Ken Potter January 17, 2011

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Ken Potter January 17, 2011
JANUARY 17, 2011
MONDAY
I
FOUNDED IN 1861
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TOP STORY: ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY
marinij.com
Winter shelter expansion studied
Get the latest Marin County
news all day at marinij.com
Organizers forced to turn some
homeless away on cold nights
M A R IN N E W S A 3
By Richard Halstead
Marin Independent Journal
GARDENS
HAVE MANY
BENEFITS
Demand for Marin’s
winter shelter program
has been so great this year
that organizers have had
to turn people away on
some especially cold and
wet nights.
As a result, the program’s organizers — St.
Vincent de Paul Society of
Marin County and Marin
Interfaith street chaplain,
Rev. Paul Gaffney — are
considering expanding the
program.
“We’re trying to figure
out if it is going to be possible,” Gaffney said.
One night recently, 52
men, a dozen more than
the program can accommodate, assembled at the
St. Vincent de Paul dining
dining room to churches
and synagogues, which
serve as temporary shelTo comment on this story online,
ters on a rotating basis.
see marinij.com.
The houses of worship
room in downtown San also provide their needy
Rafael seeking overnight guests with a free meal.
Currently, 15 churches
housing, Gaffney said.
Homeless men and and synagogues particiwomen are transported by
bus each evening from the
See HOMELESS, page 2
marinij.com
SAN RAFAEL
A new study of Marin’s
community gardens suggests
that those who work in a
shared garden — either in a
neighborhood, a school or a
local institution — tend to become more physically active,
eat more fruits and vegetables
and develop a better understanding of their environment.
Immigrant Saul Peña, who grew up in the Canal, became the first in his family to
attend college with the help of the Marin Education Fund. Now with a top investment
firm, he’s returning to the fund’s successor, 10,000 Degrees, as board chairman
M A R IN L IF E B2
WILDLIFE ON VIEW
ALONG RIDGE HIKE
Coyote bushes dominate the
landscape on Coyote Ridge,
but coyotes roam the Marin
Headlands and might be seen
trotting across the hillsides.
M A R IN O PIN I O N A 9
NOVATO STEPS UP
ON GANG ISSUE
Today’s editorial commends
Novato city officials for being
forthright in publicly addressing local incidents of gang
crime and violence.
IJ photo/Alan Dep
MARIN OBITUARIES A8
Phyllis Ingersoll
INSIDE
Ask Amy .......................... B3
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W E AT H E R B10
Today: Partly
cloudy after early
fog.
Board of Directors Chairman Saul Peña walks with 10,000 Degrees President Kim Mazzuca at the organization’s office in San Rafael on
Thursday. Peña sought help from 10,000 Degrees — then the Marin Education Fund — which helped him get into college and earn a degree.
BREAKING THE CYCLE
BY CREATING A NEW ONE
Then he met a counselor at the
nonprofit Marin Education Fund
and within four years, with the
AUL PEÑA ALWAYS knew
he wanted to go to college, but group’s support, he had an economics
degree and a job at a prestigous San
as an immigrant growing up
Francisco investment firm.
in the Canal area of San Rafael, he
Now Peña, 33, has been named
faced obstacles.
board chairman of the education
“I didn’t know how I was going
fund, the first time a former student
to pay for it,” he said. “My parents
couldn’t help me with the application has ever been tapped to lead the San
process.”
Rafael-based foundation. He says the
By Will Jason
Marin Independent Journal
S
role gives him the ultimate platform
to help others in his community.
“It’s about breaking the cycle of not
getting an education, breaking the
cycle of poverty,” he said.
Peña’s journey with the education
fund — now called 10,000 Degrees —
started his senior year at San Rafael
High School, when he met Sandy
Peeples, a counselor for the group.
See EDUCATION, page 2
64/ 40
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G O L D E N G L O BE AWA R D S
WORLD
‘Social Network’ a big winner
Ex-dictator ‘Baby Doc’
returns to Haiti
The Facebook tale “The Social Network” won top honors
Sunday at the Golden Globes with four prizes, solidifying
its prospects as an Academy Awards favorite. Among TV
winners, “Glee” (right) won three prizes, best comedy and
supporting-acting prizes for Jane Lynch and Chris Colfer. A8
Former Haitian dictator Jean-Claude “Baby
Doc” Duvalier returned Sunday to Haiti nearly
25 years after a popular uprising against his
brutal dictatorship forced him into exile A7
CAINS TIRE SELLS TIRES
For LESS than the Clubs … A Lot Less!!
Brakes • 725 Lincoln • 258-8569
Tires • 1531 Fourth St. • 453-2942
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M A R I N I J.C O M/S P O RT S
MONDAY
January 17, 2011
THREE
THINGS
TO DO
TODAY
•
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•
MOVIES B2
• TV B3
HIGH SCHOOL
REPORT
• ASK AMY B3
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TUESDAY SPORTS
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health + fitness + sports
PLUS SPORTS: CYCLING IN MARIN
GODFATHER ON
Make a difference
TWO WHEELS
Ω What: There are plenty of opportunities to volunteer around
the county, including planting
gardens and cleaning up green
spaces, during the National
Day of Service.
Ω When: 9 a.m. to noon
Ω Cost: Free
Ω Do it: Davidson Middle
School, 280 Woodland Ave.,
San Rafael; 891-8787; Golden
Gate National Parks, 948 Fort
Barry, Sausalito; 331-1540;
Manzanita Community Center,
630 Drake Ave., Marin City;
491-4366; ext. 303
Provided by Bo
b Cullinan
Artist Ken Potter was first president
of Marin Cyclists — masterminds
behind popular Marin Century ride
T WAS A SIMPLE QUESTION
with a complex answer. When was
the first Marin Century bike ride?
Finding that answer lead to a chain
of events dating back to the roots of
cycling in Marin,
and the rediscovery of a
man who truly changed
this place where we live.
The first clue was hidden inside a San Rafael
storage locker.
BOB
“There was a rather siz- CULLINAN
able box full of clippings
and letters, recounting the
history of the club and cy- ORIGIN OF
cling in the county,” Marin THE CLUB
Cyclists treasurer Doug
Marin Cyclists
Henningsen said. “There
was founded
was something from 1963
in 1963. Here
that talked about a guy
are the original
named Ken Potter setting people involved:
up the club.”
First presiBut who, and where, is
dent: Ken
Ken Potter? Henningsen
Potter
found countless people
Founding
with the same name in
members:
California, and eventualPeter Bonet,
ly narrowed his search to
John Lea, Atila dozen possible Potters.
lio Maletesta,
One lived in Fair Oaks,
Bob Marshall,
near Sacramento.
Alex McLean,
Henningsen made the
Joan Mulligan,
call one day last fall. He
Vince Mulligan,
wasn’t sure if he’d found
Nelson Shreve
his man.
“I just called and asked
if this was the Ken Potter that formed
the Marin Cyclists, and he said it was,”
Henningsen said. “He shared some of his
background, and I realized he’s truly an
interesting guy. He was really happy that
the club was still active and still around.”
I
Out of the blue
Ω What: Heidi Durrow discusses
her new novel, “The Girl Who
Fell from the Sky,” about the
daughter of a Danish mother
and an American G.I. who
becomes the sole survivor of
a family tragedy, only to find
herself alone in a world that
wants to know if she is black
or white.
Ω When: 7 p.m.
Ω Cost: Free
Ω Do it: Book Passage, 51
Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte
Madera; 927-0960; www.
bookpassage.com
Master of verse
Ω What: Former Iowa poet laureate Marvin Bell reads from
his work and talks about his
current books “Mars Being
Red” and “7 Poets, 4 Day, 1
Book.”
Ω When: 7:30 p.m.
Ω Cost: Free
Ω Do it: Falkirk Cultural Center,
1408 Mission Ave., San Rafael;
485-3328; www.marinpoetry
center.org
For more places to go and things
to do, go to events.marinij.com
M A R IN S P O R T S
TAMALPA RUNNERS
COUPLES RELAY
See CULLINAN, page 7
The Tamalpa Runners’ 31st
annual Couples Relay is set
for 9 a.m. Feb. 13 at Vintage
Oaks Shopping Center in
Novato. Registration is $30
per couple. Register at
www.active.com or
www.tamalparunners.org.
For more information, contact
Brian Valle at 310-8653 or
[email protected]
Visit the Marin youth sports blog at
blogs.marinij.com/youthsports
T O P S IN T V & F IL M
TV
1. NFL Playoff Game 2: Jets
at Indianapolis, NBC, 33.35
million.
2. NFL Playoff Bridge: (between Games 1 and 2), NBC,
31.48 million.
3. NFL Playoff Prekick
(Game 2): NBC, 30.54 million.
4. NFL Wildcard Post-Game
(Sunday): Fox, 24.86 million.
5. “Two and a Half Men”:
CBS, 15.36 million.
FILM
1. “Green Hornet”: $34 million.
2. “The Dilemma”: $17.4
3. “True Grit”: $11.2
4. “King’s Speech”: $9 5.
5 “Black Swan”: $8.1.
C O N TAC T U S
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884-1478
Prep sports hotline 382-7307
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PLUS EDITORS
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[email protected] 382-7286
Dave Allen, Plus Sports
[email protected] 382-7206
IJ archive
Special to the IJ/Anne Chadwick Williams
Ken Potter of Fair Oaks, who founded Marin Cyclists in 1963, designed the original
jersey for the group. As a painter, Potter found inspiration for his artwork in cities such
as San Francisco (right), Paris and Florence, Italy.
‘
It’s hard to be a pioneer,
but it’s very exciting.”
Ken Potter, PAINTER AND
FIRST PRESIDENT OF MARIN CYCLISTS
PLUS HEALTH & FITNESS: MEDICALLY CLEAR
It’s not simply intuition that luck’s a skill
W
HEN YOU
but also absolutely corREAD the word
rect.
“intuition,”
Intuition is everywhere.
what comes to mind?
It motivates a person to
do something “because it
A convenient excuse
feels right,” allows people
for acting on impulse?
DUSTIN
to “follow their hearts”
A skill molded by exBALLARD
and gives justification to
perience?
those who, like a certain
The Somatic Marker
former
president,
tend to “trust
Hypothesis?
their
gut
feelings.”
Jamie Foxx’s best-selling
Each day, whether you realize
album about how to impress
it or not, you make many choices
women?
that are intuitive, ones that
If you answered “all of the
Bay Area News Group photo/Sara Duran
just seem to pop into your conabove,” you are not only a student
A
new
study
of
gamblers
indicates that people who
sciousness — effortless decisionof the neural basis of cognition
seem to be lucky and whose hunches pay off may not
See BALLARD, page 2 really be simply lucky after all; it may be a skill.
and Jamie Foxx’s musical career,
Ω HIKE OF THE
WEEK: A trek
in the Marin
Headlands might
include seeing
coyotes.
B2
Ω OUTDOOR
CALENDAR: Volunteer are needed
for Redwood Creek
restoration at Muir
Beach on Jan. 22.
B2
Ω ASK AMY:
Middle-aged
couple want to
live in neighboring
condos.
B3
SPORTS
MARIN INDEPENDENT JOURNAL • MARINIJ.COM
570
M O N D A Y, J A N U A R Y 1 7 , 2 0 1 1 • B7
Marleau on verge of milestone Warriors thriving
from downtown
Center about to play
his 1,000th game
Team’s former sharpshooter
Morrow returns with Nets
By Mark Emmons
Bay Area News Group
GLENDALE, Ariz. — Sharks
center Patrick Marleau has one lasting memory of his first NHL game.
It came on his opening shift as an
18-year-old fresh out of junior hockey in 1997.
He was skating along the boards
against the Edmonton Oilers when
he saw Bryan Marchment, who had
the well-earned reputation for dishing out questionable hits, bearing
down on him.
“Luckily I fell down and he missed
me,” Marleau recalled.
Welcome to the league, kid.
When the puck drops this afternoon at Jobing.com Arena, Marleau
will play in his 1,000th-career game.
It’s no small feat. Only 256 NHL
players ever have reached the milestone.
And just 37 have done it playing
for a single team. Even more impressive for Marleau, at age 31 he is one
of the youngest players in history to
hit the mark.
While Marleau downplays the
achievement, he does concede that it
means something to have played his
entire career in Teal.
“It makes it special to be able to
stay in one city,” he said. “When
you’re growing up, you’re seeing guys
like (Mario) Lemieux and (Joe) Sakic
that stay with one team the whole
time. I’ve always kind of admired
that.” But it’s hard for Marleau to be
in a mood to celebrate because these
are hardly the best of times for him
or the Sharks.
San Jose (22-19-5) has underachieved badly this season, and the
lion’s share of the blame has been
placed at the skates of The Big Three
— Marleau, Joe Thornton and Dany
Heatley.
A year ago, Marleau enjoyed a stellar season where he scored 44 goals,
had 39 assists, posted a plus-21 rating and won a gold medal with the
Canadian Olympic team. The Sharks
rewarded Marleau with a $27.6-million, four-year contract to keep him
from testing free agency.
This season has been a different
story. He has 17 goals, 16 assists and
a minus-20 rating that is among the
league’s worst. Midseason reports
cards compiled by hockey writers
around the league often included
Marleau among the NHL’s biggest
disappointments.
By Marcus Thompson II
WARRIORS REPORT
Bay Area News Group
Bay Area News Group photo/Jim Gensheimer
Sharks center Patrick Marleau (left) will play the 1,000th game of his NHL career
when San Jose plays Phoenix on Monday.
SHARKS REPORT
Ω Sunday: San Jose at Phoenix, 1 p.m.
CSNCA
But that, Sharks coach Todd
McLellan believes, does not detract
from the larger accomplishment of
playing in 1,000 games.
“He’s been through a hell-of-alot with one organization,” McLellan said. “You have to look at his
complete body of work and the fact
that he was here at such a young age
and gone through coaches, (general) managers, highs and lows. You
have to give him credit for that.” No
player is more closely identified with
the Sharks organization. Marleau
is a homegrown star who owns the
team’s record book with the most career goals, points, games and shots,
as well as being second in assists
behind Thornton.
Marleau also personifies this franchise — a team that for years has
been among the NHL’s most talented and yet every year has come up
short in the playoffs.
That has made the quiet native of
Aneroid, Saskatchewan a polarizing
figure. Marleau receives among the
biggest cheers at the Shark Tank.
Yet he also is a lightning rod for criticism because he can be invisible on
the ice when needed the most.
He lost the captain’s “C” after
the Sharks were booted in the first
round of the playoffs two seasons
ago. (He now wears the assistant’s
“A” for home games.) And his low-key
demeanor sometimes is interpreted
as a lack of internal fire.
But ask him about how frustrating
this season has been personally, and
Marleau will respond that it’s not
about him — only the team.
“You learn that ups and downs are
part of hockey,” he said. “There’s
going to be bumps in the road and
you have to hope that it’s going to
make us stronger.” Marleau was the
second-overall pick of the ‘97 draft
and the talent-starved Sharks rushed
him into their lineup. It was more
unusual for a youngster to make an
immediate impact in that clutchand-grab era because players needed
to be more physically mature.
He lived with goaltender Kelly
Hrudey and was your typical
teenager.
“Video games basically were the
biggest thing for me,” Marleau said.
Over the years in San Jose he met
his future wife, started a family and
established himself as one of the
league’s most skilled players. While
talent best explains reaching 1,000
games, luck and good health also
have played roles.
Mike Ricci, who was the last
player to reach the mark wearing a
Teal uniform in 2004, said this is a
moment that Marleau will look back
upon with pride.
“I know he won’t feel how much of
an accomplishment it is until later
on,” said Ricci, now a Sharks development coach. “That’s the way I was.
It’s a big deal to me now.”
The Warriors finished
last season tied for third
in the NBA in 3-point percentage. It was clearly one
of their strengths.
Then, this past offseason,
Golden State lost its best
3-point shooter, guard Anthony Morrow, to New Jersey, today’s MLK Day opponent. Yet as the Warriors
tip off today, they are tops
in the league from behind
the arc at 40.8 percent.
How did they lose their
best 3-point shooter and get
better from 3-point range?
“Efficiency,” coach Keith
Smart said. “We’re taking
good shots from the right
guys.”
Smart said when he was
hired that the Warriors
would shoot fewer 3-pointers than in years past.
But his team is on pace to
take more and make more
3-pointers then it did last
season. He can’t complain,
however, because the Warriors are taking most of
their 3-pointers in the context of the offense.
Many of their looks are a
product of ball movement,
from the ability of guards
Monta Ellis and Stephen
Curry to penetrate and
dish, from forward David
Lee’s ability to draw attention from the high and low
post.
“All of that is because of
our spacing on the floor,”
Curry said. “That’s more
consistent basketball. Getting the same shots every
game and everybody’s getting a touch, feeling involved. Whoever makes a
shot, everybody feels good
about that possession.”
Of course, getting the
shot is one thing. Knocking them down is another. The Warriors have
Ω Monday: New Jersey at
Golden State, 1 p.m., CSN
capitalized by converting
on their good looks. Forward Dorell Wright said
because they are getting
such good looks, they are
knocking them down at a
higher rate.
The Warriors have four
players who shoot at least
40 percent from 3-point
range: Curry (42.7), forward
V lad imir Rad ma novic
(42.7), Wright (42.0) and
swingman Reggie Williams
(40.8).
And that doesn’t include
guard Monta Ellis, who is
on pace for a career-high at
39.9 percent, or former reserve Rodney Carney, who
was at 45.9 percent before
he was waived last month.
“Of course you miss a guy
like Morrow,” Smart said.
“But the way Dorell has
shot the ball has been a big
surprise, and Monta Ellis
the way he’s shooting the
basketball. We knew Steph
Curry would do his job, and
now Radmanovic is making
some as well.”
Wright said Smart still
has to get on the players
from time to time, tell them
to get to the basket instead
of settling for 3-pointers.
But the Warriors have
gotten away from relying
heavily on pull-up 3-pointers in transition, and stepback 3-pointers out of oneon-one play, and 3-pointers
early in the shot clock.
“We don’t think those
are high percentage shots,”
Wright said. “You don’t
want to be out there jacking up shots, because it’s
contagious, because everybody’s going to try to jack
up shots instead of trying to take threes in the
offense.”
CULLINAN: Potter picked colors and designed first logo for fledgling Marin Cyclists club
From page 1
Potter is a true Renaissance
man, with an amazing memory.
At age 84, he can still vividly
recall his very first bicycle. He
was 8 years old, living in Piedmont with his mom and dad in
1934, and he and his parents
split the cost of that $6 bike.
Fast-forward to 1950. After
serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Potter moved
from California to France. He
was the quintessential American in Paris — an aspiring artist who bought a bike as a way
to explore the French capital.
“I got a bike in Paris at the
flea market for about $35,” Potter said. “It was the first multispeed bicycle I ever had.”
On good days, he’d ride that
bike 200 miles. Thanks to the
GI Bill, Potter had enough
money to survive. “I could live
on the allowance I was given
from the government, which
was about $65 per month, but I
had to be prudent.”
Nearly three years after living in both Paris and Florence,
Italy, Potter sold the bike for
the same price he paid for it and
came back to California. But
he didn’t stay long before going
back to France, Switzerland and
Italy. That led to a job in the
commercial art business in New
York, then an extended stay in
Brazil.
Potter returned to San Francisco in 1955, and returned to
his love of cycling two years
later. “In 1957 I bought a brand
new Italian bike, and that was
my very first ten-speed,” he
said. “I paid $175, and I still
have it. It’s a great old bike.”
Potter joined a San Francisco
touring club called the Western Wanderers. The club rode
primarily in Marin, which lead
Potter to buy a home in Corte
Madera in 1961. Then one day
inspiration struck.
“My neighbor Norman Nock
and I got the idea that we really ought to have a bike club in
Marin,” Potter said. “We were
traveling to places that were a
lot less interesting than Marin,
so why don’t we just make our
Special to the IJ/Anne Chadwick Williams
Ken Potter is a former Marin resident who founded Marin Cyclists in 1963. He is a well-known watercolor artist and
continues to paint and show his work regularly. Here he looks at a finished piece called “Bay Bridge April ’09.”
own club in Marin? It’s needed,
and we can do it.”
They planned, prepared
and launched the first Marin
Cyclists club ride in February
1963. “We started at John Lea’s
bicycle shop in Corte Madera.
We had 50 or 60 riders on our
first ride. It was largely composed of youngsters. We figured
if we don’t have ’em, we’ll grow
’em.”
“Our first club ride went down
Paradise Drive to Tiburon, then
crossed over at Trestle Glen,
back over to Paradise and back
to the bike shop.” Potter lead
that first ride and was picked to
be the first president of fledgling Marin Cyclists club. He’s
quick to point out that he didn’t
do it alone.
But make no mistake about
it. Ken Potter was the driving
force behind the club. He used
his artistic talents to design
the first Marin Cyclists logo,
and pick the colors for the club’s
woolen jerseys. “I felt that green
would represent the land mass
and the blue would represent
the water around Marin. The
jerseys I got through an Italian
company. I communicated the
whole thing by writing letters in
Italian.”
In the summer of ’63, the
Marin Cyclists sponsored the
club’s first 100-mile century
ride, with an eye toward expanding the club’s membership.
“The first century ride was
August 18. That date was open
in the racing schedule, and we
wanted to get those people into
the club as much as we could.
That first century was really
128 miles.”
“Some of our people objected
to the whole thing, because they
didn’t want to be playing baby
sisters to children and novices,”
Potter said. “I insisted that it
be open to everybody because
I felt the club had to grow and
prosper and the only way to do
this was to go after a big broad
base. Some people boycotted
the ride, but I think we were
doing the correct thing.”
Twelve people entered, and
only four finished. The entry
fee was 50 cents, and for that,
the club provided a course that
started in Corte Madera, wound
north to Valley Ford, then down
the coast into Sausalito and the
finish back in Corte Madera.
The club handed out water and
oranges on the route, but riders
had to stop at stores along the
way to buy their own food.
To put that first ride into
perspective, the current Marin
Century covers essentially the
same course, attracts more than
2,700 riders, and the single biggest expense for the Marin Cyclists is post-ride pizza. They’ve
come a long way.
It all comes back to Potter. “I
am the recognized founder, nobody disputes that, but getting
a club started is an attitude,
and I have a philosophical attitude about this. It’s hard to be a
pioneer, but it’s very exciting.”
Henningsen is the first to give
full credit to Potter. “He was the
right guy at the right time, to
capitalize on the bicycle movement that was growing in its
infancy in Marin County. He got
the right people involved, but
he’s the guy who got all rolling.”
Potter is quick to return the
compliment. “I’m in awe and
I’m extremely proud of the
people in the club today. They
invited me to come to their holiday party in December. It was
a great moment, a great time
for me, and I’m just amazed at
what they have done.”
Marin Cyclists vice president
Fabiola Saballos may have put
it best. “He probably never expected this to happen, he never
though it would be this big, this
successful, and that he would
influence so many young riders.
To see how far it’s come, it’s
glorious for him.”
It will all come full-circle for
him this summer. At age 85,
Potter is planning to ride the
2011 Marin Century in August.
And if someone there asks you
who started it all, you can just
point to Ken Potter — with
pride.
Super Bowl Sunday
Looking for an alternative to
the usual full day of football on
Feb. 6? Two local events have
something for both racers and
casual riders.
In Napa, the annual Cherry
Pie criterium races attract everyone from novice first-timers
to seasoned pros, including
many Marin bike racers. And
the best part? The winner of
each category gets a cherry pie.
For more information, to go to
www.eagleracingteam.org
Closer to home, the second
annual Dirt Roll will start and
finish at the San Geronimo
Golf Course. There are rides for
both mountain bikers and road
riders, with a big post-ride barbecue for all. Proceeds go to the
Marin County Bicycle Coalition
and the NorCal High School
Cycling League.
Rumor has it that a big-time
Tour de France veteran may be
leading the Dirt Roll road ride.
Watch for an announcement,
and check out all the details,
here: www.dirtroll.org
Marin resident Bob Cullinan is the editor and publisher of cycling news site
www.CycleTo.com. Follow him on Twitter at http://twitter.com/bobcullinan or
e-mail [email protected]