October 24, 2014 - Catholic San Francisco

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October 24, 2014 - Catholic San Francisco
MARIANIST
IDENTITY:
Continues as
Riordan hallmark
PAGE 4
WELCOMING:
CEMETERIES:
Providing room
in Ebola crisis
‘right thing to do’
November an ideal
time to remember
holy souls
PAGE 7
PAGE 11
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO, MARIN & SAN MATEO COUNTIES
www.catholic-sf.org
OCTOBER 24, 2014
$1.00 | VOL. 16 NO. 28
Pope beatifies Blessed
Paul VI, the ‘great
helmsman’ of Vatican II
FRANCIS X. ROCCA
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Beatifying Blessed Paul VI at
the concluding Mass of the Synod of Bishops on the
family, Pope Francis
praised the late pope as
the “great helmsman”
of the Second Vatican
Council and founder of
the synod, as well as a
“humble and prophetic
witness of love for
Christ and his church.”
The pope spoke during
a homily in St. Peter’s
Square at a Mass for more
than 30,000 people, under
a sunny sky on an unseasonably warm Oct. 19.
“When we look to this great pope, this courageous
SEE PAUL VI, PAGE 23
US cardinal says
family synod came
to ‘real consensus’
FRANCIS X. ROCCA
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of
Washington said the Oct. 5-19 Synod of Bishops
on the family came to a “real consensus” after two
weeks of animated debate, and that its final report
will serve as a solid basis for the world synod on the
family in 2015.
“What we saw and what we ended up with was the
result of a free and open process. The pope at the
very beginning said speak with clarity and charity
and listen with humility and that’s what happened,”
Cardinal Wuerl told Catholic News Service Oct. 20.
The cardinal said the only “glitch” in the process
came with the synod’s Oct. 13 midterm report,
which made headlines with its strikingly conciliatory language toward people with ways of life
contrary to Catholic teaching, including divorced
SEE WUERL, PAGE 22
(PHOTOS BY DENNIS CALLAHAN/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Members of religious communities gathered at St. Mary’s Cathedral Oct. 20 for evening prayer in honor of the opening of
the Year of Consecrated Life, with a reflection by Presentation Sister Stephanie Still and remarks by Archbishop Cordileone.
Prayer service honors consecrated life
TOM BURKE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
More than 100 men and women religious representing more than a dozen religious communities attended a prayer service inaugurating
commemorations of the Year of Consecrated
Life at St. Mary’s Cathedral Oct. 20.
“It was wonderful,” said Presentation Sister
Rosina Conrotto, director of the office for consecrated life for the Archdiocese of San Francisco.
Sister Rosina said it was a very positive start
for the next 12 months named by Pope Francis
to appreciate and pray for religious around the
world.
Almost 100 laypeople were also in the assembly
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SEE CONSECRATED, PAGE 2
INDEX
On the Street . . . . . . . . .4
National . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Faith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . .26
2 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
CONSECRATED: 100 men and women religious attend prayer service
YEAR OF CONSECRATED
LIFE EVENTS
FROM PAGE 1
“expressing their gratitude to religious as educators, in health care and their presence in their
lives,” Sister Rosina said.
In his remarks Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone focused on Pope Francis exhortation to live
in the joy of the Gospel. “Archbishop Cordileone
was very generous in his gratitude to the religious
for their service and presence in the archdiocese,”
Sister Rosina said.
Sister Stephanie Still, president of the Sisters of
the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, gave
a reflection. She has been a religious for more
than 30 years.
She said that if described in a song, her vocation would include thanks, hope, freedom, joy and
love.
“And so it should,” she said, “because today I
stand here, you stand here, not just expressing
our own vocation and call but as witnesses to a
rich tradition of all our brothers and sisters who
have lived this life before us.”
APRIL 25, 2015:
Mass for Consecrated
Life with recognition
of men and women
religious celebrating
jubilees, St. Mary’s
Cathedral, 11 a.m.
(PHOTO BY DENNIS CALLAHAN/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
Members of religious communities gathered at St. Mary’s Cathedral Oct. 20 for evening prayer
in honor of the opening of the Year of Consecrated Life, with a reflection by Presentation Sister
Stephanie Still and remarks by Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone. In 2013, Pope Francis declared
that a Year of Consecrated Life be celebrated throughout the world, officially starting on the First
Sunday of Advent, Nov. 30.
NOV. 22, 2015:
Mass at the cathedral
to close the year,
with Archbishop Cordileone as principal
celebrant and retired
Archbishop John R.
Quinn as homilist.
A religious will offer
a reflection at each
event.
NEED TO KNOW
BONE MARROW DONORS SOUGHT: Estevan
Gonzales, a parishioner at St. Ignatius Parish,
has acute myeloid leukemia and only a 10 percent to 20 percent chance of survival without
a bone marrow transplant. According to Delete
Blood Cancer, only 4 out of 10 patients can find
a match on the National Bone Marrow Registry.
It is even harder for people like Estevan, who
is of Spanish and Mexican descent, because
patients with a diverse ethnic background are
underrepresented on the registry, the parish
announced. The University of San Francisco
and the parishes of St. Ignatius, St. Agnes, Star
of the Sea and St. Peter are sponsoring bone
marrow donor drives on the following dates:
Sunday, Nov. 9, USF campus, 8:30 a.m.-6:30
p.m., Fromm Hall, Room 115; Tuesday, Nov. 11,
USF campus, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Gleeson Plaza;
Sunday, Nov. 23, St. Peter Parish, 1200 Florida
St., after the 9 a.m. and noon Masses. Registration for the National Bone Marrow Registry
takes 10 minutes and may save a life. Donors
must be between 18 and 55 and in good general health. For more information, contact Maria
Boden, [email protected]
ONE-WOMAN PLAY ABOUT DOROTHY
DAY:“Haunted by God,” a one-woman play
about Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic
Worker movement, will be performed Sunday, Nov. 2, at 2 p.m. at Most Holy Redeemer
Church, 100 Diamond St., San Francisco. Suggested donation $10 to $20, but no one will be
turned away because of lack of funds.
LIVING TRUSTS WILLS
Help Catholic Charities’
clients enjoy a festive fall
Contributing to Catholic Charities fall festivities in
the Archdiocese of San Francisco means helping
low-income children, families and adults enjoy the
season as much as you do. Volunteering for these
events in San Francisco, Marin and San Mateo
counties is a way of building relationships while
serving our neighbors. There is a maximum number
of volunteers per activity. Note that all volunteer activities include a 15-minute orientation so be sure to
arrive on time. To donate or volunteer, contact Clint
Womack at (415) 972-1297 or [email protected]
10TH & MISSION FAMILY HOUSING: Wednesday,
Oct. 29. Decorate, serve snacks, lead games and face
paint. Five to seven volunteers needed. 5:30-7 p.m.
Holiday party supplies needed by Friday, Oct. 24.
ADULT DAY SERVICES SAN FRANCISCO: Holiday
carnival supplies needed by Friday, Oct. 24. Needed
MICHAEL T. SWEENEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
782A ULLOA STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94127
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LELAND HOUSE: Halloween party, Friday, Oct. 31.
Decorate, serve food, costume assistance, socialize,
clean up. Three volunteers needed. 6-8 p.m.
ADULT DAY SERVICES SAN MATEO COUNTY:
Halloween party supplies needed by Monday, Oct.
27. Needed are four $25-value Costco or Target gift
cards for food, and four $15-value medium pumpkins.
DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION: Saturday,
Nov. 1. Set up, lead crafts, clean up, face paint. Four
volunteers needed. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
DEREK SILVA COMMUNITY: Halloween party supplies needed by Wednesday, Oct. 29. Needed are three
$50-value Target gift cards for costumes and snacks,
and one $25-value Walgreens gift card for decorations.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
PROBATE
www.mtslaw.info
are four $25-value Costco or Target gift cards for food
or decorations.
Around the National Shrine of St. Francis
Phone: 415-983-0213
Between Vallejo & Green Street
Hours: Now open 7 days, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
www.knightsofsaintfrancis.com
West Coast Church Supplies
369 Grand Avenue
South San Francisco
1-800-767-0660
Easy access: 3 blocks west of 101
Bibles, Books, Rosaries,Statues,
Jewelry, Medals, Crucifixes,
Baptism and Christening Gifts
Mon – Fri 9:30 to 5:30 Sat 9:30 – 5
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone Publisher
Rick DelVecchio Editor/General Manager
EDITORIAL
Valerie Schmalz, assistant editor
Tom Burke, On the Street/Calendar
Christina Gray, reporter
[email protected]
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[email protected]
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Joseph Peña, director
Mary Podesta, account representative
Chandra Kirtman, advertising & circulation coordinator
PRODUCTION
Karessa McCartney-Kavanaugh, manager
Joel Carrico, assistant
HOW TO REACH US
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Letters to the editor: [email protected]
ARCHDIOCESE 3
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Expert: New biblically based spirituality
could revitalize parishes in archdiocese
VALERIE SCHMALZ
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
In church circles, and just about everywhere else,
stewardship has become just another tired word to make the pitch:
Please write a check.
But that’s not what it should
be – Catholic stewardship begins
with the truth that we “are created
by God, for God,” said a national
expert on stewardship invited by
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone
Father Andrew
to speak to the priests of the archKemberling
diocese during the clergy study
days Oct. 13-16.
“Stewardship is not about money or all these
other commitments, it’s about evangelization – true
conversion to be a disciple of Christ,” said Father
Andrew Kemberling, pastor of St. Vincent de Paul
Parish in the Archdiocese of Denver. “The greatest
need we have is to thank God for all the blessings
God has given us.”
Catholic stewardship rejects the secular fundraising model of “giving to a need” and begins with
each person’s God-given “need to give,” said Father
Kemberling, who co-authored with Mila Glodava
the book “Making Stewardship a Way of Life: A
Complete Guide for Catholic Parishes” (Our Sunday
Visitor, 2009).
Catholic stewardship is “a practical spirituality
for growth and holiness and Christian living in the
world,” Archbishop Cordileone told the about 50
priests attending the Oct. 15 session.
Embracing Catholic stewardship transforms
parishes into vibrant, growing communities of faith,
hope and love, said Father Kemberling.
“We need a conversion, an ongoing conversion, an
ongoing spirituality to be convinced that every good
thing comes from the Lord. He just lends it to us
so we can be a good administrator of all he gives to
us,” said St. James pastor Father Jose Corral, who
attended the clergy study days.
Stewardship becomes a way of life by trusting in
God, Father Kemberling said.
“You cannot outdo God in generosity. You cannot.
Try it,” Father Kemberling writes in “Making Stewardship a Way of Life.”
“Trusting in God is based upon the belief in our
own powerlessness. We realign our belief in God’s
almighty power and his total but hidden control
to bring about what’s best for us in the midst of a
struggling world. We ‘let go’ and ‘let God,’” Father
Kemberling writes in his book. “Peace of mind is the
end result of trust brought about by acceptance.”
Peace doesn’t mean sitting still. Embodying stew-
PRINCIPLES OF STEWARDSHIP
Stewardship is a way of life and a spirituality.
It promotes tithing and the need to give rather
than giving to a need.
It has biblical foundation and is supported by
the Catholic Church, including the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
Stewardship is a means to an end, and that
end is evangelization.
SOURCE: FATHER ANDREW KEMBERLING AND MILA GLODAVA,
“MAKING STEWARDSHIP A WAY OF LIFE”
ardship is prayer and action, the Denver priest told
the priests.
“When we serve our people we have to be able
to say yes – to be a ‘can do’ church, not a ‘can’t do’
church,” Father Kemberling said.
The parish priest is “engineering Catholic culture” as an antidote to the postmodernist world
that rejects absolute truth, the existence of God
and the fact that each person has a soul. “I’m
building the city of God. I’m building Catholic
culture,” he said.
“People think – ‘you don’t have a need for me,
so I’m not going to give of my time,’” Father
Kemberling said. As servant leader the pastor must be in charge but that does not mean
barking orders but eliciting and guiding parishioners’ ideas and help, he said. However,
egalitarianism and team leadership that does
not acknowledge the priest’s role as leader is
destructive, and against church teaching, Father
Kemberling said.
“As you build those programs, people then start
coming back to the parish,” Father Kemberling said.
SEE EXPERT, PAGE 5
Spreading the news
and the Good News
SENIOR
STORIES:
WELCOMING:
Education
is
woman’s every
right
Seminarian
door-to-door goes
in
search of
lost sheep
PAGE 5
CATHOLIC
SAN FRANCIS
CO
‘INTERIOR
PAGE 20
of the Archdiocese
SAN FRANCISCO,
CHRISTINA
CATHOLIC
All Souls
VALERIE
CATHOLIC
FIRE’:
What Catholics
believe: 10
truths
about purgatory
PAGE 17
Newspaper
SERVING
of San Francisco
MARIN &
Critics, including
church, question
use of isolation
in
California
prisons
SAN MATEO
COUNTIES
NOVEMBER
1, 2013
www.catholic-sf.org
$1.00 |
VOL. 15 NO.
31
M. GRAY
SAN FRANCISCO
Once
Canalesa month after
round gets into her a full workweek,
trip
and Pelicanbetween car to make
Dolores
her home
the 1,500-mile
Bay State
border.
in Orange
That’s
convicted
where Prison near
County
murderer, her 37-year-oldthe Oregon
in the
Security
is
by critics
Housingserving out son John, a
a life
Unit –
For 12 as “solitary
broadly sentence
more or years, John’s confinement.”
described
less limited human
his mother’s
contact
to the
has been
tional
face
glass and through monthly appearance
to the
the prison thick panes
windowless,
hours
of institu-of
cement staff who bring
out
one hour of each day,
cell where
meals
– but that outside his says Canales. he spends
cell each
23
is also
He
windowless
spent
day – for does get
structure. alone in
another exercise
concrete,
SEE ISOLATION,
PAGE 21
School is
SCHMALZ
SAN
Praying all
Carmelite
Francis Sisters Maria Fideles,
gather in
(PHOTO BY
Teresah
birthday.
CHRISTINA
the
Joseph,
M. GRAY/CATHOLIC
Read more garden of the
Mother
Carmel of
about their
SAN FRANCISCO)
the Mother Dolores, prioress
life of prayer,
community of God MonasteryMother Anna Marie,
and joy
on Page in suburban Marin Sister Immaculate
14.
County on
and
Oct. 1 for Sister Teresa
Mother Dolores’
91st
day, every
‘huge turnaroun
FRANCISCO
All Souls
School
emerged
in South
educationas one of
Francisco
the archdiocese’s
enrollmentsuccess
has
stories,
Catholic
ago when turnaround
in a financial
Australianpastor Father that began
and
seven
educator
Agnel
Riener
De Herediayears
Vince
recalled
ning a
hired
that the Riener as
deficit
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ment was
K-8
when
he arrived school was
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runin 2007.
away on more, some
Enrollof those
School Grand Avenue
working
had no
tion for existed. And
idea All a block
the school
teaching
Today,
Souls
All Souls math, he said. had a poor
new preschool,
reputahas 298
scores
students
are up. which opened
plus 33
and instruction
The school
a year
in
formation
is a leader ago. Mathits
of
system, technology,
in
with a the use
Smart
school
Boards
inin every
Vice principal
class(PHOTO BY
Cathy Barri Karen Johanson
VALERIE SCHMALZ/CATHOLIC
are pictured
and
at All Soulslongtime cafeteriaSAN FRANCISCO)
School
last month.manager
d’ story for
QUALITY
Irish Help
HOME
day
Catholic
education
room,
Kindle
Google
Fire tablets
Chromebooks
in the
All Souls
lower
in the
has
eteria.
grades
Parents a computer upper grades.
and
parochial
are involved,lab and
a working
Riener vicar are hands-on and
the
cafhas done
esan schools
at the pastor and
“a great
ton. “There’s Superintendent
job,” saidschool.
10 years
been a
Maureenarchdiochuge turnaround
mance in enrollment,
Huntingof
in the
She said the school.” and the academic
last
the school
parents
perforwho would has a
academically
lot of
not
excellent be there Genentech
“It’s an
“if it wasn’t
education.”
who has amazing
school,”
an
a son
fifth grade.
in first
said
“I highly grade and May Gutierrez,
friends,
family
recommenda daughter
Riener
– I always
in
it to anyone,
said technology
attractions.
recommend
He was
is
All Souls.”
hired one of the
school’s
partly
because
big
of his
SEE ALL SOULS,
PAGE 21
At Home
CARE SERVING
THE BAY
AREA SINCE
1996
INDEX
On the Street
. . . . . . . . .4
National
.........
. . . .7
World . .
.........
. . . 11
Opinion.
.........
. . . 16
Faith. . . .
.........
. . . 18
Calendar.
.........
. .26
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ANCISCO Archdiocese of San Francisco.
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JOHN PAUL I:
RESPECT LIFE:
COUNCILS:
Sainthood advanced
for beloved
“smiling pope”
Author writes
pregnancy guide
for Catholic moms
A look back at the 21
bishops’ councils in
church history
PAGE 11
PAGE 13
PAGE 20
Newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco
www.catholic-sf.org
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO, MARIN & SAN MATEO COUNTIES
OCTOBER 5, 2012
$1.00 | VOL. 14 NO. 30
Bishops urge
voters to end
death penalty’s
‘failed system’
GEORGE RAINE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
The idea that the death penalty
www.catholic-sf.or
g
NO. 29
$1.00 | VOL. 14
Newspaper of the
Archdiocese of San
, MARIN
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO
SEPTEMBER 28,
Francisco
2012
& SAN MATEO COUNTIES
JOHN PAUL I:
Sainthood advanced
for beloved
“smiling pope”
RESPECT LIFE:
Author writes
pregnancy guide
for Catholic moms
PAGE 11
Newspaper of the Archdiocese
SERVING SAN FRANCISCO,
COUNCILS:
A look back at the
21
bishops’ councils in
church history
PAGE 13
PAGE 20
of San Francisco
MARIN & SAN MATEO
COUNTIES
OCTOBER 5, 2012
www.catholic-sf.org
$1.00 | VOL. 14
NO. 30
Bishops urge
voters to end
death penalty’s
‘failed system’
GEORGE RAINE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
The idea that
in California the death penalty
should
favor of sentencing be repealed in
our most heinous
killers to life
in prison without
possibility of
the
parole may
be
traction this
year, presented gaining
as an economic
more
emotional one: argument than as an
rhaging money The state is hemordeath penalty on a badly broken
system.
That is the narrative
the proponents
Several hundred
people walked
India, where 10
from City Hall to
million girls have
Union
been killed through Square San Francisco Sept
15 t
(PHOTO BY JOSÉ
LUIS AGUIRRE/THE
SEE DEATH PENALTY,
(PHOTO BY DENNIS
PAGE 15
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CATHOLIC VOICE)
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PÁGINA 2
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$1.00 | VOL.
GET HOME BEFORE DARK!
4 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass
in San Francisco!
ST. EMYDIUS
CATHOLIC CHURCH
286 Ashton Avenue, San Francisco
(one block from Ocean Ave.)
Serving the Ingleside community of San Francisco,
since 1913, St. Emydius is a multi-cultural,
multi-racial, all inclusive faith-sharing community.
Daily Mass At 8:00 am
4:00 pm Saturday Vigil Mass
8:30 am Sunday Mass
10:30 am Sunday Mass
To reach us from 19th Ave., take Holloway Ave.,
(near S.F. State, heading East), to Ashton Ave.,
left on Ashton to De Montfort Ave.
To reach us from 280 S. (at City College) exit Ocean Ave. going
West, turn left on Ashton to De Montfort Ave., (1/2 block up).
YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME TO JOIN US!
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E 15, 2013
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Your contribution to Catholic San Francisco
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in a special way. We hope you will send a generous donation in the envelope
included in this newspaper or please mail it to Catholic San Francisco, One
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www.catholic-sf.org
4 ON THE STREET WHERE YOU LIVE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Marianist identity
continues as
Riordan hallmark
TOM BURKE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
There is no more important an element of the
foundation of Archbishop Riordan High School than its formation around the tradition of the
Marianist fathers and brothers
under whose leadership the
school was established in 1949.
The congregation’s superior
general, Father Manuel Cortes,
SM, and assistant for education,
Father Manuel
Brother Maximin Magnan, SM,
Cortes, SM
visited the San Francisco school
Sept. 25.
Marianist Brother William
Bolts a 1953 Riordan alumnus,
and Marianist Brother David
Betz, both members of Riordan’s
board of trustees, escorted the
guests around.
“It had rained overnight, but
San Francisco and Riordan gave
them the most sunny welcome,”
Bro. Maximin
Brother Bolts said.
Magnan, SM
Father Cortes and Brother
Magnan had done a bit of homework before the
trip having read the school’s history “Young Men
Dream Dreams” as well as its latest yearbook.
“The visit may have lasted for one day but the
superiors got an excellent impression of how
Archbishop Riordan is fulfilling its Catholic and
Marianist mission,” Brother Bolts said.
The day was packed with activity from the
moment school leadership and students met the
guests at the school entrance. Next stop was the
President’s library for an overview of Archbishop Riordan as a Catholic and Marianist school.
Riordan’s administrators described the student body, the curricular offerings, campus
ministry, and extracurricular activities. A focus
throughout the day as everyday at Riordan was
how the school breathes the principal characteristics of Marianist education including formation in faith; quality education; family spirit;
service, justice and peace, and adaptation and
change.
The visitors toured the school’s Chapel of the
Assumption, archives; campus ministry office,
Lindland Theatre, and gym. They visited classrooms and interacted with students and faculty
and that was only the morning schedule.
“Father Cortes and Brother Magnan learned
about our curricular offerings, the incredible
dynamic between faculty and staff, and experienced Riordan hospitality,” Joseph Conti, Rior-
GIVERS ALL: Our Lady of Angels School was honored Sept. 23 by the St. Vincent de Paul Society for its “continued support, contributions and donations for the organization and the people they help,” the school said. OLA students instituted a Wee Care program in 1993
as a branch of SVdP. Pictured from left are fifth grade teacher Donna McMorrow; eighth grader Bailey Doyle; Vincentian Len Privitera;
principal, Amy Costa; eighth grader Caroline Smith; and Capuchin Father Michael Mahoney, pastor.
dan president, said. “This was a great day in the
history of our school.”
The afternoon included a meeting with more
than 50 students from Riordan’s Marianist Life
Community, a faith-building club found at Marianist schools around the world. The theme of
the meeting was water conservation, and Father
Cortes and Brother Magnan jumped right into
the conversation.
The afternoon continued through conversations
with faculty who had participated in national
Marianist Teaching as Ministry workshops
throughout the year.
Father Cortes and Brother Magnan have visited
Marianist schools and communities on five continents. “They were impressed by the friendliness
of the students, rapport between students and
faculty, dedication of students, faculty, staff, and
parents, and the Catholic and Marianist symbols
and spirit on campus,” Brother Bolts said.
CLASSMATES: Class of 1947 alumnae from
Presentation High School, San Francisco will
gather Oct. 28 at the Olympic Club Lakeside. The
women have steered away from the usual five
and 10 year markers for reunions and are more
guided by class president Mary June King Swalen
in picking times to regroup. “Whenever Mary
June bangs her gavel we meet,” classmate Alice
Marshall Ravano told me with a laugh. Mary
June told the girls she did not know class prez
was a lifetime job but still enjoys every moment
of the work. About 20 members of the class have
already signed up for the outing. Alice and her
husband Louis are parishioners of St. Philip
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Victim Assistance Coordinator.
This is a secured line and is answered only
by Renee Duffey.
CATCHING UP: Mercy Sister Mary Edith
Hurley let me know that she was mighty proud
to teach at San Francisco’s St. Gabe’s and Holy
Name, both mentioned in her Street item of a few
weeks ago, and also at the school’s that didn’t
make the list: San Francisco’s St. Peter’s, and
St. Stephen’s; St. Bartholomew’s, San Mateo and
St. Catherine’s and Our Lady of Angels, Burlingame.
Misnamed in an item here about the well
known pasta lunch at Immaculate Conception
Church was Tom Miller.
Catholic San Francisco (ISSN 15255298) is published (three times per
month) September through May, except in the following months:
June, July, August (twice a month) and four times in October by
the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco, 1500 Mission Rd.,
P.O. Box 1577, Colma, CA 94014. Periodical postage paid at
South San Francisco, CA. Postmaster: Send address changes to
Catholic San Francisco, 1500 Mission Rd., P.O. Box 1577, Colma, CA 94014
vehiclesforcharity.com
415-614-5506
REQUIEM: Monica Williams, director, and all
at the Department of Cemeteries help each day
people struggling with the loss of a loved one. As
we come up on this season of holy days remembering the deceased as well as special days when
they will be most missed, cemetery staff have put
together opportunities for prayer that might ease
the pain and bring joy to the heart. Visit www.
holycrosscemeteries.com.
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
TAX DEDUCTION
FOR YOUR
CAR, TRUCK
or SUV
1.800.574.0888
Parish, San Francisco. They celebrated 60 years
married in 2013. Classmates can still reserve a
spot. Call Alice, (415) 826-7771, or Mary June,
(408) 354-1544.
• Parishioner St. Cecilia’s
•
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ARCHDIOCESE 5
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Cathedral honorees
John and Maryanne Murray, second and third from left, are the
recipients of the 2014 Assumpta Award from St. Mary’s Cathedral, given by the Board of Regents of the cathedral to a person
or persons who have shown great leadership and service to the
archdiocese. Mercy Sister Esther McEgan, far left, received the
cathedral’s 2014 St. Patrick Patron Award, honoring a person
in recognition of evangelization performed in the true spirit
of St. Patrick who fearlessly and tirelessly spread the word of
God. Maureen Kelly, second from right, received the cathedral’s
St. Francis Award and Mary Schembri, far right, the St. Joseph
Award. Also pictured at the awards ceremony Oct. 15 is Msgr.
John Talesfore.
(PHOTO COURTESY DENNIS CALLAHAN/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
EXPERT: Biblically based spirituality
could revitalize parishes in archdiocese
FROM PAGE 3
“My goal for them is to come back to the property
at least one other time, other than Sunday Mass: for
adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, a Bible study, a
social event – I want the parish to become the center
of people’s social and spiritual life.”
Stewarding young people’s vocations, particularly to the priesthood and religious life, is important,
Father Kemberling said. That includes nurturing
respect and honor for individual priests, encouraging children to pray for their parish priests for
instance, he said.
In addition to attending the clergy study days,
Father Corral was one of five priests and one deacon who accepted the archbishop’s invitation and
attended the International Catholic Stewardship
Council in Orlando in early October. At the conclusion of the study days, 16 priests accepted the archbishop’s invitation to attend next year’s national
conference on stewardship in Chicago.
Father Corral noted the Bible says to tithe 10
percent before allocating any other income. “We
are going to be a joyful people, more joyful parishes
and the Lord is going to multiply what we give. He
is also going to be very generous to us, to our families and to our parishes,” Father Corral said.
“It’s a foundational paradigm switch,” said
Father Kemberling, drawing the analogy to Mary’s
yes to becoming the mother of Jesus. “We are God’s
hands and feet; we are really participating and
cooperating with him.”
ST. ANNE PARISH
HARVEST FESTIVAL
This free, 3-day event features carnival games,
entertainment, raffle and silent auction,
pumpkin patch, food booths, and food trucks.
Free parking available in the school yard.
Come for family fun on Friday, 10/24, 3-9pm;
Saturday, 10/25, 9am-9pm;
and Sunday, 10/26, 10am-3pm.
Located at 850 Judah St. (enter on Funston Ave.)
For more information, please call
415.665.1600, ext. 22
Festival information is also online at the
St. Anne web site: www.stanne-sf.org,
or Facebook page:
www.facebook.com/events/887681427910557/
6 ARCHDIOCESE
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Girl’s Volleyball First Things editor: Catholicism is ‘the great
proponent of reason in postmodern West’
Club Tryouts Nov. 1st
VALERIE SCHMALZ
(Girls ages 10-17)
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Pre-Tryout October Clinics
(Sundays – October 12, 19 and 26)
5:30-7:00 PM 11; 12; and 13 year olds
7:15-8:45 PM 14; 15 and 16 year olds
Paye’s Place, 595 Industrial Rd.
San Carlos, Ca 94070
Call:
888.616.6349
Email:
[email protected]
elitevolleyballclub.net
www.elitevolleyballclub.net
Reading the monthly magazine First Things “is
like doing a graduate degree” as one admirer put it.
Published 10 times a year by the Institute on
Religion and Public Life, First Things is an ‘interreligious journal’ that was founded in 1990 by the
late Father Richard John Neuhaus “to confront
the ideology of secularism, which insists that the
public square must be ‘naked,’ and that faith has no
place in shaping the public conversation or in shaping public policy.”
Neuhaus, who died in 2009 at the age of 72, was a
Lutheran pastor who converted to Catholicism and
was ordained a priest shortly after the journal’s
founding.
First Things continues to be a journal of faith
and reason that defends life and marriage, as well
as commenting on current political, cultural and
intellectual topics, said editor R.R. “Rusty” Reno
during a visit to San Francisco in early October.
“We’re especially committed to building a culture
of life and renewing a culture of marriage,” Reno
said. “But we’re also engaged in literary and intellectual topics.”
“The biggest challenge is that we live in an intellectual culture that thinks religious faith hinders
our intellectual development,” Reno said. In fact,
he said, “Actually, faith, Catholic faith, Catholicism
in general has turned out to be the great proponent
of reason in the postmodern West – a great irony.”
(PHOTO BY VALERIE SCHMALZ/CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO)
First Things editor R.R. “Rusty” Reno is pictured during a
recent visit to the archdiocesan Pastoral Center.
“We have to renew trust in the power of reason
to discern truth about the human condition,” said
Reno, a former Creighton University professor of
theology and ethics and an Episcopalian who entered the Roman Catholic Church in 2004.
“And, we have to defend the weak in a society
that has made a god of economic success,” Reno
told Catholic San Francisco. “Then we have to
defend marriage in a society that sees sex and relationship too much in terms of choice and personal
fulfillment.”
St. Anthony’s Relics Visit
Northern California
From October 26 to November 2
A Messenger of Hope from padua, italy
San Francisco - San Pablo
Santa Clara - San Bruno
St. Anthony will be visiting us in the form of two precious relics
from his Basilica in Padua, Italy. The relics will be accompanied by
Fr. Mario Conte OFM Conv. from the Messenger of St. Anthony.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26
St. Thomas More Church
1300 Junipero Serra Blvd. in San Francisco
8 AM, 10 AM, 11:45 AM,
8 PM masses with veneration
MONDAY, OCTOBER 27
St. Paul’s Church
1845 Church Lane in San Pablo
7:30 AM mass, veneration all day, 7 PM mass
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28
Cathedral of St. Mary of the
Assumption
1111 Gough St. in San Francisco
12:10 PM and 6 PM masses with veneration
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
St. Dominic’s Church
2390 Bush St. in San Francisco
5:30 PM and 7:30 PM masses with veneration
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
St. Anne of the Sunset
850 Judah St. in San Francisco
12 PM and 6 PM masses with veneration
The Veneration Events are sponsored by the
Please visit our website at www.saintanthonyofpadua.net
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31
National Shrine of St. Francis of Assisi
610 Vallejo St. in San Francisco
12:15 PM mass with veneration until 7 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1
St. Paul of the Shipwreck
1122 Jamestown Ave. in San Francisco
12:30 PM mass with veneration
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Our Lady of Peace
2800 Mission College Blvd. in Santa Clara
5:00 PM and 7:30
PM Vigil Masses with veneration
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Saint Bruno Church
555 West San Bruno Ave. in San Bruno
8 AM, 10 AM, 12 Noon and
6 PM masses with veneration
FOR MORE INFORMATION
PLEASE CONTACT
Anthonian Association of the Friends
of St. Anthony - TEL: 347 738 4306
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path to student success.
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community, our students explore
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in our ever-changing world.
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L E A D YO U ?
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9–11 am
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to receive a regular, free subscription. Email [email protected] or call (415) 614-5639.
NATIONAL 7
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Dallas bishop: Decision to house those
monitored for Ebola ‘right thing to do’
Bishop Farrell said that he and several
other people, including Troh’s pastor at
Wilshire Baptist Church, had spoken
with the family earlier in the day.
He confirmed that local officials called
him after exhausting alternatives for a
suitable place willing to take the family.
He said he debated for about 15 minutes before saying that he followed the
example of Christ and said “yes.”
“I knew that they had tried to find
other places and they just couldn’t find
DAVID SEDENO
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
DALLAS – Dallas Bishop Kevin J. Farrell said that he followed the teaching
of Christ and stepped in to house the
fiancee of Ebola victim Thomas Eric
Duncan and three others for several
weeks at a diocesan facility because no
one else would.
The bishop’s acknowledgement Oct.
20 coincided with the lifting of the 21day quarantine for nearly four dozen
people being screened for the Ebola virus with none showing any signs of the
disease. It also capped nearly a month of
a scrambling by local, state and federal
officials in trying to both combat the
virus and calm the public’s fears about
its spread.
During the time, two nurses who had
contact with Duncan tested positive for
the virus after his death. And with the
growing health concerns, officials also
faced a national public relations headache as they acknowledged missteps in
the handling of the crisis, including not
initially banning those self-monitoring
themselves for symptoms from traveling
or coming into contact with the public.
In between, there were various
condemnations from nurses about the
hospital staff not being properly trained
to handle such a crisis, calls for travel
bans to the United States from people
from the four West African countries
hardest hit by the virus, and prayer
meetings and candlelight vigils observed at various churches in the Dallas
area for Duncan and those impacted by
the virus.
Still on Oct. 20, Dallas County Judge
Clay Jenkins and Dallas Mayor Mike
Rawlings, among other officials, spoke
at an early morning news conference at
the Dallas County office building, saying that 43 people being monitored for
the virus had not shown any symptoms
of the disease and were free to return
to their normal lives without fear that
they carried or would develop the
disease.
one. I was then moved by their dedication and concern. I too was concerned,”
the bishop said. “I felt it was the right
thing to do and am so pleased that we
did.
“It is an example of what it means
to care for our brothers and sisters,
irrespective of where they come from,
what race or what religion they are,” he
said. “We help people because they are
people. We help people because we are
Catholic, not because they are Catholic.”
(CNS PHOTO/COURTESY THE TEXAS CATHOLIC)
Dallas Bishop Kevin J. Farrell answers questions from media Oct. 20 about what will
happen to the diocese’s building in South
Dallas where Ebola victim Thomas Duncan’s
financee and her family were quarantined.
They also spoke about area residents
being compassionate and welcoming
of those who had been self-monitoring
themselves or, as in the specific case of
those who came into direct contact with
Duncan, that they be accepted back into
the society.
Duncan had traveled to the United
States from Liberia in September to
visit his fiancee and went to Texas
Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas
after feeling sick. He was sent home, but
was returned in an ambulance several
days later and tested positive for the
Ebola virus. He had been staying with
his fiancee, Louise Troh, her son and
two nephews in an apartment in an area
of the city where many refugees from
Africa make their home.
As Duncan was isolated at the hospital, officials planned to decontaminate
their apartment, but the family could
not be moved to a suitable location.
That’s when the county judge and the
mayor asked Bishop Farrell about finding a place for them. He and his staff
worked with local officials to transfer
the family from their apartment to a
building at the far end of the Catholic
Conference and Formation Center in
South Dallas.
At a mid-morning news conference outside the gated retreat center,
KINDERGARTEN – 8th GRADE
OPEN HOUSE
Parents interested in Kindergarten – 8th grade for the current
OR 2015-2016 school year, join us for an Open House. Meet the
Principal and parents and see our teachers in action with a school
tour. Open Houses will begin at 8:30am. Come and join us for
Morning Prayer and Assembly at 8:00am for a feel of our
community. October 15, October 28, and November 13.
Please call (415) 648-2008 for a reservation.
299 Precita Ave. San Francisco, CA 94110
(close to Hwy 101 and 280) www.saicsf.org
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November 9, 2014 1:00–3:00 PM
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Sunday, October 26, 2:00-4:30pm
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8 NATIONAL
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
COURT BLOCKS LAW THAT HAD CLOSED
MOST TEXAS ABORTION CLINICS
WASHINGTON – The Supreme
Court Oct. 14 blocked a Texas law
that had meant all but seven of the
state’s abortion clinics were closed
because they failed to meet new
standards.
The block will remain in effect
while the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals considers a legal challenge
to the law itself. It will allow at
least 12 clinics that were closed to
reopen.
In a brief order posted after normal business hours, the Supreme
Court granted requests by some
of the affected abortion clinics to
block parts of the law. It blocked
statewide the requirement that
abortion clinics meet standards
of an ambulatory surgical center,
which a majority of the Texas abortion providers could not meet. For
clinics in McAllen and El Paso only,
the order also blocked a provision
requiring abortion clinic doctors to
have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles of the clinic.
Emily Horne, legislative associate
at Texas Right to Life, told Catholic
News Service that the Supreme
Court stay is a “discouraging
decision, but of course it’s not the
final one.” The 5th Circuit has not
yet scheduled arguments on the
lawsuit challenging the provisions,
and Horne said the court typically
gives several weeks’ notice before
argument dates.
Judges rule to allow same-sex couples
to marry in Arizona, Wyoming
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
PHOENIX – A U.S. District Court
judge’s ruling that Arizona’s ban on
same-sex marriage is unconstitutional
“overturns the will of Arizona voters
and reflects a misunderstanding of the
institution of marriage,” the state’s
Catholic bishops said Oct. 17.
“For centuries, marriage has been
recognized as the lifelong union of a
man and a woman that benefits the
common good by respecting the unique
and complementary gifts of both a
mother and a father in the lives of children,” they said.
“As Catholic bishops, we remain committed to affirming the truth about marriage and its goodness for all of society.”
The Catholic bishop of Cheyenne, Wyoming, echoed his Arizona counterparts
in a statement released late Oct. 17 after
a federal judge that afternoon ordered
that state to allow same-sex marriage.
U.S. District Court Judge Scott W. Skavdahl stayed his decision until Oct. 23 to
allow the state to appeal.
“A true understanding of the nature
of marriage prohibits any institution,
secular or religious, from redefining
marriage,” said Bishop Paul D. Etienne.
“As church, we will continue to promote the understanding that marriage
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With regard to the Arizona ban,
Judge John W. Sedwick Oct. 16 struck
down an amendment to the state constitution approved by voters in 2008 that
defined marriage as a union between
one man and one woman, saying it
was unconstitutional because it denied
same-sex couples equal protection
under the law.
The judge also refused to stay his
decision, adding that he felt any appeal
to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
“would not succeed.”
On Oct. 9, Sedwick said he thought
an Oct. 7 ruling by a three-judge panel
of the 9th Circuit that struck down
same-sex marriage bans in Idaho and
Nevada applied to Arizona, which is
in the geographic area covered by the
circuit court.
He had given the parties that fought
Arizona’s ban and the Alliance Defending Freedom, a group defending the law,
until Oct. 16 to respond.
Arizona Attorney General Tom
Horne Oct. 17 said the state will not appeal Sedwick’s ruling.
In a letter to the clerk of the court
for Maricopa County Superior Court,
Horne said the state’s courts “can no
longer treat marriage exclusively as
‘a union of one man and one woman’
under state law” and he directed clerks
to immediately begin issuing marriage
licenses to same-sex couples.
In their statement, Arizona’s Catholic bishops reiterated their “pastoral
concern for all people, including our
brothers and sisters with same-sex
attraction, and denounce any unjust
discrimination toward anyone.”
“It is our fervent hope that the Supreme Court will eventually reconsider
the issue of marriage in the future. In
the meantime, we pray that the church
may continue to serve as a loving and
joyful witness of the truth about the
family and human sexuality,” they said.
Signing the statement were Bishop
Thomas J. Olmsted and Auxiliary
Bishop Eduardo A. Nevares of Phoenix;
Bishop Gerald F. Kicanas of Tucson;
Byzantine Bishop Gerald Dino of the
Holy Protection of Mary Eparchy of
Phoenix; and Bishop James S. Wall of
Gallup, New Mexico.
In his statement, Bishop Etienne
retired Catholic teaching that upholds
“the dignity and sanctity of every human person. This belief is rooted in our
understanding that every human person is created in the image and likeness
of God. Every person is deserving of
this respect, even those with same-sex
attraction.”
“The Catholic Church also teaches
that marriage is by nature a union of
a man and a woman. It is perhaps the
single oldest institution of society, and
as such, the primary and natural starting point of family life,” he said.
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Blessed John Paul II called for the Church to “breathe with
both lungs,” incorporating the rich traditions of both the
Christian East and West. But how?
Join Rev. Father Kevin Kennedy, Pastor of Our Lady of Fatima
Russian Byzantine Catholic Church, for a catechetical lecture
on the First Saturday of each month at 1 p.m. to learn more.
Our next First Saturday Lecture will be on Saturday, Nov. 1st,
at 1:00 p.m., at 5920 Geary Blvd. (at 23rd Ave., the former St.
Monica's convent), in San Francisco, CA 94121
10:00 a.m. Divine Liturgy
12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. Fellowship luncheon
1:00 p.m. Lecture
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CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Christians must treat others with gentleness, love, says priest
MARIE MISCHEL
Dominican Father Timothy Radcliffe pointed out that so much of the ministry of
Jesus was about touch: ‘He touches lepers.
He touches the sick. He touches people
you weren’t supposed to touch.’
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
SALT LAKE CITY – Scripture, sexual ethics, and
a healthy dose of wit and personal stories helped
Dominican Father Timothy Radcliffe convey that
people are a combination of body, soul and spirit
during an Oct. 10 presentation in Salt Lake City.
London-based Father Radcliffe, a well-known
author and lecturer who led the international Dominican order from 1992 to 2001 and wrote the 2005
book “What Is the Point of Being A Christian?”
stressed that Christians are the hands, feet, ears,
face and touch of Christ.
He noted that in the Acts of the Apostles, the account of the lame man’s healing is “an incredibly
physical story. It’s about listening, it’s about singing, it’s about touching, it’s about dancing,” he said.
“Christianity is a profoundly bodily religion,”
although modern society is very ambiguous about
bodies, presenting both the “cult of the body
beautiful” but also embracing Descartes’ idea of ‘I
think, therefore I am,’ “as if we were really minds,
and so our bodies are unimportant,” he added.
By contrast, St. Thomas Aquinas defined man as
one substance, body and soul.
“I think we discover most beautifully what it is
to be a body at the Last Supper, when Jesus takes
the bread and he breaks it and he says, ‘This is my
body, given for you,’” Father Radcliffe said.
Married couples give their bodies to each other
“with the generosity, the fidelity and the vulnerability of Jesus,” he said, adding that similarly,
parents caring for children, adult children caring
for aging parents, doctors and nurses caring for the
ill – all give away their physical strength and make
a gift of themselves.
Bodily senses are important, he added, pointing
out many biblical stories that begin with listening:
God calls Abraham out of his homeland, he calls
(CNS PHOTO/MARIE MISCHEL, INTERMOUNTAIN CATHOLIC)
Dominican Father Timothy Radcliffe signs a copy of one of his
books for Adrian Comollo following an Oct. 10 presentation in
Salt Lake City.
Moses from the burning bush and Samuel in the
temple.
Sight also figures prominently in biblical imagery. Jesus sees Nathaniel under the fig tree; he
recognizes that Levi is a good man despite being a
tax collector and he notices the widow putting her
mite into the treasury.
“Nobody else would have seen her,” Father Radcliffe said. “The beginning of all Christian ministry, a proclamation of the Gospel by every one of
us, is learning how to look at people with tenderness, with gentleness, with love. Unless you do that,
all our preaching the Gospel is an entire waste of
time.”
The priest also pointed out that so much of the
ministry of Jesus was about touch. “He touches
lepers. He touches the sick. He touches people you
weren’t supposed to touch.”
He also recounted his own recent experiences
where he said he saw the face of God in strangers.
Early this year, he was in Algeria with Bishop
Jean-Paul Vesco of Oran, Algeria, when fighting
broke out on the road and they were forced to stop.
As angry people began to surround the car, the
priest saw a young man getting ready to throw a
large rock at the windshield.
“His face was contorted with hatred, and I
thought, ‘If I can engage his eyes, he might remember that I am a human being too.’ ... But beneath all
the hatred you could see fear.”
Bishop Vesco saw a break in the hostile crowd
and was able to speed off. “Always have a bishop as
your driver,” the priest said.
The two drove off and later that day at an oasis
they asked some other men about road conditions.
The men said their car wouldn’t handle the road,
but they went on anyway. When the road became
too rough, they stopped and found that the men
from the oasis had followed them and offered them
lodging for the night, a kindness that Father Radcliffe recalls gratefully.
“It was as if, in these three young Muslims, I saw
the face of God. I’ll never forget their faces,” he said.
GRIEVING & HEALING
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC CEMETERY
A Place to Grieve – A Place to Heal
Cemeteries are sacred places of solace and peace
Please join us for our upcoming events
ALL SAINTS DAY MASS  TODOS LOS SANTOS
Saturday, November 1, 2014
Holy Cross Mausoleum Chapel – 11:00 am
Most Rev. Salvatore Cordileone, Main Celebrant Archbishop of San Francisco
Refreshments and fellowship following Mass
VETERANS’ DAY SERVICE
Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Star of the Sea Section – 11:00 am Outdoor Service
Chaplain C. Michael Padazinski Col., USAF, Chancellor, Archdiocese of San Francisco
CHRISTMAS REMEMBRANCE SERVICE
Saturday, December 13, 2014
All Saints Mausoleum Chapel – 11:00 am
Officiant, Msgr. John Talesfore
We come together to remember, to pray and to comfort one another.
a $125 contribution to the “Avenue of Flags” program to purchase a flag.
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
Santa Cruz Ave. @Avy Ave., Menlo Park, CA
650-323-6375
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
1500 Mission Road, Colma, CA
650-756-2060
Mt. Olivet Catholic Cemetery
270 Los Ranchitos Road, San Rafael, CA
415-479-9020
Tomales Catholic Cemetery
1400 Dillon Beach Road, Tomales, CA
415-479-9021
St. Anthony Cemetery
Stage Road, Pescadero, CA
650-712-1679
Our Lady of the Pillar Cemetery
Miramontes St., Half Moon Bay, CA
650-712-1679
10 GRIEVING & HEALING
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Career as undertaker calls
parish priest to late-life vocation
CHRISTINA GRAY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Father Andrew Spyrow heard the call to
priesthood after walking into
the morgue of a funeral home he
was running at the time.
The new parochial vicar at St.
Raphael Parish had heard its
whisper some 40 years earlier
but postponed that early call
for what he described to Catholic San Francisco on Oct. 8 as
Father Andrew
a long and satisfying career as
Spyrow
an undertaker. Then one day in
2005 after decades in the funeral
business, he walked into a room lined with bodies awaiting cremation or burial.
“I said to myself: ‘I’m going to be on this shelf
one day,’” Father Spyrow recalled during an
interview at the palm-shaded parish office adjacent to the historic mission church in downtown San Rafael, where he arrived three months
ago to serve as one of four parish priests. “Am I
doing what God wants me to do?”
He was ordained on June 7 by Archbishop
Salvatore J. Cordileone at the age of 54.
Spyrow was exposed to the funeral business
as an adolescent growing up in Concord, the
fourth of five sons born to a Greek Orthodox
father and a Mormon mother of Celtic descent.
He was educated in local Catholic schools and
earned a degree in business administration and
religious education from St. Mary’s College in
Moraga before entering the funeral home business.
By his late-40s he had been attending to the
needs of the dead and their grief-stricken families for 25 years for some of the Bay Area’s leading funeral homes. He loved being able to use
what he called his “gift of compassion” to help
a family or a person – Catholic, non-Catholic
or with no faith tradition at all – navigate all
the details of a loved one’s death. He also came
close to opening his own funeral business.
But while doing paperwork in his office one
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afternoon he again felt a tug from above. “I realized then that I had already mastered my craft,”
he said. It was time to see if the vocation was
real.
“Do I take my gifts helping families in one
of the most difficult situations they will ever
be in and continue on just this way?” he asked
himself. “Or can I take those same gifts and
bring them to the church where I can provide
the same type of pastoral service to people of
all ages?”
He began to answer those questions by leaving
his job and entering St. Patrick’s Seminary &
University in Menlo Park in 2007. He admits it
was a big transition for a former businessman
nearing 50.
“It was a brand-new learning curve,” said
Spyrow who while still working as a funeral
director from 2003-2007, served as the director
of religious education at St. Thomas the Apostle
Parish in San Francisco. He also served high
schools as director of campus ministry and
director of student activities.
By his fifth year, age and experience dovetailed when Sulpician Father Gene Konkel, a
beloved spiritual director at the seminary, died
in 2012. Spyrow, the newly elected student body
president, was approached by school officials
SEE FATHER SPYROW, PAGE 13
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Advice: Making Final Plans Now
Can Be A Freeing Experience
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE
–
Have you ever
thought to yourself
“I want to save
money” or “I wish
this didn’t cost as
much”?
Do you
find the expense of
gasoline inhibiting to the distances that you
drive? Or, do you feel satisfaction when
you find the item you’re shopping for has
been marked down and heavily discounted?
Do you appreciate good quality at a lower
cost? Most everyone understands value, and
the benefits it can have for your pocketbook.
When ever you have the chance to take
advantage of a good bargain you should
think carefully before passing it up.
From the time we all were very young
and saved our first coins in a piggy bank we
gained a sense that our money had worth
and was important to save. Counting our
money helped us to learn the total amount
we accumulated. Using some of that money
for a purchase would decrease what we had
saved, but gave us a feeling of satisfaction in
owning that desired item. As we grew up
we opened a bank account and with accruing
interest watched our money slowly grow.
Many times we held off on a purchase
because it was perceived as either too
expensive, or as something that we wanted
but didn’t need at the moment. At times we
became aware of purchases that could
benefit our welfare, but procrastination
prevented us from realizing their worth.
Items such as Health Insurance, Home
Owners Insurance or Life Insurance fall into
the above category, which also can include
the pre-planning of Funeral Arrangements
for ourselves or our loved ones.
People who are fiscally and economically
minded know that planning for a probable
anticipated circumstance is part of good
preparation and organization. Paying in
advance for an item or service that will
surely be needed in the future can be a
thrifty way to save money in the long term.
At some time in our lives we all come to
a realization that “final” plans for our future
are very necessary. Those of us who are
lucky have plenty of time to prepare, and
others make the time. These kinds of plans
can be made much easier by organizing
them well in advance. Talking to your
Funeral Director will help, and making “PreNeed” arrangements can be a very “freeing”
experience.
All your wishes will be
recorded at the Funeral Home and kept on
file. Your Funeral Director will guide you
with what items are needed. The cost for
these future services can be put aside in a
special Trust Account or Insurance Policy.
In turn this will lock-in most costs at today’s
prices and will help save funds for your
family when the time comes. Your Funeral
Director will also guide you with how to put
aside Pre-Need funding, and will prepare the
appropriate paperwork. This funding can be
set aside in small amounts or in full at the
time of the Pre-Need Arrangement. After
the total balance has been deposited this will
insure that most of the Funeral Costs will
remain the same as originally agreed upon.
Taxes and Cash Advance items are
customarily updated at the time of death.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make preplanning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
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GRIEVING & HEALING 11
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Visiting the cemetery during the month of November
into visible signs of our faith in the
resurrection.
Throughout our Catholic cemeteries, you will also find particular
burial sections and mausoleum
corridors named for different saints.
The saints are represented by beautiful statues, paintings and stained
glass windows. Why do we name
sections in cemeteries after saints?
In dedicating a particular section
or hallway to a saint, we commend
those interred there to the intercession of that saint. We choose saints
that represent the different communities, parishes and traditions
throughout our archdiocese. In
doing so, we are reminded of that
community of faith to which we all
belong. We, the living, entrust our
beloved dead to the intercession
of the saints. This year, on Nov. 1,
we will honor the saints in a special way. Archbishop Salvatore J.
Cordileone will celebrate Mass at
Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma on
MONICA WILLIAMS
November, as the month in which
we remember the holy souls, has
traditionally been a time for visiting
cemeteries and praying for the dead.
Cemeteries have existed in some
form since the earliest days of human history. They define our notion
of civilization. When archaeologists
determine that a society has existed
in a particular location, they do so in
large part because they have found
burial places.
Over the last 2,000 years, Christian
or Catholic cemeteries have defined
the landscape and culture of communities throughout the world. We
take many of our traditions from the
early days of the Christian cemeteries and the catacombs, which were
marked with a sign or symbol of the
faith of the young religion. Even
today, we require that all the tombs
(graves, crypts or niches) in our
Catholic cemeteries are marked with
a religious symbol. This practice
transforms Catholic cemeteries
SEE CEMETERY, PAGE 12
Communion of Saints: All Saints Mausoleum Chapel at Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma.
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Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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Wednesday, December 3, 2014
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Saturday, December 13, 2014
Christmas Remembrance Service
All Saints Mausoleum Chapel - 11:00 am
Officiant, Msgr. John Talesfore
Please contact [email protected] for more information
provider
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12 GRIEVING & HEALING
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
CEMETERY: Remembering the holy souls and honoring the saints
cemeteries provide a visual reminder
of these beliefs – they are places of
community, connection and hope.
The traditional parish cemeteries, or
churchyards, were vivid examples of
that: The worship spaces of the living
surrounded by the resting places of
the members of their community
who had gone before.
We think of Holy Cross Cemetery
in Colma as the parish cemetery
serving the entire archdiocese. Every
first Saturday of the month, hundreds of people gather at All Saints
Chapel to offer Mass for all those
interred in our Catholic cemeteries.
There, surrounded by the graves and
crypts of the faithful, the commu-
FROM PAGE 11
the great feast day of All Saints.
Everyone is invited and encouraged
to attend.
The following day, All Souls’ Day,
has special meaning as a time to visit
the cemetery and to remember our
friends and family members who
have gone before us. In the Apostles
Creed, we profess our faith and include our belief in the communion of
saints. As Catholics, we believe that
the community of believers transcends space and time, life and death.
All of us (the living, the holy souls
and all the saints) are united together
in the body of Christ. Our Catholic
nion of saints is witnessed. On the
wall of the chapel is a beautiful work
of art that depicts various saints
standing at the gates of heaven to
welcome us. The gates come together
to form a cross, reminding us that
our reward in heaven was secured
for us by the sacrifice of the son.
Above the gate, the Holy Spirit is
represented, waiting to present us
to the father. It is a profound reflection for us: rejoicing in the triumph
of the saints, praying God’s mercy
and peace on our beloved dead and
meditating on our own journey.
Thus our Catholic cemeteries are
places of history and places of faith.
They are, of course, primarily places
WILLIAMS is director of Catholic cemeteries
for the Archdiocese of San Francisco.
FUNERAL SERVICES
7747 El Camino Real
Colma, CA 94014 | FD 1522
&
of ministry. As cemetery workers,
we are charged with the corporal
work of mercy to bury the dead; and
the spiritual work of mercy to pray
for the dead and those who mourn
them. This gives our work purpose
and meaning.
What distinguishes the Catholic
cemeteries from any other cemetery?
It is this central belief in the communion of saints. It is the ministry
of prayer and consolation that we
offer. For where we gather in prayer
for our loved ones, surely they are
with us.
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invite the families we have served in the past year to our
“Here’s wishing happiness and wellbeing to
all the families of the Archdiocese. If you
ever need our guidance please call at any
time. Sincerely, Paul Larson ~ President.”
12th Annual Service of Remembrance
Remembering those we have served from October 2013 - September 2014
The Peninsula’s Local Catholic Directors…
“Celebrations of Life”
Chapel of the Highlands
A Prayer Service in memory of your loved one with music,
scripture readings, reflections and a candle lighting ceremony
Sunday, November 9
3:00pm - 4:00pm
St. Stephen Catholic Church
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Catered appetizers & desserts immediately following the Service
4:00pm - 6:00pm St. Stephen’s Donworth Hall
McAVOY O’HARA Co.
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We invite each family to bring a favorite photo of your loved one to be placed
on the Altar of Remembrance before the service.
Doors open at 2:30pm ~ Service will begin promptly at 3:00pm
In keeping with the Holiday spirit, we ask each family to bring an
unwrapped toy for the Daly City Fire Department Operation Santa Claus
or unexpired canned food for the
North Peninsula Food Pantry and Dining Center of Daly City.
E vergreen Mortuar y
4545 GEARY B OULE VARD at T E N T H AV E N U E
For information prearrangements, and assistance, call day or night (415) 668-0077
RSVP 650/756-4500 by November 1
Please call with the number attending for a light reception and
to include your loved one’s name in the Song of Remembrance
FD 523
The Catholic Cemeteries ◆ Archdiocese of San Francisco
www.holycrosscemeteries.com
H OLY C ROSS
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC
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FAITH THROUGHOUT OUR LIVES.
GRIEVING & HEALING 13
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
FATHER SPYROW: Priest’s late-life vocation
for help with Father Konkel’s passing and funeral services.
“My first role as student body president was to
take care of the dead,” he said. “I closed his eyes
and set his features.”
A long line of seminarians was already
lining up to pay their
respect.
When he went to
the funeral home,
clothed Father Konkel and placed him
in the casket, he said
he wished he could
have brought some
seminarians with
him. “I wanted them to have that experience,”
he said.
“It was interesting how my formation and
even what I left behind could be brought in at
that moment,” said Spyrow, who hopes to help
his parishioners grieve “in the context of their
faith.”
“Death is the ultimate mystery,” he said.
“Without faith, what is it? Our faith tells us to
look to Jesus Christ, to follow behind him.”
“If we look at the passion of Jesus Christ, we
have a life, a death and a resurrection,” Spryrow
said. His resurrection is what he gave us to give
death meaning. “If we grieve outside the context
of our faith, death is all there is, it’s a final moment.”
He said that for some people, death is difficult,
only about suffering and loss. “But I say, no, no,
no! Jesus showed us the way with his own death.
If we can get out of the despair, what’s ahead is
incredible.”
Spyrow joked about the similarities between
his past and his present. “As a funeral director
I’m on call all the time and as a priest I’m on call
all the time, too,” he said.
But he appreciates one important distinction.
“I’ve been able to help many families through
difficult times, he said. “Now I am able to share
in both difficult and joyous times.” Jones Mortuary, Inc.
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UPCOMING
NOVEMBER 8 – Good Shepherd Parish, Pacifica:
All Saint’s Day Mass of Remembrance 1 PM
DECEMBER 3RD  St. Peter’s Pacifica: Holiday Grief and Self-Care
10 AM-12 PM. ([email protected])
NOVEMBER 17  St. Pius X Parish evening
Holiday Grief and Healing Myself.
Contact [email protected] for time and place.
DECEMBER 13  Holy Cross Cemetery-Colma
Christmas Remembrance Service 11 AM all are welcome.
NOVEMBER 19  St. Peter’s, Pacifica: The Nature of Grief
10 AM-12 PM [email protected]
JANUARY 14, 2015  St. Peter’s Parish, Pacifica
Bereavement Ministry Training Day (RSVP [email protected])
10 AM-12 PM, bag lunch, 1-3 PM
Participating Parish Support Groups
San Francisco County
San Mateo County
St. Dominic
2390 Bush Street 94115
Structured 8 Week Group: Sundays
Contact: Deacon Chuck McNeil 415-567-7824
Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma
1st Saturdays: 11 am, All Saints Mausoleum. Mass for the deceased.
St. Mary’s Cathedral
1111 Gough Street 94109
3rd Wednesdays of the Month: 10:30 am–12 pm
Contact: Sr. Esther McEgan 415-567-2020
Marin County
Our Lady of Loretto, Novato
1806 Novato Blvd. 94947
Structured 8 Week Group: Late Afternoon
Contact: Sr. Jeanette 415-897-2171
(individual grief counseling also available)
St. Bartholomew, San Mateo
600 Columbia Dr. 94402
2nd Thursdays 6 pm–7:30 pm
Contact: Liliane Cools 650-347-1086
St. Pius, Redwood City
1100 Woodside Road 94061
Structured 8 Week Group: Monday 7 pm–8:30 pm
Contact: Parish Center 650-361-0655 or [email protected]
St. Robert, San Bruno
349 Oak Avenue 94066
Twice a Month: Saturday 3 pm–4:35 pm
Contact: Sr. Patricia O’Sullivan 650-589-0104
archdiocesan website for grief
www.sfarchdiocese.org/grief
14 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Bishop says Mongolian life better,
but material, spiritual needs persist
SARAH MCCARTHY
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
WASHINGTON – Nearly 10 years after being
ordained as the first Catholic bishop of Mongolia,
Bishop Wenceslao Padilla said though he has seen
major improvements in the society, the country is still
in need of great material and spiritual support.
“Even though Mongolia is spearheading into progress, I think many of the people are still very poor,”
he said. “That’s why our presence is still very much
needed here.”
Bishop Padilla works in the capital city of Mongolia,
Ulaanbaatar, with people in poverty and children living on the street, who have limited access to social services. Currently, there are two care centers in the city,
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Bishop Wenceslao Padilla of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, celebrates Mass Oct. 19 for World Mission Sunday at Holy Family
Church in Shuwoo, Mongolia.
set up through Bishop Padilla’s congregation, that
provide food, shelter and education to street children.
The Philippines-born bishop is a member of the
Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, also
known as Missionhurst.
He explained his involvement in bringing Catholicism to Mongolia in an online video interview Oct. 16,
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hosted by the Society for the Propagation of the Faith.
Leading the questions was Oblate Father Andrew
Small, national director of the Pontifical Mission
Societies in the United States.
“In the very beginning, we found out that the street
children ... were calling for our attention to do something for them,” said Bishop Padilla. “They come from
the countryside, especially the children who run away
from home, and so we had to do something for these
children.”
Bishop Padilla was one of three missionary priests
sent to Mongolia in 1992 to rebuild the church after
the country was liberated from the grip of communism under Russian rule. St. John Paul II extended
an invitation to the Congregation of the Immaculate
Heart of Mary to establish a mission in Mongolia that
would lend physical and spiritual support to the population. When he arrived, Bishop Padilla said, he found
people “searching for holiness.”
“When we arrived here, there was no church structure, there was no church building. And then, not
even a single Mongolian was baptized,” he said. “Since
we started from zero we had to see how the society
was at the time when we arrived.”
With help from the U.S. Department of State, Bishop
Padilla and the other missionaries, none of whom
spoke Mongolian, learned more about Mongolian
society and the troubles the people there were facing.
They were able to implement programs that have led
to positive changes in the capital city and the lives of
people living there.
“To compare the society 22 years ago and now, it is a
very stark difference,” said Bishop Padilla, who gave
the interview as part of the Catholic Church’s observance of October as Mission Month. This year, World
Mission Sunday was Oct. 19.
There are currently 1,019 baptized Mongolians in
Ulaanbaatar, Bishop Padilla said, and the church
has between 20 and 50 more people joining each year.
Despite the increase, the present society provides a
somewhat discouraging atmosphere for the church’s
continued growth.
“We are struggling with the fact that Mongolia is
becoming a materialistic society,” Bishop Padilla
said. “So my feeling at the moment, especially here in
Ulaanbaatar, (is) we have ... to sow the seeds of Christianity in the hearts of the people.”
GRIEF
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Sunday, November 9
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15
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
In Remembrance of the Faithful Departed Interred
In Our Catholic Cemeteries During the Month of September
HOLY CROSS
COLMA
Delfa R. Alcairo
Concordia Peña Almy
Ruben V. Alvarado
Henry J. Arata
Maria A. Arnal
Mathias L. Ayon
Teresa M. Balestrieri
John T. Bennett
Berta Beutelrock
Louis Bischoff
Esther Bruneman
William W. Bruner, II
Juventino Camacho
George D. Campos
Maria Refujio Campos
Frances M. Cancilla
Alma Canepa
Maria E. Carballar
Luis B. Carballar
Ruth Carlson
Melvin Paul Cavalier, Jr.
Alvaro Cazares
James E. Cornett
Sr. Maria De La Paz Corona
Marian A. Daly
Maria F. Menjivar De Aldana
David Kevin De Ceoursty
Rosemarie A. De Soto-King
Dean James DeRanieri, D.D.S.
Michael Descilo
Rafael De Leon Diaz
Lorraine Leonardo Dimayuga
Richard T. Dwyer
Naomi Eagleson
John Joseph Eberle
Anna Liza Espadilla
Peter Francis Espino
Liwayway M. Espino
Evelyn M. Ferranti
Norma E. Fleming
Dorothy L. Furay
Diego Galindo
Joanne M. Garvey
Ann Rocca
Andrew H. Rocca
Marie A. Romo
Rosetta “Auntie Rose” Sangiacomo
Joseph T. Sarto
William A. Segale
Manuel S. Sequeira
Frank Joseph Silici
Albert Wing Hung Soo
Lucille C. Theis
Joan K. Thieman
Doris Tognela
Raul B. Valadao
Joselito Vitug
John P. Ward
Rashawn A. Williams, Jr.
Doris Wilson
Sr. Jacqueline C. Golden, SND
Vera M. Grado
Lourdes (Nenita) Q. Gregson
Bruno Grenci
Anne Guerin
Sinforiano Gutierrez
Oscar Gutierrez-Morales
Chiu Lam Ho
Cristina S. Hora
Marcella Mary Hurley
John Pierre Indart
Norma Kathryn Johnson
Lester J. Jones, Sr.
Joseph F. Kennel
Lawrence “Larry” Kerrigan
Elisabeth M. Koblenz
Mercedes M. Kow
Frances V. Landucci
Carolyn Le Tourneau
Dr. Wilson Sy Lim
Vincent Michael Lopez
Jesusa R. Lovina
Lina Lucchetti
Cornelius Patrick Lyons
Patrick P. Maniscalco
August J. Marino
Michael J. Markovich
Robert B. Martinez
Florence McCaffery
William Francis McDonagh, Jr.
Thomas Michael McQuade
Florencia (Bita) Mendoza
Transita Minero
Mary Helen Monroe
Francisco G. Morales
Anthony Morales
Maureen O’Malley
Selso Oliva
Angela Orellana
Ruben Ortiz
Robert Pelletier
Mary I. Peschilli
Richard Pizzorno
Pamela Pizzorno
Patricia Realini
Roberto Efrain Renderos
Mark Alan Rizzo
MT. OLIVET,
SAN RAFAEL
Frederick Runkel Burrell
John Patrick Farley
Timothy Daniel McCarthy
Kenneth James Pitto
William F. Toepfer
Jiacinto “Chico” Valsecchi
HOLY CROSS
MENLO PARK
Frances Arcady
Alex F. Arcady, Sr.
Stephen D. Bellumori
Delia P. Del Rio
OUR LADY OF THE
PILLAR
Wyatt Matthew Salas
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC CEMETERY, COLMA
ALL SAINTS DAY MASS – TODOS LOS SANTOS
Saturday, November 1, 2014 | All Saints Mausoleum Chapel, 11:00 am
Most Rev. Salvatore J. Cordileone, Main Celebrant | Archbishop of San Francisco
Refreshments and fellowship following dedication
VETERANS’ DAY SERVICE
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 | Star of the Sea Section, 11:00 am – Outdoor Service
Chaplain C. Michael Padazinski COL, USAF | Chancellor, Archdiocese of San Francisco
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
Santa Cruz Ave. @Avy Ave., Menlo Park, CA
650-323-6375
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
1500 Mission Road, Colma, CA
650-756-2060
Mt. Olivet Catholic Cemetery
270 Los Ranchos Road, San Rafael, CA
415-479-9020
Tomales Catholic Cemetery
1400 Dillon Beach Road, Tomales, CA
415-479-9021
St. Anthony Cemetery
Stage Road, Pescadero, CA
650-712-1675
Our Lady of the Pillar Cemetery
Miramontes St., Half Moon Bay, CA
650-712-1679
A Tradition of Faith Throughout Our Lives.
16 WORLD
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
UN nuncio decries growing violence
against children around world
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
UNITED NATIONS – Millions of the world’s
children today are victims of
armed conflict, pornography
and sexual trafficking, and still
more “are denied the most fundamental right to life,” said the
Vatican’s nuncio to the United
Nations.
“Prenatal selection eliminates
babies suspected to have disabiliArchbishop
ties and female children simply
Bernardito Auza
because of their sex,” Archbishop
Berardito Auza said Oct. 17 in a
statement to the U.N. Social, Humanitarian and
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Cultural Committee, which was discussing the
rights of children.
He is the Vatican’s permanent representative at the
U.N. in New York.
Archbishop Auza cited a report delivered a month
earlier by Ambassador Anthony Lake, the executive director of UNICEF, who did not focus on any
improved conditions for children but rather on the
growing number of humanitarian crises that are
severely challenging how countries try to provide
children the protection they deserve.
“It is an unfortunate reality that every conflict, every outbreak of an epidemic, every natural disaster,”
he said, “has the potential to roll back the steady
progress the world has made in recent decades in
reducing child mortality and improving access to
nutrition, safe water and education.”
It is even more tragic “when such rollbacks” are
caused by humans and specifically target and victimize children, he said.
“In recent years, almost 3 million children have
been killed in armed conflicts; 6 million have been
left disabled; tens of thousands mutilated by antipersonnel mines,” Archbishop Auza said.
“Too many children still lack sufficient food and
housing,” he continued. In many countries “they
have no access to medicines,” he said, and still other
children “are sold to traffickers, sexually exploited,
recruited into irregular armies, uprooted by forced
displacements, or compelled into debilitating work.”
With regard to recruiting child soldiers, he noted
that “this has spread in some regions where this phenomenon was not rampant and that there have been
recent cases of children forced to commit terrorist
acts like suicide bombings.”
“Eliminating violence against children demands
that states, governments, civil society and religious
communities support and enable the family to carry
out its proper responsibility,” Archbishop Auza said.
He said the approaching 20th anniversary of the
International Year of the Family “offers an opportu-
nity to refocus on the role of the family in development.”
It is a chance to reflect on what the family, which
he termed a “primordial institution,” can do to face
the multiple challenges threatening the children’s
development in all countries.
He said the Vatican and its U.N. delegation “attaches great importance” to the commemoration.
In 1994 to mark the celebration of the International
Year of the Family, St. John Paul II issued a “Letter
to Families’’ in which he told families the love and
acceptance they show for each other are society’s
first-line defense against attacks on human dignity.
For its part, Archbishop Auza said in his remarks,
the Catholic Church, “mainly through its more than
300,000 social and educational institutions around the
world, especially in depressed and war-torn regions,
will continue working daily to ensure both education
and food for children, as well as the reintegration of
the victims of violence into their families and into
society.”
He also noted that the U.N. in November will
celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Convention on
the Rights of the Child, which he said “remains a
prominent standard in the promotion and protection
of the rights of the child.”
The document, he said, “contains such fundamental
principles as the protection of the rights of the child
before as well as after birth, the family as the natural
environment for the growth and education of children,
and the right of the child to health care and education.”
The world’s governments and civil society in general “should encourage all initiatives and activities
aimed at the promotion and protection of the rights
of the child,” Archbishop Auza said.
In this regard, he said it was fitting that this
year’s Nobel Peace Prize was jointly won by Malala
Yousafzai, a Pakistani teenager who was shot in the
head by the Taliban in 2012 for advocating girls’ right
to education, and Kailash Satyarthi of India, who
campaigns against child trafficking and child labor.
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WORLD 17
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Cardinal says balancing truth,
mercy always difficult, always needed
CINDY WOODEN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Austrian Cardinal
Christoph Schonborn of Vienna, one
of the Catholic Church’s best known
cardinal-theologians, said the Catholic Church must hold together truth
and mercy, even if it is criticized for
its attempt.
The cardinal, editor of the Catechism of the Catholic Church and the
son of divorced parents, led one of the
small working groups at the Synod
of Bishops on the family. He spoke to
reporters Oct. 16 about the groups’
attempts to improve the synod’s
midterm report, which had garnered
attention around the world for its
seeming openness to people living in
situations the church traditionally
has labeled as irregular or sinful.
As synod officials were set to modify the midterm report to draft the
synod’s final report, all 10 working
groups called for a clearer presentation of church teaching and a greater
emphasis on how Catholic families
striving to live according to that
teaching are a blessing for the church
and for their societies.
To ensure people do not think the
church is watering down its teaching on marriage and sexual morality,
Cardinal Schonborn said, “many
of the synod working groups said,
‘Attention! We do not want to forget
doctrine in those situations” in which
people must be accompanied on the
way to a fuller Christian life.
“The first place where the results of
original sin are manifested is the family, where we live,” he said. But the
synod preparatory document wanted
to emphasize “the beauty and the necessity of the family. For this reason,
we were invited to look attentively
at the reality around us. I think this
was the idea of the questionnaire sent
around the world: ‘Tell us how the
family is doing.’”
To understand the work synod
members are trying to do, he said,
people must understand what Pope
Francis means when he talks of
“accompanying. Many times he has
AGING
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Austrian Cardinal Christoph Schonborn of
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at the Vatican Oct. 16.
said, ‘Don’t judge; accompany.’ Is that
relativism? No, certainly not.”
Still, Cardinal Schonborn said, the
synod itself mirrored the differences
one might find in a family’s approach
to new situations. “It often happens
in a family that the mother says, ‘It’s
too dangerous,’ and the dad says, ‘No,
don’t be afraid.’ We’re in a big family
and some say, ‘Attention!’ and they
are right, it’s dangerous. But others
say, ‘Don’t be afraid.’”
Different emphases are normal,
he said, because “there are different
aspects to consider: There is doctrine
and the clear word of the Gospel and
there is the evident action of Jesus
showing an attitude full of mercy and
compassion. How to unite the two is
a perennial challenge for the church,
its pastors and all of us.”
When the church addresses situations in which people have fallen
short of the Gospel ideal, he said, it
must “speak the truth,” but “it does
so with compassion and with an
invitation to undertake a journey of
faith.”
At the meeting with the press,
the cardinal was asked whether he
thought the Catechism of the Catholic
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Cardinal Schonborn said
different emphases are normal
because ‘there are different
aspects to consider: There is
doctrine and the clear word
of the Gospel and there is
the evident action of Jesus
showing an attitude full of
mercy and compassion. How
to unite the two is a perennial
challenge for the church, its
pastors and all of us.’
Church would have to be rewritten
after the synod; among other things,
the catechism teaches that homosexuality is a “disordered” inclination and
that homosexual acts are sinful; it
also says that those who are divorced
and civilly remarried may not receive
Communion without an annulment.
The cardinal said the catechism
“is a synthesis of what the church
believes and lives” and he sees no
reason to change it, although “there
are developments” of Catholic doctrine and there have been throughout
history. As an example of a “notable
development of doctrine” he cited St.
John Paul’s “theology of the body,”
which he said was the first systematic
theological discussion of the human
body and its role in relationships.
POPE: HUNGER IN WORLD OF PLENTY
A TRAGIC PARADOX
VATICAN CITY – Providing food
aid to people in need is not enough
to eradicate world hunger, Pope
Francis said.
An overhaul of the entire
framework of aid policies and food
production is needed so that countries can be in charge of their own
agricultural markets, he said.
“For how long will systems of
production and consumption that
exclude the majority of the world’s
population even from the crumbs
that fall from the tables of the rich
continue to be defended?” he asked.
“The time has come to start
thinking and deciding based on
each person and community and
not from market trends,” he said.
The pope made his comments
in a message marking the Oct. 16
celebration of World Food Day, a
commemoration sponsored by the
U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization to highlight the global fight
against hunger and the need to
help farmers and farm workers.
The theme of the 2014 celebration was: “Family Farming:
Feeding the World, Caring for the
Earth.”
The U.N. organization estimates
that 842 million people are chronically hungry, but that many more
die or suffer the ill effects of inadequate nutrition. Close to 7 million
children die before their fifth birthday every year, 162 million children under 5 are stunted, while at
the same time, 500 million people
are obese, its latest figures say.
In his written message, Pope
Francis said it is “one of the most
tragic paradoxes of our time” that
there can be so many people going
hungry in a world where there is
an “enormous quantity of food
wasted, products destroyed and
price speculation in the name of
the god of profit.”
18 OPINION
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
‘Redefining’ marriage?
I
n the current debate over gay marriage, people
sometimes ask: Who should define marriage?
Democrats or Republicans in Congress? The
Supreme Court? Should it be put to a referendum, allowing the majority to choose
a definition?
We can identify two kinds of
“definitions” when it comes to
marriage. The first touches on
the essence, the objective reality, or the truth about marriage. The second involves
a legal or political position,
advanced through the media,
judicial decisions, or other
legislative means. While these
secondary definitions of marriage can be of interest, their
true level of importance is
properly gauged only in reference to the first and objective
definition.
Notable errors are someFATHER TADEUSZ
times
made in these secondPACHOLCZYK
ary definitions of marriage.
In the mid-1960s, to consider
but one example, prohibitions
existed in more than a dozen states which outlawed
persons of different races from marrying one another. A white man and a black woman could fall in
love in those states, but could not legally tie the knot.
The Supreme Court overturned those restrictions in
1967, recognizing that the ability to enter into marriage doesn’t depend on the skin color of the man
and woman getting married.
Gay marriage advocates today sometimes attempt
to draw a parallel between such mixed-race marriage laws and state laws that would prevent two men
(or two women) from getting married to each other.
They suggest that legally forbidding two men from
getting married stigmatizes those men in much the
same way that preventing a black man from marrying a white woman stigmatized both of them. Yet
there is really no parallel at all between the two cases. While marriage as an objective reality is certainly
MAKING
SENSE OUT OF
BIOETHICS
(CNS PHOTO/PAUL HARING)
New spouses exchange rings as Pope Francis celebrates
the marriage rite for 20 couples during a Mass in St. Peter’s
Basilica at the Vatican Sept. 14.
color-blind to the racial configuration of the spouses,
it can never be “genital-blind,” because male-female
sexual complementarity stands squarely at the heart
and center of marriage itself.
To see this fundamental point about marriage,
however, we have to step beyond the cultural clichés
that suggest that marriage is merely an outgrowth
of emotional and erotic companionship. The institution of marriage does not arise merely out of loving
sentiment. It is born, rather, from the depths of the
commitment assumed by a man and a woman as
they enter into the total communion of life implied
in the procreation and education of children flowing
from their union. To put it another way, marriage
arises organically and spontaneously from the radical complementarity of a man and a woman.
Sexual intimacy between men and women involves
the possibility of children. No other form of sexual
or erotic interaction encompasses this basic, organic,
and complementary possibility. Without parsing
words, professor Jacques LeClercq put it this way
more than 50 years ago: “The human race is divided
into two sexes whose reason for existence is physical union with a view to continuing the species.”
More recently, professor Robert P. George similarly
described marriage as “a union that takes its distinctive character from being founded, unlike other
friendships, on bodily unity of the kind that sometimes generates new life.” There are many kinds of
love, ranging from maternal love to brotherly love to
love of friends to love of neighbor to romantic love,
but only one that is proper and integral to marriage,
namely, spousal love with its inscribed complementarity and potential for human fruitfulness.
Marriage teaches us that men need women and
women need men and that children need both mothers and fathers. In this sense, marriage and the family represent foundational realities, not constructs
that can be invented, defined, legislated, or determined by popular vote or culture. Marriage, in fact,
is the “primordial first institution,” flowing out of
the intimate and creative union of male and female.
It precedes other societal institutions and conventions, and is essentially ordered towards creating and
caring for the future in the form of the next generation. Marriage is a given reality that we come to
discover in its authentic design, not a concept for us
to“define” according to our own agenda or desires.
Gay marriage proponents deny these foundational
truths about marriage. Through vigorous legislative
efforts, they are striving to impose a profoundly false
redesign for marriage upon society so that, in the
words of George, marriage becomes “an emotional
union for the sake of adult satisfaction that is served
by mutually agreeable sexual play,” thereby undermining its intrinsic connection to complementary
bodily union between men and women. This forced
reconfiguration of marriage is no more defensible
than the efforts of those who socially or legislatively
attempted to impose a notion of “racial purity” upon
marriage or society in former times.
FATHER PACHOLCZYK, PH.D., is a priest of the Diocese of Fall
River, Massachusetts, and serves as the director of
education at The National Catholic Bioethics Center,
Philadelphia.
LETTERS
Critics miss the point
Re Special report on Faithful America, Sept. 12,
19, 26:
I read the three-part series that investigated the
attacks on Archbishop Cordileone for his participation in the march supporting marriage and family
life, and the letters that followed, both pro and con.
The articles were designed to make three points: (1)
the archbishop is not a bigot; (2) the group which
sponsored the march is not a “hate group”; and (3)
the archbishop’s detractors have their own agenda,
which is to demonize anyone who disagrees with
them. Reasonable people can differ as to whether the
articles succeeded in that purpose. However, rather
than focus on the merits of the articles, the critical
letters by and large attacked church teaching on homosexual acts and suggested that faithful Catholics
are not obliged to follow that teaching, or that the
church has no business making its voice heard in
the public square on that issue. I think those critics
miss the point: The series was not intended to debate
the rights and wrongs of the church’s teaching on
homosexual acts, or even its position on same-sex
marriage, but rather to expose what happens when
a bishop publically espouses a church teaching that
is politically incorrect. That is a game two can play.
If a “conservative” bishop in a liberal city can be
forced into silence regarding marriage and family
issues, then a “liberal” bishop in a conservative city
can also be silenced on issues such as immigrants’
rights, capital punishment and social justice.
Roger Ritter
San Francisco
The writer is a member of St. Cecilia Parish.
ISIS and Neville Chamberlain
Re “Bombing Islamic State is fueling the violence,” Tony Magliano, Oct. 10:
Well, Tony Magliano can wait until they come
to behead him if he likes, but I’d like to see ISIS
stopped before they kill many more people, even if
it means some innocents are killed in the process.
After all the reporters and others they’ve beheaded
were innocent too. Magliano talks about collective
amnesia but he apparently never heard of Neville
Chamberlain and the “Peace in Our Time” agreement he negotiated with Hitler, and look at how
many millions Hitler killed before he was stopped
by the Allies. Does Magliano think we were wrong
to go after Hitler? Or was that different?
Virginia Hayes
San Francisco
Moved to tears
I wanted to thank all of the people that worked so
hard to make the rosary rally (Oct. 11) such a beautiful witness. It moved me to tears to see the archbishop
process into U.N. Plaza holding the Blessed Sacrament, leading the faithful through the streets of San
Francisco. The reverent silence of the crowd, as older
people (some with walkers) and young families, knelt
on the sidewalk in expectation, reminded me the
faith is alive and thriving in the city of St. Francis.
A special thanks to the priests who tirelessly heard
confessions throughout the day and to the Riordan
Crusaders who created an honor guard for the body of
Christ. God bless you all. I look forward to next year.
Dolores Meehan
San Francisco
In defense of the truth
Some comments on the letters these past few
weeks about the “culture wars”:
I disagree with those who want the church to stay
out of these sensitive issues. There are many topics on which it’s assumed Jesus was silent, but he
consistently affirmed the moral teachings from the
Old Testament and actually went further. Moreover,
he warned about not speaking in defense of the
truth. Therefore, we must stand firm in defense of
the truth. I agree we must be charitable. But I’ll ask
just one question (I could pose many): If we don’t
take a stand, what’s to stop the enemy? Wake up. Our
enemy Satan wants us to back down, and the church
is under attack all over the world. Examples: the HHS
mandate; our government leaders marginalizing and
sometimes ridiculing people of faith, especially the
Christian faith; our culture, which once supported
the family and marriage, is undermining the family
itself. Finally, those who disregard the moral teachings want to be included in the church’s life, but without seeing that Jesus calls all of us to repentance and
holiness. If they cannot accept the need to turn away
from sin and believe in the Gospel, exactly how could
they return to the sacraments? Wouldn’t everyone
quickly see that Jesus’ call to holiness is still being
ignored and the sacraments would be invalid?
J. Hermann
San Mateo
Speaking truth in love
With all respect to the Holy Father, Pope Francis,
and his words, I believe his words were taken out of
context by many. Father Godfrey, for example, says
“disputed matter” (Letters, Oct. 10). Is marriage a
disputed matter, or are the teachings on the matter clear? Is “moral teaching evolving” or is their
development of the doctrine “don’t continue the
culture war” leading us to surrender to the culture
of death? We need to be loving sinners, not embracing sin-lovers by not speaking the truth in love.
Ted Kirk
San Francisco
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OPINION 19
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
Praying for the dead
I
n her wisdom the Catholic Church
calls each Catholic to pray for the
dead, a spiritual work of mercy.
Prayer for the deceased both richly
grounds us
in our faith
and encourages us to make
progress on our
journey of faith,
which started at
baptism. Prayer
for the dead is a
gift as well as an
act of trust and
reverence.
MONICA
The Second
WILLIAMS
Book of Maccabees, which
was written
only about 100 years before the birth of
Christ, contains a reference to sacrifices offered for the dead (2 Maccabees
12:43). In addition, prayer for the dead
is recorded in the Roman catacombs,
the burial sites of the early Christians.
St. Monica, mother of St. Augustine,
implored her son at the time of her
death to “remember me at the altar
of the Lord wherever you may be”
(Confessions IX). In this instruction, we
see both a well-established tradition of
prayer and the comfort and consolation
it offers. St. Augustine went on to write
extensively on the merits of prayer for
the dead. Referring to offices, which
are services performed for someone, he
says:
“I shall fulfill these offices for my dear
departed ones as my final duty toward
them and as a balm to my own aching
heart. And moreover … (I) will faithfully, regularly, and frequently procure
for them those blessings which never
fail to succor the souls of the departed,
namely, Masses, prayers, and almsdeeds” (Sermon 172).
The services mentioned by St. Augustine are Masses, prayers and almsdeeds, and they are still a part of our
Catholic practice today. In a few months,
our parishes will open their new “Mass
Books.” The Mass Book is where
intentions for Masses in the parish are
registered. Parishioners come and make
Perspectives from Archbishop Cordileone and guest writers
Monuments at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma.
a donation to have Masses offered for
a family member or friend, especially
for those who have passed away. The
family member or friend may have died
recently or many years ago. In the latter
case the Mass is to be celebrated on that
anniversary day of the person’s death.
The Catholic cemeteries also offer
regular monthly Masses for all the faithful interred there. When a person dies,
many people also send “spiritual bouquets” (prayers or Masses offered) or
donations to a charitable organization.
St. Augustine refers to his services,
especially prayer, as “a balm to my own
aching heart.” While we believe that our
prayers aid the departed, we also know
they bring us comfort. When we pray
for the eternal peace of our loved ones,
we too find peace in our own hearts. In
these moments of prayer we occasionally think ahead to a time when we pass
from this life and we are comforted by
the realization that others will pray for
us when it is our time.
Sometimes a popular movie comes
along that manages to convey a profound truth. Last year, the movie “Gravity” entered theaters. A science-fiction
thriller, it had big Hollywood stars in
Sandra Bullock and George Clooney.
Surprisingly it displayed deep spiritual
sensitivity and an extraordinary message about the importance of prayer.
At one point in the movie, Sandra
Bullock’s character is stranded. Sensing
death because her oxygen is running
out, she says to the only person who
could hear her: “No one will mourn for
me. No one will pray for my soul. Will
you mourn for me? Will you pray for
me?” It is startling in our contemporary
culture to hear a person voice such
thoughts. This character reveals that in
our very deepest selves we want to be
remembered and prayed for.
Catholics are also encouraged to pray
for those unknown to us, especially
those who have no one to pray for them.
Referring to the unknown deceased,
Bishop John M. Quinn of the Diocese of
Winona and Episcopal Moderator of the
Catholic Cemetery Conference, recently
noted: “Those are loved ones to someone. Even if we don’t know who they are
in this life, they are loved ones to Jesus.”
As illustrated in the rich words of the
Prayer of Commendation, recited by the
priest at the gravesite or, in the case of
a cremation, at the columbarium, our
prayers for the dead are an act of charity, consolation, faith, and hope:
“Into your hands, Father of mercies,
we commend our brother/sister in the
sure and certain hope that, together
with all who have died in Christ, he/she
shall rise with him on the last day. We
give you thanks for the blessings which
you bestowed upon him/her in this life:
they are signs to us of your goodness
and of our fellowship with the saints in
Christ. Merciful Lord, turn toward us
and listen to our prayers: open the gates
of paradise to your servant and help
us who remain to comfort one another
with assurances of faith until we all
meet in Christ and are with you and
with our brother/sister forever.”
Prayer for the dead is a gift first and
foremost to our beloved dead, who we
commend to the mercy of the God and
the powerful intercession of our Blessed
Mother and all the saints. It is a gift also
to family and friends of the deceased,
since it brings comfort both to them and
to the person offering prayers. Finally,
prayer is an act of complete trust in
the triune God, because by prayer we
entrust our dear ones to His loving care,
returning back to Him the cherished gift
He shared with us.
This All Souls’ Day, and throughout
the month of the Holy Souls, let us us
pray devoutly for all our loved ones who
have gone before us and also for those
who have no one to pray for them.
WILLIAMS is director of Catholic cemeteries
for the Archdiocese of San Francisco.
An extraordinary synod, indeed
A
ccording to Vatican-speak, a
specially scheduled session of the
Synod of Bishops is an “Extraordinary Synod,” meaning Not-an-Ordinary
Synod, held every three years
or so. In the case
of the recentlycompleted
Extraordinary
Synod of 2014,
extraordinary
things did happen, in the “Oh,
wow!” sense of
the word. And
GEORGE WEIGEL
if this year’s
Extraordinary
Synod was a preview of the synod for
which it was to set the agenda, i.e., the
Ordinary Synod of 2015, that synod, too,
promises to be, well, extraordinary.
How was the Extraordinary Synod of
2014 extraordinary? With apologies to
the Bard, let me count the ways:
1. The 2014 synod got an extraordinary amount of press attention. Alas,
too much of that attention was due to
the mass media misperception that The
Great Moment of the Long-Awaited
Catholic Cave-In was at hand: the moment when the Catholic Church, the
last major institutional hold-out against
the triumph of the sexual revolution,
would finally admit the error of its
ways and join the rush into the promised land of sexual liberation, symbolized in this instance by a Catholic
cave-in on the nature of marriage. What
ought to have gotten the world’s attention – the witness of African bishops to
the liberating power of monogamy and
lifelong marital fidelity – got sadly short
shrift, though Third World women are
the principal beneficiaries of the truth
about marriage the church received
from its Lord.
2. The 2014 synod demonstrated
the extraordinary self-confidence of
bishops from dying local churches who
nonetheless feel quite comfortable giving pastoral advice to local churches
that are either thriving or holding their
own. Many northern European bishops
and theologians (and bishop-theologians) acted as if the blissful years
when they set the agenda for the world
church at Vatican II had returned. That
these same bishops and theologians and
bishop-theologians have presided over
the collapse of western European Catholicism in the intervening five decades
seemed not to matter to them in the
slightest. Happy days were here again.
3. The 2014 synod was extraordinary,
or at least the media claimed it was,
for an unprecedented public display
of discord among cardinals. Perhaps
those who found this either unprecedented or unseemly could consult
Galatians 2.11, where Paul reports that
he “rebuked” Peter “to his face.” Or
ponder the fierce arguments among
North African bishops during the
Donatist controversy. Or look into the
quarrel between Bishop Cyprian of
Carthage, a doctor of the Church, and
Pope Stephen, Bishop of Rome. Or
read the debates at the first session of
Vatican II. The 2014 controversies were
indeed noteworthy, in that otherwise
intelligent men whose position had
been pretty well demolished by fellowscholars were incapable of admitting
that they’d gotten it wrong. But upon
further review (as they say in the
NFL), that isn’t so new either.
4. The 2014 synod was extraordinary
in that a lot of theological confusion
was displayed by elders of the church
who really ought to know better. The
idea of the development of doctrine
was especially ill-used by some. Of
course the church’s self-understanding
develops over time, as does the church’s
pastoral practice. But as Blessed John
Henry Newman showed in the classic
modern discussion of the subject, all
authentic development is in organic
continuity with the past; it’s not a
rupture with the past. Nor is there
any place in a truly Catholic theory of
doctrinal development for rewriting
the words of the Lord or describing
fidelity to the plain text of Scripture as
“fundamentalism.”
5. The 2014 synod was extraordinary
in its demonstration that too many
bishops and theologians (and bishoptheologians) still have not grasped the
Iron Law of Christianity in Modernity:
Christian communities that maintain a
firm grasp on their doctrinal and moral
boundaries can flourish amidst the
cultural acids of modernity; Christian
communities whose doctrinal and
moral boundaries become porous (and
then invisible) wither and die.
6. One more thing: why were no representatives of the Pontifical John Paul
II Institute on Marriage and the Family
invited to a synod on the family?
Extraordinary, indeed: in both
Vatican-speak and plain English.
WEIGEL is Distinguished Senior Fellow
of the Ethics and Public Policy Center,
Washington, D.C.
20 OPINION
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
The goddess of chastity
A
ncient Greece expressed much of its psychological and spiritual wisdom inside their
myths. They didn’t intend these to be taken
literally or as historical, but as metaphor and as
an archetypal illustration of
why life is as it is and how
people engage life both generatively and destructively.
And many of these myths
are centered on gods and
goddesses. They had gods
and goddesses to mirror
virtually every aspect of
life, every aspect of human
behavior, and every innate
human propensity. MoreFATHER RON
over, many of these gods
and goddesses were far from
ROLHEISER
moral in their behavior, especially in their sexual lives.
They had messy affairs with each other and with
human beings. However, despite the messiness
and amorality of their sexual behavior, one of the
positive features inside these myths was that, for
ancient Greece, sex was always, somehow, connected to the divine. Even temple prostitution was
somehow related to accessing the fertility that
emanated from the divine realm.
Within this pantheon of gods and goddesses
there was a particular goddess name Artemis.
Unlike most of their other goddesses, who were
sexually promiscuous, she was chaste and celibate. Her sexual abstinence represented the place
and the value of chastity and celibacy. She was
pictured as a tall, graceful figure, attractive sexually, but with a beauty that, while sexual, was different from the seductive sexuality of goddesses
like Aphrodite and Hera. In the figure of Artemis,
sex is pictured as an attractive blend of solitude
and integrity. She is frequently pictured as surrounded by members of her own sex or by members of the opposite sex who appear as friends
and intimates, but never as lovers.
What’s implied here is that sexual desire can remain healthy and generative even while abstaining from sex. Artemis represents a chaste way of
being sexual. She tells us that, in the midst of a
sexually-soaked world, one can be generative and
happy inside of chastity and even inside celibacy.
Perhaps even more importantly, Artemis shows
us that chastity need not render one anti-sexual
and sterile. Rather she shows that sexuality is
wider than sex and that sex itself will be richer
and more meaningful if it is also connected to
chastity. Artemis declares that claiming your solitude and experiencing friendship and other forms
of intimacy are not a substitute for sex but one of
the rich modalities of sex itself.
Thomas Moore, in describing Artemis, writes:
“Although she is the most virginal of the goddesses, Artemis is not asexual. She embodies a special
kind of sexuality where the accent is on individuality, integrity, and solitude.” As such, she is a
model not just for celibates but also for people
who are sexually active. For the sexually active
person, Artemis is the cautionary flag that says: I
want to be taken seriously, with my integrity and
independence assured.
As well, Moore suggests that, irrespective of
whether we are celibate or sexually active, we
all “have periods in life or just moments in a day
when we need to be alone, disconnected from
love and sex, devoted to an interest of our own,
withdrawn and remote. (Artemis) tells us that
this preference may not be an anti-social rejection
of people but simply a deep, positive, even sexual
focusing of oneself and one’s world.”
What’s taught by this mythical goddess is a
much needed lesson for our world today. Our age
has turned sex into a soteriology, namely, for us,
sex isn’t perceived as a means toward heaven, it
is identified with heaven itself. It’s what we’re
supposed to be living for. One of the consequences
of this is that we can no longer blend our adult
awareness with chastity, nor with the genuine
Saturday October 25, 2014
Location: Walk starts at 9:15 am from Our Lady of
Perpetual Help Church, 60 Wellington Ave., Daly City; and
ends at 1:00 pm approx. at St. Dominic’s Church (Home of
the Shrine of Saint Jude), 2390 Bush St., San Francisco.
Gospel for October 26, 2014
Matthew 22:34-40
Following is a word search based on the Gospel
reading for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle
A: yet another attempt to trap Jesus in a point of law.
The words can be found in all directions in the puzzle.
Transportation: Buses will be running from St. Dominic’s
Church to O.L. of Perpetual Help Church from 6:30 am to
8:30 am only.
HEARD
SILENCED
GATHERED
ONE OF THEM
COMMANDMENTS
THE LAW
HE SAID
LOVE
GOD
WITH ALL
SOUL
MIND
SECOND
NEIGHBOR
Parking: Available at St. Dominic’s Church parking lot.
Route: Exiting O.L. of Perpetual Help Church, start walking
towards Mission St. Turn right on Mission St., right on 14th
Street. Turn left on South Van Ness Ave. to Van Ness Ave.,
left on Pine St. and left on Steiner St. (Approx. 8 miles).
LAWS
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OBLATE FATHER ROLHEISER is president of the Oblate School
of Theology, San Antonio, Texas.
11th Annual Pilgrimage for
Saint Jude Thaddeus
SCRIPTURE SEARCH
PHARISEES
SADDUCEES
TEACHER
GREATEST
THE LORD
HEART
FIRST
complexity and richness of sex. Rather, for many
of us, chastity and celibacy are seen as a fearful self-protection, which leave one dry, sterile,
moralistic, anti-erotic, sexually uptight, and on
the periphery of life’s joys. Tied to this too is the
notion that all those rich realities so positively
highlighted by Artemis (as well as by the classical Christian notion of chastity), namely, friendship, nonsexual forms of intimacy, nonsexual
pleasures, and the need for integrity and fidelity
within sex, are seen as a substitute for sex, and a
second-best one at that, rather than as rich modality of sex itself.
We are psychologically and spiritually impoverished by that notion and it puts undue pressure
on our sexual lives. When sex is asked to carry
the primary load in terms of human generativity
and happiness it cannot help but come up short.
And we are seeing that in our world today.
Of course, as Christians, we have our own goddesses of chastity, Mary, the mother of Jesus, and
many women saints. Why not draw our spirituality of chastity from these women, rather than
looking towards some pagan, mythical goddess?
Well, for the most part, we do look to Christian
models here. Moreover, I suspect that both the
Virgin Mary and all of our revered virgin saints
would, were she actually a real person, very much
befriend Artemis.
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Bilingual Solemn Mass: 1:30 pm - St. Dominic’s Church.
Most Rev. William J. Justice, Auxiliary Bishop
Archdiocese of San Francisco
For more Information:
Shrine of Saint Jude Office
(415) 931-5919
Mon-Fri 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
E-mail: [email protected]
www.stjude-shrine.org
Jaime or Rosa Pinto: (415) 333-8730
© 2014 Tri-C-A Publications www.tri-c-a-publications.com
Sponsored by DUGGAN’S SERRA MORTUARY
500 Westlake Avenue, Daly City
650-756-4500 ● www.duggansserra.com
Please be advised that the Shrine of St. Jude, as sponsor, will photograph and video record this event. The photographs or video recording may be used in St. Jude Shrine
publications and posted on their website, for educational and religious training purposes, and/or for other non-commercial uses. By participating in this event, participants are
deemed to have given their consent and approval to the St. Jude Shrine to use a photographic or digital likeness or reproduction of themselves and any minors in their custody or
control without further permission or notification.
FAITH 21
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
SUNDAY READINGS
Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time
He said to him, ‘You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is
the greatest and the first commandment.’
MATTHEW 22:34-40
EXODUS 22:20-26
Thus says the Lord: “You shall not molest or
oppress an alien, for you were once aliens yourselves in the land of Egypt. You shall not wrong
any widow or orphan. If ever you wrong them and
they cry out to me, I will surely hear their cry.
My wrath will flare up, and I will kill you with
the sword; then your own wives will be widows,
and your children orphans. “If you lend money
to one of your poor neighbors among my people,
you shall not act like an extortioner toward him
by demanding interest from him. If you take your
neighbor’s cloak as a pledge, you shall return it to
him before sunset; for this cloak of his is the only
covering he has for his body. What else has he to
sleep in? If he cries out to me, I will hear him; for I
am compassionate.”
PSALM 18:2-3, 3-4, 47, 51
I love you, Lord, my strength.
I love you, O Lord, my strength, O Lord, my rock,
my fortress, my deliverer.
I love you, Lord, my strength.
My God, my rock of refuge, my shield, the horn
of my salvation, my stronghold! Praised be the
Lord, I exclaim, and I am safe from my enemies.
I love you, Lord, my strength.
The Lord lives and blessed be my rock! Extolled
be God my savior. You who gave great victories to
your king and showed kindness to your anointed.
I love you, Lord, my strength.
1 THESSALONIANS 1:5C-10
Brothers and sisters: You know what sort of
people we were among you for your sake. And you
became imitators of us and of the Lord, receiving
the word in great affliction, with joy from the Holy
Spirit, so that you became a model for all the believers in Macedonia and in Achaia. For from you the
word of the Lord has sounded forth not only in
Macedonia and in Achaia, but in every place your
faith in God has gone forth, so that we have no need
to say anything. For they themselves openly declare about us what sort of reception we had among
you, and how you turned to God from idols to serve
the living and true God and to await his Son from
heaven, whom he raised from the dead, Jesus, who
delivers us from the coming wrath.
MATTHEW 22:34-40
When the Pharisees heard that Jesus had silenced
the Sadducees, they gathered together, and one of
them, a scholar of the law tested him by asking,
“Teacher, which commandment in the law is the
greatest?” He said to him, “You shall love the Lord,
your God, with all your heart, with all your soul,
and with all your mind. This is the greatest and the
first commandment. The second is like it: You shall
love your neighbor as yourself. The whole law and
the prophets depend on these two commandments.”
The answer is right in front of us
R
ecently, Catholic San Francisco published a
series of articles concerning same-sex marriage and the role various groups have played
in the conflict as it has unfolded in the Bay Area. As
reflected in the letters to the
editor relating to the stories,
this issue continues to be one
that promotes strong feeling
and discussions. It became
obvious to me as I read the
differing opinions that there
were people of good will
and deep faith on both sides
of this divisive topic. There
were not “good Catholics”
and “bad Catholics,” but
rather just “Catholics,” all
doing their best to live this
week’s Gospel message of
loving God and neighbor.
Back in the day, when I first
DEACON MICHAEL
began
training to be a deaMURPHY
con, life to me seemed very
straight forward. I had a view
of my faith and of church
that was pretty black-and-white and sustained and
comforted me in many different ways. I was a fairly
oblivious but very happy camper. Yet the more
SCRIPTURE
REFLECTION
people I met during my training, including fellow
deacon candidates, their wives, and the people I
encountered in my various ministries, I came to
understand that living out our faith is not simple,
easy or obvious.
I’m a white, Irish, middle-class male who grew
up in the California suburbs. My wife is a fiercely
independent woman of Filipino heritage who was
raised in an economically disadvantaged town in
Hawaii. We’re both strong Catholics, yet there are
definitely times when we view the world and our
faith very differently. When I talk to my middle
school students, all of whom have grown up in a
world that’s very unlike the one I came of age in,
I feel as if we’re often speaking entirely different
languages when it comes to God and religion. Yet
I know from experience that they are good, loving,
compassionate people who are contributing mightily to the building of God’s kingdom.
I’ve come to understand that many things affect
how we view and relate to God, our Catholic faith,
and to each other. These include gender, age, race,
life experience, sexual orientation, to name just
a few. It can all get very complicated and may, at
times, lead to anger, disagreement, disillusionment
and alienation. I seriously doubt this is what the
Lord had in mind when he commanded us to love
God and neighbor.
So what should we do? It may appear simple,
especially when it comes to our neighbor. We all
know the platitudes and proper words to say, but in
reality it can be extraordinarily complicated and
challenging. As always, however, the answer is right
in front of us as we look to Jesus to be our model
and guide.
Just like he did with everyone he met, as thankfully he does with each of us, we should reach out
and embrace all of our brothers and sisters, without
exception. We need to recognize that even those we
disagree with are a good and holy people; that the
spirit of God, the spirit of love, is alive and well in
them. We must drop our self-righteousness (nothing
annoyed Jesus more), and in our daily lives welcome everyone, accept everyone, include everyone,
without condition. Kindness, compassion, understanding should take the place of anger, resentment, condemnation. Instead of looking to others to
change, we are the ones who must grow and become
the loving people the Lord knows we all can be.
Loving God and loving neighbor is not always
easy: One merely needs look to the pages of Catholic San Francisco to see how challenging this can
be! Yet we can do it. Let’s start today!
DEACON MURPHY serves at St. Charles Parish, San Carlos,
and teaches religion at Sacred Heart Schools, Atherton.
LITURGICAL CALENDAR, DAILY MASS READINGS
POPE FRANCIS
REMEMBERING ALL THE LORD HAS DONE FOR US
VATICAN CITY – Do not forget to praise
God for all he has done and how he is there to
guide people, lowering himself like a loving
father who bends down to help his child learn
to walk, Pope Francis said in a morning homily.Giving the Lord praise “brings us joy, to be
happy before the Lord” and find safety and
comfort in his “paternal and tender” embrace,
the pope said Oct. 16 during his morning Mass.
When people pray, they usually know quite
well how to ask God for things and how to give
him thanks, he said. But prayers that give God
praise are “a little more difficult for us; it’s
not quite customary to praise the Lord,” he
said, according to Vatican Radio. Giving praise
comes easier when people think about all “the
things that the Lord has done in our lives” and
remember how God has been holding everyone in his heart since before time began.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 27: Monday of the Thirtieth
Week in Ordinary Time. EPH 4:32-5:8. PS 1:1-2, 3, 4
and 6. LK 13:10-17.
SIMON AND JUDE
first century
October 28
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28: Feast of Sts. Simon and
Jude, Apostles. EPH 2:19-22. PS 19:2-3, 4-5. LK 6:12-16.
Listed among the Twelve
Apostles in the New Testament, Simon is “the Canaanite” to Matthew and Mark
and “the Zealot” to Luke;
Jude is “Thaddeus” to Matthew and Mark, “Judas of James” to Luke, and
“Judas, not Iscariot” to John. After Pentecost, they
disappear. However, according to Eastern tradition,
Simon died peacefully in Edessa, while Western
tradition has him evangelizing in Egypt, then teaming up with Jude, who had been in Mesopotamia,
on a mission to Persia, where they were martyred
on the same day. Simon is the patron saint of tanners; Jude is the patron of desperate causes, possibly because early Christians would pray to him,
with a name evoking Judas Iscariot, only when all
else failed.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29: Wednesday of the
Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time. EPH 6:1-9. PS
145:10-11, 12-13ab, 13cd-14. LK 13:22-30.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30: Thursday of the Thirtieth
Week in Ordinary Time. EPH 6:10-20. PS 144:1b, 2,
9-10. LK 13:31-35.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31: Friday of the Thirtieth Week
in Ordinary Time. All Hallows’ Eve. PHIL 1:1-11. PS
111:1-2, 3-4, 5-6. LK 14:1-6.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1: Solemnity of All Saints.
RV 7:2-4, 9-14. PS 24:1bc-2, 3-4ab, 5-6. 1 JN 3:1-3.
MT 5:1-12a.
22 FROM THE FRONT
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
WUERL: US cardinal says family synod came to ‘real consensus’
FROM PAGE 1
and remarried Catholics, cohabitating couples and people in same-sex
unions.
The midterm report was “seen by
many as not being as balanced as it
should have been. At least from their
perspective, it wasn’t as reflective of
the balance in the discussions,” the
cardinal said.
As a result, he said, “it was really
important that that final (report) be a
consensus document.”
Cardinal Wuerl, who served on the
11-member team that drafted the final
report, said “there were a number of
things that you see in this final document that were only lightly touched
upon (in the midterm report), and then
there were things you see in that (midterm report) that aren’t in here at all.”
He said the synod’s working groups
commonly objected to the theological
concept of “graduality,” which the midterm report used, among other ways,
to suggest the positive value of “irregular” relationships such as cohabitation.
“You don’t see that in the final
document because the small language
groups said, ‘Yes, it was said, but it
didn’t garner support,’” the cardinal
said.
Synod fathers voted on each of the
final report’s 62 paragraphs. All received a simple majority, but three – on
especially controversial questions of
homosexuality and Communion for the
divorced and civilly remarried – failed
to gain the two-thirds supermajority
required for approval of synodal documents.
Archbishop Kurtz urges more
transparency at next family synod
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Archbishop
Joseph E. Kurtz
of Louisville,
Kentucky, said
the October 2015
world Synod of
Bishops on the
family should
return to the
practice of
Archbishop
previous synods
Joseph E. Kurtz
in publishing
participants’
interventions, for the benefit of
their discussions and the information of the outside world.
The archbishop, president of the
U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke with Catholic News
Service Oct. 19, the last day of the
extraordinary synod on the family
Pope Francis called to prepare an
agenda for next year’s assembly.
This year’s synod departed
from established procedure by
requiring participants to submit
written interventions in advance.
The texts were not distributed,
The final report was a “consensus
document, to the best of the ability of
not even to synod fathers, whose
brief remarks in the hall were
not reported to the press, another
departure from previous practice.
“There was the sense, I guess,
that (publishing the interventions) would inhibit people from
speaking out, but I don’t think
that’s the case,” Archbishop Kurtz
said. “My fond hope, and really
my urging, if people ask me about
this, would be to say, no, return to
that process so that that’s another
level of transparency.”
The archbishop said the synod’s
final document, approved by the
assembly Oct. 18, represented an
improvement on its Oct. 13 midterm report, which stirred controversy with strikingly conciliatory
language toward people with ways
of life contrary to church teaching, including divorced and civilly
remarried Catholics, cohabitating
couples and those in same-sex
unions.
“The initial document left
people with many questions,” he
said. “We didn’t want to leave the
synod with that lack of clarity.”
everybody working on it,” Cardinal
Wuerl said. “And you know what veri-
fies that for me? Every single one of
those paragraphs received a majority
and only a handful didn’t receive the
two-thirds.”
“What I think Pope Francis succeeded in doing was letting the synod
fathers, letting the synod participants,
actually come to a real consensus even
though it’s a weak consensus in some
areas,” the cardinal said.
The final report will serve as the
working paper for the October 2015
world synod on the “vocation and mission of the family in the church and the
modern world.”
“Between now and next October, I
think there is going to be so much fruitful discussion in the church,” Cardinal
Wuerl said.
Following the often-contentious
discussion of sexual ethics and how
to reach out to people in “irregular”
unions during the synod, preparation
for the next assembly, the cardinal
explained, would give more attention to
the challenges and virtues of traditional families.
“We’ve had such an airing, such as
expression of the problematic,” Cardinal Wuerl said. “I think we are going to
be hearing more and more the positive
side ... the wonder of what the church
has experienced and presented from
the beginning.”
He added, “We are going to be able to
celebrate that and find there are a lot
people living it, struggling to live it, and
I think they’re going to be witnesses
to the next synod. They’re going to be
the ones in the next synod who will be
bearing witness to what’s ahead of us
and what we can be.”
Synod dynamics recall the Second Vatican Council
FRANCIS X. ROCCA
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Even before the start of the Oct.
5-19 Synod of Bishops on the family, observers were
likening it to the Second Vatican Council of 1962-65.
In both cases, an innovative and charismatic pope
called an assembly in the first months of his pontificate, seeking to preach the Gospel in terms of contemporary culture and apply Catholic teaching with
what St. John XXIII called the “medicine of mercy.”
As it turned out, history also repeated itself in the
institutional dynamics of this year’s event, as bishops from around the world asserted their collective
authority, leading the assembly’s organizers in Rome
to revise some of their best-laid plans.
A classic history, “The Rhine Flows into the Tiber,”
recounts the first tumultuous week of Vatican II,
when bishops rejected the Vatican’s handpicked
candidates for the commissions that would write the
council documents.
“It was not a revolutionary act, but an act of conscience, an act of responsibility on the part of the
council fathers,” recalled Pope Benedict XVI in 2013.
Then-Father Joseph Ratzinger attended Vatican II
as a theological adviser to Cardinal Josef Frings of
Cologne, Germany, one of the leaders of the bishops’
resistance.
More than 50 years later, bishops at the synod on
the family reacted strongly after the Oct. 13 presentation of an official midterm report by Hungarian
Cardinal Peter Erdo of Esztergom-Budapest.
Cardinal Erdo’s report, which was supposed to
summarize the assembly’s first week of discussions,
made headlines with its strikingly conciliatory
language toward people with ways of life contrary to
Catholic teaching, including divorced and remarried
Catholics, cohabitating couples and people in samesex unions.
Immediately after the cardinal spoke, 41 of the 184
synod fathers present took the floor to comment.
A number objected that the text lacked certain
necessary references to Catholic moral teaching,
particularly regarding homosexuality and cohabitation. Bishops also remarked on the midterm report’s
scarce references to the concept of sin.
(CNS PHOTO/MARCIN MAZUR)
Archbishop Denis Hart of Melbourne, Australia, left, and
Archbishop Stanislaw Gadecki of Poznan, Poland, president of
the Polish bishops’ conference, right, talk with an unidentified
bishop during the opening session of the extraordinary Synod
of Bishops on the family at the Vatican Oct. 6. Archbishop
Gadecki told Vatican Radio that the synod’s controversial
midterm report was not acceptable to many synod fathers and
reflected an ideology hostile to marriage.
“Three-quarters of those who spoke had some
problems with the document,” Cardinal George
Pell, prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy, told
Catholic News Service. He called the report tendentious, skewed and without sufficient grounding in
Scripture and traditional doctrine.
“A major absence was Scriptural teaching,” Cardinal Pell said. “A major absence was a treatment
of the church tradition,” including teaching on the
family by Pope Paul VI, St. John Paul II and Pope
Benedict XVI.
At a news conference Oct. 13, Cardinal Erdo distanced himself from the midterm report, identifying
Italian Archbishop Bruno Forte of Chieti-Vasto, the
synod’s special secretary, as responsible for a particularly controversial passage on same-sex unions.
Later that afternoon, the synod fathers divided
into 10 working groups to discuss the midterm
report and suggest amendments for the synod’s final
document.
The midterm report was “seen by many as not
being as balanced as it should have been,” Cardinal
Donald W. Wuerl of Washington told CNS.
Cardinal Wuerl, one of 11 members of a team that
drafted the synod’s final report, said one common
objection was to the theological concept of “graduality,” which the midterm report used, among other
ways, to suggest the positive value of “irregular”
relationships such as cohabitation.
“You don’t see that in the final document because
the small language groups said, ‘Yes, it was said, but
it didn’t garner support,” the cardinal said.
The synod’s leadership, under Cardinal Lorenzo
Baldisseri, who served as general secretary, planned
not to publish the working groups’ individual
reports but provide them only to the drafters of the
final report, along with their approximately 450 suggested amendments.
But on Oct. 16, the bishops insisted that the
working-groups’ reports be made public.
“We wanted the Catholic people around the world
to know actually what was going on in talking about
marriage and the family,” Cardinal Pell said.
On the same day, the drafting committee was
expanded to increase its geographic diversity, with
the addition of Cardinal Wilfrid F. Napier of Durban, South Africa, and Archbishop Denis Hart of
Melbourne, Australia. Just as bishops from a cluster
of northern European countries had been leaders
of change at Vatican II, some of the more outspoken synod fathers this year were from the Englishspeaking countries and Africa.
The synod’s final report, which the pope ordered
published almost immediately after the assembly
finished its work Oct. 18, featured many more citations of Scripture, as well as new references to the
Catechism of the Catholic Church and the teachings of Blessed Paul VI, St. John Paul II and Pope
Benedict XVI.
Synod fathers voted on each of the document’s
62 paragraphs. All received a simple majority, but
three – on especially controversial questions of
homosexuality and Communion for the divorced
and civilly remarried – failed to gain the two-thirds
supermajority ordinarily required for approval of
synodal documents.
FROM THE FRONT 23
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
PAUL VI: Pope Francis beatifies ‘great helmsman’ of Vatican II
FROM PAGE 1
Christian, this tireless apostle, we cannot but say in
the sight of God a word as simple as it is heartfelt and
important: Thanks,” the pope said, drawing applause
from the congregation, which included retired Pope
Benedict, whom Blessed Paul made a cardinal in 1977.
“Facing the advent of a secularized and hostile
society, (Blessed Paul) could hold fast, with farsightedness and wisdom – and at times alone – to
the helm of the barque of Peter,” Pope Francis said,
in a possible allusion to “Humanae Vitae,” the late
pope’s 1968 encyclical, which affirmed Catholic
teaching against contraception amid widespread
dissent.
The pope pronounced the rite of beatification
at the start of the Mass. Then Sister Giacomina
Pedrini, a member of the Sisters of Holy Child Mary,
carried up a relic: a bloodstained vest Blessed Paul
was wearing during a 1970 assassination attempt in
the Philippines. Sister Pedrini is the last surviving
nun who attended to Blessed Paul.
In his homily, Pope Francis did not explicitly mention “Humanae Vitae,” the single achievement for
which Blessed Paul is best known today. Instead, the
pope highlighted his predecessor’s work presiding
over most of Vatican II and establishing the synod.
The pope quoted Blessed Paul’s statement that
(CNS PHOTOS/PAUL HARING)
Left, clergy wait for the start of the beatification Mass of Blessed Paul VI celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter’s Square at the
Vatican Oct. 19. Right, an image of Blessed Paul VI is seen on a banner prior to the Mass.
he intended the synod to survey the “signs of the
times” in order to adapt to the “growing needs of
our time and the changing conditions of society.”
Looking back on the two-week family synod,
Pope Francis called it a “great experience,” whose
members had “felt the power of the Holy Spirit who
constantly guides and renews the church.”
The pope said the family synod demonstrated that
“Christians look to the future, God’s future ... and
respond courageously to whatever new challenges
come our way.”
The synod, dedicated to “pastoral challenges
of the family,” touched on sensitive questions of
sexual and medical ethics and how to reach out
to people with ways of life contrary to Catholic
teaching, including divorced and civilly remarried
Catholics, cohabitating couples and those in samesex unions.
“God is not afraid of new things,” Pope Francis
said. “That is why he is continually surprising us,
opening our hearts and guiding us in unexpected
ways. He renews us; he constantly makes us new.”
Beatified pope inspired ethical method to overcome infertility
VALERIE SCHMALZ
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
Pope Paul VI’s 1968 encyclical “Humanae
Vitae” inspired a Midwestern obstetrician and
gynecologist who is the one of the pioneers of
ethical and effective fertility regulation as well
as developing a revolutionary method of helping
couples overcome infertility known as NaProTechnology.
Dr. Thomas Hilgers, founder of the Pope Paul
VI Institute for the Study of Human Reproduction
in Omaha, Nebraska, offered the Prayers of the
Faithful at Blessed Pope Paul VI’s beatification
Mass Oct. 19.
Hilgers developed the Creighton method of
fertility regulation, and NaProTechnology, which
assists couples with fertility problems.
The Creighton Model Fertility Care System is
one of several effective forms of natural regulation of conception by charting the signs of
fertility in a woman’s body. The Creighton Model
builds on the Billings Method, devised by Australian neurologist Dr. John Billings and his wife
Dr. Lyn Billings, who discovered that a woman’s
body has a number of signs of fertility that can be
charted.
There are three Creighton model teachers in the
archdiocese, said Ed Hopfner, director of marriage and family life. The ethical methods of birth
regulation can also help couples conceive, said
(CNS PHOTO/PAUL HARING)
A banner referencing “Humanae Vitae,” the 1968 encyclical of Blessed Paul VI, is seen in the crowd at the conclusion of the beatification Mass of Blessed Paul celebrated by Pope Francis in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Oct. 19. The Mass also concluded
the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family. Blessed Paul, who served as pope from 1963-1978, is most remembered for
“Humanae Vitae,” which affirmed the church’s teaching against artificial contraception.
Hopfner, who added “Roughly one in every eight
couples has trouble conceiving.”
“Reading ‘Humanae Vitae’ was a transformational moment for me personally and professionally,” Hilgers said in a 2011 interview with Catholic
World Report. He was a senior in medical school
at the University of Minnesota in 1968 when the
encyclical was published. “It was as if the pontiff
was speaking directly to me when he wrote about
the pastoral directives calling ‘men of science’
and ‘doctors and medical personnel’ to study the
natural rhythms of the body in search of answers,”
he said.
For more information on archdiocesan teachers of
natural family planning, contact Ed Hopfner, director of
marriage and family life at [email protected]
or (415) 614-5547.
Paul VI was pope of firsts, a pope of dialogue, cardinal says
CINDY WOODEN
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE
VATICAN CITY – Retired Italian Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re, who comes from the same diocese as
Pope Paul VI did and worked for him in the Vatican
Secretariat of State, described the late pope as a man
rich in spirituality, a thinker and a pastor “very sensitive to the challenges of the modern world.”
Speaking to reporters Oct. 17, two days before Pope
Francis was to beatify Pope Paul, the cardinal said
his concern for modern men and women and his
awareness that the majority of the world’s people
were not Catholic, also made him “a great man of
dialogue.”
Pope Paul exemplified “a dialogue respectful of
others, one that listens to others and, therefore,
trusts that there are values in the other, but also a
dialogue that aims to proclaim God’s love for all and
to proclaim the truths of the Gospel,” the cardinal
said.
Pope Paul led the church from 1963 to 1978. After
St. John XXIII died in 1963, Pope Paul reconvened
the Second Vatican Council, presided over the final
three of its four sessions and oversaw the promulgation of all of the council’s documents. He also led the
process of implementing the council’s reforms.
Cardinal Re told reporters that Pope Paul was a
“pope of firsts” ... the first pope to take a plane, the
first pope since St. Peter to visit the Holy Land and
the first pope to give up the papal tiara. The cardinal
said the pope’s renunciation of the crown was a sign
that his authority did not come from earthly power
and that he did not want earthly glory.
“He served the church and deeply desired that the
church would serve humanity,” the cardinal said.
Redemptorist Father Antonio Marrazzo, the postulator or promoter of Pope Paul’s sainthood cause, told
reporters that the now 13-year-old boy involved in the
miracle accepted for the beatification would not attend the Mass, nor would his parents, who have asked
that their identities not be revealed.
The postulator confirmed, however, that the miracle occurred in the United States – reportedly Califor-
nia – and involved a pregnant woman whose life was
at risk along with the life of her baby. Advised by doctors to terminate the pregnancy, she instead sought
prayers from an Italian nun who was a family friend.
The nun placed a holy card with Pope Paul’s photograph and a piece of his vestment on the woman’s
belly. The baby was born healthy and continues to be
“completely healthy,” Father Marrazzo said.
The Redemptorist said that during the beatification
Mass, the relic offered to Pope Francis is one of two
wool undershirts Pope Paul was wearing in Manila,
the Philippines, in November 1970 when a Bolivian
painter, dressed as a priest, stabbed him in the chest.
Father Marrazzo said he did not know why the pope
was wearing two undershirts that day, but both are
stained with blood.
Born Giovanni Battista Montini in 1897 in the
northern Italian province of Brescia, he was ordained to the priesthood in 1920 and was named
archbishop of Milan in 1954. Elected pope in 1963, he
died at the papal summer villa in Castel Gandolfo on
Aug. 6, 1978.
24 COMMUNITY
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
USF grants focus on Western Addition
OBITUARY
SISTER MAURA PURCELL, BVM, 88
Sister Maura Purcell, a Sister of Charity of the
Blessed Virgin Mary, died Oct. 1 at
her congregation’s Caritas Center
in Dubuque, Iowa, at age 88. A funeral Mass was celebrated in the
sisters’ chapel there with interment in Mount Carmel Cemetery.
Born in Nebraska, Sister Maura
entered the BVM congregation
Sept. 8, 1944. She professed first
Sister Maura
vows March 19, 1947, and final
Purcell, BVM
vows Aug. 15, 1952.
Sister Maura taught at Most
Holy Redeemer in San Francisco from 1952-54 as
well as in schools in Chicago; Butte and Missoula,
Montana; Des Moines, Iowa; and Boulder, Colorado.
She served in pastoral ministry in Michigan.
Remembrances may be sent to the Sisters of
Charity, BVM Support Fund, 1100 Carmel Drive,
Dubuque, Iowa 52003, or online at www.bvmcong.
org/whatsnew_obits.cfm.
The Leo T. McCarthy Center at the University of San
Francisco announced its first-ever Engage San Francisco grant recipients. Launched in spring 2014, Engage San Francisco is a new university-wide initiative
focused on the Western Addition neighborhood, working in partnership with organizations and residents to
improve the support for underserved children, youth
and families living in the often overlooked corners of
the neighborhood, USF announced Oct. 16.
The initiative includes faculty, staff and students
from all five colleges at USF – School of Management, Nursing and Health Professions, Law, Education, and the College of Arts and Sciences – as well as
the Division of Student Life. As part of Engage San
Francisco, groups from USF partner with nonprofits
from the Western Addition to develop unique projects and community-based learning opportunities
that support student learning and meet communityidentified needs. Engage San Francisco’s goals and
strategies are informed by the ongoing consideration
of community assets and opportunities for partner-
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Estela Nolasco 650.867.1422
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Catholic San Francisco and Pentecost Tours, Inc.
invites you
to join in the following pilgrimages
NORTHERN & CENTRAL ITALY
11 DAY PILGRIMAGE
including a rare viewing of the
$3,549 + $659 per person*
from San Francisco
April 13-23, 2014
HOLY LAND FRANCISCAN
PILGRIMAGES
Leading pilgrimages to the Holy Land for more than 100 years!
Customized Pilgrimages • Support for Christians in the Holy Land
800 Years Experience • Flights • Lodging • Meals • Transports • Mass
HOLY LAND
1-800-566-7499
February 4 - 13, 2015
$3,158
March 26 - April 6, 2015
$3,796 *Easter
HOLY LAND & JORDAN
Nov. 29 - Dec. 9, 2014
$3,690
March 12 - 23, 2015
$3,860
May 24 - June 4, 2015
$3,660
FATIMA & LOURDES
SHROUD OF TURIN
with Fr. Vincent Lampert
ships. All grantees will share their outcomes at the
completion of the projects.
Each grantee partnership has been selected for their
exceptional work that seeks to support communitybased efforts in San Francisco’s Western Addition
neighborhood. In addition to a $4,000 grant, each nonprofit works closely with its USF team to bring their
projects to life in the Western Addition.
The grant recipients are:
HANDFUL PLAYERS: Handful Players, committed
to the development of youth in San Francisco’s Western Addition through the vehicle of musical theater,
will collaborate with USF’s Performing Arts & Social
Justice program and assistant professor Christine
Young to create an arts education internship and community service project for students in the program
with a theater concentration.
AFRICAN AMERICAN SHAKESPEARE COMPANY’S SHAKE-IT-UP PROGRAM: Shake-It-Up teaches
literacy skills to students using theater games and
drama techniques. Shake-It-Up will partner with a
committee comprised of teaching artists, USF educators, youth representatives and service-learners to
develop content and techniques to enhance lifelong
creativity and learning through the arts.
BUCHANAN YMCA AND SAN FRANCISCO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT: This collaborative partnership, convened by USF professor Betty Taylor, includes
families and young people from the YMCA and
SFUSD, community organizations, and USF School of
Education faculty and students, to work together on
a platform to facilitate community conversations and
empowerment of those individuals and groups that
are often perceived as marginalized in our society.
THE VILLAGE PROJECT: This partnership will
assess the effectiveness of components of the Village
Project, a decade-long independent activity led by community activist Adrian Williams. The Village Project
provides diverse activities and counseling for youth
living in public housing in the Western Addition.
CHURCH OF ST. JOHN COLTRANE: Located on
Fillmore Street, the St. John Coltrane Church is a part
of the great African Orthodox Church, founded in the
U.S. in 1921. Working together, Pascal Bokar Thiam,
a lecturer of music at USF, and Archbishop King of
the Church of St. John Coltrane, have developed a
program to bring young African-American boys and
girls of the Western Addition together to understand,
appreciate and reconnect with some of the cultural
traits of West African culture.
$3,649 + $659 per person* after Jan. 8, 2015
* Estimated airline taxes and final surcharges
VISIT: Rome (Papal audience), Tivoli, Subiaco, Siena, Florence, Pisa, Milan
For a FREE brochure on
this pilgrimage contact:
Catholic San Francisco (415) 614-5640
Please leave your name, mailing address and your phone number
California Registered Seller of Travel Registration Number CST-2037190-40 (Registration as a
Seller of Travel does not constitute approval by the State of California)
February 5 - 13, 2015
$3,499
June 23 - July 5, 2015
$3,770
ITALY
April 20 - 30, 2015
$3,979
HOLY LAND & TURKEY
May 7 - 17, 2015
$3,660
GREECE
June 24 - July 4, 2015
$4,439
POLAND
August 17 - 25, 2015
$3,599
www.HolyLandPilgrimages.org • [email protected]
COMMUNITY 25
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
FURNITURE FOR SALE
FURNITURE
FOR SALE
Great Quality
+ Great Price
650.703.1886
➠ Young-Hinkle Windjammer-ET
➠ Solid Oak Junior Bedroom Set
➠ Featured in the movie ET!
➠ Bunk Beds, Tall & Short
Dressers
➠ Bookshelf & Desk
USED CAR NEEDED
Retired Senior
needs used car
in good condition,
for medical appts.
and errands.
Please Call (415) 290-7160
Email: [email protected]
CSF CONTENT
IN YOUR
INBOX:
Visit catholic-sf.org to sign up for our e-newsletter.
LAKE TAHOE
RENTAL
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO CLASSIFIEDS
LAKE
TAHOE
RENTAL
CALL (415) 614-5642 | VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | EMAIL [email protected]
Vacation Rental Condo
in South Lake Tahoe.
HELP WANTED
Sleeps 8, near Heavenly
Valley and Casinos.
Call 925-933-1095
See it at RentMyCondo.com#657
CAREGIVER
AVAILABLE
CAREGIVER
FOR ELDERLY
Irish lady with many
years of experience with
all types of home care.
Excellent local references
Car for errands & appts.
(415) 386-8764
CHIMNEY CLEANING AND REPAIR
Chimney Sweep
& Inspection
$75
DISCERNMENT RETREAT
Organization
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO
CONTROLLER
Reports to the Chief Financial Officer The Archdiocese must also comply with the legal
directives at the national, state and local levels for such Church organizations.
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE OF THIS POSITION:
Manage the financial activities of the Central Administrative Finance Office with respect to:
the accounting and reporting functions and services provided to the four Archdiocesan High
Schools and Seminary.
PRIMARY ATTRIBUTES OF THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE:
Strong mentor and Manager who is detail oriented. Must be comfortable with all types of systems;
Excel, PowerPoint and GL packages. Strong understanding of Non-Profit, Fund Accounting and
GAAP. Effective presenter and communicator.
MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES
• Financial Accounting and Reporting:
• Responsible for the maintenance, completeness and accuracy of the financials of the
Chancery.
• Cash Management:
• Manage cash flow of all operations, driving predictability and cash forecasting activities
• Annual Budget Process and Preparation/Expense Management
• Archdiocesan High Schools and Seminary; development and deployment of Accounting
policies
• Ensure adequate Controls and Policies are developed and maintained
• Drive Efficiency, Automation and enhanced Chancery services to other functions
• Management and Mentoring through goal setting ensuring customer commitments are
achieved
• Other; Support Finance Council and Sub-committee reporting
• Basic Skills, Knowledge and/or Abilities
• B.S. Degree in Accounting or Finance
• Ability to perform complex financial analyses and project planning
• Experience and aptitude in the area of IT/IS applications.
Please submit resume and cover letter to:
Archdiocese of San Francisco, Office of Human Resources, Attn Patrick Schmidt
One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, Ca 94109
Or e-mail to: [email protected]
Equal Opportunity Employer. Qualified applicants with criminal histories considered.
MUSIC DIRECTOR, PART TIME.
St. Raymond’s Catholic Parish,
Menlo Park (A Dominican Parish).
Nov. 7-9, 2014
Fri 6pm-Sun 2pm
Single Catholic
Women (College-40)
Nov. 7-9, 2014
Fri 6pm-Sun 2pm
43326 Mission Blvd.
(entrance on Mission
Tierra Pl.)
Fremont, CA 94539
RSVP
By Monday, Nov. 3, 2014
www.msjdominicans.org
Call Sister Marcia Krause @
510-502-5797
for more information and
directions
Free will offering appreciated.
Seeking a person qualified and
skilled in both traditional and
contemporary music to direct the
music for Parish Masses (Saturday
5:15 pm, Sunday 10:00 am),
including proficiency on organ,
piano,and in directing a schola
and cantors. Some singing
ability as well. Additional duties
on Solemnities, Weddings and
Funerals. Weekly duties currently
amount to 15 hours. Salary
according to AGO scale. Possibility
of growth into a 3/4 or full-time
position as the Parish Liturgical
program develops further.
26 CALENDAR
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
PRO-LIFE: Pray at 435 Grand Ave.,
South San Francisco, 10 a.m.-noon,
Saturdays in October. Rosa, (650) 5890998; Romanie, (650) 583-6169.
VICTIM ASSISTANCE: Survivors of
clergy sexual abuse are invited to a
Day of Mindfulness at Mercy Center,
Adeline Drive, Burlingame led by
Catherine Regan, Ph.D. For reservations contact Renee Duffey, (415)
614-5506.
DIGNITY OF WOMEN: A special
one-day presentation of educating
on the nature and dignity of women,
St. Mary’s Cathedral, Gough Street
at Geary Boulevard, San Francisco,
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $35 fee includes
study materials and lunch. Scholarships available. Talks explore the life of
Edith Stein, also known as St. Teresa
Benedicta of the Cross. Contact Maria
Martinez and Pauline Talens, endow.
[email protected]; to register, go to www.
endowgroups.org and click under the
events tab.
PAROL MAKING: Parol-making
workshop, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., St, Monica
Church hall, 470 24th Ave., San Francisco. Parol kits $7. Parol reminds
Filipino Christians of the star of Bethlehem, the triumph of light over darkness. [email protected]; (415)
699-7927; Peter and Estrelle Chan,
[email protected] GRIEF SUPPORT: “Working Toward
Inner Peace,” Good Shepherd parish,
901 Oceana Blvd, Pacifica, 10-11:30
a.m. [email protected];
[email protected]; www.sfarchdiocese.
SATURDAY, NOV. 1
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3
TODOS LOS SANTOS: All Saints’
Day Mass, Holy
Cross Mausoleum
Chapel, Holy Cross
Cemetery, 1500
Mission Road,
Colma, 11a.m.,
Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone,
principal celebrant
and homilist.
Archbishop
Refreshments and
Salvatore J.
fellowship follow.
Cordileone
(650) 756-2060;
www.holycrosscemeteries.com.
SIMBANG GABI: Mass opening novena of prayer anticipating birth of
Christ, St. Mary’s
Cathedral, Gough
Street at Geary
Boulevard, San
Francisco, 7:30
p.m. Archbishop
Bernardito Auza,
Archbishop
permanent obBernardito Auza
server of the Vatican at the U.N., is
principal celebrant. [email protected]
gmail.com; (415) 699-7927.
TUESDAY, OCT. 28
org/home/ministries/grief-consolation.
No charge.
ST. BRIGID DAY: St. Brigid School,
Van Ness at Broadway, San Francisco,
11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Enjoy Mexican food
and southern-style fried chicken, lunch
$10 adult/$7 children.Visit www.saintbrigidsf.org; (415) 673-4523.
MONDAY, OCT. 27
RIORDAN ALUMNI: All Archbishop
Riordan High School grads who live
or work in the Marin County area are
invited to attend the first annual Marin
Alumni Luncheon at La Toscana Restaurant in San Rafael. $40 per person,
reservations required. Tickets available
online. Visit www.riordanhs.org or call
Marc Rovetti, alumni director, (415)
586-8200, ext. 357.
SCRIPTURE STUDY: Mercy Sister Toni
Lynn Gallagher on achieving gratitude
and a joy-filled heart as well as reflections
on Pope Francis “Joy of the Gospel,”
9-10 a.m., Marian Room of St. Stephen
Church, 451 Eucalyptus Drive at 23rd
Avenue, San Francisco. SaintStephenSF.
org; [email protected]
REUNION: Class of 1947, Presentation
High School, San Francisco, Olympic
Club Lakeside. Alice, (415) 826-7771;
Mary June, (408) 354-1544.
THURSDAY, OCT. 30
ICA GALA: Education that Works Gala,
Grand Hyatt Union Square, 345 Stockton
St., San Francisco, 5:30-9:30 p.m. $175
PLUMBING
CONSTRUCTION
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John V. Rissanen
Cell: (916) 517-7952
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2190 Mt. Errigal Lane
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Lunch & Dinner, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
Weddings, Banquets, Special Occasions
25 RUSSIA AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO
www.iasf.com
415-585-8059
‘LOOKING EAST’: Come to Our Lady
of Fatima Russian Byzantine Catholic
Church, 5920 Geary Blvd. at 23rd Avenue, San Francisco for Divine Liturgy
at 10 a.m.; luncheon at noon and a talk
by Father Kevin Kennedy, pastor, at 1
p.m. All are welcome throughout the
day. Series continues first Saturdays
of the month. Parking is in St. Monica
Church lot. Visit www.byzantinecatholic.org; call (415) 752-2052; email
[email protected]
PEACE MASS: Sts. Peter and Paul
Church, 666 Filbert St. at Washington Square, San Francisco, 9 a.m.,
Salesian Father John Itzaina, pastor,
principal celebrant and homilist. (650)
580-7123; [email protected]
‘HOPE UNCORKED’: Catholic
Charities evening of wine, music and
celebration, benefiting Bay Area kids in
need, 6:30 p.m., Yoshi’s San Francisco,
1330 Fillmore St. Tickets are $100,
$60 for supporters 35 and under. Visit
www.CatholicCharitiesSF.org/HopeUncorked, call (415) 972-1273; email
[email protected]
GRIEF SUPPORT: “Moving Toward
the Light,” Good Shepherd Parish, 901
Oceana Blvd., Pacifica, 10-11:30 a.m,
[email protected]; [email protected]
aol.com; www.sfarchdiocese.org/home/
ministries/grief-consolation. No charge.
FENCES & DECKS
HOLLAND
Plumbing Works San Francisco
ALL PLUMBING WORK
PAT HOLLAND
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415-205-1235
415.279.1266
John Spillane
• Retaining Walls • Stairs • Gates
• Dry Rot • Senior & Parishioner Discounts
650.291.4303
[email protected]
PAINTING
ELECTRICAL
O’DONOGHUE CONSTRUCTION
S.O.S.
PAINTING CO.
Interior-Exterior • wallpaper • hanging & removal
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
Kitchen/Bath Remodel
Dry Rot Repair • Decks /Stairs
Plumbing Repair/Replacement
Call: 650.580.2769
Lic. # 505353B-C36
Support CSF
If you would like to add your tax-deductible
contribution, please mail a check, payable to Catholic San Francisco, to:
Catholic San Francisco, Dept. W, One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco CA 94109
ROOFING
Lic # 526818 • Senior Discount
415-269-0446 • 650-738-9295
www.sospainting.net
F REE E STIMATES
Bill Hefferon Painting
Bonded & Insured
CA License 819191
Cell 415-710-0584
[email protected]
Office 415-731-8065
10% Discount to Seniors & Parishioners
Serving the
Residential Bay
Area for
Commercial over 30 Years
IRISH Eoin
PAINTING
Lehane
Discount
to CSF
Readers
DINING
Italian American Social
Club of San Francisco
SATURDAY, NOV. 1
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
HOME SERVICES
CAHALAN CONSTRUCTION
per person. Rhonda Hontalas, (415) 8242052, ext. 40; [email protected]
Proceeds benefit Immaculate Conception Academy, San Francisco.
Lic. #742961
SATURDAY, OCT. 25
(415) 786-0121 • (650) 871-9227
415.368.8589
Lic.#942181
[email protected]
M.K. Painting
Interior-Exterior
Residential – Commercial
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Solar Installation
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cutter (cleaning and repairs), landscaping,
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Grant (650) 757-1946
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CALENDAR 27
CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO | OCTOBER 24, 2014
group. Jesuit Father Al Grosskopf, (415)
422-6698, [email protected]
SUNDAY, NOV. 2
ST. PETER SCHOOL: Mass and
reception honoring San Francisco school’s
deceased classmates, religious,
lay staff, 2:30
p.m. St. Peter
Church, 24th
and Alabama
Bishop William
streets, San
J. Justice
Francisco, with
former pastor,
Bishop William J. Justice, principal celebrant. Honorees include
Fred Clark, a volunteer instructor
at St. Peter, and Toni Ortengo,
who has served at the school for
more than 40 years. www.sanpedro.org/alumni.
SATURDAY, NOV. 15
HANDICAPABLES MASS:
Bishop William J. Justice is principal celebrant and homilist at
Handicapables Mass and lunch,
noon, in lower halls of St. Mary’s
Cathedral, Gough Street at
Geary Boulevard, San Francisco, Gough Street entrance. All
disabled people and their caregivers are invited. Volunteers
are always welcome to assist in
this cherished tradition. Joanne
Borodin, (415) 239-4865.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 5
DIVORCE SUPPORT: Meeting takes
place first and third Wednesdays, 7:30
p.m., St. Stephen Parish O’Reilly Center,
23rd Avenue at Eucalyptus, San Francisco. Groups are part of the Separated
and Divorced Catholic Ministry in the
archdiocese and include prayer, introductions, sharing. It is a drop-in support
Christmas Fair, Saturday and Sunday,
10 a.m.-4 p.m. both days. Email [email protected]
FRIDAY, NOV. 7
TAIZE: All are welcome to Taizé prayer
around the cross, Mercy Center, 2300
Adeline Drive, Burlingame, 8 p.m. Taizé
prayer has been sung on first Fridays
at Mercy Center since 1983. Mercy
Sister Suzanne Toolan, (650) 340-7452. MARRIAGE HELP: Are you frustrated
or angry with each other? Do you
argue? Retrouvaille helps couples
through difficult times in their marriages. For confidential information about
or to register for the program call (415)
893-1005; email [email protected];
visit www.HelpOurMarriage.com.
OUR LADY MASS: Visiting Archbishop
Paciano B. Aniceto, retired from San
Fernando, Pampanga, Philippines is
principal celebrant at Mass commemorating the Virgen de los Remedios,
patron of Pampanga, 1 p.m., St. Anne
of the Sunset Church, 850 Judah St. at
Funston, San Francisco. www.facebook.
com/VirgenDeLosRemediosInNorCal.
TUESDAY, NOV. 11
VETERANS DAY SERVICE: Holy
Cross Cemetery, 1500 Mission Road,
Colma, Star of the Sea section, 11
a.m., Msgr. Michael Padazinski,
colonel, U.S. Air Force, chancellor and
canon law head, Archdiocese of San
Francisco, will preside. (650) 756-2060;
www.holycrosscemeteries.com.
SATURDAY, NOV. 8
YOUTH RALLY: The San Francisco Interfaith Committee for Life ecumenical event
for youth, seventh through 12th grades,
10 a.m.-4 p.m., San Francisco’s Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 999 Brotherhood Way. Admission is $10 per person
with registration due by Oct. 30. Call (415)
308-4851; email [email protected]; visit
www.sfinterfaithcommitteeforlife.org/.
GRIEF SUPPORT: All Saints’ Day Mass
of remembrance, Good Shepherd Parish, 901 Oceana Blvd, Pacifica, 1 p.m.,
light reception follows; [email protected]
sbcglobal.net; [email protected]; visit
www.sfarchdiocese.org/home/ministries/grief-consolation. No charge.
BOUTIQUE: Women’s Club, All Souls
Catholic School, South San Francisco
THURSDAY, NOV. 13
PRO-LIFE: San Mateo Pro-Life meets
second Thursdays except December
7:30 p.m., St. Gregory Worner Center,
138 28th Avenue at Hacienda, San Mateo. New members welcome. Jessica,
(650) 572-1468; [email protected]
FRIDAY, NOV. 14
BOUTIQUE: Sisters of Mercy at Marian
Oaks Annual Holiday Boutique, Friday
and Saturday, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. both
days. Delicious homemade jams,
baked goods, fudge, handcrafted
items, perfect holiday gifts, 2300 Adeline Drive, Burlingame. Enter at Hoover
gate, follow Lower Road to Marian
REAL ESTATE
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650.347.6903
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415.759.0520
Marin
415.721.7380
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Michael J. Clifford
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415.209.9036
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FINANCIAL ADVISOR
MISSION TRIP: One-day pilgrimage to
Mission Santa Cruz and Mission Santa
Clara from St. Veronica Church, South
San Francisco. $100 fee includes transportation, lunch and mission entrance
fees. June Heise, (650) 871-7738.
SUNDAY, NOV. 16
FASHION SHOW: San Francisco
Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians
fashion show, luncheon and raffle;
11 a.m., no host cocktails, with lunch
at noon, San Francisco United Irish
Cultural Center, 2700 45th Ave. $55
adults, $15 children. RSVP by Nov. 10
to Pam Naughton, (415) 566-1936.
FRIDAY, NOV. 21
FAITH CONFERENCE: Faith Formation
Conference, Santa Clara Convention
Center, liturgy, workshops, and exhibits
for catechists, parish leaders, parents,
youth and young adults. Registration:
www.faithformationconference.com.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 3
KOHL CHRISTMAS: Mercy High
School, Burlingame Alumnae Association’s Christmas at Kohl 2014, 5-9 p.m.,
Kohl Mansion on the Mercy campus 2750
Adeline Drive, Burlingame, with more than
60 vendors plus docent presentations
of the mansion at 6:30 and 7. Musical
entertainment, and light refreshments will
be available for purchase. Tickets $10
adults/children free at the door. Visit www.
mercyhsb.com for information on the
event and parking/shuttles.
TO ADVERTISE IN CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO
VISIT www.catholic-sf.org | CALL (415) 614-5642
EMAIL [email protected]
THE PROFESSIONALS
Irish Help at Home
SATURDAY, NOV. 15
SUNDAY, NOV. 9
FIRST FRIDAY: The Contemplatives of
St. Joseph offer Mass at Mater Dolorosa
Church, 307 Willow Ave., South San Francisco, 7 p.m., followed by healing service
and personal blessing with St. Joseph oil
from Oratory of St. Joseph, Montreal.
HOME HEALTH CARE
Oaks. Debbie Halleran, (650) 340-7426;
[email protected]
COUNSELING
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MOST REVEREND SALVATORE CORDILEONE
and
HOLY CROSS CATHOLIC CEMETERY
invites you to share
ALL SAINTS DAY MASS | TODOS LOS SANTOS – FIRST SATURDAY
Saturday, November 1, 2014
Holy Cross Mausoleum Chapel – 11:00 am
Most Reverend Salvatore Cordileone, Celebrant Archbishop of San Francisco
Please join us for refreshments and fellowship following the ceremony.

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