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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letter from the President
2
General Information
3-4
AESA 2010 Executive Council
5-6
Executive Council Regions/AESA Staff
7
AESA Educational Foundation Board
8
2010 AESA Award Winners
9-12
Special Thanks
13
Conference Sponsors
14
Conference Highlights
15-16
AESA Sponsor Workshops
17-20
Schedule at a Glance
21
Wednesday at a Glance
22
Thursday at a Glance
23
Thursday Concurrent Sessions
24-42
Friday at a Glance
43-44
Friday Concurrent Sessions
45-56
Saturday at a Glance
57
Saturday Concurrent Sessions
57-62
Exhibitor and Showcase (Alphabetical)
63-71
Exhibitor and Showcase (by Booth Number)
72-73
Floor Plan – Exhibit Hall
74-76
Notes
77-80
meeting
celebrating
CHALLENGES
SUCCESSES
Dear Colleagues and Friends,
Welcome to Savannah, Georgia for AESA’s 25th
Annual Conference, marking the silver anniversary of our annual event. I am very pleased that
you chose to join us to learn, share and network
with ESA leaders. You are part of the 553 member agencies of the Association of Educational
Service Agencies who value the importance of
delivering a national voice regarding the issues
we public educators face during these challenging economic times. We hope you will enjoy the history and charm of
Savannah while benefitting from the excellent professional growth opportunities focused exclusively on the needs of ESAs.
This year’s conference, ESAs: Meeting Challenges, Celebrating Successes,
promises many opportunities to stimulate thoughtful discussions, help
guide the development of action plans and provide many ideas on how to
leverage resources by partnering, collaborating and sharing ideas. Please
take full advantage of all the professional development offerings, activities
and special events. Join me to hear keynote speakers Ian Jukes, Fred
Bramante and Bill Habermehl. Choose from 90 concurrent sessions as
presenters offer best practices and share exciting initiatives that are
unique to ESA educational leaders, with a special strand for ESA board
members on setting direction through policy, leadership and innovation.
Also, please visit the Exhibit Hall. There you will find our generous sponsors
and business partners. Relax and grab a snack at our ice cream social as you
learn about these companies that focus on partnering with ESAs to help us
better serve our students. Our corporate sponsors deserve special thanks
for their fantastic support. Plan to participate in the AESA Foundation’s Silent
Auction and don’t miss the Digital Jam. We will also provide the Internet
Café for your use during the conference.
In closing, welcome to our 25th Silver Anniversary
Conference, and thank you for your attendance and
participation. We hope you have a pleasant time in
Savannah as you experience its culture, history and
southern hospitality. Y’all enjoy!
Dee Alarcón, President, AESA
Solano County Superintendent of Schools
Fairfield, CA
2
GENERAL INFORMATION
ALL ACTIVITIES ARE LOCATED IN THE SAVANNAH INTERNATIONAL
TRADE AND CONVENTION CENTER UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.
AESA Registration: AESA Registration is located on the River Concourse at the convention center. Hours are as follows:
Wednesday, December 1. . . . . . . Noon – 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, December 2 . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Friday, December 3 . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Saturday, December 4 . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
AESA Exhibits: The exhibit hall is located in Exhibit Hall A just off the River Concourse.
The exhibits are open the following times:
Wednesday, December 1. . . . 2:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, December 2 . . . . . . 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
10:30 a.m. – Noon
1:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Conference Badges: Please wear your AESA badge at all times. Your badge is required
to enter the exhibit hall, general session, concurrent sessions, and breakfast discussions. If your name badge requires corrections, please go to the registration area for
assistance. A ticket is required to enter each luncheon and the Saturday brunch.
Conference Backpacks: Special thanks to NOVA Southeastern University for providing
the conference backpacks.
Internet Café and Message Board: Located in the convention center River Concourse,
the internet café is open daily to allow you the opportunity to stay connected. Special
thanks to Grace Global Computers for sponsoring the Internet Café and to Promethean
for the Message Board.
Lost & Found: Misplaced items can be turned in and claimed at the AESA registration
area on the River Concourse of the convention center.
Restaurant Information: There are numerous restaurant options in Savannah – many in
easy walking distance from the hotels. The Savannah Convention & Visitors Bureau
will have representatives available to assist you with recommendations and reservations next to the AESA registration area during the following times:
Wednesday, December 1. . . . 2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Thursday, December 2 . . . . . . 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Friday, December 3 . . . . . . . . . 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Spouse/Guest Activities: If you are interested in local events, group tours or other
activities, please see the concierge at your hotel for details and to sign up.
3
CONCURRENT
INFORMATION
SESSIONS 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.
GENERAL
Transportation: AESA has partnered with the Savannah Area Convention & Visitors
Bureau and has secured two forms of transportation across the river to and from the
convention center. Below are the schedules for each.
Shuttle Bus Transportation Schedule:
RED ROUTE: Hyatt Regency Savannah
BLUE ROUTE: Marriott Savannah Riverfront
Two routes in place provide a less than 20 minute wait time:
Wednesday, December 1. . . . 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
1 circulating bus provides
Thursday, December 2 . . . . . . 6:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
service to both hotels:
2:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Friday, December 3 . . . . . . . . . 6:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, December 4 . . . . . . 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Please ask Savannah Hosts (wearing green vests) for assistance if needed!
Water Taxi/Ferry Schedule: The Savannah River is a busy commercial waterway, with
special US Coast Guard regulations for vessels crossing the river. The Ferry may
sometimes be delayed briefly by visibility or large vessel traffic in the area. Your
patience is appreciated.
SAVANNAH BELLES FERRIES:
2 ferries running
2 routes, 20 min
wait at each dock
Wednesday,
December 1
One ferry running
triangle to all 3
docks (30 min wait)
8:20 a.m. – 6:20 p.m.
Thursday,
December 2
6:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Friday,
December 3
6:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Saturday,
December 4
8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Service ONLY
from Hyatt dock to
Convention center
(20 min wait)
7:00 a.m. – 8:20 a.m.
6:30 p.m. – 12 a.m.
6:30 p.m. – 12 a.m.
4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m. – 12 a.m.
7:00 a.m. – 8:20 a.m.
6:20 p.m. – 12 a.m.
Service Locations:
TRADE CENTER LANDING — between Trade Center and Westin Hotel
CITY HALL LANDING — River Walk at City Hall, adjacent to Hyatt Hotel
WAVING GIRL LANDING — River Walk, adjacent to Marriott Hotel
4
AESA 2010 EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Dee Alarcon, President
Superintendent
Solano County Office of Education
5100 Business Center Dr., Fairfield, CA 94534
(707) 399-4401 • [email protected]
Mike Cook, President-Elect
Executive Director
ESSDACK
1500 East 11th #200, Hutchinson, KS 67501
(620) 663-9566 • [email protected]
Joseph Crozier, Past President
Chief Administrator
Great Prairie Area Education Agency
P. O. Box 1065, Burlington, IA 52601
(319) 753-6561 • [email protected]
R. Stephen Aguirre, Executive Director
High Plains REC
101 N Second St., Raton, NM 87740
(505) 445-7090 • [email protected]
John Bass, Executive Director
Region 16 ESC
5800 Bell St., Amarillo, TX 79109
(806) 677-5010 • [email protected]
Cliff Carmody, Executive Director
South West/West Central Service Cooperative
1420 East College Drive, Marshall, MN 56258
(507) 537-2250 • [email protected]
Dee Cockrille, Executive Director
RESA II
2001 McCoy Road, Huntington, WV 25701-4937
(304) 529-6205 • [email protected]
5
AESA 2010 EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Bruce Dennison, Regional Supterintendent of Schools
Bureau/Henry/Stark ROE
107 S. State St., Atkinson, IL 61235
(309) 936-7890 • [email protected]
Lindy Franks, Director
Southwest Arkansas ESC
2502 South Main St., Hope, AR 71801
(870) 777-3076 • [email protected]
Dan Hare, Superintendent
Butler County ESC
500 North Erie Blvd., Hamilton, OH 45011
(513) 887-3710 • [email protected]
James Langlois, District Superintendent
Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES
200 BOCES Dr., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598-4399
(914) 248-2300 • [email protected]
Mick Loughran, Administrator
Educational Service Unit 9
1117 E. South St., Hastings, NE 68901-6443
(402) 463-5611 • [email protected]
Marjorie Wallace, Executive Director
Northeast Tri-County IU 5
252 Waterford St., Edinboro, PA 17350
(814) 734-5610 • [email protected]
6
AESA EXECUTIVE COUNCIL REGIONS
Western Region
AK,AZ,CA,CO,HI,ID,KS,MT,NM,OR,UT, WA,WY
Stephen Aguirre
Dee Alarcon
Mike Cook
Central Region
IA,IL,MI,MN,ND,SD,WI
Cliff Carmody
Joe Crozier
Bruce Dennison
Mick Loughran
Eastern Region
CT,IN,MA,NJ,NY,OH,PA,RI,VT
Dan Hare
James Langlois
Marjorie Wallace
Southern Region
AL,AR,FL,GA,KY,MO,MS,NC,TX,VA,WV
John Bass
Dee Cockrille
Lindy Franks
AESA STAFF
Brian L. Talbott
Executive Director
801 N. Quincy St., Ste. 750
Arlington, VA 22203-1730
(703) 875-0739 [email protected]
Peter C. Young
Chief Financial Officer
53 Hotchkiss Grove Rd.
Branford, CT 06405-5409
(203) 481-4063 [email protected]
Dick Moody
Associate Executive Director
7344 Steamboat Island Rd.
Olympia, WA 98502
(360) 866-6331 [email protected]
7
AESA EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION BOARD
Ronald S. Fielder
Chair
Grant Wood AEA
Cedar Rapids, IA
Virginia Seccombe
Vice-Chair
LEARN
Old Lyme, CT
R. Stephen Aguirre
High Plains REC
Raton, NM
Dee Alarcon
Solano County Office of Education
Fairfield, CA
Twyla Barnes
ESD 112
Vancouver, WA
David Calchera
Eastford, CT
Lee Christiansen
Portland, OR
Joe Crozier
Great Prairie AEA
Burlington, IA
David Distel
Hamilton County ESC
Cincinnati, OH
Tim Gavigan
CESA 1
Brookfield, WI
Susan Leddick
President, PKR, Inc.
Bozeman, MT
Joseph Marinelli
Wayne/Finger Lakes BOCES
Newark, NY
Glenn Pelecky
Mississippi Bend AEA
Bettendorf, IA
Don Stevens
CESA # 5
Portage, WI
Brian Talbott (ExOfficio)
AESA
Lee Warne
Marshall, MN
Peter Young
Secretary/Treasurer
Branford, CT
EDUCATIONAL SERVICE AGENCIES DEFINED
AEA
BOCES
CESA
COE
EC
ERC
ESA
ESC
ESD
ESU
ISC
ISD
IU
REC
RESA
RESC
ROE
RRC
SC
8
Area Education Agency
Board of Cooperative Educational Services
Cooperative Education Service Agency
County Office of Education
Educational Cooperative/Collaborative
Educational Resource Center
Education Service Agency/Alliance
Education Service Center/Cooperative/Commission/Consortium
Education Service District
Educational Service Unit
Intermediate Service Center
Intermediate School District
Intermediate Unit
Regional Educational Cooperative
Regional Education Service Agency
Regional Education Service Center
Regional Office of Education
Regional Resource Center
Service Cooperative
AWARD WINNERS
WALTER G. TURNER AWARD
Carolyn (Lynne) Cannon, Ph.D.
Board Vice President
Grant Wood Area Education Agency
Iowa City, Iowa
AESA annually recognizes outstanding accomplishments and contributions to education and to
AESA. Congratulations to Carolyn (Lynne) Turner,
winner of the 2010 Walter G. Turner Award, who
has been selected for outstanding contributions
in the advancement of regional educational programs at the regional, state and/or national levels.
The award will be presented at the luncheon on
Thursday December 2.
Cannon, who has served on the Grant Wood Area Education Agency board for 30
years, 26 as president or vice president, is recognized for her advancement of the
goals and philosophies of educational service agencies, outstanding accomplishments
and innovative practices, leadership, and service to educational service agencies.
She began her education journey as a parent of a student with disabilities. Her quest for
an appropriate education for her children led her into leadership roles with local, state,
and national child advocacy groups where she also was a voice for educational service
agency programs at the local, state, and national level. This quest also led her to leadership positions in her local school board where she served as a member and president
of the Iowa City schools and as a board member at Grant Wood Education Agency.
Her advocacy for Iowa’s Area Education Agencies was critical in the development of
Iowa’s AEAs as a statewide “system of AEAs” which led to the hiring of a state director and lobbyist, creation of a statewide shared budget for joint AEA services, creation
of the Iowa Educators Consortium Purchasing Cooperative, state AEA accreditation
process, and reduction of the number of AEAs from fifteen to nine.
Cannon has also served as president of the Learning Disabilities Association of America,
founder and president of Johnson County Chapter of ACLD, president of Elder Services,
Inc., and vice president and board member of the Iowa City Area Science Center.
She has served as managing editor of the Learning Disabilities Association of America’s national journal, Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, and editor of
its newsletter, Newsbriefs. She also was managing editor for two national chemistry
journals, and in 2001 retired from the University of Iowa’s Chemistry Department where
she was Director of Undergraduate Laboratories.
9
AWARD WINNERS
WALTER G. TURNER AWARD
William K. Bogdan, Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent
and Chief Operating Officer
Hamilton County Educational Service Center
Cincinnati, Ohio
AESA annually recognizes outstanding accomplishments and contributions to education and to AESA.
Congratulations to William K. Bogdan, winner of the
2010 Walter G. Turner Award, who has been selected
for outstanding contributions in the advancement of
regional educational programs at the regional, state,
and/or national levels. The award will be presented at
the Luncheon on Thursday, December 2.
Bogdan started his career as a special education
teacher in Kentucky. In 1980 he moved to Hamilton
County Educational Service Center as a special education consultant. In the subsequent 30 years at the agency he has been director of Special Education and Student
Services, director of the Southwest Special Education Regional Resource Center, and
currently serves as Assistant Superintendent and Chief Operating Officer.
Over the past three decades he has served on a multitude of boards, committees,
councils, and task forces at the agency, region, state, national, and international level.
Within every program he has served, Bogdan has advocated for the collaboration and
partnership with a vision of the critical contribution that service agencies make to the
larger educational community in service to children, schools, districts, and communities.
He is recognized for the prominent role he plays in advocating for persons with disabilities and the integration of special education and general education to better meet
the needs of all children. His extensive service in this capacity include not only creation
of programs and services at Hamilton County ESC, but also prominent positions on the
board of the Children’s Home of Cincinnati, the Family and Children First Council, the
Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence and two years as president of the Council for
Exceptional Children (CEC) where he presided over the CEC’s International Conference
and the 2000 World Conference on Special Education. His work was influential in establishing policies at the state and federal level – including assistance in formulating
AESA’s positions – regarding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
Bogdan has also been influential with development of effective regional networks
nationally. For the past 15 years he as worked with 2007 Robert E. Stephens Award
Winner Susan Leddick, president of Profound Knowledge Resources, Inc. Leddick
stated, “As a very concrete and unique example of service to the ESA community, Bill
worked with me on a major project in Montana to review existing regional service
structures and to provide recommendations to the Montana Department of Public
Instruction on how to elevate those humble beginnings to full-fledged ESCs. The report
that emerged from that project was a significant influence on policy recommendations
provided to the Montana Legislature and Montana Governor. Bill’s deep knowledge of
ESAs, other regional structures (especially special education co-ops), and practical
organization development was invaluable to our work.”
10
AWARD WINNERS
BRIAN L. TALBOTT AWARD
AESA annually recognizes outstanding accomplishments and contributions to education and to AESA. Congratulations to the 2010 winner of the Brian L. Talbott Award,
Educational Service Unit 10 of Kearney, Nebraska.
The award is for outstanding contributions through innovative technology support to
constituent schools that caused positive improvement to be made and through the
effective use of technology to enhance the agency’s own operation and accountability.
The award will be presented at the General Session on Friday morning, December 3rd.
Educational Service Unit 10’s technologies have national, state, regional, local school
district, and community reach.
• Nationally it has developed an on-line system software for the Nebraska Assistive
Technology Partnership which now is also used in Alaska, Arkansas, California,
Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, Nevada, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and
Wyoming.
• Statewide, as part of the Greater Nebraska Educational Network Consortium
(GNENC), ESU 10 serves as the base of technical and network operations for five
ESUs, and over 100 school districts in a region covering 50,000-plus square miles of
central and western Nebraska.
• Regionally and at the school district level, ESU 10 provides direct technology services to 35 public school districts in an 11-county, mostly rural area of the state.
• Within its extended community, ESU 10 provides technical support for all Buffalo
County, Nebraska services; and, has provided streaming educational website services to the Greate Platte RiverRoad Archway for the return of the Pawnee Indians to
Nebraska and to the Rowe
Sanctuary crane cam to
document the sandhill
crane migration across
Nebraska.
Accepting the award on
behalf of Educational
Service Unit 10 are ESU
10 Board President Lanny
Kizer and ESU Network
Information Systems
Director Ron Cone.
Lanny Kizer
Ron Cone
11
AWARD WINNERS
JUSTUS A. PRENTICE AWARD
Lee Warne
Executive Director (Retired)
Southwest/West Central Service Cooperative
Marshall, Minnesota
AESA annually recognizes outstanding accomplishments and contributions to education and to AESA.
Congratulations to Lee Warne, 2010 winner of the
Justus A. Prentice Award, who has been selected
for outstanding contributions through executive
leadership in the advancement of regional educational service agency programs at the regional,
state and national levels. The award will be presented at the Luncheon on Friday, December 3rd.
Warne, currently leads the Minnesota Rural Education Association, is a former
teacher, local school district superintendent, executive director of the Southwest/
West Central Service Cooperative, member of the AESA Council, and president of
AESA in 2006-2007.
He has advanced the goals and philosophies of educational service agencies through
the creation of the Minnesota Service Cooperative statewide organization, and providing
assistance to South Dakota in creation of that state’s regional agencies, and assistance
to the Wisconsin CESAs in their creation of a Wisconsin rural education group.
Warne has been involved in outstanding accomplishments and innovative practices,
including helping create AESA’s Executives in Residence program, piloting the original
natural gas cooperative program for AESA, development of the AESA succession plan,
and developing at SWWC Service Cooperative a model for what is now known as
shared services with out-sourcing agency personnel to member districts for back
office and technology services.
His exercise of leadership includes serving on the AESA Council, and being elected
president of AESA, serving as chair of AESA Governmental Relations Committee, past
member of the AESA Foundation, president and later executive director of Minnesota
Rural Education Association, chair of Minnesota Service Cooperatives statewide
organization, and its Legislative Committee.
He has also chaired the AESA Conference Committee, has been part of the conference
planning team in 2008, 2009, 2010, and helped create the “AESA Rockers” to assist in
raising funds for the AESA Foundation.
12
SPECIAL THANKS
The AEAS Annual Conference is truly a membership-driven event. We reply on numerous volunteers from many educational service agencies to ensure the success of this
conference. To all member organizations, we offer a heartfelt thank you for attending
this important event!
For this Silver Anniversary Annual Conference, we acknowledge the assistance of:
AEAS President Dee Alarcon for her vision of the 2010 Conference.
Mike Cook, John Bass and Jim Baldwin, Conference Co-Chairs, for designing and
carrying out the vision for this conference. Thank you to Texas and many other
states for providing the onsite volunteers.
President-elect Mike Cook and Co-Chairs Cliff Carmody, Lindy Franks and Dan Hare
for the 2011 Call to Conference.
All of the Executive Council members for their help in identifying the themes and
strands for this year’s conference, as well as for assisting wherever they were
needed.
Dyanne Hughes the DLH and Associates and Lee Warne with Administration
Works for all their help and support.
Special thank you to the Savannah Arts Academy Skylark Singers and the Statesboro Steel Drum Band for the wonderful entertainment that opens our sessions.
Our conference sponsors: Association of Educational Purchasing Agencies,
CDW-G, College Board, Direct Energy Business, EdisonLearning, Grace Global
Corporation, Great American Financial Resources, Marsden Holding,
NOVA Southeastern University, Promethean, myChinese360, U.S. Academic
Decathlon and Walden University.
To all of you who have done your part to assist AESA in conference planning and
coordination, we thank you. Whether you submitted a session for review or talked
one additional staff member into attending this year, we thank you for your support
of and involvement in the conference. Your personal efforts are appreciated.
On behalf of the AESA Executive Council and Staff,
Brain L. Talbott, Executive Director
13
CONFERENCE SPONSORS
Enterprise Infrastructure Systems & Management
Consulting
14
Planning
Design
Procurement
Management
Logistics Support
CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Internet Café
Open daily during registration hours from Wednesday to Saturday. The AESA conference gives you
the opportunity to stay connected-stop by to check
your email or surf the web. Sponsored by Grace Global Corporation.
RIVER CONCOURSE
Enterprise Infrastructure Systems & Management
Consulting
Planning
Design
Procurement
Management
Logistics Support
Message Board
Check to see if someone – offsite or at the Conference is
trying to reach you. Use it as a tool to find someone at the
conference. Sponsored by Promethean.
RIVER CONCOURSE
NAMTC Leadership Summit
Tuesday, November 30 — Wednesday, December 1
WESTON HOTEL, GRAND BALLROOM A & B
Welcome Reception
Wednesday, December 1, 4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
EXHIBIT HALL A
Plan to attend the welcome reception and the opening of the Exhibit Hall. This is the
perfect opportunity to begin to network with fellow conference attendees, to meet
exhibitors, and to enjoy refreshments-hors d’oeuvres and beverages.
Play Bingo in the Exhibit Hall
Included in your conference materials is an AESA bingo card. You are encouraged to
stop by the corresponding booths throughout the exhibit hours to have the squares
stamped. Upon completion, write your name and agency in the space provided and
drop the card off as you exit the Exhibit Hall. At 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 2, two
(2) drawings will be held for $250 cash awards. You must be present in the exhibit hall
to win. Only one entry per paid registration allowed.
15
CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS
Opening General Session
Thursday, December 2, 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
CHATHAM BALLROOM
Luncheon & Awards Program
Thursday, December 2, Noon – 1: 15 p.m.
CHATHAM BALLROOM
Ice Cream Social
Thursday, December 2 — 2:30 – 3:00 p.m.
EXHIBIT HALL A
AESA Foundation’s Silent Auction
Wednesday, December 1 — Thursday December 2
EXHIBIT HALL A
Help support the AESA Foundation’s Silent auction. Proceeds from the auction will
assist the Foundation’s ongoing work, which supports AESA’s highest priorities, programs and services. Silent Auction items will be displayed in the Exhibit Hall starting
on Wednesday, Dec. 1. Bidding concludes at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.2.
Auction items include donations from the AESA Foundation Board, the AESA Executive
Council, state ESA groups, AESA exhibitors and from AESA members.
Friday Breakfast Discussions
Friday, December 3, 7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. (Please see p. 43 for locations and topics)
WESTON HOTEL
These breakfasts allow attendees to meet with others interested in a particular topic
and to share information.
Second General Session
Friday, December 3, 9:00 a.m – 10:30 a.m.
CHATHAM BALLROOM
Luncheon & Awards Program
Friday, December 3, Noon – 1:15 p.m.
CHATHAM BALLROOM
Brunch and Closing General Session
Saturday, December 4, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
CHATHAM BALLROOM
16
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
Thursday, 10:45 a.m.
COLLEGE BOARD
Using PSAT/NMSQT Data: How Schools Can Get the Most from Results
This session will provide strategies that ESAs can use to help schools better utilize their
PSAT/NMSQT data and reporting tools. Participants will lean how schools can use free
PSAT/NMSQT tools to expand access to AP courses, improve student skills, and help
student prepare for college and careers. Presenters will share best practices for using
resources such as AP Potential, an online tool that helps schools identify students likely
to succeed in AP and the Summary of Answers and skills (SOAS). An online report that
provides detailed analyses of students’ skill strengths and weaknesses.
Emily Paulson, Associate Director, PSAT/NMSQT, College Board
ROOM 106
DIRECT ENERGY BUSINESS
Energy costs have become one of the largest line items in school budgets. With the
advent of electricity choice, business officials now have the added responsibility of
procuring energy supplies at a rate that fulfills expectations. Energy markets can be
their friend or foe, depending on a variety of conditions. This conversation will provide
an update on market conditions and the approaches some school systems have made
in response.
GREENE ROOM
MARSDEN SERVICES, L.L.C.
School Districts — in addition to accomplishing their primary mission of educating students — may also be challenged with running a facility management business! Hear
experts from Marsden Services, L.L.C., a leading provider of facility management services, describe how Educational Services Agencies can provide such services to their
members. Facility services when offered under centralized, professional management
produce measurable savings and, ultimately, contribute to an improved teaching and
learning environment. If such concerns as unpredictable breakdowns, poor cleaning
quality, complacent and unmotivated facility employees, or security issues keep you
awake at night – you must attend this session!”
PULASKI ROOM
17
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
CDW-G
The Value of Contract Purchasing
Join Mark Ellis, Contract Manager from CDWG, to learn about the benefits of cooperative purchasing contracts. These contracts can save schools both time and money.
Join this session to learn more.
PULASKI ROOM
AEPA
Don’t wait for Superman, AEPA is here to help! These are tough economic times; a
time of fewer dollars, and a time when taxpayers are holding public agencies more
and more accountable with spending. The Association of Educational Purchasing
Agencies (AEPA) can provide powerful solutions that will save you time and money.
AEPA is a national purchasing cooperative representing 23 member states with more
that 28 million K-12 students. This session will show you how membership in AEPA can
help you take advantage of national contracts with select vendors offering the best
material available for your school. Last year alone, AEPA generated over $500,000,000
in sales volume!
GREENE ROOM
Thursday, 3:00 p.m.
JDL/EduVision
Adding video to your website just got easier… More than a powerful video streaming
platform, EduVision provides your Educational Service Agency with its own IP television broadcast station and requires no upfront investment in either technology or
technical training and offers complete management, hosting and distribution. See
what several ESAs have incorporated into their websites for professional development, external communications, and other programs.
What you will learn:
• Placing your video into your website or Moodle is easy & affordable
• How to easily stream live events anywhere
• Embed your own portal with your own rules securely
• The power of syndication and sharing video content with trusted partners
ROOM 106
18
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
Friday, 10:45 a.m.
myCHINESE360
Meeting the Global Challenge with Mandarin Chinese Instruction
Learn how San Francisco, Solano County, Quakertown, Philadelphia, San Antonio,
Boston, Oakland, East Suffolk BOCES, and others, implemented online Mandarin Chinese programs, direct from China. MyChinese360, the nation’s fastest growing Chinese
program, provides instant capacity and cost-effective solutions to Mandarin language
instruction. This session features a live demonstration from China and first-hand experiences from district leaders
GREENE ROOM
EDISONLEARNING
Online Learning: Multiple Solutions for a Multitude of Challenges
As online learning becomes continually more imperative, districts are looking for costefficient, manageable ways to expand or improve their online programs. To serve these
diverse needs, a multi-faceted program essential. Through its innovative approach,
EdisonLearning gives ESA’s the ability to offer a full spectrum of online learning solutions, including hybrid, supplemental courses, honors/AP, credit recovery and a
full-time virtual school capable of regaining students from cyber charters. Learn how
these programs are working for other ESA’s and how they might apply in your area.
PULASKI ROOM
19
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
Friday, 1:30 p.m.
PROMETHEAN
Math: Making it Cool to Do Well in School
This session will provide examples of how teachers are using interactive whiteboards
and learner response systems to create engaging environments in mathematics classrooms. Be prepared to do some math and play some games!
ROOM 205
NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
An ESA partnership with Nova Southeastern University offering academic degree programs anytime, anyplace! Our programs offer an unparalleled range of options in
terms of level of study (associate, master’s, educational specialist and doctoral
degrees, certificates, and teacher certification/re-certification); field of study; and
method of delivery (site-based, cluster-based, online, campus-based, and myriad combinations of these). What this means to you is that we deliver advanced, practical
educational content to students anywhere in the world - in ways that are not limited by
time or place.
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services is one of the most dynamic
elements of Nova Southeastern University, providing innovative programs in leadership, teaching and learning, human development and family studies, training and
professional development, instructional technology and distance education, and communication sciences and disorders. Fischler School has the largest graduate school of
education at an accredited university (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools),
serving more than 12,000 students each academic year.
Attend an international University that was voted the #1 Online University in 2009 by
OED, is the sixth largest not-for-profit accredited university in the country and has the
most innovative, accessible, and technologically advanced programs in the nation.
Benefit from leadership perspectives of the information age and the success of international education and educators. Enroll in programs that were designed for you, with
the guidance and support of your AESA leadership.
PULASKI ROOM
Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
GREAT AMERICAN FINANCIAL RESOURCES
Saving Money with miSolutions!
Discover a means of reducing your Health Insurance claims while saving your employees out-of-pocket expenses! With this program, you also can provide them with 6
additional benefits that will add to their savings on everyday services such as dental
care, eye care, roadside assistance and others. In addition to providing these benefits,
your agency can create a revenue stream with miSolutions!
Mike Cook, Executive Director, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS
Dan Hare, Superintendent, Butler County ESC Hamilton, OH.
ROOM 205
20
SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE
Wednesday, December 1
NAMTC Leadership Summit
Registration Opens
Exhibits Open
AESA Foundation Meeting
Welcome Reception
Thursday, December 2
Registration Opens
Continental Breakfast
Exhibits Open
Opening General Session
Exhibits Open
Sessions/Workshops
Lunch and Awards Program
Exhibits Open
Sessions/Workshops
Ice Cream Social
Sessions/Workshops
Silent Auction Bidding Closes
Drawing for Bingo Prizes
8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
12:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
7:00 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
10:45 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
– 4:00 p.m.
– 8:45 a.m.
– 9:00 a.m.
– 10:30 a.m.
– 12:00 p.m.
– 11:45 a.m.
– 1:15 p.m.
– 5:00 p.m.
– 2:30 p.m.
– 3:00 p.m.
– 4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
4:45 p.m.
Friday, December 3
Registration Open
Breakfast Discussions
Second General Session
Sessions/Workshops
Lunch and Awards Program
State Leaders Meeting
Sessions/Workshops
Digital Jam
7:00 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:45 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:45 p.m.
– 4:00 p.m.
– 8:45 a.m.
– 10:30 a.m.
– 11:45 a.m.
– 1:15 p.m.
– 2:30 p.m.
– 2:30 p.m.
– 4:45 p.m.
Saturday, December 4
Registration Open
Coffee Service
Sessions/Workshops
Brunch and Closing Session
8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
9:15 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
– 10:30 a.m.
– 9:15 a.m.
– 10:15 a.m.
– 12:30 p.m.
21
WEDNESDAY AT A GLANCE
Wednesday, December 1
NAMTC Leadership Summit
Registration Open
Exhibits Open
8 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
12:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
AESA Foundation Meeting
Welcome Reception
3:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Exhibitor Orientation
EXHIBIT HALL A — 1:15 p.m.
A time for exhibitors to meet with AESA staff before the exhibit hall opens to attendees.
AESA Foundation Board Meeting
PULASKI BOARD ROOM — 3:00 p.m.
This is the annual meeting of the AESA Foundation Board.
— Ronald Fielder, AESA Foundation Chair
AESA Welcome Reception
EXHIBIT HALL A
Plan to attend the welcome reception in the Exhibit Hall. This is the perfect opportunity
to begin to network with fellow conference attendees, to meet exhibitors, and enjoy
refreshments –hors d’oeuvres and beverages(two beverage tickets will be provided to
all registered attendees).
22
THURSDAY AT A GLANCE
Thursday, December 2
Registration Open
7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Exhibits Open
7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
Opening General Session
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Exhibits Open
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Sessions/Workshops
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Lunch & Awards Program
12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Exhibits Open
1:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sessions/Workshops
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Ice cream Social
2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Sessions/Workshops
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Silent Auction Bidding Closes
4:30 p.m.
Drawing for Bingo Prizes
4:45 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
EXHIBIT HALL A — 7:30 – 8:45 a.m.
23
THURSDAY 10:45 a.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Thursday Opening General Session – Chatham Ballroom
Presiding: Dee Alarcon, AESA President
Entertainment: Skylark Singers, Savannah Arts Academy, Savannah, GA,
Diane Stallings, Director
Introduction of AESA Council
Update on the Work of the AESA Foundation: Ron Fielder, Foundation Chair
Keynote Speaker: Ian Jukes
Ian is the Director of an international consulting group that provides leadership
and program development in the areas of assessment and evaluation, strategic
alignment, curriculum design and publication, professional development, planning, change management, hardware and software acquisition, information
services, customized research, media services and on-line training. In the past
ten years he has worked with clients in more than 40 countries and made more
than 8,000 presentations typically speaking to between 300,000 and 350,000
people in a year. His latest book, Living on the Future Edge: Windows on
Tomorrow will be available in the near future
First and foremost, Ian is an educator. As a registered educational evangelist,
his self-avowed mission in life is to ensure that children are properly prepared
for the future rather than for society’s past. As a result, his material tends to
focus on many of the pragmatic issues that provide the essential context for
educational restructuring.
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Assisting Your Small & Medium Size
Districts with a New Level of RTI
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
This powerpoint presentation and discussion will assist you in taking your small and
medium size districts to a new level of RTI. This session is a “take-away” of policies,
guidelines and templates for implementation of district level supports for effective school
practices and RIT models. The project helps define your role as a regional provider in
assisting districts with the implementation of RTI, developing coaching capacity, hiring
and evaluation in relation to RTI, staff orientation, program evaluation and data systems.
This project was developed in conjunction with the University of Oregon and is based on
evidence-based practices. We are excited about sharing this resource.
Debbie Egan, Superintendent, Lane Education Service District, Eugene, OR
ROOM 104
24
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Faced with IRS Changes to 403(b) sponsorship, TPA horror stories, an environment
described as the “Wild Wild West” with multiple providers selling their program vs.
educating employees on how to create a successful retirement, Cooperating School
Districts (CSD) of Greater St. Louis answered the call from its districts. Following 18
months of analysis, planning and implementation CSD launched its 403(b)/457(b)
Retirement Trust Jan 1, 2010. The resulting plan reduced participant costs by at least
50%, increased investment options while providing independent oversight of those
investments, and dramatically reduced or eliminated administration, compliance and
record-keeping by school districts while providing revenue sharing to CSD for the
value-added services they provide.
Steve Keyser, Deputy Executive Director, Coop School Districts of Greater St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
Edmund H. Hinders III. Vice President, CBIZ Financial Solutions Retirement Plan Service.
St. Louis, MO
THURSDAY 10:45 a.m.
WIN-WIN: Using Cooperative Purchasing to Provide
Employees a “Best in Class” Retirement Program
ROOM 100
How Many Ways Can Your Customers Say “WOW”?
An ESC’s Unique Approach to Customer Service
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Interested in creating a customer-focused organization? In this interactive session,
participants will gain knowledge of various ways in which an education service
agency anticipates and meets its customer needs, thereby increasing customer loyalty. Get ready to learn multiple ways to increase customer satisfaction and become
skilled at using tools to create a wow factor. Be prepared to understand the importance of bench-marking and utilizing best practices in customer service from experts
in the field. Hear how our organization has increased its budget. Participants will leave
with many examples of expert customer service as well as samples of
products/processes used. Come ready to network and share customer-focused
processes you have in place so that we can learn from each other.
Sandra Nolan, Deputy Director for ESC Initiatives, Region 12 Education Service Center, Waco, TX
Tom Norris, Executive Director, Region 12 Education Service Center, Waco, TX
Leslie Bennett, Director of Staff Development and Human Resources, Region 12 ESC, Waco, TX
ROOM 105
Cooperation: The New Normal —
How to set up your Own Personnel Cooperative
ESA Board Members Setting Direction through Policy, Leadership, and Innovation
The Mecosta-Osceola ISD set up a personnel cooperative in 2005 to help meet the needs
of their local districts through the lens of the text “Good to Great.” As districts continue to
cut personnel the Cooperative has allowed districts to 1) maintain and increase their level
of personnel expertise; 2) save more dollars for the classroom; and 3) increase the likelihood of working in a common direction. The personnel cooperative called the MOP
Co-Op has shared employees in the areas of business and financial services, mainte-
25
THURSDAY 10:45 a.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
nance, general education, technology, pupil accounting and specialized consultants. The
purpose of this session will be to walk participants through a PowerPoint presentation of
the theory, purpose and practical applications of using a “cooperative” approach to solving mutual personnel problems in these tough economic times.
Curtis Finch, Superintendent, Mecosta-Osceola ISD, Big Rapids, MI
ROOM 200
ESC Sponsorship of Community Schools:
Helping Local Schools with Dropout Prevention
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Tri-County ESC in Wooster, Ohio has learned that sponsorship of community schools
(Charter Schools) can provide a needed service to local school districts. Participants
in this session will learn how community school sponsorship has reduced student
dropouts and raised achievement scores. Learn the steps needed from the initial planning stage to operation that have lead to a very successful community partnership in
the creation of Ashland County Community Academy (ACCA). Participants will see a
fact loaded power point presentation to guide them through this project successfully
and will then have an opportunity to interact with presenters about the challenges and
rewards of this program. It is hoped that this program can be a model for other service
agencies to use and improve.
Eugene Linton, Superintendent, Tri-County ESC, Wooster, OH
Allen Wilson, Director of Alternative Education, Tri-County ESC, Wooster, OH
ROOM 101
NAMTC Presents: MySpace and Twitter and Facebook.
Oh MY! Behaving Appropriately in a Digital World
Technology Leading us into the Future
This session will cover aspects of Internet safety from Internet Use Policies to Cyberbullying to Social Networking sites to ethics. Specific emphasis will be placed upon
the concerns educators face when dealing with the influx of social networking sites,
with solutions offered for these concerns. Participants will leave with a general understanding of the implications and consequences of Digital Age Safety including legal
ramifications for school administrators and the fine line they walk in dealing with
infractions that occur at school and infractions that occur at home.
Denise Grasso, Associate Executive Director, SE Kansas ESC Greenbush, Girard, KS
ROOM 201
Puget Sound Educational Service District’s Theory of Change:
BUILD Support for Student Success
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
The Puget Sound ESD utilizes a Theory of Change to guide its work on behalf of students and families. The Theory is focused on: 1) System level leadership focused on
student learning; 2) Cultural competence and relevance; and 3) Whole Child
Approaches. In this session, we will share the Theory, supporting frameworks, measurement approaches, and processes for linking our work with local schools, districts,
and communities. Join us for an eclectic, interactive presentation, utilizing PowerPoint,
26
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
ROOM 102
Implementing Innovative Programs to Unite Your Community
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Innovative programs that include collaboration with schools and business can unite
communities. This session will include PowerPoint presentation, videos highlighting
the programs, and time for question and answers. Hear how Stanislaus County was
named the County of the Year by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for the Health/Obesity campaign and how they implemented a model Military Academy in under a year.
Participants will learn strategies and tools to implement and run successful campaigns
and run innovative programs at their district or county office.
Tom Changnon, Superintendent, Stanislaus County Office of Education, Modesto, CA
THURSDAY 10:45 a.m.
web-based tools, and examples of the Theory being put into action. Engage in conversation with ESAs around the country about doing what is best for students, families, and
communities – and creating an implementation model that calls others to action.
Monte L. Bridges, Superintendent. Puget Sound ESD, Renton, WA
ROOM 103
The Future Role of ESAs – In Search of Blue Oceans
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
In the internationally bestselling book, Blue Ocean Strategy, authors W. Chan Kim and
Renee Mauborgne describe the scene for many established companies in traditional
industries as a bloody red ocean. Industries are engaged in fierce head to head competition for sustainable profits, market share, market advantages, and some degree of
differentiation. While ESAs may not be in competition for those same factors we do
face similar struggles that are just as fierce and bloody. Sometimes the political struggle can be even more bloody and damaging as ESAs look to secure state and federal
funding, fight for competitive grant dollars and search for new ways to be relevant in
our schools. A blue ocean sounds nice and inviting doesn’t it? But how do you find one?
The good news is blue oceans are out there but finding them requires the willingness to
think differently. This session will take a provocative look at the potential future of ESAs
and some innovative programs that are currently in place at ESAs around the country.
Andy Pechacek, Deputy Executive Director, Region 4 ESC, Houston, TX
ROOM 202
Using Guskey’s Model of Evaluation to Improve
Professional Learning and Support to Schools
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
In this day and age of accountability, it is essential that ESAs are able to prove their
effectiveness beyond perception data. Participants will be introduced to the five levels of evaluation through a powerpoint session combined with audience participation.
Participants will then learn how the use of Guskey’s Model of Evaluation improved
professional learning offerings and support, and consequently impacted student
achievement. The goal of this session is to provide participants with ideas on how to
assess their support to schools.
Martie Hutchens, Elementary Math Specialist, Northeast Georgia RESA, Winterville, GA
ROOM 203
27
THURSDAY 10:45 a.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Building a Nationwide Digital Network of ESAs —
Empowering Districts to Keep Pace in the 21st Century
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Many districts and individual ESAs lack resources to efficiently implement solutions
that meet the needs of their students as digital natives. A nationwide digital network of
ESAs that centralizes experience and expertise will maximize local capacity to provide
districts access to effective practices and programs. During this session, a panel of
ESAs will outline the recently formed committee’s scope of work and engage stakeholders in a dialogue about how to enhance their agency’s work. The standing
committee’s work incorporates the 5 areas of focus set forth in the National Educational Technology Plan (Learning, Assessment, Teaching, Infrastructure, Productivity)
and aims to build sustainable, flexible models for planning, improvement and implementation of systems, ultimately fostering student achievement. Through this effort,
ESAs will have a framework to provide districts essential services such as technology
audits/support, data warehousing, cloud hosting, distance learning, online course
development, grant writing, technology plan advising, policy making and more. Attendees are asked to join the committee to ensure the needs of local ESAs are met.
Antonio Pagan, Chief Technology Officer, Collaborative for Educational Services, Northampton, MA
Kristin Kicza, Distance Learning Coordinator, Collaborative for Educational Services,
Northampton, MA
Geoff Craven, Telecommunications Manager, Central Susquehanna IU, Milton, PA
Doreen Marvin, Director of Development, LEARN, Old Lyme, CT
Carol Teitelman, Alternative Services Coordinator, Region XIII ESC, Austin, TX
Beverly Knox-Pipes, Assistant Superintendent/Technology and Media Services, Genesee ISD,
Flint, MI
ROOM 204
Helping Kids Who Have Kids Stay in School
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Learn how collaborations with Early Head Start Programs provide free childcare for
children of high school students. This not only allows the young parent to continue
their education and obtain their high school diploma, but also to gain parenting and
leadership skills while their child gets a head start on life.
Karla Weatherly, Director/Head Start, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
Judy Horn, Assistant Director/Head Start, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
Sydney Roach, Head Start Coordinator, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
ROOM 205
Federal Relations Update
The session will focus on the progress or lack thereof on reauthorizing ESEA, with an
review of how ESA’s are faring in the discussion. The review will include what is
known about how the 2010 elections held four weeks ago will affect membership and
positioning of the House and Senate authorizing committees.
Noelle Ellerson, Assistant Director, Policy Analysis and Advocacy, AASA, Arlington, VA
OGLETHORPE AUDITORIUM
28
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Chairperson: Mike Cook; Vice Chair: Marjorie Wallace
Working session for the committee to review the strategic initiative: “Initiate, design
and collaborate with others in research and development efforts on behalf of AESA,
and member ESAs, and to provide technical assistance to the membership.”
GWINNETT ROOM
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS:
COLLEGE BOARD
Using PSAT/NMSQT Data: How Schools Can Get the Most from Results
This session will provide strategies that ESAs can use to help schools better utilize their
PSAT/NMSQT data and reporting tools. Participants will lean how schools can use free
PSAT/NMSQT tools to expand access to AP courses, improve student skills, and help
student prepare for college and careers. Presenters will share best practices for using
resources such as AP Potential, an online tool that helps schools identify students likely
to succeed in AP and the Summary of Answers and skills (SOAS). An online report that
provides detailed analyses of students’ skill strengths and weaknesses.
Emily Paulson, Associate Director, PSAT/NMSQT, College Board
THURSDAY 10:45 a.m.
AESA Research and Development Committee
ROOM 106
DIRECT ENERGY
Energy costs have become one of the largest line items in school budgets. With the
advent of electricity choice, business officials now have the added responsibility of
procuring energy supplies at a rate that fulfills expectations. Energy markets can be
their friend or foe, depending on a variety of conditions. This conversation will provide
an update on market conditions and the approaches some school systems have made
in response.
GREENE ROOM
MARSDEN SERVICES, L.L.C.
School Districts — in addition to accomplishing their primary mission of educating students – may also be challenged with running a facility management business! Hear
experts from Marsden Services, L.L.C., a leading provider of facility management services, describe how Educational Services Agencies can provide such services to their
members. Facility services when offered under centralized, professional management
produce measurable savings and, ultimately, contribute to an improved teaching and
learning environment. If such concerns as unpredictable breakdowns, poor cleaning
quality, complacent and unmotivated facility employees, or security issues keep you
awake at night – you must attend this session!
PULASKI ROOM
29
THURSDAY 12:00 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
30
12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Luncheon & Awards Program – Chatham Ballroom
Presiding: Dee Alarcon, AESA President
Introduction of Walter E. Turner Award: Dee Cockrille, AESA Council
Introduction of Award Recipient: Ron Fielder, Chief Administrator, Grant Wood
AEA, Cedar Rapids, IA
Walter E. Turner Award Recipient: Carolyn Cannon, Board Vice President, Grant
Wood AEA, Cedar Rapids, IA
Introduction of Walter E. Turner Award Recipient: Dave Distel, Superintendent,
Hamilton County ESC, Cincinnati, OH
Walter E. Turner Award Recipient: William Bodgen, Assistant Superintendent and
Chief Operating Officer, Hamilton Country ESC, Cincinnati, OH
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Continuing the Discussion with Ian Jukes
Spend an hour learning further from our morning speaker Ian Jukes!
OGLETHORPE AUDITORIUM
But, Are They Learning?
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
We have test scores, grades, and teacher comments but can we say with confidence,
“Yes! They are Learning!” Participants in this session will experience how our ESA
has worked with our schools to advance superintendent, board member and teacher
knowledge and understanding of solid assessment practices at both a district and a
classroom level. Solid assessment design begins by asking “Why?” Explore ways to
have schools expand their assessment expectations while following federal guidelines. You will leave with an understanding of solid assessment design and goals.
Diane E. Stempinski, Director of Professional Development, ROE 17, Normal.IL
THURSDAY 1:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
ROOM 200
JUST DO IT! Move Your Schools into the 21st Century NOW!
Technology Leading us into the Future
This exciting multimedia presentation will bring participants a visual perspective on
what classrooms and schools should look like when using educational technology in the
most dynamic and exciting ways. Participants will see students of all social-economic
and cultural backgrounds engaged in relevant learning through hands-on involvement.
Observe students undertaking classroom projects where they are problem-solving and
developing skills necessary to be successful workers in the 21st century. Participants
will come away from this session with tips on how to evaluate a school’s readiness to
move in this direction with success; simple assessment instruments to tell you how
ready the educational and support staff are to break down walls and create a global
classroom; and tips on how to make business and industry partnerships work to your
advantage. If there is one session you don’t want to miss, it is this one!
William M. Haberhehl, County Superintendent of Schools, Orange County DOE, Costa Mesa, CA
ROOM 105
Conversational Leadership: Why Not? Why Now?
Technology Leading us into the Future
In the ever-changing world of education, ESAs are constantly asked to redefine their
array of services and supports to their districts. Montgomery County IU 23 has found
Conversational Leadership to be an effective way to collaborate both internally and
externally to be uniquely positioned to support schools. Conversational Leadership is
not a program, it is a transformational way of working that achieves organizational
learning and a higher level of organizational competence and effectiveness. By attending this session, you will learn 4 of the key strategies used in conversational learning
including the components of a Learning Conversation, the inquiry Ladder, Systems
Thinking and the Four Step Process that makes every meeting productive.
Janet Sloand, Director – PaTTAN, Montgomery IU 23, Norristown, PA
Jane Webster-Mansuy, Assistant Executive Director, Montgomery County IU 23, Norristown, PA
ROOM 100
31
THURSDAY 1:30 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Securing ISO Certification: The Good, the Bad, and the Benefit
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
If you think ISO certification doesn’t apply to your organization or cannot help you, think
again! In this session, participants will learn how Education Service Center, Region 12 in
Waco, Texas, started and completed the journey to become ISO 9001:2008 certified.
Within this story, participants will become knowledgeable about the process, investigate
both the advantages and the disadvantages of the process, and examine the results,
benefits, and pay-offs of the process. Additionally, participants will become familiar with
ESC 12’s new journey toward ISO 14000 certification resulting in a “greener” organization. Come prepared to have your mind changed about this beneficial process including
utilizing a decision matrix to assist you in making the same journey.
Sandra Nolan, Deputy Director for ESC Initiatives, Region 12 ESC, Waco, TX
Sharon E. Henson, Associate Executive Director, Region 12 ESC, Waco, TX
Leslie Bennett, Director of Staff Development, Human Resources, Region 12 ESC, Waco, TX
ROOM 106
Empowerment Coaching for Educational Professionals
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Leading change efforts that are transformational and sustainable is one of the most
daunting aspects of school leadership. Professional coaching is a collaborative professional growth experience that focuses on increased awareness and action needed
for achieving exceptional results. Learn how the principles and concepts of executive
coaching can be used to build cultures of shared leadership and accountability in your
organization. Coaching techniques, theories, and role-playing demonstrations will be
offered in this interactive session. Participants will be introduced to iPEC, Institute for
Professional Excellence in Coaching.
Richard Alvarado, Associate Director, Administrative, Region XX ESC, San Antonio, TX
ROOM 201
Superintendent Evaluation — The Next Generation
ESA Board Members Setting Direction through Policy, Leadership, and Innovation
Always sensitive, often misunderstood and absolutely necessary, a superintendent
evaluation can be an opportunity for leadership success or merely a tool for papering
a personnel file. Working together with an education consultant, Linn Benton Lincoln
ESD has developed the next generation of superintendent evaluations. Using a standards-based approach with measurable performance indicators, and data collected by
360 degree feedback, the ESD has adopted a model for superintendent evaluation that
transcends the models currently used throughout the country. By combining superintendent performance, board performance and district performance in one evaluation
instrument and collecting information throughout the district and service region electronically, the ESD board has created a comprehensive, integrated and aligned tool
that meets both its accountability and planning duties as a board. This tool is simple to
use, provides objective results and is data-based. This leadership tool can be cus-
32
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
ROOM 101
GEMS: A Treasure Trove of Professional Development
Resources Created by Nebraska ESU Staff Developers
THURSDAY 1:30 p.m.
tomized to meet the needs of any education district. Upon completion, the information
collected during the evaluation process serves as a planning tool for next year. With
more attention given to accountability, transparency and performance at the state and
federal level, this approach to an annual performance review for the superintendent,
board and entire organization is a way to get ahead of calls for more accountability by
patrons. Various standards options will be highlighted and the development of a customized approach for a district will be described. The presentation will consist of
PowerPoint slides.
Greg McKenzie, Board Member, Clackamas ESD, West Linn ,OR
Susan Waddell, Superintendent, Linn Benton Lincoln ESD, Albany, OR
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
GEMS (Gaining Expertise through Membership Study) is an innovative model of professional study created and implemented by Nebraska’s Educational Service Unit (ESU)
Staff Development Affiliate. Fifty staff developers from across the state of Nebraska
met regularly to research and develop eleven modules on relevant topics to meet the
needs of their schools and to provide consistency in service delivery across the state.
In this session, you will see a PowerPoint presentation that describes the process
used to organize, create, and share modules on such topics as Leadership, School
Improvement, Response to Intervention, Twenty-First Century Skills, Differentiation,
and New Teacher Induction. Data are collected on an on-going basis to determine
level of use of the modules as well as impact of implementation. Preliminary reports
indicate that the modules are meeting the goals of the project. This data will be shared
during the presentation and time will be allowed for questions and answers. The model
is currently being replicated with additional ESU affiliate groups in Nebraska.
Mitzi Hoback, Professional Development, Educational Service Unit 4, Auburn, NE
Julie Barger, Program Director-Staff Development, Educational Service Unit 16, Ogallala, NE
Margaret McInteer, Educational Service Unit 16, Falls City, NE
ROOM 102
The New Paradigm for Cooperative Purchasing:
On Line Reverse Auctioning
Technology Leading us into the Future
Savings of more than 50% over state bids and other purchasing cooperatives can be
found. An ESA working in partnership with a school district has hosted two regional
online bidding sessions using reverse auctioning. This session will demonstrate the
process, the savings, the challenges and the successes.
Virginia Z. Seccombe, Executive Director, LEARN, Old Lyme, CT
ROOM 103
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THURSDAY 1:30 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Regional Needs Assessment: Just Leave the Planning to Us
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Learn how a Connecticut Regional Educational Service Center has used regional summits to define opportunities for regional cooperation, collaboration and partnerships.
Leave with sample materials and a step-by-step plan for holding a similar forum in your
region that will provide you with valuable insight into your districts’ most pressing
needs, and a forum for demonstrating your role as a regional facilitator and provider of
regional solutions. Two different regional summit designs will be presented using PowerPoint, with opportunity for discussion, questions and answers. Sample materials will
be distributed including: planning calendar; focus group strategy; delphi survey strategy; online needs assessments; prioritization matrix; participant list; program design;
small group facilitator guidelines; sample handouts; sample program and PowerPoint
presentation; feedback sheets; and online follow-up survey.
Dotty Budnick, Director, Marketing and Communication, EASTCONN, Hampton, CT
ROOM 104
Educational Service Unit #13, Scottsbluff, Nebraska —
Years of Challenge and Success
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
ESU #13 in the heart of the Panhandle of Nebraska continues to serve as a leader for
the State for its innovative approach to service delivery to nearly 15,000 students in an
eleven-county area. After successfully completing Nebraska’s first merger of ESUs,
ESU #13 was faced with the challenges of meeting the needs of students in a service
area that currently expands over 15,000 square miles. Among its successes, ESU #13
consolidated three ESUs located in the northern, southern and western Panhandle of
Nebraska to form one centrally-located ESU with two satellite offices; developed a distance learning network for classroom instruction and professional collaboration;
partnered with Western Nebraska Community College to construct a state-of-the-art
technology center to house alternative education, transition services, online learning,
and professional development; and increased revenue base as a direct result of sparsity factor and satellite office allocations in the state aid formula.
Raymond Richards, Board Member, Educational Service Unit 13, Scottsbluff, NE
Mark Sinner, Board Member, Educational Service Unit #13, Scottsbluff, NE
Jeffrey D. West, Administrator, Educational Service Unit #13, Scottsbluff, NE
ROOM 202
Response to Instruction and Intervention (Rtl2): A Framework
for Improving Achievement and Accountability of ALL Students
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
This presentation will describe how the Solano County Office of Education launched
our framework for meeting the challenge of supporting our school districts as they
plan, develop, and implement an effective Response to Intervention and Instruction
(Rtl2) system. In this interactive session, you will have the opportunity to explore the
critical components for developing and implementing an effective Rtl2 model and learn
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CONCURRENT SESSIONS
ROOM 203
Trends, Tools and Tactics for 21st Century Learning
THURSDAY 1:30 p.m.
what matters most when it comes to the professional knowledge, skills and attitudes
necessary to achieving high levels of academic achievement and behavioral supports
for all students. Hear about how the Solano County Office of Education is providing
support to districts and schools across the country and throughout Northern California
to implement the Rtl2 model. At the end of this presentation, you will receive a tool kit
with the PowerPoint and tools presented as well as additional tools to support your
districts and schools implement the Rtl2 framework for student success.
Lisette Estrella-Henderson, Assistant Superintendent-Educational Services, Solano County
Office of Education, Fairfield, CA
Rob Phillips, Associate Superintendent, Solano County Office of Education, Fairfield, CA
Technology Leading us into the Future
Today’s tools have the power to transform education but only if we as educators see
beyond the gadget to the real educational possibilities. Re-engaging disengaged learners is only part of the potential that these tools hold for us. I want to start you on a
trajectory that leads to innovative approaches to teaching and learning where you live.
I’ll share positive examples of digitally empowered learning as well as ideas and tools
that you can try tomorrow. We’ll look at some powerful , free tools and discuss the
idea of “taming the tools” to make them appropriate for educational use. I’ll share a
litany of teacher approved tools and invite you to join a network of thousands of educational technology minds so you’ll have a think-tank in your back pocket.
Kevin Honeycutt, Instructional Technology Specialist, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS
ROOM 205
Organizing Innovation:
How an ESC Developed A System for Managing Innovation
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Hamilton County ESC (OH) has developed a system for managing innovation. The system
connects strategic planning, leadership activity at both executive and mid-management
levels, and specific models and tools to assure consistency. This presentation will
explain what this work is, why it is so critical, the challenges of resourcing it, and the
leadership it demands. Innovation is targeted at organization structures, work processes
and products and services. Among other things, the system has been used to redesign
the ESC’s Early Learning Program. (See the companion presentation “Great Start:
Redesigning the Early Learning Program at Hamilton County ESC.”)
Bill Bogdan, Assistant Superintendent/ Chief Operating Officer, Hamilton County ESC,
Cincinnati, OH
Vikki Clemons, Executive Director/Service Delivery, Hamilton County ESC, Cincinnati, OH
Deb Myers, Executive Director/ Human Resources and Organizational Learning, Hamilton
County ESC, Cincinnati, OH
Susan Leddick, President, PKR, Inc, Bozeman, MT
ROOM 204
35
THURSDAY 1:30 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
AESA Governmental Relations Committee
Chairperson: Cliff Carmody; Vice Chair: Stephen Aguirre
Working session for the committee to review the strategic initiative: “We will
strengthen our ability to affect education policy through appropriate and effective governmental relations activities.” The committee is made up of one voting representative
from each state. The committee meeting scheduled for January 26-27, 2011 in Washington, DC will also be discussed.
ROOM 206
AESA Executives in Residence Program
Program Coordinators: Twyla Barnes and Ron Hitchcock
Interested in the AESA Executives in Residence Program? Come and hear how you
can get involved in this exciting program offered by AESA for aspiring ESA CEOs. An
overview will be given and you will hear how this program works, explore the potential
for participation of your ESA and receive personal perspective from past year participants, as well as from the Council and Membership Services committee members.
GWINNETTE ROOM
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS:
CDW-G
The Value of Contract Purchasing
Join Mark Ellis, Contract Manager from CDWG, to learn about the benefits of cooperative purchasing contracts. These contracts can save schools both time and money.
Join this session to learn more.
PULASKI ROOM
AEPA
Don’t wait for Superman, AEPA is here to help! These are tough economic times; a time
of fewer dollars, and a time when taxpayers are holding public agencies more and more
accountable with spending. The Association of Educational Purchasing Agencies
(AEPA) can provide powerful solutions that will save you time and money. AEPA is a
national purchasing cooperative representing 23 member states with more that 28 million K-12 students. This session will show you how membership in AEPA can help you
take advantage of national contracts with select vendors offering the best material available for you school. Last year alone, AEPA generated over $500,000,000 in sales volume!
GREENE ROOM
36
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Ice Cream Social – Exhibit Hall A
Stop by the exhibit floor for a “cool” afternoon break. If you are in need
of a mid-afternoon pick-me-up, then we have just the thing for you!
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Systemic Instructional Supervision & Coaching Resulting
in Improved Hispanic and ELL Academic Success
THURSDAY 3:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
Examine action steps toward collaboration between school districts and service agencies resulting in development, implementation with ongoing revision/improvement of
district instructional supervision and coaching processes. Explore steps taken to
improve learning in struggling student populations (Hispanic and English Language
Learners) in Mathematics and Science and improved teacher efficacy. Engage in dialogue relative to scientifically research-based strategies and practices where service
agencies and school districts can collaborate to support struggling schools and
improve teaching and learning.
Sheldon M. Barr, Education Specialist, Region 4 ESC, Houston, TX
ROOM 100
Blending Virtual Education Opportunities
to Meet the Needs of Schools
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Presenter(s) from South Central Kansas Education Service Center will share examples
of a variety of virtual options that have been blended into a smorgasbord of opportunities for school districts. Virtual education offers students in rural districts a quality
education, despite small enrollments, shrinking teacher availability, and economically
stressed budgets. On-line, distance learning, and blended offerings are successful
from elementary school through high school - from early literacy to introductory foreign language to AP calculus. PowerPoint with question and answer.
Kay Highbarger, Director, South Central Kansas ESC, Clearwater, KA
ROOM 101
District Support Team Model:
Towards Innovative Service Delivery to Schools
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Federal and state accountability standards continue to increase every year and meeting them poses a challenge to many school districts. The Division of Instructional
Support at Region One Education Service Center took action to shift from a primarily
workshop based service delivery model towards onsite targeted technical assistance
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THURSDAY 3:00 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
service delivery model. The Division of Instructional Support has been restructured
into District Support Teams (DST) and each DST is comprised of core content and special student populations program specialists. Each DST has a Team Facilitator
assigned and is supported by a data specialist. Nine DST’s serve 37 public school districts and 6 charter school systems and have been embraced as an integral part of
school district’s improvement efforts. The DST model has experienced success as
demonstrated by the number of first year Academically Unacceptable (AU) campuses
that have met accountability standards the following year.
Eduardo Cancino, Deputy Director, Region One Education Service Center, Edinburg, TX
Lisa Conner, Administrator, Region One Education Service Center, Edinburg, TX
Hermelinda Hesbrook, Administrator, Region One Education Service Center, Edinburg, TX
ROOM 205
Verified with Autism… Now What?
Supporting Students and Districts through a Teaming Process
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
This session will focus on the successes and barriers of developing an individual support team for students on the Autism Spectrum. We will discuss how ESU 4 itinerant
staff members work with district personnel to plan and implement support teams. A
discussion of supporting activities for optimal outcomes for students on the Autism
spectrum will also be included. Outcomes for this presentation will include: (1) Organizing an individual team to support and provide the consistent and appropriate services
for students on the Autism spectrum; (2) Determining who should be on the team; (3)
Determining team creation and planning; and (5) A discussion of the benefits and barriers to a support team.
Ellen Stokebrand, Director of Special Education, Educational Service Unit #4, Auburn, NE
Aimee Daily, School Psychologist, Educational Service Unit #4, Auburn, NE
ROOM 102
Race, Student Achievement, and the Multicultural Organization:
PSESD’s Strategies to Address the Achievement Gap in Our Region
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
At Puget Sound ESD, we believe that achieving our 2020 vision of closing the Achievement Gap in our region by 2020, depends first on our staff members’ ability to
understand and respond to the impact of racism and inequity of opportunity on the students we serve and the adults who work in our schools. In order to deepen our staff
members’ cultural competency and heighten our focus on equity, we have begun an
inside-out exploration of issues related to race, and other “isms,” for our individual
employees and for the agency itself. This session will detail the road map we’ve followed for the past two years to develop our agency’s skills and client services around
the intersections of race, student achievement, school improvement, multiculturalism,
equality of opportunity, and cultural intelligence.
Monte L. Bridges, Superintendent, Puget Sound ESD, Renton, WA
Janice Watson, Deputy Superintendent, Puget Sound ESD, Renton, WA
ROOM 103
38
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Technology Leading us into the Future
Greenbush Southeast Kansas ESC’s goal is to provide students throughout KS with
diverse & equal educational opportunities. The challenges they faced were interfering
with this goal: (1) rural districts were experiencing hiring and retention difficulties; (2)
they couldn’t compete with the larger KS districts and were missing out on opportunities to hire the most highly effective teachers available; and (3) students were the ones
who were missing out on quality education. By forming high-tech partnerships with
leading companies, Greenbush ESC was able to help districts fill their HR needs with a
complete HR solution, achieving: (1) Reduction in costs, increase in productivity,
reduction in data entry errors and saving thousands of dollars; (2) Automation &
streamlining the entire hiring process; (3) Easily pre-screen applicants & only interview teachers with the highest chance of success; (4) Increase in teacher quality &
decrease in employee turnover; (5) Increase in the pool of candidates for substitute
positions – ensuring the best substitute for the position; (6) Collection & management
of applications, references, & interview data all online; (7) Confidence in new hires
through completion of a national criminal background check; (8) access to a document
library of important human resource documents including evaluations, interview questions, etc.
Bart Swartz, Product Development Consultant, Southeast Kansas ESC Greenbush, Girard, KS
THURSDAY 3:00 p.m.
Learn How A Leading ESA Uses Technology to Help Districts
Recruit Highly Effective Teachers & Staff While Saving Money
ROOM 104
Challenges Lead to Creativity
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Teachers, administrators and students want 24/7 learning opportunities without having
to travel. Through the creation of digital content, school personnel receive training
through live webinars and recorded programs created at ESU 8’s in-house studio. Distance learning technologies allow students to interactively participate in live
performances. This session will focus on the creative use of technology by ESU 8 professional staff to meet the changing needs of the schools they serve. Presenters will
utilize presentation software to show examples of their innovative efforts.
Jill Bates, Assistant Administrator, Educational Service Unit 8, Neligh, NE
Corey Dahl, Instructional Technologies Facilitator, Educational Service Unit 8, Neligh, NE
ROOM 105
ExpandingTransportation Programs to Maximize Customer Service
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Are your area transportation personnel prepared to deal with emergency situations?
Have they received adequate training to deal with the numerous situations that could
arise during the course of their day? Join the Medina County Schools’ ESC as we show
ESAs how to develop and deliver programs that meet the ever-increasing challenges
faced by districts in transporting our nation’s most precious cargo. You will discover
how to work with your school districts, local emergency agencies, and federal security
administrations to provide engaging, informative programs. In addition, you will learn
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THURSDAY 3:00 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
our strategy for becoming a “one-stop shop” for bus and van driver training, as well as
how we provide assistance to districts in educating students on bus safety. An
overview of how we demonstrate the success of these programs will also be given
along with a glimpse at some of our more creative programs.
Michael Redfern, Pre-Service School Bus Instructor, Medina County Schools’ ESC, Medina, OH
William Koren, Superintendent, Medina County Schools’ ESC, Medina, OH
Bonnie McNeely, Transportation Department Administrator, Medina County School’s ESC,
Medina, OH
ROOM 201
Creating and Sustaining an Exemplary
Regional Adolescent Literacy Initiative
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
This innovative literacy initiative, developed by the two regional educational service
agencies and fifteen local school districts near Ann Arbor, Michigan, is an outstanding
model of a partnership focused on high quality student learning and effective instructional practices. Not only did the initiative increase student reading comprehension
significantly it created a regional network of teacher leaders dedicated to ensuring
high quality literacy practices. This award-winning initiative is featured on the “Doing
What Works” US Department of Education website. This presentation will focus on the
development of the regional partnership, the ongoing collegial learning through professional communities of practice, the embedded assessment model, and the overall
impact of the program on the system. Participants will leave with a copy of the initial
blueprint, strategies for implantation, and data on the student results.
Holly Heaviland, Director, Instructional Services, Washtenaw ISD, Ann Arbor, MI
Naomi Norman, Director, Assessment and Planning, Washtenaw ISD, Ann Arbor, MI
ROOM 202
Vision Web and Scenario Planning:
How to energize the planning process
ESA Board Members Setting Direction through Policy, Leadership, and Innovation
Discover a means of re-introducing fun, creative, innovative and multiple perspectives
into organizational planning through the use of the Vision Web and Scenario Planning!
These powerful tools help organizations develop a shared vision and to think differently about future possibilities and opportunities. The Vision Web and Scenario
Planning are simulations utilized to create stories or descriptions of plausible images
of the future of an organization. By exploring strategic options, promoting discussions
of change, and creating new mental images, scenarios can be an integral part in
developing a futuristic, learning organization. You will leave with a greater understanding of what a “shared vision” really means and how to create it. This session will
require your participation!
Mike Cook, Executive Director, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS
Steve Wyckoff, Chief Innovation Officer, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS
ROOM 203
40
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Hamilton County ESC (OH) used its newly developed system for managing innovation to
redesign its Early Learning Program. The new program integrates three key components of service—education and care; family support; and health, behavioral health,
and nutrition—prioritized by Ohio Department of Education’s new Center for Early
Learning. It will produce integrated service models for six client groups. The ESC will
fill four roles as service provider, model builder, capacity developer, and/or facilitator,
depending on the service model in question. This presentation will describe the challenging process of merging an existing Head Start program with other ESC early
learning programs into a coherent whole. It will also describe the Early Learning Program design that will be implemented this fall.
Bill Bogdan, Assistant Superintendent/Chief Operating Office, Hamilton County ESC,
Cincinnati, OH
Deb Myers, Executive Director/HR and Organizational Learning, Hamilton County ESC,
Cincinnati, OH
Kathy Tirey, Director-Early Learning and Literacy Center, Hamilton County ESC, Cincinnati, OH
Susan Leddick, President, PKR, Inc., Bozeman, MT
THURSDAY 3:00 p.m.
Great Start: Redesigning the Early Learning
Program at Hamilton County ESC
ROOM 204
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS:
JDL/EduVision
Adding video to your website just got easier… More than a powerful video streaming
platform, EduVision provides your Educational Service Agency with its own IP television broadcast station and requires no upfront investment in either technology or
technical training and offers complete management, hosting and distribution. See
what several ESAs have incorporated into their websites for professional development, external communications, and other programs. What you will learn:
• Placing your video into your website or Moodle is easy & affordable
• How to easily stream live events anywhere
• Embed your own portal with your own rules securely
• The power of syndication and sharing video content with trusted partners
ROOM 106
AESA Foundation’s Silent Auction
The Silent Auction Closes at 4:30 p.m. and winners will be announced. If you are not
present to claim and pay for your item, they can be picked up and paid for the following day at the Registration booth.
AESA Bingo
AESA Drawing for Bingo Prizes in Exhibit Hall A. Two (2) drawings will be held for $250
cash awards. You must be present in the exhibit hall to win. Only open to paid registrants with one entry per registrant.
41
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
42
FRIDAY AT A GLANCE
Friday, December 3
Registration Open
7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
AESA Breakfast Discussions
7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Second General Session
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Sessions/Workshops
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Lunch and Awards Program
12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
State Leaders Meeting
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Sessions/Workshops
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Digital Jam
2:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
AESA BREAKFAST DISCUSSIONS
One of the greatest benefits of attendance at the AESA Annual Conference is the
opportunity to learn from and to share with others from ESAs across the country. We
invite you to join us for breakfast and to participate in a discussion. We have chosen
four discussion topics that are listed below. The breakfast sessions are located in the
Weston Hotel next to the Convention Center. Please join us!
Statewide ESA Networks
Grand Ballroom A/B – Westin Hotel
Some are emerging while others are going through redesign. Share your experiences of
the power of ESAs working together in a state or learn what this might do for your ESA.
Shared Services versus School District Consolidation
Grand Ballroom C – Westin Hotel
State Governments are applying pressure to consolidate the number of school districts. Since consolidation has already occurred in some states and further efforts may
not be possible in terms of student transportation time, some ESAs have proposed
using Shared Services as a technique to lower costs without further upheaval. Share
your experiences / ask questions of those who are doing this.
Educational Stimulus Funds
Grand Ballroom D/E/F-Weston Hotel
Has your ESA received any funds directly? Share your experiences – whether positive
or frustrating with others. Have the funds that your districts received had a positive
impact on your ESA?
Rural School Services
Harbor Ballroom-Weston Hotel
Nearly 20 percent of the nation’s students are enrolled in rural schools. Providing equitable educational opportunities to rural, and often remote, schools is a challenge.
Discuss the services your ESA is providing to rural schools.
43
FRIDAY AT A GLANCE
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Second General Session – Chatham Ballroom
Presiding: Mike Cook, AESA President-Elect
Entertainment: Statesboro Steel, Statesboro High School, Statesboro, GA,
Joseph Ferguson, Director
Introduction of the Brian L. Talbott Award: Dan Hare, AESA Council
Introduction of the Award Recipient: Matthew Blomstedt, Executive Director,
NE Educational Service Unit Coordinating Council, Lincoln, NE
Brian L. Talbott Award Recipient: Educational Service Unit 10, Kearney, NE
Lanny Kizer, Board President, Educational Service Unit 10, Kearney, NE
Ron Cone, Network Information Systems Director, Educational Service Unit 10,
Kearney, NE
Highlighting AESA Perspectives: William G. Keane, Editor
Keynote Speaker: Fred Bramante
Fred is a former 8th grade Science teacher, a former candidate for Governor and
the past Chair and a current member of the New Hampshire State Board of Education. He is the longest serving member of the state board and has been
appointed and reappointed by both Republican and Democratic Governors. Fred
has led a full-scale effort to redesign public education, especially at the high
school level and his work has received rave reviews in educational circles.
44
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Successful and Engaging Educational
Interventions Using Web Conferencing
ROOM 100
The Improvement Toolkit:
School Improvement Tools for Building Student Success
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
An effective toolkit has the right tool for the specific job at hand. In this session participants will have the opportunity to explore the various tools, strategies and processes
included in the Region 16 Education Service Center’s Improvement Toolkit. The
Improvement Toolkit includes a variety of tools that are used in our collaborative work
with schools as we strive to increase student performance and campus improvement
efforts. These research-based strategies, tools and processes provide the perfect
foundation for assisting schools in obtaining a picture of the current state of the campus, potential areas for improvement and prioritizing goals for initial action steps.
Shirley Clark, Manager Accountability/School Improvement, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
FRIDAY 10:45 a.m.
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
The SW/WC Service Cooperative is using innovative instructional interventions and
web-based technology to meet the demands of a shortage of Speech Language
Pathologists and Low Incidence teachers in Minnesota. With this program, a number
of technologies are utilized to offer a rich experience for the students receiving educational telepractice services including Vidyo, SMART Notebook, SMART Document
Camera and a number of free and low-cost curriculum development tools. The SW/WC
SC’s technology department balanced both cost and quality to come up with a complete solution that allows schools in SW/WC Service Cooperative to access high
quality services at a rate they can afford. In this session, participants will be able to
view samples of interactive web conference speech therapy sessions, deaf and hard
of hearing educational and social interaction sessions, observe a variety of curriculum
materials utilized in the sessions and learn about the system requirements necessary
for linking students and staff, with time for question/answer.
Deb Moorse, Speech-Language Pathologist, SW/WC Service Cooperative, Marshall, MN
Josh Sumption, IT Manager, SW/WC Service Cooperative, Marshall, MN
ROOM 200
Creating a Learning Organization for Enhanced Leadership
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Developing a culture of learning with all levels of stakeholders is challenging in intermediate agencies and school districts. Educational Service Unit 7 will share
application strategies for engaging learners and developing leadership capacity.
Power point and audience participation will demonstrate a variety of methods to
impact organizations at all levels.
Barbara Friesth, Staff Development Coordinator, Education Service Unit 7, Columbus, NE
ROOM 102
45
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
Survivor: The Island of Safe, Cost-Effective Student Computing
Technology Leading us into the Future
Cuts to technology, the imperative to have collaborative learning environments and the
ever growing access to non-educational material on the internet led one ESA to work
with a business partner to develop a safe, affordable, and comprehensive student
computing environment. Learn how your ESA can help districts survive the tendency to
diminish collaboration, cut purchases of technology that directly affect students, and
eliminate access to a world of learning opportunities in the budget process.
Doreen Marvin, Director of Development, LEARN, Old Lyme, CT
ROOM 103
FRIDAY 10:45 a.m.
Improving A Struggling School: Collaborating to Create
Professional Learning Communities that Work!
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
Professional learning communities are expected in today’s schools, but many administrators and teachers have trouble finding the time or knowledge to create such
communities. Come hear what Southwest Arkansas Education Service Cooperative did
to develop a collaborative relationship in a struggling school. Find out how the staff
learned to collaborate, be reflective, maintain a focus on student achievement, make
their practice public, and establish shared norms and values with support from Southwest Cooperative and literacy consultant, Dr. Sharon Faber. You will leave with ideas
on how you can create strong professional learning communities in your schools and
increase student achievement at the same time.
Phoebe Bailey, Teacher Center Coordinator, Southwest Arkansas ESC, Hope, AR
Sharon Faber, Owner, Faber Consulting, Cumming, GA
Lindy Franks, Director, Southwest Arkansas ESC, Hope, AR
ROOM 104
Value Added Boardsmanship
ESA Board Members Setting Direction through Policy, Leadership, and Innovation
The context of ESA governance is changing as regional educational agencies expand
their role in implementing and scaling up innovations and evidence-based practices
for rapid and system-wide improvements in student learning. As ESAs are challenged
to develop, implement and scale up improvement programs, ESA boards must have the
understanding and knowledge of how to improve student learning on a large scale and
how to support ESA capacity building for this expanded role. This session will present
governance, best practices and policy frameworks that promote the development,
implementation and scale up of educational improvements. The session will explore
research-based board actions that create the conditions for organizational success
and hold ESAs accountable for achieving these large scale improvement outcomes.
Debora Boeck, Director-Grants and Development, Puget Sound ESD, Renton, WA
ROOM 201
46
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
AESA Certified Coaching for Time Management
for Very, Very Busy Professionals
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
New Time Management Secrets will guide the very, very busy professional to overcome three huge challenges: 1) How to do more with less while lowering your stress
and optimizing your work/life balance; 2) How to coach your staff to do the same, so
your entire organization is more productive, doing more with less, and still enjoying
less stress with greater work/life balance; and 3) How to make these new Time Management Secrets available to the school districts you serve with one of your ESA staff
members as a certified coach to optimize results both with your staff and in the school
districts. These tools have been tested by the AESA staff, ESA regions in Texas and
California, school systems in North Dakota, Kansas, Connecticut and Pennsylvania and
in 160 Fortune 500 companies, most recently Cisco, Disney, IBM and Westinghouse.
Wayne A. Bell, Administrator, Educational Service Unit 10, Kearney, NE
R. James Steffen, President, SSA International, Inc., Brookfield, CT
ROOM 202
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
The need to make difficult budgeting decisions in unfavorable economic times has
affected schools in New York State. This reality, teamed with the national epidemic of
rising health care benefit costs, has greatly impacted school districts. Yet over the past
several years, the Erie 1 BOCES Health Benefits Plan Trust, (as of July 1, the NY 44
Health Benefits Plan Trust) has been able to contain health benefit costs annually for
26 schools, amounting to millions of dollars. In this presentation, participants will learn
how the Trust has contained costs by more than $27 million and increased its membership enrollment to more than 6,600. Participants will learn how the Trust was able to
form a partnership with unions; how it identified a health insurance partner; the cost
advantages of being a self-funded plan; how a focus on enrollee wellness pays off,
and steps taken to ensure enhanced benefits for enrollees. The audience will learn
specific steps the Trust took to lay the foundation for a plan that has provided continuous cost containment success for its enrolled schools while maintaining enhanced
benefits for its growing number of enrollees. Participants will leave this session able to
explain self-funded Health Trust options to school board or school administration leaders as a viable option for reducing health care costs and define specific strategies
employed by the Health Trust model and contrast the Health Trust model with their current health benefits plan to identify areas of cost savings
Darleen Michalak, Plan Administrator/ExOffico Trustee, Erie #1 BOCES, West Seneca, NY
Donald Ogilvie, District Superintendent, Erie #1 BOCES, West Seneca, NY
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FRIDAY 10:45 a.m.
Containing Health Care Benefits Costs: A Success Story
ROOM 203
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Getting to the Future: School 2.0 eToolkit
and Envisioning Future Schools
Technology Leading us into the Future
A demonstration of a free on-line resource for facilitating community-based discussions
about the future of schools. Designed by the US Department of Education, the School 2.0
eToolkit is a repository of tools and resources with three main purposes: to bring instructional and technology leaders in schools to a mutual understanding of their respective
issues and perspectives; to provide resources for individual professional development
regarding educational technology issues for teachers, principals, and technology chiefs;
and to support the efforts of educators to engage their communities in a thorough
process of envisioning what schools should look like in the 21st Century. Through case
studies, self-assessment tools, bandwidth planning tools, and links to research and other
online text and video resources, the School 2.0 eToolkit can be a starting point for ESAs
to support their client districts in their efforts to transform education.
Michael Derman, Sr. IT Project Coordinator, Central Susquehanna IU, Lewisburg, PA
FRIDAY 10:45 a.m.
ROOM 101
P-16 Education and Workforce Allliance Development:
Engaging Families, Communities, Schools, and Higher Education
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
A panel presentation on the Lake, Geauga and Portage County ESC’s use of a P-16 Initiative to foster family and civic engagement. The P-16 Education and Workforce
Alliance Initiative is an effort to engage parents, the community, business, higher education, and educators in fostering and sustaining a community conversation on ways
that a county can support and sustain all students in realizing their academic potential
and achieving readiness to pursue and be successful in postsecondary education and
the workforce. Improved high school graduation rates, workforce readiness, college
access and completion, and the retention of college graduates leads to increased economic prosperity of the region. In order to regionalize the Alliance’s concept, WVIZ
Ideastream, Ohio’s largest public broadcasting station, is a partner in the initiative providing a conduit for information dissemination through distance learning and video
conferencing.
Ronald L. Victor, Education and WKRO Alliance Coordinator, Lake County ESC, Painesville, OH
Brian Bontempo, Superintendent, Lake County ESCS, Painesville, OH
Matt Galemmo, Superintendent, Geauga County ESC, Chardon, OH
ROOM 105
GPAEA TV and Iowa AEAs in Motion!
Technology Leading us into the Future
Video is a powerful communication tool and is a common medium that everyone can
understand. Communicating and delivering professional staff development using a
video portal and integrating it with the web is a powerful, convenient and cost effective way for everyone, far and near to see and hear your message effectively. Learn
how the Iowa Area Education Agencies and Department of Education worked collabo-
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ratively to share and deliver video based best practices across a state network infrastructure to support the needs of professional development, the challenges of
technology integration and the increased need to support school-community communications. Using the Eduvision video portal, access to our training content is made
available to any teacher, anywhere and at any time while dramatically reducing the
need for travel and related costs. In this session see how a powerful on-line system
that requires no purchase of hardware or software provides simple and easy access
to upload, manage and share your video content while also providing security and
control. A live demonstration will include how to syndicate your content with other
education agencies and AESA.
Sally Lindgren, Coordinator Technology & Data Services, Great Prairie Area Education Agency,
Burlington, IA
Jennifer Woodley, Communications Specialist, Great Prairie Area Education Agency, Ottumwa, IA
Thomas Lapping, Consultant, JDL Horizons, Bloomington, MI
ROOM 106
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
All means ALL in public education, however many students face significant obstacles
to achieving their full potential. ESAs can provide important services and supports to
help districts address barriers to academic achievement and behavioral issues that
disrupt the school day. Learn how one ESA has created a statewide training and technical assistance center, providing vital supports to address districts’ needs regarding
special populations including: pregnant and parenting teens, migrant education, homeless children, bullying prevention and other school safety and climate issues, home
visitation and parent engagement programs for low income parents. Discussion will
focus on services (including training and technical assistance design, online services,
research and evaluation and communication and outreach), public and private funding
strategies and essential partnerships
Lynn M. Cromley, Chief Administrative Officer/Director-Center for Schools and Communities,
Central Susquehanna IU, Harrisburg, PA
Silesete Overton-Morris, Youth Development manager, CSIU, Harrisburg, PA
FRIDAY 10:45 a.m.
Reengaging the Breakfast Club: Strategies for ESA-District
Partnerships to Reach Students and Parents on the Fringe
ROOM 204
AESA Ad Hoc Global Educational Committee
Chairperson: Mike Cook; Vice Chair: Dee Cockrille
A working session to explore the development of AESA’s relationship with international
AESA counterparts.
GWINNETTE ROOM
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AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
myCHINESE360
Meeting the Global Challenge with Mandarin Chinese Instruction
Learn how San Francisco, Solano County, Quakertown, Philadelphia, San Antonio,
Boston, Oakland, East Suffolk BOCES, and others, implemented online Mandarin Chinese programs, direct from China. MyChinese360, the nation’s fastest growing Chinese
program, provides instant capacity and cost-effective solutions to Mandarin language
instruction. This session features a live demonstration from China and first-hand experiences from district leaders
FRIDAY 10:45 a.m.
GREENE ROOM
EDISONLEARNING
Online Learning: Multiple Solutions for a Multitude of Challenges
As online learning becomes continually more imperative, districts are looking for costefficient, manageable ways to expand or improve their online programs. To serve these
diverse needs, a multi-faceted program essential. Through its innovative approach,
EdisonLearning gives ESA’s the ability to offer a full spectrum of online learning solutions, including hybrid, supplemental courses, honors/AP, credit recovery and a
full-time virtual school capable of regaining students from cyber charters. Learn how
these programs are working for other ESA’s and how they might apply in your area.
PULASKI ROOM
12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Luncheon & Awards Program – Chatham Ballroom
Presiding: Joe Crozier, AESA Past-President
Introduction of the Justus A. Prentice Award: Bruce Dennison, AESA Council
Introduction of the Justus A. Prentice Award Winner: Cliff Carmody, Executive
Director, Southwest/West Central Service Cooperative, Marshall, MN
Justus A. Prentice Award Recipient: Lee Warne, Executive Director (retired)
Southwest/West Central Service Cooperative, Marshall, MN
AESA Executives in Residence Program: Recognition of the 2009 Participants,
Twyla Barnes, ESD 112, WA
Bob Baker, Lisa Fry, Jerry Maze, Janet Sloand
State of AESA: Brian L. Talbott, Executive Director
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1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Continuing the Conversation with Fred Bramante
Spend an hour learning further from our morning speaker Fred Bramante!
OGLETHORPE AUDITORIUM
One Choice At a Time: Building Stronger
Learning Communities for Students and Adults
ROOM 100
How to Avoid the 5 Most Costly Mistakes
in your School Construction Project
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
This workshop will focus on the 5 most common mistakes made by districts in their
school construction projects that result in the loss of money. Incomplete documentation and untimely reporting are just two of the mistakes made. Many districts have lost
funding due to insufficient management. They have literally given back millions of dollars that could have been used for their projects. This workshop will inform board
members, superintendents, business managers and town officials about the benefits of
project management and how to avoid making mistakes that result in increased costs,
lost time and productivity, all while minimizing their intensive involvement. In addition
to informing attendees of these common and often repeated mistakes, this workshop
will show how the Owner’s Representative (OR) coordinates all the activities of the
project on behalf of the district by reporting progress, and managing the project team.
This frees up the superintendent or business manager to attend to the issues of managing the school system. In addition, we will demonstrate how the OR also provides all
the required reporting to the State Department of Education on change orders, financial matters and project close-out resulting in maximum reimbursement.
Roger LaFleur, Director, Facilities and Operations, Capitol Region Education Council, Hartford, CT
FRIDAY 1:30 p.m.
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Have you ever wondered why struggling schools often have adult cultures that bump
along, get stuck, or become toxic? At Puget Sound ESD, we’re devising tools and
strategies to assist our own leadership team and our regional schools in building
learning communities where adults make positive choices about their teaming behavior, their interactions with one another, and their focus on students. Attend this session
to explore our Choices Matrix, a framework that guides adults as they create schools
characterized by a shared language of civility, principle-driven behavior, and commitment to student learning.
Janice Watson, Deputy Superintendent, Puget Sound ESD, Burien, WA
Gordy Linse, Executive Director/Learning & Teaching, Puget Sound ESD, Renton, WA
ROOM 201
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eLearning for a 21st Century Learning Environment
Technology Leading us Into the Future
Teaching curriculum geared towards 21st Century learning is challenging for all educators. Because of various mandates, schools need alternative methodologies to help
all students learn. Come and see how over 45,000 students worldwide are using
eLearning aligned 100% to Academic Content Standards to prepare a 21st Century
Workforce. A PowerPoint will outline the program and its benefits. A demonstration of
the program will be shared.
Wendy Hanasky, Director of Technology Services, Jefferson County ESC, Steubenville, OH
Craig Closser, CEO Regional Services, Jefferson County ESC, Steubenville, OH
Maribeth Arlia, Instructional Technology Coordinator, Jefferson County ESA, Steubenville, OH
ROOM 101
FRIDAY 1:30 p.m.
Conference in the Cloud
Technology Leading us into the Future
Meeting the professional development needs of a variety of learners over a large geographic area can be extremely difficult. This session will walk participants through the
process of how the Curriculum and Instruction Team at Region 16 Education Service
Center in Amarillo, Texas created, developed and implemented their first cyberconference and share the lessons we learned while training in the cloud.
Gwen W. Hicks, Deputy Director-Instructional Services, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
Lola Henning, Education Specialist-Science, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
Angie Watson, Education Specialist-Math, Region 16 ESC, Amarillo, TX
ROOM 102
Meeting the Needs of Districts
through Web-based Monitoring Tools
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
This presentation will feature two web-based monitoring tools developed by the Summit County Educational Service Center (SCESC) to meet the very real needs of districts
within and beyond Summit County, Ohio. School districts in Ohio are mandated by the
Ohio Department of Education to operate Local Professional Development Committees
(LPDC). The charge for these committees is to facilitate and monitor the professional
development related to the renewal of licensure for certified staff. The SCESC has
developed a web-based monitoring tool which streamlines the process by reducing, if
not eliminating significant paper use, as well as individual committee meeting time. A
number of districts have opted to purchase this time-saving and inexpensive service.
Additionally, Senate Bill 311 recently mandated that the Ohio State Board of Education
adopt a plan that enables, “students to earn units of high school credit based on a
demonstration of subject area competency, instead of or in combination with completing hours of classroom instruction.” All school districts, community schools and
chartered nonpublic schools are mandated to comply with the provisions of this plan.
This “credit flexibility” initiative, which requires districts to have a policy in place by
fall 2010, requires a significant amount of planning and implementation. Credit Flexibility makes it possible for students to test out of standard courses, or utilize a variety of
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educational options such as distance learning, educational travel, independent study,
an internship, music, arts, after-school/tutorial program, community service or other
engagement projects and sports in place of the traditional “seat time.” The SCESC has
developed a web-based monitoring tool which allows districts to join with the SCESC
in a consortium relationship to operationalize their individual plans and monitor the
process electronically. The presenters will address the development, as well as
demonstrate the functionality of the two tools. They will clearly show how technology
has been used to serve their districts and assist them in becoming more efficient and
effective in working with their staffs and students.
William Holko, Director, Summit County ESC, Cuyahoga Falls, OH
David E. Jones, Director, Summit County ESC, Cuyahoga Falls, OH
ROOM 103
Using Blended Learning to Support Rural Schools
FRIDAY 1:30 p.m.
Technology Leading us into the Future
This session will address blended learning to support rural schools. Presenters will
access the ESU #13 website so that models may be viewed. Educational Service Unit
#13’s journey into the world of blended learning is now over ten years old. ESU #13
formed the Western Nebraska Distance Learning Consortium (WNDLC) consisting of
12 member schools and two higher education institutions in 1999. The creation of webbased learning opportunities for students began in 2003, with the installation of our
first Moodle server. We are now beginning to see the convergence of these components being used to create a variety of exciting learning opportunities to meet
individual student needs. Teachers delivering courses from a dedicated distance
learning classroom are using Moodle, allowing students to access online content
resources and submit coursework. Teachers using Moodle to deliver online courses or
supplemental resources are using the distance learning equipment to create highquality learning objects. The future use of these technologies (and others on the
horizon) will allow teachers to create learning opportunities for students that can be
delivered in various ways providing increased flexibility.
Mark Sinner, Board Member, Educational Service Unit 13, Scottsbluff, NE
Raymond Richards, Board Member, Educational Service Unit 13, Scottsbluff, NE
Jeffrey D. West, Administrator, Educational Service Unit 13, Scottsbluff, NE
ROOM 104
Using Accreditation to Transform Your Agency
ESA Board Members Setting Direction through Policy, Leadership, and Innovation
This session is for those interested in learning how to use the accreditation process to
transform your education service agency (ESA). Based on a systems approach,
AdvancED ESA Accreditation ensures that all people, processes, departments, and
operations work in concert to achieve desired results. Learn how ESAs in Ohio, Michigan, and Nebraska are using the accreditation process to strengthen, embed, and
sustain continuous improvement. Explore the research-based quality standards and
indicators that form the foundation of the accreditation process and begin to selfassess your own agency against these standards and indicators. Discuss the benefits
of internal and external review and the value of an internationally recognized seal of
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quality. View a short video that includes ESA administrators sharing their experiences
and the benefits of AdvancED accreditation. Each participant will receive handouts
and an executive summary of AdvancED’s current research on leveraging change at
the system level.
Bart Anderson, Superintendent, ESC of Central Ohio, Columbus, OH
Sharon P. Zimmers, Ohio State Director, AdvancED/NCA Accreditation, Columbus, OH
Warren Jacobson, Associate VP of Accreditation, AdvancED, Alpharetta, GA
ROOM 202
FRIDAY 1:30 p.m.
Shared Technology Services:
How ESA’s Can Be the Missing Pieces in the Puzzle
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
The Information Technology field is one of the most rapidly changing arenas for
schools throughout the nation, but it is also one of the hardest areas for schools to
staff. Technologies of all shapes and sizes have quickly become critical tools for student engagement as well as the administration of the school district itself, making it a
truly administrative function for every school district. For the past five years SW/WC
Service Cooperative has been designing and delivering a model for Shared Information
Technology Services for our member school districts. Our service offering fills the
gaps that school districts might have in their current technology staffing and/or completely provides a district’s IT department. Come and see how we have progressed
over the years, hear about our mistakes and our vision for the future. Our model for
partnership with other regional ESA’s in Minnesota will also be presented.
Josh Sumption, Manager of Information Technology, SW/WC Service Cooperative, Marshall, MN
ROOM 105
Using Innovative Practices to Provide Essential Services
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Region 10 ESC has recently developed a new service to provide much needed assistance to school districts as they tackle challenging issues such as public and voter
opinion, election planning, campaign strategy, leadership training for superintendents
and school boards, and community relations. This session will focus on how Region 10
is providing these services and how they benefit the districts it serves.
Gordon Taylor, Associate Director, Region 10 ESC, Richardson, TX
Scott Milder, Principal and Strategist, Cambridge Strategics, Plano, TX
ROOM 106
Collaborative Partnerships to Implement
New Instructional Mentoring Program
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
Beginning in January 2011, Ohio will implement a new educational licensure system
which creates a four-year Resident Educator license for entering teachers. With a
two-year transitional period, the Ohio Department of Education was charged with
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creating a program that would not only bridge the gap between past practice and a
new system, but also one which would inform the future mentoring process. In order to
implement this vision, the Ohio Department of Education sought partnerships with Ohio
Educational Service Centers. The ESCs involved agreed to be fiscal agents for the 16
individuals who received training for the Ohio Resident Educator Transitional Program.
Those individuals were trained by the New Teacher Center from Santa Cruz, California,
to deliver and implement a formative assessment model for entry level mentoring. This
collaborative effort between the Ohio Department of Education and the Educational
Service Centers will be the topic of this presentation delivered through PowerPoint
and question and answer formats.
Jacqueline Rae Miller, School Improvement Supervisor, Brown County ESC, Goshen, OH
ROOM 203
Using the Power Walkthrough Informal
Observation to Guide Instruction
ROOM 200
FRIDAY 1:30 p.m.
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S .Department of Education Principles
Stevens Point, Wisconsin has been using McREL’s Power Walkthrough software and
process for the past two years as part of their district three year plan as a way to
gather data on the quality and rigor of instruction district-wide. Staff from both Stevens
Point and McREL will describe how the district monitors instruction and uses those
data to inform professional development and drive change in teacher practice. McREL
will also present information on how AESA member organizations can partner with
McREL to bring this process to their member schools.
Don Stevens, Agency Administrator, CESA # 5, Portage, WI
Howard Pitler, Senior Director, McREL, Denver, CO
Bill Carlson, Principal, Steven’s Point School District, WI
Jon Vollendorf, Assistant Principal, Steven’s Pint School District, WI
AESA State Leaders Meeting
This is an opportunity for the individuals who have been identified by their states as
the ESA state leader and/or state executive director to discuss common interests with
each other and the AESA executive director, staff and council.
ROOM 204
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
PROMETHEAN
Math: Making it Cool to Do Well in School
This session will provide examples of how teachers are using interactive whiteboards
and learner response systems to create engaging environments in mathematics classrooms. Be prepared to do some math and play some games!
ROOM 205
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FRIDAY 1:30 p.m.
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOPS
NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
An ESA partnership with Nova Southeastern University offering academic degree programs anytime, anyplace! Our programs offer an unparalleled range of options in
terms of level of study (associate, master’s, educational specialist and doctoral
degrees, certificates, and teacher certification/re-certification); field of study; and
method of delivery (site-based, cluster-based, online, campus-based, and myriad combinations of these). What this means to you is that we deliver advanced, practical
educational content to students anywhere in the world — in ways that are not limited
by time or place.
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services is one of the most dynamic
elements of Nova Southeastern University, providing innovative programs in leadership, teaching and learning, human development and family studies, training and
professional development, instructional technology and distance education, and communication sciences and disorders. Fischler School has the largest graduate school of
education at an accredited university (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools),
serving more than 12,000 students each academic year.
Attend an international University that was voted the #1 Online University in 2009 by
OED, is the sixth largest not-for-profit accredited university in the country and has the
most innovative, accessible, and technologically advanced programs in the nation.
Benefit from leadership perspectives of the information age and the success of international education and educators. Enroll in programs that were designed for you, with
the guidance and support of your AESA leadership.
PULASKI ROOM
2:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
NEW!
AESA’s Digital Jam
Let’s Explore the Digital World! Ever want to:
• try an iPhone, iPad or Droid without a salesperson right next to you?
• create an avatar and play Second life?
• wail on a digital instrument?
• go digital dumpster diving?
Do all of this and more at a user friendly time of exploration and what you can do.
Consider how your experiences might change how you think about technology in
the future. Spend a few moments or stay for the full two hours. Most of all –have
some fun!
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!
Facilitated by: Kevin Honeycutt, Technology Integration Specialist, ESSDACK,
Hutchinson, Kansas
CHATHAM BALLROOM FOYER
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SATURDAY AT A GLANCE
Saturday, December 4
Registration Open
8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Coffee Service
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
Concurrent Sessions
9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Brunch and Closing General Session 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 a.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS: 9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
High School Redesign Through a
Regional Solution to Online Learning
Technology Leading us Into the Future
The vision of the Capital Area Online Learning Association (CAOLA) is: Engage,
Achieve, Succeed: Options for Every Learner. This program will highlight the characteristics of our program that have allowed us to realize our vision. Participants will
learn how the Capital Area Intermediate Unit and member school districts developed
CAOLA and will cover the following topics: (1) An alternative to cyber charter schools;
(2) Enhanced online options; and (3) Meeting a variety of special needs through online
courses. Through CAOLA, our districts are able to offer courses that have been developed by master teachers, piloted by actual students and subjected to a rigorous
review by Stanford University staff members before they are made available through
CAOLA. Additionally, every course is aligned with PA Academic Standards and/or the
appropriate nationally recognized benchmarks. CAOLA became operable the summer
of 2009 with 17 students successfully earning summer school credits. By spring of 2010
CAOLA has over 200 students enrolled in over 85 different courses from member districts. CAOLA was originally comprised of 13 districts in the CAIU region. The program
has now grown to 17 school districts in various regions of the state. The CAOLA full
time model is cost effective and saves districts thousands of dollars compared to the
cost of cyber charter school or hiring additional staff.
Holly A. Brzycki, Supervisor of Online Learning, Capital Area Intermediate Unit 15, Enola, PA
Turning Things Around: ESA’s Role In Supporting Better Schools
and Higher Achievement of Children Living In Poverty
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
Focusing on more than 30 years of research on high-performing/high poverty schools, this
session presents a compelling picture of what it takes for a low performing, high poverty
school to make a dramatic turnaround. Participants will learn how ESAs can support
struggling schools by asking questions to guide improvement in three areas: 1) building
the necessary leadership capacity; 2) focusing the staff’s everyday core work on student,
professional, and system learning: and 3) creating and fostering a safe, healthy, and supportive learning environment for all. Participants will also learn how ESAs can support
local leaders who must frequently defy the norm to facilitate deep change, take coura-
SATURDAY 9:15 a.m.
ROOM 100
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geous action to eliminate practices that perpetuate low achievement, and use “uncommon sense” (out-of-the-box thinking) to foster a culture of high achievement for all
students. Tools to facilitate self-auditing and planning will be featured.
Kathleen Budge, Coordinator-Ed. Leadership Program, Boise State University, Boise, ID
William Parrett, Director-Center for School Improvement, Boise State University, Boise, ID
ROOM 101
WoodsEdge Learning Center: Advocating and Creating Unique
Environments for Special Needs Students
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Learn how collaboration between ESA School Board Members, a dedicated staff and
creative designers led to a new special education building providing “high touch”
amenities for children with autism and children with severe cognitive and physical
impairments. With careful thought to mobility challenges, color palettes, lighting, custom learning spaces and safety, this school creates an environment that fosters
educational exploration within “learning villages.” Students progress from individual
classrooms, to a common village and ultimately to “main street” where they are connected to engaging activities that ultimately allow them to connect to the world.
Attendees will learn how to educate your public, advocate for your students and apply
unique design solutions to your ESA facilities and programs. Attendees will experience
the process and the outcomes through direct discussion with the Director of
WoodsEdge Learning Center, the Assistant Superintendent of Facilities and Operations, and the Architect firm that lead us through the process. A PowerPoint
presentation will discuss how we educated our public to obtain approval of funding for
this project, an in-depth look at the specialization that went into the design of this facility to directly meet the needs of our students and a report on the first six months in the
facility and what we have learned.
Holly L Norman, Assistant Superintendent, Kalamazoo RESA, Kalamazoo, MI
Angela Telfer, Director, WoodsEdge Learning Center, Kalamazoo RESA, Kalamazoo, MI
Steve Hoekzema, Architect, Tower Pinkster Titus Associates, Inc., Kalamazoo, MI
SATURDAY 9:15 a.m.
ROOM 201
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Communicate with AgendaMan;
an Effective Paperless Meeting Solution
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
With the influx of applications available to education, it can be overwhelming to determine what can be used to increase efficiencies and collaboration, while decreasing
expendables such as paper, ink and wasted time. Join us as we discuss how a paperless meeting solution can increase the efficiency of agenda creation, storage and
dissemination while decreasing the costs associated with printing and mailing paper
agendas. We will talk about best practices for a paperless meeting solution, share
success stories and provide an option for LEAs to use. Communication is an essential
process in the development of group culture. The type of communication structure
determines leadership, roles and the status hierarchy within the group; group morale
and cohesiveness; and it limits or enhances productivity (Hare, 1992). The CAIU has
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
used a paperless meeting solution for board meetings for the past five years. More
recently, the CAIU has migrated to a paperless solution for the multitude of meetings
held within the organization. Job-alike groups can easily review the agendas and minutes of the related meetings that have occurred. Agendas that change frequently prior
to the meeting are updated easily, are accurate for all attendees when the meeting
begins. Public stakeholders are able to view an accurate and timely agenda for
upcoming board meetings and are able to see a history of minutes, thereby increasing
the transparency of the organization.
Jill Machemer, Instructional Technology Specialist, Capital Area Intermediate Unit, Enola, PA
Joan Adams, IT Systems Administrator, Capital Area Intermediate Unit, Enola, PA
David Martin, Director-Technology Services, Capital Area Intermediate Unit, Enola, PA
ROOM 102
Building Inclusive Schools Initiative:
A Model For Student Success
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Through cross departmental planning and the flexible use of resources the Region 4
ESC Building Inclusive Schools Initiative (BISI) supports schools in meeting the challenge of improving the academic performance of students with disabilities by accessing
the general education curriculum. Region 4 works with schools selected to participate
in the BISI project to develop standards of excellence, promote high expectations for all
students, generate a faculty-wide culture of collaboration and transition to more inclusive classrooms. Participants will leave the session excited to return to their ESA to
develop a model that truly results in improving student performance.
Fred Shafer, Director of Special Education Services, Region 4 ESC, Houston, TX
Michael Webb, Education Specialist, Region 4 ESC, Houston, TX
ROOM 104
Treating the Instructional Core:
Using Instructional Rounds to Improve Teaching and Learning
ROOM 202
SATURDAY 9:15 a.m.
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Instructional Rounds—a practice adapted to education from the field of medicine—is
a specific set of ideas and a professional development process that educators can use
to work together to solve common problems and improve their professional practice
and schools. Instructional Rounds connects school, district and state efforts with
improvements in the instructional core and the networking process builds collaborative teams of educators who learn from one another about improving instruction. Data
reviewed in Marzano’s “District Leadership that Works” indicates that district administrators, school boards and superintendents can have a measurable impact on student
achievement if they focus their work in an effective manner across the district. The
audience will experience a power point presentation with discussion and question/
answer session.
Ann H. Burns, Leadership Consultant, Kentucky Educational Development Corporation, Ashland, KY
Stan Riggs, Executive Director, Kentucky Educational Development Corporation, Ashland, KY
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Got Leadership? Strategies for Tough Times
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S. Department of Education Principles
Got challenging times, changing needs of students, standards and curriculum
demands, budget shortfalls? In this hands-on, interactive session, participants will
engage in a variety of scenarios to learn how to apply strategies to effectively deal
with challenging people (including teachers, parents, community members, administrators, and Board members), as well as difficult situations and education reform
issues. Learn valuable tools for resolving conflict, moving from inquiry to discussion,
problem solving, team building, conducting successful meetings, increasing effective
communication, facilitating change, building consensus, and much more. Participants
will leave with new ideas to explore possibilities and develop new ways of thinking
about adult interaction and the change process. You will not want to miss this engaging and thought-provoking session.
Dana Stoltz Gray, Director of Programs, High Plains Regional Education Cooperative, Raton, NM
Elisabeth Nixon, Education and Program Specialist, High Plains Regional Educational Cooperative,
Raton, NM
Shari Zimmer, Education and Program Specialist, High Plains Regional Education Cooperative,
Raton, NM
ROOM 203
SATURDAY 9:15 a.m.
Helping your Districts Collect and Use Data
60
ESAs Assisting Schools in Meeting the Four U.S.Department of Education Principles
Learn how EASTCONN, a Connecticut Regional Educational Service Center, develops
data systems as a significant revenue stream while supporting the school improvement efforts of its members. Small districts have the same mandates, but few
resources, to support the collection and use of data. EASTCONN has worked in collaboration with districts to develop low-cost, customizable, web-based student
assessment systems. Learn more about the data systems we have developed through
PowerPoint presentation, live web demonstration and discussion, including EASTCONN’s latest application, MyRtI. CT recently mandated the implementation of RtI in all
schools and EASTCONN responded with MyRtI, an assessment management solution.
This web-based system provides schools with an efficient way to collect assessment
data and document the effectiveness of interventions.
Jim Huggins, Director of Technology Services, EASTCONN, Hampton, CT
ROOM 105
Successful Online Course Programs:
Planning, Policy and Promotion
Technology Leading us into the Future
A growing number of schools are offering or considering online courses as part of
their curriculum. The addition of online courses requires clear planning, specific policies and appropriate promotion in order to insure success. Lower Hudson Regional
Information Center (LHRIC) and Virtual High School Global Consortium (VHS) will present examples and a framework for successful online program implementations. The
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
objective of this session is to provide administrators and technology directors with a
comprehensive framework of the planning, policy and promotion considerations when
implementing online courses for students. In addition, attendees will learn about various selection criteria to use when identifying faculty, staff and students that are likely
to lead to a successful implementation. This lecture style presentation will include an
overview of recommended ESA, district and board level policy issues to be considered
during the planning stages of selecting online program providers. Attendees will leave
with specific examples of actual district policies including school staff expectations,
student expectations, parent/guardian approval and student eligibility considerations.
Sarah Martabano, Regional Coordinator, Lower Hudson Regional Information Center, Elmsford, NY
Dana Koch, Global Services Director, Virtual High School (VHS,Inc.), Maynard, MA
ROOM 106
The Future Isn’t What it Used to be:
Developing a Vision and Setting Goals in Uncertain Times
Innovative ESA Programs that Meet Challenges and Demonstrate Success
Typically in the planning and goal setting process education organizations base their
efforts on the idea that tomorrow’s world will be familiar. In these rapidly changing
times, it becomes increasingly important to acknowledge that the future will be radically different from the present. To ensure that leadership decisions serve both
immediate needs and long term goals, Washtenaw Intermediate School District has
been using a unique long-range planning process that moves beyond probable or
inevitable futures to create a collective “preferable future” through the use of focus
areas scenarios and consensus-building protocols. This presentation will outline the
Preferred Futuring Process, provide data and outcomes from nearly twenty years of
implementation in Washtenaw County, Michigan, and give participants the materials to
get started.
William C. Miller, Superintendent, Washtenaw ISD, Ann Arbor, MI
Naomi Norman, Director-Assessment, Planning and Research, Washtenaw ISD, Ann Arbor, MI
ROOM 204
AESA Business Relations Committee
PULASKI ROOM
AESA Membership Services Committee
Chairperson: Mick Loughran; Vice Chair: Lindy Franks
Working session for the committee to review the strategic initiative: “Our members are
our primary customers-their satisfaction is our highest priority.”
GWINNETT ROOM
SATURDAY 9:15 a.m.
Chairperson: John Bass; Vice Chair: Dan Hare
Working session for the committee to review the strategic initiative: “Enhance business relations with ESAs and businesses offering educational products/services.”
61
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
AESA SPONSOR WORKSHOP
GREAT AMERICAN FINANCIAL RESOURCES
Saving Money with miSolutions!
Discover a means of reducing your Health Insurance claims while saving your employees out-of-pocket expenses! With this program, you also can provide them with 6
additional benefits that will add to their savings on everyday services such as dental
care, eye care, roadside assistance and others. In addition to providing these benefits,
your agency can create a revenue stream with miSolutions!
Mike Cook, Executive Director, ESSDACK, Hutchinson, KS
Dan Hare, Superintendent, Butler County ESC Hamilton, OH.
ROOM 205
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Saturday Brunch and Closing General Session
Presiding: Dee Alarcon, AESA President
Keynote Speaker: Bill Habermehl
Bill Habermehl is the Orange County (CA) Superintendent of Schools and has
been elected to that post for three terms. He began his career in education as a
science teacher and football couch over four decades ago. He remains enthusiastic about learning and is excited about the future educational challenges and
opportunities facing students. Bill seeks and embraces innovative ways to engage
and influence educators and the business community via his television show,
Spotlight on Education. Sought after as a speaker in CA and around the country,
Bill delivers a strong message and has been known to add to his presentations
with his magic skills. Join us to hear one of our own at this closing event!
CHATHAM BALLROOM
2011 CALL TO CONFERENCE: COLORADO SPRINGS, CO
62
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Aesop — Frontline Placement Technologies, Inc.
305
397 Eagleview Blvd., Exton, PA 19341
610-727-0316
www.aesoponline.com
Aesop is an Automated Substitute Placement and Absence Management System currently used by over 2,300 school districts in the U.S. and Canada.
Advanced Academics
320
1 East Sheridan, Suite 500, Oklahoma City, OK 73104
405-512-6366
www.AdvancedAcademics.com
Advanced Academics is utilized around the country in a variety of ways including fulltime virtual schools, credit recovery, dropout prevention and recovery, curriculum
expansion, teacher shortages, remediation, and acceleration.
American Public University
401
10111 Battleview Parkway, Suite 114, Manassas, VA 20109
703-334-3938
www.studyatapa.com
American Public University offers over 100 undergraduate, graduate degree, and certificate programs, many tailored to the needs of educators and counselors. All courses
are online, affordable, and conveniently scheduled for the working professional.
Association of Educational Service Agencies (AESA)
115
801 N. Quincy Street, Suite 750, Arlington, VA 22209
203-481-4063
www.aesa.us
The Association of Educational Service Agencies (AESA) is a professional organization
serving educational service agencies (ESAs) in 45 states; there are 553
agencies nationwide with hundreds of thousands of staff members. AESA is in the
position to reach well over 80% of the public school districts, over 83% of the private
schools, over 80% certified teachers, and more than 80% non-certified school employees, and well over 80% public and private school students. Annual budgets for ESAs
come to $14.7 billion. AESA’s membership is agency wide and includes all ESA employees and board members.
Association of Educational Purchasing Agencies
400
c/o Oakland Schools, 2111 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford, MI 48328
248-209-2209
www.aepacoop.org
Agencies in 23 states go to bid to get you best-value prices for the products and services you use in your school. AEPA bids on contracts are: National bid solicitations,
advertised in each state, compliant with individual state bid laws, and individual state
contract awards.
Atlas Tracks, Inc.
403
19495 SW Teton Avenue, Tualatin, OR 97062
503-805-0382
www.atlastrack.com
Atlas Track & Tennis offers indoor and outdoor sport and landscape surface: running
tracks, tennis/basketball courts and playgrounds. Plus, through our partnership with
Field Turf®, we offer the “greatest turf on earth.”®
63
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Capital Region Educational Council
417
111 Charter Oak Ave., Hartford, CT 06106
860-524-4065
www.crec.org
The Capitol Region Education Council (CREC), working with and for its member districts, has developed a wide array of cost-effective and high-quality programs and
services to meet the educational needs of children and adults in the Hartford, Connecticut region.
Carnegie Learning
307
437 Grant Street, 20th Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15219
412-690-2442
www.carnegielearning.com
Carnegie Learning, Inc. is a leading publisher of innovative, research-based math curricula for middle school, high school, and post-secondary students. Providing
differentiated instruction to schools across the United States, Carnegie Learning is
helping students to succeed in math, creating a gateway to graduation and preparing
them for the 21st century.
CDW-G
103
200 N. Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills, IL 60061
847-371-5029
www.cdwg.com
CDW Government, Inc. (CDW-G) is a leading provider of technology solutions for federal, state and local governmental agencies, as well as educational institutions at all
levels. For more information about CDW-G services and solutions, call 1-800-808-4239
or visit CDWG.com
College Board
405
45 Columbus Ave., New York, NY 10023
212-649-8428
www.collegeboard.org
The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. It is composed of more than 5,700
schools, universities and educational organizations and is committed to excellence
and equity in education.
Computer Automation Systems, Inc.
218
P. O. Box 590, Mountain Home, AR 72654
402-380-3691
www.computerautomation.com
Computer Automation Systems’ special education plan management line of products
(SEASTM) helps over 2,000 school districts nation-wide reduce paperwork, improve
compliance, and increase efficiency and accountability. Now CAS’ SEAS Achievement
PlansTM manages any student performance, including Academic Intervention and RTI.
Leaders in Medicaid consulting, billing and reconciliation.
Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI)
311
3315 – H North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005
262-317-3413
www.crisisprevention.com
Since 1980, CPI has been training educators to safely manage disruptive and
assaultive behavior. To date, more than 6 million individuals have participated in CPI’s
Nonviolent Crisis Intervention® training program. CPI also offers on-site training,
DVDs, posters and books.
64
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
CRS Advanced Technology
204
926 Plaza Drive, Montoursville, PA 17754
800-782-3463
www.crsadvancestechnology.com
CRS Advanced Technology has led the way in automated human resource management and substitute placement for over 20 years with our innovative, evolving product
line including SubFinder and SubPay. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 800-782-3463 today.
Direct Energy Business
300
1001 Liberty Avenue, Suite 1200, Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412-667-5618
www.directenergybusiness.com
Direct Energy Business is a leading commercial retail energy supplier dedicated to
serving our customers with innovative energy management solutions and cost-effective choices for their electricity and natural gas requirements
EdisonLearning
107
2350 Mission College Blvd., Ste. 972, Santa Clara, CA 95054
408-396-6281
www.edisonlearning.com
EdisonLearning is a leading international educational solutions provider with nearly 20
years of experience helping schools achieve lasting gains in performance using an
extensive portfolio of proven school improvement services, academic tutoring, formative assessment tools, and online learning solutions.
EduVision by JDL (JDL Horizons)
120
8300 Norman Center Drive, Ste 510, Bloomington, MN 55437
Studio sets, complete lighting and audio, virtual sets using green screen, and live
streaming to the Internet will be staffed by technology professionals from JDL Horizons. The center will produce interviews featuring attendees, exhibitors, keynote
speakers and others. We invite you to stop by and see the system used by several
ESAs for professional development, external communications, and more.
eSchool Solutions
319
604 Courtland Street, Suite 300, Orlando, FL 32810
407-835-9899
www.eschoolsolutions.com
eSchool Solutions is a “total solutions” provider emphasizing absentee management
and professional development.
escWorks
202
7145 West Tidwell Road, Houston, TX 77092
713-744-6834
www.escWorks.com
escWorks is data management software containing multiple online modules designed
to transform once time consuming tasks into easily manageable processes. Data
stored in escWorks can automatically generate technical and graphical reports that
communicate services provided over time to state agencies or school districts.
65
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Event Management Systems (EMS)
208
5613 DTC Parkway, Suite 1250, Greenwood Village, CO 80111
407-835-9899
www.dea.com
Event Management Systems (EMS) is the premier facility scheduling solution for ESA’s
to simplify the scheduling of activities, efficiently coordinate space and resources,
manage meetings and trainings, handle registrations and surveys as well as publish an
online community calendar.
Follett Software
411
1391 Corporate Drive, McHenry, IL 60050
815-578-7274
www.follettsoftware.com
America’s K-12 school districts rely on Follett Software for its innovative management
of educational content and library materials, textbooks, assets, data and other critical
resources. Follett’s solutions support staff and engage students in a digitally rich environment that empowers 21st century learning.
Global Compliance Network
220
5859 W. Saginaw Highway # 384, Lansing, MI 48917
231-578-6753
www.gcntraining.com
GCN provides online HR &OSHA training with a tracking database. Bloodborne
Pathogens, Sexual Harassment, Ethics/Boundaries for School Employees. 70+ Tutorials. Unlimited Tutorials, Unlimited Access: $1400/district. Consortium discounts
available. To review a tutorial, Login with Organization ID of “sample”.
Great American Financial Resources
109 / 111
525 Vine Street, 7th Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202
541-359-9270
www.grafri.com
Great American Financial Resources: Choose the benefit services you need most with
the AESA All American Line Up: 403(b) and 457 retirement plan administration; miSolution, an innovative package of medical and lifestyle benefits; Section 125 Cafeteria
Plans and voluntary insurance products; Retirement annuities; and Teachers Deserve
the Best, valuable resources for teachers in the classroom today!
Harvard Education Publishing Group
303
8 Strong Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
617-498-3483
www.hepg.org
The Harvard Education Publishing Group contributes to the knowledge and greater
understanding of educational issues in society today. We are committed to serving as
a forum for different perspectives through the Harvard Educational Review, the Harvard Education Letter, and books under the imprint Harvard Education Press.
High School 101
410
PO Box 1408, Conyers, GA 30012
706-342-9189
www.chadfoster.com
21st century skills curricula and drop-out prevention strategies. Professional development
for educators and dynamic presentations for students. Meet best-selling author Cad Foster and receive free autographed copies of his books—“Financial Literacy for Teens” and
“Teenagers Preparing for the Real World,” which are used in 4,500 classrooms nationwide.
66
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
iPEC
317
149 Avenue at the Commons, Suite 202, Shrewsbury, NJ 07702
310-351-4820
www.coachtrainingforeducators.com
iPEC’s Educational Leadership Coach Training enables educators to develop effective
leadership skills, producing sustainable cultures of shared leadership. Participants learn to
coach within their roles and schools — building greater leadership capacity, increasing
faculty/student engagement, and impacting overall school performance measurements.
419
L4U Library System
1632 Dickson Ave., Ste. 400, Kelowna, BC V1Y 7T2
800-667-3634
www.L4U.com
The award winning L4U has been serving K-12 schools and public librarians for 25
years and is installed in 2,700 libraries in North America. Patrons of all ages love our
engaging ‘discovery’: iPac interfaces. L4U is Library Automation Made Easy!
Lancaster-Lebanon / Intermediate Unit 13
318
1020 New Holland Avenue, Lancaster, PA 17601
717-606-1673
www.iu13.org
IU 13 is an educational service agency located in Lancaster, PA. We developed a number of marketplace products including but not limited to Solutions Cubes (Itinerant
Time Tracker software), Tech Talk Live Conference, and Leading the Learning for the
Next Generation Conference.
LanSchool Technologies
210
770 West 210 South, Orem, UT 84058
801-701-1787
www.lanschool.com
The original classroom management software, LanSchool improves learning in computer classrooms by enabling teachers to remove distractions, demonstrate skills,
monitor screens, and assess student progress. LanSchool supports PCs, Macs and
Thin Clients. Download a free 30-day trial version.
Lightspeed
302
1800 19th Street, Bakerfield, CA 93301
661-716-7600
www.lightspeedsystems.com
Lightspeed Systems Inc., founded in 2000, develops comprehensive network security
and management solutions for the education market. We are committed to helping
schools of all sizes operate their networks effectively and efficiently, so educators can
provide safe online teaching and learning environments. Our innovative, comprehensive
solutions for network security, internet filtering, monitoring, management, and optimization have emerged from Lightspeed’s IT expertise and constant customer interaction.
404
Lincoln Interactive
50416 Calcutta-Smith Ferry Road, East Liverpool, OH 43920
724-764-7200 x1679
www.lincolninteractive.com
Lincoln Interactive is a series of standards-based, engaging courses for elementary,
middle and high school students designed to maximize academic success. It is a hightech, high-touch comprehensive learning package that provides flexible, dynamic and
adventurous learning opportunities for students.
67
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Marsden Services, LLC
119 / 121
380 St. Peter St., Ste. 760, St. Paul, MN 55102
651-523-6612
www.marsdenservices.com
Clean! Green! Safe! Efficient! These words describe the results you get when Marsden Services, L.L.C. cares for your facility. Marsden, a leading facility management
company, produces measurable savings with best-in-class cleaning, maintenance,
HVAC, and security solutions. Learn more at www.marsdenservices.com.
MAXIMUS
408
15030 N. Hayden Road, Suite 100, Scottsdale, AZ 85260
480-483-7594
www.maximum.con/tienet
TIENET® from MAXIMUS is a proven solution that helps manage instruction, assessment, intervention and special education (creation and management of IEPs). It has
been endorsed by the Council of Administrators of Special Education (CASE).
Mid-continent Research for Education & Learning (McREL)
105
4601 DTC Boulevard, Suite 500, Denver, CO 80237
303-632-5554
www.mcrel.org
Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) is a nonprofit corporation
based in Denver, Colorado. McREL’s focus is on research, product development, technical assistance and training for K-12 education improvement, leadership
development, standards-based instructional practice, and systemic reform.
Mother Goose Programs
201
4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706
717-794-3800 x3642
www.bernan.com/mgp
Mother Goose Programs™ are a collection of picture books, manipulatives, activity
guides, and training that enable early childhood educators, librarians, and parents to
transform the act of reading to children into a multidimensional and powerful learning
experience.
National Association of Media and Technology Centers (NAMTC)
214
PO Box 9844, Cedar Rapids, IA 52409
319-654-0608
www.namtc.org
The National Association of Media and Technology Centers (NAMTC) provides leadership opportunities for educational communities. Visit www.NAMTC.org to learn how
membership services can work for your service agency. The equitable access to
media, technology and information services is our organizational goal.
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
221
1525 Wilson Blvd., Suite 500, Arlington, VA 22209
703-465-2168
www.nbpts.org
The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards administers National Board
Certification for teachers and is developing advanced certification for principals and
teacher leaders. National Board Certification was recently recognized by the National
Research Council for its positive impact on student achievement and teacher retention. NBPTS is integral to the nation’s growing education reform movement.
68
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Netchemia
315
3520 W. 75th Street, Suite 300, Prairie Village, KS 66208
800-490-9686
www.netchemia.com
Netchemia, LLC delivers needs-specific solutions to over 300 districts across the nation
that helps streamline administrative process, optimize information flow, and enrich
communication. Web-based management solutions incude; SchoolRecruiter, Applicant
Tracking & Hiring; netIEP®, Special Education; and netRTI, Response to Intervention.
Nova Southeastern University
117
1750 NE 167th Street, North Miami Beach, FL 33162-3017
800-986-3223
www.fischlerschool.nova.edu
Nova Southeastern University’s Fischler School of Education and Human Services is
one of the nation’s largest accredited schools of education. Choose from an unparalleled range of options in terms of level of study (associate, masters, educational
specialist and doctoral degrees, certificates, and teacher certification/re-certification). Our ideas, our approach, and our programs inspire educators to inspire their
students to move the world.
OnDemand Energy
219
300 Corporate Center Dr., Suite 50, Moon Twp, PA 15108
866-699-9968
www.ondemandenergy.com
OnDemand Energy provides maximum choice and competition in helping your district
choose the right electricity supplier(s). A leading independent and objective energy
consultant , OnDemand has placed over 14 Billion kwhs of energy utilizing 16 different
suppliers saving our clients in excess of $100 million on their energy spend.
Promethean
101
1165 Sanctuary Parkway, Suite 400, Alpharetta, GA 30009
678-336-8044
www.prometheanworld.com
Change the Classroom. Change the World. Promethean helps bring to life the promise
of 21st Century Learning. Our mission is to create, develop, support and supply technology-enable education and training environments that unlock the potential of human
achievement, improving engagement and increasing the success of learners and
instructors alike.
Promethean – ActivClassroom In Motion
On the Street at the Entrance
Public Sector Benefits
301
19140 Baythorn Way, Brookfield, WI 53045
262-439-8400
www.1psb.com
Public Sector Benefits and The Hartford offer an Employer Paid, Life and Disability program as a Business Member of the AESA. The objectives are to: 1) save the employer
money, 2) reduce unpaid claims 3) offer a viable collective purchasing opportunity to
members of Educational Service Agencies, using the broker of their choice.
69
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Region 4 Education Service Center
200
7145 West Tidwell Road, Houston, TX 77092
713-744-4427
www.theansweris4.net
Region 4 ESC provides nationally recognized professional development, technical
assistance, and quality, economical education products to districts businesses.
Scholar Centric
409
2406 W. 32nd Ave., Ste. C, Denver, CO 80211
720-450-8204
www.successhighways.com
ScholarCentric partners with ESAs to provide educational institutions the tools they
need to increase the student academic resiliency skills tied to academic success.
ScholarCentric’s Success Highways offers predictive resiliency assessment and curriculum well suited for ESA professional development support.
ScholarChip
216
6 Commerce Street, Hicksville, NY 11801
516-827-5081
www.scholarchip.com
Create K-12 contactless campuses. Our platform has issued 750,000 smart cards. Activate our attendance, operations and security portfolio. Employ our one-card strategy:
move towards an advanced and integrated information model.
Schoolnet, Inc
402
525 Seventh Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10018
646-496-9026
www.schoonet.com
Schoolnet is the leading provider of data-driven software that empowers and informs
educators. Through the Schoolnet Suite, districts get the only integrated system that
includes formative assessment, dashboards, gradebook, curriculum management, PD
management, parent portals, SIS and RTI solutions.
SSC Service Solutions
309
1845 Midpark Road, Suite 201, Knoxville, TN 37921
865-673-4366
www.sscserv.com
SSC Service Solutions is your single source for custodial services in K-12 Schools.
We’re the People Company, That Cleans.
Staples
414
500 Staples Drive, Framingham, MA 01702
508-253-1208
www.staplesadvantage.com
Staples is committed to making it easy for our customers around the globe to buy a
wide range of office products including supplies, technology, furniture, facilities, and
business services.
TinyEYE Therapy Services
418
103-116 Research Drive, Saskatoon SK S7N 3R3
305-955-1911
www.TinyEYE.com
TinyEYE is the world leader in online speech therapy services. TinyEYE specializes in
serving school districts with hard-to-fill Speech-Language Pathology vacancies. We
connect students with SLPs using our advanced, award winning online speech therapy platform. Visit us at www.TinyEYE.com.
70
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (Alphabetical)
Tremco
415
3735 Green Road, Beachwood, OH 44122
216-766-5567
www.tremcoroofing.com
Tremco delivers solutions designed to reduce roofing and building envelope life-cycle
costs while extending overall performance. Capabilities: premium products/systems;
inventory/diagnostics; roof repair/restoration/replacement, façades, parking
garages/lots; HVAC systems; preventive maintenance and transfer of risk.
Tyler Technologies Inc.
203
370 US Route One, Falmouth, ME 04105
800-772-2260
www.tylertech.com
Tyler Technologies’ comprehensive school software and service solutions - financial,
student information, transportation, special education, food service and district planning — empower schools and school districts of all sizes to spend more time with their
students, and less time with their data.
United States Academic Decathlon
407
P. O. Box 1834, Council Bluffs, IA 51502
712-366-3700
www.usad.orghttp://www.usad.org
The Academic Decathlon, the premier national scholastic competition for high school
students, was created to provide opportunities for students to experience the challenges of rigorous team and individual academic competition. Students from all
achievement levels participate in all ten events.
Williams Scotsman
206
8211 Town Center Drive, Baltimore, MD 21236
410-931-6139
www.willscot.com
Williams Scotsman offers a variety of flexible space options for every facet of the education market — public and private, including preschool, primary and secondary,
college and university. From relocatable classrooms to permanent modular construction, we have solutions for your needs.
Wimba
406
10 East 40th Street, 11th Floor, New York, NY 10016
407-620-7248
www.wimba.com
Wimba® is a leading provider of collaborative solutions used by thousands of educators around the world to engage students, support business needs and save time and
money. It offers students, teachers and administrators an engaging and comprehensive collaboration environment for instruction, meetings and help.
Wonderlic
416
1795 N. Butterfield Rd., Libertyville, IL 60048
800-784-1537
www.wonderlic.com
Wonderlic is the recognized leader in employment assessments and surveys for the
Education market. Wonderlic helps schools increase the quality and efficiency of their
employee recruitment, hiring and retention processes, as well as providing stakeholder surveys to assess parent, student, graduate and employee satisfaction.
71
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (by Booth Number)
BOOTH
101
Promethean
103
CDW-G
105
Mid-continent Research for Education & Learning (McREL)
107
EdisonLearning
109/111 Great American Financial Resources
115
Association of Educational Service Agencies (AESA)
117
NOVA Southeastern University
119/121 Marsden Services, LLC
72
120
JDL Studio
200
Region 4
201
Mother Goose Programs
202
escWorks
203
Tyler Technologies, Inc.
204
CRS Advanced Technology
206
Williams Scotsman
208
Event Management Systems (EMS)
210
LanSchool Technologies
214
National Association of Media andTechnology Centers (NAMTC)
216
ScholarChip
218
Computer Automation Systems, Inc.
219
OnDemand Energy
220
Global Compliance Network
221
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
300
Direct Energy Business
301
Public Sector Benefits/Hartford
302
Lightspeed Systems
303
Harvard Education Publishing Group
EXHIBITOR AND SHOWCASE (by Booth Number)
BOOTH
305
Aesop — Frontline Placement Technologies, Inc.
307
Carnegie Learning
309
SSC Service Solutions
311
Crisis Prevention Institute
315
Netchemia, LLC
317
iPEC
318
Lancaster-Lebanon / Intermediate Unit 13
319
eSchool Solutions
320
Advanced Academics
400
Association of Educational Purchasing Agencies (AEPA)
401
American Public University
402
Schoolnet, Inc.
403
Atlas Tracks, Inc
404
Lincoln Interactive
405
College Board
406
Wimba
407
United States Academic Decathon
408
MAXIMUS
409
Scholar Centric
410
High School 101
411
Follett Software
414
Staples
415
Tremco Inc.
416
Wonderlic
417
Capitol Region Education Council (CREC)
418
TinyEYE Therapy Servcies
419
L4U Library Services
73
FLOOR PLAN — EXHIBIT HALL
AESA ANNUAL CONFERENCE
December 1– 4, 2010
Savannah International Trade & Convention Center
EXHIBIT HALL A — LEVEL ONE
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
74
FLOOR PLAN — EXHIBIT HALL
75
FLOOR PLAN — EXHIBIT HALL
76
NOTES
77
NOTES
78
NOTES
79
NOTES
80