up to, and where they’re
heading next…
What’s the biggest venue you’ve
played to date and who have you
enjoyed supporting the most?
The best venues are probably the ICA
in London and Rock City for A Drop
In The Ocean. Not sure which one’s
bigger! We’ve been lucky to play with
some great bands; The Research
from Wakefield, they’re brilliant and
really nice guys, but we’re big Six By
Seven fans and had a wicked time
touring with them.
We’ve also played with people like
Secret Machines and The Others
who are so arrogant, it’s about as
much fun as reading the NME.
You’re striking out across Europe,
and America soon. Are you excited,
apprehensive, or both?
We’re all really excited, we honestly
never believed we’d ever get to
play out of the country. I’m looking
forward to Europe especially
because, from what I can tell,
audiences aren’t as concerned with
what they should be liking or what’s
‘cool’. They’re more open-minded
and are just into the music itself. As
for America, I guess I’m a little more
apprehensive. Just the sheer size of
the place is intimidating. Hopefully
our British charm and punctuality will
see us through. If that fails, (and
it probably will) at least we’ll be
fucking loud!
Your live show seems a bit cleaner
than before. Subtle evolution,
improvement or a conscious
decision to inflict less of an aural
assault on your audience?
I suppose it’s a bit of all three. I
think... I hope we’ve improved over
time. We’ve only been playing since
last January, and I think during that
time we’ve become a bit more, I hate
to say it, professional, and together
as a band. As a consequence, the
want and need for sonic assault has
decreased. Slightly.
Any new material on the way?
We’re planning to release an EP in
the coming months. It’s definitely a
healthy progression. The addition
of John (Sampson) and his infinite
sonic coolness has added a whole
new dimension to what we’re
doing. I think the most striking
difference with the new stuff is that
it’s blatantly a live band and it’s
certainly more exciting, bigger and
better in general, because of that.
Is your new writing more
collaborative, or are you still
writing alone?
Well, both really. I write the core of
the song on my own, and everyone
writes their own parts and chips
in with arrangement ideas and
production. Dan (Knowles) and John
are both really good engineers,
which is great because you have
this feeling of being completely
self-contained, no mardy producers
trying to turn you into the Libertines.
It’s hard work, that is: “Can we do
that take again? It was in time! You
don’t sound like you’re fucked! uncoooool!” Then they demand £1000
a second for their genius. Dan’s
genius, on the other hand, is easier
to work with, pretty bottom of the
range, ha ha!
We got to hear a selection of
your own record collection when
you DJ’d at LeftLion presents
last month. But are you really a
Phil Collins fan, or was that tune
towards the end of the night a
joke?
How could you ask me that?! Phil
is a huge part of my life! I grew up
jivin’ to Phil, especially early Genesis.
I should have flexed some of that
shit on the night actually, the whole
4 sides of The Lamb Lies Down on
Broadway! Definitely next time!
Amusement Parks On Fire play at
The Social on April 30th.
www.amusementparksonfire.com
10
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
Words: Emily Hynd Photos: David Bowen
I was first graced by the brilliance of Bent in 2000 and have been in love
ever since. Like all young, heady relationships, we’ve had our ups and
downs but their quality (and my loyalty) has never faltered. The sampleheavy debut ‘Programmed To Love’ that first caught my eye was fun while
it lasted but as the Bent boys grew, so too did their sound and by Album
Three we were looking at a far more sophisticated, mature piece of work.
With a strong focus on song-based material, Ariels proved Nail Tolliday and Simon Mills’
true talent for all things musical and saw them sit comfortably alongside fellow downtempo
gurus Zero 7 and Lemon Jelly. And yes, you’ve heard of them (even if you don’t know it)
from the many adverts they’ve featured on, from Carlsberg to the Inland Revenue.
As Nottingham lads Bent have done us proud, they’ve been here through thick and thin,
have nursed many a thumping hang-over and have given us the soundtrack to countless
summers. I caught up with Simon to find out more…
Tell us where it all started for Bent…
We both made music before we started working together in 1998, since we were
teenagers really! We met because I used to live above Nail, and eventually we moved
in. I had a small studio set up, and a box of shitty records from charity shops, and we
both went from there. We realised very quickly that we worked very
well together. Lots of messing around but then realising that
we really liked what we were making. Shortly we had a
manager, and it all went from there. But it wasn’t until
late ‘99 that we had deals forming and music released.
There was a shift in your last album Ariels from
sampling vinyl to musicians and instruments.
Was this a natural progression?
There’s a few reasons for that. Firstly, we wanted to
make an album with a melancholic emotional feel
and have a flow to it, not take you all over the place.
An album that you could put on and listen to as one
piece in a way. We were sampling ourselves and
although we made nearly 40 tracks for the album,
many of them were electronic and sampled, but
the ones we chose had that organic quality. Also,
samples are expensive and sometimes take
months to clear! We wanted to have an album we
could take to the stage and have electronic sounds
and musical performance.
So you’ve traded in your old vinyl for a
set of drums?
Nope. Still used the vinyl, but in more subtle
ways than before. People think we’ve turned
our back on electronic music. Not at all.
The next album may be more electronic
than the first two! It’s very nice to get a
real harpist involved and string quartets.
The style of the music tends to come out
a bit more “traditional” sounding, but
there’s some beautiful musicianship there
that you can’t achieve with a sampler.
Your website is one of the most
unique we’ve seen in ages. Is the
Bent image quite important to you
or do you just enjoy doing cool stuff
on the side?
I come from an art background, and
so images, attitudes and all the rest of
it are very important to us; it reveals
a bit more about us. People do read a
book by its cover. We thought it would
be nice to have a Ceefax website,
seeing as everyone else does slick
web pages.
“We’ll meet up,
juvenile, wind
up and all the
In between
somehow make
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
11
The artwork for your latest EP Flavour Country featured 500 photographs taken by yourselves…
act very
each other
rest of it.
that we
music.”
To have a sleeve containing pictures of your toilet, keyboards, wife and mum is quite nice, because bands rarely
reveal to their audience what they see day-to-day and hide behind a certain image. 500 limited versions of those
records actually contained a single unique print. People were emailing us saying “what’s this?” We’d be saying, “That’s
my daughter”, “That’s a picture of the Robin Hood statue”. I was wondering out of all the pictures who on earth was
going to get the record that contained the limited picture of me and my Mum. I couldn’t believe it when Nail got it!
I keep reading about Nail’s life-changing experiences last year...
Well, Nail’s now happily married with a beautiful daughter, and he wasn’t well a couple of years
back. It puts your life in perspective. Over the years we’ve almost become married. Hahah! But
when you work together you get to know each other very well, and we both made a definite
decision to make an album that was more ‘emotional’. The next might end up being whatever more banging, more strange and abstract, etc. We just go off on how we’re feeling at the time.
What’s a typical day in the studio with you both like?
We’ll meet up, act very juvenile, wind each other up, and all
the rest of it. In between that we somehow make music.
Two typical blokes, really. Lots of people say hanging
out with us makes them uncomfortable, because
we almost speak in code nowadays. This is what
happens when you spend all day in a room full
of machines with another person. Heheh!
You seem to be quite proud of your Nottingham
roots. Are you ever tempted by the bright
lights of London like so many other artists?
London is a big expensive place with great
places to go and all the rest of it. Lots of bands
stay here. There’s a great musical community in
Nottingham. Why go somewhere expensive where
your friends and family aren’t? If that was the
case, I’m sure we’d be in Barcelona or something!
What’s your favourite place in Nottingham?
The Victoria Centre, Wilkos on Parliament Street,
Yates, TGI Fridays, Dunkirk flyover…I can’t choose.
Kidding! There’s a lot of places I like in Nottingham,
but most of them that are springing to mind are bars.
And that’s probably because we have more bars and
pubs per square mile than any other city, don’t we?
Where would we be most likely to find you on
a Friday night out?
Not in the town centre. It’s a bit nightmarish in
certain places nowadays. I’d go into town on a
night out on a more relaxed evening. If I had to go
out on that night though, it would either be around
the Castle area since I live near there or in Hockley.
What festivals can we catch Bent at this
summer?
We’re probably going to be at The Big Chill
again - we’ve been for the last few years, and
I love it. It’s perfect. I’m sure we’ll be doing
another tour soon, but right now we’ve just
come back from touring with The Scissor Sisters,
Mylo and loads of others in the Good Vibrations
festivals all over Australia.
What’s the future for Bent?
Look for album four, more gigs, more remixing, lots
of DJing. Check our website as the year goes on for
updates. There you go. A bit of blatant advertising.
We’re working with other acts like Weekend Players
and other singers on their projects. All good fun!
www.bent-world.com
12
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
“More fools pass
through Gotham
than remain in
it…” (Medieval Proverb)
words: Jared Wilson
Gotham (pronounced
Goat-ham) is a small
village in South
Nottinghamshire. It
contains five pubs, a
butchers, a newsagent,
a fish and chip shop, a
church (St Lawrence’s),
a public library and a
handful of houses. All the
ingredients for a simple
life out in the sticks…
These basic amenities,
however, offer little sign
of the rich legacy of a tiny
geographical area which
has left a sizeable footprint
in transatlantic culture.
The village of Gotham in
Nottinghamshire is the root
of an international myth, the
inspiration for the name of a
dark underworld, adopted by
the New Yorkers and ultimately
the reason that legendary DC
Comic character Batman hails
from Gotham City.
It all began just under a
thousand years ago. Stories
and jokes that had circulated
in England orally since
the twelfth century were
eventually printed up in
books, the earliest of which
recorded is The Merie Tales of
the mad men of Gotam from
1565 (the year after William
Shakesperare was born).
The text included tales of
idiocy such as the one about
a man who rode to market
on horseback, carrying two
heavy bushels of wheat on his
own shoulders, in order not to
burden his horse.
Another told of a tenant
who was late with his rent
payment and so tied his purse
to a quick-footed hare, which
promptly ran away.
The books soon became
popular and the place became
fabled as a place of madness,
it’s inhabitants proverbial for
their folly. Every era singles
out some geographical
location as a spawning ground
for the less intelligent (in the
modern day it has evolved into
jokes about the Irish or Essex
girls). Five hundred years
ago, Gotham was the butt of
jokes about its simpleminded
citizens, not least because the
goat was considered to be a
foolish animal.
The most famous of all the
Gotham stories is set in the
early 1200’s, when King John
traveled throughout England
with a crew of knights and
ladies. The monarch was
heading to Nottingham
Castle by way of Gotham
and dispatched a herald to
announce his arrival. Laws at
the time stated that wherever
the royal carriage rode would
become the King’s land and
therefore a public highway.
This thought obviously did not
please landowners in the area.
Upon entering Gotham the
herald was given an angry
reception and returned to
the King reporting that the
townspeople had refused
him entry. The monarch was
livid, outraged at this lack of
respect, so he sent an armed
party of knights to wreak
vengeance.
The townsfolk, however,
had a cunning plan. In the
twelfth century, medicine was
still relatively basic and the
greatest doctors of the time
believed that insanity was a
contagious disease, which
could be passed between
people like the common cold.
The knights arrived in Gotham
to find the inhabitants engaged
in various forms of insane
behaviour such as pouring
water into a bottomless tub,
painting green apples red and
trying to drown an eel. They
soon decided to make haste
and leave for fear of catching
the madness and upon their
return reported back news
of their encounter. The King
subsequently instructed his
horsemen to make a route
around the village.
The name of Gotham originally
transferred to the US with
American historian Irving
Washington. Washington
was keenly aware of British
literature and first affixed
it as a nickname for his
home city of New York in the
Salmangundi papers (1807),
a set of sardonic essays he
penned with two colleagues.
Repeatedly in these texts
Manhattan was referred to as
“the antient city of Gotham”
or “the wonder loving city of
Gotham’.
After this literary success, the
name of Gotham continued to
have implications throughout
American literature as a dark
underworld, an alter ego to
the many metropolises that
were springing up.
Batman’s realm is a dark
looming underworld
reminiscent of New York. His
city is overrun by madmen
such as the Penguin, The
Riddler and The Joker,
all dangerous eccentric
characters, attempting to
get one up on each other.
When New Yorkers Bob Kane
and Bill Finger first created
the Caped Crusader in the
late 1930’s they considered
naming his hometown ‘Civic
City’, ‘Capital City’ or ‘Coast
City’. After flicking through
the phonebook, however
they came across a Gotham
Jewelers and found inspiration.
A later Batman comic editor
would refer to Superman’s
Metropolis as “Manhattan on
the brightest sunniest July day.”
By contrast he felt Gotham was
“Manhattan at 3am, November
28 in a cold year.”
The references to Gotham
in modern day New York
are found in a variety of
wide reaching places. The
Gotham Gazette is a daily
NYC newspaper and website,
covering news, politics,
entertainment, housing,
transportation, and arts.
The Gotham Comedy Club is a
NYC nightspot that has been
described as “The Toast of the
New York Comedy Scene” by
Vanity Fair.
Most impressively, the Gotham
Centre is home to the history
of New York City. It was set up
by historians Mike Wallace and
Edwin G Burrows after they
collaborated on the Pullitzerprize winning book Gotham:
A History of New York City
to 1898. It is this text which
much of the information in this
article was sourced from.
The links between Gotham in
Nottingham and the spiritual
home of modern New York are
a little tenuous these days but
ultimately they are the roots.
Perhaps part of the beauty
of being British is being
surrounded by a rich and
delicate historical tapestry that
we constantly interact with,
yet only occasionally become
aware of.
Next time you see the signs
on the motorway, you might
want to consider visiting one
of the five public houses in
Gotham, Nottinghamshire
and raising a glass to Michael
Jordan, Tom Cruise, Mayor
Ralph Giuliani or any of the
other 19 million residents of
the modern day Gotham. I bet
not even Bruce Wayne knows
how close he came to fighting
crime in Bestwood…
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
13
“Rock ‘n Roll…Whoo! What a long, strange trip it’s been”
Jann Wenner, founder of Rolling Stone, describing the history of Rock
“Bleddy hell…Worra batchy ode storeh, me duck”
LeftLion, describing the history of the Nottingham music scene
Nottingham. It’s full of fun. Oh, Nottingham is full of fun. It’s full of... well, you know what it’s
full of. Writers. Artists. Designers. Actors. Producers. A few bands as well – a shitload, actually.
Problem is, all those bands are battling against history, whether they know it or not…
It pains LeftLion to say
this, but say it we must;
Nottingham is the most
underperforming music city
in the United Kingdom. Think
about it; Sheffield (a town of
comparable size) has punted
out an incredible range of acts;
Joe Cocker, ABC, the Human
League, Pulp and Def Leppard,
to name but a few. Birmingham
(our nearest rival) has done
even better; UB40, Duran
Duran, Black Sabbath, The
Streets etc etc. Nottingham? Er,
KWS and Paper Lace, both of
which had a Number One with
someone else’s record, had a
few more minor hits, then sank
without trace. That’s pretty
much it. There are entire streets
in Manchester and Liverpool
that have contributed more to
the history of popular music
than Notts.
So, what is it about Nottingham
and its inability to produce
chart-ravishing bands and
singers? Is Rock City built over
an ancient Romany burial site?
Are we more interested in
listening to a DJ play a record
than check out a live band? Are
record labels too scared to come
to Nottingham, or is our music
scene, well, just a bit rubbish?
Of course not. If you’re a
regular reader of LeftLion,
you’ll know only too well
that Nottingham has a killer
selection of bands who play a
staggering range of musical
styles and, to be perfectly
honest, the local scene has
never looked healthier. As
pop music celebrates its 50th
anniversary, the time has never
been better to cast an eye over
the full, horrific story of the
Trent Tempo; not to chastise or
take the piss, you understand,
but to attempt to work out
why our forebears never made
it big. We talk with someone
who actually made it, ask some
of the players on the current
scene about the pros and cons
of trying to make it in Notts,
and, yeah, take the piss a bit.
In any case, futility is far more
interesting than success, and
who wants to hear any more
about the bleddy Beatles,
anyway? In what is believed to
be a first, we’ve compiled the
definitive history of the Trent
Tempo and a very interesting
read it is too…
The cheesy gameshow host
who scored a gig with the
mighty Small Faces. The record
shop in town that caused the
biggest obscenity trial since
Lady Chatterley’s Lover. The
beardy Nottingham scholar that
inspired a generation of bands.
The West Bridgford lads who
made it to Woodstock.
Oh, and there’s also the local
girl who made it big, only to be
knocked unconscious at Rock
City by her Mam. The No.1
record about London that was
written in a Nottingham flat,
and the seminal funk band that
were formed in a hotel near the
station. All this, and the full
and enriching contribution to
Pop history made by Mother
Nottingham herself, Su Pollard.
14
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
Opportunity Notts
Whether you know them or not, Paper Lace were probably
the most successful band Nottingham has ever produced.
Philip Wright tells us of life with the lace, from talent show
triumph to flexing it with Forest.
words: Al Needham photos: Dom Henry
What was the music scene
in Nottingham like when
Paper Lace started up?
“Pretty good. The music
licence situation was a lot
more flexible then than it is
today. Most pubs in those
days had a piano in the corner
and were happy to let you
perform, and we were working
every night we could. You
could actually make a living
as a professional musician in
Nottingham without a record
deal, and there were plenty
of gigs out of town too. I was
working for 5 years before the
fame bit happened.”
Tell our younger readers
about Opportunity
Knocks…
“It was the 70s version of The
X-Factor. There was a huge
audition week in 1970 at the
Bridgford Hotel, which is now
the Rushcliffe Council building.
There were thousands of
people queuing up. We turned
up in our best suits, did a few
numbers, and were told that
they liked us but not to expect
to go on straight away. When
they finally got back to us
in 1973, we thought; do we
really need this now? But they
were getting viewing figures
of 7 million, so we went for it
and we won five weeks on the
trot!”
Then came the record
deal…
“Two songwriters got in touch
with our management and
offered us Billy Don’t Be A
Hero. We went down, recorded
it, and they said ‘Hey, this is a
great song, it’s gonna be a hit’.
The song proved to be stronger
than the band. Everyone knows
it, they just can’t remember
who recorded it. Except in
Nottingham, of course…”
You were unknown in
January and No.1 in May.
How did you deal with so
much success so quickly?
“It was a bit difficult. Nobody
was in the band to make it, it
was just one of those things
that happened. You don’t think
about the ramifications of
having a hit until you get one.”
How were you treated in
Notts?
“When we came back
we practically got a civic
reception. All the local media
were at the station, and before
we knew it we were put into
an open-top limo and driven
round the city. It was like
Forest winning the Cup! People
were out on the streets! In the
end, we presented our silver
disc to the city of Nottingham.
I don’t know where it is now…
“Having said that, when
we actually played gigs in
town, we didn’t get much
of a reception. It’s a bit of
an East Midlands thing. It
was like when Forest were
winning everything in sight
and some of the gates were
poor. I remember Cloughie
saying there was apathy in
town when local people were
successful and he had a point.”
After the fame cooled
off, you hooked up with
Forest…
“It was put to us by our
management that if we could
come up with a good song
idea, we could do something
with Forest. In 1978, we went
up on a coach to Birmingham
with the Forest team and what
a team it was, all done up in
their blazers. We had a few
beers and did the song. Not
many of them could sing, but
we found four decent ones and
triple-tracked ‘em. Cloughie
bought us fish and chips on
the way back, bless him. We
did TOTP, Jim’ll Fix It… it was
great promotion for the city.”
What happened to Paper
Lace in the end?
“By the latter half of the 70s,
I’d just had enough. I always
wanted to quit at the top, and
I didn’t want to do the full
Phil (left) and the Lace hitch a ride on the Wagon of Success
all the way to the Toppermost of the Poppermost, 1979
circle. I became a builder. Then
eight years ago, I joined the
reformed Sons and Lovers.”
So why is Nottingham the
most underproductive
music city in the country?
“Well, it’s not through want of
trying! I’ve heard that there’s
some hellish talent round
here, so I don’t really know.
When we were starting up,
there were almost as many
entrepreneurs (managers,
promoters etc) as there were
bands. Too many, in fact,
and a lot of them were rip-off
merchants. Nowadays, it’s the
other way round. The band
can’t do it all and they’ve got
to concentrate on what they
do best. It’s not enough these
days to say that the music’s
great.
You need exposure and
someone to get it for you.”
Is there anything you’d
like to say to the new
generation of Nottingham
musos?
“I don’t envy them at all. I’m
glad I was a working musician
then and not now. There
are only so many chords out
there! I know that sounds
cheesy coming from me,
because at the end of the day,
who the bloody hell am I? But
we worked in the same era
with some of the people who
made music what it is today.
Trying to make songs that the
public liked and sometimes
pulling it off.”
Extended interview at
www.leftlion.co.uk
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
So, what is it about Nottingham that’s stopping us from
making more of a musical mark? We asked some of the
prime movers in the city to explain…
15
TEN NOTTS TRIBUTE
ACTS YOU MUST SEE...
1. MARILYN MANSFIELD
The Band
The Magic Heroes
The Promoter
Anton Lockwood
The Insider
Guy Elderfield
The finest exponents of what The Kids
are calling ‘Notts Rock’, the Heroes –
Stav, Ian and The Bass Rooster – are
one of the best new bands in town.
Discover more at
www.themagicheroes.co.uk...
Anton plays a very major part at what
goes on at Rock City, The Rescue
Rooms, Stealth, and The Social.
Consequently, if he can’t tell us what’s
what in Notts, no-one can.
www.rescuerooms.com
If you don’t know Guy, you don’t know
the local music scene. An engineer,
producer and studio owner, Guy has
worked with many Notts bands, been
involved with the Libertines (in a musical
sense, we hasten to add) and has just
come back from a six-month tour with
The Donnas.
Musicwise, what have other
cities got that we haven’t?
Guy: There are some very
talented people here, but I feel
other cities have a more united
approach. Things have improved,
but Nottingham still seems
quite fractional, maybe because
Nottingham is a small city, which
results in people being more
guarded with their knowledge.
Heroes: Until recently, other
cities have had more of a passion
for live music. It used to be really
hard to convince people to give
you a chance. No-one wanted live
bands. It wasn’t ’cool’ for some
reason.
Guy: There are very few people
here with direct links to the
industry. Nottingham will always
suffer from “big fish in a small
pond” syndrome. It’s a nice
comfortable city where ten years
can pass in the blink of an eye!
Anton: I’m not sure that they’ve
got anything different nowadays.
You just need one band to put the
town on the map, and the media
and A&Rs become interested in
what else is about. Nottingham
isn’t that different from Bristol,
Leeds or Sheffield these days, it
just hasn’t been as lucky.
Guy: I’ve have always thought
that there is a link between how
hard a city is and their musical
output. Sheffield and Birmingham
are prime examples of that. It’s
easy for people in Nottingham to
meander through life expecting
everything to come to them. It
very rarely does!
Heroes: Maybe because these
other cities are known for
producing successful bands, locals
will go and see new bands to try
and catch the Next Big Thing and
brag that they were there. Noone in Notts believes that it could
happen here because it hasn’t for
years.
Do people in Notts prefer to
dance to a record than check
out a band?
Anton: I disagree with that.
When you put on a band that
people want to see, the locals will
turn out.
Heroes: It seemed most people
just wanted to go out to get
pissed, dance to shit music, try
and pull and then get into a fight.
Guy: Let’s not forget that
Nottingham is a tiny city, with a
lot of other distractions. Having
said that, nights like Liars Club (at
the Social) have tried to address
that and marry the club/band
issue.
3. CHERWOOD
“Reprising the greatest hits of one of popular music’s
greatest divas is one thing, but it’s the attention to stylistic
detail that really impresses the audience. When this
incredible woman comes out on stage straddling a twentyfoot Pork Farms sausage and sings If I Could Turn Back
Time in a tiny body-corset made out of Wilko bags, you will
applaud as loudly as I did”
Heroes: A lot of students are
into bands right now, hence the
success of Club NME at Stealth
and The Rescue Rooms. It’s
deemed cool right now to listen to
Indie bands and copy their style.
What advantages are there
being based in Notts?
Heroes: We’re reasonably close
to London. We’re starting to gain
a following there...
Anton: We’re also well placed
for other major cities, and there
are advantages to not being in
a place where you’re constantly
scrutinised by A&Rs and the press.
So we can operate comfortably
in Nottingham without being
isolated, but the bands also get a
chance to develop.
Heroes: Notts is a blank canvas;
there are many venues, all the
recording studios and rehearsal
rooms you need and a large
student population
Guy: It shouldn’t matter where
you are based really, as long as
you make things happen. If you
really want it you can achieve it
wherever you live, but you have
to put the work in!
The disadvantages?
Guy: The Nottingham comfort
zone.
Heroes: Not enough decent
management companies or record
companies with cash. Inter-band
slagging is a problem as well. It
happens everywhere, but it makes
the creation of a unified scene
difficult. It makes things difficult
when you’re starting up – less so
when you’re more established.
2. CLIFTON RICHARD
Local pub singer who has devoted his life to imitating his
hero in every way (apart from the virginity bit, obviously,
because he lives in Clifton). Currently planning to film a
remake of Summer Holiday, where he steals a No.17 bus
and drives it to Skegness with Su Pollard and Dale Winton.
That’s slowly changing. People
have realised that bands are cool
again.
Guy: We need more people like
Ricky Haley (Liar’s Club) and
Anton, who take the responsibility
and put on nights/bands that they
themselves would love to see.
Dressed in black fishnets, SS cap, and an NCB donkey
jacket, Marilyn Mansfield seeks to blur sexual boundaries
and challenge his audiences’ perceptions on what is really
taboo in an increasingly amoral world. He does this by
getting off his tits on Kimberley Ale, shouting “Ah’m the
fookin’ God Of Fook, youth! Yer wanna MEK summat on
it?” and then having a fight with himself in the car park. A
must-see.
4. LENTON KWESI JOHNSON
Anton: None really, but I do
rather envy Brighton. They have
half a dozen bands who are either
established or about to be, loads
of venues, and plenty of media
interest. It’s not surprising, seeing
as most of the music press live
there, and some of the journos
are sharing flats with band
members…
What advice would you give to
the next generation of Notts
bands?
Anton: I must have been
e-mailed and called by every
local band that have ever existed,
and the moment they say “We’ll
support anyone”, I immediately
switch off. Trying to sound like
this band or that band is fine at
first, but you’ve got to be original
and exciting.
Guy: Practice hard. Learn the
art of stagecraft. People want to
be entertained and not just sit
through another hour of bland
Indie tunes. You have to leave
an impression on them. If you do
that, more people will come and
see you next time. Oh, and be
nice to engineers!
Heroes: Be unique, and polite
and courteous to everyone you
meet, because they’ll be more
willing to help you out in the
future. Try and promote yourself
without claiming that you’re
the best band in Notts ever. Be
persistent with venues, but not
pushy.
Anton: Develop your own
style, play to your mates in a
pub, encourage a following at
Junktion 7 and the Old Angel,
and approach us whenever you’re
good enough. If you’re not, keep
playing to your mates and don’t
bother us!
Firebrand Rasta poet whose verses of dignity and
righteous anger rail against injustice, poverty, racism, and
the fact that he lost his very agreeable sales job at Central
when they moved back to Birmingham.
5. TERENCE HATES DERBY
Combining the smooth, proto-Nu Soul sounds of one of
the 80’s most talented singers with a vicious loathing
for the arsehole of the Midlands, THD held an audience
absolutely spellbound as he sang “Sign your name across
my heart…we hate Derby and we hate Derby” and “If
you let me stayyyy-hey-hey! sheep-sheep-sheepshaggers!
bahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!
6. RUN-QMC
Formed by three medical students in order to entertain
Saturday-night pissheads who have had a fight with their
reflection in a bus shelter window, Run-QMC’s repertoire
includes You Be Illin’, Walk This Way (To Casualty), and
It’s Tricky To Do A Stitch When Dealing With A Pissed-Up
Bitch, It’s Tricky.
7. SIOUXIE SIOUX POLLARD
A fearsome juxtaposition of two of the 1980’s most striking
female icons, Siouxie Sioux Pollard combines the stark
brutality of Neo-Gothic Sturm und Drang with the inner
turmoil of a Nottingham girl who wants to be a Yellowcoat.
I have seen the future of Rock ‘n Roll - and it is a woman
in white make-up and massive glasses stomping across
the stage howling ‘This is! The Happy House! We’re Happy
Here! Ooh, Miss Cathcart!’ forever.
8. HOCKLEY REBEL
They do a cracking version of 70’s No1 Come Up And See
Me (In My New Crappy Jacket And Twatty Mullet).
9. THE WOLLATON CLAN
Representing Shaolincoln and featuring Ol’ Dirty Basford,
Mansfield Man and The Dazza, The Wo are currently
recording their debut single, The Art Of Dobby Scarecrow.
Oh, and yes, they definitely ain’t nowt to fuck wi’.
10. ZZ TOP VALLEY
Three men in long beards and chatty tracksuits recreate
on-stage the videos that made the original band famous.
But in a neat twist, they break into the Eliminator, drive it
around Bulwell for a bit like mad bastards, and then leave
it in a hedge after shitting on the passenger seat.
16
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
17
words: Al Needham
Local minstrel Alan A’Dale brings the noise in a lute-and-flute style,
but falls in with the local criminal underworld and loses his record
deal. Seeing as there were no such thing as records then, that wasn’t
such a bad thing.
Elvis releases Heartbreak Hotel and Bill Haley’s Rock Around The
Clock ushers in mass outbreak of quiff-sporting and seat-slashing,
but where is Nottingham’s contribution to Rock n’ Roll? The
nearest thing we can claim is a Grantham lad called Roy Taylor,
whose skiffle band makes it onto Come Dancing before going solo,
renaming himself Vince Eager and having a decent amount of
hits.
George Martin and Dick James (The Beatles’ producer and publisher
respectively) release the Robin Hood song (yes, that one). This
is the only Nottingham – Beatles link we can find, and yes, we do
know its rubbish.
Pop music still struggles on somehow without help from
Nottingham, although local scholar Paul Oliver writes Blues Fell
This Morning, a massively influential book that (quite possibly) Eric
Clapton and Mick Jagger looked at, giving them the inspiration to
form bands. So you could claim that Nottingham is the home of
the Blues. If you’re a bit mad.
Rock n’ Roll is on its last legs, possibly because no-one from
Nottingham was involved. However, local cinemas are playing
host to loads of gigs, the most vital of which is Little Richard’s
historic comeback performance when he stops messing about
with gospel and returns to his outrageous best in, er, Mansfield.
However, loads of British bands are grafting in the clubs of
Hamburg, including West Bridgford’s The Jaybirds, more of
whom later…
Some bands form in Liverpool, and make a bit of a scene. But
stuff that, because (finally!) Nottingham makes its first stitch in
the tapestry of Rock. Not only did The Honeycombs have a female
drummer, they had something even rarer, someone from Notts.
Yes indeed, ‘tis Alan Ward who twangs that gee-tar on No.1 top
fave rave Have I The Right, before resurfacing ten years later in less
family-friendly rock group, erm, Bastard.
The good news is that a Nottingham singer appears on telly every
week banging out hit tunes. The not-so-good news is that it’s
Leslie Crowther, murdering cover versions of Beatles songs on
Crackerjack with Peter Glaze. However, give the man his props,
when ace Face Mod raves The Small Faces go a pianist short when
they appear to sing All Or Nothing, Leslie fills in.
The Beatles and Stones make regular appearances at the ABC and
Odeon in town. Your Auntie or Nana probably went – and still
moan about how they couldn’t hear anything or see owt. More
importantly, Nottingham lad Dave Rowberry replaces Alan Price
in the Animals. That organ bit in We’ve Gotta Get Out Of This Place?
Pure Notts, youth. Sadly, the Animals split up a year later and Dave
is written out of the band history, not even being mentioned in the
Rock N’ Roll Hall Of Fame.
At long last, something vaguely resembling a Nottingham music
scene starts to grow. By this time, town is rammed with pubs that
put on gigs by local bands, and top dogs in Notts at the time are
Sons and Lovers and Whichwhat. Both of them eventually sign
record deals, both of them have big hits in Germany, Japan and
places like that, and neither of them make so much as a dent in the
UK charts. Sigh. On the upside, Selectadisc opens in town.
The Jaybirds realise their name is a bit pants, seeing as it’s now
the psychedelic era, and change it to Ten Years After, who are
arguably the most successful band to ever come from Hood Town
with four Top Ten UK LPs, in a mere 18 months, all in a bluesy
Hendrixy style with guitar solos that went on for ages.
By now, the concept of playing gigs at cinemas is old hat (not to
mention chatty as fuck, after the Beatles and Stones played the
local Odeon, the place would reek of adolescent piss), leaving
Nottingham with no major music venue. However, the Boat
Club establishes itself as the place to be, with appearances by
Jimi Hendrix, Curtis Mayfield and a seminal gig by the newlyformed Led Zeppelin (even though legend has it that Jimmy Page
got stabbed there). Meanwhile, Elton Dean, longtime associate
of Elton John and Long John Baldry (and a Nottingham lad),
joins Soft Machine, a highly influential band who ushered in the
monolith that was Prog Rock. Nottingham’s sole contribution to
Woodstock is Ten Years After.
The Age of Rock is finally upon us, and who’s this catapulting into
the charts at No.2, long of hair, wide of flare and devil-may-care?
Why, ‘tis Deep Purple with Black Night, of course. But who’s that on
drums? None other than Ian Paice, formerly of this parish, who
played with local bands such as Georgie and the Rave Ons. He also
plays with the Velvet Underground and Whitesnake.
Possibly the most barren period in Nottingham music lore,
only punctuated by the debut gig of Paul McCartney’s Wings at
Nottingham University, which was a really big deal at the time
(c’mon, how were we to know they were gonna end up shite?).
Apparently, Macca just rang them up the day before and asked
if the venue was spare.
As Glam holds the nation in its thrall, the Nottingham music scene
plumbs new depths, with nothing on the horizon. Having said that,
if you lived in Notts at the time, would you go out looking like Ziggy
Stardust on a Saturday night? The final kick in the teeth comes
when Alvin Stardust (from Mansfield, for Christ’s sake) rockets
to No.2 with My Coo-Ca- Choo and No.1 with My Jealous Mind. In
proper Mansfield fashion, he was a right moody-looking bleeder, so
much so that children’s TV thought about banning him in case he
frightened the kiddies. Men in Mansfield pay tribute to Alvin to this
very day by sporting massive sideburns and not talking much.
Yessssss! Nottingham arises from its torpor when the mighty
Paper Lace destroy the competition on Opportunity Knocks
(imagine The X-Factor with more moustaches, bigger hair and
less twats in it). From there, a record deal and, before you
could say “Nottingham gets its first No.1”, Nottingham gets
its first No.1, with Billy Don’t Be A Hero, the official National
Anthem of Nottingham (even though it’s about the American
Civil War). They would have got an No.1 in America as well,
but some Yankee teef’ bwoy called Bo Donaldson beat them
to it. Never mind; the next release, The Night Chicago Died
made it all the way to No.1 in America and No.3 here. The
follow-up single The Black-Eyes Boys only dented the chart,
but they would return…
Perhaps the most seismic moment in Nottingham music
history; a couple of American session musicians who’ve
known each other for years finish a gig at local chicken-in-abasket venue The Heart Of The Midlands after backing up an
unknown soul singer, and wind up chatting in the Bentinck
Hotel, after one of them’s had his wallet nicked. On the spot,
they decide to form their own band. Their names? Nile Rodgers
and Bernard Edwards. The band? Chic. True story.
‘Tis the era of Punk and the daddies of them all, The Sex
Pistols, play the Boat Club. It’s been said that when they
played Manchester in the same year, everyone in the audience
went out and formed bands. When they play Nottingham,
alas, everybody goes out to the chip shop and gets the last
bus home. The Nottingham Punk scene consists of youths
in bin liners hanging about Slab Square in bondage trousers
bought from Viccy Market. No bands from the city ever do
anything. Which, when you think about it, is a very Punk
thing to do.
Nottingham becomes the
centre of the music world (sort
of) when the manager of the
Virgin Records shop in Clumber
Street (it’s now a Superdrug) is
arrested for covering his shop window
in Never Mind The Bollocks posters
and charged under the Indecent
Advertising Act (passed in 1898!).
Weeks later, Nottingham Crown
Court is besieged by the media,
as the word ‘Bollocks’ is fought
over. John Mortimer, for the
defence (the bloke who wrote
Rumpole Of The Bailey), calls
upon an English professor
from Nottingham Uni to
explain the origins of the
word. Before too long, the Judge
decides the charge is, well, bollocks
and acquits the manager. Next day,
the shop is absolutely plastered in posters
and record covers with ‘Bollocks’ on them…
Records by football teams on their way to Wembley are tena-penny, but who would have the cheek to release a record
when they haven’t even won anything yet? Nottingham
Forest, Paper Lace, and 20,000-odd Forest fans,
of course, who release We’ve Got The Whole World In Our
Hands for no real reason at all, apart from to show off a bit
and get Robbo on Top Of The Pops where he belonged. It
goes to No.28 here and (amazingly) No.1 in Sweden. On
a similar Forest tip, punk band The Lurkers release their
debut LP Fulham Fallout. If you look at the audience photo
on the inner sleeve, you can clearly see future honorary
Nottinghamian Stuart Pearce pogoing…
Air Supply, a rather cheesy Australian band of the type you
usually hear on Neighbours when someone gets married or
on Simon Bates’ Our Tune, have their only UK hit with I’m
All Out Of Love which gets to No.11 (No.2 US). So why are
we mentioning them here? Because lead singer Graham
Russell is a Notts lad.
The bowling alley in town is named in a shock expose in
The News Of The World. People having sex in the alleys?
No. Bowling balls full of heroin? No. According to the
article, local ‘Pop-crazed Kids’ who are into the Jam are
going in, handing over their tatty Golas, putting on bowling
shoes beloved of their hero Paul Weller, and legging it out,
costing the alley thousands of pounds.
For years and years and years and years, we didn’t even
have a proper music venue, never mind any bands to fill it
with. If you want to see The Jam, The Specials, Dexy’s or
anyone else, you have to go to Way Ahead and get
on a coach to Birmingham or Leicester. Sigh.
But all of a sudden, two new venues spring
up. The Royal Concert Hall opens, and,
just up the road, The Heart Of The
Midlands transforms into Rock
City. Goodbye scampi and the
Brotherhood of Man, hello
sticky carpeting and Alien Sex
Fiend. On the record front,
Justin Fashanu releases Do It Cos
You Like It. The sentiments pre-date Relax
by Frankie Goes To Hollywood by a full
year, yet fails to do owt.
Mash down Babylon! (and Bulwell,
and Bestwood) The Naturalites
have a massive UK reggae No.1
with Picture On The Wall, and
get on The Tube and all sorts.
Sadly, they didn’t convert that
into any proper chart success,
even though UB40 had loads
of hits at the same time with
rubbish cover versions. Cha.
Another Nottingham youth who has to emigrate in order to get
a hit; John Parr, who scores big with the theme tune to crappy
Brat-Pack film St Elmo’s Fire, which goes all the way to No.6.
Meanwhile, a fey young muso called Neil Tennant crashes round
his cousins flat in Notts, and while he’s about to nod off on the
settee, writes the first line of West End Girls, a massive No.1 hit.
Nottingham’s only participant at Live Aid is a drunk and excitable
Su Pollard being interviewed at a club (“So what did you think of
Elvis (Costello)?” “Ooh, has he been resurrected, then?”)
A massive year for Nottingham music. Corinne Drewery and
Swing Out Sister reach No.4 with Breakout and more importantly,
encourage girls to wear black bobbed haircuts and hoopy stockings.
Sadly, her triumphant homecoming at Rock City is ruined
somewhat when her Mam throws a bunch of flowers onstage,
hitting her squarely in the face and knocking her unconscious. But
even better than that, the mighty Su Pollard sings the theme tune
to Starting Together, a docu-soap about a newlywed couple and it
goes all the way to No.2, only being held off the top spot by the
frankly inferior When The Going Gets Tough by Billy Ocean. Is there
nothing this woman can’t do?
Another near miss for the Trent Tempo. Krush, a couple of nice
young lads in bicycle shorts and gold chains, create the first UK
House record to hit the charts – House Arrest, No.3.
The Public Enemy gig at Rock City is named as the 40th most
important event in the history of popular music by Mojo mainly
because they decide to perform Bring The Noise for the first
time ever and are worried about performing an unknown tune.
Unbeknownst to them, everyone in the audience had spent
twelve quid (a lot of money in them days, kids) on the imported
soundtrack of Less Than Zero, and proceeded to go mental. The
gig is also immortalised by Chuck D walking about the audience
signing people’s trainers, and Flavor Flav shouting “Public Enemy
No.1 in Nahdinham! Public Enemy No.1 in Derby! Public Enemy No.1 in
Mansfield” at the end.
The hottest Reggae sensation in New York is Trevor Sparks,
who releases massive-selling cover versions of Bye Bye Love, On
The Wings Of Love and Under The Boardwalk. This comes as a great
surprise to residents of Hyson Green, who used to know him when
he was called Trevor Chambers and went to Scotholme Junior
School. Sadly he is no longer with us, as he died in 2004.
Katie Garside joins Daisy Chainsaw, rips up a few dresses, gets
them all dirty, and scores a one-hit wonder with Love Your Money.
Alas, The stresses of being an Indieboy wank-fantasy force her to
pack it in.
Wicked bad fresh! KWS go to No.1 with Please Don’t Go, a cover of
the KC and the Sunshine Band record that was supposedly recorded
as a plea to Des Walker not to leave Forest. They appear on Top Of
The Pops looking like a bunch of nightclub bouncers and cabbies.
Sadly, they don’t follow up with tunes called What The Fucking
Hell Is Going On With Forest, Oh My God We’ve Been Relegated,
and Why Is Platty Buying All These Crap Italians? Meanwhile, local
Thrashmongers Lawnmower Deth play the Marquee. More
importantly, they give Loughborough band Manslaughter, the
group featured in the BBC Teenage Diaries documentary In Bed With
Chris Needham (which is the best documentary about pop music
ever and pisses all over Spinal Tap) the support slot. Whycliffe
releases his debut LP, and the Stereo MCs, with Notts-born
frontman Rob B, have loads of hits.
Finally, some credible Notts bands spring up. Tindersticks release
their debut LP, which is named Album Of The Year by Melody
Maker. They gain all manner of critical acclaim throughout the 90s,
yet can’t manage to convert it into chart success. Bah.
Reef go to No.6 with Raise Your Hands, assisted by Carltonian
Kenwin House on drums. Meanwhile, Pantera lead singer Phil
Anselmo overdoses on scag while listening to a demo of Notts
Sludge Metal band Iron Monkey. Despite promising much with
debut release Our Problem, lead singer Johnny Morrow passes away
and the band fall apart.
After years of getting pissed about by record companies, Six By
Seven release European Me off their own backs, which the NME
calls one of the great all-time debut singles. Again, despite the
music press loving them to bits, they remain one of the great alltime underground bands. Grr. Over in St.Anns, Big Trev forms
Outdaville, the UK’s premier hip-hop collective. Featuring Lee
Ramsay, Scorzayzee and C-Mone (to name but a few), they were
rumoured to be talking to Sony but it fell through. Rat’s cocks.
Pitchshifter establish themselves as one of the premier DnB/
Industrial auteurs with their third release, www.pitchshifter.com,
which is full of punky chelp and tunes the milkman would find very
hard to whistle.
Brian Harvey gets twatted outside The Works.
Xylophone Man dies.
Cappo releases his debut album Spaz The World, produced by
Nottingham’s Heavy Bronx, The P Brothers.
A Drop In The Ocean demonstrates beyond doubt that
Nottingham is rammed with bands and artists across the musical
spectrum, and the future has never looked brighter. We think.
18
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
Out&About
BARS/GYMS/RESTAURANTS/SHOPS
In a new regular feature, LeftLion whips out the credit card and wallows in
the retail wonderland that is Nottingham. Our correspondent, looking nervously
at the unopened Barclaycard bill on the mantlepiece is Christina Chapman.
Raspberry Village
Reminiscent of a Moroccan bazaar, except for the
wily old men haggling over a set of salad servers,
this place is a cornucopia of furniture, gifts, rugs
and world beats. Set on three floors, it is rampacked with diverse room sets. It’s a little like a
Mr Benn shopping experience. One minute you are
in colonial Africa leaning on the mantel sipping
Bourbon on the rocks, fighting off the sweltering
heat. The next you are in Nigella Lawson’s country
kitchen using your pastel-coloured accessories
to bake rye bread. You could easily while away an
hour or so trying out the red leather sofas, cubist
tables or browsing for that perfect birthday gift
for your best mate. Then suddenly the shopkeeper
appears, and you feel that you really should buy
something.
Atomic
Raspberry Village World Interiors, 311-313, Mansfield Rd, NG5 2EA.
0115 962 3337 www.raspberryvillage.co.uk
Virgin Active
Bar De Nada
If you know a Barcelona chair from a Joker and
you’ve come into some money, or just want to
be flash, get down to Atomic. For a city drowning in furniture pastiche, Atomic is the antidote
for design enthusiasts. There is not a single
colonial-style bedroom set, piece of pine, or
medieval-effect dining set in sight.
Atomic sells the best of the best, stocking pieces
from Europe’s most exclusive interior design
houses – B&B Italia, Vitra, Porro and Flos, to name
a few. The store offers a fabulous selection of
tables, sofas, chairs, lighting, and accessories. If
you don’t see what you’re looking for, managers
Rob and Lee have a library of catalogues and brochures and can generally lay their hands on what
you’re after.
Conveniently located in the Cornerhouse basement
and decorated in that slightly tired breeze block
and air vent style, Virgin would probably like you
to think that this is the most urban gym in the city.
Its range of fashionably named classes back that up.
From Box Fit to Sexercise, and Ballet Fit to Kung
Bo, Virgin has all the latest fitness classes on the
list. Not that it ignores the staple gym diet though.
They also supply a regular dose of yoga, step, circuits and legs, tums and bums (although they call it
Fab Abs and Killer Butt, which we think is much more
catchy). Probably the most interesting and comprehensive list of classes we’ve seen out of the city’s
gyms.
Virgin also provides well for those who prefer
weights, treadmills and cross trainers. Most of the
gym is packed tight with machines and has a good
space for warm-ups and stretches. The changing
rooms are a decent size and provide the standard
gym package. There’s not much more to it than that.
No racket sports, no pool, no sofa area. This is a
strictly “work your body and go” kind of place. And
the prices reflect that. Starting from £25 a month
with a £50 joining fee, or £37 a month without, Virgin
is a good value solution for those who are serious
about toning up and getting fit. They also do a package for 16 and 17-year-olds, at £19 per month.
Virgin Active Pure Fitness, Corner House, Burton St, NG1 4DB
0115 934 2200 www.virginactive.co.uk
They really know their stuff and are probably the
most laid-back salespeople you’ll come across.
They won’t force their taste down your throats
and will give you time to come to a decision about
what you want. After all, the product will sell
itself to people who are willing to invest in
design. But you may need a house the size of
Rock City to fit the furniture in.
Atomic Interiors, Plumptre Square, NG1 1JF, 0115 9415577
Anybody who loves tapas knows where to head.
La Tasca in the Lace Market, right? Nope. For
anyone who’s tried the real thing Bar De Nada, on
Broad Street, Hockley, is a more authentic and
original choice. From any chain, you are likely to
get the same patatas bravas in Liverpool as you
will in Nottingham, which makes you think they
have come out of a plastic box delivered from a
food factory in Corby.
In Bar De Nada it tastes like they peeled, boiled,
spiced and fried the food on the premises. The
same goes for their delicately fried haddock,
their grilled vegetables and their prawns. Each
dish is combined with staple spices, like garlic
and ginger, or simple seasoning, which allow the
flavours to come into their own. The menu offers a
clever mix of recognisable favourites and original tapas ideas to tempt your taste buds. This is
a totally relaxed place to while away an evening
with mums, friends or lovers. The prices are like
the atmosphere comfortable.
And they even do a Monday to Friday Happy Hour.
From 5pm to 7pm, whatever time the last person
in your party arrives is the price you pay for the
meal. So if you arrive at 5.15pm, you pay £5.15p.
Clever innit!
Bar De Nada, 43 Broad St, NG1 3AP, 0115 9881199
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
19
Notts New
COMING TO A CITY CENTRE NEAR YOU...
LET THEM EAT CAKE
Nottingham’s treasure, The Cheesecake Shop, has teamed up with the
Broadway cinema and café. You can
now sample some of the Cheesecake
Shop’s finest concoctions at any
time of the day. For a smart £2 they
have seven flavours to choose from,
including caramel mudcake, passion cake, carrot cake, orange deluxe mudcake and continental apple
cake. Perfect with a mug of tea, as
long as you don’t mind Broadway’s
chaotic service and occasionally
mucky tables…
Broadway, 14-18 Broad Street, NG1 3AL,
0115 9526611, www.broadway.org.uk
HAPPY KIMONO GIRLS
Among the knik-knaks of Branches,
one of Nottingham’s more eclectic furniture shops (we don’t get
the connection between Betty Boop
statues and pine) comes a touch of
the Orient. From a princely £15 you
could
get
your
hands on a Kosode
figure blessed with
a sunny name
like Happy Kimono Girl. This
is not an episode of Buffy,
but a traditional
Japanese token of
friendship.
Apparently
peasant farmers
fashioned them
out of bits of old
wood they found
lying about. They
were then painted
up in a convincing womanly form and
handed out to mates. So if you’ve
been looking for a replacement for
those friendship bracelets you used
to make at school, you know where
to go. Don’t say we never do anything for you.
tre. Not any more. This Spar does
it all, milk, papers, stamps, bread,
spaghetti hoops and a coffee bar!
Spar, Upper Parliament Street, NG1 5QN
expensive loaf of bread you’ve ever
bought, there has been a drought of
convenience shops in the city cen-
Old School Bookshop
Geoff Blore’s bookshop is a rare
treat! As you walk in a little bell
sounds your arrival. The member
of staff on duty will look up, invariably sitting at the end of the
room, head tucked into a novel. At
first you’re not sure where to look.
There are shelves full of books
all around you and staircases and
doorways, suggesting other rooms
of a similar nature nearby. This is
not a place that you stop in for
five minutes. The longer you stay,
the more treasure you find.
Branches of Nottingham, 28-30, Carrington St,
NG1 7FG, 0115 948 0233 www.durham-pine.com
MID TOWN CRISIS
Next time you’re in town and need
something essential (we’re thinking
more pint of milk than a new pair of
jeans or round-the-world ticket)
head for the new Spar shop on Parliament Street. The mini supermarket (does that make it a market?) is
what the city centre has been crying
out for. Save for hiking to the far
end of the Victoria Centre to queue
for twenty minutes in Tesco, or down
to Marks and Spencer for the most
Notts Landing #1:
In total there are three rooms stacked full of literary bullion. If you’re
looking for something in particular (ie your course books) then you
should consult the staff, for their zen-like knowledge of the entire
back catalogue. Otherwise just browse shelf after shelf packed full of
works from the the likes of William Burroughs, James Joyce and Irvine
Welsh among literally hundreds of thousands of others. There are many
rare classics to be found here. It just depends on how much time you
have to look
Geoff Blore’s Bookshop, 484 Mansfield Road, Sherwood, NG5 2FB, 0115 9691441
Suspension Bridge, River Trent
There’s a place in every city where you just want to be. Whether you want to people-watch or think about the good
times, everyone’s place is different. Each issue, a member of the LeftLion crew explains the spot they like best…
As an Aries, I love the sparkly bits
of the city, but every now and then
I need a little water to cool my astrological fire. That’s when I head
for the Suspension Bridge over the
Trent. I like playing Pooh Sticks
out of the rowers as they race each
other through the bridge. I also
like to congratulate myself for not
being daft enough to be one of them
(rowing generally means hard work
and early mornings).
I also like the bridge railings.
They are particularly high, to stop
people jumping off I suppose, but it
means I have to pull myself up with
my arms and dangle from them if I
want to look at the view. It makes
me feel like I’m five again and too
short for a world that has amazing
stuff to discover, if only I was tall
enough to see it.
For me, the view is the best in the
city. I go there to empty my head,
losing myself in the chaos of Trent
Bridge and life along the banks
of the Trent. I watch the runners
working their way through their
pain barriers and the ducks and
geese fighting for the stale Mighty
White being thrown at them by
chubby seven year-olds.
The bridge also keeps me a safe
distance from the vicious, unpredictable swans. Beautiful they may
be, but they are also territorial
and always look ready to attack
you. So as far as I’m concerned,
they should only be appreciated
from above or as a garnish in a
Thai restaurant.
Cristina Chapman
Nottingham
Voices
Things People have said
listings...
clubs/theatre/live music/comedy/exhibitions
on the leftlion forum
Where did it all go wrong for
Forest?
“The only 2 decent things to happen since Brian
Clough were Stan Collymore and Paul Hart. Hart
sorted our youth policy out sweet style. Things were
looking promising for a while then he got sacked
because we were doing shit. He had no money to
bring new faces in.”
Skinny
“David Pratt, that’s where.”
Cash Mark
“It all went wrong when Scousers got English clubs
kicked out of Europe with their hooliganism the year
after Forest had just won it twice and were becoming
the biggest team in England. Had Forest been allowed
to play in Europe I believe they would be in a similar
position to Man Utd in terms of popularity today.”
onthebridge
“Selling Marlon Harewood for £500K was a really bad
decision. I think that was a hefty nail in the coffin...”
Jared
“Bad debts.”
Pisces J
“Selling Collymore, things have gone downhill from
then (remember Andrei Silenzei?). Also when Basset
Transit Mafia (aka 29 year old James
sold Campbell, which was just stupid. He effectively
Busby) has quite a few things going for
got rid of Van Hooijdonk in doing so.”
Neb him at the moment.
“I reckon they’ll stay up. Plymouth Argyle are on a
dangerous slide and plummeting down the table while
Forest are (slowly) starting to get their act together.
It’s always the ones who start to fall late on in the
season that you’ve gotta watch out for...”
El Chupacabra
Not only is he one of the best of an upcoming bunch
of Drum and Bass DJ’s from the Nottingham scene,
but he is also a hugely successful event promoter in
his own right.
Is Nottingham North or South?
Six years ago, alongside his friend Kath, James set up
Detonate. Over the next few years the night moved
upwards, through venues from Deluxe to Stealth (via
Dubble Bubble, Beatroot, The Garvey, The Old Vic,
The Rescue Rooms and The Bomb).
“I know we are in the Midlands but Nottingham
seems far more southern, in my opinion. Go to cities
like Sheffield and Manchester and they’re ugly and
have a grotty feel to them. Nottingham doesn’t
though. But then again we are not as stuck up as the
south.”
Marc-2005
Things are looking up for them right now. Over May
bank holiday Detonate host one of their most ambitious nights yet at Rock City. Not only does it feature
drum and bass acts like Andy C, London Elektricity
and LTJ Bukem, but it also has hiphop legend Afrika
Bambaataa along for the ride. We spoke to James to
pick his brain about local talent and the future plans
for Detonate.
“We are more northern than southern. I think we’re
You must be looking forward to your May bank
more sophisticated then most typical northerners but holiday show
a bit more brash than most southerners.”
Kelly We love doing the Rock City shows. In the lead up to
the first one I didn’t really sleep for about two weeks
because the DJ bill was massive. Thankfully they’ve
“More sophisticated? Are you having a laugh? Us
been really well attended and so we just keep trying
Northerners have sophistication coming out of our
to make the line-ups bigger and bigger. It’s good to
arses. As Nottingham is the furthest south I’ve ever
have Spectrum and Camouflage on board for this one
lived, there’s a tendency to say it’s southern, but the
as well.”
friendliness of the place likens it to the north.”
Denz
Who are your favourite acts that you’ve brought
to Nottingham?
“To northerners we’re south to southerners we’re
north. To me we’re slap bang in the middle. But in my
We were really happy to get The Roots last year,
opinion everyone north of Manchester is Scottish, so
because both me and Kath have been big fans for
I dunno…”
a long time. Roni Size live was something that we’d
Skinny
been trying to get since we started out. Roots Manuva
was another one which stands out. It’s a good feeling
“We’re East Midlands. Just saying we’re midlands will
when you get an act that you’ve rated for years, and
make ignorant southerners think we’re Brummies.”
people come out and support it.
onthebridge
Tell us about the first ever Detonate? Where was
it? Who played? What kind of a night was it?
“A friend once said, ‘We enjoy pretty girls of the
south and good beer of the north, so we got the
best of both worlds.’ Doesn’t clear it up but a good
It was at Deluxe (now the Cookie Club) in January
thought. West Bridgford is south I reckon...”
1999. Kenny Ken headlined the DnB room. At the time
Timmy Kath was a student and I was doing a music course.
We both borrowed £100 to get it off the ground.
make your voice heard
www.leftlion.co.uk/forum
www.detonate1.co.uk
If you could book any DJ or musician to play at
Detonate who would it be?
There are a few big American hip hop artists which
we’d like to put on one of which is KRS-One which will
hopefully happen in June.
What’s the plan with Detonate Recordings?
The label isn’t focussing on a certain sound, it’s just
tunes which we like and I play. The first release
should drop around May-June time. It’s by a big DnB
DJ/producer going under his Killer Instinct guise,
backed with a track by Hold Tight.
What do you think to other Notts DnB labels
such as DSF and Brutal Recordings?
There seems to be loads of good music coming out of
Notts at the moment. DSF have been doing their thing
for a while and Brutal have come up with a strong first
release. Also, a guy called Ben Fawce has got his first
release coming on Mindrush soon. On the hiphop tip
Dealmaker and Sureshot are doing good things.
Tell us about the rest of the Detonate crew…
Myself and Kath started Detonate, but now Rich works
with us full time as well. Kath has a facial recognition problem so smiles at everyone in case she knows
them! Also she quite often nearly pays DJ’s wages to
random people. A punter nearly got given Andy C’s
money recently!
Small Kid has always done our flyers. He’s a wicked
designer and artist whose getting the recognition
he deserves these days. He specialises in drawing
monkeys and making horrendous spelling mistakes.
Apparently we were meant to have a ‘Special Gust’ at
a Detonate recently.
What other jobs have you had apart from DJing
and promoting?
I worked at Drum & Bass Arena for 4 years up until last September. Since that I’ve started managing
Mampi Swift’s label Charge, and Friction’s Shogun
Audio label. I also help get out Ram, True Playaz, and
Technique with digital distribution. Through my work
running Detonate and D&B Arena over the years I’ve
got good links in the scene. The worst job I’ve had
was in a cardboard box factory. The machine was bust
so I had to stand in the same place with my arm out
all day. This is loads better…
Detonate Rock City Sunday 1st May
listings...
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
Max Cooper
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Max Cooper and Live Techno
Period Of April / May
Club Nights
fri 01/04
Spectrum
Style:
Breaks
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£8 adv £10
10 otd
Times: 10pm - 4am
Ali B (Fabric / Air), Danny McMillan
(Inflight), Pete Jordan
Danny Donnachie
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Basement Boogaloo
Style:
Soul, Funk, Jazz
Venue: Bar None
Price:
Free
Times: 10pm - 2am
Chris Lowlife (Lights Down Low)
Dollop
Style:
Breaks, House, Electronica
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Fonk Dirty, Chard and guests.
sat 02/04
Renaissance
Style:
House
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£10 adv £12 otd
Times: 10pm - 4am
James Zabiela, Eric Prydz,
Luke Chable, Roo
DJ Hal
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Enjoy the Ride take on the Bomb for a latenight extension to their Malt Cross gigs.
fri 08/04
Camouflage
Style:
HipHop
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£8 adv £10 otd
Times: 10pm - 3.30am
The Mitchell Brothers (The Streets), Full
Fat (Live), Instrumentals,The Lost Projects,
Blumonkey, T-Cutt, Swiz
Focus
Style:
Drum and Bass, Deep House
Venue: Blueprint
Price:
£7 (NUS Discount)
Times: 9pm - 3am
Hazard (True Playaz), Danny Wheeler
(Infrared), MC Maveric (Formation),
Disfunktion & Jaydan (Propaganda),
Apocalypse, Kronic, Indigo Sync
MC’s G1, Choppa, Carasel, Anger
Supa Nova, AEM Soundsystem
sat 09/04
The Bomb Babes
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - 4am
The Bomb Babes - DJ Sass, CJ & Wings
Psycle
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Nightmare
Venue: Spiders
Info:
Goth, Industrial, Cyber
Wildside
Venue: Spiders
Sleazy Glam
The Cool Off
Style:
Ska, Bashment, Dub
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
mon 04/04
tue 05/04
El Viaje
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Misterioso de Kevlua
Moog
Free
8pm - 12am
Pumped
Style:
Techno
Venue: Spiders
DJ Ezy Ryder
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Chilled, sexy grooves with DJ Ezy Ryder.
mon 11/04
thu 07/04
Sunk n Foul
Style:
Funk, Soul
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Funk & Soul with the Drop Menace and
‘special’ guests The Mysterious K.
Highness Sound System
Style:
Reggae, Roots
Venue: Blueprint
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Only Love...
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Destination
Venue: Oceana
Gay friendly night at the upgraded Palais.
Listen With Motherf**ker
Style:
Electronica, Dub
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
wed 13/04
Pink Flamingos
Style:
Rock, Seventies, Eighties
Venue: Spiders
Sleazy RnR, Electro Clash, 70’s - 80’s.
Highness
Style:
Roots, Reggae
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Dogmatic
Style:
Drum and Bass
Venue: Dogma
Price:
£2
Times: 10pm - 2am
Calibre, Catalyst, Priceless
Hosted by DRS
The Groove
House, Disco
Moog
Free
8pm - 12am
Camouflage
Style:
Electronica, Breaks, Techno
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£12 adv
Times: 7.30pm - 12am
Nottingham’s Camouflage crew showcase
including a live set from Autechre and DJ
sets from Rob Hall and Mark Broom
Mother Of All Bombs
Style:
Hiphop, Breaks, Drum and Bass
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Hip-Hop, Funk, Breaks and Drum n Bass
with DJs M.O.and A.B.
Koolsville
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
DJs, Sloe & King Kahlua.
fru 15/04
Sancho Panza
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£7
Times: 10pm - late
Sancho Panza and Percussion DJ’s.
Cult
Style:
Hiphop
Venue: The Loft
Price:
Free
Times: 9pm - 1 am
Cult is an audio/visual marriage of quality
underground sounds and classic Cult movie
imagery. The film this time is ‘Wild Style’,
shown alongside hiphop and breaks from
some of Nottingham’s finest DJ’s including
Fluff & Detail from Detonate and Ryo & s1
from Prescription.
sun 24/04
DJ Ezy Ryder
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Chilled, sexy grooves with DJ Ezy Ryder.
mon 25/04
Something Chronic
Style:
Hiphop, Funk, Soul
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Old School Hiphop, Funk, Soul, Big Beat and
Breaks with regulars Will and guests.
Tush
Venue: The Bomb
Times: 10pm - 2am
Lesbian night at the Bomb.
George Be Tall
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Chilled grooves building to a crescendo of
dirty beats with George & guests.
Dogmatic
thu 21/04
Style:
HipHop
Venue: Dogma
Price:
£3
Times: 10pm - 2am
Live Hip Hop from Dealmaker Records and
Camouflage
Sell Out
Style:
Alternative
Venue: Spiders
Times: 9pm - 2am
Wayne and Russ present an ecclectic
alternative night.
Only Love...
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Product
Style:
Breaks, Tech House, Electronica
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£7 adv £8 otd
Lee Coombs (Thrust), Si Begg (Novamute/
Trigger), Tim Lyall (Slinky), Problem Child,
Rez, Iain Mac
Detonate
Style:
Drum and Bass, HipHop, Breaks
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£10 adv £12 otd
Times: 10pm - 4am
Goldie, Red One, Fingathing (Live), Transit
Mafia, Santero, Detail
‘Sheila’ Fine Art Student Party
Venue: Moog
Price:
Donations welcome!
Times: 8pm - 12am
DJs and Visuals supplied by artists
mon 25/04
tue 26/04
tue 19/04
fri 22/04
thu 14/04
Shrewd
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£8
Times: 10pm - 4am
Alligator
Style:
HipHop, Drum and Bass
Venue: Moog
Price:
£2
Times: 8pm - 12am
With DJ’s Transit Mafia and Strike
The Wake
Venue: Spiders
Deathrock, Old School Goth
Behind
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
sat 23/04
Bluesilver
Style:
Eighties
Venue: Spiders
Alternative 80’s
Sound Alliance
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - 4am
wed 20/04
tue 12/04
Mother Of All Bombs
Style:
Hiphop, Breaks, Drum and Bass
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
DJs M.O.and A.B.
sat 16/04
mon 18/04
City Of Dog
Style:
World Music
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Tush
Venue: The Bomb
Times: 10pm - 2am
Lesbian Night
Demo
Venue: Blueprint
Times: 7.30pm - late
sun 17/04
Psy-Trance
Blueprint
£5
10pm - late
sun 10/04
Pure Filth
Style:
Techno, DnB, Deep House
Venue: Blueprint
Price:
£6
Times: 10pm - late
Databomber - AKA Esther Ofei (Live)
Aled Jones Filth Residents
DJ Smith & Jay, Planar & Fijjitt
Paul Murphy, Ed Cotton
fri 15/04
Kombination Funk
Style:
Drum and Bass, Techno, Breaks
Venue: Blueprint
Price:
£5
Times: 10.30pm - Late
Temper D (Cell), Fatal (Charge), Bouncer
(Ignition), Lowkey (Brutal)
MCs: Ninety, G1 and Anger
Mark Jacobs,Macp and more
Mr Seavers and friends.
Listen With Motherf**ker
Style:
Electronica, Dub
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Vastick
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Root
Breaks, Electronica
Moog
Free
8pm - 12am
wed 27/04
thu 28/04
Funktion
Style:
Drum and Bass
Venue: Synergy
Price:
Free
Times: 9pm - 2am
Random Guy, Jest-r,
Timmy, The Weasalman
Dogmatic
Style:
Hiphop
Times: 10pm - 2am
RND with Joe Ransom
Full Metal Racket
Style:
Rock
Venue: Spiders
Times: 9pm - 2am
fri 29/04
Stealth’s First Birthday
Style:
Drum and Bass, HipHop, Breaks
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£10 adv £12 otd
Times: 10pm - 4am
Fabio, DJ Format feat. Abdominal and
D-Sisive, Little Barrie, Sambawamba (38
piece live act), Transit Mafia (Detonate)
Pete Jordan (Spectrum), JS & Fever
(Chibuku), Windows 78 (Camouflage)
listings...
Juke
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
fri 29/04
Funk, Soul
Moog
Free
8pm - 12am
Pumped
Style:
Techno
Venue: Spiders
thu 05/05
Highness SoundSystem
Style:
Reggae
Venue: Blueprint
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Silver Planet
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Thru The Looking Glass
Style:
House, Drum and Bass, Funk
Venue: Blueprint
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
Schmoov room featuring The Little Men
(Mobile Trax, Drop Music) and Murphy.
Funktion room with Random Guy, Timmy,
The Weaselman and Jest-r. I-Fuel room with
Osbourne (DIY) and Adam
sat 30/04
Bob’s Dynamic
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
Moocha presents wig-out acid jungle,
elektro-dancehall and ting
Federation
Style:
Funky House
Venue: Ocean
Psycle
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
fri 06/05
Spectrum
Style:
Breaks, HipHop
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£8 adv £10 otd
Times: 10pm - 4am
DJ Yoda goes to the movies with a DVDJ
set. Also along are DJ Hyper (Kilowatt),
Steelzawheelz (West Records), Western
Allstars (West Records), Hexidecimal, Pete
Jordan, B Boy J and the All Torque Breakers
SPAM
Style:
Sixties, Pop
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
Free
Infectious
Venue: The Bomb
Times: 10pm - Late
Justin Long, Rhythm Plate
North meets South
Style:
Bashment, Reggae, RnB
Venue: Blueprint
Times: 10pm - late
Live PA from Audley Anderson (Fame
Academy), Success Solid Rock, Klimax,
Geoff Schuman (BBC), Cabbage Man,
Soulman, Master G
sun 01/05
The Asylum
Style:
Alternative, Rock
Venue: Spiders
Price:
£3
Times: 9pm - 2am
Focus
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Drum and Bass, Funky House
Blueprint
£7 (NUS Discount)
9pm - 2am
Dollop
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Breaks, House, Electronica
Moog
Free
8pm - 12 am
The Cool Off
Style:
Ska, Roots
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
sat 14/05
Trance
Blue Print
£5
10pm - late
fri 27/05
Nightmare
Venue: Spiders
Goth, industrial and cyber rock!
Highness
Style:
Reggae, Dub, Roots
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8 pm - 12 am
Spanjj
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
wed 18/05
May Bank Holiday Alldayer
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 12 pm - 12 am
DJs, comedians and barbecue on the roof.
tue 03/05
El Viaje Misterioso de Kevlua
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8 pm - 12 am
Like a broken jukebox that’s stuck on
random for 4 hours
thu 05/05
Dogmatic
Style:
HipHop
Venue: Dogma
Price:
£3
Times: 10pm - 2am
Live Hiphop showcase from Dealmaker
Records and Camouflage
Pure Filth
Style:
Techno, DnB, Funky House
Venue: Blue Print
Price:
£6
Times: 10pm - late
Paul Langley (Jackstar) is guest on the
decks at the filthiest techno night that
Nottingham has to offer.
Wildside
Venue: Spiders
Sleazy Glam
Spanjj
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
sun 08/05
Breaks, Electronica
Moog
Free
4pm - 8pm
thu 19/05
Sell Out
Style:
Alternative
Venue: Spiders
Times: 9pm - 2am
Wayne and Russ present an eclectic night of
alternative music.
fri 20/05
Product
Style:
Breaks, Tech House, Electronica
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£7 adv, £8 otd
Blim - TCR/Botchit, Problem Child,
Rez, Iain Mac, Guest tbc
Kombination Funk vs Detonate part 2
Style:
Drum and Bass, Techno, Breaks
Venue: Blue Print
Price:
£8
Times: 10.30pm - Late
A big crossover night for Nottingham DnB.
Acts on show include Raiden (Renegade
Hardware), Sub-Focus (Ram), Transit Mafia
(Detonate), Dyazide (Brutal), Lowkey (KF),
MC Ninety, Juma Phist, Dreama, Mark
Jacobs, Macp, Mr Seavers and friends.
Cult
Venue: The Loft
Price:
Free
Times: 9pm - 1am
Cult is an audio/visual marriage of quality
underground sounds and classic cult
movie imagery. It’s all presented to you
by some of the best DJ’s and visual artists
Notts has to offer. Up this time are Anth
(John Peel Jnr), Windows 78 and Dubfella
(Camouflage). Join The Cult at
www.wearethecult.co.uk
The Wake
Venue: Spiders
Deathrock, Old School Goth
sun 22/05
wed 11/05
Pink Flamingos
Style:
Rock, Seventies, Eighties
Venue: Spiders
Dogmatic
Venue: Dogma
Style:
Drum and Bass
Times: 10pm - 2am
XRS
Detonate
Style:
Drum and Bass, Hiphop
Venue: Stealth
Times: 10pm - 4am
Ed Rush & Optical plus more tbc.
Album Launch Party, More details to be
confirmed soon, www.detonate1.co.uk
Breaks, Electronica
Moog
Free
8pm - 12am
sat 21/05
Detonate
Style:
Drum and Bass, HipHop, Breaks
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£20 adv
Times: 8pm - 5am
Get ready for Detonation in the main room
with London Elektricity (live), LTJ Bukem,
MC Conrad, Andy C, MC GQ, Zinc, Friction,
MC Eksman, Craze, MC Armani, Swift, MC
Fearless, High Contrast, SP MC and Transit
Mafia. Downstairs is Camouflage with the
legendary Afrika Bambaataa, Cash Money,
Taskforce, Karizma, Foz, Lost Projects,
T-Cutt, Santero and Detail. Spectrum have
the run of the Rig with Soul of Man, Krafty
Kuts, Phantom Beats, Hexadecimal, Pete
Jordon and Problem Child
thu 26/05
Full Metal Racket
Style:
Rock
Venue: Spiders
Times: 9pm - 2am
Night of extreme, euro and power metal
with Andy and Stumpy. Includes regular
promos, playbacks and giveaways courtesy
of Earache Records.
Bluesilver
Style:
Eighties
Venue: Spiders
Alternative 80’s
sat 28/05
mon 30/05
Moog Bank Holiday Alldayer
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 12pm - 12am
More great acts from Nottingham and
beyond having a ball in the sunshine!
sat 07/05
Renaissance
Style:
House
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£10 adv £12 otd
Times: 10pm - 4am
Hernan Cattaneo (3 Hour Set), The Cuban
Brothers (Live), Marcus James and CMWMA.
Crasher
Style:
Trance
Venue: Nottingham Arena
Price:
£32.50
City Of Dog
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 12am
thu 12/05
Spanjj
Style:
Breaks, Electronica
Venue: Moog
Price:
Free
Times: 4pm - 8pm
Electronik guff, broken beats stuff and out
there visuals and future music with DJ
Friendly & Nezlord
thu 26/05
UK Takeover 3
Style:
Hiphop
Venue: Rock City
UK Takeover are putting on some of the
best UK hiphop nights ever assembled at
the moment, all from the comfort of venues
around Hood Town.
The line up for Takeover Three is one of
the best yet! Assembled to appear live on
one stage will be Ty, The Scratch Perverts,
Skinnyman and DJ Flip, Phi Life Cypher,
Mitchell Brothers, Kyza & Terra Firma, Roll
Deep, Skitz ft MC D (and other special
guests), Foreign Beggars, Yogi & Baby J, Joe
Buhdha, 45, Wariko, Hoodz Underground,
Elementz, Karizma and PeteBox. The whole
thing is hosted by Rodney P and MistaJam.
Check out interviews with two of the
Takeovers finest Ty and Skinnyman on our
website at www.LeftLion.co.uk
The event will also feature an open
invitation emcee battle, the ‘60 Second
Assassin’ contest. The top prize is two
custom made beats from premier UK hiphop
producers Joe Buhdha & Skitz. Contestants
will be drawn to face off against each
other and given just 60 seconds to lyrically
destroy their opponents. When the time
runs out, it’s up to the crowd to decide
who’s displaying the illest skills on the mic.
The first few rounds will take place during
the pre-takeover warm up (check www.
LeftLion.co.uk for more details) with the
semi-finals onwards being held on the
night itself. If you want to take part, email
[email protected] leaving your
name and home town. Otherwise just turn
up and enjoy...
www.uktakeover.net
fri 13/05
Camouflage
Style:
HipHop, Breaks
Venue: Stealth
Times: 10pm - 3am
Live Hip Hop, Grime and Beats, Kano,
Cannibal Ox (Def Jux), Non Thespian,
Lost Projects, Problem Child,
Aled Jones, T-Cutt, Swiz
Funktion
Style:
Drum and Bass
Venue: Synergy
Price:
Free
Times: 9pm - 2am
Random Guy, Jest-r, Timmy Hands,
The Weasalman
listings...
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
tuesdays
Period Of April / May
Weekly Club Listings
fridays
Tiger Style
Style:
Breaks
Venue: Stone
Price:
Free
Times: 9pm - 1am
Pete Jordan, Future Proof
Soul Buggin’ with DJ Beane
Style:
Funk, Jazz, Disco
Venue: Bar Humbug
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 1am
Hiphop, House, Breaks
Dogma
Free
Until 2am
Love Shack
Style:
Eighties
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£4 adv £5 otd
Times: 9.30pm - 2am
Fridays
Style:
Price:
Times:
@ The Market Bar
Breaks, House, Disco
£4 (NUS Discount)
9pm - 3am
Booty Bassline House
Style:
House, Deep House
Venue: The Edge
Price:
£7
Times: 10pm - late
Audio
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Funk, Soul, Disco
Snug
£5 (£3b4 10.30pm, NUS Discount)
10pm - 3am
Atomic
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Wednesday
Alternative, Rock, Pop
The Cookie Club (NUS Discount)
£2.50
10.30pm - 2am
Ritmo with Leon Moran
Style:
Funky House, Disco, Breaks
Venue: Bar Humbug
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 1am
thursdays
Thursdays @ The Market Bar
Style:
Funk, HipHop
Price:
£4
Times: 9pm - 2.30am
saturdays
HipHop, RnB, Soul
Snug
Free
til 2am
Tuned
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Saturdays @ The Market Bar
Style:
Funky House
Price:
£5
Times: 9pm - 2.30am
mon 04/04
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£7 / £4
Times: 7pm
Your regular Sunday comedy night, this
time featuring Rob Rouse, Mick Ferry and
Nottingham’s own Darrell Martin.
thu 07/04
Jongleurs
Venue: Jongleurs
Price:
£8 - £15
Times: 7pm
Smug Roberts, Helen Austin, Andy Robinson
Dave Williams
Runs Until: 09/04
sat 09/04
Rappers Delight
Style:
HipHop
Venue: The Bomb
Price:
£3 - £4
Times: 10pm - 2am
Local Hiphop acts and Open Mic Session...
Nu World
Style:
HipHop, Funk
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
Free
Times: 7pm - 11pm
Dogmatic
Style:
HipHop, Drum and Bass
Venue: Dogma
Price:
Various
Times: 10pm - 2am
fri 01/04
Jongleurs
Price:
From £13
Times: 7pm
John Mann, Richard Morton,
Tom Stade and Andrew Murrell
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£7 / £4
Times: 7pm
Ian Cognito and Will Hodgson
sun 10/04
tue 02/05
fri 05/05
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£7adv
Times: 7pm
Phil Nichol, Carey Marx,
Andy Robinson
sun 08/05
thu 14/04
fri 15/04
Jongleurs
Price:
£8
Times: 7pm
Keith Fields, Tony Hendriks, Brendan Burke
and David Hadingham
Jongleurs
Price:
£8
Times: 7pm
Tim Clark, Simn Bligh, Scott Capurro
Jongleurs
Price:
£13 - £15
Times: 7pm
Tim Clark, Scott Capurro, Anthony King
Runs Until: 16/4
sun 17/04
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£7 / £4
Times: 7pm
Craig Campbell, Rob Heaney, Darrel Martin
thu 21/04
thu 12/05
fri 13/05
Jongleurs
Price:
£13 - £15
Times: 7pm
Keith Fields, Tony Hendriks
Gina Yashere, Brendan Burke
Runs Until: 14/5
thu 19/05
Jongleurs
Venue: Jongleurs
Price:
£8 - £15
Times: 7pm
Tony Morewood, Simon Clayton
Kevin Hayes, Simon B Cotter
Runs Until: 21/5
sun 22/05
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£7adv
Times: 7pm
Tim Vine, Howard Read, Darrell Martin
thu 26/05
Jongleurs
Venue: Jongleurs
Price:
£8 - £15
Times: 7pm
Raymond Mearns, Jeff Innocent
Paul B Edwards, Dom Carroll
Runs Until: 28/5
sundays
Bounce
RnB, Bashment
The Edge
£3
10pm - 1am
Recover
The Chuckle Brothers
Venue:Royal Centre
tue 10/05
Distortion
Style:
Rock, Indy, Alternative
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£5 (NUS Discount)
Times: 9pm - 2.30am
Sunday
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
sun 01/05
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£8adv
Times: 7pm
Reg Hunter, Morris the Morris Dancer,
James Dowdeswell and Darrell Martin
Jimmy Greaves
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£15
Times: 7.30pm
Footballing pundit appears in Nottingham.
Rescued
Style:
Indy, Alternative
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Times: 10pm - 2am
Out To Lunch
Style:
Jazz
Venue: Dogma
Price:
Free
Times: Afternoon
thu 28/04
Jongleurs
Price:
£8 - £15
Times: 7pm
Phil Butler, The Raymond and Mr Timpkins
Revue, Johnny Candon, John Simmit
Runs Until: 30/4
Jongleurs
Price:
£8 - £15
Times: 7pm
Mandy Knight, Mike Gunn, Steve Harris
Daniel Packard
Runs Until: 7/5
Harry Hill
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£17.50
Times: 8pm
Comedy
Rise and Shine / Funk U
Style:
Indy, Alternative, Funk Disco
Venue: The Cookie Club
Price:
£5 (NUS Discount)
Times: 10.30pm - 2am
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£7adv
Times: 7pm
Brendon Burns, Addy Borg, Darrell Martin
Indy, Alternative, Pop
Rock City
£4 / £3.50 (NUS Discount)
8.30pm - 2am
Club NME
Style:
Indy, Rock, Alternative
Venue: Stealth
Price:
£2 / £3 / £4
Times: 10pm - 2am
Platinum
Style:
House, Breaks
Venue: The Edge
Price:
£5
Times: 10pm - late
sun 24/04
sat 02/04
Up the Junction
Style:
Sixties
Venue: The Cookie Club
Price:
£2.50 (NUS Discount)
Times: 10.30pm - 2am
Mirrorball
Style:
RnB, Disco, Funk
Venue: Snug
Price:
£3 - £4 (NUS Discount)
Times: 10pm - 3am
Eighties, Nineties
The Cookie Club
£4 (NUS Discount)
10.30pm - 2am
Stylus
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
wednesdays
The Big
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
The One and Only
Style:
Rock
Venue: Spiders
Salt
Style:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Tuesdays @ The Market Bar
Style:
Disco, RnB
Venue: The Market Bar
Price:
£4 (NUS Discount)
Times: 9pm - 2.30am
Jongleurs
Price:
From £15
Times: 7pm
John Mann, Richard Morton,
Tom Stade and Andrew Murrell
sun 29/05
mondays
April Fools Comedy Night
Venue: Lakeside
Price:
£12/ £14
Times: 8pm
Rob Deering and Francesca Martinez
Jongleurs
Price:
£8 - £15
Times: 7pm
Martin Bigpig, Jamie Mathieson,
Dave Fulton, Brian Higgins
Runs Until: 23/4
Just the Tonic
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£8 adv
Times: 7pm
Andy Parsons, Jared Christmas
Robin Ince, Martin Davies
listings...
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
wed 06/04
Period of April / May
Live Music
fri 01/04
Left Side Brain
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4
Times: 9pm - 1am
Left Side Brain, Killing Ruth, Meridian
fri 08/04
The Morphines
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv £5 door
Times: 7.15pm
The Morphines plus special guests
The Mardous
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv £5 otd
Times: 7.15pm
The Mardous, The Old House plus guests
Nusantara
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£7 - £10
Times: 7.30pm
Fifty Get Funkey
Venue: Dogma
Price:
Free
14 Hours of live acts
sat 09/04
All Nighter
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£6 adv
Times: 9pm - 6am
Do Me Bad Things, Tokyo Dragons,
Feable Weiner
10000 Things
Venue: The Social
Price:
£5 adv
Times: 7 pm
sat 02/04
Enuff Z Nuff
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£13.50
Times: 7pm
Enuff Z Nuff, Bang Tango, Pretty Boy Floyd
Mike Peters
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£10 adv, £12 otd
Times: 9pm - 1am
Acoustic Alarm Tour with support from
Lee Rickers.
Enjoy The Ride
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
£3
Times: 8.30pm - 11pm
An audio visual delight of live music, poetry,
films, art and whatever else they can fit in.
Hosted by the near legendary Pete Finch,
who is a very sound bloke!
Curtis Eller’s American Circus
Venue: Cabaret
Price:
£5
Times: 8.30 pm
Curtis Eller is New York’s angriest yodelling
banjo player. Nottingham’s very own The
Hellset Orchestra provide support.
36 Crazyfist
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£10 adv
Times: 7.30pm
Midasuno
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4 (NUS Discount)
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Midasuno, Eustacia vye,
Utoxator, Astro Pirates.
High On Fire
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£8
Times: 7.30pm - late
Basement Show
thu 07/04
Atreyu
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£10 adv
Times: 7.30pm
Sam Brown
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£12adv
Times: 7.30pm
thu 14/04
I Am Kloot
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£10 adv
Mancunian musical mavericks
Open Mic Night
Venue: The Orange Tree
Price:
Free
Times: 7.30 pm
Quasi
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£8 adv
Times: 7pm
Sacramento
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Sacramento, Anti Hero, Locus Of Control,
Psylence.
David Gow
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4 adv, £5 otd
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
David Gow, Plan B, The Tommies,
Lee McMahon.
Aiden Smith
Venue: The Social
Price:
£5 adv
With support from Bitmap
Juliette
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Girls Aloud
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£21
The girls embark on their “What Will The
Neighbours Say” Tour. Get lost possibly?
mon 11/04
and The Licks
Rock City
£10 adv
7.30pm
Wishbone Ash
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£14 adv
Plus guests
fri 15/04
Panic Cell
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 9pm - 1am
Panic Cell, Sevenyearsdead, Iluminatus,
Nowhere Near The Garden
The Paddingtons
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£4 adv £6 otd
Times: 7.15pm
plus special guests
Mat Andasun Band
(featuring Bosco D’Olivera)
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4 adv, £5 otd
Times: 8pm
tue 12/04
tue 05/04
Kaiser Chiefs
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£9 adv
Leeds Psych-punks who seem to enjoy
playing in Nottingham.
Mates Of State
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£6 adv
The Lost Prophets
Venue: Moog
Price:
£3
Times: 8pm - 12am
The Lost Prophets, Vaccine, Transit Mafia &
DJ Strike playing Drum n Bass and Breaks
Love with Arthur Lee
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£17.50 adv
Juliette and The Licks
Venue: Rock City
With support from Voicst
Eel Shock
Rock City (Basement)
£6 adv
7.30pm
Liars Club
Venue: The Social
White Rose Movement
sun 10/04
Fans of Kate
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£4
wed 13/04
Music Room
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm-11pm
Martin Stephenson
Venue: The Gladstone
Times: 8.30 pm
Haffner Wind Ensemble & Min-Jung
Kym Piano
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£9 - £12
Times: 7.30pm
Hell Is For Heroes
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£9.50
Times: 7.30pm
London-based band who apparently offer
up a Neon Handshake. Support comes from
Jacobs Stories
T-Model Ford
Venue: The Social
Price:
£8 adv
Electric
Venue:
Price:
Times:
sun 03/04
mon 04/04
tue 12/04
Broxtowe College
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£3 (NUS Discount)
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Misused, Tyler Marshes, Lakrymology,
The Unknown
Trashlight Vision
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£6 adv, £7 otd
Times: 9pm - 1am
Trashlight Vision, Johnny Panic,
Teenage Casket Company, Plan A
Jocelyn Pook & Natasha Atlas
Venue: Lakeside
Price:
£12 - £15
Times: 8pm
Jocelyn Pook has provided original scores
for film and TV including Laurent Cantet’s
Time Out and Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut.
New School Of Rock
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£5 adv
Times: 7.30pm
The Glitteatti, Hurricane Party, Silvertide
Part Chimp
Venue: The Social
Price:
£4 adv
Plus guests
Devilish Presley
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£6
Times: 9pm - 1am
Devilish Presley, Scarlet Soho,
Abigail’s Mercy, Minus 13
Terrorvision
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£15 adv
Times: 7.30pm
The Bradford-based Tequilla rockers return
to Notts with support from Happylife
65 Days of Static
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£5
Times: 7pm - 10.15pm
Wednesday 13
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Price:
£9 adv
With support from 69 Eyes
sat 16/04
listings...
Vertavo
Venue:
Price:
Times:
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
Quartet
Lakeside Arts Centre
£12 - £15
7.30pm
sat 16/04
Suits You
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 11pm
Made to measure beats, breaks, chunks,
bumps and off the peg visual treats
seamlessly put together by Invisible Jim
and friends.
The Musical Box
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£21.50 - £23.50
Times: 8.15pm
sun 17/04
Blues Explosion!
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£13 adv
Jon Spencer brings the travelling explosion
to Nottingham. Jodah Bauer and Russell
Simins are along in support.
The Longcut
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£6 adv
thu 21/04
V.E. Gala, Glenn Miller Orchestra
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£15 - £21.50
Times: 7.30pm
Golani Piano Trio
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£7 - £10
Times: 7.30pm
Wreckless Eric
Venue: The Social
Price:
£7 adv
Botb Final
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
My Luminaries
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv - $5 door
Times: £7.15pm
My Luminaries, Lo - Ego, The Pedestrians
sat 23/04
LeftLion Presents...
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 11pm
This month we bring you a feast of live
local hiphop! Notts’ own Skinny Sumo and
Alligator are both doing full live band sets.
Check our LeftLion.co.uk for interviews with
the bands...
Brendan Benson
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£9 adv
Hal, Psychid
sat 30/04
Rooster
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£9 adv
Times: 7.30pm
Between The Notes & Niall Ashdown
Note To Tale
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£7 - £10
Times: 7.30pm
Fish and Band
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£14 adv
Times: 7.30pm
Former Marillion singers new crew.
Rufus Wainwright
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£17.50
Idlewild
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£15 adv
Times: 7.30pm
tue 26/04
Captain
Venue:
Price:
Times:
mon 18/04
Nanci Griffith and the Blue Moon
Orchestra
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£22.50 - £25
Times: 7.30pm
Caribou & Boom BIP
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£9 adv
tue 19/04
Everything
Rock City
£6 adv
7.30pm
ManPlayingKazoo
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Manplayingkazoo, Tiber Ran Red, Paris In
The Spring, Honeycomb Graveyard,
Finbar Cartilage
Asia Carrera
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4
Times: 9pm - 1am
With support from The Sound Explosion,
Magic Heroes and The Swarm.
Hard Fi
Venue: The Social
Price:
£5 adv
Sage Francis
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£7.50 adv
Times: 7pm - 10.15pm
With support from Grand Buffet
Mary Gauthier
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£11 adv
Dokken
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£15
Times: 7.30 pm
Bandsoc BOTB Presents
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Colonel K, Pinao, Divided Persona, Plinth,
Knights Of Steel And Thunder
The House Of Love
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£12.50 adv
wed 20/04
Streetlight Manifesto
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£5
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Streetlight Manifesto, Phinius Gage
Weeble, 3 Gun Pete.
Big D and The Kids Table
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Price:
£7 adv
Times: 7.30 pm
All Nighter
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£6 adv
Times: till 6am
Therapy, Alabama Thunder Pussy
Milion Dead, More tbc
Music Room
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm-11pm
The Immortal Lee County Killers
Venue: The Social
Price:
£6 adv
The Presidents Of The
United States Of America
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£12 adv
Times: 7.30 pm
Millions of peaches,
peaches for me,
millions of peaches,
peaches for me!
Go to Rock City and
pretend that the
last decade never
even happened with
the Presidents.
sun 24/04
Kasabian
Venue: Nottingham Arena
Price:
£15 adv
Times: 7.30
Current indie favourites rocking the arena.
Captain Everything
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Yourcodenameis:Milo
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Times: 7.30pm
Faster Pussycat
Venue: The Rig
Hellset Orchestra
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4 (NUS Discount)
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Hellset Orchestra, Lo Ego, Belasco.
Hot Hot Heat
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£10 adv
Tom Vek
Venue: The Social
Price:
£6 adv
Chuck Prophet Band
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£12 adv
mon 25/04
fri 22/04
Peter & The Test Tube Babies
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£8 adv £9 otd
Times: 9pm - 1am
Peter & The Test Tube Babies,
Better Than Onion.
Liars Club
Venue: The Social
Price:
£4
Lost Sounds
fri 29/04
sun 24/04
James Blunt
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
wed 27/04
thu
Dead By Dawn
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Dead By Dawn, Emergency Funeral,
Ape Of Death
28/04
Isis
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Price:
£10 adv
Times: 7.30pm
With support from Jesu.
Brant Bjork and The Bros
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£9 adv
Times: 7.30pm
Brant Bjork and The Bros,
Winnebago Deal
mon 02/05
tue 03/05
Story One
Venue: The Social
Price:
£3 adv
The Waifs
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£12 adv
Plus support.
Little Richard
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£30 - £35
Good golly miss molly!
fri 29/04
70s Soul Jam
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£10 - £25
Featuring the Delphonics, Chi-Lites, The
Bluenotes and Stylistics.
The Smears
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4
Times: 9pm - 1am
The Smears, Firebrand, The Mothers.
Buffalo
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv £5 otd
Times: 7.15pm
Buffalo, Philistine, plus special guests.
Bandsoc BOTB Presents
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Pink William, Stuntmen, Nezza,
To Die For, Stickers.For.Kids
Carnal Forge
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£8 adv
Times: 7.30pm
With support from Stand Aside.
wed 04/05
The Havenots Band
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£5 adv
Leicester-based singer-songwriting duo.
Their debut record Never Say Goodnight
is stacked full of poppy love songs. With
support from Ox.
listings...
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
wed 04/05
Face Tomorrow
wed 11/05
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
Face Tomorrow, Public Relations Excercise,
Tired Irie
Silverstein
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£6 adv
Times: 7.30pm
thu 12/05
fri 13/05
The Henry Road
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£4
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
The Henry Road, Lyca Sleep,
Jesus Deluxe, Daybreak
Guile
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv, £5 otd
Times: 7.15pm
With support from The Ambassadors.
thu 05/05
A
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Price:
£10 adv
Times: 7.30pm
With support from Instruction.
fri 06/05
Public Display Of Affection
Venue: Old Angel The
Adam Bomb
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 9pm - 1am
Adam Bomb, Wild Roses,
Drugdealer Cheerleaders
Amen
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£9.50 adv
Times: 7.30pm
sun 15/05
mon 16/05
Killing Miranda
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£tbc
Times: 9pm - 1am
Plus support.
Hopesfall
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£10 adv
Times: 7.30pm
With support from Tsunami Bomb.
The Honeymoon Machine
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv, £5 otd
Times: 7.30 pm
The Honeymoon Machine,
The Deltarays, plus special guests.
Story One
Venue: The Social
Price:
£3 adv
Extinction Of Mankind
sat
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£5
Times: 9pm - 1am
Extinction Of Mankind, Gurkha,
Hibakusha, Certified.
07/05
Ciysteay
Venue: The Social
Price:
£7 adv
tue 17/05
wed 18/05
Vic Chesnutt
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£10 adv
Musician whose fans include REM, Madonna,
and the Smashing Pumpkins.
Illuminatus
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 9pm - 12am
Illuminatus, Humanity, Deliverence
sat 21/05
Enjoy The Ride
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
£3
Times: 8.30pm - 11pm
Ezio
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£10 adv
wed 25/05
Calculating Mr One
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£5
Times: 10.30am & 1.30pm
thu 26/05
Elvis Costello and The Imposters
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£28.50
fri 27/05
Vain
Venue: Rock City (Basement)
Price:
£12.50 adv.
With support from New Generation
Superstars.
Dune
The Rescue Rooms
£5 adv
7pm - 10.15pm
Hooker
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
With support from Tram Dolls
Lesley Garrett
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£20 - £30
The Men They Couldn’t Hang
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£12.50 adv
Times: 7pm - 10.15
Johnny Panic
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£3/4
With support from Tobias.
Herman
Venue:
Price:
Times:
tue 24/05
sun 08/05
Byzantine
Venue: Junktion 7
Price:
£5
Times: 9pm - 12am
Byzantine, D-Rail, and Support
Suits You
Venue: Malt Cross Cafe Bar
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 11pm
Made to measure beats, breaks, bumps
and off the peg visual treats seamlessly put
together by Invisible Jim and friends.
Bobby Conn
& The Glass Gypsies
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£7.50 adv
Fairport Convention
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£15 adv
tue 10/05
The Void
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 8.30pm - 12am
The Void, Big Red, Fallen View,
Hypnotoad, Mako
wed 11/05
Trivium
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£7 adv
Times: 7.30 pm
Road runner Rage rage tour featuring
Trivium, 3 Inches of Blood and Still Remains
mon 23/05
Hawkwind
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£15 adv
Times: 7.30 pm
Morcheeba
Venue: Rock City
Price:
£16 adv
Times: 7.30 pm
Some people like Morcheeba for the trip-hop
dreamscapes of songs like Trigger Hippie,
which soothe frazzled nerves after a night of
frenzied clubbing. Others bought into them
when the down tempo grooves of 1998’s Big
Calm became an essential accessory at best
dinner parties. Here is a chance to see Paul,
Ross and Skye live act in action at a venue
near you.
LeftLion Presents
Venue: Malt Cross
Price:
Free
Times: 8pm - 11pm
Bringing you the best in Nottingham’s live
music every month for free. This month
sees the album launch party for Lorna.
Miss Black America
Venue: Junktion 7
Times: 9pm - 1am
Plus support
Havana Guns
Venue: The Boat Club
Price:
£3 adv, £5 otd
Times: 7.30 pm
Plus special guests
Magnolia Electric Co.
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£6
mon 30/05
tue 24/05
Story One
Venue: The Social
Price:
£3 adv
tue 31/05
The Magic Band
Venue: The Rescue Rooms
Price:
£17 adv
Jukebox jury
Want to challenge an acoustic
guitarist to learn De La Soul’s The
Magic Number in a week? Head
down to Synergy on a Tuesday night.
Nottingham’s human jukebox, Alex
Chapman, will play you anything from
hippy classic Sweet Home Alabama to
princely ballad Purple Rain. And if he
doesn’t know it, he’ll learn it for you.
Each week you can put forward songs
for Alex to go away and work out how
to play. The audience votes on the
suggestions and the winning song
makes the star spot the following
week. We love a bit of audience
participation. Synergy, Broad Street,
from 10pm, every Tuesday.
In the Moog
Sit down, shut your face and listen
to the boy talk. On April 28, comedy
circuit wide boy Duncan Oakley starts
his own night at the Moog, After six
years playing every town and city
except his own, finally Mr Oakley will
compere a night of games and class
acts for the Nottingham crowd. First
up will be cheeky northerner Steve
Shanyaski, followed by scary copperheaded songster Andrew Lawrence.
DJ Cardigan will be playing his tunes.
So grab your beer and curl up on the
sofas by 8pm for Shut Your Face, at
the Moog, on April 28.
To get your gig
listed here
get it entered
on the website
www.leftlion.co.uk
[email protected]
listings...
clubs/comedy/live music/theatre/exhibitions
Period of April / May
wed 20/04
Hi 5 - Space Magic
Venue: Royal Centre
Runs Until: 21/4
Theatre
sat 02/04
The Mystery Of Madam Midas Or The
Hand Of Fate
Venue: Nottingham Arts Theatre
Times: 7.30pm
Runs Until: 21/4
Billy Liar
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£5.50 - £7
Times: 2.30pm
Runs Until: 24/4
Exhibitions
Reflections
Date:
14/03 - 03/04
Venue: The Yard Gallery
Price:
Free
Times: 11am - 4pm, Monday to Sunday
Jordan McKenzie
Date:
11/04 - 22/04
Venue: The 1851 Gallery
Price:
Free
Times: 10am - 5pm, Monday to Saturday
sat 23/04
Drawing Breath
Date:
14/04
Venue: Bonnington Gallery
Price:
Free
Times: 2pm - 6pm
A one on one performance of 10 minuets
per slot. Booking is essential.
wed 27/04
Derren Brown
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£16.50 - £18.50
An evening of mind control from the tv
magic-man
mon 04/04
The Changeling
Venue: Lace Market Theatre
by Thomas Middleton and William Rowley.
Runs Until: 9/4
tue 05/05
Endangered Species
Venue: Lakeside
Price:
£5 - £10
Times: 8pm
From Here To Maturity Dance Company
Presents Endangered Species.
fri 08/04
Conversations After A Burial
Venue: Lace Market Theatre
Runs Until: 30/4
sun 01/05
I’ve Got Your man
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£18 - £20
Show 2005
Venue: Nottingham Arts Theatre
Price:
£5.50 - £9
Times: 2.30pm and 7pm
wed 11/05
The Crucible
Venue: Nottingham Arts Theatre
Price:
£5.50 - £7
Times: 7.30pm
Runs Until: 16/5
The Seagull
Venue: Lace Market Theatre
Runs Until: 21/5
sat 18/05
Chicken Soup with Barley
Venue: Playhouse
Price:
£6 - £22
Times: 7.45pm
Runs Until: 23/4
mon 11/04
Round The Horne - Revisited
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£8 - £20
Runs Until: 16/4
wed 13/04
Page to
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Stage Performance Workshop
Nottingham Arts Theatre
£1
12pm - 1pm
sat 16/04
Street Trilogy
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£7 - £10
Runs Until: 21/5
Spirit of
Venue:
Price:
Times:
the Dance
Royal Centre
None
7.30pm
mon 23/05
High Society
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£10 - £26.50
Runs Until: 28/5
fri 27/05
Dance The Show:
Lights, Camera, Action
Venue: Nottingham Arts Theatre
Price:
£7 - £7.50
Times: 7.30pm
Runs Until: 29/5
A Who’s Who Of Flapland
Venue: Lakeside Arts Centre
Price:
£9 - £12
Times: 8pm
Runs Until: 30/4
Rat Pack Gala
Venue: Playhouse
Price:
£20
Times: 7.30 pm
Madama Butterfly
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£20 - £30
Times: 7.30pm
sun 17/04
sun 29/05
tue 31/05
Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime
Venue: Royal Centre
Price:
£8 - £22.50
Accessory - Joy Gregory
Date:
23/03 - 07/05
Venue: Angel Row Gallery
Price:
Free
El Antsui: Gawu
Date:
16/04 - 05/06
Venue: Lakeside
Price:
Free
Digwood
Date:
23/3 - 07/05
Venue: Angel Row Gallery
Price:
Free
Window 05: - Sheila Ravnkilde
Date:
23/03 - 09/07
Venue: Angel Row Gallery
Price:
Free
Furball Revisited
Date:
21/04
Venue: Bonnington Gallery
Price:
Free
Times: Performance: 1.30pm onwards,
Lecture: 8pm
thu 16/05
Fiddler On The Roof
Venue: Nottingham Arts Theatre
Price:
£6.50 - £8
Runs Until: 21/5
Dancing With Strangers
Date:
02/04
Venue: Lakeside
Price:
Free
Who By
Date:
Venue:
Price:
Times:
Lawrence In Notts
Date:
02/04 - 15/06
Venue: Lakeside
Price:
Free
Fire
28/04
Bonnington Gallery
£6 / £4
8pm
This Is A Test - James Ireland
Date:
21/05 - 09/07
Venue: Angel Row Gallery
Price:
Free
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
NOTTS 10: MUSIC VENUES
IN NOTTINGHAM THAT
DON’T EXIST ANY MORE
1. BARRY NOBLE’S
ASTORIA
Early 80s. Run by local
Geordie one-armed-bandit
tycoon. Loads of adverts on
Radio Trent and fledgling
Channel 4, with Barry standing
there with a big cheesy
grin and loads of ‘lovelies’
with crappy bubble-perms,
shouting “Iz that alreet fer
yerz?” But then he snuffed it.
Now Ocean, via MGM.
2. ZHIVAGO’S
70s – early 80s. Built into
the side of Viccy Centre, a
subterranean Disco-hole with
a wonky dancefloor that sunk
in the middle. If you didn’t
have a tie, you weren’t coming
in. Now Vision Express.
3. TRENT POLY
60s-90s. For ages, the only
place in town to see vaguely
famous bands. During the 80s,
played host to a procession
of Psychobilly bands, where
Sociology students would take
notes from the balcony while
enormous men and women
in flat-tops would beat each
other to the ground, and then
help each other up and ask
if they were alright, before
beating each other to the
ground again. Now not open
to the general public.
4. EASY STREET
Mid-late 80s. Miami Viceinspired bar. Miss Wet T-shirt
contests. Special appearances
by Radio 1 DJs. To think that
places like Re-Flex have gone
to so much expense trying to
recreate shitholes like this.
Now the Rescue Rooms, and
thank every known deity in
the cosmos for that.
5. THE BEER KELLER
70s. Across the road from
the train station, with a front
entrance designed to look
like you were walking into
a massive barrel. At one
point, it was the nightclub for
Nottingham’s elite (i.e. Radio
Trent DJs and Forest players).
Now knocked down.
6. THE GARAGE
80s. Previously the Ad Lib
(where Jimi Hendrix played),
this was the place to be if
you were a bit alternative
but snobbish. Loads of gigs
by bands not big enough to
fill Rock City (The Redskins,
Three Johns, Hunters Club
etc.) They even played Def
Jam records but they wouldn’t
allow you in if you had trainers
on. Now the Lizard Lounge.
7. THE MAZE
70s-2005. The most intimate
music venue in Notts (which
also had a stuffed cat with
real hands and a bare-knuckle
boxing ring). Now soon to be
more student flats. Pathetic.
8. BOBBY BROWN’S
Late 80s – early 90s. Not
owned by Whitney Houston’s
knock-off, but he would have
been well happy to have a
pint in here (and would have
pulled quite easily). Used to
hold annual Jazz festivals,
where we saw an early gig by
the Brand New Heavies where
the band outnumbered the
audience. Now Benson’s.
29
9. THE VIDEO DISCO BAR
2. WAY AHEAD
6. REVOLVER RECORDS
Early 80s. The basement of
the Palais, where one could
wear New Romantic gear
without fear of a shaming, and
stare glassy-eyed at tellies
which played Rockit by Herbie
Hancock and the rude version
of Girls On Film by Duran
Duran. Over and over and
over again. Now a toilet
in Oceana.
70s-90s. If you were of the
Greb persuasion, this was
the one-stop shop for all your
Metallic needs (apart from
patchouli oil). The only time
anyone with hair above their
arse ever entered the shop
was to buy gig and coach
tickets. That part of the
business was so lucrative that
it swallowed the shop whole.
Early 80s. Part of a longforgotten chain, we got Gary
Glitter’s autograph from there
when his was making his fifth
or sixth comeback. Now, we
could go back to the same
premises (Sportizus near
Broado) and get 24p for it.
10. LOCAL SCHOOL
YOUTH CLUB
3. THE OTHER PENDULUM
RECORDS
70s-90s. A chance to
reaffirm your standing in the
community whilst feeling the
subversive thrill of wearing
your bondage trousers or
fishtail parka on school
premises, whilst leaning
up against a mural of disco
dancers or poorly-executed
graf that would be cuttingedge today while being
supervised by a beardie in
loon pants and a tank top.
Now replaced by maximumsecurity fencing and gormless
nob-ends wobbling around
the estate on mini-superbikes
suitable for five year-olds.
Twats.
70s-90s. Not the one that
still exists today, but the one
with the massive cabinet full
of Jam badges, plastic Walt
Jabsco brooches, enormous
Mod target patches, Madness
combs, and skinny ties. For
many years the favourite
hangout spot of Axe Man,
taking the piss out of 12 yearold Mods and bragging about
his exploits in the Sal.
NOTTS 10: RECORD
SHOPS IN NOTTINGHAM
THAT DON’T EXIST ANY
MORE
1. ARCADE RECORDS
80s – early 90s. Upstairs was
chart mank. Downstairs was
the only place apart from
Selectadisc that sold import
hiphop vinyl, along with
pirated Marley Marl and Mr
Magic WBLS tapes that were
respectfully hidden when any
rappers were in town. Now
part of the Holiday Inn.
for the answers to the previous Nottsword
log on to www.leftlion.co.uk/nottsword
Across
Down
3. Oddly lined inside the horse (7)
4. Not allowed back in (8)
5. After seeing forest, a God takes a lesson (10)
8. Brought no tea, Boil madly within (10)
10. Place for a vehicle with a lieutenant on! (7)
12. Attach an ex-president (10)
17. Radical – A place to cross the river (7)
19. Touring round with a double – d (10)
20. Leper may find a penny here (9)
21. Subject to a party in the west or south (10)
25. Bones set near University (7)
27. Nonsense is fine here (8)
28. Where a snake yells back endlessly (5)
29. Raise in a scam (7)
30. To Ned, Law is crazy! (8)
31. Pastures in the woods (12)
1. The National Theatre is in Mr Edmond’s Back (6)
2. Sounds like a good place to relax (8)
4. Get birds down for – No No! (12)
5. Wolf gets rid, Strangely (7)
6. The theme park is nice, even without me (7)
7. Ran around before the aged (6)
9. Leper may find a penny and leave his car here (13)
10. Strangely not caring, but right at heart (10)
11. Calvin Klein is not applicable in Hull (7)
13. Place for a troll, Note (9)
14. Mags not suitable here (7)
15. Go up here to play (8)
16. Sounds like it was devoured some time ago (9)
18. The herd is confused and ill here (7)
22. The show rode into town (8)
23. Area weighing nine tonnes (8)
24. Around Neds layer, ease off (7)
25. Boards around with a letter (7)
26. Little Stanley has directions to this area (7)
4. VIRGIN RECORDS,
CLUMBER STREET
Late 70s-early 80s. First shop
in town to have a video wall,
which played a non-stop loop
of Journey, The Selector, and
Judas Priest doing Breaking
The Law that you had to put
massive headphones on to
listen to. Accused of gross
obscenity and taken to court
over Never Mind The Bollocks
posters. Now Superdrug.
5. HMV, BROAD MARSH
70s-mid-80s. Full-on disco
light extravaganza made
this the kind of place that
John Travolta would have
patronised, only ruined by the
queues of grannies buying
Mary’s Boy Child and When A
Child Is Born. Now a cheapo
sports shop.
7. GUAVA RECORDS
90s. Bravely set up shop next
to the Selectadisc empire,
selling import hiphop and
DnB, as well as spray paint
and graf pens.
8. FOX RECORDS
70s-mid 80s. Regularly
rammed out on a Saturday
with Mods, who would piss
the management off by trying
to play Green Onions on the
organs. Now taken over by the
keyboard half of the business.
9. OUR PRICE
Late 80s-90s. Unlamented Lshaped chain store wrapped
around what is now USC.
If you were looking for 600
copies of Sade’s Diamond
Life, you were in luck. If you
wanted anything that wasn’t
in the charts, you weren’t,
usually. Now JJB Sports.
10. THE COUNTER OF YOUR
LOCAL NEWSAGENTS
70s-early 80s. As well as 10p
mixes and copies of BattleAction, your Newsie could
also sort you out with cutprice chart smashes of three
months hence that had been
ripped out of jukeboxes. No
picture sleeve, but the chance
to snap up Remember When
by Showaddywaddy without
being laughed at in a record
shop was too good to miss.
Now replaced by poor-quality
DVDs.
30
www.leftlion.co.uk/issue4
Roger Mean’s
Rocky Horrorscopes
Aries (March 20 - April 20)
Libra (September 23 - October 23)
It’s crazy o’clock at the circus that is your life! Now is the time to go loco.
A maniacal grin and a vacant lost look in your eyes are the must have facial
expressions of the spring season. You’re chic baby, you’re chic! Get on the catwalk
and remember to pout…
Sun is shining, weather is sweet and the best way to poison squirrels is hazelnuts
dipped in cyanide. Rats with big bushy tails and murder on their minds, get them
before they get you first. Their passion for ultraviolence is matched only by their love of
the old in-out in-out. Chocolate Orange stylee.
Taurus (April 20 - May 21)
Scorpio (October 23 - November 23)
Don’t get mad, get yourself arrested! A night in the cells would be good for your karma.
Those inch thick sponge mattresses that they have will offer you a good nights rest,
with the security of knowing you are no longer in control of what happens. The prison
guard is always watching you…
There are no strangers, only friends you haven’t betrayed yet. Between the 17th and
24th, you should expect to be visit by El Chupacabra, the Goat Sucker. He’s a good lad
really, he just gets a bad rep. He’ll be fine as long as you make sure there are plenty of
goats around.
Gemini (May 21 - June 21)
Sagittarius (22 - December 22)
Bigamy up yourself! It’s time to go on a marriage spree. See how many you can manage
without getting caught. I managed 13 wives one year, but I know people who have
done twice that. The key to success is to have one in every harbour and choose characters that don‘t interact much. Minimise your marital loss…
You don’t believe in the power of the zodiac, so why are you even reading this? Do you
think I’m here to amuse you? To provide you with some form of banal entertainment?
Put this rag down, get off the toilet, wipe your ass and grow up you snivelling freak.
Don’t make me repeat myself.
Cancer (June 21 - July 23)
Capricorn (December 22 - January 19)
On occasion there is something to be said for man’s best friend, but not today. If you
see any canines on your journey through the neighbourhood ignore them. Do not
attempt to start a conversation by any means. Dogs are crap at smalltalk, anecdotes
and they tell the shittest jokes. Cats are your friends!
A quick break this month will do you the world of good. An arm or a leg perhaps? Your
spine? Maybe even your collar bone? The more daring and wreckless you feel today,
the more you will regret it in later life. Why bother feeling comfortable when you’re a
pensioner hey? Throw yourself down the stairs and forget about tomorrow…
Leo (July 23 - August 23)
Aquarius (January 20 - February 19)
Ever feel like you’ve lost a tenner and gained a fatal illness? Hot sweats around your
collar are a sign of anxiety. Loosen your physical tension by breaking eggs in the bath
or going outside, getting in the car, locking the doors and having a good shout!
When Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in 1969 you can bet that he wasn’t
thinking about how much money he would have to save to be able to afford to pay that
bill you have racked up on ebay. Go easy on the online bidding fool! You know that you
don’t need that ridiculous pneumatic vase you purchased. Smash your PC up with it!
Virgo (August 23 - September 23)
Choose a colleague at work that you don’t like. Wait until they have their phone turned
off. Phone them up and record their answerphone message. Then phone them back
repeatedly and play it to their answerphone, leaving several messages. Wait until they
turn their phone back on to see what they make of it…
Pisces (February 19 - March 20)
Just when you thought it was safe to go back on public transport, your easy rider
buscard has mysteriously run out. Not only that but all the drivers hate you. They held
a private meeting and decided that if they see you they’re going to try and crash the
bus especially. Beware. You are a danger to yourself and others…
NOTTS
Bones’ Fun Cave...
Grate Misstakes in Cultural Histroy
TRUMPS
East Midlands Today
Trifling Local
News Stations
Central News East
This is it! This is our
moment...hold still
I can’t
I can’t
You can
Distance of Studio from Nottm (miles
)
#04: Sarajevo 1984 - Orville & Dean’s “Bolero” changes figure skating forever
0.4
Distance of Studio from Nott
m (miles)
48
Presenters with Notts accents
0
nts
Presenters with Notts acce
0
Presenters worth poking
1
Presenters worth poking
0
News items of gripping importance (avg)
3
News
Items about animals on skateboards
4
Items about animals on skat
(avg)
ce (avg)
items of gripping importan
eboards (avg)
2
9
We’re looking for a Designer
with three to five years experience
For more details visit
purplecircle.co.uk and click on jobs
Please send CV’s via post or email to
Jenni Taylor
Purple Circle Brand Consultants
Global Headquarters
1 Howard Street
Nottingham NG1 3LT
[email protected]

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