Quarter Notes

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Quarter Notes
September • October • November
Quarter Notes
89.7 WCPE’s member magazine • Fall 2015
Brothers and Sisters
Honoring Bryn Terfel
Fall Membership Drive
table of contents
WCPE Daily Schedule
Weekdays
12:00 Sleepers, Awake! with Phil Davis
midnight Campbell and Sherman Wallace
5:30 a.m. Rise and Shine with David Ballantyne
9:00 a.m. WCPE Classical Café with David
Ballantyne and Dan McHugh
9:00 a.m.– Final Friday of each month: All-Request
10:00 p.m. Friday
1:00 p.m. As You Like It with Tara Lynn
4:00 p.m. Allegro with Dick Storck
7:00 p.m. Mondays through Wednesdays and
Fridays: WCPE Concert Hall with Andy
Huber, David Wayne, Warner Hall, Larry
Hedlund, Juergen Rathgeber, and a
variety of volunteer hosts.
Thursdays: WCPE Opera House with Bob
Chapman
8:00 p.m. Mondays: Monday Night at the Symphony
with Andy Huber and David Wayne
10:00 p.m. Music in the Night with David Wayne,
Dave Stackowicz, Bob Chapman, Pete
Winn, and a variety of hosts
Saturdays
12:00 Sleepers, Awake! with Phil Davis
midnight Campbell and Sherman Wallace
6:00 a.m. Weekend Classics with Dan McHugh,
Helen Halva, Alex Beary, Curtis Brothers,
Joyce Kidd, and a variety of volunteer
hosts
6:00 p.m. Saturday Evening Request Program with
Haydn Jones and a variety of volunteer
hosts.
Sundays
12:00 Sleepers, Awake! with Phil Davis
midnight Campbell and Sherman Wallace
6:00 a.m. Weekend Classics with Bruce Huffine
7:30 a.m. Sing for Joy with Bruce Benson
8:00 a.m. Great Sacred Music with Rob Kennedy
11:00 a.m. Weekend Classics with Jonathan Bailey,
Greysolynne Hyman, Carol McPherson,
Patty Smith-Pearce, and a variety of
volunteer hosts
6:00 p.m. Preview! with Paul Jordan and Steve
Thebes
9:00 p.m. Wavelengths with Ed Amend
10:00 p.m. Peaceful Reflections with Ed Amend
B
Quarter Notes®
WCPE’s member magazine
Vol. 37, no. 3
WCPE’s mission is to expand the community of Classical
music lovers by sharing Classical music with everyone,
everywhere, at any time. We entertain, educate, and
engage our audience with informative announcers,
programs, and publications. We strive to make it easy to
appreciate and enjoy Great Classical Music.
Managing editor: Christina Strobl Romano
Designer: Deborah Cruz
Printer: Chamblee Graphics
WCPE Staff
Deborah S. Proctor........................ General Manager
& Chief Engineer
David Ballantyne.............................. Assistant to the
Program Director*
Peter Blume......Business and Underwriting Director
Curtis Brothers............................Facilities Engineer;
Tower Antenna Contact*
Phil Davis Campbell................................Announcer
Bob Chapman.............................. Opera House Host
Patricia Crane..............Director of Member Support
Adrienne DiFranco.....Accounting/Member Support
John Graham........................... Engineering Director
Rob Kennedy...................... Great Sacred Music Host
Tara Lynn....................Arts & Community Liaison*
Eric Maynard.....................................Webmaster; IT
Dan McHugh.................. Public Relations Director*
Jane O’Connor..................... Volunteer Coordinator
Stu Pattison.......................................... Data Services
Jonny Pierce........................ Programming Assistant*
Christina Strobl Romano.....Director of Publications
Alex Ruzzier.........................Underwriting Assistant*
Patty Smith-Pearce..............Music Library Assistant*
Dick Storck.................................. Program Director*
Sherman Wallace.....................................Announcer
William Woltz.................................Music Director*
*This staff member is also an announcer.
©Copyright 1978–2015, WCPE Radio, Raleigh, NC.
All rights reserved. All material disseminated by WCPE
is copyrighted or used under application regulations.
Allegro; As You Like It; Classical Cafe; Quarter Notes; Rise
and Shine; Sleepers, Awake!; The Classical Station; and
WCPE are registered or pending trademarks or service
marks of WCPE.
WCPE
P.O. Box 897
Wake Forest, NC 27588
800.556.5178
Information: [email protected]
Editor: [email protected]
Web site: theclassicalstation.org
Meet Your Host:
Ed Amend
Home Sweet Home.................2
How long have you been an announcer
at WCPE, and what attracted you to The
Classical Station? I started training this
past January. I used to listen to WCPE while
driving home from work (now I work from
home and travel occasionally); then I realized
the tower was in my “backyard.”
September Calendar................4
What is your favorite genre of music? Who
are some of your favorite composers and
artists? There is very little music I don’t
like. I love Classical, country, classic rock,
pop. My favorite Classical genre would be
the Romantic Period.
Kidznotes Classics.....................7
Do you have a background in music
performance? Yes, I played trombone in
high school. This included concert band and
marching band. On the marching band field
I would play a bass trombone. An exciting
event from this time period include the fact
that I (along with my high school band in
Old Tappan, NJ) played the half time show
for a NY Giants Game in 1978.
Is there anything else you’d like your
listeners to know about you? I grew up
in New Jersey, with roots in New York City.
I am one of nine children. I volunteer at my
church, St. Catherine’s, helping people get
jobs by improving their interview skills.
Fall Highlights.........................3
October Calendar....................5
November Calendar................6
My Life in Music......................7
Mondays This Quarter
Monday Night at the Symphony
and Renaissance Fare......................8
Opera House...........................9
Sundays This Quarter
Great Sacred Music, Preview,
Wavelengths, and Peaceful
Reflections.................................10
Program Guide......................12
Thank-you Gifts....................16
WCPE in the Community.....26
Lately We’ve Read
That Iron String By Jack Kohl............27
On the Cover
Sibling Revelry.............................28
Bryn Terfel............................29
Classical Community............30
What You’re Saying...............32
Donor Spotlight
Victor Schoenbach.........................32
On the cover:
On the birthday of composer
Michael Haydn (Franz Josef ’s
younger brother), we feature
notable siblings in Classical
music: Claremont Trio and
more. Read more on page 28.
Photo by Merri Cyr
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home sweet home
Great Classical Music
Because of You!
Labor Day Weekend
September 4–7
We’ll play lots of your Classical favorites for
the last holiday weekend of summer, culminating on Labor Day, September 7.
First, a big “thank you!”
First, let me give you a big “thank you” for
helping us with your summertime donation.
Summer is typically a slow time of the year
for donations to community radio stations
like WCPE Radio, The Classical Station. I
truly appreciate all the support you and other
listeners gave to us.
Patriot Day
September 11
Music of reflection and remembrance at various times through the day.
Rosh Hashanah
You and many others helped us on our
37th birthday, celebrated on July 18. We
held a mini-festival from the Friday before
that through the Sunday after. Thank you
very much for giving the station a birthday
gift on one of those three days. I really do
appreciate your wonderful and especially
longstanding support.
Many donors are deciding to become sustaining members by giving us a set amount every
month. They give $5, $10, $15, and more
every month. I can’t tell you often enough
how being a sustaining member helps the station—because I can count on your donation
every month when I’m paying the bills.
I know your gift will be coming in, and it
makes my job so much easier because I know
I can count on you. Every month, I have to
cover $151,900 in operating costs, and you
make it easier to meet that big number. So let
me tell you again: thank you very, very much!
Let’s move on to the fall membership drive
and what our overall goal is:
From September 1 through December
31, we need to raise not only four times
$151,900—but we have to exceed that
because the months of January and February
and the first half of March are really financially slow. I have to be ready for that.
We hold our silent fundraiser through the
mail during the month of September, and
then again during the month of December.
During these two months, donors like you
answer my several fundraising request letters,
and you really come through for us. You
help us through both the mail and the web
site giving page. But one important thing
is missing: I don’t have the addresses of the
newest listeners, and they haven’t decided to
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fall highlights
Sunset, September 13
Yom Kippur
Sunset, September 22
Deborah S. Proctor
General Manager
become supporters because they don’t know
how important they are.
So we need to hold a fall drive over the air,
to tell these folks about us and to encourage
them to make their first gift. We’ve found
that the best time to hold this fall “Help!”
drive is during the last week of October. As
I write this, I don’t have a goal to give you,
because I can’t predict how much the silent
fundraiser will yield. However, I can tell you
that, historically, half of our gifts come in
during the last four months of the year, so
this is an important time for us. Sometimes
we need to have a mini-drive at the end of
December to meet our financial obligations.
Donors come through for us, and I squirrel
away the funds which we don’t need immediately for the months later in the year that
are traditionally slow.
Keep up the good work telling your
friends about us! Remember that no matter
where they live, if your friends like Great
Classical Music, they can hear it on
theclassicalstation.org. You are wonderful!
Special music to mark the beginning of Rosh
Hashana (the Jewish New Year) and Yom
Kippur (the Day of Atonement). The programs air at 6:00 p.m. ET on each day, with
encore airings to be announced.
Brothers and Sisters
September 14
We’ll celebrate the birthday of composer
Michael Haydn (Franz Josef ’s younger
brother) and feature other notable siblings
in Classical music: Gil and Orli Shaham
performing together and separately, Mari
and Hakon Samuelsen, the Ying Quartet,
the Claremont Trio, and the brothers
Contiguglia, among others.
Great Ballet Days
September 17–20
Complete musical performances of some of
your favorite ballets, including Tchaikovsky’s
Sleeping Beauty and Delibes’s Coppélia, plus
selected ballet highlights each day.
Armchair Travelers Weekend
WCPE’s Fall Membership Drive
October 23–November 1
Thank you for your generous financial
support, which enables WCPE to share
Great Classical Music with listeners everywhere. Make your tax-deductible gift
at theclassicalstation.org, or mail it to
WCPE Radio, PO Box 897, Wake Forest,
NC 27588.
Great Nicknames Weekend
November 7–8
What’s the story behind Haydn’s Farewell
Symphony and Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata?
Join WCPE for a weekend full of colorful
musical works with intriguing names.
Thanksgiving Day/New World
Weekend
November 26–29
Celebrate home and family with Classical
favorites chosen to provide a beautiful
accompaniment to your Thanksgiving gathering. The weekend that follows is filled with
the best offerings of American composers
and performers.
All-Request Fridays
September 25 and
November 27
You’re the music director, from
9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Eastern Time. Submit your
advance requests at
theclassicalstation.org,
or call WCPE at
919.556.0123 on the
morning of the
request program.
October 10–11
Let the music take you away to beautiful and
enchanting places, from the Blue Danube to
the Grand Canyon, the canals of Venice, the
courtyards of the Alhambra, and an English
country garden.
Thank you again!
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1 Tuesday
15 Tuesday
1 Thursday
Johann Pachelbel 1653
Engelbert Humperdinck 1854
Seiji Ozawa 1935 (80th birthday)
Leonard Slatkin 1944
2 Wednesday
3 Thursday
Bruno Walter 1876
Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos 1933
Jessye Norman 1945 (70th birthday)
16 Wednesday
17 Thursday
Paul Dukas 1865 (150th anniversary
of birth)
Vladimir Horowitz 1903
2 Friday
J.C. Bach 1735
Giacomo Meyerbeer 1791
Amy Beach 1867
Eduardo Mata 1942
Marc-André Hamelin 1961
6 Sunday
Yevgeny Svetlanov 1928
Joan Tower 1938
Labor Day
7 Monday
Jean-Yves Thibaudet 1961
8 Tuesday
Antonín Dvořák 1841
Christoph von Dohnanyi 1929
9 Wednesday
Ádám Fischer 1949
10 Thursday
Christopher Hogwood 1941
Patriot Day
11 Friday
William Boyce 1711
Friedrich Kuhlau 1786
Arvo Pärt 1935 (80th birthday)
12 Saturday
Jeffrey Kahane 1956
brothers
and sisters
13 Sunday
Rosh Hashanah
begins at sunset
Girolamo Frescobaldi 1583
Clara Wieck Schumann 1819
Arnold Schoenberg 1874
14 Monday
Michael Haydn 1737
Luigi Cherubini 1760
Kurt Sanderling 1912
20 Sunday
21 Monday
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski 1923
4 Sunday
5 Monday
6 Tuesday
Karol Szymanowski 1882
Stanley Myers 1930 (85th
anniversary of birth)
7 Wednesday
Gustav Holst 1874
Yom Kippur
begins at sunset
22 Tuesday
Alfred Wallenstein 1898
Charles Dutoit 1936
Yo-Yo Ma 1955 (60th birthday)
Alison Balsom 1978
8 Thursday
Henryk Szeryng 1918
23 Wednesday
24 Thursday
Autumn begins
Louis Vierne 1870
9 Friday
John Rutter 1945 (70th birthday)
25 Friday
All-Request Friday
Jean-Philippe Rameau 1683
Dmitri Shostakovich 1906
Colin Davis 1927
Glenn Gould 1932
26 Saturday
Charles Munch 1891
George Gershwin 1898
27 Sunday
Misha Dichter 1945 (70th birthday)
Dmitri Sitkovetsky 1954
28 Monday
Alina Ibragimova 1985 (30th
birthday)
29 Tuesday
Václav Neumann 1920 (95th
anniversary of birth)
Richard Bonynge 1930 (85th
birthday)
30 Wednesday
Johan Svendsen 1840 (175th
anniversary of birth)
Václav Smetáček 1906
David Oistrakh 1908
armchair travelers
weekend
labor day weekend
Anton Bruckner 1824
Darius Milhaud 1892
5 Saturday
Saverio Mercadante 1795
Charles Griffes 1884
18 Friday
19 Saturday
Michel Plasson 1933
3 Saturday
great ballet days
Pietro Locatelli 1695
4 Friday
4
october calendar
photo: Courtesy of Decca
september calendar
Giuseppe Verdi 1813
Camille Saint-Saëns 1835
10 Saturday
Chris Walden 1966
Evgeny Kissin 1971
11 Sunday
12 Monday
Ralph Vaughan Williams 1872
Luciano Pavarotti 1935 (80th
anniversary of birth)
Ton Koopman 1944
13 Tuesday
Jean-Yves Thibaudet b. 1961
18 Sunday
Miguel Llobet 1878
Wynton Marsalis 1961
19 Monday
Emil Gilels 1916
20 Tuesday
Charles Ives 1874
Ivo Pogorelich 1958
21 Wednesday
Joseph Canteloube 1879
Georg Solti 1912
Malcolm Arnold 1921
22 Thursday
Franz Liszt 1811
23 Friday
Albert Lortzing 1801
24 Saturday
Malcolm Bilson 1935 (80th
birthday)
25 Sunday
Johann Strauss II 1825
Georges Bizet 1838
Midori Gotō 1971
26 Monday
Peter Van Anrooy 1879
14 Wednesday
Domenico Scarlatti 1685
27 Tuesday
Alexander von Zemlinsky 1871
15 Thursday
Niccolò Paganini 1782
28 Wednesday
Bernhard Henrik Crusell 1775
Dag Wirén 1905
16 Friday
Howard Hanson 1896
29 Thursday
30 Friday
Marin Alsop 1956
17 Saturday
Herbert Howells 1892
Stephen Bishop Kovacevich 1940
(75th birthday)
Philip Heseltine (AKA Peter
Warlock) 1894
Frans Brüggen 1934
Shlomo Mintz 1957
31 Saturday
Halloween
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Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf 1739
Giuseppe Sinopoli 1946
Election Day
3 Tuesday
Samuel Scheidt 1587
Vincenzo Bellini 1801
4 Wednesday
5 Thursday
great nicknames
weekend
First Mondays at 7:00 p.m.
(Eastern)
With host Tara Lynn
Joan Sutherland 1926
Hélène Grimaud 1969
8 Sunday
Arnold Bax 1883
Simon Standage 1941
9 Monday
Ivan Moravec 1930 (85th birthday)
Thomas Quasthoff 1959
Bryn Terfel 1965 (50th birthday)
10 Tuesday
François Couperin 1668
Veterans Day
Ernest Ansermet 1883
Vernon Handley 1930 (85th
anniversary of birth)
12 Thursday
George Whitefield Chadwick 1854
14 Saturday
Leopold Mozart 1719
Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel 1805
Aaron Copland 1900
15 Sunday
Jorge Bolet 1914
Daniel Barenboim 1942
W.F. Bach 1710
Joaquín Rodrigo 1901
Benjamin Britten 1913
Kent Nagano 1951
Stephen Hough 1961
23 Monday
Anita Burroughs-Price
Harp, North Carolina Symphony
Monday, September 7, at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 13, at 5:00 p.m.
Samuel Almaguer
Acting Principal Clarinet, North Carolina
Symphony
Manuel de Falla 1876
24 Tuesday
25 Wednesday
Monday, October 5, at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, October 11, at 5:00 p.m.
Wilhelm Kempff 1895
Jean-Claude Malgoire 1940
Suzanne Kelly
Violin 2, North Carolina Symphony
Thanksgiving
Monday, November 2, at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, November 8, at 5:00 p.m.
Earl Wild 1915 (100th anniversary
of birth)
Eugene Istomin 1925 (90th
anniversary of birth)
27 Friday
All-Request Friday
Franz Krommer 1759
Hilary Hahn 1979
28 Saturday
Jean-Baptiste Lully 1632
Ferdinand Ries 1784
Anton Rubinstein 1829
29 Sunday
Gaetano Donizetti 1797
30 Monday
Charles-Valentin Alkan 1813
Radu Lupu 1945 (70th birthday)
new world weekend
Alexander Borodin 1833
13 Friday
Francisco Tárrega 1852
22 Sunday
26 Thursday
Anita Burroughs-Price
Tune in for a full hour of highly influential
recordings, as we get to know our state’s fine
musicians. Each month, WCPE’s Tara Lynn
invites a member of the North Carolina
Symphony to share favorite Classical works
and stories from the road to professional
musicianship.
Kenneth Schermerhorn 1929
21 Saturday
John Philip Sousa 1854
Ignaz Paderewski 1860
7 Saturday
6
Carl Maria von Weber 1786
Eugene Ormandy 1899
19 Thursday
Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov 1859
20 Friday
György Cziffra 1921
6 Friday
11 Wednesday
Charles Mackerras 1925 (90th
anniversary of birth)
18 Wednesday
Kidznotes Classics
Great Classical Music for
kids, presented by kids
on WCPE
photo: Courtesy of Samuel Almaguer
Eugen Jochum 1902
2 Monday
16 Monday
17 Tuesday
Samuel Almaguer
photo: Courtesy of the NC Symphony
Daylight Saving Time ends
photo: Ken Demery Photography
1 Sunday
mondays this quarter
photo: Courtesy of the NC Symphony
november calendar
Suzanne Kelly
Monday, September 21,
at 7:00 p.m.
Sunday, September 27
at 5:00 p.m.
Kidznotes Classics returns to WCPE this fall!
Based on Venezuela’s successful El Sistema
program, Kidznotes is a music program that
inspires social change for its students and
community in Durham and Raleigh, North
Carolina. In this second annual edition of
Kidznotes Classics, students in grades 5
through 9 will share favorite Classical works
and reflect on the rewarding experiences
that their musical education has offered.
Kidznotes Classics airs Monday, September
21, at 7:00 p.m. ET and Sunday, September
27, at 5:00 p.m. ET.
7
R
enaissance
Fare
Second Mondays at 7:00 p.m.
(Eastern)
With host George Douglas
Renaissance Fare in September will feature music from the Elizabethan period
in England. The great musical renaissance
started a little later in England than in Italy
and other parts of mainland Europe, but the
music caught on very fast, and the period
created many famous composers. We’ll
listen to music of John Dowland, Anthony
Holborne, and many others played on the
most popular instruments of this period.
The program airs on Monday, September
14, at 7:00 p.m., with a repeat broadcast
on Sunday, September 20, at 5:00 p.m. (all
times Eastern).
opera house
In October, we celebrate the discovery of
America in 1492. If Columbus had had
an iPod for the long journey, what kind
of music would he have been listening to?
We’ll listen to music from the times of
Christopher Columbus, during the early
stages of Renaissance Music. Listen on
Monday, October 12, at 7:00 p.m., with a
repeat broadcast on Sunday, October 18, at
5:00 p.m.
After October’s program, it seems only
natural to listen to music the pilgrims would
have been listening to when they landed at
Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607. We’ll hear
how the music changed from the late 15th
to the early 17th centuries. This edition of
Renaissance Fare will be heard on Monday,
November 9, at 7:00 p.m., with a repeat
broadcast on Sunday, November 15, at 5:00
p.m.
Listen to Renaissance Fare on the second
Monday of each month on WCPE, The
Classical Station, with a repeat broadcast on
the following Sunday at 5:00 p.m.
September
By William Woltz
Mondays at 8:00 p.m. (Eastern)
Each week we spend two hours featuring
one great orchestra on Monday Night at the
Symphony. Whenever possible, we like to
showcase what the orchestra is doing today,
with its current music director or a great
guest conductor. But we also search our
ever-growing music library for classic performances, some of which have never been
heard before on WCPE.
As always, it is your financial support that
makes this possible, and for that we are
very grateful. Be sure to listen each week as
we spotlight the world’s best orchestras on
Monday Night at the Symphony.
8
7
14
21
28
San Francisco Symphony
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
London Symphony Orchestra
October
5
12
19
26
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
Staatskapelle Dresden
Seattle Symphony
Show your support for Monday Night at the
Symphony during WCPE’s Fall Membership
Drive
November
2
9
16
23
30
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
French National Orchestra
Scottish Chamber Orchestra
Berlin Philharmonic
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
photo: Festival de Saint-Denis – Sébastien Chambert
mondays this quarter
Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. (Eastern)
With host Bob Chapman
September 3
Auber’s La Muette de Portici
Alphonse (Aler), engaged to Elvire (Anderson),
seduces and abandons the mute Fenella, whose
brother Masaniello (Kraus) uses his Neapolitan
people’s dissatisfaction with their Spanish rulers
to encourage revolution.
September 10
Golijov’s Ainadamar;
Guerrero’s Los Gavilanes
Argentinian composer Osvaldo Golijov’s 2003
opera about playwright Federico Garcia Lorca is
heard along with a zarzuela by Jacinto Guerrero.
September 17
Halévy’s La Juive
Rachel (Isokoski), daughter of the Jewish
goldsmith Eléazar (Shicoff), discovers her lover
“Samuel” is actually Prince Léopold (Todorovic),
who’s married to Princess Eudoxie (Schörg).
September 24
Flotow’s Martha
Lady Harriet (Rothenberger) and her maid Nancy
(Fassbaender), disguised as peasants, become
servants of farmers Plunkett (Prey) and Lyonel
(Gedda). (From the Ruocchio Archives.)
October 1
Goldmark’s Die Königin von Saba
Although engaged to Sulamith (Kincses),
Solomon’s (Sólyom-Nagy) favorite Assad
(Jerusalem) has fallen in love with the Queen of
Sheba (Takács).
Composer Osvaldo Golijov
featured September 10
October 22
Gounod’s Mireille
Mireille (Freni) loves Vincent (Vanzo), but her
father, Ramon (Bacquier), wants her to marry
Ourrias (Van Dam). (From the Ruocchio Archives.)
October 29
Fall Membership Drive
Bob Chapman, Rob Kennedy, and guest co-hosts
play recent recordings as you pledge your support
for the WCPE Opera House.
November 5
Erkel’s Hunyadi László
King László V (Molnár) befriends László Hunyadi
(Gulyás), son of a popular Hungarian military hero,
but soon plots to have him murdered. The king
then falls in love with Hunyadi’s fiancée, Mária
(Kalmár).
November 12
Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte
Flute-playing Tamino (Jerusalem) falls in love
with Pamina (Popp), daughter of the Queen of
the Night (Gruberova). She has been kidnapped
by Sarastro (Bracht). Bird catcher Papageno
(Brendel) wants only food, drink, and Papagena
(Lindner).
November 19
Bizet’s Carmen
Attila the Hun (Ramey) celebrates yet another
victory and falls in love with female warrior
Odabella (Studer), who stabs him to death with
the sword he gave her.
Naïve soldier Don José (Shicoff) falls for freespirited Carmen (Norman), helps her escape from
jail, goes AWOL, and joins her in a smuggling gang,
only to lose the Gypsy seductress to the dashing
bullfighter Escamillo (Estes). (From the Ruocchio
Archives.)
October 15
November 26 Donizetti’s Rosmonda d’Inghilterra
October 8
Verdi’s Attila
Britten’s Peter Grimes
In a Suffolk fishing village, Grimes (Vickers)
has lost an apprentice at sea under suspicious
circumstances and is warned not to take on
another. Schoolmistress Ellen Orford (Harper)
stands by him, despite general disapproval.
Enrico II (Greager) returns from war to his
mistress Rosmonda (Kenny), who doesn’t know his
true identity. When she learns she’s been sleeping
with the King of England, she’s horrified, but
Enrico promises to make her his queen.
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sundays this quarter
sundays this quarter
Preview!
September 6
Bach: Cantata BWV 25
Beethoven: Missa Solemnis
Sundays at 6:00 p.m. ET
With hosts Paul Jordan and
Steve Thebes
September 13
Bach: Cantata BWV 138
Mozart: Requiem
WCPE keeps you up to date on Classical
music events in the Triangle and around
the world every week on Preview! Listen
for the best new releases of Classical music
recordings as well as exciting interviews with
today’s music makers.
September 20
Bach: Cantata BWV 95
Haydn: Lord Nelson Mass
September 27
Bach: Cantata BWV 114
Martin: Mass for Double Choir
October 4
Bach: Cantata BWV 169
Gounod: Requiem
Johannes Ockeghem
featured on November 29
October 11
Bach: Cantata BWV 5
Rossini: Petite Messe Solennelle
October 18
Bach: Cantata BWV 162
Bruckner: Mass in F minor
Great Sacred Music
Sundays at 8:00 a.m. (Eastern)
With host Rob Kennedy
October 25
Bach: Cantata BWV 109
Howells: Hymnus Paradisi
November 1
Bach: Cantata BWV 115
Honegger: Le Roi David
November 8
Bach: Cantata BWV 163
Bach: Magnificat
Sundays at 9:00 p.m. ET
With host Ed Amend
Every week, WCPE showcases the
best works of modern composers on
Wavelengths, our Sunday evening program
of new music. We feature works written
from 1950 to the present, with a strong
focus on the 21st century. But we also reach
farther back into the 20th century to present
important compositions that have helped
pave the way for today’s music.
Wavelengths depends upon financial support
from listeners. Please make your tax-deductible gift online at theclassicalstation.org.
Arvo Pärt
November 15
Bach: Cantata BWV 60
Pärt: Berliner Messe
November 22
Bach: Cantata BWV 90
Handel: Brockes Passion
Arthur Honegger
featured on November 1
November 29
Bach: Cantata BWV 62
Ockeghem: Missa l’Homme Armé
Keep in touch with The Classical Station all the time by liking us on
our Facebook page! Just go to www.facebook.com/theclassicalstation.
Don’t forget to tell your friends about us!
10
Sundays at 10:00 p.m. ET
With host Ed Amend
Each Sunday evening after Wavelengths,
WCPE brings you two hours of relaxing music on Peaceful Reflections. It’s a
thoughtful mix of orchestral, chamber,
choral, and organ works, chosen to help you
unwind from the week just ended and prepare for the one ahead. Peaceful Reflections,
Sunday from 10:00 p.m. to midnight ET
on The Classical Station, WCPE.
11
program listings (september)
All programming is subject to change. For a
complete list of a specific day’s music, go to
theclassicalstation.org.
1 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Pachelbel: Suite in B-flat for Strings
10:00 a.m. Vivaldi: Four Seasons
12:00 p.m. Humperdinck: Overture to Hansel
and Gretel
2:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 96 in D
(Miracle)
3:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no. 1
in F-sharp Minor
4:00 p.m. Pachelbel: Canon and Gigue in D
7:00 p.m. Mussorgsky: Night on Bald Mountain
8:00 p.m. Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole
9:00 p.m. Brahms: Serenade no. 2 in A
2 Wednesday
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
Corelli: Concerto Grosso in F
Beethoven: Symphony no. 1 in C
Chopin: Barcarolle in F-sharp
Mendelssohn: Symphony no. 3 in A
Minor (Scottish)
Tchaikovsky: Symphony no. 2 in C
Minor (Little Russian)
Bach: Concerto in D Minor for Two
Violins
Brahms: Variations on a Theme by
Haydn
Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances
3 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Locatelli: Concerto Grosso in B-flat
10:00 a.m. Ravel: Noble and Sentimental
Waltzes
12:00 p.m. Haydn: Horn Concerto no. 1 in D
1:00 p.m. Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 2 in B
Minor
2:00 p.m. Korngold: Fairy Tale Pictures
3:00 p.m. Mozart: Quintet in E-flat for Piano
and Winds
6:00 p.m. Bach, C.P.E.: String Symphony in C
10:00 p.m. Schumann: Scenes from Childhood
4 Friday
9:00 a.m. Sibelius: Karelia Suite
10:00 a.m. Weber: Symphony no. 2 in C
12:00 p.m. Milhaud: Scaramouche, Suite for
Two Pianos
2:00 p.m. Bruckner: Symphony no. 4, Scherzo
and Trio
3:00 p.m. Telemann: Viola Concerto in G
5:00 p.m. Williams: “Summon the Heroes”
7:00 p.m. Gershwin: An American in Paris
8:00 p.m. Bruckner: Symphony no. 1 in C
Minor
9:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no. 3
in D Minor
10:00 p.m. Barber: “Agnus Dei”
5 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Meyerbeer: “Coronation March” from
Le Prophète
10:00 a.m. Schumann: Carnaval
12:00 p.m. J.C. Bach: Symphony in E-flat for
Double Orchestra
2:00 p.m. Bizet: Symphony in C
3:00 p.m. Beach: From Grandmother’s Garden
4:00 p.m. Dvořák: American Suite
5:00 p.m. Copland: “An Outdoor Overture”
6 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Copland: “Simple Gifts” from Old
American Songs, Set I
11:00 a.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 3 in E-flat
(Eroica)
1:00 p.m. Berlioz: Roman Carnival Overture
2:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Symphonic Dances
3:00 p.m. Copland: El Salón México
4:00 p.m. Barber: Violin Concerto
5:00 p.m. Prokofiev: Symphony no. 1 in D
(Classical)
9:00 p.m. Tower: Fanfare for the Uncommon
Woman
7 Monday
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
Seiji Ozawa b. 1935
(80th birthday)
12
Grieg: Piano Concerto in A Minor
Mizesko: Sketches from Pinehurst
Beethoven: Overture to Egmont
Handel: Music for the Royal
Fireworks
3:00 p.m. Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue
5:00 p.m. Brahms: Academic Festival Overture
8:00 p.m. Copland: Four Dance Episodes from
Rodeo
10:00 p.m. Satie: Three Gymnopédies
photo: Lesley Mair
September Featured Works
program listings (september)
8 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Dvořák: Slavonic Dances, op. 46
10:00 a.m. Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 3 in
C Minor
12:00 p.m. Dvořák: “Carnival Overture”
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 22 in
E-flat
3:00 p.m. Dvořák: Symphony no. 9 in E Minor
(From the New World)
5:00 p.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 2
in F
7:00 p.m. Bizet: Carmen Suite no. 1
8:00 p.m. Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C
(Great)
9:00 p.m. Dvořák: Symphony no. 7 in D Minor
9 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Dvořák: Prague Waltzes
10:00 a.m. Tchaikovsky: Orchestral Suite no. 3
in G
12:00 p.m. Handel: Harp Concerto in B-flat
2:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 45 in F-sharp
Minor (Farewell)
3:00 p.m. Brahms: Piano Concerto no. 1 in D
Minor
5:30 p.m. Strauss II: Artists’ Life
7:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 104 in D
(London)
8:00 p.m. Schubert: Sonatina in D
9:00 p.m. Sibelius: Symphony no. 2 in D
10:00 p.m. Ravel: Pavane for a Dead Princess
10 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Chopin: Piano Concerto no. 1 in E
Minor
10:00 a.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 25 in G Minor
12:00 p.m. Gade: Concert Overture no. 3 in C
1:00 p.m. Respighi: The Birds
2:00 p.m. Bizet: Roma
3:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 5 in C
Minor
6:00 p.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 4
in G
10:00 p.m. Elgar: Serenade for Strings in E
Minor
11 Friday
8:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
Ward: “America the Beautiful”
Allegri: “Miserere Mei, Deus”
Pärt: Spiegel im Spiegel
Williams: “Hymn to the Fallen” from
Saving Private Ryan
Charles Mackerras b. 1925
(90th anniversary of birth)
1:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: The Lark
Ascending
2:00 p.m. Dvořák: String Quartet no. 12 in F
(American)
3:00 p.m. Mozart: “Sequentia” from Requiem
in D Minor
5:00 p.m. Fauré: Cantique de Jean Racine
7:00 p.m. Harbach: One of Ours—A Cather
Symphony
8:00 p.m. Schubert: “Song of the Spirits Over
the Waters”
9:00 p.m. Copland: Quiet City
10:00 p.m. Pärt: “Cantus in Memory of
Benjamin Britten”
12 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Debussy: Children’s Corner
10:00 a.m. Bach: Violin Concerto no. 1 in A
Minor
12:00 p.m. Schubert: Sonata in A Minor
(Arpeggione)
2:00 p.m. Falla: Four Dances from The ThreeCornered Hat
3:00 p.m. Beethoven: Leonore Overture no. 3
4:00 p.m. Borodin: Symphony no. 2 in B Minor
5:00 p.m. Richard Strauss: Burleske for Piano
and Orchestra
13 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Frescobaldi: “Ave, Maris Stella”
11:00 a.m. Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto in
A Minor
1:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 40 in G Minor
2:00 p.m. Copland: Red Pony Suite
3:00 p.m. Clara Schumann: Three Romances
for Piano
13
16 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Brahms: Serenade no. 1 in D
10:00 a.m. Handel: Concerto Grosso in E Minor
12:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 12 in
A-flat
2:00 p.m. Gade: Symphony no. 5 in D Minor
3:00 p.m. Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon
of a Faun
5:00 p.m. Mozart: Horn Concerto no. 1 in D
7:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture
8:00 p.m. Schubert: Symphony no. 5 in B-flat
10:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Cello Sonata in G
Minor
17 Thursday
Alina Ibragimova b. 1985
(30th birthday)
4:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Symphony no. 6 in B
Minor, op. 74 (Pathétique)
6:00 p.m. Rosh Hashanah Special
14 Monday
8:00 a.m. Cherubini: Overture to Anacréon
9:00 a.m. Michael Haydn: Symphony no. 22
in D
11:00 a.m. Mozart: Clarinet Quintet in A
12:00 p.m. Schubert: Rondo in A
1:00 p.m. Dvořák: Violin Sonata in F
2:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Concerto in E for Two
Pianos
3:00 p.m. Schubert: Piano Quintet in A (Trout)
7:30 p.m. Arensky: Piano Quintet in D
8:00 p.m. Horner: Pas de Deux, Double
Concerto for Violin, Cello, and
Orchestra
10:00 p.m. Beethoven: Clarinet Trio in B-flat
15 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Dvořák: Symphony no. 8 in G
10:00 a.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 17 in G
12:00 p.m. Borodin: In the Steppes of Central
Asia
2:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 2 in D
3:00 p.m. Albéniz: Suite Espanola
6:00 p.m. Offenbach: Barcarolle from Tales of
Hoffman
7:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 100 in G
(Military)
8:00 p.m. Dvořák: Violin Concerto in A Minor
9:00 p.m. Schumann: Symphony no. 2 in C
10:00 p.m. Strauss, R.: “September” from Four
Last Songs
14
8:00 a.m. Beethoven: Romance no. 1 in G for
Violin
9:00 a.m. Mercadante: Flute Concerto in E
Minor
10:00 a.m. Delibes: Coppélia
12:00 p.m. Ravel: Mother Goose Suite
2:00 p.m. Adam: Giselle
5:00 p.m. Griffes: “The White Peacock”
6:00 p.m. Khachaturian: “Adagio of Spartacus
and Phrygia” (Love Theme) from
Spartacus
10:00 p.m. Griffes: Three Tone-Pictures
18 Friday
8:00 a.m. Mozart: Overture to The Marriage
of Figaro
9:00 a.m. Glazunov: Raymonda
12:00 p.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 4
in G
1:00 p.m. Telemann: Overture in D
2:00 p.m. Khachaturian: Gayne
5:00 p.m. Offenbach: “Ballet of the
Snowflakes”
7:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Sleeping Beauty
10:00 p.m. Puccini: Chrysanthemums
19 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Mozart: Ballet Music from
Idomeneo, King of Crete
9:00 a.m. Copland: Appalachian Spring
11:00 a.m. Chopin: Les Sylphides
1:00 p.m. Ravel: Daphnis et Chloé
3:00 p.m. Shchedrin: Carmen Ballet
4:00 p.m. Stravinsky: Petrushka
5:00 p.m. Debussy: Toy Box Ballet
20 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Handel: Ballet from Il Pastor Fido
(The Faithful Shepherd)
11:00 a.m. Copland: Billy the Kid
1:00 p.m. Stravinsky: Firebird Suite
e
program listings (september)
2:00 p.m. Massenet: Ballet Music from Le Cid
3:00 p.m. Prokofiev: Cinderella
21 Monday
8:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
Holst: Second Suite in F
Haydn: Trumpet Concerto in E-flat
Schumann: Fantasy Pieces
Holst: St. Paul’s Suite
Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini
3:00 p.m. Holst: The Planets
8:00 p.m. Gershwin: Concerto in F
10:00 p.m. Holst: “Invocation”
22 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Telemann: Concerto in D for Three
Trumpets
10:00 a.m. Beethoven: Piano Trio in B-flat
(Archduke)
12:00 p.m. Schumann: Overture, Scherzo, and
Finale
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 29 in A
3:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E
Minor
6:00 p.m. A Celebration of Yom Kippur
7:00 p.m. Rimsky-Korsakov: Suite from The
Golden Cockerel
8:00 p.m. Brahms: Violin Concerto in D
10:00 p.m. Beach: “Dreaming”
23 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Mozart: Piano Sonata no. 8 in A
Minor
10:00 a.m. Bach: Cello Sonata no. 1 in G
12:00 p.m. Massenet: “Méditation” from Thaïs
2:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a
Theme of Thomas Tallis
3:00 p.m. Ravel: Le Tombeau de Couperin
5:00 p.m. Grieg: In Autumn
7:00 p.m. Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 3 in D
8:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Symphony no. 4 in F
Minor
10:00 p.m. Chaminade: “Autumn” from Concert
Études
10:00 p.m. Rutter: “To Every Thing There is a
Season”
25 Friday
8:00 a.m. Shostakovich: “Festive Overture”
9:00 a.m. All-Request Friday
10:00 p.m. Bach: French Suite no. 2 in C Minor
26 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Gershwin: Three Preludes
9:00 a.m. Saint-Saëns: “Omphale’s Spinning
Wheel”
11:00 a.m. Gershwin: An American in Paris
1:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 1
in C
3:00 p.m. Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue
4:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Symphony no. 5
(Reformation)
5:00 p.m. Gershwin: Lullaby for Strings
27 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 3
in G
11:00 a.m. Chopin: Grand Fantasia on Polish
Airs in A
1:00 p.m. Mozart: Violin Concerto no. 5 in A
(Turkish)
2:00 p.m. Grieg: Suite no. 1 from Peer Gynt
3:00 p.m. Rimsky-Korsakov: Capriccio
Espagnol
4:00 p.m. Mozart: Sonata in C for Two Pianos
28 Monday
9:00 a.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 14 in
C-sharp Minor (Moonlight)
photo: Nick Rutter
photo: Sussie Ahlburg
program listings (september)
24 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Mouret: First Suite of Symphonies
10:00 a.m. Bruch: Scottish Fantasy for Violin
and Orchestra
12:00 p.m. Rutter: “Gloria in Excelsis Deo”
1:00 p.m. Weber: Clarinet Concerto no. 2 in
E-flat
2:00 p.m. Brahms: Symphony no. 3 in F
3:00 p.m. Schubert: Sonatina in A Minor
6:00 p.m. Copland: “Fanfare for the Common
Man”
John Rutter b. 1945
(70th birthday)
15
thank-you gifts
thank-you gifts
Fall Membership Drive 2015
WCPE is pleased to offer the following selection of thank-you gifts when you make a donation to support Great Classical Music on WCPE. All members also receive a subscription of
Quarter Notes. Learn more about the benefits of membership at theclassicalstation.org.
For a $60 donation
(or $5/mo. sustainer)
•Bumper sticker magnet, blue/white logo
•Grocery tote, reinforced
For a $75 donation
(or $6.25/mo. sustainer)
•Baseball cap, tan with navy logo
•Notepad and pen (with stylus),
black/silver logo
For a $100 donation
Bizet cd
•T-shirt, pistachio green with white logo (sizes
S, M, L, XL, XXL)
•George Bizet: Symphony in C, Jeux d’Enfants,
Variations Chromatiques (special)
For a $120 donation
(or $10/mo. sustainer)
•Ceramic soup mug w/spoon, 12 oz.,
white/blue
•Musical-instrument notecards (set of four
with envelopes)
•Fleece scarf, arctic gray with embroidered logo
•Choose one of the following CDs:
CD #1: Saint-Saëns: Symphony no. 3 (Organ)
CD #2: Fugue State
CD #3: Hear My Prayer
CD #4: Discover Music of the Classical Era
CD #5: Adagios
16
•Large canvas tote bag, natural with navy logo
•Vented umbrella in hunter green with white
logo; folds to 16"
•CD #6: Mozart’s Magical Night
•DVD #1: An Evening with the Royal Opera
Sweatshirt
•Leather bookmark with logo
For a $150 donation
(or $12.50/mo. sustainer)
For a $180 donation
(or $15/mo. sustainer)
•WCPE crewneck sweatshirt, hunter green
(sizes M, L, XL, 2XL)
•CD #7: Itzhak Perlman: Five Classic Albums
For a $200 donation
•Day dedication, four times on the day
you choose
For a $240 donation
(or $20/mo. sustainer)
•WCPE hoodie, navy with tan logo (sizes S, M)
•CD #8: Brahms Inspired
CD #7: Itzhak Perlman: Five Classic
Albums
Michael Stern conducts the Kansas City
Symphony Orchestra with organist Jan
Kraybill in a dynamic new recording of
Saint-Saëns masterpiece.
We celebrate the great violinist’s birthday this
year with a collection of his best recordings,
including the concertos of Bach, Beethoven,
Mendelssohn, and Brahms. (5 discs.)
CD #2: Fugue State
CD #8: Brahms Inspired
Pianist Alan Feinberg explores the masterful
counterpoint of Bach, Handel, Buxtehude,
Domenico Scarlatti, and more.
Pianist Orli Shaham presents a beautiful
program of Brahms, Schubert, Schumann,
Chopin, Schoenberg, and more. (2 discs.)
CD #3: Hear My Prayer
CD #9: Strauss II: Operettas
Noel Edison leads the Choir of St. John’s
in Elora, Ontario, in the sacred music of
Purcell, Mendelssohn, Fauré, Duruflé, and
more. Beautiful, uplifting performances.
Classic performances of some of Johann
Strauss II’s most enduring masterpieces, led
by Franz Welser-Möst and Willi Boskovsky.
Features Nicolai Gedda, Brigitte Fassbaender,
and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. (10 discs.)
CD #4: Discover Music of the
Classical Era
An introduction to the world of Mozart,
Haydn, Boccherini, and Beethoven, with an
illustrated 100-page booklet. (2 discs.)
CD #5: Adagios
Music to soothe body and mind from Bach,
Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, and Schubert.
(2 discs.)
CD #6: Mozart’s Magical Night
In this delightful children’s story, 7-yearold Mozart is befriended by a young girl
while exploring the palace gardens. Jennifer
Larmore narrates with music performed by
pianist Hélène Grimaud and the Bavarian
Radio Chamber Orchestra.
DVD #1: An Evening with the
Royal Opera
Arias and choruses from some of the world’s
favorite operas with Renée Fleming, Jonas
Kaufmann, Bryn Terfel, and more. (1 DVD.)
For a $500 donation (patron level)
•Monthly on-air acknowledgment
•CD #9: Strauss II: Operettas
For a $1000 donation (patron level)
•Weekly on-air acknowledgment
Notecard Set
For a $35 donation
CD #1: Saint-Saëns: Symphony
no. 3 (Organ)
17
program listings (september/october)
10:00 a.m. Bizet: Symphony in C
12:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on
“Greensleeves”
2:00 p.m. Haydn: String Quartet in C
(Emperor)
3:00 p.m. Bach: Trio Sonata in C, BWV 529
7:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in D
Minor
8:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 6 in F
(Pastoral)
10:00 p.m. Dvořák: Serenade in D Minor for
Winds
29 Tuesday
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Franck: Symphonic Variations
Mozart: Symphony no. 39 in E-flat
Weber: “Invitation to the Dance”
Dvořák: Symphony no. 3 in E-flat
Rossini, arr. by Respighi: The
Fantastic Toyshop
7:00 p.m. Meyerbeer: The Skaters
8:00 p.m. Dvořák: Piano Concerto in G Minor
9:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto no. 1 in
B-flat Minor
30 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Saint-Saëns: Introduction and
Rondo Capriccioso
10:00 a.m. Suk: “Love Song”
12:00 p.m. Svendsen: “Norwegian Artists’
Carnival”
2:00 p.m. Bach: Violin Concerto no. 2 in E
3:00 p.m. Brahms: Symphony no. 4 in E Minor
7:00 p.m. Chopin: Polonaise Fantasy in A-flat
8:00 p.m. Svendsen: Symphony no. 2 in B-flat
9:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 39 in E-flat
10:00 p.m. Svendsen: Two Icelandic Melodies
October Featured Works
All programming is subject to change. For a
complete list of a specific day’s music, go to
theclassicalstation.org.
1 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Corelli: Concerto Grosso in C
10:00 a.m. Chopin: Piano Sonata no. 2 in B-flat
Minor
12:00 p.m. Dukas: Fanfare from La Péri
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 23 in A
3:00 p.m. Dukas: Symphony in C
5:00 p.m. Vivaldi: Lute Concerto in D
6:00 p.m. Dukas: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
10:00 p.m. Mozart: Adagio in B Minor, K. 540
2 Friday
9:00 a.m. Grieg: “March of the Trolls”
10:00 a.m. Gounod: Symphony no. 2 in E-flat
11:00 a.m. Mozart: Concerto in C for Flute and
Harp
12:00 p.m. Smetana: “The Moldau”
2:00 p.m. Chausson: A Holiday Evening
3:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Capriccio Italien
5:00 p.m. Ponchielli: “Dance of the Hours”
8:00 p.m. Prokofiev: Lieutenant Kijé Suite
9:00 p.m. Mussorgsky: Pictures at an
Exhibition
10:00 p.m. Wagner: “Forest Murmurs”
3 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Schubert: Overture to Rosamunde
10:00 a.m. Haydn: Violin Concerto no. 1 in C
12:00 p.m. Schumann: Piano Concerto in A
Minor
2:00 p.m. Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique
4:00 p.m. Brahms: Symphony no. 2 in D
5:00 p.m. Ravel: “La Valse”
4 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Purcell: Suite from Abdelazar
11:00 a.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 41 in C
(Jupiter)
1:00 p.m. Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D
3:00 p.m. Handel: Water Music
4:00 p.m. Bizet: Children’s Games
5:00 p.m. Nielsen: Symphony no. 2 (The Four
Temperaments)
5 Monday
Jessye Norman b. 1945
(70th birthday)
18
9:00 a.m. Telemann: Suite in A Minor for
Recorder and Strings
10:00 a.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 7 in A
12:00 p.m. Walton: Suite from Henry V
e
program listings (october)
2:00 p.m. Vivaldi: Four Seasons
3:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings
in C
5:00 p.m. Mozart: Serenade no. 13 in G (Eine
Kleine Nachtmusik)
8:00 p.m. Dvořák: Symphony no. 8 in G
10:00 p.m. Grieg: Lyric Pieces no. 2
6 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Mendelssohn: Calm Sea and
Prosperous Voyage
10:00 a.m. Schumann: Concert Piece in F for
Four Horns and Orchestra
12:00 p.m. Myers: Cavatina from The Deer
Hunter
2:00 p.m. Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 4 in D
3:00 p.m. Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G
Minor
7:00 p.m. Szymanowski: Concert Overture
8:00 p.m. Brahms: Symphony no. 3 in
9:00 p.m. Chopin: Piano Concerto no. 2 in F
Minor
7 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo
Theme
10:00 a.m. Saint-Saëns: Piano Concerto no. 2
in G Minor
12:00 p.m. Bach: Concerto in C, BWV 1055
1:00 p.m. Haydn: Cello Concerto no. 2 in D
2:00 p.m. Liszt: Piano Concerto no. 1 in E-flat
(Triangle)
3:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto no. 1
in G Minor
7:00 p.m. Schubert: Sonata in A Minor
(Arpeggione)
8:00 p.m. Prokofiev: Piano Concerto no. 3 in C
9:00 p.m. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E Minor
10:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: “Melancholy Serenade”
8 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Bach: “Air on the G String”
10:00 a.m. Dvořák: Symphony no. 5 in F
12:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 26 in
E-flat (Les Adieux)
2:00 p.m. Ravel: Introduction and Allegro
3:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 94 in G
(Surprise)
5:00 p.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 3
in G
6:00 p.m. Vierne: “Carillon de Westminster”
10:00 p.m. Copland: “Down a Country Lane”
9 Friday
8:00 a.m. Verdi: “Va, Pensiero” (“Chorus of the
Hebrew Slaves”) from Nabucco
9:00 a.m. Saint-Saëns: Carnival of the Animals
Richard Bonynge b. 1930
(85th birthday)
11:00 a.m. Mozart: Serenade no. 11 in E-flat
12:00 p.m. Verdi: “Gloria all’Egitto” (Grand
March) from Aida
2:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 8 in F
3:00 p.m. Saint-Saëns: Piano Concerto no. 5 in
F (Egyptian)
5:00 p.m. Verdi: “Di Provenza il Mar” from La
Traviata
7:00 p.m. Saint-Saëns: “Danse Macabre”
8:00 p.m. Verdi: Four Seasons Ballet
9:00 p.m. Saint-Saëns: Symphony no. 3 in C
Minor (Organ)
10:00 p.m. Verdi: “Ave Maria” from Four Sacred
Pieces
10 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Glinka: “Memory of a Summer Night
in Madrid”
9:00 a.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 24 in C
Minor
11:00 a.m. Grofé: Grand Canyon Suite
1:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Symphony no. 4 in A
(Italian)
3:00 p.m. Copland: El Salón México
4:00 p.m. Offenbach: Gaîté Parisienne
5:00 p.m. Strauss II: “The Blue Danube”
11 Sunday
7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
Nelson: “Savannah River Holiday”
Sowande: African Suite
Parry: An English Suite
Respighi: The Pines of Rome
Rimsky-Korsakov: Overture on
Russian Themes
3:00 p.m. Duff: Echoes of Georgian Dublin
19
program listings (october)
photo: Ivan Maly
14 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Handel: Overture and Suite from Il
Pastor Fido (The Faithful Shepherd)
10:00 a.m. Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no. 4
in G Minor
12:00 p.m. Debussy: “The Girl with the Flaxen
Hair”
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 25 in G Minor
3:00 p.m. Grieg: Holberg Suite
7:00 p.m. Rossini: Overture to William Tell
8:00 p.m. Zemlinsky: Symphony no. 2 in B-flat
10:00 p.m. Brahms: Cello Sonata no. 1 in E
Minor
15 Thursday
Radu Lupu b. 1945
(70th birthday)
4:00 p.m. Falla: Nights in the Gardens of
Spain
12 Monday
9:00 a.m. Vaughan Williams: English Folk Song
Suite
10:00 a.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 83 in G Minor
(The Hen)
12:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: The Lark
Ascending
2:00 p.m. Handel: Concerto Grosso in G
3:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: Symphony no. 5
in D
6:00 p.m. Puccini: “Nessun Dorma!”
8:00 p.m. Schubert: Symphony no. 8 in B
Minor (Unfinished)
10:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a
Theme of Thomas Tallis
13 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 15 in
D (Pastoral)
10:00 a.m. Schubert: Adagio for Piano Trio in
E-flat (Nocturne)
12:00 p.m. Bach: Concerto in D Minor for Two
Violins
2:00 p.m. Dvořák: Czech Suite in D
3:00 p.m. Schumann: Symphony no. 4 in D
Minor
6:00 p.m. Anrooy: “Piet Hein Rhapsody”
8:00 p.m. Copland: Appalachian Spring
9:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 5 in C
Minor
10:00 p.m. Anrooy: Piano Quintet in A
20
9:00 a.m. Crusell: Clarinet Concerto no. 2 in F
Minor (Grand)
10:00 a.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 38 in D
(Prague)
12:00 p.m. Richard Strauss: Waltzes from Der
Rosenkavalier
1:00 p.m. Bach: “Sheep May Safely Graze”
2:00 p.m. Chopin: Nocturnes
3:00 p.m. Geminiani: “The Enchanted Forest”
5:00 p.m. Wiren: March from Serenade for
Strings
10:00 p.m. Widor: Evenings in Alsace
16 Friday
9:00 a.m. Dvořák: Symphonic Variations
10:00 a.m. Mendelssohn: Selections from
Incidental Music to A Midsummer
Night’s Dream
12:00 p.m. Elgar: “Salut d’Amour”
2:00 p.m. Boccherini: Cello Concerto no. 9 in
B-flat
3:00 p.m. Brahms: Variations on a Theme by
Haydn
7:00 p.m. Barber: Overture to The School For
Scandal
8:00 p.m. Schumann: Cello Concerto in A
Minor
9:00 p.m. Debussy: “Spring”
17 Saturday
9:00 a.m. Handel: Concerto Grosso in G
11:00 a.m. Grieg: Piano Concerto in A Minor
1:00 p.m. Strauss, R.: Concerto in D for Oboe
and Small Orchestra
2:00 p.m. Elgar: Enigma Variations
3:00 p.m. Wagner: “Siegfried’s Rhine Journey”
4:00 p.m. Howells: Piano Concerto no. 2 in C
5:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 14 in
C-sharp Minor (Moonlight)
18 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Thompson: “Alleluia”
program listings (october/november)
11:00 a.m. Handel: “Let the Bright Seraphim”
1:00 p.m. Schumann: Symphony no. 3 in E-flat
(Rhenish)
2:00 p.m. Debussy: Dances Sacred and
Profane for Harp and Orchestra
3:00 p.m. Hummel: Trumpet Concerto
4:00 p.m. Llobet: Popular Catalan Songs
19 Monday
9:00 a.m. Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 2 in B
Minor
10:00 a.m. Schubert: Fantasy in F Minor for
Piano (Four Hands)
12:00 p.m. Brahms: Academic Festival Overture
2:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto no. 1 in
B-flat Minor
3:00 p.m. Weber: Grand Duo Concertante for
Clarinet and Piano
5:00 p.m. Smetana: Three Dances from The
Bartered Bride
7:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 8 in C
Minor (Pathétique)
8:00 p.m. Rimsky-Korsakov: Russian Easter
Overture
10:00 p.m. Franck: Violin Sonata in A
20 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Telemann: Concerto in F for Three
Violins from Tafelmusik
10:00 a.m. Bach: English Suite no. 3 in G Minor
12:00 p.m. Elgar: “Coronation March”
2:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet
Fantasy Overture
3:00 p.m. Warlock: Capriol Suite
7:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 101 in D
(Clock)
8:00 p.m. Ives: Symphony no. 2
9:00 p.m. Brahms: Horn Trio in E-flat
21 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. C.P.E. Bach, C.P.E: String Symphony
in A
10:00 a.m. Schubert: Symphony no. 5 in B-flat
12:00 p.m. Franck: The Breezes
2:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Trio in D (Ghost)
3:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no. 2
in C Minor
5:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
10:00 p.m.
Arnold: English Dances, Book One
Brahms: Symphony no. 1 in C Minor
Dvořák: Serenade in E for Strings
Canteloube: “Bailero” from Songs of
the Auvergne
22 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Mozart: Oboe Quartet in F
10:00 a.m. Liszt: Six Consolations
11:00 a.m. Biber: Suite no. 1 in D from Mensa
Sonora
12:00 p.m. Liszt: Les Préludes
1:00 p.m. Bizet: L’Arlésienne Suite no. 1
2:00 p.m. Liszt: Three Sonnets of Petrarch
3:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Symphonic Dances
5:00 p.m. Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody no. 2
10:00 p.m. Liszt: “St. Francis of Paola Walking
on the Water”
October 23—November 1
Fall 2015 Membership Drive
Call 800.556.5178
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radio. Please do your part to help
continue this vital service.
November Featured Works
All programming is subject to change. For a
complete list of a specific day’s music, go to
theclassicalstation.org.
2 Monday
9:00 a.m. Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C
(Great)
10:00 a.m. Dittersdorf: Symphony in D (The Fall
of Phaeton)
12:00 p.m. Beethoven: Romance no. 2 in F for
Violin
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 26 in D
(Coronation)
3:00 p.m. Ravel: Noble and Sentimental
Waltzes
5:00 p.m. Verdi: Overture to The Sicilian
Vespers
8:00 p.m. Turina: Sinfonia Sevillana
10:00 p.m. Wagner: Siegfried Idyll
Using the Buy Now link embedded in our daily playlists is a great way
to support WCPE when you purchase your favorite Classical music
recordings! Arkiv Music donates a portion of the proceeds to WCPE
when your purchase originates from our web site. Click What’s Playing at
theclassicalstation.org to use the Buy Now feature and support WCPE.
21
program listings (november)
3 Tuesday
8:00 a.m. Gould: “American Salute”
9:00 a.m. Scheidt: Suite for Ten Brass
Instruments
10:00 a.m. Bellini: Oboe Concerto in E-flat
12:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Waltz from Sleeping
Beauty
2:00 p.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 100 in G
(Military)
3:00 p.m. Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances
4:00 p.m. Williams: “Liberty Fanfare”
6:00 p.m. Bellini: “Casta Diva”
7:00 p.m. Chopin: Grand Fantasia on Polish
Airs in A
8:00 p.m. Brahms: Symphony no. 2 in D
10:00 p.m. Debussy: Petite Suite
4 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 17 in
D Minor (Tempest)
10:00 a.m. Mozart: Violin Concerto no. 3 in G
12:00 p.m. Dvořák: The Wood Dove
2:00 p.m. Brahms: Double Concerto for Violin
and Cello in A Minor
3:00 p.m. Schumann: Papillons
7:00 p.m. Arnold: Four Scottish Dances
8:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 3 in E-flat
(Eroica)
9:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Symphony no. 2 in
E Minor
5 Thursday
8:00 a.m. Sibelius: Finlandia
9:00 a.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 6
in B-flat
10:00 a.m. Chopin: Fantasie in F Minor
12:00 p.m. Elgar: Bavarian Dances
2:00 p.m. Grieg: Piano Concerto in A Minor
3:00 p.m. Bizet: L’Arlésienne Suite no. 2
5:00 p.m. Handel: Largo from Xerxes
10:00 p.m. Ravel: Gaspard de la Nuit
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
6 Friday
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. Sousa: “The Stars and Stripes
Forever”
10:00 a.m. Purcell: Suite from The Fairy Queen
12:00 p.m. Sousa: “The Liberty Bell”
2:00 p.m. Paderewski: Polish Fantasy for Piano
and Orchestra
3:00 p.m. Mozart: Clarinet Concerto in A
7:00 p.m. Paderewski: Piano Concerto in A
Minor
8:00 p.m. Richard Strauss: Horn Concerto no.
2 in E-flat
9:00 p.m. Lalo: Cello Concerto in D Minor
7 Saturday
8:00 a.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 92 in G
(Oxford)
10:00 a.m. Dvořák: String Quartet no. 12 in F
(American)
12:00 p.m. Boccherini: Symphony in D Minor
(House of the Devil)
2:00 p.m. Mendelssohn: Symphony no. 5
(Reformation)
3:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Symphony no. 1 in G
Minor (Winter Dreams)
4:00 p.m. Schubert: String Quartet no. 14 in D
Minor (Death and the Maiden)
5:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 5 in
E-flat (Emperor)
8 Sunday
7:00 a.m. Prokofiev: Symphony no. 1 in D
(Classical)
11:00 a.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 96 in D
(Miracle)
1:00 p.m. Liszt: Piano Concerto no. 1 in E-flat
(Triangle)
2:00 p.m. Bach: “Air on the G String”
3:00 p.m. Chopin: Étude in A Minor (Winter
Wind)
4:00 p.m. Mahler: Symphony no. 1 in D (Titan)
9 Monday
Camille Saint-Saëns b. 1835
22
9:00 a.m. Schumann: Piano Concerto in A
Minor
10:00 a.m. Mozart: Quintet in E-flat for Piano
and Winds
e
program listings (november)
Schubert: “The Erl-King”
Dvořák: Symphony no. 7 in D Minor
Chopin: Scherzo no. 4 in E
Mozart: “Catalogue” Aria from Don
Giovanni
8:00 p.m. Ravel: Le Tombeau de Couperin
10:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: Songs of Travel
10 Tuesday
Couperin: Pièces en Concert
Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 19 in F
J.C. Bach: Sinfonia Concertante in C
Couperin: Royal Concert no. 4
Sibelius: Symphony no. 2 in D
Dvořák: In Nature’s Realm
Mozart: Symphony no. 35 in D
(Haffner)
9:00 p.m. Schubert: Selections from
Rosamunde
11 Wednesday
8:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
10:00 p.m.
Williams: “Summon the Heroes”
Gershwin: Lullaby for Strings
“Taps” and “America the Beautiful”
Delius: “By the River” from Florida
Suite
Barber: Adagio for Strings
Rimsky-Korsakov: Suite from The
Tale of Tsar Saltan
American Service Hymns
Rodgers: Five Selections from
Victory at Sea
Dvořák: American Suite
Gershwin: Concerto in F
Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on
Sussex Folk Tunes
12 Thursday
9:00 a.m. Telemann: Suite in D for Viola da
Gamba and Strings
10:00 a.m. Borodin: Symphony no. 3 in A Minor
(unfinished)
12:00 p.m. Albéniz: “Sunday Festival in Seville”
2:00 p.m. Haydn: Cello Concerto no. 1 in C
3:00 p.m. Borodin: Symphony no. 2 in B Minor
5:00 p.m. Borodin: “Polovtsian Dances” from
Prince Igor
10:00 p.m. Borodin: String Quartet no. 2 in D
13 Friday
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
Chopin: Polonaise Fantasy in A-flat
Chadwick: Symphonic Sketches
Bach: “Sleepers, Awake!”
Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 20 in D
Minor
3:00 p.m. Chadwick: Suite Symphonique in
E-flat
Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel
b. 1805
7:00 p.m. Grieg: Suites 1 and 2 from Peer
Gynt
8:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 8 in F
9:00 p.m. Debussy: Nocturnes
10:00 p.m. Chadwick: String Quartet no. 3
14 Saturday
9:00 a.m. Copland: Appalachian Spring
10:00 a.m. Mendelssohn-Hensel: Piano Sonata
in C Minor
12:00 p.m. L. Mozart: Symphony in G
2:00 p.m. Copland: Four Dance Episodes from
Rodeo
3:00 p.m. Bach: Trio Sonata in G, BWV 1039
4:00 p.m. Mendelssohn-Hensel: Piano Trio in D
5:00 p.m. Copland: “The Promise of Living”
from The Tender Land
15 Sunday
7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
Liszt: “Un Sospiro”
Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 25 in C
Franck: Prelude, Aria, and Finale
Schubert: Symphony no. 5 in B-flat
Schumann: Carnaval
Dvořák: Symphony no. 8 in G
16 Monday
9:00 a.m. Albinoni: Adagio in G Minor
10:00 a.m. Clementi: Symphony no. 3 in G (The
Great National)
12:00 p.m. Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon
of a Faun
2:00 p.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 2
in F
3:00 p.m. Brahms: Piano Concerto no. 2 in
B-flat
7:00 p.m. Beethoven: Leonore Overture no. 3
8:00 p.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 17 in G
10:00 p.m. Corigliano: “Lullaby for Natalie”
23
program listings (november)
photo: David Thompson EMI Classics
9:00 a.m. Schubert: Sonata in A Minor
(Arpeggione)
11:00 a.m. Fauré: Dolly Suite
12:00 p.m. Ippolitov-Ivanov: “Procession of the
Sardar”
2:00 p.m. Schumann: Symphony no. 1 in B-flat
(Spring)
3:00 p.m. Ippolitov-Ivanov: Symphony no. 1 in
E Minor
5:00 p.m. Wagner: Overture to Tannhäuser
10:00 p.m. Handel: Suite in G Minor for Piano
20 Friday
Stephen Bishop Kovacevich
b. 1940 (75th birthday)
17 Tuesday
9:00 a.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 29 in A
10:00 a.m. Grieg: Incidental Music from Sigurd
Jorsalfar
12:00 p.m. Telemann: Trumpet Concerto no. 3
in D
2:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 21 in C
(Waldstein)
3:00 p.m. Brahms: Symphony no. 1 in C Minor
5:00 p.m. Smetana: “The Moldau”
7:00 p.m. Britten: Young Person’s Guide to the
Orchestra
8:00 p.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 1 in C
9:00 p.m. Bruch: Kol Nidrei (Adagio on Hebrew
Melodies)
18 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G
Minor
10:00 a.m. Weber: Clarinet Concerto no. 2 in
E-flat
12:00 p.m. Bach: Violin Concerto no. 1 in A
Minor
2:00 p.m. Weber: “Invitation to the Dance”
3:00 p.m. Richard Strauss: Suite from Der
Rosenkavalier
6:00 p.m. Weber: Overture to Oberon
7:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto in D
8:00 p.m. Weber: Symphony no. 1 in C
9:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no. 3
in D Minor
19 Thursday
8:00 a.m. Mozart: Horn Concerto no. 3 in E-flat
24
9:00 a.m. Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto no. 2
in D Minor
10:00 a.m. Cui: Miniature Suite
12:00 p.m. Berlioz: “Le Corsaire” Overture
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Violin Concerto no. 3 in G
3:00 p.m. Glazunov: Overture on Three Greek
Themes
7:00 p.m. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 5
in D
8:00 p.m. Elgar: Enigma Variations
9:00 p.m. Vaughan Williams: Five Variants of
“Dives and Lazarus”
10:00 p.m. Hanson: Rhythmic Variations on Two
Ancient Hymns
21 Saturday
9:00 a.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 6 in F
(Pastoral)
10:00 a.m. Debussy: Two Arabesques
12:00 p.m. Tárrega: “Capricho Arabe”
2:00 p.m. Handel: Amaryllis Suite
3:00 p.m. Brahms: Violin Concerto in D
4:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 40 in G Minor
5:00 p.m. Tárrega: “Recuerdos de la Alhambra”
program listings (november)
3:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 36 in C (Linz)
7:00 p.m. Falla: Four Dances from The ThreeCornered Hat
8:00 p.m. Borodin: Symphony no. 2 in B Minor
10:00 p.m. Butterworth: Two English Idylls no. 2
24 Tuesday
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Holst: Brook Green Suite
Berlioz: Harold in Italy
Bach: “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring”
Beethoven: Triple Concerto in C
Chopin: Piano Concerto no. 1 in E
Minor
7:00 p.m. Wagner: Prelude to Act 1 of Die
Meistersinger von Nürnberg
8:00 p.m. Brahms: Clarinet Trio in A Minor
9:00 p.m. Mozart: Symphony no. 25 in G Minor
25 Wednesday
9:00 a.m. Handel: Water Music
10:00 a.m. Beethoven: Piano Sonata no. 26 in
E-flat (Les Adieux)
12:00 p.m. Elgar: Serenade for Strings in E
Minor
2:00 p.m. Bizet: Symphony in C
3:00 p.m. Schumann: Symphony no. 2 in C
7:00 p.m. Mozart: Flute Concerto no. 1 in G
8:00 p.m. Dvořák: Cello Concerto in B Minor
9:00 p.m. Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 4
in G
26 Thursday
7:00 a.m. W.F. Bach: Sinfonia in D
11:00 a.m. Rodrigo: Fantasia for a Gentleman
12:00 p.m. Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no. 1
in F-sharp Minor
2:00 p.m. Britten: Simple Symphony
3:00 p.m. Bruch: Concerto in E Minor for
Clarinet and Viola
4:00 p.m. Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez
5:00 p.m. Britten: Piano Concerto
9:00 a.m. Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini
10:00 a.m. Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 3 in D
11:00 a.m. Beethoven: Symphony no. 5 in C
Minor
12:00 p.m. Dvořák: American Suite
1:00 p.m. Thompson: “Alleluia”
2:00 p.m. Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 24 in C
Minor
3:00 p.m. Handel: Music for the Royal
Fireworks
4:00 p.m. Copland: Old American Songs, Set I
5:00 p.m. Copland: Appalachian Spring
6:00 p.m. Gershwin: Concert Fantasy on
Themes from Porgy and Bess
10:00 p.m. Copland: Our Town
23 Monday
27 Friday
8:00 a.m. Falla: “Ritual Fire Dance”
9:00 a.m. Purcell: Suite from King Arthur
11:00 a.m. Haydn: Symphony no. 104 in D
(London)
12:00 p.m. Parry: Symphonic Variations
2:00 p.m. Falla: Nights in the Gardens of
Spain
8:00 a.m. Gershwin: “Strike Up The Band”
9:00 a.m. All-Request Friday
10:00 p.m. Barber: Knoxville: Summer of 1915
22 Sunday
28 Saturday
9:00 a.m. Delius: Florida Suite
11:00 a.m. Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue
12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Sousa: “The Washington Post”
Copland: Billy the Kid Ballet Suite
Mizesko: Sketches from Pinehurst
Williams: Three Pieces from
Schindler’s List
4:00 p.m. Still: Symphony no. 1 (AfroAmerican)
5:00 p.m. Dvořák: String Quartet no. 12 in F
(American)
29 Sunday
7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
Ward: “America the Beautiful”
Higdon: “Amazing Grace”
O’Connor: Fanfare for the Volunteer
Amram: This Land, Symphonic
Variations on a Song by Woody
Guthrie
3:00 p.m. Gershwin: An American in Paris
4:00 p.m. Dvořák: Symphony no. 9 in E Minor
(From the New World)
5:00 p.m. Hailstork: Three Spirituals
30 Monday
9:00 a.m. Alkan: Aesop’s Feast
11:00 a.m. Mozart: Andante and Variations for
Four Hands in G
12:00 p.m. Debussy: “En Bateau”
2:00 p.m. Tchaikovsky: The Seasons
3:00 p.m. Telemann: Paris Quartet no. 12 in
E Minor
5:00 p.m. Holst: Second Suite in F
7:00 p.m. Haydn: Piano Concerto in D
8:00 p.m. Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade
10:00 p.m. Ravel: Sonate Posthume for Violin
and Piano
Johan Svendsen b. 1840
(175th anniversary of birth)
25
wcpe in the community
photo: Courtesy of NCCMI
By Tara Lynn
NC Chamber Music Institute
I am deeply touched by the support we’ve
received from our donors for the WCPE
Education Fund. Together, we are sending
a clear message about the value we place
upon music education and the importance of
building a stable future for the arts in North
Carolina. This summer, WCPE awarded five
grants totaling more than $8,000, reaffirming our commitment to increasing access to
Classical music education in North Carolina.
Grant recipients include North Carolina
Chamber Music Institute, Wake Forest
Community Youth Orchestra, Community
Music School, Chamber Music Raleigh, and
Raleigh Concert Band.
Funding for Wake Forest Community Youth
Orchestra, a strings program now entering its
second year, will provide printed music, new
instruments, and tuition assistance to students from low-income families and families
experiencing financial hardship. North
Carolina Chamber Music Institute connects
student musicians with top musical coaches
in the area. Each student participates in a
quartet or quintet, performing several times
throughout the year in recitals and outreach
concerts. A chamber ensemble will be named
in honor of WCPE for the 2015–16 season.
The Community Music School provides
weekly music lessons at the price of one dollar per lesson to children from low-income
families. A grant from the WCPE Education
Fund will allow the school to provide highquality music education to more students at
this affordable rate. Chamber Music Raleigh,
formerly known as the Raleigh Chamber
Music Guild, will add outreach concerts to its
programming in the 2015–16 season, making use of its resident ensemble, Oak City
String Quartet, which comprises members of
the North Carolina Symphony. A grant from
the WCPE Education Fund will support
family concerts at various Wake County public library branches targeting young families.
Oak City String Quartet will work with
students at Community Music School several
times on Saturday mornings this season.
Finally, a grant to Raleigh Concert Band, a
recreational and educational adult ensemble,
will purchase music and provide funding
for concert venues in the 2015–16 season.
To learn more about these grants, visit
theclassicalstation.org/education. q
In Memoriam
WCPE mourns the loss of volunteer John
Erhardt of Raleigh, who passed away on
April 29, and volunteer Bob Hudson of
Clayton, who passed away on June 5. John
was a regular Friday volunteer at the reception desk for the last four years and had
recently trained as a fundraiser phone-room
supervisor. Bob had been a weekly Tuesday
morning volunteer for seven years, helping
to pack and mail thank-you gifts. We extend
our condolences to John’s wife, Lil Erhardt,
and Bob’s wife, Carol Hudson. Both gentlemen will be missed by all of us at WCPE.
26
e
lately we’ve read
That Iron String
By Jack Kohl
Pauktaug Press; 258 pages
A review by R.C. Speck
Life in the shadow of his virtuoso cousin
Boston was never too bad for Portsmouth…
as long as he managed his expectations.
Against the serene backdrop of Pauktaug, a
fictional waterside village on Long Island,
That Iron String, by author Jack Kohl, tells
the story of two Classical pianist cousins
as they prepare for a prestigious piano
competition in New York City. Portsmouth
and Boston are named after port cities
because of the tragic circumstances of their
arrival in Long Island. Their parents were
taking them as unnamed newborns from
Connecticut to Long Island by boat to
show them off to family. Mysteriously, the
parents died on the trip, but the boys did
not. For all anyone knows, they could be
brothers. As they grew up, they found they
approached their art from different perspectives: Boston from innate mastery and
perfection, and Portsmouth from constant
striving and practice.
Portsmouth seems as though he has the
steeper climb, but through a series of letters
from Boston, we discover that that may not
be the case. While living on the west coast,
Boston found that his performances had
been sliding a bit, and he’s not sure why.
He’s due home in Pauktaug any day now to
begin his preparations for the competition
but seems strangely unhurried and
uncommunicative.
Part mystery, part coming-of-age story, That
Iron String explores the psychological terrain
that dedicated musicians must traverse in
order to perform on the highest levels. It
also offers an unadorned look at the egos
and politics one has to deal with in the
world of Classical music. Most importantly,
it provides powerful insight on how artists must position themselves vis-à-vis the
big aesthetic concepts of Truth and Beauty.
There is a lot of that in Boston’s letters,
which provide just about the only glimpse of
this enigmatic character until perhaps twothirds into the novel.
Resigned to coming in no better than
second, Portsmouth practices diligently in
the home of his aunt and uncle. They run
a funeral home. Their home is the funeral
home. So this complicates Portsmouth’s
preparations. So does the appearance of
Lana, an old high school flame. This new
distraction really is the last thing Portsmouth
needs. Yet his playing seems to improve as
previously dormant passions are aroused by
his rekindled relationship with Lana. He’s
discovering things about his playing that he
never knew before.
Will Portsmouth’s newfound artistry be
enough to trump the invincible genius of the
returning prodigy Boston? Or will Boston
overcome his complex demons and reclaim
his position as the nation’s premier young
pianist?
These, in the end, are only some of the
things Jack Kohl invites us to contemplate
while reading That Iron String. q
Why not renew your membership…as a sustainer?
John Erhardt
Bob Hudson
By making a commitment to donate the same amount every month, you have the convenience
of spreading your contribution over 12 months via a monthly debit to your credit card.
27
on the cover
By Patricia Crane
But take that unique relationship and mix in
some prodigious creative talent, and you have
the makings of a dynasty.
The modern landscape of Classical music
teems with siblings following in the footsteps
of Fanny and Felix Mendelsohn and the
Strauss brothers. Today’s sibling collaborations
run the gamut—from exclusive partnerships
to pursuing individual careers and collaborating on special projects.
Speaking of string-playing siblings, tune in
on September 14 at 8 p.m. as Monday Night
at the Symphony features Norwegian sister/
brother duo Mari and Hakon Samuelsen,
playing the late James Horner’s Pas de Deux,
Double Concerto for Violin and Cello.
The piece premiered in 2014 for the Royal
Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra’s 175th
anniversary; it’s one of Horner’s final completed works.
Don’t miss the Ying Quartet (boasting three
of the founding Ying siblings) with pianist
Adam Neiman, playing Anton Arensky’s
Piano Quintet in D at 7:30 p.m. on
September 14.
And be sure to listen for solo pieces and collaborations by pianist Orli Shaham and her
brother, violinist Gil. These award-winning
siblings have their own stellar careers, but
28
Gil Shaham
Bryn Terfel
Meat Loaf at the Met?
Terfel turns 50!
By Bob Chapman
Mari and Hakon Samuelsen
photo: Todd Matarazzo
Together literally all their lives, identical twins
Richard and John Contiguglia are the most
famous duo-pianists playing today. Making
their world debut in 1962, they’ve spent their
joint career bringing oft-forgotten duo-piano
pieces back into the limelight. And since
1999, twin sisters Emily and Julia Bruskin
(violin and cello) have collaborated with pianist and fellow Juilliard alumna Andrea Lam
as the award-winning Claremont Trio.
Orli Shaham
Richard and John Contiguglia
photo: DG Adam Barker
Anyone with a brother or sister can tell you:
the sibling relationship is delicate, equal parts
fraught and rewarding. If they’re too far apart,
siblings can feel like strangers; too close, and
the competition can be fierce. Spend five
minutes in a car with two kids in their “I’m
telling Mom!” phase, and you can attest to the
high emotions and singular energy that exist
between siblings.
photo: Luke Ratray
photo: National Gallery, London
Sibling Revelry
photo: Christian Steine
on the cover
The Ying Quartet
they’ve recorded several acclaimed albums
together.
Is it coincidence? Genetics? Their parents’
attitudes, or just good old-fashioned sibling
rivalry? Whatever the cause might be, when
musical greatness runs in families, we are the
beneficiaries—and we can only hope that
their artistry inspires a sister somewhere to
stop poking her brother, and likewise get
her brother to stop stealing her favorite bear.
Otherwise, I’m telling Mom. q
Bryn Terfel continues to seek new artistic
challenges. One of the few non-tenor male
opera singers to have achieved worldwide
fame, the Welsh bass-baritone took on the
role of Tevye, Russian-Jewish peasant farmer,
in Fiddler on the Roof in the U.K. last summer, following a triumphant run of Sweeney
Todds in New York and London.
Born Bryn Terfel Jones on November 9,
1965, in Pant Glas, Caernarfonshire, Wales,
he dropped the Jones surname at the beginning of his professional career so as not to be
confused with a baritone named Bryn Jones.
At first, says Terfel, he was more drawn to
popular music than to Classical, and as a
young student at the Guildhall School of
Music in London, he often went to Pink
Floyd concerts. American fans sometimes
compare him to Meat Loaf, whom he physically resembles.
His introduction to opera was a Covent
Garden production of Verdi’s Otello with
Plácido Domingo as the tragic Moor. In
1989, Terfel won the Lieder Prize in the
BBC Cardiff Singer of the World competition, and he made his professional operatic
debut the following year as Guglielmo in
Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte with the Welsh
National Opera.
For the past quarter century, Terfel has sung
leading roles at the world’s greatest opera
Bryn Terfel
houses, including New York’s Metropolitan,
Milan’s La Scala, London’s Covent Garden,
and the Vienna State Opera. When he sang
Mozart’s Figaro at the Met in 1994, The
New York Times ran a front-page story
about him.
Terfel’s rich, warm, vibrant voice is capable
of expressive pianissimos as well as roaring
fortissimos. Along with major roles in operas
by Mozart, Verdi, and Puccini, his repertory includes Nick Shadow (Stravinsky’s The
Rake’s Progress), Offenbach’s four villains (Les
Contes d’Hoffmann), and Wagner’s Wotan
and Hans Sachs.
Equally acclaimed as a song recitalist, particularly with Schubert and Mahler lieder,
Terfel continues to champion British composers such as Delius, Vaughan Williams,
Finzi, and Butterworth. No Classical snob,
Terfel seems just as happy belting out Welsh
ballads (with his compatriot Tom Jones) and
Broadway showstoppers.
On November 9, during the first hour of
Music in the Night, Bryn Terfel will sing Ralph
Vaughan Williams’s Songs of Travel, accompanied by pianist Malcolm Martineau. q
29
e
classical community
classical community
WCPE salutes its business partners! These public-spirited companies, organizations, and individuals have joined the friends of WCPE in supporting Great Classical Music.
Advanced Technical Support, Inc.
Authorized sales and service provider for Canon, Xerox, and HewlettPackard imaging products
100 Southcenter Ct. Suite 500
Morrisville, N.C. 27560
919.462.3000
The Alternative
Serving central North Carolina for
more than 20 years in mailing and
shipping solutions
335 Sherwee Dr. Suite 111
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
919.779.8828
American Dance Festival
Box 90772
Durham, N.C. 27708
919.684.6402
americandancefestival.org
Autobahn Automotive, Inc.
4200-159 Atlantic Ave.
Raleigh, N.C. 27604
919.878.6191
autobahn-automotive.com
Baird Private Wealth
Management
The Carolina Theatre
of Durham, Inc.
309 West Morgan St.
Durham, N.C. 27701
919.560.3040
carolinatheatre.org
Cary Skin Center
Offering comprehensive services
through its Skin Cancer Center and
Aesthetic Surgery and Laser Center
At the corner of N.C. 55 and
High House Rd.
Cary, N.C. 27519
919.363.7546
caryskincenter.com
The Chamber Orchestra
of the Triangle
1213 E. Franklin St.
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514
919.360.3382
thecot.org
Chamblee Graphics
Printer of WCPE’s Quarter Notes
1300 Hodges St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27604
919.833.7561
3600 Glenwood Ave., Suite 200
Raleigh, N.C. 27612
919.789.5555
bairdraleigh.com
Member SIPC
The Chapel of the Cross
Bel Canto Company
Cherry Hill Plantation
Cherry Hill Concerts
A choral ensemble of professional
singers
200 North Davie St. Suite 337
Greensboro, N.C. 27401
336.333.2220
belcantocompany.com
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
of North Carolina
P.O. Box 2291
Durham, N.C. 27702
800.324.4973
bcbsnc.com
Carolina Ballet
3401-131 Atlantic Ave.
Raleigh, N.C. 27604
919.719.0800
carolinaballet.com
Carolina Performing Arts at
Memorial Hall
Fulfilling UNC-Chapel Hill’s commitment to the arts since 2005
Box office: 919.843.3333
carolinaperformingarts.org
30
304 E. Franklin St.
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514
919.929.2193
thechapelofthecross.org
Inez, N.C. 27589
252.257.5259
cherryhillconcerts.com
Choral Society of Durham
120 Morris St.
Durham, N.C. 27701
919.560.2733
choral-society.org
Church Street Galleries
2001 US Highway 301 South
Wilson, N.C. 27895
252.246.0808
Concerts at St. Stephen’s
82 Kimberly Dr.
Durham, N.C. 27707
919.493.5451
ssecdurham.org
Concert Singers of Cary
101 Dry Ave.
Cary, N.C. 27511
919.249.6421
concertsingers.org
Dean Ramey Insurance
7200 Creedmoor Rd.
Raleigh, N.C. 27613
919.571.0033
rameyhealthandlifeinsuranceofraleigh.com
Duke Primary Care
Multiple Triangle locations
888.275.DUKE
dukehealth.org/primarycare
Duke University, Chapel Music
P.O. 90883
Durham, N.C. 27708
919.684.3855
www.chapel.duke.edu/music.html
Duke University, Dept. of Music
Box 90665
Durham, N.C. 27708
919.660.3300
music.duke.edu
Duke University, Graduate
Liberal Studies
2114 Campus Dr. Box 90095
Durham, N.C. 27708
919.684.3222
liberalstudies.duke.edu
Durham Savoyards, Ltd.
120 Morris St.
Durham, N.C. 27701
durhamsavoyards.org
Four Seasons Chamber
Music Festival
East Carolina University
School of Music
102 AJ Fletcher Music Center
Greenville, N.C. 27858
252.328.6019
ecuarts.com
Halle Cultural Arts Center of Apex
P.O. Box 250
237 N. Salem St.
Apex, N.C. 27502
919.249.1120
thehalle.org
Holy Trinity Evangelical
Lutheran Church
2723 Clark Ave.
Raleigh, N.C. 27607
919.828.1687
htelc.org
ibiblio
The Internet’s library
213 Manning Hall
UNC Campus
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599
919.962.5646
For information on becoming a business partner, contact
Peter Blume at 800.556.5178 or [email protected]
Tom Keith & Associates, Inc.
Serving the Carolinas for over 45
years in the valuation of corporations,
partnerships, professional practices,
and sole proprietorships
121 S. Cool Spring St.
Fayetteville, N.C. 28301
910.323.3222
keithvaluation.com
L&D Self Storage
A self-storage facility specializing in
residential and commercial needs and
located near RTP and RDU airport
10802 Chapel Hill Rd.
Morrisville, N.C. 27560
919.469.2820
Mallarmé Chamber Players
120 Morris St.
Durham, N.C. 27701
919.560.2788
mallarmemusic.org
Timothy Mowrey, CFP, AAMS
Mowrey Investment Mgmt.
Private, experienced, fee-only wealth
management and financial planning
services
Raleigh, N.C. 27613
919.846.2707
mowreyinvest.com
Nasher Museum of Art
at Duke University
2001 Campus Dr.
Durham, N.C. 27705
919.684.5135
nasher.duke.edu
N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences
11 West Jones St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27601
919.707.9800
naturalsciences.org
North Carolina Museum of Art
2110 Blue Ridge Rd.
Raleigh, N.C. 27607
919.839.6262
ncartmuseum.org
North Carolina Museum of
History
Old Salem Museums & Gardens
600 South Main St.
Winston-Salem, N.C. 27101
336.721.7300
oldsalem.org
Our Savior Lutheran Church
1500 Glenwood Ave.
Raleigh, N.C. 27608
919.832.8822
oslcraleigh.org
The Raleigh Concert Band
P.O. Box 20932
Raleigh, N.C. 27619
thercb.org
Resurrection Lutheran Church
100 W. Lochmere Dr.
Cary, N.C. 27518
919.851.7248
rlcary.org
Reynolda House
Museum of American Art
2250 Reynolda Rd.
Winston-Salem, N.C. 27106
888.663.1149
reynoldahouse.org
Sears Farm North
Luxury condominiums
A 55-plus community
Located in Cary, N.C.
919.377.1399
searsfarmnorth.com
Sorgi Insurance Agency, Inc.
16 Consultant Pl., Suite 102
Durham, N.C. 27707
919.682.4814
sorgiinsurance.com
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
1200 West Cornwallis Rd.
Durham, N.C. 27705
919.489.3214
stpaulsdurham.org
St. Philip Lutheran Church
7304 Falls of the Neuse Rd.
Raleigh, N.C. 27615
919.846.2992
st-philip.org
5 East Edenton St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27601
919.807.7900
ncmuseumofhistory.org
Summertrios
North Carolina Opera
Taziki’s Mediterranean Café
612 Wade Ave. Suite 100
Raleigh, N.C. 27605
919.792.3850
ncopera.org
North Carolina Symphony
3700 Glenwood Ave. Suite 130
Raleigh, N.C. 27612
919.733.2750
ncsymphony.org
Chamber music workshops for
adult amateur musicians
summertrios.org
Two Cary locations:
Waverly Place
Parkside Town Commons
919.532.6363
tazikiscafe.com
Town of Cary
Parks, Recreation, & Cultural
Resources
316 N. Academy St.
Cary, N.C. 27513
919.469.4061
townofcary.org
Triangle Community Foundation
Inspiring thoughtful giving
324 Blackwell St. Suite 1220
Durham, N.C. 27701
919.474.8370
TriangleSings
Your local vocal community
919.796.1600
trianglesings.org
Triangle Wind Ensemble
P.O. Box 701
Cary, N.C. 27512
919.960.1893
trianglewind.org
UNC-Greensboro
School of Music, Theatre,
and Dance
100 McIver St.
Greensboro, N.C. 27402
336.334.5789
performingarts.uncg.edu
UNC-TV
10 TW Alexander Dr.
RTP, N.C. 27709
919.549.7000
unctv.org
University of North Carolina
School of the Arts
1533 South Main St.
Winston-Salem, N.C. 27127
336.770.3399
uncsa.edu
Virginia Symphony Orchestra
150 Boush St., Suite 201
Norfolk, Va. 23510
757.892.6366
virginiasymphony.org
Vocal Arts Ensemble of Durham
Box 90665
Duke University
Durham, N.C. 27708
919.660.3302
vocalartsensemble.org
Wake Forest Renaissance Centre
405 S. Brooks St.
Wake Forest, N.C. 27587
919.435.9458
wakeforestnc.gov
Wake Radiology
60 years of comprehensive radiology care
and advanced imaging for your family
3949 Browning Pl.
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
919.232.4700
wakerad.com
31
Let Me Help!
What You’re Saying
I love to start my day with Rise and Shine
and Classical Café. I also enjoy Great
Sacred Music and all forms of early music.
Thank you for such great programming!
(John in Raleigh)
I love being able to hear great Classical music
anytime, day or night. I especially like Sing
for Joy, Great Sacred Music, Rise and Shine
with David Ballantyne, and the WCPE Opera
House. (Karlyn in Cary)
WCPE is my wake-up call. The radio is the
first thing that goes on in the a.m. to 89.7.
We are so grateful for your soothing, refreshing selection! Our hearts and souls thank you.
(Ann and Fred in New Bern)
Good morning, folks at WCPE! I’ve been
a sustaining member for a number of years
now. Such a great way to support WCPE—I
never have to wonder whether it’s time to
renew; I never feel guilty, thinking, “Have I
donated recently? This year?” because I know
it’s all taken care of. I love WCPE and listen
virtually every day, sometimes all day. Keep
up the great work! (Claudia)
I live in Liberec, Czech Republic, more or
less where Poland, Germany, and the Czech
Republic share a border, and listen to you over
the Internet. Impressed you can pronounce
Dvořák’s name correctly! Keep up the great
work! (Patrick in Liberec, Czech Republic)
WCPE is licensed by the Federal Communications
Commission to broadcast on 89.7MHz with
100,000 watts.
WCPE programming is carried on the following FM
channels in North Carolina and Virginia:
• W202BQ on 88.3 MHz (Aberdeen, Pinehurst,
Southern Pines)
• W205CA on 88.9 MHz (Foxfire Village)
• W210BS on 89.9 MHz (New Bern)
• WZPE on 90.1 MHz (Bath)
• WBUX on 90.5 MHz (Buxton)
• WURI on 90.9 MHz (Manteo)
• W237CM on 95.3 MHz (Fayetteville)
• W247BG on 97.3 MHz (Greenville)
• W275AW on 102.9 MHz (Danville, VA)
• W292DF on 106.3 MHz (Martinsville, VA)
name
WCPE programming is carried on partner
stations across America listed at:
theclassicalstation.org/partners.shtml.
telephone
city
statezip
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WCPE streams on the Internet to IOS and Android
smartphone apps.
WCPE streams on Ku-band satellite AMC1 at
103°WL, transponder 12K vertical polarity,
DVB-compliant, free-to-air, downlink frequency
11942 MHz, IF 1192 MHz, FEC 3/4, symbol rate
20 MSps, audio PID 5417, channel 81.
See theclassicalstation.org/satellite.shtml.
o I would like to use my gift of $250 or more as an angel challenge.
Please use:
o My full name, o My first name & city
WCPE grants blanket permission to retransmit and
rebroadcast its programming in real time without
charge or royalty to WCPE, to any entity that may
legally disseminate programming to the general
public. This permission includes AM, FM, and television stations and translators; cable TV systems;
closed-circuit TV systems; common carriers; directbroadcast satellite systems; Internet service providers and audio services; multipoint distribution
systems; pay-TV systems; subscription TV systems;
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licensed or authorized entities.
It is a violation of law to record copyrighted music
or performances without authorization; please use
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Run largely by volunteers, WCPE has steadily expanded and innovated.
WCPE’s FM simulcasts meant that one could watch the Met telecasts without
sacrificing high-quality audio. An early entrant into Internet broadcasting,
WCPE became a worldwide source of Classical music round the clock and put
central North Carolina at the center of the virtual music world. “WCPE has
nourished my career as a UNC epidemiology faculty member and my life and
my family’s well-being. Thank you, WCPE!”
o I want to be a WCPE volunteer.
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32
address
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systems across America listed at:
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WCPE streams on the Internet in Windows
Media, MP3, and Ogg Vorbis at
theclassicalstation.org/internet.shtml.
“A gift that keeps on giving” is how
Victor Schoenbach characterizes
WCPE. A native of Baltimore, MD,
and Brooklyn, NY, Victor lived in
Cambridge, MA; New York City; and
London, England, before moving
to Carrboro, NC, in 1972. During
his years as a graduate student in
public health education at UNC,
Vic and Marion Schoenbach
there was no local public FM radio
station until WUNC-FM began
bringing news and Classical music to our community in 1976. WCPE’s launch
in 1978, while he was an epidemiology doctoral student, greatly enriched
the musical environment. Nine years later, when Victor’s family lured his
mother Frances to Chapel Hill from New York City, WCPE was a key recruiting
incentive. How could he have asked her to leave behind the Metropolitan
Opera broadcasts that she listened to religiously every Saturday afternoon?
WCPE gave her that and more, with year-round opera on the WCPE Opera
House! During her latter years, WCPE was her constant companion.
Fill out this form and send it to WCPE.
Thank you for your support!
Please mail to:
WCPE
PO Box 897
Wake Forest, NC 27588
33
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