Time for Santa 24 page

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Time for Santa 24 page
BUFFET NIGHT
IS BACK!
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22 Francis Street
Stornoway
Isle of Lewis
HS1 2NB
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•
Insurance Services
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•
Risk Management
t: 01851 704949
•
Health & Safety
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Christmas gifts
now available, including
Harris Tweed jackets,
bags and slippers.
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Halle and Sebastian meet Santa at the Maybury Gardens light switch-on. Turn to Section Four
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Photograph by Melissa Silver
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WHO ID[ EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 2
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
Karen inspires school pupils with Paralympic triumph
competition.
By Iain A MacSween
A
Paralympic silver medallist thrilled island
schoolchildren on Monday November
16, giving an inspiring talk on overcoming
difficulties to achieve great things.
Karen Darke was paralysed from the chest down
after a freak climbing accident when she was just
21.
Despite her horrific injuries, she achieved
lifetime ambitions by climbing the Himalayas and
reaching the summit of ‘El Capitan’ in Yosemite
National Park.
But it was her success in the 2012 London
Paralympics that propelled her to stardom, when
she came second in the women’s road trial H1-2
Now she is focussing her efforts on going one
better and bringing home a gold medal from the
Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro next year.
On her visit to Lewis, she visited pupils in Tong,
Laxdale, Stornoway Primary, and The Nicolson
Institute.
Karen told EVENTS: “When you are young it’s
easy to watch the television and see things like the
Olympics, and think ‘I could never do that’.
“My first visit to the Outer Hebrides was on a seakayaking holiday shortly after I became paralysed,”
she said.
“I lived in Aberdeen at the time and myself and
some friends came to a kayaking symposium in
North Uist.
“I just fell in love with the place and have been
coming back ever since.
“I find the Outer Hebrides very inspiring.”
“I’m here to get the message across that if you
want to do something, and you believe you can do
it, then anything is possible.”
She added: “I’m telling the schoolkids in the
islands to focus on the here and now and the future,
and on what is possible, rather than letting things in
the past keep them back.
Karen is no stranger to the Western Isles, having
cycled her way across Harris in recent years.
“If they do that they can achieve anything they
want to.”
Jamie opens car wash in Harris
By Iain A MacSween
A
Buth Bheag
Candle Co.
Open Tuesday,
Wednesday, Friday
and Saturday
throughout December
Opening times may vary
Two festive scents available, Cinnamon
& Apple and Cranberry Orange &
Cinnamon, along with our usual five.
Lots of other Gifts/Crafts/Christmas goodies available
Main Street, Tarbert, Isle of Harris HS3 3DJ
t: 01859 502 101 [email protected]
www.buthbheagcandleco.uk
new car wash facility has opened in Harris. 'Isle of Harris
Hand Car Wash and Cleaning' is situated at the new Iomairt
an Obain business units beside Willow Park, in East Tarbert.
The venture has been launched by Jamie McGowan, who has
taken hire of Unit 3 for production of his hugely successful 'Buth
Bheag' candles and scented sticks.
The car wash will be open from 9am until 5pm, every Friday and
Saturday.
A hand car wash costs £5, with wheel cleaning £1.50, interior
hoover £2, and a dash clean costing £2.
All of the above are on special offer for £9, with a surcharge for
4x4 vehicles and jeeps.
Jamie said: "We were lucky enough to get this unit from the North
Harris Trust to manufacture our candles, but we wanted to utilise the
building to its full capacity.
"Because we own Isle of Harris Car Hire we have to wash our own
cars, so since we have the equipment here on site, it made sense to
provide a new service for the people of Harris where they can get
their cars cleaned to a high standard at excellent rates.
"In the winter there's a lot of salt on the road so we expect to be
quite busy," he added.
MV Suilven: salvage possible
T
he Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport in Fiji is in talks
with Venu Shipping regarding the removal of the former
CalMac ferry Suilven from the bed of Suva harbour.
After conducting a dive to determine the amount of diesel fuel on
the ship, which sank on Tuesday November 24th, the Ministry said
there was no leakage of light diesel fuel and estimated about 3,000
litres of fuel could be left in its tanks from the 8,000 litres it had before
departing the nearby island of Ovalau.
The Ministry's permanent secretary, Francis Kean, said while they
continued discussions with the shipowner and its insurers, small boat
operators needed to be reminded to keep clear of the site for safety
and security reasons the Fiji Times reported.
The mv Suilven capsized in Suva's harbour on Tuesday November
24. There were no paying passengers aboard as the vessel was on a
freight voyage and the crew of around 30 were all rescued. The Fiji
Navy's hydrographic unit divers were onsite the next day.
HOW TO CONTACT US
Editor: Fred Silver 01851 705743
[email protected]
Advertising: April Maclean Graham
[email protected]
Feature writers/reporters:
Iain A Macsween 01851 705671
[email protected]
Roz Skinner, Katie Macleod,
Eilidh Whiteford
Administration:
Melissa Silver 01851 705749 or
[email protected]
Design and layout: Andrew Jeffries
Additional design: Keith Stringer
Accounts email: [email protected]
NEXT EDITION: The deadline for information and advertising is Tuesday
December 29th. The newspaper will appear on Wednesday January 6th
Free listings information:
[email protected]
EVENTS is published by Intermedia Services, Offices 1-3, Clintonʼs Yard, Rigs Road, Stornoway, HS1 2RF Tel: 01851 705743
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 3
www.hebevents.com
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30 Francis Street
Stornoway
Isle of Lewis
HS1 2ND
T: 01851 707219
E: [email protected]
W: www.orbit.agency
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• Business Advisory Services
• Marketing & Social Media
• Administration Support
• Human Resources
• Training & Development
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EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 4
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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Lewis Weddings
Professional Wedding Films
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mhacachd & Daltach
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Be a foster carer and change lives forever
Do you have time, patience and
understanding to give to children?
We need foster carers for children and
young people living in the Western Isles
who are unable to remain living with their
families.
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We provide specialist support and training
and can provide allowances of up to
£194.00 p/wk. There is also the potential
career prospect as a fee paid Foster Carer
where qualified and experienced foster
carers receive £18,000 per annum plus
allowances.
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HAVE YOU EVER
CONSIDERED FOSTERING?
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If you are interested in finding out more please contact:
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The Adoption & Fostering Team
Comhairle nan Eilean Siar
Sandwick Rd, Stornoway
Tel: 01851 822749
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[email protected]
[email protected]
A’ Coileanadh Sàr-Mhaitheas Còmhla –Achieving Excellence Together
$LUSRUW
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We offer a wide range of services
and product support, including:
Ŷ Concrete Works Ŷ Site Clearances Ŷ Access Roads
Ŷ Landscaping Ŷ Driveways Ŷ Tar Preparation
Ŷ Drainage Ŷ Digger Hire Ŷ Tipper Hire Ŷ Top Soil
Tel: 01851 621 432 Mob: 07769712170
www.amkplantandtipperhire.co.uk
[email protected]
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IT Support and Maintenance
Computer Repairs, Sales and Upgrades
Suppliers of IT Hardware and Software
Desktop, Laptop and User Support
Server and Network Support
Wireless Installations and Support
Backup Solutions
Print and eDocument Solutions
Telephone System Support
Office Relocations/Extensions and New Builds
On-site and Remote Support
Professional, friendly and reliable service
If you don’t see what you need above, just ask!
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Hebridean Connections
Fìor dhaoine, fìor bheatha - Real people, real lives
A project that brings people together around a shared
interest in the history and culture of the Outer Hebrides.
An initiative that promotes volunteering and develops IT
skills within the community.
A unique website, bringing tens of thousands of records from
the islands’ historical societies together in one place.
A vast resource where a worldwide audience can find out
about island people and their way of life in times gone by.
ZZZKHEULGHDQFRQQHFWLRQVFRP
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
CUT
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THE
CALORIES
Is it time to change the way you drink?
Be Drinkaware with our new lifestyle app. Calculate the
calories and units in your drinks, and view alcohol in terms
of burgers and exercise equivalents.
You can also set goals and get personalised support.
GET OUR FREE APP AND CUT BACK TODAY.
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 5
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 6
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
Scenes from the final event for the visiting
Pendleton students at Sandwick Hall
20 years on…Pendleton exchange students visit
By Eilidh Whiteford
T
wenty years on from the first school exchange and six
Pendleton High School (PHS) students recently discovered
what life is like in the Western Isles – along with lessons on how
to deal with storms!
For keen runner Dr Joanna Avery, a South Carolina Director of
Education who travelled with the Pendleton group, there “will never
be a bad hair day again back home,” following one particularly
blustery morning island run.
PHS senior student Joey McCannon was literally blown away by
his experience on an island croft: “We just don't get wind like you
guys do!” he said.
And pupil Cameron McIntosh added: “It's incredible. It's very
amazing how it happens, the way the whole island shuts down for a
bit of weather.”
The links between Pendleton High School and The Nicolson
Institute, as well as connections between the two communities, have
been well fostered over the past two decades with students from both
sides of the Atlantic recalling fond memories of exchange trips.
Yet this close connection arose from a chance meeting many years
ago when a group from the islands, including Ellis MacLeod, working
HEB
gas & oil
with the Education Department in the late 1990s, met South Carolina
state Department of Education employee Jane Cahaly in a lift during
an education conference in Washington DC.
Jane Cahaly spoke of their desire to twin with a school and town in
Scotland, and Ellis suggested The Nicolson and Stornoway. The rest,
as they say, is history.
Travelling over on Friday, November 13th, the 2015 Pendleton
contingent just made it to Lewis before ferries were cancelled and
hatches were battened down for the weekend of storms.
But the weather didn't stop the adventure as the group spent
Saturday touring the sites of Lewis, including Callanish Standing
Stones, Carloway Broch and the Gearrannan Blackhouse village.
e. [email protected]
Gas appliance install, service and repair
Oil boiler service and repair.
Domestic, commercial plumbing
See the Outer Hebrides
from the sea…
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Gift vouchers are available for all our trips and are valid for a year from the date of purchase.
PHS pupil Melanie Mullikin, who celebrated her 18th birthday
in Lewis, was also impressed by her visit to the Scottish Salmon
Company, realising that there was a lot more involved than simply
'growing the fish'.
“We were out at the fish hatchery, checking all the fish, their tails
for disease,” she said. “Then we took four inside to the laboratory and
I got to dissect them and look at them under the microscope – it was
really cool and there is so much that goes on in there.”
And on their final full day in the Western Isles, PHS students
attended a morning work placement – an experience which left an
impression on many of the young American men and women.
For all the PHS students, the welcome received by their hosts,
Nicolson pupils and the community at large was another aspect of
their trans-Atlantic trip which will stay with them.
For Joey McCannon, a senior student who comes from a farming
background, spending the morning with Iain Murdo Macmillan from
the Scottish Agricultural College was an eye-opener he relished.
Bailee Hayden said: “The hospitality has been unbelievable. I
thought all Europeans would be mean to us because no one seems to
like Americans, but that's not been at all true.”
“He took me around a few crofts, including his own, and pointed
And Cameron McIntosh added: “The friendliness and hospitality
have been incredible. We've seen that everyone is the same, there's
the same types of groups in the school, and everyone has welcomed
us wherever we've gone.”
It's been the same story as that told by the hundreds of Nicolson
students who, over the years, have made the trip to South Carolina.
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Landlord Safety Certificates.
“There was so much to take in, all the different breeds of sheep for
example, but it was so beautiful being out there,” he added.
The Sunday was spent with their island hosts, before Monday saw
the students experience life within The Nicolson Institute, as well as
a tour of Lews Castle.
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t. 07557236604
out improvements, things that needed done,” said Joey. “There's a
number of the same problems we face back home, the necessity of
drainage and so on, but the wind is something different. The land is
so open, at least we have trees at home to help shelter, but there's
nothing here.
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Comhairle Councillor Charlie Nicolson, who has visited Pendleton
a number of times, said: “The young people learn about another
culture, another education system and how different nations operate.
It builds up their confidence and they become better citizens, they
understand that they themselves can do things; and it brings both
communities together.”
And Councillor Zena Stewart, a Pendleton stalwart who has
arranged and taken the trip several times, added: “There have been so
many people who have gone backwards and forwards [to Pendleton]
over the years and they've made their own connections and life-long
friends.
“Every year I wondered why I was doing it, but as soon as you
walked into the library at Pendleton High School and saw all the
familiar faces and received such a warm welcome, it made it all so
worthwhile.”
And Pendleton High School headmaster Brian Couch, on his second
trip to Stornoway, said: “So many people from both communities
have so many ties with these trips.
“It gives the students a chance to be citizen diplomats. That's
important in days like this,” he continued, making reference to the
Paris terrorist attacks that took place last month.
“The governments, the people at the top, are not able to change
these situations; it's the people and their relationships which solve
the problems, and through these trips the young people get a chance
to discover the power of that.”
strath
print
Broadford, Isle of Skye, IV49 9AP
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Tel: 01471 822 555
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www.strathprint.co.uk
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 7
www.hebevents.com
Saint Raymond
joins festive show
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By Eilidh Whiteford
F
orget St. Nicolas this month, it's all
about Saint Raymond at the 'Alternative
Christmas Carol' music night taking place in
the Woodlands Centre on Friday, December
11th.
Established last year, the Alternative Christmas
Carol offers a night of original music and
festive covers, and this year is delighted to have
Nottingham-born rising star Saint Raymond as
headline act.
Event organiser, local singer/songwriter Colin
Macleod, said: “We are very happy to have the
Alternative Christmas Carol returning for another
year and really excited to have Saint Raymond
coming to play.
“He's such a great talent and it's great he's taken
time out to come and play with us.”
Saint Raymond burst on to the UK music
scene with the release of EP 'Escapade' in 2013.
Following a stint on the BBC Introducing Stage
at the Reading and Leeds Festival in August that
year, he embarked upon a UK and Ireland tour
during September; then took up support slot
for Californian band Haim's sold out UK and
European tour in December 2013.
His second EP 'Young Blood' heralded in 2014,
and the title track was named 'Hottest Record in the
World' by BBC DJ Zane Lowe. And he supported
Ed Sheeran during the star's European tour.
Saint Raymond's success has continued into
2015 with the release of debut album 'Young
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the official midweek charts and reached No.15 on
the iTunes chart on pre-orders alone.
Colin continued: “I'm also very excited for our
local acts who have agreed to join us. We'll have
Eleanor Nicolson, Neosa, Jane Hepburn doing
a solo set, and returning for a second year – I
suppose that makes them the house band – The
Dun Ringles!”
Certainly An Alternative Christmas Carol, the
evening looks set to be a good one, as Colin
added: “We'll have mulled wine and mince pies
available on the night to get everyone in the mood.
Christmas attire optional!”
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Friday, December 11th, Woodlands Centre, Lews
Castle Grounds. Tickets, priced £8, are available
from the Woodlands Centre.
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EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 8
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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Christmas?
Come and see
our collection
of luxury
Harris Tweed
gifts, including
jackets, bags and
slippers.
Your local fuel and
lubricant supplier
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Fast | Friendly | Reliable service
Call your local depot on
01851 703484
part of
certas energy
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
Winter shop opening hours:
11.30am - 5.30pm, Mon - Sat
Fuel 24hrs
www.hebevents.com
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 9
www.ravenspoint.net
Kershader, Isle of Lewis, HS2 9QA
It's time again...
Yes, here we are again, dusting off
the decorations, rolling out the
pastry, and getting ready for another
great Ravenspoint Christmas lights
switch-on!
Our little (big!) elf from Croft 1 is
working away to get everything
r e a d y, a n d t h a n k s t o A l i n e
Woodland, it looks like this year's
festive tree will be the biggest and
brightest yet!
The big night is Thursday, 10th
December. We’ll have stalls offering
a mix of festive goodies from 5pm,
and there'll be a selection of local
crafts, gifts and books for all ages
on sale in the shop to help you find
the perfect pressie.
We’re delighted that Santa has
promised to join us at 6pm, and
we’re hoping everyone will be in
good voice afterwards for some
traditional, and judging by last year's
efforts, enthusiastic carol singing
around the tree, as the festive lights
are switched on.
Christmas - we still love it!
New Winter
Opening Hours
Shop:
11.30am - 5.30pm
Monday - Saturday
Fuel Service:
Petrol and Diesel 24/7
(easy payment by card
machine when shop closed).
Café:
Closed for the winter.
Available to hire for
functions and meetings.
Catering service also
available.
Call 01851 830236
to book.
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 10
www.hebevents.com
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
funding was a major issue. Four people were
employed locally on a part-time basis, managing
42 people. “We desperately need more workers,”
said Debs.
Sharing experiences in
all fields of education
On a national level, Penumbra campaigns
to influence national and local government
policy, and to increase public knowledge and
understanding about mental ill health.
The charity is seen as one of the most significant
mental health voluntary organisations in Scotland.
It is known for the quality of its work, its creativity
and ability to work in partnership with a range of
organisations and groups.
The Fifth Partnership Event was held on November 12 in the Caberfeidh
Hotel. The focus was to bring all key partners and agencies in the
Education Sector together and share ideas and practice. CnES
organisers said afterwards that this was the most successful yet, lasting
from 9am-1pm, and bringing people together who otherwise would
be working in separate locations. Subjects ranged from counselling
to child sexual exploitation, and Harris Tweed to substance abuse.
A partnership between Lews Castle College
and CnES provides somewhere where longterm unemployed people could enhance their
employability skills - this came in the form of
the Hebridean Independent Living and Learning
Service (HILLS), which brings us Grow to Work.
The Partnership Event welcomed David Bell of
Grow to Work; Anne Blyth, project manager at
CnES’ Outer Hebrides Managing Employment
Enterprise and Training Programme (OHMEET), as
well as student guest, Derek.
HILLS and OHMEET work together to get people
- often people with “barriers to employment”,
such as learning difficulties and mental health
issues, and those who have been made redundant,
who have often been referred to them by the job
centre - from unemployment into some form of
employment, whether it’s full-time work, or just a
day’s work per week.
OHMEET have noticed a high proportion of the
unemployed fall into the over 50s category, and
Anne states: “There seems to be an element of
employers not wanting to employ over 50s,” which
is a problem OHMEET are trying to tackle.
HILLS now runs a project called Grow to Work,
which takes place in the college nursery, and
uses horticulture to get people into the routine of
working. David Bell explained that he didn’t expect
everyone on the course to go into horticulture, but
it gets them used to working to a schedule and
being in a working environment. Grow to Work is
intended to “empower” people.
Sexual Violence
Prevention’
There’s a strong chance that the last movie
you watched is discriminatory towards women,
according to the Bechdel Test, which rates films
based on the criteria of containing at least two
female characters who talk to each other about
something besides a man.
The Harris Tweed Authority’s main aim is to protect
the Harris Tweed trademark and the industry that it
represents. Based in Stornoway, the Authority puts
effort into educating young people on the work that
the Authority does, as well as the job opportunities
the Harris Tweed industry provides.
In Jane’s role as Education Officer, she has been
given the opportunity to teach kids about what goes
on in the industry, and has given them hands-on
experience, by arranging weaving lessons, and
getting them involved in marketing. Marketing,
Jane explained, can be more difficult than you
might expect, as you have to be careful not to alter
the Harris Tweed trademark in any way.
Jane referred to herself as a ‘home bird’, and
stated that she might never have been able to find
work at home if it weren’t for the Harris Tweed
Industry - highlighting the importance of the
industry in keeping young people on the islands,
and bringing young people back to the island, after
they’ve gone away to study or gain experience
elsewhere.
Jane talked about Ruth MacDonald, of Harris
Tweed Hebrides, who studied Fashion Marketing in
university. “She couldn’t imagine getting a job in
Harris Tweed, then she got to show a representative
of Chanel around the tweed mill - not something
you’d usually get to do!”
There are currently 300 people employed by
the Harris Tweed industry, many of them young
people. There are many different jobs available,
for example: weaving; designing; marketing;
promoting; and, of course, protecting the famous
orb.
OHMEET deals with people all over the Western
Isles who are in long-term unemployment, and
they try to get them back into the world of work by
organising paid placements with local businesses.
These placements usually last for about a year,
but they can often lead to work opportunities,
either within the business in which they had their
placement, or elsewhere, thanks to the experience.
Each position offers minimum wage, and usually
30-37 hours per week.
The Parternship event saw Suzanne MacAulay,
Substance Misuse Development Office at the ADP,
explain the current aims of the ADP in tackling the
islands’ known alcohol problem.
OHMEET are currently applying for more funding
to allow them to provide more spaces for people to
get placements.
In 2010-11, alcohol misuse cost the Western
Isles a total of £9.94million, however, the trend of
alcohol-related A&E attendances is shown to be
Substance Misuse
The Outer Hebrides Alcohol and Drug Partnership
(OHADP) consists of a number of organisations
and stakeholders, the aim of whom is to tackle the
issue of alcohol and drugs in the islands.
Marina Macfarlane, of Western Isles Rape Crisis,
hosted a workshop at the Partnership Conference
on ‘Sexual Violence Prevention’.
gradually going down.
She explained how her remit involved doing
various school visits, looking at issues involving
gender, sexism, and those who were LGBT. All
sessions applied to all sexual orientations, and the
feedback was that Western Isles schoolchildren
were more willing to talk to a trained sexual
violence prevention worker than a teacher.
ADP funded services in Lewis and Harris
include: NHS Alcohol Liaison Nurse and
Brief Interventions; Hebrides Alpha Trading,
who offer therapeutic employment; Hebrides
Alpha Supported Accommodation; Crossreach
Housing Support Worker; Martin’s Memorial,
who organises the Well Drop in at The Shed;
and Action for Children, who offer an Early Years
Drug and Alcohol Service, an Early Intervention
Children and Family Support Service, and an Early
Intervention Young Person Liaison Worker.
There were four age groups to work with –
Secondary 1 and 2; Secondary 3 and 4; Secondary
5 and 6, and those aged between 16 and 25 years.
With the advance of mobile phone technology,
keeping a grip on sexual exploitation had never
proved such a challenge. In particular, said
Marina, ‘sexting’ had been established as one of
the key areas that required attention.
Information gathered by the ADP funded
services in 2014 showed that over half of the
problems that brought people to use their services
were alcohol-related, with over-the-counter and
prescription drugs also showing themselves to be
an issue on the islands.
‘Sexting’ is when someone sends or receives
a sexually explicit text, image or video on their
mobile phone, usually in a text message. What
was little known in society, she said, was that
indecent images of anyone under the age of 18
were viewed by the law as child pornography.
Legal highs are also shown to make up a small
portion of the issues tackled by the ADP - which
Suzanne explained is the case all over Scotland.
The ADP are due to run a course in February to
educate people - especially those in authority - on
the dangers of legal highs.
Within in the Western Isles, we don’t have an
injecting problem compared to other areas in
Scotland, with only a small number of known
heroin users.
Currently, the ADP are focussing largely on
prevention, and “changing the culture locally in
the first place,” explained Suzanne, whilst still
offering support and assistance to regular drinkers
and substance users, and working with ADP's
partners to promote healthy living in the Outer
Hebrides.
The ADP’s Recovery Orientated System of
Care (or ROSC) is person-centred, inclusive of
family and significant others, keeps people safe,
and is able to help recovering addicts find work,
housing and education. The ideas behind ROSC
are that everyone is capable of recovering, those
in recovery can help others in the same boat, and
“people will own their own recovery.”
For further information on the ADP, you can visit
their website: www.outerhebadp.co.uk
New home almost
ready for band
Since then the charity’s growth has encompassed
a range of new individual and group projects, as
well as negotiating and tendering for work from
statutory agencies.
Harris Tweed Authority
Jane Hepburn, Education Officer for the Harris
Tweed Authority, and speaker at the Partnership
Event, talked about her role in educating the
islands’ young people on the possibilities that
tweed provides, as well as her own and other’s
experiences in finding employment in the Harris
Tweed industry.
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 11
Penumbra began in 1985, by providing
the first registered mental health supported
accommodation services in Scotland, enabling
people with long term mental health issues to live
with independence and pioneering community
based support. The organisation started as it meant
to go on – by providing innovative solutions to gaps
in mental health provisions based on the rights of
service users to choice, dignity and the expectation
of recovery.
Reports by Melissa Silver
and Iain A MacSween
Hebridean
Independent Living
and Learning Service
www.hebevents.com
Western Isles
Nova Project
More needs to be done to remove social stigmas
around mental illness. It’s an old problem, but
one which simply isn’t going away, according to
a group who attended a workshop led by staff of
mental health charity Penumbra.
Everyone was in agreement that media, and
particularly social media, had a massive role to
play in ensuring that people with mental issues
were treated fairly. One attendee highlighted the
increasingly popular ‘Yik-Yak’ app, which allows
users to anonymously post messages onto a forum.
Recently, there had been a spate of messages
posted locally which were tantamount to bullying,
she said.
Debs Cruden is manager of the Stornoway-
based ‘Western Isles Nova Project’, which operates
under the Penumbra umbrella, providing flexible,
person-centred, recovery-focused support. She
explained that Nova provided one-on-one
support, workshops on wellbeing, and peer
support. Through the use of a ‘hope toolkit’, staff
at Penumbra worked with clients to offer hope,
opportunities and empowerment. “They are in
control,” said Debs.
Penumbra, she explained, worked to improve
mental wellbeing across the nation. With over 350
staff across Scotland, the organisation promoted
mental health and wellbeing for all, aimed at
preventing mental ill health for people who are
‘at risk’ and supported people with mental health
problems.
The organisation provided a wide range of
services that offer hope and practical steps towards
recovery. Yet here in the islands, explained Debs,
Marina told the workshop that as part of her
role she had met with youngsters throughout the
Western Isles. While those in Barra knew where
to go if they felt uncomfortable or that they were
being exploited, the same level of faith was not
expressed in Lewis.
Of all factors in addressing issues relating to
sexual violence, TV and media, and increasingly
pop culture, were most influential. The lyrics to
the global hit ‘Blurred Lines’ were highlighted as
being particularly demeaning towards women
– yet were sung freely by youngsters who didn’t
realise the extent of their meaning.
The Bechdel Test had proved time and again
that Hollywood studios were failing to address the
imbalance between men and women on screen.
Marina explained that even the 1930’s
blockbuster cartoon ‘Snow White and the Seven
Dwarves’ was sexually exploitative, in that the
prince had kissed Snow White while she was
asleep, and therefore she had not consented.
“Only now are production companies becoming
aware of the issues,” added Marina. “Until they
do, the problems will persist.”
Douglas Buchanan, Managing Director of Macleod &
Buchanan, and Sandy Gomez, Chairman of Lewis Pipe
Band, outside the new building on Bells Road
By Iain A MacSween
T
he Lewis Pipe Band is getting ready to move into a
brand new home.
Work is almost complete on a new five-room base on
Bells Road, which will safeguard the future of the band, as
well as the location of the building.
Lewis Pipe Band Chairman, Sandy Gomez, explained:
“The Lewis Pipe Band has owned this piece of land for
over 100 years. In 2002, the Citizens Advice Bureau
kindly gifted us a portable cabin but last year it became
completely unusable, as these buildings only have a
limited lifespan.
“We needed to do something quickly to ensure that we
had somewhere to practice.”
Joiners and building contractors Macleod & Buchanan,
also on Bells Road, leased the land they are on from the
Pipe Band, so a plan was drawn up to the advantage of
both parties.
Sandy said: “We came to an agreement with Macleod &
Buchanan where we would sell them the land on which they
are based in exchange for them building our hall. We still
had to contribute money ourselves, and we received a grant
through the Comhairle’s ‘Industrial Promotion’ scheme.”
The total cost of the project is around £40,000 – a sum
which Sandy says will be money well spent as far as the
future of the Lewis Pipe Band is concerned.
“The new hall gives us a great place to practice, and it
will see us continue to be based on a site we’ve owned for
around 100 years,” he said. “We’ll continue here. That’s
the main aim – to stay here.”
The new venue comprises a main hall with a ceiling
height of three metres – essential for the noise of a full
pipe band.
There are two rooms to house both drumming sections
(side and tenor), and a storage area for uniforms and
equipment, as well as a disabled toilet.
While work has been progressing at the site, the
Pipe Band have been practicing at the Young Musicians
Stornoway building on Bells Road, and in the Stornoway
Sea Angling Club. “We’re very thankful to both places,”
said Sandy.
The Lewis Pipe Band is currently made up of 25
members, both male and female, but they are always
looking for more people to come and join the group.
In the last seven years the band has won six trophies,
securing a raft of promotions along the way.
“We are always looking for new members,” added Sandy.
“Now is a great time to be part of Lewis Pipe Band and I’d
encourage anyone to come along, regardless of ability.
“It’s a community band at the end of the day, and we
want to involve the community as much as possible.”
New chapter for HebCelt as Runrig
bring 'The Story' to island festival
S
cottish rock legends Runrig will make the Gaelic
heartland part of their 2016 UK tour by headlining
next year’s Hebridean Celtic Festival.
The band will close the 21st HebCelt’s ‘coming of age’
celebrations on Saturday, 16th July, during the nationwide
tour in support of their 14th - and last - studio album, The
Story, which is released in January.
It will be Runrig’s fourth appearance at HebCelt, where
the internationally-renowned band are also honoured
in the Hall of Fame for their outstanding contribution to
Celtic music.
They say HebCelt is as close as it gets to coming home
and, therefore, there could be no more fitting place to
include on the tour.
Guitarist and founder member Rory Macdonald said:
“Of all the festivals we have played there is no doubt that
HebCelt stands alone in the band’s experience.
“It is the festival that is closest to the music and the
people that inspired us. It is very much home ground.”
The original Runrig Dance Band performed for the first
time as a three piece in 1973 at Glasgow’s Kelvin Hall
with Rory Macdonald on guitar, brother Calum on drums
and Blair Douglas on accordion. Singer Donnie Munro
joined the following year.
Later Blair left, and they were joined by accordionist
and old school friend Robert Macdonald, who died
in 1986 after a long battle against cancer. Subsequent
changes saw guitarist Malcolm Jones, drummer Iain Bayne
and Richard Cherns, on keyboards, join.
When Richard left in 1986 his place was taken by Pete
Wishart, which completed the classic Runrig line up that
was to endure for a decade.
In 1997 Donnie left to pursue a political career and his
place was taken by Canadian Bruce Guthro. Pete was
later replaced by Brian Hurren in 2001 to put in place the
current line-up.
Last year the band staged Party on the Moor, a massive
gig at Muir of Ord, near Inverness, to celebrate their 40th
anniversary and the remarkable journey from island dance
band to international phenomenon.
Their 2016 tour starts in Aberdeen in February after two
years of writing and recording the new album. A single,
also called The Story, and video are already available.
The 2016 festival will be held from 13th to 16th July.
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 12
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
Archivist added to
new museum staff
A
new archivist has been appointed for the
Lews Castle Museum and Archive project.
Seonaid McDonald was previously Head of
Archives and Museums (Scotland) at Lloyds
Banking Group, responsible for managing not only
the Bank's Edinburgh archives (which date back to
1695), but also the Museum on the Mound.
Her proudest achievement of recent years was
getting the Bank of Scotland's archive inscribed on
UNESCO's Memory of the World UK Register.
Seonaid first started working for the Bank of
Scotland as a research assistant on the Bank's
tercentenary history project.
On successful
completion of this, with the publication of a book
to commemorate the Bank's 300 years in business,
she was invited to remain with the Bank's archives
department.
She subsequently attained her
professional archives qualification via distance
learning.
She was educated at schools in Clydebank
and Inverness and at Glasgow University where
she attained an MA Honours degree in history.
She has a strong interest in the Gaelic language,
culture and music due to her family connections.
Her grandfather was a Gaelic speaker from Glen
Convinth, near Loch Ness.
Seonaid McDonald
Having moved to Edinburgh to work she joined
Edinburgh Saltire Gaelic Choir (now Còisir Dhùn
Èideann) in 2004, eventually becoming the choir's
conductor in 2008. She has been learning Gaelic
for a number of years and is currently undertaking
An Cùrsa Adhartais (the distance learning course)
through Sabhal Mòr Ostaig.
A first minister for
High Free Church
By Iain A MacSween
M
ore than 500 people assembled in
Stornoway on Friday November 6, to
welcome Rev Hugh Ferrier as the first-ever
minister of the High Free Church.
Afterwards there was a fellowship in the MA
Macleod hall with further speeches and praise.
The downstairs section of the Kenneth Street
building was full for the historic occasion, as the
High Free congregation was only formed last year
and Rev Hugh Ferrier is their first minister.
Rev Andrew Coghill gave thanks for the ministry
of Rev Hugh Ferrier and also the unity within the
High Free congregation. The Scalpay minister
preached on Jeremiah 1, highlighting the necessity
of the Lord’s hand in ministry and also the
importance of preaching the word God gives to his
servants that will transform the lives of others. Mr
Coghill exhorted those present to take the Gospel
message to all of the world, especially in their own
lives, homes, hearts and lips. Mr Coghill also said
he hoped that Mr Ferrier would feel the hand of
the Lord supporting him in this new congregation.
The new High Free Church minister answered
the induction vows, before signing the formula and
being presented with the right hand of fellowship
by members of the Western Isles Presbytery.
Knock Free Church’s Rev James Maciver gave
an address to Mr Ferrier based on Ephesians 5:15
and 16. His key points were to allocate priorities
for every day, not to become captive to people’s
expectations of the ministry, and finally to carry out
his role by always keeping eternity in perspective.
She is familiar with the terrain, having spent a
By Eilidh Whiteford
B
eing nominated for the Best Church
Building Project in the Christian Funders'
Forum awards was a shock for those at Martin's
Memorial Church community hub The Shed.
“We didn't put ourselves forward for this award,
so it really did [the nomination] come as a shock.
They looked in from the outside at the work that we
do and judged us from that, which makes it even
more satisfying,” said The Shed Project Manager
Murdo Maciver.
Next to speak was Point’s Rev Dr Iain D
Campbell who urged the congregation to welcome
Mr Ferrier into their hearing – by this he meant they
should make it a priority to be at every gathering
where the High Free Church minister is preaching
the Word.
Three presentations were made: by Robert France
to Rev Hugh Ferrier, from Session Clerk Christopher
Martin to Rev Dr Iain D Campbell who served as
interim moderator, and then to Mr Martin from fellow
High Free Church elder Neil Galbraith for the Session
Clerk’s dedicated service during the vacancy.
Mr Ferrier made a brief speech, thanking the
High Free Church for their warmth and love for
the Scriptures, and that he would value everyone’s
prayers as he seeks to put Jesus at their centre of his
preaching and daily living, and that souls would be
saved. Mr Galbraith paid tribute to Chris Martin’s
work as Session Clerk, particularly providing
leadership to the Kirk Session as well as taking on
organisational logistics for all of the meetings.
Mr Martin gave thanks for the unity in the
congregation, particularly that the entire Kirk
Session had stuck together and supported one
another after unanimously leaving the Church of
Scotland. After the service there was a time of
fellowship and refreshments in the MA Macleod
memorial hall with further speeches and a time of
praise. The High Free Church continues to meet in
Stornoway Primary School every Sunday at 11am
and 6.30pm.
holiday cycling from Barra to Stornoway, a couple
of summers ago on 'holiday'! Seonaid's husband,
James Lumsden, is an artist, and is also looking
forward to working in the Western Isles.
The official opening of Lews Castle Museum and
Archive was recently delayed until March 2016.
Top award for church project
And scooping the Gold from a number of other
national projects at the recent award ceremony
surprised them even more.
The induction service was hosted by Stornoway
Free Church because the High Free are presently
without a building of their own.
Rev Andrew Coghill, minister of Scalpay
and Moderator of the Western Isles Presbytery,
preached and presided with pulpit addresses from
Knock’s Rev James Maciver to the newly inducted
minister and from discharged interim moderator
Rev Dr Iain D Campbell to the congregation.
Seonaid is very much looking forward to applying
her professional knowledge and skills to an area in
which she is so deeply interested, and to discovering
more about the rich store of information, artefacts
and knowledge held by the network of Comainn
Eachdraidh throughout the Western Isles.
“Being a national award ceremony there were
projects from all over the UK and when Martins
Memorial The Shed Project was announced as
the Gold winner in our category I was stunned,
especially after hearing more details of all the other
amazing projects that are going on around Britain.
You just feel privileged to be amongst them.
“We're still a relatively new project so that makes
this award from the Christian Funders' Forum even
more special,” Murdo continued. “But we are very
conscious of God's hand being on us and His
direction in all that we're involved in and have to
acknowledge His grace and provision on us and
the project over the last year and a half.”
He added: “It's a win for our minister Tommy and
the leaders for having the vision and drive to pursue
this and all the people of Martins who prayed,
worked, financially contributed and still give of
their time, it means the world to them.
“It also means the world to all who use The Shed
facilities, as it's as much their place as it is the
people of Martins, and they see this as a win for
them and what they are involved in.”
With Martin's Memorial Church facing space
challenges for youth and community based work,
in 2011 the church leadership established The Shed
project and set about raising £250,000 from within
the church, external founders and from the Church
of Scotland centrally.
At the end of the year a gift of land, on which
The Shed is now built, was received from Sheriff
Colin Scott and Mrs Christeen MacKenzie – and in
2013 Donald Macfarlane Builders started work on
the new community base.
“Donald Macfarlane's workforce did a
tremendous job in constructing The Shed and they
completed the project in May 2014, which was just
in time for us to have an official Royal Opening for
the new building with His Royal Highness Prince
Edward and his wife Sophie, Countess of Wessex,”
said Murdo.
“The church wanted to go from being 'a one
day a week service church', to being a 'seven day
a week serving church' – The Shed has helped us
achieve that goal!” he added.
With youth worker Kathryn Macleod working
alongside Murdo, The Shed now offers a safe and
neutral venue for all walks of life, and welcomes
anyone from the community in need of space,
help, or simply a chat and some company.
Thanks to the continued support of Martin's
Memorial congregation, the Alcohol and Drug
Partnership, MIN Group Western Isles Health
Board, Robertson Trust and The Souter Charitable
Trust for financial support this year, services offered
at The Shed include The Well, a drop-in service
for anyone whose life is affected by their own
or someone else's drug or alcohol use (Monday
and Tuesday 10am-5pm, Friday 7-9.30pm); and
Narcotics Anonymous, a meeting for people who
want to talk through their struggles, encourage and
support each other in recovery from drugs (Tuesday
7-9pm).
Also held at The Shed are Youth Club for
Primary 7-Secondary 3 (Thursday 7.30-9.30pm);
Asymmetric Drop for S1 and S2 pupils (Friday
1-4pm), the Little Start baby and toddler group
(Friday 10am-12pm), and Impact for S1-S6 (Sunday
11am-1pm).
Indeed, the work being undertaken by The Shed
is not only giving something back to the community,
but leading the way in church outreach, as Murdo
said of the recent win: “It has taken The Shed Project,
our little youth and community building, from one
that's known locally to one that is now recognised
with the Christian community nationwide and one
that other churches are talking about and wanting
to replicate, which is fantastic.”
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EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 13
KC's Cuts Salon expands range
By Eilidh Whiteford
A
fter seven years working on her own,
Lewis hairdresser Kathleen Robertson is
delighted to have some company as hair salon
KC's Cuts expands its services with two new
faces.
Reunion
planned
In August this year, barber Sarah Jayne (SJ)
Macleod took up a chair at KC's Cuts to join
Kathleen at the salon, based in Cearn Shulasgeir,
next to the Cearns Community Shop.
T
he build-up to the next Lewis and Harris
40th Reunion is well under way for former
pupils of The Nicolson Institute, the Lews
Castle School and Sir E. Scott School.
And now Kathleen's sister Annemarie
Mackinnon has been added to the KC's Cuts
team, expanding the salon's services with the
introduction of Shellac nail design. Alongside a
refurbishment of the salon interior, it really is all
go at KC's Cuts.
Were you – born in 1976 or 1977? in the Fourth
Year leavers class of 1992? in the Fifth Year leavers
class of 1993? or in the Sixth Year leavers class of
1994? If so, then 2016 is your Reunion year.
For Kathleen, a hairdresser with over 17 years
experience, setting out on her own following a
decade of working at Jennifer's in Stornoway town
centre, was a dream come true.
"We hope that our website will provide everyone
with all the information they need in the build-up
to the event and keep you informed of how the
organisation is progressing," say the organisers.
“This was an empty space,” she said of the
salon's home, “and I just wanted to take the
opportunity to try, see if I could do it.
“I went to PSYBT for help and was granted a startup loan. That made all the difference, I wouldn't
have been here had I not had that assistance.”
In her seven years solo at KC's Cuts, Kathleen
has built up a loyal and content customer base,
with clients coming from all over Lewis to leave
looking fabulous.
The basics are as follows:
Annemarie Mackinnon, left, Kathleen Robertson, and Sarah Jayne (SJ) Macleod
the salon looks fabulous, redecorating regularly;
but also in keeping up to date with the latest hair
fashions.
“It's been great so far,” Kathleen continued. “The
location is really good for parking, handy for folk
who don't want to go into town, and has the shop
right next door.
She said: “I've been taking courses every year
since I started up on my own. It's important to me
to keep up to the minute with everything so we
can create our own looks and our own colours,
offer something different to our clients.”
“I'm so pleased to have so many islanders coming
to the salon and I have to thank my loyal customers,
as they are the reason it's gone so well so far.”
And for the most recent course, Kathleen is
joined by her sister Annmarie, both undertaking
an Artistic and Design hair course locally.
But it is also down to Kathleen's 'never-rest-onyour-laurels' attitude, and ensuring that not only
For Annemaire, who qualified as a hairdresser
in 2010, the course is a return and refresh for her
skills, having taken time out to raise a family.
However, after gaining her Shellac Service
Provider certificate in October, following a threemonth Hand Care and Artistic Design course at
Lews Castle College UHI, Annmarie is ready and
waiting to make the most of customers' nails.
“It's good working together,” said Annmarie.
“Luckily we're really good friends as well as
sisters, so we always have a good time.”
Kathleen added: “I like that we're keeping the
business in the family in a way, and Annmarie's
daughter is thinking of training to be a hairdresser,
so there may be a second generation to add to KC
Cuts.”
Working on Thursdays, 4-9pm, and Saturdays
10am-6pm, Annmarie is offering a special
introductory price for Shellac nails, with CND
Shellac Service costing £15 and the CND French
Manicure £18.
And there will also be extended opening hours
at KC Cuts over the festive season – keep an eye
on the salon's Facebook page 'KC'S CUTS Salon'
for more details, or call in or phone on 01851
703676.
And it's not only island ladies that will be kept
groomed by KC's Cuts, as for barber Sarah Jayne,
the move to KC's Cuts after 18 years with Men
Only, is a breath of fresh air.
“We have loads of fun and there's always banter
going on with customers,” she said. “It makes for
a great atmosphere in the salon as well, we're all
really busy and the day just flies by.
Annemarie Mackinnon has been added to the KC's Cuts team,
expanding the salon's services with the introduction of Shellac nail design
“And because we're all doing different things it's
not like in a normal salon, there's no competition
between us for clients – it's just a really fab wee
atmosphere to work in.”
The main evening with dinner, live band and
school photographs will be Friday 1st April 2016
at The Cabarfeidh Hotel. Classmates are asked to
gather for 4.30pm with photographs from 5pm and
dinner at 7pm.
There will be an old-fashioned school sports day
for families at Ionad Spòrs Leòdhais on Saturday
2nd April from 1.30-3.30pm.
The evening
entertainment will be in Stornoway Golf Club from
7pm where we will have a short 90's quiz, hog
roast buffet and disco. Partners are very welcome.
Registration is now open - links for this can
be found on our Facebook page and on our
website www.the2016reunion.com. Everyone is
encouraged to visit the website to contribute to the
Jukebox (songs that will be played at the reunion),
to leave messages, add old photos and to check
regular updates on minutes of meetings etc.
Flybe have now opened flight booking for
March and April 2016 - anyone travelling from
the mainland or further afield may like to look at
booking now.
Two charities supported are CLIC Sargent - who
work with and support children with cancer and
their families; and SAMH - The Scottish Association
for Mental Health, a charity that provides help,
information and support to individuals and
families who have faced mental health challenges.
As well as raising money for the two charities
above, we will be asking attendees at the Saturday
evening event to bring along a food donation to
the Western Isles Food Bank.
Organisers have started collecting prizes for the
raffle which will be drawn on Friday 1st April and
would be very grateful for any contributions to
raise money for our chosen charities.
Raffle prize donations can be handed in to any
member of the committee or dropped into The
Home Improvement Centre.
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EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 14
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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Chance to give views on healthcare
By Eilidh Whiteford
I
t seems that whether it's a greater focus on
prevention, or bringing services closer to
communities, everyone has a view on how to
create a fairer Scotland and how Scotland's
healthcare should take shape.
And that's exactly the opportunity island
residents took up recently as the Western Isles
joined two National Conversations through which
local thoughts and opinions will be fed back to
Scottish Government and play part in designing the
future of a fairer Scotland and the future of health
and social care services for the next 10 to 15 years.
A spirited discussion on 'Creating a Fairer
Scotland' took place in Stornoway on October 29th;
feedback from which will go into a final national
Fairer Scotland Forum this month, with an action
plan to be published by Holyrood in the New Year.
And most recently, individuals, groups and
representatives joined to take part in the National
Conversation on a Healthier Scotland, which
took place at Bayhead Bridge Centre on Thursday,
November 26th, where topics arose concerning the
time home carers have to spend with clients; the
responsibility of individuals for their health, and
the support and priorities needed locally amongst
others.
Hosted by Emma Goodland (Grants and
Impact Officer) and Kevin Geddes (Director for
Development and Improvement) from the Health
and Social Care Academy, based within the Health
and Social Care Alliance Scotland (the ALLIANCE),
along with Fiona Macleod, Liaison Officer with CoCheangal Innse Gall, the relaxed gathering heard
local views and thoughts on the future priorities
in health and social care, and the support which
is needed both at home and country-wide in order
that people can live healthier lives.
“We have a vibrant third sector and as the Islands
Third Sector Interface (TSI), we try to support as
many initiatives as we can that make these Islands a
place where people's voices are heard and listened
to,” said Fiona Macleod.
“We welcome these events which offer a fantastic
opportunity for Islanders to have a direct influence
over the policy and direction of Scotland in the
course of the next fifteen years.”
Speaking to EVENTS prior to the Healthier
Scotland sessions in Stornoway, Emma Goodland
said of her experience hosting National
Conversations around Scotland: “There have been
different responses from different areas and the
remote, rural area needs are very different from
those in more populated areas.
“An issue we find in remote areas, and particular to
islands which perhaps don't have large populations
and are spread out, is that people generally have
to travel large distances to access services; we hear
that regularly,” Emma continued.
the islands the establishment of the new Health and
Social Care Partnership – creating the Integration
Joint Board (IJB) between Comhairle nan Eilean
Siar and Western Isles Health Board – is part of that
movement.
IJB Chair Officer Dr Ron Culley, alongside Dr
Maggie Watts, attended the evening session of
the islands' National Conversation on a Healthier
Scotland, which was also attended throughout the
day by representatives from the Comhairle; third,
voluntary and independent sectors, as well as
Penumbra, the NHS, Ambulance Service, Mental
Health and the Scottish Health Council.
With conversations kept informal to allow the
voices of people living on the islands to be heard,
discussions focused on three broad questions: What
support do we need in Scotland to live healthier
lives? What areas of health and social care matter
most to you? and Thinking about the future of health
and social care services, where should our focus
be?
And following the event, ALLIANCE's Emma and
Kevin are busy preparing a report to be fed into the
results of National Conversations taking place in
each of Scotland's 32 local authorities.
“But on the other hand, in the more rural and
remote areas, there seems to be a willingness
more to work together to make changes and
improvements happen.”
The main three aspects which arose during the
Western Isles discussions however were, firstly that
healthcare professionals and home carers need to
have more time to spend with people so that they
can have a good conversation and time to focus on
what the individual's needs and priorities are.
Working together is one of the Scottish
Government's priorities moving forward, and on
It was also felt by those present at the discussion
that people need to be empowered to take
responsibility for their health when they are ready,
and support needs to be given to those who aren't
in a position to do so.
And thirdly, that there needs to be a focus on what
is important in localities, and those localities need
to have an element of autonomy to decide what the
priorities are for the health of their community.
Do you agree? There is still a chance for those
who didn't make the National Conversation events
in Stornoway to have their say as the Scottish
Government initiative runs until April 2016.
You can make your voice heard in a number of
ways – add a post of comment on the Healthier
Scotland website (www.healthier.scot); follow
and drop your ideas on Twitter @scotgovhealth;
use the Twitter hashtag #healthierscotland in your
tweets; join in the conversation on Facebook (www.
facebook.com/healthier.scot ) or email your ideas
and opinions to [email protected]
And if you wish to hold your own local event,
financial assistance is available through the
Voluntary Action Fund's (VAF) recently launched
Healthier Scotland Engagement Fund.
Aiming to help small voluntary organisations and
community groups to run an event of engagement
activity to glean the views of people in their
community, grants up to £500 are available, and
applications are accepted until 5pm on Friday,
December 11th.
Further information, including the guidance
and application form, can be found at
www.voluntaryactionfund.org.uk.
Labour selects candidate
T
he Western Isles Labour Party has
selected Highlands & Islands MSP
Rhoda Grant as their candidate in the
2016 Scottish Parliament.
Ms Grant was selected after two well
attended constituency meetings, the first in
Uist followed by Stornoway.
Members were given the opportunity to
discuss the challenges facing the islands
with Ms Grant, who was clear that in the
current climate a strong Labour voice for
the islands is essential.
Speaking after the selection meetings
Rhoda Grant said: "As a Highlands and
Islands MSP, I have a proven track record
of speaking up on the issues which really
matter to the islands. The Western Isles
have unique challenges and it is imperative
that these are taken into account by
government. I look forward to continuing
my work to achieve a better future for the
Western Isles."
Chair of the Western Isles Labour Party,
Billy MacKinnon, said: "I am delighted that
Rhoda Grant will be our candidate in the
forthcoming Scottish Parliament elections."
These are known as constituency MSPs
and are elected by 'first past the post' in
exactly the same way as MPs are elected to
Westminster. This is the elector's 'first vote'.
The 'second vote' is used to elect 56
additional members. Scotland is divided
into 8 parliamentary Regions and each
region elects 7 regional MSPs.
There are two ways an MSP can be
elected. Each elector (voter) has two votes.
In the second vote the voter votes for a
party rather than a candidate. The parties
are then allocated a number of additional
members to make the overall result more
proportional. The regional MSPs are
selected from lists compiled by the parties.
Scotland is divided into 73 constituencies
and each constituency elects one MSP.
These MSPs are also sometimes referred
to as List MSPs.
Rhoda Grant has been a Member of
the Scottish Parliament for the Highlands
and Islands region from 1999 to 2003 and
since 2007.
Congregation hears of progress to find a church
By Iain A MacSween
A
Harris pub could be converted into a church, it
was revealed recently.
The recently-formed North Harris Free Church
commissioned a survey into the viability of redeveloping
the Isle of Harris Inn, on Scott Road, as a place of worship.
That survey took place on Friday November 27.
The 120-strong congregation currently meets each week
in Tarbert Community Centre.
The Rev David Macleod was inducted as minister in
February this year, and he and his family are currently
housed in Kyles Scalpay.
At a sermon in November, Gordon Macleod, elder of
North Harris Free Church, asked for continued prayer into
the situation.
He said: "In May at the congregational meal, we made
a plea for anyone with knowledge or access to buildings/
land etc to come and speak with the committee and
since then there has been a number of suggestions and
tentative discussions. There is one project that has moved
slightly further in that following a meeting of the Deacon's
court on Monday evening it was agreed to commission a
survey of a property as to the viability of it being used as a
Church. As a result of this it was agreed that it was time to
inform the congregation of this development and ask for
continued prayer.
"The property we have commissioned a survey on
is owned by Atlantic Land and Property and currently
operates as The Harris Inn on Scott Road. As some of you
may be aware Mr David Cameron, one of our Deacons, is
a director in this company and as such has stepped down
from the property committee and does not attend Deacons
Court Meetings. David will, however, continue to perform
all his other duties as a Deacon."
Mr Macleod added: "It has to be emphasised, that
discussions are at a very early exploratory stage and will
take some time as we go forward, looking at the viability of
the project, costs, etc but we will provide regular updates
to the congregation, so please keep praying."
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New welcome for Harris House residents
By Iain A MacSween
A
full year after it was officially opened, the
£6.4 million Harris House care home is
able to make use of its front doors.
As Care Home Manager Katie Ann Young says:
“It’s no longer a building site.” Indeed, to those
who haven’t yet seen the front area of the new
Harris House, the proper entrance comes as a nice
surprise, especially so given that it’s been hidden
for so long.
“We were having to use the back doors for
everything,” said Katie Ann. “All our deliveries
had to come through that door and then up via a
lift. So to be able to use the front doors and have
that area all opened up is already making a huge
difference for the better.”
The new care home – developed right alongside
the site of the previous Harris House on Leverhulme
Road – more resembles a hotel than a centre
dedicated to residential care. It features 16 rooms
– 14 for permanent residents and two respite care
rooms. Admissions are co-ordinated by the Social
and Community Services department of Comhairle
nan Eilean Siar, with the respite beds frequently
used by those in need from Lewis, as well as Harris.
Each bedroom is equipped with all mod-cons,
including a fridge and a television, as well as a
spacious en-suite shower room. While the old
care home found it challenging to keep up with
demands from the Care Inspectorate, the new
Harris House can now rightly boast that its rooms
are above the required size and standard.
their own room.“ Special care has been made to
make the new building easy to navigate. Specialist
dementia-friendly signage with large print is
displayed throughout the building to help residents,
visitors and staff.
One of the main sitting rooms has been laid out
in exactly the same format as the previous Harris
House.
“We took the fireplace, pictures and
lamps and set them up just as they were in the
old building,” said Katie Ann. “We thought that if
someone was to become unsettled after we moved,
we could take them into that room and it would be
instantly familiar to them.”
The reception area features a cosy seating
area with a Harris Tweed wall hanging based on
an Amish design, created by residents, staff and
friends of Harris House, back in 2008. Explained
Katie Ann: “Many years ago, we distributed a
questionnaire to residents on what they would like
to see in the new Harris House. One resident,
Jocky Macleod, suggested that he would like to see
a comfy seating area at reception where he could
sit and read a newspaper or a book while watching
the world go by. He’s sadly no longer living, but it
always stuck in my mind, and it played a big part in
how that area looks today.”
A total of 27 members of staff are employed at
Harris House, mostly part-time. There is one fulltime manager, and two full-time senior Social Care
workers.
“When we were getting to the stage where the
rooms were ready to be furbished, we took the
able-bodied residents over from the old care home
to show them where their new rooms would be,”
said Katie Ann.
The residents have a wide and varied range of
activities. “We have something different on for
them every day,” said Katie Ann. “We play board
games, basketball, hoopla, proverbs, chocolate
fountain, barbecues, we go on bus trips to various
places for lunch or afternoon tea, we have sing-alongs, and we are supported to attend a monthly
Dementia Cafe.
“The residents were able to choose their feature
wall colour for their rooms, their choice of fabric
for bedding, their furniture, and were supported to
make their rooms homely. They also picked out a
landscape picture to have on their wall. The same
picture is laminated and placed on the outside
door of their rooms, to help residents to recognise
“Worship is important to many of our residents
and all the local Churches play a big part in
providing services within the care home for those
who are unable to attend Church. We are always
trying to come up with new ideas, and we use some
that are geared towards older people, to stimulate
their memory.
Care Home Manager Katie Ann Young sitting in the new seating area at reception
To help residents settle, one living area has been formatted exactly the same as the old Harris House
“We find that residents really do respond to
these things, but the biggest thing for them is music.
Even the most disabled of our residents respond to
music. It’s a wonderful medium.
“We’ve also got a sensory garden, where we
grow things,” said Katie Ann. “We grow long
marram grass so residents can reach out and touch
it, and we grow flowers and a variety of herbs so
they can smell them. This year we grew our own
potatoes and we enjoyed eating them with herring
at a special meal.” Each month, a local hairdresser
visits the in-house salon and is a very popular guest
among the residents.
Plans are on hand to develop a small shop in a
room with hatch access to the dining area, selling
newspapers, toiletries, tissues, and the older brands
of sweets that would appeal to the residents.
“It’s taken almost four years but we finally feel
as though we’ve made the move from the old care
home to the new care home,” said Katie Ann. “We
have plans to develop outside areas by planting
daffodils, crocus, snowdrops, etc to get the area
around the home back to being bright, cheery and
homely.
“The most important thing is that our residents
like it. In fact, they love it. The residents all settled
in to the home well, and sleep well in their new
rooms.
“The company who were working on the home
worked well with us as a staff group, and this is
what has made the place such a lovely place to live
and a practical place to work. We couldn’t have
asked for more than that.”
Residents are treated to a varied range of entertainment on a daily basis
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 16
in order to provide initial assessments of patients, in necessary, who
need to be seen promptly but not as emergencies.
“This would provide additional capacity and would potentially
remove the need for Community Unscheduled Care Nurses to travel
down from Stornoway."
Dr McKellar added: “Personally, I stay in Harris. I’ve got a great
desire to see the community content but I also know what is possible
and what is not possible. The community, I think, are beginning to
see what’s possible.
“We have to move on from demands to have what cannot be had
and I am really encouraged that the community seem to be starting
to see what the limits of possibility are so that we can work together
to improve the service.”
Praise from inspectors
Out-of-hours medical services
strengthened in Harris
During November, NHS Western Isles said it had two new
developments to announce, to hopefully help allay any concerns
persisting in the Harris community regarding the Out of Hours
service.
Dr Angus McKellar, Medical Director, said: “I’m pleased that there
was very positive engagement at the meeting of the Harris Locality
Planning Group, attended by Primary Care Manager Christine McKee.
“Any change is always difficult for a community and it’s very
important that we work together to identify the strengths of the
current Out of Hours service (in order to sustain this) and identify
areas of concern where improvements may be needed.
“I’m pleased to confirm that three improvements have been agreed
and are being pursued. Namely, that a list is being put together of
off-duty GPs, paramedics and nurse practitioners who are prepared
to be called by the Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS) in the event of
the ambulance being out of area in an emergency.
The Healthcare Environment Inspectorate (HEI), which is part of
Healthcare Improvement Scotland, published its report during
November relating to an unannounced inspection of Western Isles
Hospital.
They state: "We carried out an unannounced inspection to Western
Isles Hospital on Tuesday 15 and Wednesday 16 September 2015.
"This was the first inspection of the hospital against the new
Healthcare Improvement Scotland Healthcare Associated Infection
(HAI) Standards (February 2015).
"Before carrying out this inspection, we reviewed NHS Western
Isles self-assessment and previous Western Isles Hospital inspection
reports. This informed our decision on which standards to focus on
during this inspection.
"We focused on:
Leadership in the prevention and control of infection;
Infection prevention and control policies, procedures and guidance;
Insertion and maintenance of invasive devices; and
Decontamination.
"We inspected the following areas: the accident and emergency
department; medical ward 1; medical ward 2 (medical receiving/
acute admissions); and the maternity ward."
The inspectors found: "The ward environment was clean.
"All patient equipment inspected was clean."
“I have put my name on that list – as a GP, not Medical Director
– and so has Anthony Latham. The SAS have also confirmed that all
Tarbert-based staff – including technicians as well as paramedics –
are willing to be called during off-duty periods.
And there was "good staff compliance with standard infection
control precautions (SICPs)."
“It is also worth noting that additional capacity (both GP and
Community Unscheduled Care Nurse), in terms of hours of
availability, has been in place in the Out of Hours service since the
public consultation during the pilot phase.
"NHS Western Isles must develop a policy for handling and storing
breast milk."
“A third development is that the Scottish Ambulance Service have
confirmed they are willing to work with us to train up paramedics
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Under the heading "What the hospital could do better", the
inspectors said:
very good across all the wards inspected, and that there was
evidence of good compliance with the 10 standard infection control
precautions which minimises the spread of infection."
Hospital works
The public were advised of works at Western Isles Hospital, which
will cause some disruption.
The carpets are being replaced to the Level 3 corridor and main
stairwell from Monday, November 30. To allow these works to be
done, visiting to Medical 1, Surgical and Maternity wards will need
to end at 8.30pm for the week commencing November 30. Also,
work was to begin on the helipad. The work, which is weather
dependent, is expected to take four weeks – during which the helipad
will be off-limits to aircraft – and there will be associated works to
the roads and car parks. The roadworks will take about two weeks
as it is intended to do this work a little at a time in order to minimise
disruption. During this time, there will be a reduction of parking
capacity of up to 40%.
Pregnant women urged to protect
babies against whooping cough
All mums-to-be are being urged to get vaccinated against whooping
cough (pertussis) to ensure their babies are protected from this nasty
disease during the vulnerable first two months of life.
The vaccine is available from GP practices and offered to women
between their 28th and 32nd week of pregnancy.
NHS Western Isles is concerned that there has been an increase in
cases of pertussis in Scotland this year, with the rate in infants under
one year of age almost doubling. Half of all infants affected were
babies aged two months or under.
Most at risk are babies under two months of age who have no
natural protection against whooping cough and are too young to be
immunised directly. For these babies, the disease is very serious and
can lead to pneumonia and permanent brain damage. Babies have
already died in the UK because of this. Protection can only be given
to babies under two months of age through vaccination of their mum
in pregnancy.
The vaccination (a small injection in the upper arm) is currently
offered to all pregnant women between their 28th and 32nd weeks.
It requires a visit to their GP practice.
The mother’s immunity is boosted by this vaccination and high
levels of antibodies cross the placenta to help protect the baby.
Research has found that the vaccine given in pregnancy provides
good protection for babies up to three months of age.
Neil Galbraith, NHS Western Isles chairman, said: "The Board
welcomes the Inspection findings which largely corroborate the
Western Isles Hospital's own self-assessment report and provide the
external reassurance that our cleanliness and anti-infection regimes
are being effective.
Dr Maggie Watts, NHS Western Isles Director of Public Health,
said: “Whooping cough in babies can be a horrible disease. Anyone
who has seen the suffering and heard the coughing of a child with
pertussis will want to avoid it happening to another child. Very
young babies are particularly vulnerable if they don’t have immunity
from their mother.”
“The Board notes the one requirement emerging from the inspection
and will look to have the policy paper produced, and related practice
brought into being, with immediate effect.”
There is no evidence of risk to the pregnancy or the infant from
inactivated vaccines such as the pertussis vaccine.
Jacqui Macrae, Head of Quality of Care for Healthcare
Improvement Scotland, said: “This was a good inspection in which
we found that the ward environment and all patient equipment we
inspected was clean.
"We also saw good staff compliance with standard infection control
precautions. The inspection resulted in one requirement relating to
the need for NHS Western Isles to develop a policy for handling and
storing breast milk. We expect NHS Western Isles to address this
requirement and will continue to monitor the standard of safety and
cleanliness at Western Isles Hospital to ensure standards continue to
improve.”
The report was very much welcomed by staff. Janice Mackay,
Interim Manager / Advanced Practitioner for Infection Prevention
and Control, said: “I was personally delighted with the inspection as
it recognises all the hard work over the years between the infection
prevention and control team (IPCT) and the staff of the Western Isles
Hospital, which we as a team have always appreciated.
“The report states they found the level of environmental cleanliness
After the first two months of life, immunity reduces so it is important
that you continue to protect your baby against pertussis in infancy
through the routine childhood schedule.
Dental health improves
CHILDREN in the Western Isles are enjoying much better dental
health than in the recent past, with new figures showing that 82.8%
of P7 pupils have no obvious decay.
This compares to 54.5% of P7 children in the Western Isles having
no obvious decay in 2007.
Children from all the health board areas in Scotland have their teeth
looked at every year for the National Dental Inspection Programme
(NDIP). In alternate years Primary Seven and Primary One children
are offered a dental inspection.
This year the Scottish average for children with no obvious decay
was 75.3% and this year’s result for the Western Isles has been
warmly welcomed. As well as 82.8% having no obvious decay, the
average number of obviously decayed, missing and filled permanent
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EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 17
To date, around £1,200 has been raised for the Hebridean Men's
Cancer Support Group, and if you would like to add a donation,
please visit: http://www.hebmenscancer.com
A huge thanks to all entrants, marshals, supporters, helpers and
organisers for making this event such a success and a regular date in
the calendar - see you all in 2016!
Cheerful approach to children's dental health brings success against tooth decay
teeth was 0.38 against the Scottish average of 0.53.
result of attending the NHS Western Isles Smokefree Hebrides service
will also feature, as well as images from previous health promotion
campaigns.
The National Dental Inspection Programme began in 2003.
In 2007, 54.5% of P7 children in the western isles were found to
have no obvious decay, with the Scottish average of 59.1%.
In 2009, this increased to 55.5%, with the Scottish average of
63.6%. In 2011, there was another increase to 74.5%, overtaking the
Scottish average of 69.4%. In 2013, there were 79% with no obvious
decay, ahead of the 72.8% average across Scotland.
Michael MacMillan from Stornoway gets his trophy
from Norma Macleod, HWL Advisor, Western Isles NHS
This year, the Western Isles are second in Scotland, just slightly
behind Borders, who have 83.6% with no obvious decay.
The government-funded Childsmile programme, which aims
to improve the oral health of children across the country, has
been running in the Western Isles since 2008. This programme
has a particular focus on improving children’s oral health through
a combination of health promotion and early identification /
management of oral disease.
The film, which will display on a continuous loop, will initially be
available to view in the main window of Stornoway Public Library
throughout December 2015.
It is planned to distribute the film more widely across the Western
Isles for use in public waiting areas to raise awareness of the
importance of being cancer aware. The film will also be available on
NHS Western Isles social media sites, including Facebook, Twitter,
and its website.
The film has been commissioned by the NHS Western Isles Health
Promotion Department in conjunction with local company Wee Studio.
Gordon Jamieson, NHS Western Isles chief executive, said: “I am
delighted with what is being achieved in this important area of oral
health in children.
“This is testament to the combined efforts of parents and our
dental staff working hard to ensure the best start for children in our
community. Well done.”
John Lyon, chief administrative dental officer, said: “It’s really good
news. The level of dental disease has significantly decreased since
NDIP reports on primary school children started in 2003. It is a
significant improvement in oral health. We have no doubt that the
Childsmile programme is certainly contributing to this improvement.”
Highland Hustle as part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month
October ‘Pink’ success
As part of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month this year,
NHS Western Isles also highlighted the importance of the ‘wee c’
campaign. The ‘wee c’ is the new Scottish campaign helping not
only to make cancer a less scary word, but also reminding people
that thanks to earlier detection, research breakthroughs and treatment
advances, more individuals diagnosed with cancer are surviving than
ever before.
Breast cancer remains the most common cancer in women, with
one in eight women being diagnosed with the disease at some point
in their lives and you are still five times more likely to survive the
disease if it’s caught in its earliest stage.
It is important that you get to know how your breasts look and
feel so you know what is normal for you. You can then feel more
confident about noticing any unusual changes.
Don Maclean, from the Hebridean Men's
Cancer Support Group, with the 118 118 girls
Stornoway Men's 5k
On Saturday 21st November, 70 men (and a few women) braved
the cold wintry weather in Stornoway, to take part in the annual
Hebridean Mens Cancer 5K. The event was organised by the NHS
Western Isles' Health Promotion Department and Comhairle nan
Eilean Siar's Sports Development Officer.
As well as individuals and teams taking part, this year's event also
attracted fathers and sons (and even grandsons!), alongside a number
of women who also took part dressed as men - all helping to raise
funds for local individuals, and their families, that have been touched
by male cancers. Those not sporting a home-grown moustache
were offered a fake one to wear to raise awareness further of the
Movember campaign. This national campaign encourages men to
grow moustaches for the month of November to highlight the issue
of male cancers.
Michael MacMillan from Stornoway took overall first place with a
time of 17 minutes 50 seconds. The first female was Kirsty Brown,
who along with the "118 118 girls" received a trophy for taking part.
If you're worried about a symptom, or you notice any unusual
change in your body, don't let fear or embarrassment stop you from
getting it checked – visit your GP. It's probably nothing but if it is
something, they have a better chance of successfully treating it if it's
caught early. So, don't get scared, get checked.
As part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month a concertina information
card promoting breast awareness was launched during a ‘Highland
Hustle’ event in Stornoway on the 16th October. The concertina
card, produced by NHS Western Isles in conjunction with Scottish
Government, features information and images of certain signs to look
out for, such as lumps, dimpling and changes in texture of the skin.
Over 20 women attended the launch and dance event, and were also
provided with a talk on the importance of being breast aware.
Cancer Awareness campaign
Give yourself and your family the most important gift this year, look
after your health and Detect Cancer Early.
Stornoway Library will be showing a localised short film created to
remind islanders to be aware of cancer signs and symptoms and of
the importance of detecting cancer early.
Using local images and clips, the film brings together health
messages on the most common cancers, those of breast, lung, bowel,
liver and prostate, alongside advice and encouragement on healthy
lifestyles. Local stories from those who have stopped smoking as a
Bright new signage, above, has just been set up at all NHS Western
Isles sites, reminding everyone who visits, works or is treated on any
of our premises that NHS Scotland is smoke-free. These permanent
fixed signs are bright and colourful, featuring flora and fauna native to
these islands and incorporating the ‘no smoking’ logo into the design.
The arrival of new signage and information leaflets provides an
ideal opportunity to remind staff, patients, contractors and the public
of the NHS Western Isles Smokefree policy.
Although all Western Isles NHS sites have been smokefree since
November 2013, some people have still persisted in smoking outside
the hospitals and on other NHS premises. Now, in line with many
mainland authorities, the entire grounds of the NHS Western Isles are
to be included in the ban on tobacco. That means delivery drivers,
visitors, and patients are all prohibited from lighting up in or on any
NHS premises or grounds. E-cigarettes are also not allowed in NHS
buildings or on the majority of NHS grounds. This is because they
are not currently regulated as a tobacco product or a medicine in
the UK and may also mimic the look of smoking, which may make it
harder for others not to smoke.
Joanne O’Donnell of Smokefree Hebrides, the team that provides
support for people who want to stop smoking, explained: “The NHS
exists to look after people’s health. Even smoking outside can harm
those visiting and working in NHS buildings. For example, every time
you smoke, you breathe out second-hand smoke; 85% of secondhand smoke is invisible and odourless, yet it can spread through open
windows, doors and ventilation shafts, harming those inside."
The Smokefree policy will also benefit patients who are attending
a range of clinical services. Dr Maggie Watts, Director of Public
Health said: “Being Smokefree is not just about having a policy
banning smoking, it is also about helping people to move away from
tobacco use which we know is so harmful to health."
Smokefree Hebrides’, led by Western Isles Health Promotion,
is the stop-smoking service across the Western Isles and provides
confidential advice and information on a one-to-one or group basis.
Please do not hesitate to contact the Smokefree Hebrides team on
01851 701623.
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 18
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Fire training set-up for Isles firefighters
By Iain A MacSween
A
brand new carbonaceous fire training
facility was officially opened in Stornoway
on November 24.
The new site is located at Stornoway Airport, and
is part of a £3.5 million investment in the Western
Isles, with a major refurbishment to Stornoway
community fire station due for completion late
next year. The new fire training facility means
there's no need for retained fire crews to leave the
Western Isles for training, which will in turn benefit
local employers who will not lose staff for lengthy
periods of time because of training commitments.
The fire team based at Stornoway Airport will
also reap the benefit, as HIAL have entered into
a partnership with the Scottish Fire and Rescue
Service which will allow them to use the new
centre for their own training. The new facility
includes a dedicated search and rescue section and
compartment fire behaviour units.
It also houses a welfare de-briefing room/
classroom unit with BA maintenance capability
and a wood storage facility. Officially opening the
new unit in Stornoway, SFRS Chief Officer Alasdair
Hay commented: “This latest investment is more
good news for the north service delivery area.
“These strategically placed training facilities will
reduce the need for our staff to travel unnecessarily
and present the service with significant savings in
the future.
“We are working with tighter budgets every
year and projects such as these demonstrate the
service’s commitment, not only to the safety of
our firefighters and residents, but also that we are
making savings and delivering best value to our
communities.”
Chair of the Comhairle’s Environment and
Protective Services Committee, Norman Macleod,
commented: “This is very good news for Stornoway
and the Western Isles.
“It will support our staff and employers who
employ retained firefighters and reduce the impact
on their full-time jobs when they are required to go
for training. We have received tremendous support
from the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service and we
look forward now to the completion of the works at
Stornoway Fire Station.”
St Kilda swimmers hand
over cheques to charities
By Eilidh Whiteford
T
he successful St Kilda Swim 2015 team had
the delight recently to hand over donations
to four worthy charities after raising a total
of £21,505 through their epic challenge this
summer.
Swim Team Captain, Colin Macleod, said: “A big
thank you to everyone who donated to the St Kilda
Swim 2015 challenge – you have all made a great
difference to four brilliant charities.”
The team of seven swimmers, along with three
support kayakers and support vessel mv Cuma from
Island Cruising, completed the 60 mile swim route
from Village Bay, Hirta, to Hushinish in Harris in
August this year.
Leaving Hirta at around 4am on Monday, August
17th, the St Kilda Swim team landed on Hushinish
slipway just after 3pm on Tuesday, August 18th – taking
only 35 hours to finish a swim that had been postponed
three times from May to July due to bad weather.
During the challenge, the team were joined by
a large pod of dolphins, and swimmer John Dyer
encountered a 25ft Minke whale that swam around
20ft beneath him!
Further funds were raised following the
successful attempt through the St Kilda Swim Song,
penned and recorded by young songstress Rosie
Sullivan, the proceeds of which were added to the
charities' total.
Members of the swim team in Stornoway recently
had great pleasure in handing over donations
of £5,772.14 to the Fishermen's Mission and
£5,620.68 to the Leanne Fund.
For 130 years the Fishermen's Mission has been
the only fishermen's charity to provide emergency
support, alongside practical, financial, spiritual and
emotional care to all fishermen, active or retired,
and their families.
Established on the Isle of Lewis in 2009 in
memory of Leanne Mitchell, the Leanne Fund
provides finance for special treats and experiences
for young people suffering from Cystic Fibrosis,
and their families, in the Highlands and Islands of
Scotland.
On the mainland, St Kilda swimmer John
Dyer was over the moon to present donations
of £7,568.43 to Yorkhill Children's Charity, the
fundraising body which aims to improve children's
health by providing services and equipment for the
Yorkhill NHS Trust Hospitals.
which provides help to over 6,000 of Scotland's
And John also visited the Aberlour Child Care
Trust – the largest, solely Scottish, children's charity
most vulnerable children, young people and
families – to present donations of £2,543.77.
New exercise class wins over users
By Eilidh Whiteford
I
t tones, can bust cellulite, burns around 700
calories a class; but most of all, it's fun - it's
Boogie Bounce Xtreme.
A complete exercise programme on minitrampolines, the laughs and health boosts of Boogie
Bounce Xtreme (BBX) have been brought to Lewis
by Point resident Sophie MacDonald; and is already
proving popular with active islanders.
Speaking after her first week of classes, Sophie
said: “It's been a brilliant start. The classes have
been chock-a-block and people have said it's not
what they expected, but they've really enjoyed
themselves; the feedback has been fantastic.”
Indeed, bouncing around on a mini-trampoline
might not sound much at first, but even NASA
agrees with the benefits of bouncing with studies by
scientists at the US space programme revealing it to
be 68% more effective than jogging, and requiring
less effort!
“The most efficient and effective exercises yet
devised by man,” states NASA of 'rebounding
exercise'; aka bouncing.
And Sophie, and now her clients, understand
why: “It's a great mix of everything,” she said.
“It uses the upper and lower body, is good for
coordination, keeps the brain active, burns fat and
reduces cellulite – it's an all-rounder.
“And it's so much fun, the class is over before you
know it,” she added.
Using High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)
techniques, BBX is said to maximise effective fatburning processes during cardio sections, while
the pliable trampoline mat supplies a range of
core-stability exercises to engage more deep core
muscles.
BBX gurus say that the exercise programme can
also provide the development of both upper and
lower body strength just as effectively as weightlifting but without the threat of straining, pulling or
tearing muscles.
But it is the fun element, the social aspect and
party atmosphere of Boogie Bounce Xtreme that
proves attractive to exercisers – and Sophie is
delighted to be bringing BBX to the isles.
She spent the summer in training, first achieving
her Fitness Instructing qualification and then her
Boogie Bounce Xtreme training, and Sophie is now
running classes every Wednesday and Thursday
evenings, and Friday and Saturday mornings, in
Stornoway Sea Angling Club.
Classes are priced at £5 and booking is essential
with ten places available per class – you can find
out more about class times and availability on
Facebook at 'Boogie Bounce Extreme Isle of Lewis'.
And already Sophie is looking towards expanding
her BBX repetoire in 2016.
“I'm planning on going away in February to
attend a course teaching five to 15 year olds and
then set up classes for kids and teenagers,” she said.
“I'm also keen to start BBX Hen parties or
Birthday parties,” Sophie continued. “And if
people don't fancy going to a class to start off with,
then they can hire me privately for themselves or a
group of friends to try it out.”
There's no excuse then for not trying out the
islands' latest exercise class, and who knows,
Boogie Bounce Xtreme could be just the thing to
see a brand new you in 2016!
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EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 19
OUTER HEBRIDES BUSINESS GATEWAY is delivered by Comhairle nan
OUTERSiar
HEBRIDES
GATEWAY
a Comhairle
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SOUTH UIST ENTREPRENEUR
Young entrepreneur, Iain MacPhee of South Uist has
taken an exciting leap to set up his own business
called BukPal® - http://bukpal.com/ Iain sells a
sturdy, versatile, foldable stand, which was initially
created to hold a recipe book. The stand was
designed to keep the recipe book raised above the
work surface, to keep it clean and clear of spillages.
However, through Iain’s market research, he got lots
of positive feedback about how versatile the stand
could be as it also proved really useful to hold a
range of books, iPads/Tablets, display plates, plaques
and similar things, keeping peoples’ hands free.
Iain has received support from Include-Us (a
fixed-term project run by Comhairle nan Eilean
Siar), Business Gateway and The Prince’s Trust.
Iain also entered a nationwide competition called,
Tenner, which was rolled-out in Uist by Include-Us
in 2013. Iain received a Highly Commended award
in the 12-19 year old “Most Inspiring Individual”
category. This made him realise the potential his
product could have and gave him the confidence
he needed to turn this into a business. A few years
later, now all Iain’s research and development
has been undertaken, he is now ready to launch
BukPal®.
Whilst still studying at Sgoil Lionacleit, Iain has
invested a few years’ worth of research, testing and
hard work in developing this manufactured stand,
since his achievement at the Tenner competition.
Iain’s product has gone through vigorous testing
and this design is now officially protected. The
stand is foldable, which makes it easy for people
to store away or wrap up as a gift and it also has
integrated holes, so you could hang it up on the
wall as an alternative storage option.
For further information please visit the website at
http://bukpal.com/
COMHAIRLE PROPERTIES
FOR LEASE
(1) UNIT 1, BARVAS INDUSTRIAL ESTATE – 50m2
(2) UNIT 5, JAMES STREET – 45m2
(3) UNIT 7A, JAMES STREET – 65m2
(4) UNIT 7B, JAMES STREET – 66m2
(5) ARDMHOR WAITING ROOM SERVERY,
BARRA – 10m2
For more information and to apply please contact
the Business Gateway office on 01851 822775 or
[email protected]
RESOURCE
EFFICIENCY GRANT
Do you have a convenience store that you're
planning to renovate? If so, you could eligible
for a Resource Efficiency Grant. To find out more
visit http://www.zerowastescotland.org.uk/content/
convenience-store-resource-efficiency-grant
ARTIST AND DESIGNER
TRAINING
If you are an artist, designer,
painter or someone who draws
or creates images, why not take
advantage of this FREE training?
XpoNorth are working with HIE,
MG Alba, and King Rollo Films,
who are delivering two professional animation
training courses each of two weeks duration. King
Rollo are aiming to have an original animation
series produced on Skye. This training will equip
talented artists and train up a new workforce for the
Highlands and Islands.
Designing Backgrounds for Animation
7th December - 18th December 2015
CelAction 2D Animation
11th January - 22nd January 2016
Course Times and Venue: 9.30am - 5pm each
day, except the first day, which will start at 10am,
Sabhal Mor Ostaig, Sleat, Isle of Skye.
Accommodation and travel can be provided, if
necessary. There are also a number of networking
events taking place around the Highlands and
Islands between 18th-26th November. Find more
details here http://xponorth.co.uk/news/do-youwant-to-work-in-animation
How to Apply
If you’re interested in taking part, please
[email protected] for more information
and details on how to submit an application.
“STATE PENSION
TOP UP” SCHEME
Iain MacPhee with a BukPal stand.
A new scheme has been launched which offers
anyone reaching State Pension age before 6 April
2016 the chance to increase their State Pension but
up to £25 per week. If you are entitled to a UK
State Pension and will have reached State Pension
age by 6 April, you will be eligible for the scheme.
Bespoke Bicycles Limited on North Beach Street
WATCH THIS SPACE COMPETITION WINNERS
The winner of the recent “Watch this Space”
competition run by Business Gateway was
Bespoke Bicycles Limited, who won the use
of a retail unit in Stornoway for a few weeks
during November and December. They have
now set up in the old Events shop on North
Beach so why not pop in? They have a lot
of information available on their future plans
for a cycling hub they hope to set up on the
island and there are also some bikes and other
equipment for sale. They will be in the shop
until 12 December.
The runners up in the competition were
Stornoway Golf Club who have opened up
at 4 Bayhead and are selling golf clubs, golf
related gifts as well as other sporting apparel.
They also have clothing that was specially
made for their 125th anniversary this year
along with novelty items.
Stornoway Golf Club at 4 Bayhead
The scheme will be open for 18 months and will
enable people to buy additional State Pension,
worth up to £1,300 per year.
BUSINESS GATEWAY MEET
THE ADVISER EVENTS
More information on State Pension top up
and how to apply is available at www.gov.uk/
statepensiontopup.
The Business Gateway and Prince’s Trust advisers
have been hosting Meet the Adviser events in Lewis
and Harris throughout November. They visited the
Clan MacQuarrie Centre in Borve, the Comhairle
Offices in Tarbert and the Uig Community Centre.
They met with a number of people who were either
interested in starting a new business or in developing
an existing venture. If anyone who wasn’t able to
attend would like to make an appointment to meet
an adviser please contact our office on 01851
855775 or [email protected]
CREATIVEMIX
ONE DAY SONGCAMP
CreativeMix will kick-start a
new series of youth programmes
with a one day SongCamp at
Ironworks Venue in Inverness
on Saturday 12th December.
The project is a partnership
between Ironworks Venue and
Highlands and Islands Enterprise, with a range of
extended partners including XpoNorth Music and
Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival.
The event is open to young songwriters aged 1625 and based in the Highlands and Islands, with
Rachel Sermanni and Joe McAlinden confirmed to
mentor the session. SongCamp will offer young artists
an excellent opportunity to develop their skills, gain
valuable feedback on their material and get advice on
how to take their writing to the next level.
The event is completely free to attend, however,
spaces are strictly limited.
For full details on how to apply please visit
http://www.creativemix.org/news/2015/10/29/
creativemix-one-day-song-camp
The photo shows Stephen Mackinnon and Fiona
Chisholm, Business Gateway Adviser, at the Meet the
Adviser event in Tarbert.
Find us on Facebook – search for Business Gateway Outer Hebrides
Online Local Business Directory – go to: www.businesshebrides.co.uk
EVENTS SECTION ONE - Page 20
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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Published by Intermedia Services, Office 3, Clinton’s Yard, Rigs Road, Stornoway Tel: 01851 705743
Printed by Highland Web Offset, Dochcarty Road, Dingwall
The Gift shopwas declared officially open by Morag Campbell, front,
pictured with Annie Macsween, Chairperson of Comunn Eachdraidh Nis
Gift shop marks new
stage for society
What's in Section Two
RNLI News ..........................................................................................................................................B2
Breakfast with the Salvation Army ......................................................................................................B2
EVENTS Cinema Focus .........................................................................................................................B3
Pròiseact nan Ealan ends with top award ............................................................................................B3
Dr You: Talking About Disability .........................................................................................................B3
Lewis Car Club....................................................................................................................................B4
Careers convention to be repeated ......................................................................................................B4
Patient Welcome packs at Western Isles Hospital .................................................................................B5
Comunn Eachdraidh Nis .....................................................................................................................B5
Building our communities..............................................................................................................B6-B7
Environmental Health and Trading Standards Advice...........................................................................B8
Obituary: Mrs Marie A Macmillan OBE JP ............................................................................................B9
Lewis & Harris Rangers Supporters Club at 40.............................................. B10-B11
Astrid get back in tune ..................................................................................................................... B11
New books at Western Isles Libraries ................................................................................................B12
Stornoway Primary Newsdesk...........................................................................................................B13
December at An Lanntair ..................................................................................................................B13
The Linda Norgrove Foundation: Orphanage visit ..............................................................................B14
Jersey makes island home for Angus from Ness ................................................................................B14
Jumper Day for Save The Children ....................................................................................................B14
SAC: Cattle and Sheep Health: Top ten Liver Fluke do's and don'ts .....................................................B15
Scottish Crofting Federation: 'Ruinous' delay in support payments to crofters....................................B15
Naidheachdan Gàidhlig ............................................................................................................. B16-B17
Events in Stornoway and East Lewis ............................................................................................. B18-19
Events in Harris / Events in West Lewis .............................................................................................B19
or at www.welovestornoway.com
T
he opening of a new gift shop on
Tuesday November 24th was a new
mark of the progress of one of the most
successful community organisations on
the Isle of Lewis.
Comunn Eachdraidh Nis (CEN) was the
first historical society to be set up in the
Western Isles in 1977 – and its first ever
employee, Agnes Rennie, now manager of
Gaelic publishers Acair, was present as the
former Cross School celebrated a further
transformation.
Over the last summer CEN – with
eight employees – was the biggest single
employer in north Lewis – and even in the
winter months, it now has three full-timers.
Over the years it has been based in
several different locations throughout the
district, none of which were suitable for an
ever-increasing collection of artefacts. In
November 2011, CEN secured ownership
of the former Cross Primary School.
The building is now home to a vast
archive of historical information, family
records, photographs as well as an
accredited museum. There is a café in
the centre, catering for locals and tourists
and it also hosts a weekly day club for the
housebound and elderly in the area.
And on Tuesday 24th November
marked the opening of a new retail area
at the centre, selling crafts, artwork and
publications from across the Hebrides. The
shop will provide another income stream
for the centre and safeguard employment.
The shop has replaced an area used by the
boy’s toilets in the former school.
Chairperson of CEN, Annie Macsween
said: “We are especially thankful to the
funders of this latest development. CEN is
grateful to Highlands and Islands Enterprise
and Comhairle nan Eilean Siar for the
financial assistance it was granted from
these organisations.
“This development is very much in line
with the aspirations of these organisations
and of many other national bodies
including Bòrd na Gàidhlig and the Scottish
Government.“
The old school building was packed with
visitors and guests for the official opening
as the local community – such a vital
support and resource for the society over
the years – turned out in force to emphasise
its importance. Annie also thanked all the
contractors and workers involved in the
project – which was declared officially
open by Morag Campbell, whose son
Donald was one of the contractors on the
project.
More on Page B5
EVENTS is published by Intermedia Services, Offices 1-3, Clintonʼs Yard,
Rigs Road, Stornoway, HS1 2RF Tel: 01851 705743
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B2
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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The amazing Grace Darling
November 24th marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of the
amazing Grace Darling.
Stornoway
On September 7th, 1838, Grace, the lighthouse keeper's daughter
at Longstone Lighthouse on the Farne Islands, looked from the
window as the winds were howling and the storm was getting worse.
Stornoway Shouts
November proved an exceptionally quiet month for the local
lifesavers of Stornoway RNLI with not one shout to report.
She and her father took turns to look for ships throughout the
very dark night, through roaring seas and spray. At 7am, while on
watch, 22-year-old Grace spotted the wreck and survivors of the SS
Forfarshire on Big Harcar, a low rock outcrop.
The RNLI boys have, of course, been out every Monday to undertake
their regular training, ensuring the Stornoway crew is ready for action
when the call comes to help save lives at sea.
Grace pleaded with her father to help and together they pushed
their 20ft long rowing boat into the raging surf – Grace wearing a full
length dress and armed with blankets to warm those shipwrecked.
And on Sunday, November 8th, the volunteer crew of Stornoway
RNLI joined the congregation and guests at St Columba's (Old Parish)
Church in Stornoway to pay their respects at the Remembrance Day
Service.
Exhausted and aching the pair rowed through the vicious storm, a
gruelling and dangerous journey of a mile to reach the survivors and,
as Grace single-handedly steadied the boat, her father climbed the
rocks to help the casualties into the small craft.
Stornoway RNLI Shop
Looking for anything this Christmas? Look no further than the
Stornoway RNLI Shop on Cromwell Street.
With a selection of Christmas Cards, stocking fillers, presents for
him, her and the wee ones, there is plenty to choose from in the local
RNLI shop – and you can buy safe in the knowledge that your money
will be helping save lives at sea.
Grace Darling
shop – visit ww.rnlishop.org.uk to find out more.
And if there's someone who is particularly hard to buy for this
Christmas, check out the Made for Life 235 range of wallets, bags
and accessories. Made from real disused RNLI life-jackets, the range
offers a unique gift for even the most pickiest of people.
Stornoway Lifeboat Ladies Guild
Some were left behind to be picked up later by Grace's father
and two uninjured survivors, while at the lighthouse Grace and her
mother tended to the injured and distressed, now safe at least from
the sea's clutches.
The courage shown by Grace and her family that night became
legendary and you can find out more about her, and the Grace
Darling Museum, at www.rnli.org
How to Help
The Stornoway RNLI Shop, manned by the fantastic fundraisers of
Stornoway Lifeboat Ladies Guild, is now open every Thursday and
Saturday from 11am to 3pm.
The superwomen of Stornoway Lifeboat Ladies Guild were in action
on Saturday, November 21st, hosting a very well attended Coffee
Afternoon in the Retirement Centre on Bayhead, Stornoway.
Why not pop in and have a look – you may even get all your
Christmas shopping at once!
A huge THANK YOU to all who came and enjoyed an afternoon
cuppa and cakes – you raised the magnificent total of £775!
To donate to the local lifesavers of Stornoway RNLI, or help raise
funds through an event, contact Stornoway Lifeboat Ladies Guild
Chair Ellen MacDonald on 01851 702154, or Guild Treasurer Maggie
Macleod on 01851 705407.
You can also find a huge selection of RNLI branded gifts –
everything from Christmas cards and wrapping paper; tea-towels,
mugs and decorative accessories, to jigsaws, notebooks, kids toys,
clothing, food hampers and much, much more at the RNLI online
And the fundraising Ladies will be up in Ness on Saturday,
December 5th, with a stall boasting a range RNLI Christmas gifts and
cards at the local Christmas Fayre. A great opportunity to stock up for
Christmas if you can't get to the RNLI Shop in town!
You can keep up to date with the RNLI at www.rnli.org – or to
keep up with the local lifesavers, why not 'Like' the Stornoway RNLI
Facebook page; log onto www.facebook.com and search 'Stornoway
RNLI'.
Breakfast with
the Salvation Army
Words and photograph
by Melissa Silver
here,” Callum explained. But the numbers of the people who can
afford to donate have taken a dive, meaning the service is under
threat.
obody leaves here with an empty stomach’ is the motto
at the Salvation Army Stornoway Corps, where they
pile the plates high for anyone who walks through their door
for breakfast on a Friday morning, or for lunch on a Tuesday
and Thursday.
Callum described their breakfast club as a “safe environment…
a place to share,” explaining that whole families often come in
to eat. One family in particular, the members of which are from
different parts of the island, meet there for breakfast every Friday.
In the school holidays, they have to set out more tables and chairs
as their regulars turn up with their kids too. And it’s easy to see why
people come back.
‘N
But, lately, the numbers - particularly for the breakfast club have dipped, and the Salvation Army is looking to the community
to support this much-needed service.
It was a cold, blustery Friday morning when I went to have a
chat with Callum and Emma Newton, Commanding Officers of
the Salvation Army Stornoway Corps. I was greeted by the smell
of cooked breakfasts, the noises of the bustling kitchen, and the
smiling faces of the team that make it all happen every week.
Through the doors, in the hall, were tables set out, and people
sitting, chatting, laughing, enjoying their breakfast - a breakfast
made up of “good quality meat,” Callum states, “all sourced from
local butchers,” as well as Stag Bakery rolls, and fresh, local eggs,
brought in by a volunteer. Emma adds: “I think all that comes from
the supermarket is the baked beans and tomatoes!”
The ‘donation only’ system means that you can pay what you
can afford. If you can’t afford anything, there’s no judgement, and
the idea is that the donations from those who can afford it pay
for the food that feeds everyone. “Some people who come here
wouldn’t feed themselves properly otherwise… that’s why we’re
Every Friday, the police station order in 16 bacon rolls, which
the cooks make ready for them to pick up, and this is something
they’d like to encourage other people to do. “Just give us a call,
and we’ll have it ready, if you’re in a hurry,” Callum said. The cooks
are in from 7.30am on a Friday, breakfast officially starts at 8am,
and if you turn up, they will feed you!
Before I left, I was enticed by the delicious smells of their kitchen
and their almost parental desire to have everyone fed well, so was
handed a full Scottish breakfast and a pot of tea. Heading back out
into the cold wasn’t nearly as difficult with a belly full of hot food!
So, as the nights are drawing in, temperatures are dropping,
and heating bills are rocketing, spare a thought for the people you
could be helping by going there for a bacon roll on a Friday, and
making a donation in the pot.
Equally, if you’ve found yourself struggling for the wherewithal
to get a good hot meal down you, the Salvation Army is waiting
with open arms.
The team at the Salvation Army Stornoway Corps
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B3
www.hebevents.com
Pròiseact nan Ealan ends with top award
T
he national Gaelic arts agency, Pròiseact nan Ealan, again
won the Arts & Culture award at the annual Gaelic awards
in Glasgow last month‚ but this also marked the end of the
Stornoway-based agency's existence.
an Lanntair
The Closer We Get
The event, sponsored by the Daily Record & Bòrd na Gàidhlig,
celebrates excellence across the language and this was the second
year in a row that Pròiseact nan Ealan won this category.
Karen Guthrieʼs tender yet bittersweet Scottish
documentary is the story of an apparently ordinary
family having to deal with broken dreams and hidden
secrets. With her mother disabled after a stroke – but
retaining her strong personality – Karen films her
family, revealing the truth about her taciturn father
(an engaging yet unforthcoming figure) and the
other life he led in Africa….
Monday 7th Dec
6pm
The award celebrates the significance of World War One
multimedia production 'Sequamur' which toured locally, nationally
and internationally to widespread critical acclaim. Sequamur is
written by Shetland-based Niseach Donald S Murray.
isability can arise in a number of ways, and is described as
anyone who has a physical or mental impairment which
has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on their ability to
carry out daily activities.
Local groups and services can refer people to Advocacy Western
Isles, or individuals can self-refer themselves by contacting Advocacy
Western Isles, Lamont Lane, Stornoway, telephone 01851 701755, or
email: [email protected]
In simple terms, these impairments may include: loss of limbs;
a visual or hearing impairment; long-term health condition such
as cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and heart disease; learning
difficulties; and mental health problems such as autism, eating
disorders, depression and dementia.
The ‘Dr You’ range offers a wide range of self-help books, available
within your local or mobile library.
Disabled people are often talked about as though they form one
group. But every disabled person faces different challenges and
health conditions. In fact, more than 80% of people with a disability
were born without it and find they have to adjust.
More people are living with a disability because we’re living
longer, and improved medical treatments are helping people to
manage long-term health problems. For a lot of people, independent
life also means being employed, with half of those disabled in the UK
being in employment.
For those who have become disabled through an accident, illness
or a deteriorating medical condition, life will change significantly.
But with the right support, individuals can often continue to live in
their own home, remain in employment, and enjoy an independent
life.
Local group Advocacy Western Isles offers one-to-one confidential
independent advocacy support. Priority is given to those with mental
health issues, people with learning disabilities, children and young
people, and parents/carers.
Miracle on 34th Street
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Advocacy Western Isles also supports adults with learning
disabilities and runs ‘The Stand Up For Yourself Self Advocacy
Group’, helping adults with learning disabilities to have a stronger
collective voice about matters in the community which concern
them. The group also operate the SMILE Project (See Me I want to
Live Equally), which trains others on how best to treat people with a
learning disability using forum theatre and audience participation.
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for up-to-date info on what's coming
to a screen machine near you
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ST
Go to www.screenmachine.co.uk
Advocacy is all about being on someone’s side, helping and
empowering them to deal with whatever issue they may have, and
putting forward what they believe is best for them, especially when
their views are different from professionals and agencies that are
involved.
www.cne-siar.gov.uk/library 01851 822744
This project is supported by the Scottish Government Public Library Improvement Fund.
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. WE
Screen Machine
The range of issues can be varied and complex. This includes
challenging decisions; bullying in the workplace; support with care
needs and carers assessments; additional support for learning needs;
family break up and contact/residency issues; and support for young
people who come before the Children’s Panel.
Books and information to help you take control of your health and well-being
Available from branch and mobile libraries across the Western Isles
SIAR
Beset with personal and professional problems, George
Bailey finds his previously happy life falling apart
around him on Christmas Eve. Seeing no way out,
he considers suicide from the edge of a bridge – until
his guardian angel intervenes to show George what
his beloved hometown of Bedford Falls would be like
without him. A truly warm and joyous Christmas classic.
Wednesday 23rd Dec
2.30pm
Advocacy Western Isles can help achieve this by finding out about
your rights, helping with forms and letters, receiving clear written
and verbal information, attending meetings and if need be, speaking
on your behalf.
AN
Sophisticated six-year-old Susan Walker doesnʼt believe
in Father Christmas…until she meets a department
store Santa who calls himself Kriss Kringle. But when
Kringleʼs assertions that he is Santa Claus lead to
threats of his being declared insane, he ends up taking
part in a legal case which may well have everyone –
even Susan – believing in Father Christmas.
Wednesday 24th Dec
11am
Itʼs a Wonderful Life
Your guide to self-help
=SYVKYMHIXSWIPJLIPT
in the Western Isles
MRXLI;IWXIVR-WPIW
ES .
The role of independent advocacy is to support people to speak
up for themselves and to promote what they think is in their best
interests. This can be through ensuring their voice is heard, their
views are taken seriously, their rights are explored and upheld, and
that they are involved in decisions that are made about them.
RI
A Christmas Star
Set in the picturesque village of Pottersglen in Northern
Ireland. A Christmas Star follows young and spirited
Noelle who, born in dramatic circumstances under the
Christmas Star, believes she has the gift to perform
strange miracles. When conniving developer McKerrod
threatens her peaceful life, she teams up with a misfit
gang of local kids to save the village from demolition.
Tuesday 22nd Dec
2.30pm
The Night Before
Ethan, Isaac and Chris have been friends since
childhood. For 10 years running, their annual
Christmas Eve reunion has been a night of
debauchery, but now that theyʼre adults, the tradition
is about to come to an end. To make it as memorable
as possible, they set out to find the mythical
ʻNutcracka Ballʼ – the greatest of all Christmas
parties.
Monday 21st Dec
6pm
Wednesday 23rd Dec
6pm
D
ER
R
A
Sunset Song
Director Terence Daviesʼ exquisitely-shot adaptation
of Lewis Grassic Gibbonʼs classic Scottish novel centres
on the agrarian Guthrie family. Contrasted against its
fearsome patriarch, daughter Chris is an intelligent
young woman divided between hatred for her coarse
village and love of its landscape. She and her brother
dream of escape and freedom – possibilities for which
suddenly present themselves to Chris….
Monday 21st Dec
2.30pm
Tuesday 22nd Dec
6pm
SPECTRE
Still reeling from the devastating events of Skyfall,
James Bond (Daniel Craig) investigates a cryptic
message and begins to uncover layer upon layer
of deception and global conspiracy, leading to the
sinister SPECTRE organisation. As M battles political
pressures on MI6, the shadow of Bondʼs past looms
large as he confronts a formidable and familiar
enemy….
Thursday 17th Dec
8.15pm
Friday 18th Dec
6pm
Saturday 19th Dec
2.30pm
Thursday 24th Dec
2pm
Dr You – Talking About Disability
HA
When young Tom discovers a slimy green ghost called
Hugo living in his cellar, he is understandably afraid.
But Hugo turns out to be only an ʻAveragely Spooky
Ghostʼ – meanwhile, a more dangerous ice ghost is
spreading an arctic cold over their town. Now, it is
up to Tom, Hugo and professional ghosthunter Hetty
Cuminseed to prevent an icy apocalypse!
Thursday 17th Dec
6pm
PnE's previous major landmark achievements included the St Kilda
Opera which had Europe-wide acclaim and An Leabhar Mòr: The
Great Book of Gaelic.
LEAB
Ghosthunters –
On Icy Trails
"Pròiseact nan Ealan has been a major part of Gaelic arts
development over many years, and I wish to thank all our supporters
HA
Brooklyn
LEAB
Young Eilis Lacey arrives in New York from Ireland
in the 1950s, and soon finds herself swept up in an
exciting romance. But, on a return visit, a reunion with
a former acquaintance leaves her with an agonising
decision between two men, two countries and two
lives. This adaptation of Colm Tóibínʼs novel features
standout performances from its youthful leads.
Tuesday 15th Dec
8pm
"However, we have found ourselves in a constrained financial
position in recent times and, despite all our best efforts, the
organisation will close next month.
Speaking on behalf of the Pròiseact nan Ealan Board, Catherine
Macdonald (Chair) said: "Funding is a growing problem for arts
organisations and, sadly, Pròiseact nan Ealan are not immune from
this. My thoughts are with the staff whose hard work and commitment
to Gaelic arts has been validated once again by last night's arts and
culture award."
ES .
With the nation of Panem in a full scale war,
Katniss Everdeen confronts President Snow in a
final showdown. Teamed with a group of her closest
friends, Katniss goes on a mission with the unit from
District 13 as they risk their lives to liberate the
citizens of Panem, stage an assassination attempt on
President Snow, and preserve the future.
Thursday 10th Dec
8.30pm
Friday 11th Dec
5.30pm
Wednesday 16th Dec
8.15pm
who have contributed to our numerous achievements."
RI
The Hunger Games:
Mockingjay – Part 2
Speaking after collecting the award Erica Morrison, Creative
Director of Pròiseact nan Ealan, said: "As an organisation we have
always been committed to delivering high quality Gaelic arts, and
we are delighted to receive this award in recognition of a wonderful
piece of Gaelic drama which recognised such a significant period in
the history of the Gael.
A
The Lady in the Van
The unusual and unlikely bond between an eccentric
transient and young playwright Alan Bennett is
explored in Bennettʼs adaptation of his acclaimed
play, directed by regular collaborator Nicholas
Hytner. Maggie Smith plays the role she originated
onstage in this true story of the elderly Miss
Shepherd, who lived in a van which remained parked
in Bennettʼs driveway for 15 years.
Thursday 10th Dec
6pm
Wednesday 16th Dec
5.30pm
However, it was a bittersweet night for the agency as it announced
that, after more than 25 years of being at the forefront of Gaelic arts
development, it will cease to operate this month.
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B4
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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New committee elected to
LEWIS CAR CLUB
lead club into next season
T
he Lewis Car Club AGM was held in November with a good
turnout and a new committee elected and in place ready for
2016's Motorsports season.
Hebrides Rally 2016 is now confirmed and will be held in the
middle of August 2016.
There were two Motortests held in November and we had 13 entries
and it was great to see new entrants still turning out for these events. Both
events very closely contested and challenging in the wintry conditions.
If everything seems under control, you ain't going fast enough. You
can repair cars and plug a leak but you can't fix stupid.
The 2015 Lewis Car Club annual dinner and awards ceremony will
be held in the County Hotel on Saturday 9th January at 7pm and all
are very welcome. Bring a friend and if you don't have any, friends
bring some sheep or chickens with you. If you're not a meat-eater or
don't enjoy fish then a veggie option will be on the menu.
The 2015 Lewis Car Club chocolate fireguard trophy and the Heb
Rally ashtray on a motorbike decanter will be awarded as will the
2015 Dolly Dimple Irn Bru sponsored T Towel.
Careers convention to be repeated
By Iain A MacSween
A
Careers Convention held in Harris on
Thursday November 19 has been hailed a
great success.
The venue for the event was Sir E. Scott School,
which last hosted a Careers Convention seven
years ago.
What Do
Baha'is Believe?
Bahá’ís believe the crucial need facing humanity is to find a unifying vision of the future of society
and of the nature and purpose of life. Such a vision unfolds in the writings of Bahá’u’lláh.
In accordance to the Bahá’í Writings, “All human beings have been created to carry forward an
ever-advancing civilization.” The creation of a peaceful global society that fosters both individual
and collective wellbeing is at the heart of the Bahá’í vision of the future. Within the framework of
a growing community concerned with moral and spiritual transformation, social and economic
development is one expression of the Bahá’í commitment to realising this vision.
Bahá’í beliefs address such essential themes as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Oneness of Humanity
Freedom from Prejudice
Oneness of God and Religion
Inherent nobility of the human
Progressive revelation of
religious truth
Development of spiritual
qualities
Fundamental equality of the
•
•
•
•
sexes
Integration of worship and
service
Harmony between religion and
science
Centrality of justice to all human
endeavours
Importance of education
A total of 29 companies and organisations were
on hand to provide information for pupils on a
wide representation of training, further and higher
education opportunities.
Representatives from the University of Strathclyde
and the University of Stirling were among those
who took part, joining among others, the Isle of
Harris Distillery, the Army, MG Alba and Harris
Tweed Hebrides.
The event was co-hosted by Skills Development
Scotland, and it is now hoped to hold a Careers
Convention in the school every two years.
Iain Maclennan, of Skills Development Scotland,
told EVENTS: “We’re very thankful to all the
employers and local businesses who came together
to help young people find out what opportunities
are available to them in the world of work, along
with the places of further and higher education.
“We had pupils attending from S1 to S6.
Obviously the older pupils are closer to making
decisions as to what they want to do, but it’s
also good for the younger pupils to see what
opportunities are available locally. The event
coincided with a national ‘Learning Through Work’
week, promoting apprenticeships and the like. It
gets the message across that young people can
develop and learn while they are employed and
earning a wage, while at the same time working
towards getting a qualification.”
Aileen MacSween, head-teacher at Sir E. Scott
School, felt the day had been of great value to
all who attended. “It was very pleasing to see a
Careers Convention at Sir E Scott School being
reinstated after a gap of seven years,” she said.
“The day went very well indeed with 29
companies/organisations providing information
for our pupils on a wide representation of training,
further and higher education opportunities.
From the pupils' perspective it was an excellent
awareness raising event for the P7 to S3 cohort,
while for the S4-6 pupils it provided quality time
to engage in dialogue around their proposed
post school destination or an opportunity to still
consider the options available to them.
“On behalf of pupils, staff and parents I wish
to acknowledge and thank all delegates for the
preparation, time and commitment they gave
to attending our Careers Convention, and to
our main partner in organising this event - Skills
Development Scotland.
“As a consequence of the success of this event
we intend to host a Careers Convention on a
biennial basis.”
Eilean Siar Foodbank:
December Collection
What Do Baha'is Do?
We are engaged in community building in our neighbourhoods and have regular meetings, events
and activities open to everyone from any background, culture or religion. We look for and foster
what connects us rather than divides us.
The community host regular activities for children, youth and adults.
Join us for Enjoyable, Healthy, Peaceful and Spiritual Activities for All Ages.
Contact Mina:
07798700443 / [email protected]
www.bahai.org.uk
“To love humanity and try to serve it; to work for universal peace and universal brotherhood.” ~
‘Abdu’l-Bahá
T
he Eilean Siar Foodbank will be collecting
donations of food from Tesco, from Thursday
December 3rd to Saturday December 5th,
9am-10pm.
Eilean Siar Foodbank, based in Stornoway, first
opened its doors in September 2013, and is open
three days a week (Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays, 11am-2pm) to provide emergency food
to those on the islands who are below the poverty
line.
Volunteers are needed on December 3rd-5th,
9am-5pm, to help sort donations, and distribute
suggestion lists to customers.
Don't forget, the foodbank needs volunteers all
year round!
Have you got spare time on your hands? Are you
caring, compassionate, reliable and discreet? Eilean
Siar Foodbank needs your help. We are looking for
able-bodied volunteers who can help out regularly
at our Stornoway distribution centre with a variety
of tasks including greeting clients, sorting food,
handling admin and applying for funding.
If you feel you could help in any of these areas
and would like to find out more about being a
volunteer, please email [email protected]
org.uk for more information. Please note that
volunteers must be able to climb stairs.
For more information, to volunteer, or to see
how Eilean Siar Food Bank can help you, visit:
www.eileansiar.foodbank.org.uk, call: 01851
706650, or email [email protected]
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B5
Patient Welcome packs at Western Isles Hospital
T
he League of Friends at Western Isles Hospital have stepped
in to meet a need for patients who arrive without personal
possessions.
The League of Friends consulted with staff as to what kind of items
they felt were of most importance to patients in the first 24 hours of
their stay in hospital.
The League have for many years worked in the background providing
support within the hospital working with staff and patients to deliver
essential services that support patients and make their stay a better
experience. This year the League of Friends have once again provided
time and resources to continue to support patients in Western Isles
Hospital.
The League of Friends have now provided 50 admission packs
(25 male and 25 female) which include items such as dental packs,
shaving supplies, non-slip socks, ear plugs, shampoo, shower gel and
comb. These will be held in A&E department for those patients who are
unable to access their own belongings.
The latest move came after they were approached by the Scottish
health Council who advised them that patients had raised the issue
of people being admitted to hospital without access to personal
belongings.
Every year the League of Friends raise funds via the Tea Bar in the
hospital, through a raffle and by bag packing and every year they invite
requests from all departments for items on their "Wish List".
Roy Cameron, Chairperson of the League of Friends is seen, right,
handing over the patient admission packs to staff in A&E
Inside Comunn Eachdraidh Nis…Left, part of the World War One exhibition, centre, a display about tractors, and right, part of a crofting display
COMUNN EACHDRAIDH NIS | naidheachdan
COMUNN EACHDRAIDH NIS A’ FOSGLADH BÙTH ÙR
Chairperson of CEN, Annie Macsween said “CEN
is grateful to Highlands and Islands Enterprise and
it was granted from these organisations. This
of these organisations and of many other national
!"
’S math as fhiach dhuibh ur tiodhlaicean Nollaig
fhaighinn ann.
society to be set up in the Western Isles in 1977.
locations throughout the district, none of which were
suitable for an ever increasing collection of artefacts.
In November 2011, CEN secured ownership of the
former Cross Primary School. The building is now
home to a vast archive of historical information,
family records, photographs as well as an accredited
museum. There is a café in the centre, catering for
locals and tourists and it also hosts a weekly day club
for the housebound and elderly in the area. Tuesday
24th November marks the opening of a new retail area
at the centre, selling crafts, artwork and publications
from across the Hebrides. The shop will provide
another income stream for the centre and safeguard
employment in a fragile area.
Cllr Alasdair Macleod, Chair of the Comhairle’s
Sustainable Development Committee said:
“I’m delighted that the Comhairle’s Community
+ ,/0%000
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their ambitions in relation to the opening of the new
!1
!"
HARRY FERGUSON NIGHT AT CEN
An energy audit carried out in 2012, recommended
replacing the existing electric storage heating with a
!
the grant from HIE and CNES has allowed this work
to be carried out and that the subsequent savings
can be reinvested in the further development of CEN
services. The upgrade also ensures that the stringent
standards set by Museums, Galleries Scotland when
it comes to collections care are met.
Morag Campbell opening the new shop at CEN.
HIE’s Head of Strengthening Communities in the
Outer Hebrides, Jane Macintosh, said: “We are
#
as a priority within a Community-led Plan for the
$
! %
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well as boost visitors numbers. A new retail outlet
&
%
% ' !
(
%
%
)
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!"
Late night shopping
in North Lewis
Thurs 3rd & 10th December
Comunn Eachdraidh Nis, Buth Lisa,
Borgh Pottery, Sallie Jayne Avis, Cross
"#$
%"
Design will all be open until 9pm.
George served his apprenticeship in R.Hewitt Motors
Ltd., Portadown (part of the W.H. Alexander Group
— later Charles Hurst) in the mid seventies. He then
taught motor vehicle engineering for a few years in
Dungannon Technical College. For the past twenty
plus years, he and his wife Andrea have been full
time workers in The Faith Mission.
6JRLO&KURLV1HVV,VOHRI/HZLV+6617(RϒFH#FHQRQOLQHRUJ:ZZZHDFKGUDLGKQLVRUJ_2SHQLQJWLPHV0RQ±)UL±SP
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B6
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
Building our communities
Choices ahead as
education budget
falls by £4m
By Iain A MacSween
A
number of further efficiencies and service
choices will be required if the Education
and Children’s Services department of the
Comhairle is to come in under budget over the
next four years.
A consultation paper was recently distributed to
all department staff seeking views on proposals for
2016-17, and 2017-18.
The paper revealed that over the next three years,
the Education and Children’s Services department
was looking at budget cuts of almost £4 million.
Stated the report: “The department will focus
on its statutory duties as a priority and scrutinise
carefully all other areas of non-statutory spending.
However, it is inevitable that the department will
have to undertake further efficiencies through
service redesign and choices in terms of service
provision.
Proposals for 2016-17:
1) - Itinerant Staffing
The report stated that all primary teaching staff
are trained, qualified and GTC registered to teach
art, music and PE from nursery to P7. In addition to
meeting all experiences and outcomes required by
Curriculum for Excellence previous budget choices
have reduced itinerant provision in primary and
the current policy is to provide limited resource
allocated pro rata across all schools in P4 – P7.
Teachers have had significant opportunities to
build their confidence and skills in these areas
working alongside itinerant specialists and have
themselves been responsible for stages P1 – P3 for
a number of years now.
Most local authorities have withdrawn itinerant
specialist provision in Primary. In addition, the
Comhairle provides significant input in other ways
such as active schools, Art and Music instruction.
“Consequently, the emphasis and focus of this
exercise will be on service outcomes and impact
rather than protecting existing service structures
and provision.
It was recommended that the Comhairle
discontinue with all itinerants in primary schools,
achieving a saving of £465,000.
"The department has a budget of approximately
£39m (reducing to £35m) to provide a service
to a children and young person’s population of
approximately 3400. With less money and fewer
staff the department has improved outcomes for
children. It has done this by focusing on priorities
and addressing inefficiencies and ineffectiveness
while, at the same time, increasing the range of
resources available to children, young people and
families.”
As pupil numbers fall, stated the report, ASN
Audit procedures are used to allocate ASN
resources in an objective, fair and transparent way.
Feedback from the consultation, which has now
ended, will be considered alongside budget choices
before a final proposal document is produced for
elected members during the budget setting process
in early 2016.
2) - Additional Support Needs Audit
Staff have had enhanced training and models of
staged intervention/GIRFEC and this is producing
opportunities for efficiencies.
It was recommended that an ASN audit be used
to achieve overall budget reduction, with a saving
of £10,000.
3 - Shared Headships
The report confirmed that there was further
capacity for shared headships in Lionel/Sgoil
an Taobh Siar, Eoligarry/Castlebay, and Iochdar/
Balivanich .
This model of provision was well established,
effective, and accorded with the policy of the
Comhairle.
It was recommended to merge the headship of
Lionel and Sgoil an Taobh Siar, creating a saving
of £10,000.
4 - Senior Education Officer Posts
In light of the above, the decreasing school estate
and the increasing number of nonteaching head
teachers, the adoption of a distributed leadership
model of management made it possible to reduce
the number of Senior Education Officers from 3 to
2 (1 for Uist, Barra and Harris and 1 for Lewis).
This efficiency would result in a £70,000 saving.
5 - Above Formula Staffing
It was still the case that due to anomalies in
timetabling, historical practice and the planned
workforce reduction strategy, that there remained
over-capacity in all four of the Western Isles
secondary schools. The current situation was
that there is a shortage of staff in Maths (1) and
Physics (2) but over-provision in other subjects.
There would be a period of transition in which the
department would have to adopt to the use of Time
Plan, more effective timetabling, shared resources,
e-learning and contracted supply.
2017/18
1 - Business Support Function
It was anticipated that redesign of business
support and administration (in light of rationalising
office bases and a review of the service function)
would realise savings.
As such, a review of service function would
result in saving of £113,000.
2 -Children’s Services Staffing Review
Children’s Services redesign, service efficiency
and improved partnership working would produce
further opportunities for workforce reduction,
stated the report.
It anticipated that a review of Children’s Services
would achieve saving of £46,000.
3 - Janitorial/Cleaning Services Review
It was proposed that there should be a review
of janitorial and cleaning services to schools and
common support should be established across all
schools.
This would mean efficiency savings of £125,000.
4 - Extended Learning and CLD Review
It was anticipated that the integration of these
sections and a review of service delivery focussing
on key priorities would realise a small staff
reduction, meaning saving of £33,000.
2018/19
The 2016-18 savings proposal taken together
assumed a saving of £1,194,000, which left a
shortfall in the target for 2018-19 of £2,733,000.
Further work in terms of budget choices,
curriculum redesign (BGE and Senior Phase) would
realise further savings yet to be costed.
In addition, work currently being considered in
terms of the common timetable, e-learning, further
educational restructure would provide further
opportunities for workforce reduction and more
efficient staff deployment.
Overall, it was anticipated that these changes,
together with a greater focus on a partnership
approach in service delivery, would realise the
savings necessary to meet the shortfall.
Government seeks improvements to croft home scheme
P
lans to target and extend levels of support
available through the Scottish Government’s
Croft House Grant Scheme (CHGS) are likely
to be modified following a public consultation.
Change and Environment (RACCE) Committee
to confirm some proposals are being investigated
further – including the possible reinstatement of a
loans scheme.
But the changes are so significant that the
Scottish Government is consulting again with all
those involved in the sector.
Dr McLeod made the announcement on a visit
to Inverness to highlight Scottish Government
support for crofting. She said: “Feedback from our
consultation has been extremely helpful and we are
now refining our proposals.
Views were sought earlier this year on proposed
changes to the scheme, which provides up to £1.4
million in grants each year to crofters towards the
cost of building or improving their homes.
Since the start of 2007, over £14 million of grant
payments have been approved under the scheme.
Crofting Minister Aileen McLeod has now written
to the Scottish Parliament’s Rural Affairs, Climate
"For example, we are looking again at the
geographical areas eligible for the standard and
higher rate of grant under the scheme, and the
appropriate level of grant. We are also considering
introducing a more formal method of targeting the
scheme to those who need it most.
“As a number of these changes differ from
those set out in the consultation paper, I believe
that it would be beneficial to undertake a further
engagement with key stakeholders who responded
to the consultation. This is expected to conclude
in time to revise grant arrangements during this
Parliamentary term, with changes coming into force
shortly after that.
and - as I do not want to delay the launch of the
new grant arrangements – I intend to take it forward
separately. I look forward to further feedback from
key stakeholders so that this important scheme,
which has approved funding to build or improve
almost 700 homes in the last eight years, will be
well placed to support Scottish crofters in the years
ahead.”
“Amongst responses to the consultation was
support for reintroducing a loan scheme to help
crofters build or improve their homes. While this
was not one of the proposals in our consultation,
I am keen to look again at the feasibility of such a
scheme being introduced.
Crofting Commission Chief Executive, Catriona
Maclean, said: "The CHGS provides important
financial assistance to attract and retain people
in our crofting communities and also in helping
crofters to fulfil their duty of living on or close to
their croft so it is important that it is fit for purpose
and helps crofters with a genuine housing need.”
“However, this is a longer-term piece of work
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B7
www.hebevents.com
Building our communities
Failte Cafe
Young Carers
Partnership success with learning in communities
By Iain A MacSween
C
ommunity Learning and Development
(CLD) practice covers a broad range of
activities across the Western Isles, including
adult learning, family learning, community
capacity building and work with young people.
CLD empowers people of all ages to work
individually or collectively to make positive
changes in their lives, and in their communities,
through learning, personal development and
active citizenship. These changes can improve
an individual’s life chances, help to create a more
resilient and enterprising community, or contribute
to improved public services.
CLD plays an essential role in ensuring that
individuals and communities, particularly those
facing discrimination and disadvantage, gain the
confidence and skills to influence the decisions
that affect their lives. Partnership is a key feature
of CLD planning and delivery. Local partnerships
vary in membership, depending on local needs and
circumstances.
Those working in CLD are based in a range of
organisations spanning the public, voluntary, third
and community sectors. This diversity results in
a varied mix of activities in widespread settings,
building confidence, skills and networks.
Current guidance says the purpose of CLD is:
empowering people, individually and collectively,
to make positive changes in their lives and in their
communities, through learning.
Strategic Guidance for Community Planning
Partnerships:
Community
Learning
and
Development
The principles that underpin CLD practice are:
empowerment - increasing the ability of
individuals and groups to influence matters
affecting them and their communities
participation - supporting people to take part in
decision making
inclusion, equality of opportunity and antidiscrimination - recognising that some people need
additional support to overcome the barriers they
face
self-determination - supporting the right of
people to make their own choices
partnership - ensuring that resources, varied skills
and capabilities are used effectively.
Some examples of the kind of work CLD in the
Western Isles is involved with, include:
POINTERS
“Pointers Drop In is open on Friday nights 8pm –
11pm and Saturday afternoons 2pm – 5pm.
“We have recently started opening on a
Friday afternoon from 1.30pm – 4pm so there is
somewhere for young people to come and relax
when they finish school early on a Friday. It is open
to all young people from S1 upwards. We have free
pool, wifi with i-pads and laptops, wii, x-box and
playstation and a tuck shop.
“In the summer, two family fun days were held
during the week of the Hebridean Celtic Festival
where there was face painting, cup cake decorating,
balloon modelling and much more.
“We had over 160 people attending over the two
days and all activities were free. With donations
accepted towards Crossroads Lewis, the amazing
amount of £150 was raised!
“Pointers Young Carers meet every week during
term time. We provide activities and services
based on the requirements of those who attend.
We aim to identify young carers who are coping
without adequate support in the Western Isles, to
uncover the issues they face and to help support
them and tackle these issues. The group is great
allowing young carers to come together to relax and
participate in various activities such as segways,
paint a pot, beauty and hair care, cookery, baking
and much more. Transport costs are paid and
snacks and a nutritious evening meal are provided
at every session.
“We also have a Young Mums Group that meet
every Tuesday from 10.30am – 12pm. The mums
regularly attend a programme of events and
information sessions designed to promote both
their own health and lifestyle and the health of their
children. Various topics have been covered such
as routines for babies, first aid, health and nutrition
along with fun activities for the children with arts
and crafts, book bug, learning how to make play
dough and much more.”
Hi-Fires
This programme is designed to engage young
people who would otherwise not attend or be part
of other youth work activities.
The programme engages with young people (14+)
in structured activity which is not only designed
to help build confidence, self-esteem, and reduce
anti-social behaviours, but it is also a course where
young people are able to increase their fitness as
the course is physical.
the activities and programme were put together
to target young people who were disaffected and
disengaged. However, young people who were
making the transition from primary to secondary
participated in the activities as it was a good way
of meeting new people prior to starting secondary
school.
Adult Learners Week - 24 years on!
It’s 24 years since the first Adult Learners Week
and it was a year of change with Adult Learners
Week moving to November for the first time ever.
As a result, a number of events celebrating adult
learning in the Western Isles were organised by the
Comhairle’s Adult Learning and Employability team
during the week starting Saturday 21st November.
These activities included:
Partnership working is crucial in ensuring the
continuation of the course and to ensure referrals
are made. Current partners are: CLD, The Nicolson
Institute, Opportunities for All and Extended
Learning. The course would not run without the help
of the Scottish Fire Service who are instrumental in
the running and facilitation of the course.
Free Gaelic Beginners Level One and Level Two
classes at Stornoway library
Out of the 8 young people that started the last
course, five graduated and received their certificates
in recognition of the hard work and commitment
that they showed for the duration of the 10 week
course.
A one-day HACCP course in Pointers Youth Café
Lewis Summer Activities Programme 2015
In total 27 young people took part in a range
of activities over the summer with the CLD team
overseeing the activities. With money secured
through the Cashback for Communities Fund,
the team were able to offer young people the
opportunity to engage in structured activities over
the course of the summer holidays. Young people
had the opportunity to engage in activities they
did not have the opportunity to get involved with
before. These activities included; Cake Decorating,
Bowling, Gorge Scrambling, Rock Climbing,
Segways, Seatrek, Dinghy Sailing and Mountain
Biking. The CLD team offered summer activities
to all young people primary 7 onwards. Primarily
New, free Gaelic Beginners Level One and Level
Two classes at Uig Community Centre
A three-day Intermediate Food Hygiene course
and a one-day Elementary Food Hygiene course in
Pointers Youth Café
In addition, Wednesday 25th November was
‘Open Doors Day’ in Adult Learning Week 2015
and, as a result there was a Celebration of Learning
Event at the Failte Café in Pointers at 2-4pm that
day to which the public were invited to see
displays of local adult learning achievements and
for complimentary tea and cake. Graeme Miller,
Community Learning and Development said: "There
is a diverse range of adult learning taking place in
our community and we are working closely with
partners such as the Libraries Service, NHS Western
Isles, An Lanntair and Ionad Spòrs Leòdhais to
improve outcomes for learners of all ages – adult
learners week is a great opportunity to celebrate the
achievements of those involved’.
If you would like to get involved or find out more,
contact Community Learning and Development on
01851 822716 or register an interest in a class at
www.cne-siar.gov.uk/commed/clh
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B8
Environmental Health and
Trading Standards Advice
Information for
landlords and tenants
Electrical Safety - From 1st December 2015,
Carbon Monoxide – Any rented properties
where there is a fixed combustion appliance (i.e.
oil/gas boiler /open fire /wood burning stove)
must have proper carbon monoxide detection.
Full details are in our Private Landlords Bulletin.
It contains useful information for landlords and
tenants and can be found at the link below:
www.cne-siar.gov.uk/plr/documents/Landlord%20Leaflet.pdf
Landlords are reminded it is a criminal offence to rent property
without being registered *Exemptions apply (see bulletin)
Consumer &
Environmental Services
Comhairle nan Eilean Siar
Sandwick Road, Stornoway
Isle of Lewis HS1 2BW
Tel: 01851 822694
Fax: 01851 705349
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.cne-siar.gov.uk/envserv/
Facebook: CnES-Consumer-Environmental-Services
Coping with the outside
weather inside
Applying from 1st December 2015
Landlords are required to ensure that rented
houses have regular electrical safety inspections
carried out (as part of the repairing standard).
This includes the installation and any portable
appliances provided by the landlord. Inspections
must be carried out at least every 5 years
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
T
he clocks have just gone back and the nights are
long and dark, the weather can be miserable and
you can’t get the washing dried outside. It’s important
though to get the balance right between heating and
ventilating your home, otherwise you might end up
causing condensation which can lead to mould growth.
POINTS TO REMEMBER
Produce less moisture:
• Cover pans to lessen the amount of moisture in the air
• Dry clothes outdoors if you can, or indoors with a
window open
• Vent your tumble dryer to the outside
• Avoid using paraffin or flue-less bottled gas heaters,
they put a lot of moisture in the air
Ventilate to remove moisture:
• Ventilate all the time, especially when someone is in
the property
• Increase ventilation of the kitchen and bathroom
when in use and shut the door
• Ventilate cupboards, wardrobes and blocked chimneys
Insulate and draught-proof to keep your
home warm and reduce bills
• Insulate the loft
• Draught-proof windows and external doors
• Consider cavity insulation
• Consider secondary glazing
• Find out if you are eligible for a grant or other help
(see below)
Heat your home a little more
• If possible, keep low background heat on all day, with
background ventilation too
• Find out about benefits, rebates and help with fuel bills.
There is further information available from The Energy
Advisory Service (TEAS) who can provide impartial
energy efficiency advice to householders. The TEAS
contact number is 01851 704300 and the website is
www.theenergyadvisoryservice.co.uk/
Make Christmas
Go Further
Use leftovers safely: Cover leftovers and store them in the fridge,
then eat them up within two days or freeze them. If you are reheating
leftovers do so until steaming hot throughout to destroy food
poisoning bugs. Chilled leftovers can be eaten cold if they have been
stored correctly.
Your freezer is your friend this Christmas: Freezing your leftovers
can help them last longer. Once food is in the freezer it can be safely
stored for a considerable time, although the quality will be best
within three months.
Don't wash your turkey: Washing raw turkey is unnecessary and can
spread germs rather than kill them. Thorough cooking will kill germs.
Enjoy your
Christmas meal and have
ve
a happy and healthy
festive season!
Food Hygiene
Information Scheme
Comhairle nan Eilean Siar launched the Food Hygiene Information Scheme throughout the Outer Hebrides in 2012.
The Food Hygiene Information Scheme effectively 'opens the door' to the kitchen and/or food areas. This will increase
consumer confidence and help people make informed choices about where they eat or buy their food. The scheme is
designed to give straightforward information about how each food outlet fared at its last food hygiene inspection.
The scheme applies to all food outlets that supply food to consumers in the
authorities taking part in the scheme. Each food outlet is asked to display a
certificate on the door or window of their premises, saying whether they have
passed their hygiene inspection or whether improvement is required.
The scheme was developed by the Food Standards Agency (Scotland) and
provides information on the standards of hygiene in food outlets throughout
most local authority areas in Scotland.
Further information on the Food Hygiene Information Scheme is available at
http://www.cne-siar.gov.uk/foodsafety/food-hygiene-scheme.asp
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B9
www.hebevents.com
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Obituary: Mrs Marie A Macmillan OBE JP
M
rs Marie A Macmillan OBE JP, who died
recently in Petersfield, Hampshire, at the
venerable and happy age of 91 years, was the
highly successful Chairperson of Western Isles
Health Board for 14 years, from August 1979 to
March 1993.
She was a pragmatic and effective leader to whom
must go the credit for breaking through many years
of bureaucratic and political delay in the provision
of a new hospital for the Western Isles to replace the
aged Lewis Hospital and also the County Hospital,
and provide a centre of excellence for all the
people of the islands community. She served on the
Health Board for 20 years and resolved the many
and complex issues with tact, common sense and
firm belief that all the population of all six islands
deserved nothing less than equal service as enjoyed
by the rest of Scotland. She played a significant role
in the wider arena of Scottish health provision by
her concomitant service on the umbrella group of
Scottish Health Board chairmen where her flair for
persuasive advocacy was affectionately admired by
her colleagues there and in Government circles at
St Andrew's House.
Mrs Macmillan was a superb ambassador for
her community throughout her 30 years of public
service. Shortly after returning to the town of her
birth she took on the challenging task of being
secretary to the local Conservative Association.
Despite this daunting task and all the responsibilities
of family she still made time to work with the local
Meals on Wheels service where she was an effective
fund raiser and co-ordinator of the distribution
of meals to the elderly and infirm. In 1971 she
successfully stood for election to Stornoway Town
Council, being only the fourth woman to enter that
traditionally male preserve.
Notwithstanding her work with the Conservative
party she made it perfectly clear at the election
and throughout her entire public service that her
priority was to promote the best interest of the entire
electorate regardless of party politics. She was a
spirited advocate of this independent philosophy
and like many others deplored its demise in favour
of the partisan advocacy of councillors beholden
to the 'party machine.' Indeed this quality was so
evident that her future appointments outside of
local election were endorsed by Governments of
all political colours. In 1975 she was elected to
the newly constituted Western Isles Island Council
(Comhairle nan Eilean Siar) and served there
with distinction for ten years This coupled with
her appointment to Stornoway Pier and Harbour
Commission and the Electricity Consultative Board
for Scotland and also work on the local bench as
Justice of the Peace, confirmed her reputation as a
devoted and loyal servant of her community.
In 1947 whilst domiciled in Glasgow she married
Captain Ian Macmillan of Stornoway, then a dental
student recently demobbed from the Royal Marines,
where he had been one of the earliest commandoes
ashore on Sword Beach at the Normandy landings
in June 1944. After her husband qualified he set up
practice in Glasgow where their two children, Iain
and Moira, were born. Then in 1961 the family moved
back to Lewis thus benefitting the island community
with a much needed dental practice, a family adding
to the life and times of the town and fresh contribution
to both the social and public life of Stornoway.
In 1992 Marie Macmillan was appointed OBE
for her services to the Health Service in Scotland.
The family attended the investiture in Buckingham
Palace by HM The Queen, but very sadly some
weeks after that happy family occasion her husband
Ian, only recently retired from his dental practice,
died suddenly after a short illness. Notwithstanding
this great loss and her family distant from her in
Aberdeenshire and Hampshire, Marie bravely
carried on with her local service, including hosting
the Official Opening of the new hospital (Ospadal
nan Eilean) by HRH Prince Charles, Duke of
Rothesay, in June 1993.
In 2011, fifty years after her returning to Stornoway
she decided, much to the sadness of her many friends
and colleagues there, to live near her daughter Moira
and son in law Alan in the attractive and pleasant
town of Petersfield. Tragically, shortly thereafter
Marie's son Iain died at the early age of 63 leaving
her bereft, as she said herself: "It is not in the order
of things that a mother should survive her child."
Nonetheless she was greatly comforted by the family
in both Aberdeenshire and Petersfield and many new
friends she had made in her new home.
She passed away peacefully on 16th September
after a very short illness and was buried beside her
husband Ian in Sandwick Cemetery, Stornoway. She
is survived by Moira, four grandchildren, six great
grandchildren and one great great grandchild. Her
wonderful and useful life was well lived and sorrow
at her death is mitigated by the rich heritage of love
and service she bequeathed to her family and all
her friends and former colleagues.
Sandy Matheson
What we achieved in 2013/14
D
Our aspiration: - The Comhairle will provide good quality and efficient
services to meet the needs of the community.
ecember
2015
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Christmas Robin. Photo courtesy of Iain Watson.
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EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B10
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
LHRSC pulled off their biggest coup to date as one of Rangers greatest ever managers, Walter
Smith travelled north for a Q & A night in the Club in August. The legendary gaffer spoke with
passion, honesty and wit about his two spells in charge at Ibrox, regaling the eager fans with
tales of title triumphs, big European nights and Old Firm victories. Following the speaking part
of the night Smith stayed at the club house for a couple of hours for pictures, autographs and
to chat with fans informally before closing the night with a word of thanks to the members and
committee of LHRSC for the warm welcome and hospitality he received. A very special night
which will be remembered for a long time by everyone at the Supporters Club.
www.hebevents.com
LHRSC Manager, John Macinnes, presenting a cheque for £1000 to Chrisetta Mitchell of
The Leanne Fund in March, following a successful fundraising night at the Rangers Club with
DJ’s George & Paul for the local charity.
Another local charity event LHRSC supports each year is the Emergency Services Butt to
Barra Cycle. Pictured here are the cyclists and organisers at the cheque presentation ceilidh
in the club. Several members of LHRSC took part in the cycle which raised an incredible
£56000 for The Western Isle Branch of Macmillan Cancer Support, Crossroads Lewis & The
Lewis & Harris Youth Club’s Association.
Rangers legend Ian Ferguson visited the Club for a Q & A event in November. One of only three
players to win all 9 in a Row medals and one of Rangers all time most decorated players with a
trophy haul of 19 during his time at Ibrox.
Astrid get back in tune
By Eilidh Whiteford
J
ust over a decade since they went their
separate ways, Lewis band Astrid are
reformed and producing a new album that all
agree 'is the best yet'.
“It feels amazing to have Astrid back together,”
said front-man Willie Campbell.
The Old Team & Young Team line up before the Rangers Club’s Annual Over 30’s v Under 30’s Charity Match.
This year the Young Team ran out 5-2 winners and the match raised £1000 for a local charity.
And band-mate and old friend Charlie Clark
concurred: “It felt really special to play together
again.”
Lewis & Harris Rangers Supporters Club at 40
2
015 was a special year for Lewis & Harris Rangers Supporters Club as it
marked the RSC’s 40th Anniversary. The Club was formed in 1975 and
its founding members met in several different locations around Stornoway
before moving into specially built premises at 19 Inaclete Road in the early
1980’s. The Club House was officially opened by the great Jock Wallace
in 1984 and since then LHRSC has grown to become the world's biggest
Rangers Supporters Club, as recognised by Rangers FC.
A visit from fans favourites Charlie Miller and Derek Ferguson in early February to get the
40th year started. Both players played in Rangers teams during the successful 9 in a Row era
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B11
It was the late 1990s when the Western Islands
first heard that a band of their own was making
waves in the Scottish music industry as Charlie
and Willie were joined by fellow islander Gareth
Russell in Glasgow.
2015 turned out to be a great year for the Supporters Club and the LHRSC
committee would like to thank all of its members once again for its loyal and
continued support as they look forward to another 40 years of success.
The Lewis & Harris RSC is always open to new members, forms are available
at the bar or via email and you can keep up to date with what is happening at the
Club through its Facebook & Twitter accounts.
It is still based at the Inaclete Road premises which were refurbished and extended
following a fire on New Year’s Day 2004. To celebrate its 40th birthday the Club’s
committee organised several special functions and events throughout the year
including guest speaker nights, charity events and their annual hospitality trip to Ibrox.
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/
Lewis-Harris-Rangers-Supporters-Club/321928968320?pnref=lhc
The Rangers Club organised a 40th Anniversary Event in June with former Rangers players
Alex MacDonald & Tom Forsyth. Both of whom were part of the Rangers 1975 League
winning side – the year the Lewis & Harris RSC was formed. They are pictured here at the
club with LHRSC Ambassador Ronnie Mackinnon. The trio amassed an incredible 1300
appearances and 30 medals for RFC between them.
Twitter: @lhrsc
Email: [email protected]
Rangers Managing Director
Stewart Robertson took time
out of his busy schedule
in July to visit the World’s
Biggest RSC. He was joined in
Stornoway along with former
player John Brown to speak
to fans about the new board’s
plans to rebuild RFC
Recruiting drummer Gareth Thom, the pop
foursome first caught the attention of Scot's
success Belle and Sebastian in a tour support slot
that lead to a deal with Fantastic Plastic Records
and the release of the first Astrid EP 'No Reason'
in 1998.
A year later and teamed with former Orange
Juice singer Edwyn Collins on production, Astrid
put forth their debut album 'Strange Weather
Lately'.
The debut well received and amid comparisons
to fellow Scottish indie bands The Pastels and
Teenage Fanclub, Astrid continued, with Neil
Payne taking over drums from Gareth Thom, as
they recorded and released second album 'Play
Dead' in 2001.
In hindsight, the turn of the century had brought
with it the peak of Astrid's success – the release of
third album 'One in Four' in 2004 was followed
shortly by Willie's departure and, before the end
of that year, the band had broken up.
Fast forward ten years and last month saw Willie
travel to Charlie's new Los Angeles home where
the pair played together for the first time in over a
decade as the recording of the fourth Astrid album
began.
“When Willie and I sat down to work the day
after he arrived it certainly didn't feel like so
much time had passed,” said Charlie.
Former Rangers manager Jock Wallace officially opening
LHRSC in 1984 with then chairman Archie Macarthur.
Pictures from the Supporters Club annual hospitality trip to Ibrox in April. This years trip was made extra special as the members were met in the Cooper Suite
by then manager Stuart McCall, Captain Lee McCulloch, Director Paul Murray, former players Willie Henderson, Derek Johnstone, Gordon Durie, Kenny Black and
the Greatest Ever Ranger John Greig. The group were treated to a 4-0 victory over Raith Rovers to round off the day also.
“This new record was the easiest album I've
ever made but also very emotional too. Willie
and I got to remember just how well we work
together and what fun we can have in the studio
– there was a lot of goofing around between takes
and it was big smiles and laughter for five days
straight.”
Having grown up together, the reunion was
equally as emotional for Willie, who said: “It felt
fantastic to be playing together again. Musically
we picked up where we left off, but it was better
than that.
“We've both been writing so much for the
album, we were excited about the songs from the
start. We approached this with the best possible
attitude, we enjoyed making it and had a laugh
the whole way through, while being focused on
making it the best it could be.”
In five fun and music filled days, Willie and
Charlie were joined by Charlie's 'L.A go-to guys',
drummer Dash Hutton from HAIM – fresh from
opening for Taylor Swift on her US tour – and
producer Eric McCann, who also laid down bass
guides until original Astrid bassist Gareth Russell,
who went on to perform with Idlewild and the
Vasalines before settling on tour management,
completes his Astrid part back in Glasgow.
Recording the whole album live, once Gareth's
parts are added, Scottish producer Tony Doogan,
producer of Astrid album 'Play Dead' and all of
Willie's most recent records, will mix the new work
also.
And the gents believe that this Astrid album is
the 'best we've made'.
“The album really goes back to where it all
began with Astrid, but in a more realised and
mature way and, without any hesitation, is my
favourite Astrid album so far,” said Charlie.
“Each song has its own personality and Willie
and I are just better players now.”
Willie added: “It was kind of inevitable that me
and Charlie would do something together again,
and this has surpassed what we hoped for.
“Once Gareth agreed to join, it was Astrid
again and we're really looking forward to getting
his bass parts on top of these songs.
“We both have our respective groups, Charles
has Broken Arrow who have a really dramatic
deep sound, I've got The Open Day Rotation and
we recorded an album this year that has a full
sound I'm really proud of,” he continued.
“There are hints of both these things in this new
Astrid album, but the songs are totally 60s pop
influenced, the lyrics and songs are better than
before.
“If you liked Distance and the EPs, you'll enjoy
this. It's the best album we've made, I'm sure of
that.”
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B12
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
New books at Western Isles Libraries
FICTION
ABERCROMBIE, Joe
ADLER-OLSEN, Jussi
ALTAN, Ahmet
APPIGNANESI, Lisa
BARNETT, Laura
BEARD, Richard
BEATON, M.C.
BEAUFOY, Kate
BENDORIS, Matt
BERLIN, Lucie
BRAGG, Melvyn
BRODY, Frances
BURKE, Alafair
CAMILLERI, Andrea
CAMPBELL, Barney
CHAMBERLAIN, Diane
CLARE, Alys
CLARE, Alys
COHU, Will
COLE, Martina
CONNELLY, Michael
CORNWELL, Bernard
CUSSLER, Clive
CUTLER, Judith
DAVIDSON, Lionel
DAY, Elizabeth
DUNCKER, Patricia
ENARD, Mathias
FARJEON, J. Jefferson
FARJEON, J. Jefferson
FRANCIS, Felix
FRASER, Anthea
FREEMAN, Brian
GALGUT, Damon
Half a war
The hanging girl
Endgame
Sacred ends
The versions of us
Acts of the assassins
Dishing the dirt
Another heartbeat in the house
DM for murder
A manual for cleaning women
Now is the time
A death in the Dales
If you were here
Angelicaʼs smile
Rain
Pretending to dance
Blood of the south
Land of the silver dragon
Nothing but grass
Get even
The crossing
Warriors of the storm
The Solomon curse
Cheating the hangman
Kolymsky Heights
Paradise city
Sophie and the Sibyl
Street of thieves
The Z murders
Mystery in white: a Christmas crime story
Front runner
A tangled thread
Goodbye to the dead
Arctic summer
Fantasy
Crime
Crime
General Fiction
General Fiction
Thriller
Crime
General Fiction
Crime
Short Stories
Historical Fiction
Crime
Thriller
Crime
Adventure
General Fiction
Crime
Crime
General Fiction
Crime
Crime
Historical Fiction
Thriller
Crime
Thriller
General Fiction
General Fiction
General Fiction
Crime
Crime
Thriller
Crime
Thriller
Historical Fiction
FEATURED TITLES
Arctic summer
by Damon Galgut
"In 1912, the SS Birmingham approaches
India. On board is Morgan Forster, novelist
and man of letters, who is embarking on a
journey of discovery. As Morgan stands on
deck, the promise of a strange new future
begins to take shape before his eyes. The
seeds of a story start to gather at the corner
of his mind: a sense of impending menace,
lust in close confines, under a hot, empty
sky. It will be another twelve years, and
a second time spent in India, before A
Passage to India, E. M. Forster's great work
of literature, is published. During these years, Morgan will come to a
profound understanding of himself as a man, and of the infinite subtleties
and complexity of human nature, bringing these great insights to bear in
his remarkable novel. At once a fictional exploration of the life and times
of one of Britain's finest novelists, his struggle to find a way of living and
being, and a stunningly vivid evocation of the mysterious alchemy of the
creative process, Arctic Summer is a literary masterpiece, by one of the
finest writers of his generation."
We are our brains:
from the womb to Alzheimerʼs
by Dick Swaab
Everything we think, do, and refrain from
doing is determined by our brain. It shapes
our potential, our limitations, and our
characters. In other words, we don't just
have brains; we are our brains.
This forceful conclusion is at the heart of
pre-eminent brain researcher DF Swaab's
international bestseller. It reveals how
nearly everything about us - from our sexual
orientation to our religious proclivities
- is present in our neuronal circuits before we are even born. In short,
engaging chapters that combine fascinating and often bizarre case studies
and historical examples, Swaab explains what is going on in our brains
at every stage of life, from the womb to the radical changes that take
place during adolescence to what happens when we fall in love or get
Alzheimer's. Provocative, opinionated and utterly convincing, We Are
Our Brains illuminates this complex organ's role in shaping every aspect
of human existence.
Search the library catalogue online –
www.cne-siar.gov.uk/library
GARNIER, Pascal
GRAHAM, Laurie
GRAY, Millie
GRISHAM, John
GROFF, Lauren
HADLEY, Tessa
HAGGITH, Mandy
HARRIS, Robert
HARROD-EAGLES, Cynthia
HEABERLIN, Julia
HILTUNEN, Pekke
HOGG, Nicholas
HUGHES, Kathryn
IGGULDEN, Conn
ISAAC, Jane
JACOBS, Anna
JACOBS, Anna
JAMES, Peter
KELLY, Cathy
KLAUSSMANN, Liza
KUZNESKI, Chris
LA PLANTE, Lynda
LALAMI, Laila
LISH, Athicas
LIU, Cixin
MANBY, Chris
MARSTON, Edward
MARTIN, George R.R.
MILLER, Derek
MIRALLES, Francesc
MORTON, Kate
NESSER, Hakan
NESSER, Hakan
NESSER, Hakan
NESSER, Hakan
OʼBRIAN, Patrick
OATES, Joyce Carol
OSBORNE, Lawrence
PAMUK, Orhan
PATTERSON, James
PERRY, Anne
PRATCHETT, Terry
RANDALL, Anne
RENDELL, Ruth
RUSSELL, Craig
SAMSON, Polly
SMILEY, Jane
SMITH, Alexander McCall
SPURLING, John
STOCKWIN, Julian
VLADISLAVIC, Ivan
Boxes
The night in question
Silver linings
Rogue lawyer
Fates and furies
The past
Bear witness
Dictator
One under
Black-eyed Susans
Black noise
Tokyo
The letter
Bloodline
The truth will out
A time for renewal
Tomorrowʼs path
The house on Cold Hill
Between sisters
Villa America
The prisonerʼs gold
Tennison
The moorʼs account
Preparation for the next life
The three-body problem
A proper family adventure
Dance of death
A knight of the seven kingdoms
Norwegian by night
Love in small letters
The lake house
The stranglerʼs honeymoon
Hour of the wolf
The G file
Borkmannʼs point
Beasts royal: twelve tales of adventure
Lovely, dark, deep
Hunters in the dark
A strangeness in my mind
Murder house
A Christmas escape
The long utopia
Silenced
Dark Corners
The ghosts of Altona
The kindness
Golden age
The woman who walked in sunshine
The ten thousand things
Tyger
101 detectives
Crime
Historical Fiction
General Fiction
Thriller
General Fiction
General Fiction
General Fiction
Historical Fiction
Crime
Thriller
Thriller
General Fiction
General Fiction
Historical Fiction
Crime
General Fiction
Thriller
Horror
General Fiction
General Fiction
Thriller
Crime
General Fiction
General Fiction
Science Fiction
General Fiction
Crime
Short Stories
Thriller
General Fiction
General Fiction
Crime
Crime
Crime
General Fiction
Adventure
Short stories
General Fiction
General Fiction
Thriller
Crime
Science Fiction
Crime
Thriller
Thriller
General Fiction
General Fiction
General Fiction
Historical Fiction
Historical Fiction
Crime
WELSH, Louise
WHITE, Neil
Death is a welcome guest
The death collector
Thriller
Crime
LEONHARD, Woody
LUCAS, Edward
CHOPRA, Deepak
SOLDATOV, Andrei
Windows 10 all-in-one for dummies
Cyberphobia
The future of God : a practical approach to spirituality for our times
The red web : the struggle between Russia's digital dictators and the
new online revolutionaries
RECOVERING Scotland's slavery past :
the Caribbean connection / edited by Tom M. Devine
Straight expectations : what does it mean to be gay today?
Prisoners of geography : ten maps that tell you everything you need
to know about global politics
The perfect kill : a personal history of modern-day assassination
Stalin's Englishman : the lives of Guy Burgess
Call me Dave : the unauthorised biography of David Cameron
Renewable energy : clean, fair, democratic
The Nazi hunters
The Gestapo : the myth and reality of Hitler's secret police
Reason in a dark time : why the struggle against climate change
failed--and what it means for our future
This house of grief
They all love Jack : busting the Ripper
Magic of maths
We are our brains : from the womb to Alzheimer's
Neurotribes : the legacy of autism and how to think smarter about
people who think differently
Pathalogical demand avoidance syndrome : my daughter is not
naughty
Simply Nigella
Healthy eating for the menopause : Britain's leading nutritional
therapist and a top chef create 100 really, really delicious recipes
The no-sugar! desserts & baking cookbook : over 65 delectable yet
healthy sugar-free treats
The complete Aga cookbook
The microwave kitchen handbook : how to get the best out of your
microwave : techniques, tips, guidelines and 160 step-by-step recipes
Slow cooker
Mrs Beeton's homemade sweetshop
NON FICTION
BINDEL, Julie
MARSHALL, Tim
BAER, Robert
LOWNIE, Andrew
ASHCROFT, Michael
CHIVERS, Danny
LEWIS, Damien
MCDONOUGH, Frank
JAMIESON, Dale
GARNER, Helen
ROBINSON, Bruce
5BENJAMIN, Arthur
SWAAB, Dick
SILBERMAN, Steve
SHERWIN, Jane Alison
LAWSON, Nigella
GLENVILLE, Marilyn
SPEVACK, Ysanne
BERRY, Mary
BOWEN, Carol
LEWIS, Sara
BEETON, Isabella
PAPERCRAFT
ATSUMI, Minako Chiba
WELLESLEY-SMITH, Claire
BUSH, Nancy
LODINSKY, Heather
PEPPIATT, Michael
JONES, Tom
FISHER, Gregor
FIENNES, Ranulph
CONEFREY, Mick
REYNOLDS, Kev
JAMES, Clive
PARINI, Jay
LOWE, Hannah
FORSYTH, Frederick
MARS-JONES, Adam
SPENDER, Matthew
KAVANAGH, P.J.
PRATCHETT, Terry
COLLINS, Richard
BRYSON, Bill
ARMSTRONG, Alexander
ROBERTS, Alice
SHIPTON, Elizabeth
HOLLAND, James
SNYDER, Timothy
GILDEA, Robert
DIMBLEBY, Jonathan
NEIL, Tom
BLOOM, Clive
PIKE, Joe
WEIR, Alison
TEEGE, Jennifer
RAWSON, Andrew
COATES, Ben
YAZBEK, Samar
GREAVES, Adrian
GLENNY, Misha
PATTEMORE, Michael
Japanese paper embroidery
Slow stitch : mindful and contemplative textile art
Knitted lace of Estonia : techniques, patterns, and traditions
The crochet bible
Francis Bacon in your blood
Over the top and back
The boy from nowhere
Heat
The ghosts of K2 : the epic saga of the first ascent
Abode of the Gods: tales of trekking in Nepal
Latest readings
Every time a friend succeeds something inside me dies :
the life of Gore Vidal
Long time no see : a memoir of fathers,
daughters and games of chance
The outsider : my life in intrigue
Kid gloves
A house in St John's Wood : in search of my parents
The perfect stranger
A slip of the keyboard : collected non-fiction
DESERT songs of the night: 1500 years of Arabic literature
The road to Zagora
The road to Little Dribbling : more notes from a small island
Land of the midnight sun
The Celts
Female Tommies : the frontline women of the First World War
The war in the west: a new history. Volume 1: Germany Ascendant
1939-1941
Black earth : the Holocaust as history and warning
Fighters in the shadows: a new history of the French Resistance
The battle of the Atlantic : how the allies won the war
Scramble : the dramatic story of a young fighter pilot's experiences
during the Battle of Britain and the Siege of Malta
Thatcher's secret war : subversion, coercion, secrecy and government,
1974-90
Project fear : how an unlikely alliance kept a kingdom united, but a
country divided
The lost Tudor princess : a life of Margaret Douglas, Countess of
Lennox
My grandfather would have shot me : a black woman discovers her
family's Nazi past
Schindler's Krakow : the city under the Nazis
Why the Dutch are different : a journey into the heart of the Netherlands
The crossing : my journey to the shattered heart of Syria
Isandlwana: how the Zulus humbled the British Empire
Nemesis : one man and the battle for Rio
My Lynda
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B13
www.hebevents.com
Kenneth Street, Stornoway HS1 2DS
www.lanntair.com
An Lanntair Box Office: 01851 708480
0
An Lanntair Café Bar: 01851 708492
email: [email protected]
DECEMBER AT
AN LANNTAIR
Iain Morrison
Saturday 12th December at 8pm,,
£12.£10
Each track on the new Iain
Morrison album ‘Eas’ is
based on ‘piobaireachd’,
the classical music of
the highland bagpipes.
Although
hough the melodies that
e inspired this album
albu
have
y be several
eral hundred
may
rs old, thee songs have
years
n written
n in Iain’s
Iai
very
been
own
n contempora
contemporary
ntemporaryy style.
st l
Iain’s
ain’
n’s father is Iain
n M.
M
Morrison,
voices and
rrison,
on, one of the worlds
ds leading voice
vo
tutors
Snr was
ors in thee world of piobaireachd.
piob
iobaireachd. Iain Sn
taught
ght by thee legendary Donald Macleod who
also
o hails from
m the Isle of Lewis.
Condition’,
you
On track 7, ‘Too Long in This Condition’
C
can hear the voice of Donald Macleod and also
the canntaireachd of Iain Snr.
Our touch rugby teams recently took part in the local Rugby World Cup tournament, which was won by Tong Primary School.
The musicians featured on the recording of ‘Eas’
‘Eas
will be joining Iain at An Lanntair:
r:
Pete Harvey: Cello, Gordon MacLean:
an: Bas
Bass,
s,
Lori Watson: Fiddle/Vocals & Joe Smillie:
illie: Drum
Drums.
s.
Bliadhna Mhath Ur! –
Hogmanay at An Lanntair
Thursday 31st December at 8pm, £12
An Lanntair is delighted to welcome back Willie
Campbell and friends in what promises to be
another spectacular night of entertainment to
bring in the New Year. Following the success of
last year’s sell out show, which showcased the
huge variety of local musical talent, he will once
more take to the stage with a new line up of guest
musicians
ians for an excl
exclusive one off performance.
Willie w
will be join
joined on stage by fellow local
musicians Colin Ma
MacLeod, Jane Hepburn, Iain
“Spanish”
Sp ish” Mackay
M
and
a
many more. The event
celebrates
ce ebrates the huge
hug vvariety of local musical talent
as well
w ass island trad
traditions
tra
of Hogmanay.
Winte
Winter
W
inter Warmers
Wa
in the
Lannt
An Lanntair
Café Bar
throug
Available throughout
December, see
www lanntair c for more details.
www.lanntair.com
Three girls from
primary 7 - Leah
Glackin, Alannah
Logue, Iona
MacDonald - placed
a wreath at the war
memorial on behalf
of the school and all
those who died during
both world wars, on
remembrance Sunday.
Breabach
Family Hogmanay Ceilidh
Saturday 2nd January at 8pm, £10
Voted ‘Best Live Act 2013’ & ‘Best Folk Band
2012’ at the Scots Trad Music Awards; Scottish
five-piece Breabach deliver a thrilling and unique
brand of contemporary folk music that has earned
them international recognition on the world
and roots music scene as one of the UK’s most
dynamic and influential bands.
Sùil air An Dùbhlachd
December at a glance...
Karen Darke, a
paralympian athlete, visited
the school and spoke to
primary 4-7 pupils about
her experiences after she
was paralysed during a
climbing accident. She gave
a very inspirational speech,
which was well received by
all the pupils and staff.
Pudsey visited the school on Children in Need day and got a great reception from all the children.
A grand total of £854 was raised on the day for this worthy cause.
Wednesday 2nd
Thursday 3rd
Friday 4th
Saturday 5th
Monday 7th
Film Club .......................................................................7pm
Panto: Alice in Wonderland........................... 10.30am & 7pm
Panto: Alice in Wonderland.............10.30am, 1.30pm & 7pm
Panto: Alice in Wonderland.................................. 1pm & 4pm
Monday Movie & Meal – 10% off in the Café Bar with film tickets
The Closer We Get (PG) 1h31 ..........................................6pm
Post film discussion with director Karen Guthrie ......... 7.45pm
Wednesday 9th Film Club .........................................................................7pm
Talk by Dr Margaret Bennett –
“Oidhche Challain & The Celtic Calendar” .....................8pm
Thursday 10th The Lady in the Van (12A) 1h44 ....................................6pm
The Hunger Games:
Mockingjay - Part 2 2D (12A) 2h17.........................8.30pm
Friday 11th
The Hunger Games:
Mockingjay - Part 2 3D (12A) 2h17 ............................5.30pm
Saturday 12th Iain Morrison ...................................................................8pm
Monday 14th Dementia Friendly Event Orain, sgeulachdan, clann oga le cleas Nollaig .............2pm
Tuesday 15th International Film: Brooklyn (12A) 1h52 ......................8pm
Wednesday 16th The Lady in the Van (12A) 1h44 .................................5.30pm
Film Club .........................................................................7pm
The Hunger Games:
Mockingjay - Part 2 3D (12A) 2h17 .............................8.15pm
Thursday 17th Ghosthunters: On Icy Trails (PG) 1h39 ..........................6pm
SPECTRE (12A) 2h28....................................................8.15pm
Friday 18th
SPECTRE (12A) 2h28......................................................6pm
Saturday 19th SPECTRE (12A) 2h28...................................................2.30pm
Monday 21st Sunset Song (15) 2h16 ...............................................2.30pm
The Night Before (15) 1h41 ...........................................6pm
Tuesday 22nd A Christmas Star (U) 1h22..........................................2.30pm
Sunset Song (15) 2h16 ....................................................6pm
Wednesday 23rd Itʼs a Wonderful Life (U) 2h10 ....................................2.30pm
The Night Before (15) 1h41 ...........................................6pm
Thursday 24th Miracle on 34th Street (U) (1h54).................................11am
SPECTRE (12A) 2h28........................................................2pm
Friday 25th
CLOSED ..........................................................................
Saturday 26th CLOSED ..........................................................................
Thursday 31st
Hogmanay with Willie Campbell & Friends ...................11pm
Friday 1st
CLOSED ..........................................................................
Saturday 2nd
Breabach .......................................................................8pm
Join us at An Lanntair this Christmas where we
have a whole range of special festive treats for
you in our Café Bar including spiced Mulled
wine and a cider punch - with extra punch!
Why not warm up with a meal and a great
bottle of Wine. Our special selected wine for
the Christmas season ‘Still Bay’ is priced at a
friendly and reasonable £12.00.
We know you
you’re
r savin
saving all your pennies
have designed a range
for Christmas so we
w hav
of affordable
ffordable nights out aand festive offers at
An Lanntair.
ta r C
Ch
Check out ou
our Café Bar page at
www.lanntair.om
air.
for d
de
details on Prosecco,
Wine and
d Cocktails
Cockt
throughout
throug
thro
December.
Fes
Festive
stiv
stive
ve S
Shopping
Sho
hoppi
Lanntair
at An
An Lannt
tair
This winter An Lanntair’s shop becomes an
enchanted woodland! Come and see our
selection of specially selected gifts for all the
family, including stunning jewellery from Israeli
artist Ayala Bar and woodland-inspired porcelain
jewellery from Scottish brand And Mary. We have
a great range of gifts for men including Ted Baker
hip flasks, locally made Harris Tweed ties and
Ishga Men’s Skincare. Look out for our children’s
shop area full of books and gifts that will inspire
creative young minds. We have everything you
need this festive season.
Remember if you are stuck for gift ideas we
have An Lanntair gift vouchers that can be used
at our box office, café bar and shop! The perfect
gift for anyone this Christmas.
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B14
the linda norgrove foundation
Orphanage visit
E
arlier this year Lorna and John Norgrove
travelled to Afghanistan to visit projects
supported by the Linda Norgrove Foundation.
The Foundation was set up in 2010 by Linda’s
parents after Linda was killed during an attempt
by US special forces to rescue her from kidnappers
who seized her in Kunar province in the east of the
country. Linda worked in aid development and the
Foundation was set up as a positive response to a
negative situation, to help women and children
affected by the war in that country.
Trustee Carola Bell and supporter David Green
travelled with the Norgroves, all paying their own
expenses, so they could see how the projects are
progressing and meet with those implementing the
work in the country.
This was the Norgroves' second trip and they
revisited several of the projects that they support such
as the Window of Hope Orphanage for children.
This home cares for 14 children with disabilities
aged between about four and 16 years. Most have
severe to mild mental disabilities, but several have
both physical and mental disabilities. Three of the
children are immobile and require 24/7 care.
Lorna said: "We were delighted to find that the
care the children receive has improved no end over
the last couple of years. The children are better fed,
receive medical treatment where necessary and are
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
being given schooling.
"Two wee ones rattled off the English alphabet for
our benefit and much to our surprise! Members of
staff have now been properly trained and the whole
atmosphere is happier. Seeing such progress makes
our work feel so worthwhile but it’s something we
couldn’t do without the help of our supporters.’
Children with special needs are stigmatized in
Afghanistan, often abandoned, left on the street with
nowhere to go. Some are brought to the Window of
Hope unexpectedly so room is always kept for such
an eventuality.
This year so far the Foundation has provided
£10,000, a third of the running costs for the
orphanage for a year.
For further reading about other projects that
the Foundation supports or how you can help, see
their website:
http://www.lindanorgrovefoundation.org/
Facebook: /lindanorgrovefoundation
Twitter: @Lindafoundation
Linda Norgrove Foundation Christmas cards and
2016 calendars are for sale through the website, or
in various shops in Stornoway.
For an original Christmas present, artwork by
students at the Afghan charity SCAWNO are for sale
in an Lanntair arts centre, proceeds of which will
provide better quality art materials for the students.
Jersey makes island home
for Angus from Ness
By Roz Skinner
W
ith EVENTS now available to download as
a free .pdf, it made me think of the many
people who will enjoy such a feature. Those
who have moved away will especially appreciate
getting news from home, direct to their tablet.
A little taste of the Hebrides in electronic form.
One such person is Angus Morrison, who left
Ness, Isle of Lewis at the age of 21 to live on an
island at the other end of the country – the Isle of
Jersey! "We set off from Southhampton to Jersey in
a ferry that made the Suilven look like a toy boat!"
grinned Angus. "It was absolutely huge – and it
needed to be! We sailed right into the midst of
a gale! The waves were breaking right across the
highest windows! We just thought: 'Wow!'"
I met Angus when I was enjoying a holiday in Jersey,
and his soft Lewis accent, our brief conversation in
Gaelic and his memories of places and streets that I
knew well made it clear that, though he was far from
home, he had never forgotten it.
Arguably, it was his upbringing on Lewis that
shaped Angus for his life and work on Jersey. His
love of mechanics originated back in the Hebrides,
when he regularly borrowed his neighbour's Morris
van. "I drove anything that would run!" he grinned.
"I used to have a Ford Capri and its door kept flying
open! I lived beside the machair and everybody
would tear up and down on it in their cars! It wasn't
until a few years ago that I finally got told off for
doing that!"
Does Angus have a favourite place on Lewis?
"Where I lived at Ness, it was very windswept and
open," he replied. "So I loved the Castle grounds –
maybe because of the trees there or maybe because
I went to secondary school there. I had so many
good times. It was quite basic –we stayed in hostels,
not dorms – but I really enjoyed it." Many things
have changed since then, such as the Museum and
Archive that has been built onto the Castle. "It wasn't
open when I was last there, but it looked smart from
the outside," Angus commented. "My brother works
there, so I've an idea of what it's like."
In Angus's garden with Nessa keeping an eye on Chook
Angus's life on Jersey is not a million miles
away from what his life on Lewis could have
been. Mechanics is still a big part of his life, as
he works for Renault. He even manages to do a
little bit of crofting! "My partner is a tenant farmer
and she keeps Jersey cows. I occasionally, very
occasionally, help out with them," Angus said.
"We have a dog who is from Ness, as well –and we
called her Nessa!"
Lewis and Jersey are islands with entirely different
personalities, but both retain that special "island
feel." "I love living on an island –I like the slower,
more relaxed pace of life," said Angus. "I don't
miss the weather and the midges on Lewis, though!
Jersey is nice –it feels safe, and the craic is good!"
Jumper Day for Save The Children
By Eilidh Whiteford
S
ave the Children's annual Christmas Jumper
Day is layering up this year.
The children's charity has teamed up with ITV Text
Santa and two other fantastic charities – Macmillan
Cancer Support and Make-A-Wish® UK – to give
hope to families in difficulty at Christmas.
The Text Santa Christmas Jumper Day will take
place on Friday, December 18th, and it's hoped
many friends and families, workplaces and schools in
the Western Isles will don their festive woollies and
donate to the cause.
Previous years have seen the local Save the Children
branch delighted to welcome Christmas Jumper Day
donations from Laxdale, Stornoway Primary, Back,
Tolsta, The Nicolson Institute, Shelibost, Leverhulme
and Lionel schools, as young islanders have got into
the Christmas spirit and wore their favourite yuletide
yarns to help raise much needed funds.
Working to the ethos ‘No Child Born To Die’, the
work of Save the Children charity, both at home,
and around the world could not be more needed,
especially in the face of the current refugee crisis.
The children’s charity has been helping displaced
people around the world for many years, but the level
of recent assistance has shocked even some of the
charity’s most experience volunteers.
During September and October, compared to
the previous two months, Save the Children dropin centres in Rome experienced a 56% increase in
children arriving to receive a meal, shower, change of
clothes and legal advice.
And the age of children arriving are getting younger
– the average age now being 14-16, compared to 16-
18 year olds last year.
So, why not do your bit to help out families at home
and around the world this Christmas, and turn your
festive spirit of goodwill into a fun-filled event for
friends, family, workmates, classrooms and nurseries.
Joining in the Text Santa Christmas Jumper Day
2015 couldn’t be easier: First, grab some pals who
share your passion for jumpers, then dig out your fave
festive knitware, donate £2, or go all out with some
extra fundraising fun.
A free Text Santa Christmas Jumper Day fundraising
kit, full of top tips and posters to help you have a
woolly wonderful day is available from itv.com/
textsanta, call 0808 1001232, or visit http://www.
savethechildren.org.uk/. And remember to keep an
eye on ITV on Friday, December 18th, to see how
others have helped across the country with the Text
Santa Christmas Jumper show.
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B15
www.hebevents.com
Crofting
Services
Cattle and Sheep Health: Top ten
Liver Fluke do's and don'ts
iver Fluke control may not be something
on the run up to Christmas that we really
want to think about. For our livestock, given
our climate and ground conditions particularly
in 2015, it is essential to be very aware of the
devastating effect of Liver fluke.
DO look out for fluke risk forecasts in the press
and online (www.nadis.org.uk, www.scops.org.
uk). Disease risk in autumn is higher following a
wet summer and extra treatments may be required
particularly for sheep in high-risk areas. Always
take local knowledge and experience into account
when planning liver fluke control.
DO think ahead and plan grazing strategies to
reduce the risk of infection to certain groups of stock
e.g. fattening lambs, if you want to reduce the problem
of long withdrawals. Sheep are much more likely than
cattle to die from liver fluke infection during autumn.
Lower risk fields are drier and better drained with no
areas where mud snails will thrive. Re-seeds, brassicas
or areas ungrazed by sheep earlier in the year will also
be lower risk. Housing is another option.
DO consider collecting samples for monitoring
if you are unsure whether animals need to be
treated for fluke. First season grazers (both lambs
and calves) can be blood sampled to check for
antibodies to liver fluke. Dung samples (for
coproantigen testing or fluke egg counts) can
also be screened but beware of negative results in
autumn when only young fluke may be present in
Scottish
the liver. Samples can also be collected to check
whether treatment has been effective.
DO talk to your vet or advisor about the best
product to use and the timing of treatments. This is
particularly important if triclabendazole resistance
has been confirmed. Products vary in their ability
to kill different ages of fluke in the liver making
some less suitable for use in autumn. Further
information can be found at:
www.cattleparasites.org.uk/guidance/COWS_
Flukicides_product_table.pdf.
DO remember that liver fluke treatments are not
long acting. Animals can be re-infected the day
after they are treated. If sheep are dying or losing
condition then, where possible, move to a lower
risk area or house following treatment. Otherwise
treat again in four to six weeks.
DON’T wait until there have been multiple
deaths before investigating the cause. If liver fluke
is the problem a post-mortem examination will
provide an immediate diagnosis allowing you to
take action and reduce further losses. If another
disease is diagnosed you will still get useful
feedback on the condition of the liver and whether
any fluke are present.
DON’T use combination products (including
pour on) unless treatment for both worms and liver
fluke is required.
DON’T give white drenches to sheep at the
higher fluke dose during tupping or for one month
Crofting
Federation
'Ruinous' delay in support
payments to crofters
T
he Scottish government recently announced
that CAP support payments to farmers and
crofters will only start (possibly) by the end of
the year.
Of the ones that do start, only a maximum of
70% of the claim will be paid, and it is estimated
that only a quarter of claimants will get anything
this year.
The remainder will get paid in the new year with
payments continuing up to April. This works out as
17.5% of payments being met this year.
As has been highlighted several times, this year
has been particularly difficult for crofters, who
this year have faced appalling weather conditions
whilst tending to be in the most marginalised areas
anyway. The very late start to grass growth meant
animals had to be fed way beyond when they
normally would be out on the grazings.
The slow grass also resulted in hay and silage
yields being very low so crofters are worried about
how they will feed their stock this winter, fearing
that they will need to buy-in more feed than usual
and that consequently feed prices will escalate.
So, in this context, it can be seen why the delay in
support payments that are needed to help mitigate
the weather impact, will exacerbate the problem.
So why are there delays? Granted, this is the first
year of the new phase of CAP following extensive
reform, but other parts of the UK seem to be coping.
Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for
Agriculture, defended the Scottish Government
saying: “There can be no doubt the three payment
regions and coupled support schemes requested
by industry – as well as the move to area-based
payments required by Europe – have greatly added
to our enormous administrative challenge.”
after the tups are removed. Not only will fail to
kill young fluke it can also cause deformities in the
unborn lambs.
DON’T use products containing triclabendazole
unless you need to. For sheep in high risk areas this
remains the best treatment particularly following a
wet summer. In lower risk areas, or following a
dry summer, consider changing to products that
contain closantel or nitroxynil. If you routinely
treat cattle a couple of months after housing, there
is no need to use triclabendazole.
DON’T worry about rumen fluke. Cases of scour
due to infection with young rumen fluke have been
reported in the UK but these are currently few in
number. In autumn the priority is to target liver
fluke effectively. Products that kill rumen fluke
only kill adult liver fluke making them unsuitable
for use in the autumn.
Heather Stevenson, SAC Consulting Veterinary
Services, [email protected] Iain
M Macmillan, SAC Consulting Stornoway, iain.
[email protected]
SAC Stornoway would like to wish all their clients and associated
businesses a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.
Join the SCF
Membership of the Scottish Crofting
Federation is an investment in
the future of crofting.
Your support will strengthen the voice
of crofters, crofting communities
Let’s have a look at these two culprits. Who
is meant by “industry”? Crofters didn’t ask for
three payment regions. Along with some 70% of
respondents to the Scottish Consultation, crofters
asked for two payment regions. The main industrial
agriculture lobby demanded three regions; that
must be who Mr Lochhead is referring to.
The move to area-based payments cannot be
used as justification for late payments, when it was
on the cards from back in 2003, surely? Scotland
decided not to move towards it then in part or
in full, as did other members of the UK. Again,
it will be recalled, it was under intense lobbying
by industrial agriculture that stopped the move
to area-based in preference for an historic-based
single farm payment, a bizarre ‘retirement plan’
that bred the new species, the ‘slipper farmer’.
So in both cases the Scottish Government obeyed
what the industrial agriculture lobby demanded
and now we pay the consequences.
So saying, there can be no doubt that government
officials have been working assiduously to mitigate
the problems and if some payments are made at all
this year it is a bonus. Will they take heed though
and not let the industrial agriculture lobby rule the
roost for the next round of CAP reforms?
Registered in Scotland as a Limited Company No: SC218658
Recognised
Scottish
Charity No:
No: SC218658
SC031919
Registered in Scotland
as aasLimited
Company
Recognised as Scottish Charity No: SC031919
www.crofting.org
ww
www.crofting.org
01599
01599 530
530 005
005
01599
530
005
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B16
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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Naidheachdan
àidhlig
Benefits of bilingualism
H
ow difficult is it for a child to grow up in a
bilingual or multilingual environment? And,
what are bilingual children capable of? Well, they
are capable of quite a lot, even at a very young age.
They can understand and produce expressions
in more than one language, they know who to
address in which language, they are able to switch
very fast from one language to the other.
Clearly we are talking here of a range of different
skills: social, linguistic and cognitive. Social skills
are the most known: bilingual children are able to
interact with speakers of (at least) two languages
and thus have direct access to two different cultures.
But they also have linguistic skills, some very
obvious, such as understanding and using words
and expressions in different languages. A less
obvious aspect is that bilingual children have a
raised awareness for how language “works.”
Less known are the cognitive skills developed by
bilinguals, an issue of great interest for research at the
moment. Probably due to the practice of switching
languages, bilinguals are very good at taking
different perspectives, dealing with conflicting cues
and ignoring irrelevant information. This skill can
be applied to domains other than language, making
it an added value of bilingualism.
THE PRYER FAMILY
Dylan and Lewis Pryer attend the Gaelic
Medium Unit at Sgoil nan Loch. This is a
testimony from their mother, Joanne.
D
ylan is now in P5 and still loves school. As
his Gaelic has progressed, we are finding
that we need less support for homework as he
understands himself what is needed and is able
to complete it with little or no help from us.
However, support from the school is still readily
available and Gaelic4Parents still provides backup when needed. The on-line help each evening
is particularly useful. Dylan has been a very
active participant at the local Mod over the past
few years as well as taking part at Fèis Eilean an
Fhraoich. These opportunities outside of school
really help to cement his Gaelic as an important
part of his identity and not just as a language he
uses only at school.
Lewis is now in his second term in P1 in GME.
Having completed two years in the Gaelic nursery
within the school, he has been able to settle very
quickly into the routine of school and is happy to
be with classmates with whom he spent the last
two years. We have found that the experience of
early Gaelic exposure has made him feel quite
comfortable with the language. At the moment he
seems to understand more than he speaks but he
Considering
is always asking what such and such is in Gaelic.
I think he views Dylan as a walking dictionary!
The support from school has been excellent and
we always feel confident that we can call on them
if we have any concerns.
Overall we are happy with our choice of Gaelic
Medium education for both of children and feel
confident that working together with the school
we have given them the best possible start.
aelic Medium Education for your child?
If you are considering Gaelic Medium Education for your child and have any
questions or would just like more information regarding Gaelic Medium Education
and its benefits, please do not hesitate to contact Iona MacTaggart, Gaelic Medium
Officer, Comunn na Gàidhlig, Stornoway for more information and advice.
Erica Moireasdain bho Phròiseact nan Ealan agus Evelyn Coull NicLeòid
bho Chomhairle nan Eilean Siar le sgoilearan bho Sgoil Ghàidhlig Ghlaschu.
Modern Gaelic
resource is ‘App’ tastic
L
earning and enjoying Gaelic song
has just got easier, thanks to a
new Gaelic song app. Launching at
Sgoil Ghàidhlig Ghlaschu, Òrain na
Cloinne Bige’ is a free downloadable
app and website featuring twenty
Gaelic songs recorded by five talented
young singers from the Western Isles.
The project has been a collaboration
between Pròiseact nan Ealan and
Comhairle nan Eilean Siar with both
organisations working closely together
to ensure that this new resource would
complement the existing work being
done within Gaelic medium cròileagan
and early stages classrooms. Each song
has been carefully chosen to aid the
learning process, enhanced by vibrant
It’s never too early to get listening to Òrain na Cloinne Bige. Here’s
engaging images which will hold
James Earl MacLeod from Stornoway who certainly seems to be enjoying it!
children’s attention and increase the
enjoyment of the learning experience.
produce this wonderful Gaelic app which can be
Evelyn Coull MacLeod, Manager of the Multimedia
enjoyed by fluent and learner Gaelic speakers.
Unit said: “We are delighted with the end result of
This resource will enrich the Gaelic experience for
Òrain na Cloinne Bige. We hope it is a resource that
young people, especially as it is not confined to
will be used by parents, carers and teachers across
the classroom. Embracing modern communication
the country to introduce a new generation to Gaelic
methods is essential to ensure that Gaelic is used in
song. It was a great opportunity for our young singers
everyday life.”
to be engaged in the whole recording process. It is
Òrain na Cloinne Bige is available to download
hoped that over the coming months we will develop
on both Apple and Android and is available to view
further teaching aides to accompany the resource
at the following link: http://orain-na-cloinne-bige.eand this will be found on the website”.
storas.com/
Erica Morrison, Creative Director at Pròiseact
Òrain na Cloinne Bige features the voices of Amy
nan Ealan added: ‘We are delighted to have worked
MacKay, Koren Pickering, Dena-Anne MacLeod,
in partnership with Comhairle nan Eilean Siar to
Calum Nicolson and Mairi MacLennan
Òrain
Na
Òrain Na
Cloinne
Bige
Làrach-lìn agus app ùr bho Chomhairle nan Eilean Siar
Iona can be contacted on 01851 701802 or by email to [email protected]
A’ beachdachadh air Foghlam tro Mheadhan na
àidhlig airson ur cuid chloinne?
Ma tha sibh a’ beachdachadh air ur cuid chloinne a chur tro Foghlam tro Mheadhan
na Gàidhlig agus a’ lorg freagairtean air ceistean sònraichte no fiù’s ma tha sibh
dìreach a’ coimhead airson barrachd fhaighinn a-mach mu Fhoghlam tro
Mheadhan na Gàidhlig agus na buannachdan a tha na chois, leigibh fios gu Iona
Nic an t-Sagairt, Oifigear Leasachaidh, Comunn na Gàidhlig, Steòrnabhagh.
Faodar fònadh Iona air 01851 701802 no post-dealain gu [email protected]
www.parant.org.uk
www.foghlamgaidhlig.com
Fichead òran chloinne
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B17
Sgoil MhicNeacail
A soirbheachail ann
an Deasbad 2015!
Ghabh a’ chuairt dheireannach de Dheasbad
Nàiseanta nan Àrd-sgoiltean 2015 air Diciadain
25 Samhain. Bha deasbad air leth beòthail ri
chluinntinn ri Sgoil MhicNeacail A an aghaidh
Àrdsgoil Àrd nam Murchan. Ach, aig a’ cheann
thall ‘s iad caileagan Sgoil MhicNeacail, Catriona
Bain agus Ceitidh NicAonghais a bha soirbheachail
agus thèid a’ chuach air ais a Steòrnabhagh am
bliadhna seo. ‘S iad Rona NicNeacail à Àrdsgoil
Àrd nam Murchan a choisinn an sgiath airson an
òraidiche as fheàrr agus ‘s e Iseabail NicIllinnein
bho BBC Gàidhlig a thug an duais seachad.
Rona NicNeacail bho Ardsgoil Àrd nam Murchan le
Iseabail NicIllinnein bho BBC Gàidhlig.
Sgoil MhicNeacail A le na britheamhan,
Jo NicDhomhnaill, Cairistiona Walker
agus Aonghas Dòmhnallach
Dòmhnall MacNèill bho Chomunn na Gàidhlig
le Cathy Nicdhòmhnaill
Evelyn Coull NicLeòid agus Ailig MacMhathain bho
sgioba Aonad Ioma-mheadhain Chomhairle nan Eilean Siar
Cuach na Cloinne – Duais Spòrs 2015!
Tha a’ phròiseact òigridh Cuach na Cloinne, a th’ air
a ruith le Comunn na Gàidhlig, air soirbheachadh
ann am farpais Duaisean Gàidhlig na h-Alba 2015
le bhith a’ buannachadh “Duais Spòrs” na bliadhna.
Se farpais ball-coise do sgoilearan eadar P4-P7, a
th' ann an Cuach na Cloinne agus ann am farpais
2015 ghabh 48 sgioba, bho 29 sgoiltean, pairt ann
– còrr is 300 duine cloinne. Chaidh farpaisean
roinneil a chumail an Leòdhas, Uibhist, An t-Eilean
Sgitheanach, Inbhir Nis, Glaschu agus an t-Oban, leis
na sgiobannan a shoirbhich sna farpaisean roinneil
sin a' dol troimhe chun Cuairtean Deireannach
a chumadh an Inbhir Nis. An 2015, b' iad Sgoil
Lacasdail à Leòdhas a thog duais na bliadhna, a’
dèanamh a chùis air Sgoil Ghàidhlig Ghlaschu sa
chuairt dheireannach.
Thuirt Dòmhnall MacNèill, Ceannard ChnaG,
“Tha sinn air leth toilichte a bhith a’ gleidheadh
Duais Spòrs na bliadhna. Tha sinn as leth moiteil
a Cuach na Cloinne agus dha riribh mothachail
air am feum a tha e a’ dèanamh dhan òigridh a
bhith a’ faighinn cothroman an cuid Gàidhlig a
chleachdadh ann an diofar chur-seachadan mar
spòrsan is ceòl. Tha sinn taingeil do Bhòrd na
Gàidhlig, Comhairle nan Eilean Siar is Comhairle
na Gàidhealtachd airson a bhith a’ maoineachadh
an fharpais.”
Leabhraichean Ùra Bookbug ann an Gàidhlig
Tha Urras Leabhraichean na h-Alba air an
ath shreath de leabhraichean bho sgeama
Bookbug (P1) a dheasachadh ann an co-bhonn
ri Acair. Tha faidhlichean fuaim airson nan
tiotalan ùra rim faighinn air làrach G4P aig
http://www.gaelic4parents.com/maoilios/read-aloud.
’S iad na tiotalan ùra:
Ralfaidh Rabaid, Mèirleach nan Leabhraichean
Air do Bheatha Bhuan na Diogail Tìgear
Luchag Bheag aig Sgoil Sholais na Gealaich
Feuch gun tèid sibh ann agus gun èist sibh!
An fheadhainn a bha soirbheachail aig
Duaisean Ghàidhlig na h-Alba 2015
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B18
www.hebevents.com
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
Events in Stornoway and East Lewis
Every day: Phone or email 24/7. Free call from
landline or mobile: 116123. Samaritans of the
Western Isles, 87 Cromwell Street, Stornoway, HS1
2DG. Email: [email protected] / or write to Chris,
P.O. Box 90 90, Stirling, FK8 2SA
Sundays: Prayer Meeting at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 10-10.30am, 59 Bayhead.
01851 703875
Sundays: Stornoway Baptist Church, Gospel
Preaching Service, 6-7pm, 60 Seaforth Road. All
questions from “Is there a God?” to “What am I
here for?” answered. Surprise yourself and come!
For more information: 01851 704770
Tuesdays: Boys’ Brigade Anchors and Juniors (ages
5 to 10), 6.00-7.00pm, St Columba’s New Church
Hall, Lewis Street, Stornoway
Tuesdays: Bridge Community Centre P5&6
Club night, 6-8pm, Bridge Community Centre,
Stornoway. For more information: www.
bridgecommunitycentre.co.uk
Tuesdays: Kettlebell class, 6-6.45pm, Fitness Suite
SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For more
information: 07919200761
Tuesdays and Thursdays alternating: Lewis and
Harris Riding Club ‘open’ training. Lochside Arena,
6pm-10pm. £5 per person. Members only
Sundays: St Columba’s Church of Scotland, Lewis
Street, Stornoway. 11.00am: Worship, Crèche,
Sunday-school, Bible Class. 6.30pm: Worship
Tuesdays: Lunch Club at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 12-1pm, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875
Sundays: St. Peter’s Scottish Episcopal Church,
Francis Street, Stornoway. Sunday Services: 11am
Eucharist Service; 7pm Evensong. All are welcome!
Our church is open every day for quiet prayer
Tuesdays: Lunchtime walks in Stornoway, 12.30pm,
meet outside An Lanntair. Now in their seventh
year. Walks are 30-45 minutes duration. New
walkers welcome. For more information contact:
Chris Ryan, Paths for Health coordinator – 01851
702712; 07743507982
Sundays: Sunday School at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 1pm-3pm, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875
Sundays: Sunday Service at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 11am-12pm, 59 Bayhead.
01851 703875
Monday - Friday: Adult Literacy Classes, Western
Isles Learning Shop, Town Hall. Free, flexible,
confidential help with reading, writing, general
confidence, preparing for interviews, homework
and learning English as a second language. Later
opening hours 7-9pm on Monday. For more
information: 01851 822718
Monday (second Monday of month): Autism/
Aspergers Support Group, 12-noon, Newton
Community Association, Seaforth Road, Stornoway.
We welcome all those who have an interest in
Autism and Aspergers, e.g. people affected by
the condition, family and carers. Teas and coffees
served after meeting. Contact [email protected]
gmail.com
Mondays: Ballet, Adult Improvers, 8pm, Hebrides
Dance & Wellbeing Studio. Please contact Kirstie
to find out more: 07715 499552; [email protected]
gmail.com; www.hebridesdance.co.uk
Mondays: Digi-Heb, the Bridge Centre, Bayhead.
Aspiring actors, actresses, filmmakers and writers
welcome. Free
Mondays: Family Fun Night. Games, movies, jokes,
snacks. For all ages. Everyone invited. Make some
new friends too. 7.30pm, at 8 Newton Street, The
Church of Latter Days Saints. 01851 706405
Monday: Kettlebell class, 1.15-1.45pm, Fitness
Suite SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For
more information: 07919200761
Mondays: Leisure Running Group, Stornoway
Running Club, 6pm, Running Track.
An
opportunity to get fit and stay fit, running or jogging
with other people. All abilities welcome. For more
information: James Mackenzie, 07983718316
Mondays: MiLC Piping School, 7-9pm, Laxdale
Hall. All levels and all ages welcome. Tel. 704241
or email [email protected]
Mondays: Piping School, 6.30pm, Lewis Retirement
Centre, Stornoway. Open to all, under instruction
of the excellent leading piper Larry Ferguson,
students will learn the basics of the chanter and
a wide range of traditional Scots tunes. For more
information: 01851 704241.
Mondays: Point Girls Club, 7pm-9pm, Sgoil an
Rubha
Wednesdays: Healthy Weighs, 5-6pm, Lewis Sports
Centre. Do you want some help to lose weight, get
fitter and feel healthier? This is a six-week rolling
programme run by a registered dietician and a
personal trainer. For more information: 01851
822800
Thursdays: Stornoway Running Club, senior
session, 5.30pm, Smith Avenue changing rooms
(winter)/Porter’s Lodge (summer). An opportunity to
get fit and stay fit, running or jogging with other
people. For more information contact James
Mackenzie, 07983718316
Wednesdays: Island Archers, 7-9pm, Lochs School.
Indoors: late August to mid May. Outdoors: late
May to mid August. Want to try archery? Equipment
and friendly coaching provided to all ages and
abilities. For further information contact Stuart
Oakley: 01851 643204; [email protected];
www.islandarchers.org
Thursdays: Studio 7, Young Musicians Hebrides,
from 7pm. Are you under 18? Interested in being
in a band? Or being a solo performer? Are you in
a band and want to develop your potential? YMH
Studio 7 is OPEN. Contact [email protected]
com
Wednesdays: Kettlebell class, 9.15-10am, Fitness
Suite SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For
more information: 07919200761
Wednesdays: Kettlebell class, 5.15-6pm, Fitness
Suite SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For
more information: 07919200761
Wednesdays: Parent and Toddlers at the Salvation
Army Stornoway Corps, 9.30-11.30am, 59
Bayhead. 01851 703875
Tuesdays (first of the month): 10am-12noon:
Nappucino, Bayhead Bridge Centre. Drop in for a
free cuppa and a chat about cloth nappies. Hire a
nappy kit or simply share experiences with other
cloth nappy users, and enjoy some cake. www.
nappynetwork.org.uk
Wednesdays: (Last of the month) Stornoway Library
Reading Group, 6.30pm, Stornoway Library.
Contact 01851 822744 for further details
Tuesdays: Occupational Therapy Drop-in Clinic,
10am-2pm, Western Isles Sensory Centre,
Esplanade Court, Stornoway
Wednesdays: Tap dancing for adult beginners (16+,
12+ also welcome with participating responsible
adult), 5.15-6.05pm, Bridge Centre. Drop-in: £5
per class
Tuesdays: Pairc Senior Youth Club, 7.30-9.30pm,
Pairc School
Tuesdays: Parent and Toddler group, 1-3pm, MA
Macleod Memorial Hall, Stornoway Free Church,
Kenneth Street. Open to babies and children under
five. Come along for a chat and a cuppa while the
kids play. Everyone welcome
Tuesdays (first of the month): Stornoway
Astronomical Society. Please see our website
www.stornowayastra.org for details of our regular
lectures and observing sessions with times and
venues etc. Beginners always welcome
Tuesdays: Stornoway Bridge Club, 7pm, Stornoway
Golf Club. Meet for Bridge, chat, competitions and
cheer
Tuesdays: Stornoway Running Club, 6pm, Running
Track junior session. An opportunity to get fit and
stay fit, running or jogging with other people. All
abilities welcome. For more information contact
Seumas Mactaggart, 07766654449
Tuesdays: Stornoway Singers, 8pm, St Columba’s
Old Parish Church Hall, Lewis Street. Come and
give it a go. For more information: 07938590767
/ 01851 706521
Tuesdays: Substance Use Open Access Clinic,
for all those affected by substance misuse,
20-minute slots between 11am and 1pm. For
further information contact: Alcohol & Mental
Health Nurse Elizabeth Shelby on 07768323437
or Community Alcohol Nurse Chris Mina Morrison
on 07825780175
Wednesdays: Bible Study at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 12-1pm, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875
Wednesdays: Bookbug Sessions, 11am, Stornoway
Library. A free story, song and rhyme sessions
for babies, toddlers, pre-school children and
their families. For more information: www.
scottishbooktrust.com/bookbug
Mondays: Scottish Slimmers, 6.30pm, Caladh
Inn, Stornoway. Call 0800 362636 or visit www.
scottishslimmers.com
Wednesdays: Bosom Buddies, 10am-12pm,
Grianan Centre, Westview Terrace, Stornoway. Your
local breastfeeding support group, with a midwife
to help, and a cup of tea
Monday: Thai boxing pad work, 6-7pm, followed
by Open sparring, 7-7.45pm, Fitness Suite SY
at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For more
information: 07919200761
Wednesdays: Bridge Community Centre S2
Club night, 7.30-9.30pm, Bridge Community
Centre, Stornoway. For more information: www.
bridgecommunitycentre.co.uk
Tuesdays: Beavers, a fun club for 5-8 year-olds,
6-7.30pm, Tigh Ceilidh, Gravir. (Term-time only)
For more information: 01851 880437
Wednesdays: Dannsa Eileanach, 7-9pm, Stornoway
Primary School gym. Ceilidh dancing sessions.
Open to all. For more information: 01851 704870
Tuesdays: Beavers, a fun club for 6-8 year-olds.
6.30-7.30pm, Stornoway Scout Hall, Keith
Street. See www.scouts.org.uk/beavers/ for more
information
Wednesdays: Girls’ Brigade. Explorers: 6.307.30pm. Juniors: 6.30-8pm. Brigaders: 6.30-8pm.
St Columba’s New Church Hall, Lewis Street,
Stornoway
Wednesdays: (1st of the month) Stornoway Quilters,
Cuibhrigean Eilean Leodhais. 7.30pm - 9.30pm,
Grianan, Westview Terrace, Stornoway
Wednesdays: Thai boxing pad work, 6-7pm,
followed by Open sparring, 7-7.45pm, Fitness Suite
SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For more
information: 07919200761
Wednesdays: (1st of the month) RAF Association
Stornoway branch, 7.30pm, TA Hall, Church Street,
Stornoway. Call 705561 for further details
Thursdays: Absolute Youth project, 1-4pm,
Pointers, Stornoway. Learning project for young
adults aged 16-21 years. Its aim is to involve
young people in activities designed to develop
confidence, teamwork and literacy skills. The
group also works towards gaining the Bronze level
Youth Achievement Awards. For more information:
01851 707460
Thursdays: Body conditioning, 6-7pm, Fitness Suite
SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For more
information: 07919200761
Thursdays: Chen style Tai Chi, 7-8.30 pm, the
Bridge Centre. Beginners very welcome
Thursdays: Come and try session, 6.30pm at
Stornoway Bowling Club, Bayhead, Stornoway
Thursdays: Home League at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 2-3pm, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875
Thursdays: Jogscotland, group jogging. Thursday
545-630, Lewis Sports Centre
Thursdays: Knitters on the Edge, 11am till Ipm,
at Wool4Ewe, on Cromwell Street. Local knitters
and holidaying knitters welcome, just bring your
knitting and a sense of humour! More info on our
Facebook page Knitters on the Edge. Tel: 01851
701719 Email: [email protected]
Thursdays: Lunch Club at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 12-1pm, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875
Thursdays: Meeting for Prayer and Bible Study,
7.30pm, St Columba’s Church of Scotland, Lewis
Street, Stornoway
Thursdays: Parent and Toddler Group, 9.45am11.45am, MA Macleod Memorial Hall, Stornoway
Free Church, Kenneth Street. Open to babies and
children under five. Come along for a chat and a
cuppa while the kids play. Everyone welcome
Thursdays: Point Boys Club, 7.30pm-8.30pm, Sgoil
an Rubha
Thursdays: Pointers U-16s group, 7-9pm, Pointers,
Stornoway
Thursdays: Westside Yoga, 5.30-7pm and 7.158.45pm, Stornoway Masonic Hall
Fridays: Ballet, Adult Beginners, 5.30pm, Hebrides
Dance & Wellbeing Studio. Please contact Kirstie
to find out more: 07715 499552; [email protected]
gmail.com; www.hebridesdance.co.uk
Fridays: Breakfast Club at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 8-11am, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875. Donation at the door. All welcome!
Fridays: Bridge Community Centre P7 Club night.
7–9pm, Bridge Community Centre, Stornoway. For
more information: www.bridgecommunitycentre.
co.uk
Fridays: Cearcall Comhraidh Gaelic Conversation
Circle at the Retirement Centre Bayhead, all
welcome. 4.30-6pm. Use and build on your Gaelic
vocabulary in a supportive environment. For more
information, call Maggie 07554665549
Fridays: Cream teas served every Friday, St Peter's
Church, Francis Street, 12-3pm. All welcome
Fridays: Dannsa Eileanach, 7.30-9.30pm, Stornoway
Primary School gym. Ceilidh dancing sessions.
Open to all. For more information: 01851 704870.
Fridays: Jogscotland, group jogging, 12.45-1.30pm,
Lewis Sports Centre
Fridays: Junior Club at the Salvation Army
Stornoway Corps, 6-7.30pm, 59 Bayhead. 01851
703875
Fridays: Mini ballet (P1-3) 4.30pm, Hebrides
Dance & Wellbeing Studio. Please contact Kirstie
to find out more: 07715 499552; [email protected]
gmail.com; www.hebridesdance.co.uk
Fridays: Music and Song at the Retirement Centre
Bayhead, all welcome. 6-9pm. Live music and
Gaelic, Irish and Country songs. More information
Maggie 07554665549
Fridays: Rionnagan Beaga, 10.15-11.45am, Young
Musicians Hebrides, Bells Road, near Tesco. Learn
Gaelic through songs and play - for children
age 0 to 5. All young children, whatever their
level of Gaelic, welcome with their parents and
grandparents. For more information contact June:
01851 709861.
Fridays: Thai boxing pad work, 5-6pm, followed
by Open sparring, 6-7pm, Fitness Suite SY at the
Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For more information:
07919200761
Fridays: Youth Drop-in (14+), 8-10pm, Aird
Community Centre. For more information contact
Erica Campbell: 01851 707816.
Saturdays: Bag work and kettlebell conditioning
class, 10-11.30am, Fitness Suite SY at the
Cabarfeidh Hotel, Stornoway. For more information:
07919200761
Saturdays: Bridge Community Centre S1 Club
night, Bridge Community Centre, Stornoway,
7.30–9.30pm. For more information: www.
bridgecommunitycentre.co.uk
Saturdays: Carpet Bowls, 2-4.30pm, Breasclete
Community Centre. Everyone welcome. For more
information: 01851 643485 / 840743
Saturdays: Junior Thai boxing class (age 11-15),
12-1pm, Fitness Suite SY at the Cabarfeidh Hotel,
Stornoway. For more information: 07919200761
Saturdays: Kids Club, 3.30-6pm, Newton
Community Centre, Seaforth Road. Baha’i Youth
and Children Group, now in its fourteenth year.
Term-time only. For more information contact Mina
Sheppard: [email protected]
Although at EVENTS we try our best to get all up-and-coming events in the paper, it’s
a challenge as EVENTS is only a monthly paper! For all the latest events happening in
Stornoway and East Lewis, go to www.welovestornoway.com and click on ‘Events’.
Send us your events. LISTINGS ARE FREE! E-mail to [email protected] or ring 01851 705749
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B19
www.hebevents.com
Events in West Lewis
Sundays: (Last of the month) Gaidhlig Service at
Bernera Church of Scotland, Bernera. 6pm
Sundays: Gaidhlig Service at Ness Church of
Scotland, Cross, Ness. 12noon
Sundays: Gaidhlig Service at Uig Church of
Scotland, Miavaig, Uig. 6pm
Sundays: Pol’s Pantry, open every Sunday 11am
to 5pm, Leumadair Gueshouse, 7A Callanish (just
off the main road). Teas, coffees, home baking and
light lunches, contact: 01851 621706
Sundays: St. Moluag’s Scottish Episcopal Church,
Eoropaidh, Sunday services April to September:
1st Sunday of the month, 11am Eucharist Service.
Other services as announced. All welcome.
Mondays (second of the month): Carloway and
Breasclete Gardeners Club, 7.30pm, Breasclete/
Carloway Community Centre (alternating between
Breasclete and Carloway). For more information:
Kirsty – 01851 643497
Mondays (term-time): Carloway Youth Club Junior
Club, 7–8pm, Carloway Community Centre
Mondays: Gaelic Singing class, 7-8pm, Taigh
Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness. For more information:
01851 810166; [email protected]
Mondays: Highland Dancing Class, 6pm, Great
Bernera School of Highland Dancing. For more
information: Karina Macaulay – 01851 612312.
Mondays: Keep Fit, 6.15–7.30pm, Uig Community
Centre
Mondays: Ladies Keep Fit, 8–9pm, Clan MacQuarrie
Community Centre. Open to all ages and abilities –
come along and build up your fitness
Monday–Saturday: Spòrsnis Ten Pin Bowling
Alley, 12–9pm (although later nights can be
accommodated), Spòrsnis, Habost, Ness. A game
for a family of four usually lasts about 30-45
minutes. To book, call: 01851 810039
Mondays: Westside Yoga, 11.15am-1245pm at
Spors Nis, and 5.30-7pm at Carloway Medical
Practice. Contact Lucy Harness for more info:
07557 261193
Mondays: Whist Drive, 8pm, Breasclete
Community Centre
Thursdays (weekly): Zumba with Jemma, Dance
Fitness Classes all welcome. 8-9 pm at Sporsnis. £4
a session. Tel: 01851 810039
Tuesdays: Gaelic in the Home, 7-9pm, Breasclete
Community Centre
Tuesdays: Guitar class, 6-7pm, Taigh Dhonnchaidh,
Habost, Ness. For more information: 01851
810166; [email protected]
Tuesdays: Melodeon class, 7.15-8.15pm, Taigh
Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness. For more information:
01851 810166; [email protected]
Tuesdays: Under-12 football training for boys and
girls, 6.30–7.30pm, Carloway Community Centre
or pitch
Tuesdays: Westside Runners & Fitness Club - Ladies
keep fit classes, 7pm, Barvas and Brue Community
Centre
Tuesdays: Westside Yoga, Barvas Community
Centre at 6-7pm, and Bragar old school at 9.158.45pm. Contact Lucy Harness for more info:
07557 261193
Wednesdays: Adult Badminton Club, 8–10pm,
Spòrsnis, Ness. All abilities welcome. For more
information: 01851 810039
Wednesdays: Borve Parent & Toddler Group,
1.30pm-3pm, Sgoil Araich Airidhantuim
Wednesdays:
Cairdeas,
1.30-3.30pm,
Uig
Community Centre. An informal get-together club
for the over 60s
Wednesdays: Ceilidh Dancing, 8pm, Shawbost
Old School Centre. For more information: 01851
643485 / 840743
Wednesdays: Ceilidh Dancing Classes, 8.30pm,
Ness Social Club, Lionel, Ness. All abilities come
along and learn the steps. For more information:
01851 810421
Wednesdays: Creative reawakening open studio
sessions, 1pm-4.00pm Blue Pig Studio, 11 Upper
Carloway. Develop your own artwork in a peaceful,
mutually supportive atmosphere. Bring a packed
lunch. For more information: 01851 643225
Wednesdays: Dog Obedience Class, Carloway
Community Centre. Whether it’s an adult dog or a
new puppy, why not book on to one of our courses?
For more information or to book: 01851 710669 /
07748 638108
Wednesdays: Fiddle class, 6.30-7.30pm, Taigh
Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness. For more information:
01851 810166; [email protected]
Wednesdays: Gaelic in the Home, 10am-12noon,
Breasclete Community Centre
Wednesdays (second of the month): Gardening
Club, 7.30pm, Carloway Community Centre.
Everyone welcome. For more information: 01851
643485 / 840743
Wednesdays: Highland dancing class, 6-6.30pm
and 6.30-7.30pm, Taigh Dhonnchaidh, Habost,
Ness. For more information: 01851 810166; [email protected]
taighdhonnchaidh.com
Events in Stornoway
and East Lewis (continued)
Saturdays: Pairc Junior Youth Club, 6.30-8.30pm,
Pairc School
a Christmas Carol Evening, hosted by the High Free
Church in Stornoway Primary School. Refreshments
provided. Donations on entry will go towards our
church building fund. All welcome.
Saturdays: Stornoway Running and Athletics
Club, junior sessions, 10.30am–12-noon, Porters
Lodge (winter) and running track (summer). For
more information contact Seumas Mactaggart,
07766654449
Sunday December 20: Family Service, 11.00am,
Saint Columba’s Church
DECEMBER
Sunday December 20: Nine Lessons and Carols,
6.30pm, Saint Columba’s Church
Thursday December 3: Stornoway Thespians
Pantomime - Alice in Wonderland, showings at
10.30am (SOLD OUT) and 7pm, An Lanntair
Thursday December 24: Christmas Watch-night
Service, 11.15pm, Saint Columba’s Church
Friday December 4: Stornoway Thespians
Pantomime - Alice in Wonderland, showings at
10.30am (SOLD OUT), 1.30pm and 7pm, An
Lanntair
Saturday December 5: Stornoway Thespians
Pantomime - Alice in Wonderland, showings at
1pm and 4pm, An Lanntair
Thursday 3, Friday 4, Saturday 5 December: Eilean
Siar Food Bank collection at Tesco, Stornoway
Friday December 11: Stornoway Christmas Lights
Switch On featuring six of the Shetland Vikings,
from 7pm onwards
Saturday 12 December: Christmas Carol Evening,
6.30pm, Stornoway Primary School. Come along to
Saturday December 26: Pandejo, 10pm, Stornoway
Golf Club
JANUARY
Friday January 1: Tong Family Quiz and New Year
Dance. Start you first footing at Tong Hall in 2016!
Quiz: Family quiz night, 6pm to 8pm, teams of up
to six people, all ages welcome, teas, coffees and
tuck shop available, £5 entry per team. Call Donna
Murray on 07496584938 to register your team.
Dance: The Links are playing 8pm till late. £10
for 18+, limited free children's tickets available.
Under 18's must be accompanied by an adult.
Tickets available in Tong shop or call Eilidh Smith
on 0794622503.
Wednesdays: Junior classes for 16 and under, 7pm,
Barvas and Brue Community centre
Wednesdays: Music Night, Lochcroistean Guest
Centre, Uig. For more information: 01851 672722
Wednesdays: Top Tots Parent & Toddler Group,
2–3.30pm, Carloway Free Church Hall. Contact
Chrisann: 07766157015
Wednesdays: Weekly Carloway Sunshine Club,
1.30-3.30pm, Carloway Day Centre. For all aged
60+; minibus will collect. Speakers, crafts, chat
and a cup of tea. For more information or to book:
01851 643382
Wednesdays: Westside Runners & Fitness Club –
Junior & adults sessions, 7pm, Barvas and Brue
Community Centre. Adults meet at 7pm at the
entrance to Barvas machair for all abilities run / jog
sessions and training
Wednesdays: Westside Yoga, 7-8.30pm, Spors Nis.
Contact Lucy Harness for more info: 07557 261193
Thursdays: Archive Group, 2-5pm, Ness Heritage
Centre
Thursdays: Gaelic for Beginners, 7-9pm Breasclete
Community Centre
Thursdays: Harp class, 6.15-7.15pm, Taigh
Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness. For more information:
01851 810166; [email protected]
Thursdays: Keyboard class, 5-6pm, Taigh
Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness. For more information:
01851 810166; [email protected]
Thursdays: Scottish Slimmers, 6.30pm, Barvas and
Brue Community Centre. Call 0800 362636 or visit
www.scottishslimmers.com
Thursdays: Grinneabhat Coffee Mornings at the
former Bragar School. Come for a coffee and good
company, 11-12pm
Thursdays (weekly): Zumba with Jemma, Dance
Fitness Classes all welcome. 8-9 pm at Sporsnis. £4
a session. Tel: 01851 810039
Fridays:
Chanter,
6.15-7.15pm,
Taigh
Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness. For more information:
01851 810166; [email protected]
Fridays: Folk Group/Session class, 7.158.30pm, Taigh Dhonnchaidh, Habost, Ness.
For more information: 01851 810166; [email protected]
taighdhonnchaidh.com
Fridays: Junior Youth Club, 7-9pm Bernera
Community Centre
Fridays: Top Tots Parent & Toddler Group 10-
11.30am, Carloway Free Church Hall
Saturdays: Bingo, 9pm, Ness Social Club, Lionel.
For more information: 01851 810421
Saturdays (term-time): Carloway Youth Club Senior
Club, 7–9pm Carloway Community Centre
Saturdays: Carpet Bowls, 2-4pm, Breasclete
Community Centre. For more information: 01851
621214
Saturdays (first of the month): Traditional Music
sessions, 8–11pm, Barvas and Brue Community
Centre. Bodhran, Whistle, Guitar, Melodeon etc.
For more information: 01851 643485 / 840743
Saturdays (first of the month October till March):
Woolcraft and spinning workshops, 2.30- 5.00pm
Barvas and Brue Community Centre
Saturdays (first of the month): Green Gym,
10am-12pm, Eoropie Dunes Play Park. For more
information: e-mail Joanne – [email protected]
or call 01851 810357
DECEMBER
Thursday 3 December: North Lewis Late Night
Christmas Shopping. Borgh Pottery, Bùth Lisa,
Sea in Design, Sallie Avis Designer, Comunn
Eachdraidh Nis, Cross Stores and Ness Post Office
will all be open until 9pm
Friday 4 December: Sgadan’s Night 4 PSP, 7pmmidnight, Barvas & Brue Community Centre. BBC's
Derek 'Pluto' Murray will MC the event and take
you through the Prize Bingo, Wheel of Fortune,
Ceilidh and complete the night with a good
old fashioned Dance. Music will include New
Tradition (featuring Iain Costello Maciver and John
Murray). The event is free to attend. Free transport
from Ness & Westside is generously provided by
Hebridean Mini Bus and Shawbost to Barvas will
be serviced by the Horshader Community Minibus.
For the latest information, go to the Facebook event
page - search: “Sgadan’s Night 4 PSP”.
Saturday 5 December: Xmas Craft Fair, 1-4pm,
Ness Hall, North Dell, Ness. Free Entry
Thursday 10 December: North Lewis Late Night
Christmas Shopping. Borgh Pottery, Bùth Lisa,
Sea in Design, Sallie Avis Designer, Comunn
Eachdraidh Nis, Cross Stores and Ness Post Office
will all be open until 9pm
Thursday 10 and Friday 11 December: Harry
Ferguson Night, 7.30pm, Comunn Eachdraidh Nis.
Admission free - all welcome!
Events in Harris
DECEMBER
Wednesday December 2: Ceilidh Dancing – Harris
Hotel, 7pm
Thursday December 3: Scalpay Island Common
Grazings meeting – Scalpay Community Centre,
7pm
Friday December 4: Winter Afternoon tea – Skoon
Arts Café, 1pm. (Booking essential)
Friday December 4: Sale of Work – Scalpay
Community Centre, 7pm
Tuesday December 8: Harris Charity Shop AGM,
Tarbert Community Centre, 2pm.
Wednesday December 9: Ceilidh Dancing – Harris
Hotel, 7pm
Wednesday December 16: Ceilidh Dancing –
Harris Hotel, 7pm
Friday December 18: Music by JEL – Hotel Hebrides
Thursday December 24: Christmas Eve disco with
DJ Jedd – Hotel Hebrides
Saturday December 26: Music by Bugsy – Hotel
Hebrides
Saturday December 29: Music by Willie Campbell
– Hotel Hebrides
Thursday December 31: Hogmanay Ceilidh with
Iain Angus – Hotel Hebrides
PERMANENT EVENTS:
Scottish Slimmers: Every Wednesday 6pm, Tarbert
Community Centre.
Ceilidh Dancing: Every Wednesday 7.30-9.30pm,
Harris Hotel, Tarbert.
Choir Singing: Every Thursday 7.30pm, Tarbert
Community Centre. Harris Choir (Coisir Eilean na
Hearadh). New members welcome, no audition.
Contact: John Masterson on 07788 940222 or
01859 530463.
Pilates: Every Thursday:
9.45 – 11.00am,
North Harris. Pilates Matwork. Prior booking
essential. Phone: Peggy Briggs on 01859 502376.
email:
[email protected]
website:
mikeandpeggybriggs.co.uk.
Obbe Parant is Paiste: Every Monday, 9.3011am, Leverburgh. A new Gaelic parent and
toddler group. Information about the group
and enrolment process can be found on
www.obbeparantispaiste.com.
Send us your events. LISTINGS ARE FREE! E-mail
to [email protected] or ring 01851 705749
EVENTS SECTION TWO - Page B20
www.hebevents.com
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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It was Thursday, November 26, at Maybury Gardens…and yes, you're right, it wasn't snowing! The camera never lies…but occasionally it wanders from the
path of righteousness such as here, where the effect of using slow exposure and the flash, converted otherwise invisible light rain into something very like snow!
Christmas starts at Maybury Gardens
3 3 Festive lights raise £1100 for charity 3 3
By Eilidh Whiteford
T
he annual Maybury Gardens Christmas
Lights switch-on proved another great
success this year – raising £1,100 for donation
to Bethesda Hospice.
Opening this year at 1pm to allow young ones
of all ages the chance to meet Santa, jolly old Mr
Claus had the delight of giving out 420 presents to
island children.
Throughout the day those visiting the Garden
Centre Christmas event munched through more
than 500 mince pies, sipped more than 500 cups of
hot chocolate and supped 36 litres of mulled wine!
“The day was excellent, it really, really went
well,” said Maybury Gardens' David Carty. “The
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weather was not the best, but starting at 1pm made
a difference, spread the fun out throughout the day,
and gave everyone a chance to come and visit Santa.”
Maybury Gardens would like to pay huge thanks
to the 'army of volunteers' who gave their time
and assistance making the Christmas Lights 2015
one of the best yet; and to Tesco in Stornoway who
donated 100 children's presents to the event.
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Fair Trade
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New to LochCroistean Coffee Shop
01851 672 772 Wed-Sat 12-8pm
Plus Thursdays at Uig Shop
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and best wishes for 2016…
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D7
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Tablets
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• Asus • Lenovo
• Acer
ipad,
Galaxy Tab A
and Linx Tabs
All the
latest Games
Otone speakers
PS4 bundles
Xbox One
and Headfones
from £300 bundles from £300
Laptops
Lego
Dimensions
Skylander
Superchargers
Disney Infinity
Starwars
Gift vouchers & Mobile topups available
Mobile
phones
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A panful of fish: By John Dory
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
Christmas Fish Dishes
A
lthough our household is very traditional
when it comes to Christmas fare, two or
three days after the annual turkey feast, my taste
buds start to yearn for fish, any kind of fish.
In olden times in a less affluent age, fish
or probably salt fish would have featured
extensively on festive menus, not by choice
but because there was no other option. In
countries, such as Italy and Poland, eating fish
at Christmas or during the festive period was an
ancient tradition that was strictly observed. The
Feast of the Seven Fishes was supposed to have
originated in Southern Italy and was a meal eaten
Christmas Salad
with Sautéed Scallop
6 large scallops, roe removed
100g streaky bacon/ Panchetta
70g dried cranberries
70-100g crushed pistachio nuts
Shredded lettuce leaves
Cooked kidney beans or green beans
Half a teaspoon grated ginger
1 mandarin or orange zest
2 teaspoons olive oil
Half a teaspoon malt wine vinegar
Wrap the scallops with the bacon, securing
them with a cocktail stick.
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Sauté the scallops in a hot non-stick frying
pan with 1 teaspoon of oil and some of the
grated ginger.
Fry until golden brown and remove the
cocktail sticks before serving.
Meanwhile, mix the remaining olive oil,
ginger, vinegar and zest of a mandarin in a small
bowl.
Combine the cranberries, nuts, lettuce and
beans in a big salad bowl.
Pour the dressing over and toss.
Finally, top with the sautéed scallops and
bacon.
Serve with a chilled, crisp Sauvignon Blanc.
Smoked Salmon Quiche
on Christmas Eve and was thought to have been
linked to the Roman Catholic religious tradition
of abstinence from meat. In Poland, live carp
were bought a few days before Christmas and
kept alive in the family bath until they were killed
and eaten on Christmas Eve. This tradition had a
religious dimension to it and was also thought to
bring luck to the household. In our country at
Christmas we eat vast quantities of different kinds
of shellfish and salmon at Christmas but usually
for the starter courses. The recipes this month
can be used as main courses in the post-turkey
period of the festive season.
water as you don't want the dough to be too
soggy.
Preheat the oven to 180˚C.
Roll the dough into a ball and cover with
cling film.
Chill in the fridge for 30 minutes
Roll out the dough and put into a greased
flan dish.
Bake blind for 30 minutes
Remove from oven and take out the baking
beans.
Put the whisked eggs in a bowl with the
cream and chopped dill.
Pour a little of the mixture into the flan dish.
Add the chopped salmon pieces and grated
cheese then top up with the rest of the creamed
mixture.
Bake at 180C for about 30/40 minutes until
the centre of the quiche sets.
Bacon or Parma Ham
Roasted Monkfish
1 monkfish tail, boned and skinless
1 packet of Parma ham or rashers of thin
smoked bacon
8-10 sage leaves
2 large red onions, peeled and chopped
1 level tablespoon light brown sugar
1 cup dry red wine
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 fish stock cube
300g plain flour
125g butter cubes at room temperature
1 teaspoon salt
2 egg yolks, beaten
2 tablespoons very cold water
Filling
250g smoked salmon
6 eggs, whisked
150g grated Parmesan cheese
150g Emmental or strong cheddar, grated
400ml single cream
Chopped dill
Salt and pepper to taste
To make the pastry, add the salt to the sieved
flour in a bowl and then add the cubes of butter.
Using your fingertips, rub the butter and flour
together until the mixture has the consistency of
very coarse crumbs but don't over mix.
Mix in the beaten egg yolks and the water to
form a dough. You may not need to use all the
Remove the bone of the monkfish so you
have two long strips of flesh.
Lay the Parma ham or bacon on a chopping
board to form a rolling mat.
Place one fillet along the outer edge then the
sage leaves and salt and pepper.
Then lay the other fillet alongside and then
roll and tie up the fish and bacon.
Roast at 200C for about 15/20 minutes or
until the ham/bacon is crispy.
For the Balsamic sauce, pan fry the finely
chopped onions in butter over a medium heat
for about 10 minutes until soft.
Add the sugar, cover and cook for 10 minutes,
stirring occasionally.
Add the wine, vinegar and stock cube cooking
uncovered, stirring occasionally until the liquid
is reduced by half.
Slice the roasted fish whilst hot served with
the balsamic sauce, green vegetables and
roasted potatoes.
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D9
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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Calanais Visitor Centre
C
café and gift shop
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Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from all of us at the CleanSquad.
Many thanks to all our customers for your business, the
warmest wishes for the festive season and throughout the New Year.
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D11
www.hebevents.com
Willowglen
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GARDEN CENTRE AND PET SHOP
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Fibre optic trees
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www.hebevents.com
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D13
9f\j]oOaddaYekgf$[gf]j%@[email protected]$K`YoZgkl
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D12
New York
showcase covers
Harris Tweed…
and also
whisky, biscuits,
cosmetics and
smoked salmon
Harris Tweed Hebrides sets
new goal for Island fabric
with top football deal
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T
he Scottish FA teamed up with two awardwinning Scottish companies to create a
bespoke range of clothing and accessories for
players, fans and fashionistas alike using Harris
Tweed.
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Harris Tweed Hebrides of Shawbost and Edinburgh
fashion house Walker Slater were commissioned by
the Scottish FA to produce a range of jackets and
accessories using a design that combines the dark
blue of the Scotland jersey with the sky blue of the
Saltire.
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US model Jagee Scott
helps promote Hebridean
products in a photo-shoot
beside the Hudson river,
with New York in the
background
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H
igh quality products from the Isle of Lewis were given a showcase in New York on St Andrew’s
Day with support from the island’s award-winning exporter, Harris Tweed Hebrides.
In addition to displaying its own fabric range at a prestigious Manhattan event, the Shawbost-based company
was backing a range of other island products that range from whisky and oatcakes to seaweedbased cosmetics.
The venue was a famous New York mansion, renamed Holiday House, located just off 5th Avenue and
now used as a show house for interiors and design. For the past month, two rooms have been leased by
Scottish Development International to display top-of-the-range fabrics, including Harris Tweed, and other
leading Scottish products.
Each of the rooms was stylishly set out by leading New York interior designers, James Rixner and Robert
Passal. Mr Rixner said: “The fabric we have been asked about all the time is Harris Tweed. The richness of
colour is so striking that it stands out. It has been a pleasure to work with it.”
Harris Tweed Hebrides chairman and former UK Trade Minister, Brian Wilson said: “We are all working
for the good of the island economy. New York has long been an important market for Harris Tweed and we
know that, given the chance, there are other excellent products that could flourish here. This seemed like a
good opportunity to help them get their message across”.
The island products featured were Rarebird accessories in Harris Tweed; the Ishga range of seaweedbased cosmetics; Abhainn Dearg whisky from the Uig distillery which uses locally grown barley; Uig Lodge
smoked salmon; and Stag Bakeries oatcakes and biscuits, some using local seaweed flavouring.
Martin MacLeod, managing director of Hebridean Seaweed which produces the Ishga range, said: “Harris
Tweed Hebrides has shown what can be done as exporters from an island base and we are delighted to
work with them in expanding our own business.
National coach Gordon Strachan and the Scotland
squad have been fitted out with their official Harris
Tweed jackets and Gordon has declared the new
range a winner.
He said: “The Scotland fans arrive at games dressed
for the occasion and now we will be able to do the
same, through Harris Tweed. It is really smart and it
will help bring us all together, players and fans alike.”
Brian Wilson, chairman of Harris Tweed Hebrides,
said: “It’s a great partnership which links the national
team to Scotland’s most iconic fabric. The idea was
to produce something both Scottish and stylish which
works both for players and supporters.”
This was confirmed by Scotland captain, Scott
Brown, who added: “The players all like this outfit
and will enjoy wearing it. It looks great and is a lot
more casual than what we are normally asked to
wear. Everyone is looking for something classy and
distinctive so I think Harris Tweed is a good fit for the
Scotland national team.”
The range is now available exclusively from
Edinburgh-based Walker Slater and will
be rolled out in response to demand.
Paul Walker, the tailoring firm’s
managing director, said that they were
proud to have worked with the SFA
and Harris Tweed Hebrides to create “a
classic but edgy collection.”
Paul said: “A strong-looking tweed
was needed for this project and that’s
exactly what we got from Harris Tweed
Hebrides. It’s a deep, rich design
and perfectly fits the range we have
produced. The players’ response was
very encouraging and I’m sure it will be
shared by the supporters.”
Harris Tweed Hebrides creative
director Mark Hogarth said: "The Harris
Tweed partnership with the Scottish
football Association will bring some
style and warmth to the terraces. The
fabric design is a strong navy verging on
midnight blue with a saltire blue chalkstripe. We hope that the modern cut of
the jackets and original design of the
accessories will strike a chord with the
Tartan Army."
The new Harris Tweed Hebrides
range
is
available
now
from
www.walkerslater.com/scottishfa
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“Harris Tweed benefits from the image of the place that it comes from and I believe there is far greater
commercial potential than has ever been recognised in the Hebridean brand. There are quite a few other
quality products that reflect the natural resources of the island”.
The Holiday House event was supported by the Harris Tweed Authority, based in Stornoway Town Hall,
which is the industry-funded body that protects the famous Orb trademark.
Models: Lucy Garvie and Patrick Toner
Photography by Pierre Guillemin
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D14
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D15
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D16
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D17
www.hebevents.com
Essential research
and insight from
historical studies
The Archaeology of Ness: Chris S Barrowman, 324pp, £29.99
Dùn Èistean, Ness: Rachel C Barrowman, 454pp, £29.99
airson
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Published by Acair
www.acairbooks.com
B
Review by
Fred Silver
T
his morning, I did
something which I
have never done before.
I weighed two books
about the history of
the Ness district on my
bathroom scales. Using
the
best
electronic
technology, they came in
at 3kg exactly! These are
indeed, weighty tomes,
to revive that description
of worthy academic
works which fellow historical researchers are
always going to be hoping will be analysed by
someone else.
I think it can safely be said that no one will ever
read either book from cover-to-cover and I make
no claims to have done that, or anything like it!
There are, however, some worthwhile comments
that I can make from reading much of the general
sections of The Archaeology of Ness. In the centre
of the book there is a marvellous breakdown of 46
abandoned sites of former developments running
right through the millennia to the Second World
War – anyone from the Ness district who had
wondered about the provenance of that "pile of
old stone" on the hill will probably find more than
enough answers in this book.
The scale of development in the Ness district
over many thousands of years suggests a much
huger picture for civilisation throughout the
Islands. For instance, evidence from peat, soil and
vegetation samples suggest that original woodlands
were cleared around 8,000 years ago, and that for
several thousands of years before the peat grew,
the land was maintained by inhabitants practising
a form of Mesolithic muirburn to enhance the
fertility of the land. Given the loss of peripheral
land areas to the sea from erosion and changing
post-glacial sea levels, it will never be known for
certain what the scale of settlement was.
But, consider this, almost 800 pages of work,
partly aimed at fellow scholars, partly at more
casual historians, is just covering one district of
the Isle of Lewis…and one of the most exposed
parts of the Island. How much more could be
written about the Broadbay communities if such
extensive and intensive fieldwork had been
done, matching modern geophysical research
with estate surveys from the 18th Century and
later, and the early Ordnance Survey research?
The Archaeology of Ness looks at the vast areas
covered by the feannagan which supported the
growing population in the 18th Century and
remarks about the relative lack of coastline loss
because of the local geology…contrast that with
the softer conglomerates around Tong, Holm and
so on, where feannagan run straight over the
edge of the present cliffs, hinting at a much huger
degree of erosion.
There is a fascinating section about the
development of blackhouses and the movement
of whole communities over the centuries as
efforts were made to make the best use of
resources. But, as so often with writing about
blackhouses, an element of roseate romanticism
creeps into the story. It is now fashionable to
see the blackhouses as the apogee of a natural,
sustainable development which was wilfully cast
aside by landlords and factors, imposing their own
ideas on to crofting communities. It's important
not to lose track of reality here…the improvements
suggested included having a proper chimney so the
smoke of the central peatfire did not fill the living
spaces; using walls to separate people and their
farm animals; and moving away from communal
bedroom areas. Just imagine the uproar from
modern crofting campaigners if landlords had
taken the opposite view and insisted their tenants
continue to live as they had for centuries while
their contemporaries in cities had running water,
electricity and separate bedrooms! There is an
excessive emphasis on the small number of local
inhabitants who opposed the changes, rather than
the many who embraced the new styles of building
– although there is possibly another book to be
written about the Government-provided houses
from the 1920s that had stone gable ends but only
corrugated iron roofs and wooden stud walls front
and back. How did anyone survive in them?
I feel that these books could be the first books in
a vast wall that will construct an entirely different
picture of human life in the Outer Hebrides from
that imagined 50 years ago if other scholars can be
persuaded to do the work, and funding be found
for it.
It is a strange fact that there is almost as much
doubt about the history of Ness and Lewis in
general in the 16th century AD as in the 16th
century BC. And it is here that the book on
Dùn Èistean, Ness comes into its own, dragging
documentary evidence from across Scotland to
construct a picture of life at the time. As with the
history of the blackhouse, readers will be welladvised to forget any romantic notions of clans
and community cohesion. In Lewis, there were
several centuries of civil war and near anarchy…
and I suspect there was far more support for the
peace that came with the Cromwellian conquest
in 1650-3 than is imagined by some writers.
Anyway, I am not even attempting in 900 words
to claim I am properly reviewing these vast books.
I am certain, though, that these are revolutionary
works that could form the basis for a revival of real
understanding of what our predecessors in the
Islands actually did.
ILABLE
OFFER AVA
ISTMAS
UNTIL CHR
Y+
BABOG TEDlaD
g(BB agus Bel
Alba)
as seen on BBC
£25 inc vat
(p&p extra)
free DVD
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D18
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
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HEBRIDEAN MEN’S CANCER
SUPPORT GROUP
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THE AIMS OF THR GROUP ARE TO HELP AND SUPPORT MEN AFFECTED BY
CANCER, THEIR RELATIVIES AND FRIENDS.
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D21
www.hebevents.com
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D22
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
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02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D23
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EVENTS SECTION FOUR - Page D24
02/12/15 - 06/01/16
www.hebevents.com
heart and soul
Fàilte / Welcome
Prògraman ri thighinn... Coming up on BBC ALBA...
bbc.co.uk/alba
Là na Nollaig / Christmas Day
Mòd 2015 – Mòd nan Còisirean
7.30f / 7.30pm
Disathairne 19 Dùbhlachd /
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Oidhche Challainn / New Year’s Eve
Cèilidh na Bliadhn’ Ùire /
Hogmanay Cèilidh
Belladrum 2015 Highlights:
Cridhe Tartan - The Proclaimers
Fèis Chiùil Thiriodh /
Tiree Music Festival – Highlights
11.30f / 11.30pm
10f / 10pm
11.50f / 11.50pm
Dihaoine 1 Faoilleach 2016 /
Friday 1 January 2016
Diluain 28 Dùbhlachd /
Monday 28 December
Là na Sàbaid 20 Dùbhlachd /
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Trusadh: Ceòl Chaluim
Trusadh: Dòtaman @ 30
9f / 9pm
8f / 8pm
Pìobairean Beaga Bhaile Ghobhainn /
The Wee Govan Pipers
8f / 8pm
Clann Pheter Roraidh
Diardaoin 24 Dùbhlachd / Christmas Eve
10f / 10pm
Mòd 2015 – Mòd na Cloinne
Skipinnish
9.55f / 9.55pm
Diciadain 30 Dùbhlachd /
Wednesday 30 December
7.30f / 7.30pm
Rona: Dìleab Chlann Eardsaidh Raghnaill
9f / 9pm
Trusadh: Dòtaman @ 30
Trusadh: Ceòl Chaluim
Freeview 8
Virgin Media 161
Cèilidh na Bliadhn’ Ùire/ New Year’s Eve Cèilidh
Sky 143
Freesat 110
Piobairean Beaga Bhaile Ghobhainn /
The Wee Govan Pipers
bbc.co.uk/iplayer
Tha BBC ALBA air a ruith le MG ALBA ann an co-bhuinn ris a’ BhBC. | BBC ALBA is run by MG ALBA in partnership with the BBC.

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