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View/Open - RIT Digital Archive - Rochester Institute of Technology
You can afford a college education!
In 1983, 135 million dollars of
financial aid money went
We can help you find your share.
Guaranteed!
T u i t i o n Assistants w a n t s t o help y o u f i n d
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This college tuition money is available to virtually everyone, but not many people know how or
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Our computer lists have more than 4,000
sources representing over 4 billion dollars
($4,000,000,000 + ) in legitimate available financial aid. College funds for you may be on that list
of A,000+ sources.
i
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Helping y o u afford the h i g h cost
of higher e d u c a t i o n is o u r business!
A recent printout located over $18,(X)0 for one
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A college sophomore qualified for $9,(X)0 in aid
and is able to continue his education!
T h i s Is your guarantee PLUS:
Tuition Assitants guarantees to search out all its
possible sources of available aid for you, and to
find at least five financial aid sources that match
your qualifications and goals. If w e c a n ' t f i n d
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Guaranteed!
You pay Tuition Assistants a one-time fee of
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send you
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'Source: Kenneth A. Kohl, former U.S. Associate
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SPECIAL
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Use the coupon be\ow to send us your name and
address. We send you your application form (a
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the form and mail it to us with your check or
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aid search begins. Allow three weeks for the
computerized report. When you receive your list
of college money sources, you apply to them for
your share (we can't do that for you).
W
I
i want to enroll in the search for college aid
T C O • through Tuition Assistants. I understand i
must complete a simple questionnaire and return It to you
with my check or money order for $52.00. if Tuition Assistants cannot find five legitimate sources where i can apply
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and mail to
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TUITION ASSISTANTS
Dept. N-3 2112 Empire Blvd.
Webster, NY 14580 (716) 671-1000
Member—B*n»r Busir>eM Bureau o' Hocbealer NY
CONTENTS
V o l u m e 60. N u m b e r 20
V r f V ^ l
1 I
Comment
ILA
1 I
C J
March 30. 1984
4
S L' CFC: E S S,that's the way we spell
success.
Cover Story
12
Feature
16
Dr. Ruth Westheimer spoke to the RI'I
community during Sexual Awareness
Week.
Reportage
6
Election for SD hoard members was
held.
Black Awareness Week previewed.
Fire at fraternity is investigated.
Weight lifting benefit proves successful.
New OCSA officers are elected.
R I T I S A plans annual banquet.
Reprodepth
8
.An analysis of the democratic can
didates in New York's April 3 primary.
American Video Institute has been
established at R I T .
Dr. Raman continues his lecture series,
with (ireek Science.
RI T students learn more about their
sexual selves during the schoors
Human Sexuality Week.
REPRORLE
Fend for yourself I've done it before,
and thanks to poor planning by the
department of Off Campus and Apart
ment Life, will have to do so again.
After a year with a protest rally I
thought things would he better, hut
after all the committees have done their
work, I am forced to leave my R I T
apartment.
I sp>oke with the director of Apart
ment Life, who told me I would not he
able to return to the apartment in which
I have lived for two years, and felt as i f I
was talking to a brick wall. Even though
I was willing to sign a contract that
would obligate me to pay rent and he
responsible for finding roommates I was
not permitted to renew my lease. I did
not meet the minimum occupancy re
Students endured 12 grueling hours
during the M D A Dance-a thon.
Reproview
20
Departments
Zodiac
Tab Ads
What's Happrening
15
28
30
Talisman presents its great directors
scries.
Vegas' Robert Urich stars in the space
satire Ice Pirates.
An introduction to classical music.
Vertigo, the second of five rerelcased
Hitchcock classics.
Scoreboard
26
'I"he lacrosse team is in pre season.
Men's swimming does well at nationals.
Men's basketball wins a game and
finishes season.
quirement.
I needed three roommates, since my
roommates would he on co op fall
quarter, and was unable to fine! new
roommates, although I did advertise at
the Off Campus O n t e r and on various
bulletin hoards on campus. Normally, I
would he able to find roommates after
the lottery was over, but the person
doing the scheduling this year put the
returning resident apartment sign up
before the lotter)'. T o say this made
things difficult would he to cloud the
truth. T o say it left me without a place
to live while at school would he
accurate.
I f I do find a place to live, it will pro
hahly he a number o f miles from campus. Gasoline and car maintenance costs
Cover:
Dr. R u t h
Westheimer
p h o t o by
Steve
Hockstein
will inhibit my travel, and this will, un
fortunately, reduce my involvement in
R I T activities. I will not he able to
afford a trip to school for any "op
tional" event, and although the ad
ministration will crv "apathy," I will
know mv reduced involvement is
brought about hv the very administra
tion that complains. I f the administra
tion wanted me to he involved, they
should have done a better job of keeping
me closer to campus.
R E P O R T E R M A G A Z I N E is published weekly d u r i n g the a c a d e m i c year by students at Rochester Institute of Technology. O n e L o m b M e m o r i a l Drive. Roctiester. New York 14623 Editorial a n d production facilities a r e located m R o o m A-283 of the Coiiege-Aiumni Union telephone 716-475-2212 S u b s c n p i i o n $4 0 0 per quarter The opinions e x p r e s s e d m R E P O R T E R d o not necessarily reflect
those of the institute RiT does not generally review or a p p r o v e the contents of R E P O R T E R a n d d o e s not a c c e p t responsibility tor m a t t e r s c o n t a i n e d m R E P O R T E R • Letters must be s u b m i t t e d to
the R E P O R T E R office by 4 p m Monday Letters must be typed and double s p a c e d Please limit letters to 250 w o r d s R E P O R T E R reserves the right to edit tor iibei a n d cianty N o letters wiii be
printed unless Signed a n d a c c o m p a n i e d by a p h o n e number R E P O R T E R will w i t h h o l d n a m e s upon request An letters r e c e i v e d are the property of R E P O R T E R Magazine • R E P O R T E R lakes
pnde in Its m e m b e r s h i p in the A s s o c i a t e d Collegiate Press a n d the A m e r i c a n Civil Liberties U n o n • 11964 R E P O R T E R M A G A Z I N E . All rights reserved N o portion of this m a g a z i n e may be
reproduced without prior w r i t t e n permission f r o m R E P O R T E R .
COMMENT
REPORTER
Magazine
Editor in Chief
Jeremy Schuster
Managing Editor
Executive
Douglas Miller
Editors
Eric Postpischil
Scott Stockham
News E d i t o r s
Laurie DiNatale
Kevin Minnick
News Writers
Judith Ramos
Sidney Hawkes
Tony DeMaria
Arlen Miller
Julie Montinieri
Lori Polzello
Raymond Jacques
Trade Johnson
Jane Klein
Entertainment Editors
David Hurwitz
Bill Amstutz
Entertainment Writers
Steve Cohen
Michael Dygert
John Kovaleski
Sports W r i t e r s
John Harrington
Catherine Fick
Photo E d i t o r
Cyrus McCrimmon
Chief P h o t o g r a p h e r
Robert F. Bukaty
Photographers
David Sanders
Jonathan Nourok
Steve Hockstein
Production Managers
Darlene Parker
John Weingardt
Production Staff
Pam Knapp
Carrie Southworth
Meryl Randman
Andrea Geer
Jeanie Swanson
Kathy Schaufler
Advertising Manager _
Sales Representatives^
Renee Bures
Michael Skurski
Stephen Luke
Business M a n a g e r
Bob Barker
Bindery S t a f f
Myron Peniak
Oleh Mudry
Cartoonist
Bill Dawson
Calendar C o o r d i n a t o r ^
Terrence James
Consultants
Dan Falby
D. Mark Kingsley
Advisor
Thomas J . O'Brien
4
The Treadmill
I bet this kind of feeling comes over a lot of
seniors at the end of their college careers. I
am afraid of success at all different levels.
Yes, that's right, I do not know if I want to
make it in the real world.
Since childhood, I have been blitzed by
the success message. Advertisements tell
me that i f successful in a materialistic
sense, I can have sex with anv woman I
want. Success breeds success (pardon the
pun). We want our partners to he sue
cessful. We want our children to have what
we did not. Success is a treadmill that I do
not want to run.
Success has as manv interpretations as
people. Mine is to make a "contribution"
and have a family. Others' may he to have a
a'sponsihle position in a high visibility
agency in New York, or to live the
American Dream (house in the suburbs and
2.-5 kids). Whatever it is, success can make
you miss the trees for the forest. We strive
for success so hard that we fail to recognize
it when it happens.
Or another danger could come about:
dis.satisfaction. The reason that people
strive to win the game is because thev are
not satisfied with what thev have. I f you get
that promotion, life will he so much better.
(Xher women become more attractive than
your wife of ten years. Your child could
have better friends. Your eves plav tricks
on vou. The grass on the other side turns
greener. I want to move to California. A
friend in C^alifomia wants to move to New
York.
T o set a goal is to ofx'n yourself up to
destruction. To achieve that goal is to he
destroyed. The onlv solution then is to set
another goal and shift the treadmill into a
higher gear, (ioal setting just adds in
crements to success.
What makes me afraid is that once I
succeed, I will not he able to stop. .Success
will become the onlv meaning of mv life.
Like a drug addict, tolerance sets in. I need
more.
.\ f riend tells me of an acquaintance that
went to Europe with only a hundred dollars
in his pocket. That was his step into sue
cess. He travels constantly and with no
direction, picking up jobs to keep him go
ing. When mv friend had a chance to ask
him what he did for several vears. he did
not know. The success of travel dazed him.
Be careful what vou wish for, vou might get
it.
Success is empty meaning. The onlv
nx'aning of life is to live. Life is life. The
|)lienomena of existence blows mv mind.
Why am I so concerned w ith getting a good
job with benefits when a tuna fi.sh sandwich
tastes so great? There is nothing better than
doing menial labor. My body moves and I
can taste the sweat on my face.
Take a day and ex|)erience your environment. Chew your food slowly enough
to really taste it. Try to feel it going down.
VNTiat do your clothes feel like right now?
What muscles are vou keeping tense? Can
vou hear vour heartfx'at? Where does it
hurt?
Yes, it is a game. But, one that can he
expanded. Who are you sitting with? What
Is the state of your relationship with them?
Who have you insulted today? The experience of experience leads to apprecia
tion.
Mother was almost right. Do not just
stop and smell the roses
take time to
look, eat, hear and rub them all over vour
IXKIV. Why Ixither to worry about vour
stereo when there is life to he lived. What is
the ultimate success? Being alive. Con
gratulations, vou made it.
— D.
MARK
KINGSLEY
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HOURS: 10-6, Mon- Sat.
March 30,
1984
Biocun
^ w t t h herbal extrocts
BLACK AWARENESS WEEK
Power and Politics 1984
•
Sunday, April 1st
C o l l e g e - A l u m n i U n i o n F i r e s i d e L o u n g e (4 t o 7 p m )
Opening Reception
RIT G o s p e l E n s e m b l e
M o d e m Dance
Speaker—Dr. David A n d e r s o n
The mild acting perm
Experience the Bio Wave
A n Unique C o m M n a l l o n
ol Panning Ingrediantt
• with soothing herbs
• and lucious scents
Monday, April 2nd
HAIR
CARE
CENTER
RIT M a i n G y m (7:30 t o 10 p.m.)
B a s k e t b a l l G a m e — B A C C W a r r i o r s vs. W D K X
$1.50 RIT s t u d e n t s , $2.00 A l l o t h e r s
Tuesday, April 3rd
s t u d e n t Special
H a i r c u t $10.00
Perm Wave $35.00
RIT I n g l e A u d i t o r i u m (7 t o 9:30 p.m.)
S p e a k e r — I m a n B e n j a m i n K a r i m — E d i t o r of " E n d of t h e W h i t e W o r l d
S u p r e m a c y " a n d c l o s e a s s o c i a t e o f M a l c o l m X.
— p o e t r y recital a n d s o l o s
40 MULLER BLVD.
Off Jefferson Rd , Behind Wendy's
Call 424 2670
Wednesday, April 4th
Or just come in.
RIT I n g l e A u d i t o r i u m (7 t o 8 p.m.)
YMCA Youth Group—Black History Skits
HOURS
TUES THURS 10 7pm
Wed & Fri 10-5pm
Saturday 9-5pm
Thursday, April 5th
RIT A l u m n i R o o m (11 t o 2:30 p.m.)
Soul F o o d Taste
C U C a f e (7 t o 8:30 p.m.)
Political N i g h t — P a n e l D i s c u s i o n
— A s s e m b l y m e n Alvin W a l d e n a n d David Gantt
Friday, April 6th
RIT R i t z s k e l l e r (9 t o 1 a.m.)
T a l e n t S h o w — $ 1 RIT s t u d e n t s , $1.50 A l l o t h e r s
Saturday, April 7th
C o l l e g e - A l u m n i U n i o n C a f e (8 t o 2 a m . )
Miniature Concert
Pop
City
Fashion
Rockers
(8 t o 9 p.m.)
Show
Live f r o m B u f f a l o The
Hanniables
DJ M a g i c M i k e
A L L F O R O N L Y — $ 5 s t u d e n t s , $7 all o t h e r s
Sunday, April 8th
RIT Olark D i n i n g R o o m
C l o s i n g R e c e p t i o n — C a s h Bar a n d D i n n e r
RSVP by 4/2—Wanda Bruce x4691 • Sharon Smith x4681 • Jackie Brown x4689
$7 S t u d e n t s , $ 1 0 all o t h e r s / F a c u l t y
Co-Sponsored by:
CAB, Comp Ed. HEOP, Student Directorate, Special Services,
Minority Affairs, College of Liberal Arts, Creative Arts,
fTTID Speakers Series
Donations will be accepted throughout the week for t h e Fredrick Douglas
Scholarship Fund.
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REPORTAGE
Banquet Planned
The R I T International Student Associa
tion ( R I T I S A ) and the Spring Arts Festival
Company are planning the 1984 Interna
tional Banquet for Saturday, April 14. This
year's banquet promises to be more of a
success than those past, with fine interna
tional cuisine and entertainment planned.
Three hundred and fifty tickets will be
made available to the R I T community and
all are expected to sell quickly. Student
tickets are priced at 6.50 dollars and the
community price is 13 dollars, which in
dudes dinner and entertainment. Tickets
are available at the R I T Candy Counter or
through R I T I S A .
Last year, along with foreign foods,
three dance groups led the entertainment.
Black Awareness Time
Black Awareness Week will be held April
1-8. This event has been celebrated at R I T
since 1969 and, according to Black
Awareness C o o r d i n a t i n g Committee
(BACC) president Wanda Bruce, is intended to "educate people in the sense o f
black people's attitudes, tastes and such."
Many events are .scheduled throughout
the week, including an opening reception
on Sunday with speaker Dr. David Ander
son, a basketball game Monday evening
and black history skits Wednesday night.
There will be a chance to taste soul food on
Thursday from 11 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. in
the R I T Alumni Room.
The theme of the week, stated Bruce, is
the politics surrounding Presidential candidate, Jesse Jackson. On Thursday night,
assemblymen Alvin Walden and David
Gantt will discuss Jackson's political posi
tions and the local considerations voters
need to remember. Tuesday evening, Iman
Benjamin Karim, editor of End of the
White
World
Supremecy
and close
as.sociate of Malcolm X , will address the
worldwide political aspects of Jackson.
BACC's annual talent show will take
place Friday evening. " A l l acts will be con
sidered and everyone is welcome to com
pete for the trophy," said Bruce. Saturday
night will be the annual fashion show with
a different twist this year. There will be a
miniature concert with The Hanniables, a
Buffalo band, and from 8 to 9 p.m., the
Pop City Rockers will perform a routine
with break dancing and electric boogie. DJ
Magic Mike will also be there.
New to Black Awareness Week this
year will be a banquet and awards
ceremony on Sunday, April 8. Donations
will be accepted all week for the Frederick
Douglass Scholarship Fund.
•
6
This year the event will begin with a cash
bar at 6:00 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge.
From there, the group will move to Ingle
Auditorium for a short multi media show,
sponsored by the Department of Creative
Arts. Later, dinner will be served in the
College Alumni Union cafeteria, featuring
food from countries around the world, induding France, China, Russia, America,
India and Mexico. Following dinner will be
an awards ceremony to honor an outstand
ing student and an outstanding faculty
member who have helped promote interna
tional activities on campus. There will then
be two groups performing Ukranian and
Greek music and dance. Later, there will be
a live DJ playing a wide array of dancing
music.
create a cultural mixture between the
American and international members of the
community. Vivek Rao, president o f
R I T I S A , feels there is a lack of interest in
any intercultural activities here at R I T . He
hopes the banquet and the ensuing years
will improve the participation and interest
in the international activities of the community. Next year, more foreign students
are expected to be attending R I T and Rao
hof)es the increased international student
body will strengthen and encourage more
cultural events on campus. Along with the
Chinese New Year celebration and the
UN'ICEF holiday card sales, R I T I S A
hopes to make the banquet an additional
annual event.
O
R I T I S A , a Class I Club, is hoping to
Fire At Sigma Pi
A minor fire occurred at Sigma Pi fraternity approximately 1 a.m. on March 30.
According to Mark Cavanaugh, Campus
Safety fire safety sf>ecialist, it lasted approximately 30 seconds. Cavanaugh said their
(Campus Safety's) investigation found that
some brothers of the fraternity were being
rowdy in the hall and created a large pile of
toilet paper. Another brother, annoyed by
the noise, came out of his room and threw a
lighted match onto the pile, igniting it. The
brothers in the hall quickly extinguished
the blaze with blankets, said Cavanaugh.
The Henrietta Fire Department was called
in to check on sparks. Cavanaugh said the
student responsible for the fire (X)ssihlv
An electrical
apartments.
faces either a one year suspension or a two
quarter suspiension with coun.seling. I f
taken off campus, he could have been
charged with reckless endangerment, a
class A misdemeanor, which could result in
up to a year in prison.
A false alarm occurred in the Nathaniel
Rochester/Fish residence halls on Saturday
at 1:10 a.m. Cavanaugh explained that the
cause of the alarm was a student playing
with a hockey stick in his room who acddentallv hit the heat sensor on the ceiling.
He emphasized that the heat sensors in the
students' rooms are very sensitive and
should he treated delicately. Cavanaugh
added that Campus Safety can trace the
alarm to the room from which it was triggered with little difficulty.
U
problem was the cause of a small fire at the laundromat in Riverknoll
Here a fireman removes the base of a trash can which had caught fire.
March 30, 1984
OCSA Board Elected
Lift America Succeeds
Doug Cochrane was re-elected president of
the Off Campus Student Association (OCSA) on March 23, 1984, for the 1984 85
academic school year. Michael Krivaneck
was elected vice president, and Cecil
Johnson was elected director of student
issues. Appointments for directors' positions in finance, public relations and student services are piending, according to
Cochrane.
Regarding the primary objectives for
OCSA in 1984 85, Cochrane responded,
"We
are aiming for a good crossrepresentation of off campus students, including minority groups ( N T I D and Black
Awareness Coordinating Committee), off
campus groups (commuters, area apart
ment dwellers and R I T owned apartments)
and older students . . . . They are often
underrated and not well recognized when
RIT administration makes plans (lighting
on campus, hut not at R I T owned apart
ments). The priority seems to he directed
towards the on campus students. It is a
struggle to get the administration to
become aware of the needs of the off cam
pus student population . . . . It does not
mean they do not respiond . . . . We need to
make our needs known and felt."
The Lift America benefit, which was held
on March 25, raised a total of 982.85
dollars. This money will he donated to the
Special Olympics to expand the training
program for special athletes. Participants in
the event solicited pledges based on their
strength or the maximum number of repeti
tions.
.An audience of handicapped children
Concerning OCSA's external goals,
Cxichrane said, "We want to better our
public relations to gather and disseminate
information."
C
New SD Board Elected
Names of the new Student Directorate (SD)
hoard members were announced at the
regularly scheduler! March 27 meeting.
Ejected were: Cheryl Medford, director of
Activities; Rusty N'aughn, representative
at large; and Christopher F'olta, director of
Student Services. The appointment of
Director of Finance will he made next
week.
"The
Dance Marathon collected
2224.84 dollars," said Jill Frushour, chair
woman of SD, speaking for the absent Rose
Bizova, director of Student Services.
Frushour commented, " I would like to
thank the Amateur Radio C\uh, .American
Marketing .Association (AMA), Hotel Sales
and Marketing Association, Greek Council
and W I T R for making it a big success."
Top prize was a trip to Florida won by
Marie Anders and Tonv Johnson.
Kathy (ireene, president of N T I D Student Congress, announced that Peter Fere,
dean of N T I D has resigned, so that he mayspend more time with his family.
SD hoard members voted to provide
AMA with money to cover partial cost of
their trip to the Eastern Regional Con-
from the Mary Cariola C^hildren's Center
watched the compietition at R I T and
dieered on the lifters. There were two
plaques presented after the fundraiser, one
to Jim DeCaro and the other to Laura
FVeeman, who had received the largest
amount of pledge donations. The R I T
Strength and Fitness Club, who sponsored
the event, was very pleased with the
positive turnout and participation.
•
o
Construction
continues
with the bookstore
was abuzz with activity.
ference in Boston, .March 8-11. The conference consisted of Boston area businesses
discussing various aspects of marketing ser
vices. John Pomerov, vice president of
.AMA said, " W e had the most representa
tion there and won an award for the most
students from one school covering the most
distance."
Parvesh Singh, director of Financial Aid
and James Miller, associate vice president
for Institutional Advancement, held a
presentation on the tuition increase for
academic year 1984 85 and new financial
aid programs at the regularly scheduled
March 20 SD meeting. " O u r goal is to in
.sure we offer high quality education at a
good price. We compete with private in
stitutions such as Cornell and Syracuse, "
responded Miller concerning a major
reason for increased tuition. .Miller said,
"Thirty percent of the cost of education at
R I T is subsidized hv financial aid pro
grams. Our concern is multifaceted. We
have students here from all income levels."
According to Miller, 59 percent of students
apply for financial aid. Incomes range from
zero to above 45,000 dollars per year.
RIT's distribution of aid is primarily based
on need. "The lower income receives more
as the whole College-Alumni
Union area
aid from state and federal programs," said
Miller.
On increasing financial aid for next
year. Miller responded, increa.sing the tui
tion with an increase in financial aid, " w i l l
put returning students in a better position
than i f tuition increased 1.5 percent less
without an increase in financial aid. We
will he able to assist more students than last
year. Grants could range from 300 to 4,000
dollars," said Miller. He commented,
"Sixty-seven percent of R I T aid will go to
returning students, rather than attracting
new students with financial aid packages."
There will be a new tuition payment
program, according to Miller, spreading
payments over a 12 month period without
interest, instead of three large payments.
Miller said, "There will he an R I T Supplemental Loan Plan. Students can borrow
up to 5,000 dollars for four vears at a rate
of 12.75 percent (depending on the market
conditions), i f they are not eligible for any
other aid." Eligibility for this loan is in
dependent of parents' income. A l l students
may participate. "There will he no repayment during attendance until six months
after graduation or withdrawal from
school," said Miller.
D
7
REPRODEPTH
Sexual Awareness Emphasized
Accounting for tlie popularity of tlie topic
of liuman sexuality is not too difficult
esf)eciallv on a college campus, where, in
addition to attending lectures and lahs,
young men and women are forming their
sexual values. They are asking themselves
how they feel ahout "commitment." They
are wondering when it is appropriate for a
friendship to become a relationship. Young
men and women are concerned ah)out risk
ing pregnancy. Together, tfiev are assum
ing responsibility for birth control. Tliese
familiar questions and concerns are what
make human sexuality such a vital topic on
university campuses across the country.
Students are becoming aware that .sexual
reIation.ships involve not onlv their physical
selves, hut their emotional and intellectual
selves, as well.
Human Sexuality Week was designed to
promote an awareness of sexual issues
among students at R I T . A l l week long, in
lectures and workshops, students have been
encouraged to listen, to learn, to inquire
and to participate in discussions on such
various topics as sexual decision making,
relationships in the 80's, fantasy and sexual
arousal and contraception. Professionals
from tlie R I T community, as well as
faculty members and students, have
a)operated to present many worthwhile
programs during the week.
The activities began with Dr. Ruth
Westheimer, a noted psycho sexual
tlierapist, who spoke and received students'
questions in a crowded Ingle Auditorium
on Monday evening. Candor and humor
diaracterized her manner as she explained
why she believes it is necessary to sp>eak
frankly ahout "love and relationships and
sex and intercourse and erection and
inasturhation and orgasm," that is, to promote sexual literacy. Westheimer believes
we must bury the myths ahout sex with
which most of us were raised. She relied on
tlie evidence of scientifically validated
research to support many of her points.
Westheimer said we carry the best
aphrodisiac around with us between our
ears—how convenient, and how much more
engaging sex is.
Other programs this week included
"Everything You Ever Wanted to KnowAbout Y D , " presented by the Elling
son/Peterson/Bell Student Government.
" T o Be or Not T o Be . . . Pregnant," a
discussion of the birth control pill, was led
by Susan E. Smith, N T I D / R I T student;
Patti Logo, N T I D faculty member and
Julie Shattuck, R I T Student Health Ser
vice. The fxipular movie, .Making Love,
which probed homosexual as well as
lieterosexual relationships, was shown in
Kate Cleason lounge on Wednesday even
ing. O n Thursday afternoon, T o m
Holcomh from N T I D Student Life and
Doreen Simons from R I T Residence Life
led a discussion of deaf attitudes ahout sexuality. Tliat evening, a married couple and
.several student couples gathered to discuss
how their relationships had evolved from
friendship into intimacy, common reactions
of parents and roommates, and other situations familiar to couples on campus.
Events culminated in a multi media
human sexuality exhibit in the lobby o f
Grace Watson Dining Hall all day Saturday, March 24. A n informational and
tliought provoking exhibit covering a
variety of topics such as love, parenting,
contraception, dating, relationships and
sexual exploitation was presented. A con
eluding presentation on Sunday evening by
Dr. J i m Meyer from R I T Psychological
Services covered "Sexual Decision Making:
Wliat Kind of a Relationship Do 1 Want?"
Sharon Doescher, graduate assistant for
Residence Life Programming, extends
special thanks to the students who organ
ized, promoted and participated in Human
Sexuality Week. Memfciers ot tlie liuman
Sexuality Committee include Joy Covert
(Counseling Center), Julie Shattuck and
Charlvn Feeney (Health Center), Barb
Chandler ( N T I D Student Life) and Raj
Bachan (HEOP). Other spninsors who conunhuted to the success of Human Sexuality
Week are N T I D Student Life and
Psychological Services, R I T Student
Health Services, R I T Counseling Center,
Ri r Residence Life, R I T Area Programm
ing Assistants, College Activities Board,
Student Directorate, Residence H a l l
Association and Higher Educational Opportunities Program.—JULIE M O N T I N I E R I
Raman Lectures On Greek Science
As part of a continuing series of science lectures. Dr. Varadaraja Raman, professor of
physics in the College of Science, lectured
on ancient Greek science on Tuesday,
March 20, 1984, in the Max Lowenthal
Memorial Building. Raman's lecture refer
red to periods of Greek science spanning
several generations, each with an enormous
impact on their own times, and having a
great impact on modem day scientific
thought. He traced ancient Greek science
chronologically, emphasizing the pieople
and discoveries which occurred in each
period.
The Greek people were the first to think
of science in a rational and scientific wav
instead of spiritually and symbolically, as
was done by the Babylonians and Egyptians. They modified their perceptions of
the world in a unique way. Raman stated
the word "logos" which is present in manv
technical terms, was a major concept in
Greek thought. It signified the relationship
8
between thought, discourse and measure,
explained Raman.
In reviewing the events and the individuals contributing to the development
of ancient Greek science, Raman stated
that scientific thought arose in the region of
Meliansian philosophy in Isoniaw. Thales,
one of the first philosophers, believed all of
tlie physical universe came from water.
"Tliis was the first time the origin of the
physical world was thought of as
nonspiritual and naturalistic," said Raman.
He continued by saying, "The realities of
evervdav life must he always taken into
consideration."
Raman continued and di.scussed Anax
imander, who thought the world was
boundless, and touched upion the Chinese
amcept of Chi, or cosmic breath, where the
wtirld was determined to he based on air,
amcluded from simple expieriments done
by breathing, l l i e central concepts of the
origins of the universe at that time were
based on air, fire and water.
He
discussed
the later
Greek
pihilosophers, who described the universe in
terms of change as the basis for everything.
Pythagoras' contributions to math and
astronomy were mentioned, espieciallv his
view that the earth is spherical and that the
earth and sun revolved around fire, a
dieorv which stemmed from fire and sun
worship. Raman mentioned Xenophanes,
part of the lUiadic school of thinkers, who
viewed the universe as being based on
diange. Xenophanes believed things are
not many, they are one single entity. This
was a mi.sconception, according to Raman.
Raman described the though* process of
tlie time, which "consisted of a group of
tliinkcrs with one view, and another oppiosing group." He mentioned a third group of
tliinkers, which synthesizes the other two
and "is respxmsihle for the richness of
science." Raman said, "Freedom of
tliought compietition and rivalry causes exMarch 30, 1984
ploration for new ways of thinking." He
clarified this fxiint hy giving an example,
" A student working on a doctoral thesis is
trying to challenge something established
and find something new. This can occur
unconsciously or consciously," explained
Raman.
Raman lectured ahout Anaxagoras, who
believed the primary function of life is to
investigate the world. Further discussion in
volved scientists such as Euclid, Ap
pollonius, Kepler, Archimedes, Aristotle
and Plato, and their contributions to the
scientific world. Raman clarified three
main strands of ancient Greek scientific
thought: Pythagorian, Aristotelian, and
Mechanistic. Pythagorian consisted of
mystical, symbolic, aesthetic and emotional
reaction to science and
excluded
mechanical, rational methods of thinking.
Aristotelian organic tradition looks at the
world as a constantly changing organism
subject to corruption, decay and nonper
manence. This is a dynamic aspect,
according to Raman, non-static which is
strengthened hv the views of Ptolemv.
Dr. Varadara/a V.
physics,
lectured
Science.
Raman, professor
of
on Ancient
Greek
Lastly, the Mechanistic tradition, inspired
hy Democritus and Archimedes, explores
tlie function of things hy principles. He
amcluded his lecture hy .stating, "Tliese
different traditions and approaches have
counterparts in other cultures. When the
scientific revolution began, these traditions
influenced other traditions. This became
tlie fountainliead of modern .scientific
tliought."
Following the lecture, a discussion was
lield during which the organic tradition o f
tlie world was challenged, as well as the
uniqueness of the development of Greek
science as compared with other cultures,
such as Indian science. Raman said, " T l i e
many thinkers working at the same time in
different fields was the key to Greek scientific development." The quantitative aspect
of Greek science was questioned. Raman
said practically all of the ancient science
was non quantitative, and it was not until
the Renaissance period that quantitative
science really developed, although the
Greeks used geometrical proportion and
— LORI POLZELLO
the circle.
American Video Institute Moves To RIT
Tlie American Video Institute, a NewYork Gity based non-profit corporation,
has been dissolved, and tranferred its assets
to R I T to establish and operate the
American Video Institute Videodisc and
EJectronic Publishing Laboratory ( A V I
Laboratory).
The A V I Laboratory, part of the Gollege of Graphic Arts and Photography, vrill
he producing interactive videodi.scs and
other electronically published programs to
he used in government, industry and education. It will also research, develop,
distribute and promote hardware and soft
ware in connection with those programs.
John Giampa, founder of American
Video Institute, has been appointed direc
tor of A V I Laboratory. Giampa said R I T
was selected as the site for the A V I
Laboratory because of its reputation in
photography and its resources in the
technical aspects of disc production. "The
medium demands expertise, not onlv in the
art and science of the image," said Giampa,
"hut in the computer and engineering
systems as well. At R I T , 1 found both the
artistic and scientific components required
hy disc technology."
One v-ideodi.sc can contain 108,000
.stills, two hours of moving segments, 20
hours of audio or 10 billion hits of computer information.
R I T faculty and students collaborated
with the American Video Institute to produce a videodisc, called Landisc I I , for the
Gity of Rochester last year. The project involved photographing all 62,000 real estate
parcels in the city. The discs are now
available in six public libraries for tax
pavers to compare their assessments to
those of comparable homes. Viewers can
see pictures of all the homes on their street,
in their neighborhood or in other parts of
tlie city.
"Viewers don't have to sit through a
long line of prepared images and information," said Giampra, "hut can express their
needs directly to the information delivery
system and he .satisfied instantly, or rather,
at their own speed." The Landisc I I project
has resulted in .significant savings to the city
because of the reduction in the number of
litigations arising from assessment
disagreements. The National Association of
Realtors has requested a study of the design
for an image delivery system for real estate
brokers.
A V I Laboratory is now developing and
producing videodiscs that teach sign
language, computer programming and
printing technology. They are currently involved in creating a disc similar to Landisc
11, in which all the citizens of Rochester
will he photographed. The project will he
called "Portraits for Posterity."
— RAYMOND
JACQUES
Democratic Presidential Candidates And Their Views
With the New York State Democratic
primary coming up on April 3, students
might he curious ahout where the can
didates stand on such educational issues as
student aid and federal funding for educa
tional programs. Recently, The Chronicle
of Higher Education compiled summaries
of the candidates' positions based on infor
mation gathered hy the Action Gommittee
for Higher Education. Following are their
views on various issues pertaining to educa
tion that might he of particular interest to
students.
Senator Hart believes in a "strong, ade
quatelv funded system of education.
America cannot meet the technological,
economic and defense needs of the 1980's
and beyond unless we have a well-educated
population."
Hart has a piarticular interest in science,
math, technology and computer science; in
May 1983 he introduced the American
Defense Education Act in an effort to in
crease funding in these areas.
Hart's record shows that he has stood in
opfKisition to attempts hy the Reagan administration to cut federal education programs, including funds for school — lunch
and child nutrition programs. He has suggested that reducing tax deductions for
9
business lunches might provide additional
funding for school lunch programs.
Hart supports adequate funding for stu
dent aid and believes student loan programs should not he reduced.
Former Vice-President Mondale shares
Hart's view that education should he a
priority for Americans: "As President, I
will propose substantial additional funds to
strengthen education. With both our
economy and security at stake, this is the
worst possible time to slash education."
Mondale has proposed a national
"Fund for Excellence" which would provide communities with resources to
stimulate strides toward excellence. In ad
dition, Mondale would establish an
"Education Corps" to make teaching a
more attractive career option for outstand
ing students. Mondale would further
establish scholarships in math, sciences and
languages as well as forgive the loans of
students who go on to teach in these areas
for four years after graduation.
Under Mondale's administration, " A d
vanced Study Awards" would provide
financial support for minorities and women
pursuing graduate studies. Talented low
income students would receive aid from the
expansion of Talent Search and Upward
Bound programs. Funding would he
restored for handicapped children and their
teachers.
Mondale would like to make a five year
public investment, matched with private
and public donations, to modernize univer
sity research laboratories and libraries.
Mondale further supports financial sup
port for students. He would expand the
Guaranteed Student Loan Program as well
as campus-based aid programs such as
work-study. Low and moderate- income
students would he assisted hy an increase in
the Pell Grant.
Reverend Jesse Jackson asserts that
"No domestic issue would receive higher
priority in a Jackson campaign than education. We must see education not as a mere
social problem hut as our first line of
defense and our last hopie for the future."
Jackson believes that government and
private funds should he fxjoled "to
preserve and defend black institutions of
higher learning. " He opposes aid to
schools that discriminate on the basis of sex
or race.
The Department of Eiducation would
receive full funding under Jackson. He supports merit pay for teachers, along with
regular evalutions.
Since these issues directly affect us we
should cast a critical eye on the views of
those who seek the Democratic nomination.
10
— JULIE MONTINIERI
T h i s D e s k C a nR e a c h M a c h 2.
making authority.
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as you gain experience.
of supersonic jet aircraft and advanced electronic equipment. No company can give you this kind of
leadership responsibility this fast. And
But you can handle it. Because Navy
flight training gives you the navigation, nothing beats the sheer excitement of
Navy flying.
aerodynamics and other technical
know-how you need.
The salary is exciting, too. Right
away, you'll earn ahout $18,300 a year.
In return. Navy aviation demands
That's better than the average corporasomething of you as an officer:
tion will pay you just out of college.
Leadership.
And with regular Navy promotions and
Your path to leadership starts with
other pay increases, your annual
officer training that's among the most
demanding in the military. It's intensive salary will soar to $31,100 after four
years. That's on top of a full package
leadership and professional schooling
of benefits and privileges.
combined with rigorous Navy flight
training. And it's all geared to prepare
Before you settle down to an earthbound desk job, reach
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AIR F O R C E E N G I N E E R I N G
B Y D. MARK K I N G S L E Y
Her point is that sex, no
matter what variety, is
normal and should he
shared in a loving manner.
HUMAN SEXUALITY
D r .
R u t h
S e x u a l i t y
W e s t h e i m e r
H u m a n
W e e k
i i ^ ince the topic is sex,
Oeverybody comes," said Dr.
William Castle, vice-president of
Government AfTairs and director
of N T I D , while introducing Dr.
Ruth Westheimer. Dr. Ruth, the
sliort ladv with the scoop on sex,
was at R I T to open Human Sexuality Week.
Castle's informality (in public,
even) is not that out of place. Sex
is not a deep dark secret that we
all have, hut a normal
physiological response. And what
Dr. Ruth wants to do is to get
people to talk ahout it in an open,
honest manner. Our society, and
its Victorian heritage, tries to
repress sexuality. Parents are hap
12
O p e n s
py when their child has its first
bowel movement, hut neglect the
sexual organs. They tell little
Johnny not to play with his p>enis,
diat what he is doing is "had."
Dr. Ruth feels that this attitude
is the basis for our sociological
repression of masturbation. While
not everyone masturbates, it still is
a normal physiological reaction
and does not lead to blindness,
tuberculosis, retardation or excessive hair growth.
Her point is that sex. no matter
what variety, is normal and should
he shared in a loving manner,
lliere are other aspects to relation
sliips. Love, intellectual and emotional stimulation, and raising of
children are all the stuff that sex is
part of. Sex is sharing and consideration, qualities tliat demand
tliought on contraception and
respect of religious and ethical
beliefs. " I train the best lovers in
die tri-state area," she says.
Everytime a male asks a question
ahout contraception, she congratulates him: " I know that you
are going to make a good lover."
For Dr. Ruth, concern ahout your
partner is an honorable thing.
If people are able to talk ahout
sex, and receive information on
.sexual topics, much heartbreak
could he prevented. A child's fear
of asking his or her parents ahout
contraception contributes to the
March 30. 1984
1.5 million unwanted pregnancies
in this country. Standing up during intercourse, the witlidrawl
method and douching with Coke
afterwards are non-methods that
are propagated hy ignorance.
Dr. Ruth's concern for the individual has its controversial and
political sides. She is pro-ahortion.
Legalization protects the poor
from shady coat hanger butchers
who do their deeds cheaply and
carelessly. She is against squeal
law legislation that would require
organizations like Planned Paren
tliood to inform parents of their
daughter's visit. This would deter
some women from going for help.
She is against the pill. Altering a
woman's chemistry is a potentially
dangerous tiling. The same goes
for vaginal suppositories, which
are not effective enough and can
hum tlie penis, and tlie sponge,
which she fears could have some
connection with toxic shock syndrome. Dr. Rutli prefers the use of
the diapliram and condom. If an
abortion is needed, a woman
sliould have it as soon as possible
and witii the guidance of a good
counselor.
But with ease of accessibility to
sexual information, Dr. Ruth cau
tions ahout some of the hooks and
research on the Graffenhurg Spot
(G-Spot) and the "30 Second
Orgasm." The doctors who wrote
ahout the G-Spot used only 27
women in their survey, as opposed
to Masters and Johnson who
studied hundreds of subjects and
made what Dr. Ruth feels is a
conclusive report on human sexuality. She wants to see scientific
data on tlie level of Masters and
Johnson before she will include
the G-Spot into her professional
practice. No two women are alike
and searching for something that
is not diere can promote feelings
of abnormality or inadequateness.
Dr. Ruth is also skeptical
ahout the man who says that he
can perform an operation on the
clitoris and give women 30 minute
orgasms. She is very cautious
about new developments without
extensive research.
The female orgasm has become
a red flag in the politics between
tlie sexes. Masters and Johnson's
work in tiie sixties showed that 30
percent of the female population
had an orgasm during intercourse,
30 percent before or after, 30 percent cannot, five percent are faking it and the remaining five percent cannot because they are
depressed, alcoholics, diabetics or
have some other medical problem.
Oral sex should
not be forced.
Communication is the first step
towards die female orgasm. There
are not too many mind readers in
tlie world; partners have to tell
each otlier what is pleasurable.
Any individual problems should
he directed towards professional
advice.
Dr. Ruth's key to good sex is
respect for and communication
with each other and equality bet
ween partners: " T h e best
aphrodisiac is between the ears."
People should stick to their
ediical and religious decisions. A
decision to remain a virgin should
he followed. Oral sex should not
he forced. " I f you hate it, don't
do it." Dr. Ruth is a self-confessed
square. She promotes romance and
detests ignorance. People's lives
have been affected hy one insignifi
cant incident which was thought
to he a sign of abnormality. A
homosexual thought does not in-
dicate a homosexual lifestyle. People do not have to he afraid of
tliemselves and their bodies.
Television has also contributed
to the sexual illiteracy in our
society. Dr. Ruth points to the
myths tliat men have to "work"
to he pleasured and only beautiful
people have good sex. "Sexuality
is the realm of everyone," she
says. The elderly and handicapped
have good sex. It is okay to get
homy.
Dr. Ruth has been spreading
her philosophy and becoming a
media star at the same lime.
Along with her teaching, consulting and private practice. Dr.
Ruth hosts a radio call in show
which is heard in New York and
Los Angeles. Her show.
Sexually
Speaking,
was a ground breaker in
radio psychology and set the format for numerous copies. No
stranger to television. Dr. Ruth
hosted her own program for a
while and has appeared on
Johnny, Merv and David Letterman (which she will he on again
on May 2). Her hook. Dr.
Ruth's
is being
translated into four languages and
contains most of the material that
her lecture on campus u.sed.
In her travels throughout the
western world, Dr. Ruth has
found that people have the same
questions and are anxious ahout
the same things. She is ahout to
embark on a trip to a symposium
that will bring together sex
tlierapists, educators and researchers from the West and East.
Wdiile there probably will he an
examination of superficial cultural
differences in sexuality, 1 feel that
die basics will he the same. We
are pretty much the same, with the
same basic aspirations and ques
tions. Since the topic is sex,
everybody comes. D
Guide
to
Good
Sex,
13
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ZODIAC
Brain D a m a g e
(RNR) The brightening economy may be
sending lots of workers back to their jobs,
but will they be as efficient as when they
were laid off? A British study indicates pro
longed unemployment may permanently
impair mental ability. In a poll of jobless
workers, one in four reported they'd
become less able to handle tasks requiring
concentration, quick thinking and decisionmaking. The problems were most severe
among older workers who were more likely
to have family responsibilities. And the
longer the unemployment lasted, the
greater the damage.
Cheap W o m e n
(RNR) Uncle Sam is looking for. . a few
cheap women. Congressman Les Aspin
wants the military to step up its recruiting
of women because they don't cost as much.
It's not that Aspin wants to pay the woman
warriors any less than their male counter
parts: he just believes it would he harder to
enlist more men without raising the payscale for all Gl's.
Food Junkies
(RNR) .Alcoholism and drug addiction are
serious problems, hut doctors are saying
the most commonly abused substance
today may he. . . food. According to
psychologist Gloria Arenson, compulsive
eaters are like other addicts: they're looking
for a tempKjrary feeling of tranquility and
an escapie from reality. How can you tell i f
you're a victim? I f you eat when you're not
hungry, don't enjoy what you eat, or feel
guilty before, during or after eating.
Arenson compared food addiction to an
allergic reaction to life's problems. In other
words, you won't he able to stop overeating
until you find out what's eating you.
B e w a r e Of M a i l m e n
(RNR) New York City's health department
says your chances of being bitten hy a dog
tliere are dropping, hut your chances o f
being bitten hy a fellow human are going
up. Almost 1600 New Yorkers were bitten
hy pieople last year, a slight increase over
the previous year. Dog bites, on the other
hand, are down hy two-thirds from 10 years
ago.
G l o w In T h e Dark
(R.NR) Couples who sleep together should
live longer, a British study says, because
tJiey get more. . . radiation. Researchers say
regular doses of low-level radiation can
pH-olong life. And, because of the small
amounts of radioactive potassium in our
bodies, spending the night with someone
else is the best way to get that radiation. In
fact, sharing a bed may even reduce the risk
of cancer. One thing to note, however, the
study was prepared hy a company that
designs and builds nuclear power stations.
Dimples Exposed
(RNR) A distinctive derriere is protected hy
a fundamental right to privacy. That's
what a New York court ruled in upholding
a woman's lawsuit against three magazines
that printed a picture of her naked backside
in an ad for anti-cellulite pills. Susan
Cohen says the pirture may not have shown
her face, but her husband was able to
distinguish her dimples. Tlie judge agreed,
ruling that her posterior is covered by the
same law that protects Groucho Marx's
moustache or Bob Hopie's nose.
Psychotic State
(RNR) College kids are flipping out in
record numbers, and they're notgettin' the
help thev need. So says psychiatrist Samuel
Klagshrun, who claims today's undergrads
are cracking under the pressures of sex,
career, and worries ahout nuclear war. And
they're expected to solve these problems
without that traditional base of support, the
family. That leaves only the college, hut
Klagshrun says most campuses offer no
help. The reason: administrators often
refuse to intervene even in obvious cases of
mental illness because they're afraid of
lawsuits. It's a fear that Klagshrun calls excessive. Says he: "They've gone a little
crazy on that themselves."
Think Young
(RNR) I f you can think and grow rich whv
not meditate and grow young? T w o Iowa
doctors believe transcendental meditation
(TM) can actually reverse the aging process. Doctors K i m Smith and James Brooks
say 700 studies of T M have shown
meditators can improve vision, hearing,
reflexes and blood pressure. Subjects who
meditate for five vears, thev sav, are ahout
five years younger hiologicallv than can he
expected. The American medical Associa
tion is not convinced. While it does not object to the using T M for treating something
like hypertension, spokesman James Stacey
says, " I f you've got really had symptoms,
thev won't go away by meditating."
J e s s e Is C o o k i n g
(RNR) Hart may have the new ideas, Mondale the endorsements, but the real ques-
tion is. . .can they cook? The Business
Women's Political Action Gommittee has
invited each of the candidates, including
President Reagan, to prepare his favorite
dessert for an April fourth fundraiser in
Washington, DG. Susan Davis, chairwoman of the group, says, "We thought we
sliould turn the tables on them." She says
Jesse Jackson has already confirmed he'll
he there. Davis expects the rest will show
up, too.
Nature Outlawed
(R.NR) The wood huming stove—once ihe
darling of environmentalists—is now the
biggest source of air pollution in several
northern states. And some communities are
beginning to take action. Missoula, Montana, orders residents to douse their fires
when pollution levels reach the danger
point. And in the resort of Beaver Greek,
Golorado, where former President Ford has
a ski lodge, every fireplace is hooked to a
central computer. When the outside air gets
hazy, a red light goes on next to the hearth
and fires must be extinguished. I f they
<u-en't, a heat sensor in the chimney alerts
tlie computer, which dispatches a warden
to levy a 500-dollar fine.
IBM Is W a t c h i n g
(RNR)
A Buffalo
psychiatrist
has
developed a computer program he says can
actually control minds. Dr. Ronald Levy
says all his patients have to do is look at the
screen. Within minutes, he says, they are
hypnotized. Levy uses the computer program to implant subconscious messages.
He's written one program to motivate
students to stay in school and another to
help patients stay on a diet. Levy says hypnotism works like a charm and he's willing
to make the software available to the
medical community. He will not, however,
release it to the general public because, he
says, computers can have a deep and
powerful influence on our minds. As the
doctor puts it, "This is the machine George
Orwell spoke about in his book, '1984,'
only we're about half a year early.
Never A t RIT
(RNR) A lot of tension between the sexes
would he eliminated i f women would stop
confusing their erotic feelings with love.
Tliat's the word from psychologist Garol
Gassell, who says women who claim to
have been "swept away hy passion" are
really trying to excuse their physical
desires. "Sex is permissible only when
we're driven out of control," she says,
"because what we can't control, we can't
he blamed for."
15
DflNC E
DflNC E
DANC E
D
ancin g fo r Jerry' s kid s — a good wa y
to spen d hoi f a Saturday . It wa s
shorte r tha n othe r years . 12 hours , but
thi s wa y th e dancer s coul d go oil out oil
day . Sneak y Pet e wa s there . WIT R wa s
there . Studen t Directorat e wa s there .
Th e dancer s got fre e refreshment s an d
prize s wen t to th e best fun d raisers .
•
PHOTOQRRPHS BY JONRTMAN N O U R O K
(Right) Starting at
1:00 p.m., one of the
dancers proceeded
through the evening
until 11:00.
These dancers let
loose with a style of
their own as the
early evening wore
on.
16
March 30, 1984
17
Didn't you know that if you're a senior with the promise of a $10,000
career-oriented job, you could have the American Express" Card?
Where have you been?
Asleep?
Because for some time American Express has been saying that we believe
in your future. But even more than that. We believe in you now. A n d we've
been proving it. A $10,000 job. That's it. No strings. No gimmicks. A n d this
offer is even good for 12 months after you graduate.
But why do you need the American Express Card now? First of all, it's a
good way to begin to establish your credit history. A n d you know that's
important. Of course, the Card is also good for vacation travel, as well as
for shopping for things like a new stereo or furniture. And because the Card
is recognized and welcomed worldwide,
so are you.
So call 800-528-8000 for a Special
Student Application or look for one at
your college bookstore or on your
campus bulletin boards.
The American Express Card. Don't
leave school without it."
Look for an application on campus.
NTID Theatre at RIT
presents
HAIR
A m e r i c a s m o s t f a m o u s musical
DESIGNS
exclusively
at
STYLE^O^RAMA
OKLAHOMA
Music by Richard Rodgers
Book & Lyrics b y Oscar H a m m e r s t e i n
April 12-14, 1 9 8 4- 8:00 p . m .
April 15, 1 9 8 4 - 2:30 p . m .
Box Office O p e n
Weekdays 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Beginning April 2
NTID Theatre - 475-6254
All Tickets $2.00
• All NTID productions are performed
in both sign language and voice.
• Hair Design
• Highlighting
• Perming
FREE
CONSULTATION
ask about our
S T U D E N T
D I S C O U N T
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REPROVIEW
A Swashbuckling Space Spoof
Hie music emulates James Bond's
tliemes, the characters can be seen in
many other movies too numerous to
mention, the plot has been picked up
and dusted oft from the M G M shelves,
but regardless The Ice Pirates still
holds a little freshness.
The plot is a simple recipe. Take
one devil-may-care, rakish hero
(Robert L'rich), add a heroine brim
ming with beautv and bravado (Mary
Crosby), stir in as many robots, adventures and jokes as possible. Add a
galactic water shortage to complicate
tilings and a handful of adversaries
known as Templars. Let simmer for
two hours. The results will be The Ice
Pirates.
This film incorporates the elements
of many other fantasy and adventure
flicks. Reckless car chases, gallant
sword fights and the classic good-guysversus bad guys struggle are used to
supfKirt some of the films more unique
plot involvements. These include
"space herpes — the love bug" and the
fantastic time warp that our heroes
must experience in order to find the
"mythical" seventh planet, upon
which is enough water to fill their en-
tire dehydrated galaxy.
Many connoisseurs and critics will
be quick to note the lack of taste in
some of the dialogue. For example,
our hero, Jason (Urich), is taken
aboard a ship as captive of the evil
Templars. He is told by one of the
other slaves that all the captured men
are on their way to be castrated and
lobotomized. A l l , that is, except for a
dergvman sitting on the floor of the
cell. The following conversation ensues: Slave: "They don't castrate
clergy, just in case." Jason: "Just in
case, what?" Slave: "Just in case there
really is a God."
Nonetheless, those who are not so
discriminating will find humour in the
rapid-fire deliveries of lines such as
these.
The humour, however, is not entirely to be heard, but also to be seen.
Fighting robots that appear to be a
cross between C-3PO and ET battle in
tlie fashion of Kung Fu warriors.
Though thev are not as smart, they do
come equipped widi battle axes and
shields in place of human hands.
For those who prefer die artistry of
the cinema, one scene in particular
stands out above the rest. The pirates'
planet, upon which is located the
meeting ground of the galaxy's ruffians and no-goods, aptly named The
Pirate's Den, provides for some of the
most visually stimulating moments in
the film. The streets outside The
Pirate's Den are filled with neon im
agery and pieople that mix in with the
shadows, rather reminiscent of certain
scenes in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner
(1982). Shafts of light interrupt the
otherwise low-key background.
However, the patterns and forms
created hy the light do not detract
fixim the main action; thev seem to
enhance the helievahilitv of the
characters and the plotline.
The Ice Pirates is a fun movie filled
with enough quick humour to quickly
pass two hours. This film has its
childish moments, hut then again,
what is the pxiint of being grown up i f
you can not act childish?
The Ice Pirates is an MGM release,
rated PG. and is playing at I.oewes
Towne Theatre, opposite Southtown.
— SuzAN L A R O C C A
Hanging On For Dear Obsession
Tlie opiening sequence of Alfred
Hitchcock's Vertigo is a tour de force
of economical exposition. The film
begins with a closeup of a horizontal
metal bar bisecting the frame - the
background is out of focus. A hand
grasps the bar, and the camera pulls
hack to reveal a man hurriedly climbing a ladder. In a long shot we see him
being pursued across roof tops hy a
piolice officer and a man in a suit. The
piresumptive criminal leaps to an adjoining rooftop, closely followed hy
the policeman. Tlie other man in pur
suit also leaps, hut slips on the steep
tile roof and barely catches himself on
tlie roofs gutter. When the pioliceman
stops to help him, he slips and falls
several stories to his death. The ter
rifled man is left hanging as a crowd
gathers below and the film fades to
black.
We're never told how police detec
tive Scottie Ferguson, played hy James
Stewart, is saved, hut we do learn that
he is forced into premature retirement
because of the incident. The trauma of
20
the expierience has produced a severe
case of acrophobia that has rendered
liim incapable of continuing in his
demanding profession. Scottie is not
idle for long, however, for he soon
reluctantly agrees to help an old friend
whose wife's recent behavior has been
strange to say the least. It seems that
she is the wealthy decendent of a
notorious San Franciscan who went
mad and killed herself a century
earlier. Gavin Elster, the woman's
husband, believes her to he piossessed
hy the dead woman's spirit and is
understandably concerned for her
safety.
Scottie begins tailing Madeline, the
beautiful woman thought to he
possessed, and observes her visiting
her ancestor's former residence, grave
et cetera. On one occasion, her travels
take her to the park beside the Golden
Gate Bridge. Seemingly in a trance,
she plunges into the Bay, and is of
course saved hy the intrepid Scottie.
The plot thickens, and without
either Scottie or Madeline planning it.
they fall in love. Their brief, troubled
romance is cut short when Madeline
suddenly races to the top of a Spanish
Mission's tower and throws herself
from the belfry. Scottie vainly tries to
follow her flight, hut his vertigo stops
him midway up the steep flight of
stairs. Helplessly he watches in horror
as she falls to her death.
Racked hy feelings of guilt and inadequacy, Scottie plunges into a deep
depression
and is
subsequently
hospitalized. Upon his release, the
spectre of Madeline continues to haunt
him. Her beautiful visage appears to
him repeatedly, then vanishes like the
chimera that it reallv is, until one day
he discovers a woman hearing an eerie
resemblance to his lost love. Like a
man possed, Scottie pursues this
semblance of his beloved Madeline,
and in doing so stumbles upon a starding revelation that leads to still more
personal tradegy.
James Stewart gives a fine pierformance as the Hitclicockian hero of
necessity who finds the lure of the
March 30, 1984
beautiful, sensual and poignantly
vulnerable Madeline irresistible. As
she was possessed hy the spirit of her
long dead ancestor, so he too becomes
piossessed with totally making over
Judy — the common shopgirl who
bears an uncanny resemblance to the
sophisticated Madeline — in her mirror image.
Kim Novak, at the height of her
career and piopularitv when Vertigo
was first released in 1958, is compielling in the dual roles of blonde
Madeline and brunette Judy. Her
enigmatic appieal is that of, as Richard
Quine once observed, "the proverbial
quality of the lady in the parlor and
the whore in the bedroom." Stepping
into a role that Hitchcock had tailored
for the unavailable Vera Miles, Novak
makes the part her own with a pierfor
mance that displays great depth and
varied emotion.
Hitchcock, the supreme technician,
doesn't disappioint film huffs with Vertigo — his virtuosity and unparalleled
piyrotechnics are evident throughout.
His carefully compiosed visuals, including numerous shots of the
beautiful Northern Califomian land
scape, are ideally complemented hy
the fine musical score of the incompiarahlc Bernard Hermann. Vertigo
may he, however, a disappointment
for those aware of its reputation as
Hitchcock's finest film, a reputed
masterpiece that has been showing up
in recent years on the "ten best" list of
many critics. One suspiects that this
may he a delayed reaction to the condescension of many critics to his work
tlirough much of his career. Hitchcock
was routinely dismissed as a mere
technician, the self-promoting "Master
of Suspense" — a film genre that until
quite recently was not taken seriously
hy the majority of film critics. His
"discoverv" and re evaluation hv the
influential French critics in the Sixties
and the preeminence of the auteur
theory of filmmaking has rightfully ensured him a niche in the history of the
dnema.
While there is no denving the
brilliance of Hitchcock as a director,
tlie status of Vertigo as his finest filmi
is opien to debate. Although full of
brilliant flourishes and masterful
technique, the film fails to hold
together as a whole and hogs down inthe complexity of its plot. The
diaracteristic Hitclicockian humor is
in short supply and his preoccupation
with voyeurism, as manifested in the
sequences of Stewart tailing Novak,
slows the movie's pace to a crawl.
Still, i f not Hitchcock's supreme effort. Vertigo is undouhtahly one of his
best, and that can only mean excellent
entertainment and superior filmmaking.
I-'
i'/
— MICHAEL DYGERT
A Neophyte's Guide To Classical Music
Prelude in E flat to the Clavierubung
Ever been upstairs in the Record Archive? Ascend that intimidating set of
stairs and expand your musical
horizons. Enter the Classical Music
department.
A popular misconception is that
"Classical M u s i c " consists o f
everything after the violin was invented, but before Chuck Berrv
learned to duckwalk. You either like it
or you do not. This is not only false,
hut utterly ridiculous. Listen to ten
minutes of music on any radio station
today and trv to catagorize it all under
one heading. It is not easily done.
Classical music is even more diverse,
considering that it spans centuries of
musical output. Mozart and Wagner
have as little in common as do Air
Supply and Ultravox. Some .styles vou
will like, some you will not. So how
does a neophyte know what to buy? A
good way to start is to consider the
several basic forms of composition
which most music follows.
A Concerto features a solo instrumentalist with ^vmphonic accompaniment. Two fast tempoed sections
are interrupted hv a slower, more
lyrical passage, all showcasing the virtuosity of the soloist. Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) was a
master of this form. I f a particular in
strument of the orchestra holds ap
peal, try a concerto.
A Symphony is heavier musical
fare, with no featured pierformer, hut
three or four movements of varying
character. Symphonies hy Mozart and
Franz Joseph Havden (1732 1809) are
elegant and sophisticated examples of
a refined, sensitive stvle. Those of
Ludwig van Bethoven (1770 1827) are
much more emotional. Intense roman
ticism replaces the
restrained
dassicisim of the earlier composers.
Numbers Four, Five (remember " A
Fifth of Beethoven?") and Nine are ail
^ 4
recommended,
(iustav Mahler's
(1860-1911) symphonies are even
more dynamic and unrestrained.
Speakers worth more than 300 dollars
deserve at least one Mahler Svmpliony. Numbers One through Four
are all excellent choices. Another
powerful work is the Sevo World Sym-
by J. S
Bach.
phony
by
Antonin
Dvorak
(1841-1904). While visiting America
in 1892, Dvorak was impressed with
the vernacular music he heard, from
Negro Spirituals to the songs of
Stcphan Foster. He incorporated these
styles into this symphony, which set a
precedent hy drawing inspiration from
non-European sources.
Chamber Music is made up of
smaller musical ensembles. Orchestration is flexible, hut usually consists of
strings, a few woodwinds and a harp
sichord. Tlie finest examples are the
Brandenburg
Concerti hy Johann
Sebastian Bach (1685 1750). These six
sliort pieces (two discs) are as close to
perfection as has ever been attained in
any art form. Upon the first hearing, it
will become obvious why they have
been popular for over three hundred
years. Also recommended, Eine Kleine
Sachtmmik (A Little Nightmusic) by
Mozart.
Igor Stravinsky's Symphonic Poem
Le Sacre de Printemp (The Rites of
Spring) premiered as a ballet score in
Paris, 1911. The music was considered so revolutionary and radical
that a riot broke out in the concert
liall. Duels were fought the next day,
over whether this was truly music or
just incoherent cacaphony. (And you
thought Brian Fno was extreme . . . .)
Another riot almost occurred at the
1928 premier of Maurice Ravel's
dance score Bolero, hut for different
reasons. Bolero consists of a driving.
rhythmic heat supporting a sinuous,
repetitive melodic line which is cycled
through the various instruments in the
orchestra, each time growing louder
and more intense, until it finally
reaches a grand climax. Ravel's intent
was to musically re-create a sexual encounter. It worked, and the audience
went wild. The piece is seventeen
minutes long. Definitely a " 1 0 . "
Many recordings of all the
aforementioned works exist, and
prices will vary greatly between the
various releases. Higher priced issues
feature more prestigious conductors,
superior musicians and higher quality
pressings. You get what you pay for.
Get it, pay for it and enjoy it!
— EMILY THOMPSON
The Magic Talisman Of Great Directors
Talisman presents . . . the roots of
modem cinema. On Sunday nights
tliis quarter. Talisman is featuring a
tribute to the greatest film directors,
providing a chance for the serious
moviegoer to explore the background
of today's standardized film techniques. From its trivial silent beginning,
film has grown into the most influential of all media and art forms. No
other art form can affect a person's
emotions the way cinema can;
everyone has walked out of a theater
feeling different from when they
walked in: sad or happy and even
violent or tearful.
The person responsible for such a
drastic programming of emotions is
tlie director. The immensely powerful
film medium did not spring up over
night, and the techniques used to
manipulate human emotion are not
true to a photographic acetate, which
records numerous images in a single
second and gives the illusion of motion. Human senses are stimulated hy
tlie way a director wishes to structure
tliese numerous multi-image recordings. Making a film involves the use
of a filmatic language. The director is
die interpreter. In the truest sense, a
director is a storyteller. But more than
just telling a story, the director
transports the viewer into the storv. It
is the director who creates. It is the
director who manipulates. It is the
director who commands.
Undoubtedly the greatest and most
influential of all directors is Alfred
Hitchcock. In all of his 46 plus feature
films, Hitchcock triggers an emotion
in his audience. He terrified millions
22
in his famous productions of Psycho
(1960) and The Birds (1963), puzzled
and thrilled with his catastrophic production of The Man Who Knew Too
Much (1935) and amused with com
cdy dramas such as Rich And Strange
(1932). Unlike any director before,
Hitchcock was a master at stimulating
emotions through cinematic tech
niques, using unusual camera angles to
provoke feelings and motion witfi
similar music to enhance the impact.
His horror films, such as Psycho, are
terrifying hut are not gory. He leaves
much to the imagination of the audience. His ability to identify
characters to the audience is unparalleled. Not only does he tell a
story, but he plunges into a character's
mind like a novel. Hitchcock can be
called a cinematic genius without
hesitation. Without his influence,
films of today would never reach the
inside of an audience the way many
do.
Howard Hawks, a director who excelled in action pictures with adven
turous male protagonists, uses a sharp
and unobtrusive style that permits him
to portray highly stereotypical prin
dples in an intense, dramatic and pro
fcssional manner. His protagonists,
such as Hildy Johnson in His Girl Friday (1939), are pulled towards normal, stereotypical procedures, reveal
ing a basic human integrity. As Hitch
cock was devoted to emotions, stories
and characters, Howard Hawks concentrates more on only characters and
their human sensibilities.
Although the director of Shirley
Temple's cute-comedy Wee Willie
Winkie (1937), John Ford was more
typically a serious and dramatic director. His films depict stories of
betrayal, loyality, and patriotism. In
his production of The Man Who Shot
Liberty
Valance, starring James
Stewart and John Wayne, a case of
mistaken identity elects an undeserving lawyer to the Senate. Throughout
Ford's illustrious 48 year career, he
excelled in great westerns such as My
Darling
Clementine
(1946), Rio
Grande (1950) and Cheyenne Autumn
(1964).
A Frenchman, Francois Truffant's
directing style is somewhat of a contrast to that of American directors.
Unlike American filmmakers, he was
able to produce films with maximum
directorial freedom because he was not
concerned with commercial acceptability. His farce and melodramatic
production Shoot The Piano Player
(I960) is the story of a small-time
piano player who searches for
anonymity after a successful concert
career. Viewing Truffant's films are a
unique chance to expierience a totally
different style of filmmaking that
evolved in Furopie at a time when
aesthetics were more impiortant than
dollar signs.
This is only a partial listing of the
directors on display on Sunday nights.
For a complete listing and times, refer
to a Talisman pxister or each week's
WH.\TS
H.4PPEMNG.
Check
out
Talisman's great directors series at
two dollars for two movies. You cannot heat the price and you may be
educated while entertained.
— B I L L AMSTUTZ
M a r c h 30, 1984
phony
by A n t o n i n
Dvorak
(1841 1904). While visiting America
in 1892, Dvorak was impressed with
the vernacular music he heard, from
Negro Spirituals to the songs of
Stephan Foster. He incorporated these
styles into this symphony, which set a
precedent by drawing inspiration from
non-Eurojaean sources.
Chamber Music is made up of
smaller musical ensembles. Orchestra
tion is flexible, but usually consists of
strings, a few woodwinds and a harp
sichord. The finest examples are the
Brandenburg
Concerti by Johann
Sebastian Bach (1685 1750). These six
short pieces (two discs) are as close to
perfection as has ever been attained in
anv art form. Upon the first hearing, it
will become obvious why they have
been popular for over three hundred
years. Also recommended, Eine Kleine
Sachtmusik (A Little Nightmusic) by
Mozart.
Igor Stravinsky's Symphonic Poem
Le Sacre de Printemp (The Rites of
Spring) premiered as a ballet score in
ftiris,
1911. The music was considered so revolutionary and radical
that a riot broke out in the concert
hall. Duels were fought the next day,
over whether this was truly music or
just incoherent cacaphony. (And you
thought Brian Eno was extreme . . . .)
Another riot almost occurred at the
1928 premier of Maurice Ravel's
dance score Bolero, but for different
reasons. Bolero consists of a driving.
rhythmic beat supf>orting a sinuous,
repetitive melodic line which is cycled
through the various instruments in the
orchestra, each time growing louder
and more intense, until it finally
reaches a grand climax. Ravel's intent
was to musically re-create a sexual encounter. It worked, and the audience
went wild. The piece is seventeen
minutes long. Definitely a " 1 0 . "
Many recordings o f all the
aforementioned works exist, and
prices will vary greatly between the
various releases. Higher priced issues
feature more prestigious conductors,
superior musicians and higher quality
pressings. You get what you pay for.
Get it, pay for it and enjov it!
22
in his famous productions o f Psycho
(1960) and The Birds (1963), puzzled
and thrilled with his catastrophic production o f The Man Who Knew Too
Much (1935) and amused with comedy dramas such as Rich And Strange
(1932). Unlike any director before,
Hitchcock was a master at stimulating
emotions through cinematic tech
niques, using unusual camera angles to
provoke feelings and motion witfi
similar music to enhance the impact.
His horror films, such as Psycho, are
terrifying but are not gory. He leaves
much to the imagination o f the audience. H i s ability to identify
characters to the audience is unfiaralleled. Not only does he tell a
story, but he plunges into a character's
mind like a novel. Hitchcock can be
called a cinematic genius without
hesitation. Without his influence,
films of today would never reach the
inside of an audience the way many
do.
Howard Hawks, a director who excelled in action pictures with adven
turous male protagonists, uses a sharp
and unobtrusive style that permits him
to portray highly stereotypical prin
dples in an intense, dramatic and pro
fessional manner. His protagonists,
such as Hildy Johnson in His Girl Fri
day (1939), are pulled towards normal, stereotypical procedures, reveal
ing a basic human integritv. As Hitchcock was devoted to emotions, stories
and characters, Howard Hawks concentrates more on only characters and
their human sensibilities.
Although the director of Shirley
Temple's cute-comedy Wee Willie
T N C
Ir l C
O D C / ^
1^ I U
H ClJi
M
I PI IN
BAND ^'^"^^^^'^
I X
SPECIAL GUEST
MODERN
ENGLISH
— EMILY THOMPSON
The Magic Talisman Of Great Directors
Talisman presents . . . the roots o f
modem cinema. On Sunday nights
tJiis quarter. Talisman is featuring a
tribute to the greatest film directors,
providing a chance for the serious
moviegoer to explore the background
of todav's standardized film tech
niques. From its trivial silent beginning,
film has grown into the most influential of all media and art forms. No
other art-form can affect a person's
emotions the way cinema can;
everyone has walked out of a theater
feeling different from when they
walked in: sad or happy and even
violent or tearful.
The person responsible for such a
drastic programming of emotions is
the director. The immensely powerful
film medium did not spring up over
night, and the techniques used to
manipulate human emotion are not
true to a photographic acetate, which
records numerous images in a single
second and gives the illusion of motion. Human senses are stimulated by
tlie way a director wishes to structure
tliese numerous multi image recor
dings. Making a film involves the use
of a filmatic language. Tlie director is
tlie interpreter. In the truest sense, a
director is a storyteller. But more than
just telling a story, the director
transf>orts the viewer into the story. It
is the director who creates. It is the
director who manipulates. It is the
director who commands.
Undoubtedly the greatest and most
influential of all directors is Alfred
Hitchcock. In all of his 46 plus feature
films, Hitchcock triggers an emotion
in his audience. He terrified millions
GENESEO CONCERTS
PROUDLY PRESENTS
Winkie (1937), John Ford was more
typically a serious and dramatic director. His films depict stories o f
betrayal, loyality, and patriotism. In
his production of The Man Who Shot
Liberty
Valance, starring James
Stewart and John Wayne, a case of
mistaken identity elects an undeserving lawyer to the Senate. Throughout
Ford's illustrious 48 year career, he
excelled in great westerns such as My
Darling
Clementine
(1946), Rio
Grande (1950) and Cheyenne Autumn
(1964).
A Frenchman, Francois Truffant's
directing style is somewhat of a contrast to that of American directors.
Unlike American filmmakers, he was
able to produce films with maximum
directorial freedom because he was not
concerned witli commercial acceptability. His farce and melodramatic
production Shoot The Piano Player
(I960) is the story of a small-time
piano player who searches for
anonymity after a successful concert
career. Viewing Truffant's films are a
unique chance to experience a totally
different style of filmmaking that
evolved in Europe at a time when
aesthetics were more important than
dollar signs.
This is only a partial listing of the
directors on display on Sunday nights.
For a complete listing and times, refer
to a Talisman poster or each week's
WHATS
HAPPEMNC;.
Check
out
Talisman's great directors series at
two dollars for two movies. You cannot beat the price and you may be
educated while entertained.
— B I L L AMSTUTZ
March 30, 1984
Qeneseo C O
dent fees-
DANCE
BlackAmnca
WAVEKt?
CONSORC
MichAeL jAFFee.DiRecuoK
ic hilfitinL' siiiiyh iinl-pliuvrs
iival^^'Sidance
fesi
'Rrformiiuj on autdcntic ttproSuctions of
^naissaiui an!Tlaro^ue instruments
'T^rean/fvautifuOnnusicof tdi ijtd
tdrouJfd iStd Odiurics
^
M o n d « v . M « V t h 26. I 9 S 4 a l 8:00 p.m.
WadiMorlh Auditorium • S L N Y G e M M O
riiKi-T* $« tX) Students w ID & f t e
$ 9 00 F S A
$ 1 0 0 0 Public
Ticknt jvaMilr m th* Colrgi U n o n T i c k « t OflKr.
Colmr Uraon Room 32* « by Cdhng 245 M73
Sponorad by Umbpii Co,nt
Funda) by Mmduory Siudmi F m
uuiMTH m^it
i
nil «.f umi
^
It was party time at ttie
Brooklyn Academy ol
Nlusic. when ttie DANCE
BLACK AMERICA Festivars
Street and Social dance
program erupted on tlie
stage ol tlie Playhouse,
ywy^ GEHESEO
WADS WORTH AUDITORIUM
APRIL 7,198^ 8:00PM
T I C K E T INFORMATION C A L L
245-5873
MEMO
TO; COLLEQE STUDENTS
FROM: HIT OR MISS STORES
SUBJECT: DRESS FOR SUCCESS
SPRING SUIT AND DRESS OFFER
Is your graduation near? Are you on your way to career
interviews?
IF SO, NOW'S THE TIME TO DRESS FOR SUCCESS!
Hit or Miss,"America's finest off-price women's specialty
store is now offering college students an additional
20% OFF OUR ALREADY LOW PRICES ON
ANY SUIT OR DRESS! *
We want YOU to create the successful, professional
image. Bring i n this coupon to your nearest Hit or Miss "^
Store and we w i n insure that you are ready to
DRESS FOR SUCCESS!
Panorama Outlet Mall, Penfield, 586-9319
JefftTMn Rd., Henrietta 271-9705
Lori's
Food
^
excellence
n.: state or condition of
superior quality.
r
We have the technology and the resources
necessary to produce an outstanding
magazine. No collegiate publication can
match our results and most will not even
try.
You have a chance to become a part of our
staff if you are experienced and
enthusiastic. Please see us for an interview.
n
Complete line of natural
foods, supplements, health
care products, snacks, cold
cuts, cheeses a n d beverages.
RIT STUDENTS:
Mention this
ad and
receive a
10%
Discount
on all Bulk-"
Natural
JUU
At REPORTER a dedicated staff strives for
excellence. A committment to quality and
advancement of the magazine is an integral
part of their work.
^
Natural
Center
.
tORI-S r<>9ional
market
J«f)er»on Road
RIT
900 Jefferson Road
424 - 2323
PASSOVER 1984
Seders
Monday, April 16th
6 p.m. — The Cellar
Tuesday, April 17th
6 p.m. — Hillel House
$10.00 each Seder
Interpreted
Kosher for Passover
REPORTER
Magazine
Meal Plan — Lunches & Dinners in
the Hillel House: deadline for all
reservations Monday. April 9th.
For r e s e r v a t i o n s a n d
information brochure:
C o m e to the Hillel Office or call
4 7 5 - 2 1 3 5 (voice & T T Y )
SCOREBOARD
Winning Game Ends Basketball Season
Coach Boh McA'ean and the Tiger basket
hall squad finished their season on a win
ning note when thev edged the Alfred
University Saxons at home with a 55 53
victory.
The Tigers finished with an 8 16 overall
record and a 4 8 mark in the I C A C . R I T
had some tough luck during the season
with five losses coming on less than five
point deficits. The .slu)ts just did not seem
to fall at the right time.
For the season, the Tigers were paced
hv Chuck Sease. Sease, a transfer from
Broome Community College, led R I T in
tlie scoring column with a 13.5 points per
game average. Chris Bolder and Gerry
Tilehein were the other Tigers in double
figures with 11.9 and 10.7 points, respec
tivelv. Steve Sisson (9.2 fioints per game).
Paul Brown (5.4) and Mike Alessio (3.7) all
diipfied in and each had one or more big
games.
From the field, the Tigers shot a respec
table 46.1 percent, with Tilehein pacing the
RIT squad with a 50.0 piercent touch with
Sisson (48.9) and Sease (47.7) close behind.
From the free throw line, the Tigers shot
69.4 percent with .Alessio (78.8) and Sisson
(78.7) leading the way.
Alessio ran the offense from the point
guard position and lead the Tigers in
minutes played with a 35:11 average while
pacing the Tigers in the assist column with
120 assists for a 5.0 average. Bohlr and
Sease were equally adept at finding the
open man. averaging 3.0 and 2.0 assists,
respectively.
Bolder was the chairman of the hoards
on the R I T squad, leading the way with 88
offensive and 120 defensive rebounds, good
for a 5.2 per game average. Bohler was
helped out hy Sease (4.9). Tilehein (4.7)
and Sisson (4.8).
Joe Dermaily and Mike Reed finished
up their R I T careers this season. Dermaily
finished with 88 |X)ints. including a perfect
20 for 20 from the free throw line. Reed
returned after a year off and backup up at
center. app>earing in 233 games and chipped in 21 points and 23 rebounds.
With only two Tigers graduating, the
Tigers look to improve on this year's
record and a chance to bring in some excellent recruits and a return squad.
— JOHN HARRINGTON
Men's Tigersharks Place Eighth In NCAA Championship
In an incredible leap from last year's thirteenth place finish, the R I T men's swimm
ing team scored 47 points to earn an eighth
place berth in the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA) Division 111
national championships, held March 16. 17
and 18 at Emor\ College in Atlanta.
Georgia. Taking the national crown in
team competition was Kenvon College of
Cliio. leading the 76 team field with 264
points.
In the first event of the three day competition. Tigershark James Shank, a
sophomore, placed third in the finals of the
500 yard Freestyle in 4:36.05. He set a new
school record and earned A l l .American
honors for his performance. Then, in the
200 yard Freestvle. Shank splashed to a
fourth place finish in the finals, in 1:43.03.
His preliminary time of 1:42.88 established
vet another R I T record. In his final in
dividual event, the 400 yard Individual
Medley. Shank repeated his A l l American
performance of last year hy placing third,
in a record setting 4:05.5.
Teamed with Barry Zacharias. Karl
Wilhanks and Jeff Smith. Shank placed
17th in the preliminaries of the 800 yard
Freestyle Relay. Zacharias made waves of
Iris own in the 100 yard Backstroke, taking
fourth place in a time of 53.53. to become
RIT's second A l l .American of the cham
pionships. and setting a new school record.
In the 200 yard Backstroke, he finished
fifth in 1:55.09. setting another school
record. In his third individual event, the
400 yard Individual Medley. Zacharias
finished sixth in the Consolation champion
ship, to equal Shank's triple AH American
performance.
Scott Anderson placed 28th in the
preliminaries of the 100 yard Backstroke
for the Tigersharks. and Bob Ketrick
scored 162.60 points in the One Meter Div
ing to place 28th to finish the scoring for
tlie team.
— CATHERINE FICK
Scott Yureshek grimmaces
in
strain as he twists through a toss
of the discus during last
Tuesday's
practice. Yureshek, a first year
accounting
student, prepared for
the upcoming Track season that
opens at home April 7.
26
March 30. 1984
Bright Season Expected For Lacrosse Team
If the past two seasons are any indication,
the 1983 84 lacrosse season at R I T will be
a successful one. Last season the Tigers
captured the Independent College Athletic
Conference (ICAC) outright and was
awarded a berth in the NCAA tournament.
Two seasons ago. third year Coach Bill
Tiemey guided the Tigers to a tie for conference honors, and the prospects for the
upcoming season are even brighter.
"This season we have more depth and
experience at every position than R I T has
ever had." notes Tiemev. Last season the
Tigers compiled an 113 overall record, including a perfect 5 0 mark in conference
play. Tierney's first task is replacing A l l
American attackman Keith Vadas; last year
Vadas led the Tigers with 65 {joints. This
year's attack is loaded with talent, in.eluding six veterans and four top new pro
spiects. Sophomore Bill Bjomess returns
aifter compiling 64 points last season and
will be joined bv junior Bruce Remus who
was the Tigers third leading scorer, with 50
{xjints. Also returning are sophmores. Scott
()live. John Donnelly. John Rattinger and
John Harrington. Top new prospects include transfer Steve Britton and freshman
Ted Diehl. Mike Pannone and Dan Stehn.
" A l l of the attack is capable of putting the
ball in the net. and I look to them to carry
tlie bulk of the scoring load." adds
Tiemey.
At the other end of the field, the Tigers
return an exf)erienced crew of top
defenders. Returning are tri-captains Ed
Purcell and Shawn MacAvoy. along with
juniors Tom Sill. Dan Miller. VValt McMur
trv and Joe Samuelman. MacAvov. an A l l
American last year, will be looked to later
in the season, after he recovers from an off
season knee injurv. Purcell is considered to
be the backbone of the Tiger defense and
comes off an All I C A C season in which he
scoof)ed up 70 ground balls. Sill will be
guarding the opposition's top attackman.
while Miller. McMurtry and Samuelman
will help ease the loss of MacAvoy. The
Tiger defense also features six newcomers.
Tiemey will look to the newcomers to progress into the Tiger defensive system, the
top newcomers include Geneseo transfer
Dave Eckert. Jim Kimmel heads the list of
top freshmen
prospects, while Neil
Mullane. Mike Sherlock. Kurt Peterson
and Jeff Fl\Tin will be backing up the
starters.
good stop{)er and has developied into a
great all-around goaltender." says Tierney.
Backing up Demetres is first-year player
Demetrius C^astro. Castro is in his first
season in the nets and looks to develop into
a Division I I goaltender.
The midfield posses.ses excellent depth
and good scoring potential. The Tigers
feature eight retumees along with nine
newcomers. Tlie middies are headed by tri
captain Scott Hedden. who finished up last
season with nine goals. Joining Hedden are
Don Balch (11 goals and four assists). Brad
Lynn (three goals) and Don Losier (four
goals and one assist). John Deane. Mike
Kelly. Scott Helm and Andre Schmid also
return to the midfield. giving the Tigers
depth to wear teams down over the stretch.
The incoming middies are loaded with
talent and all look to break into the lineup.
Heading the list are transfers Bob Sichenzia
(from
Farmingdale). Chuck Cincebox
(Denison). Chris Zello (Cobleskill) and
Tom Scharr (Salisbury). The freshmen all
aime from ex{)erienced programs and
Tiemey is not afraid to give them a regular
run. T i m Turner is the top prosfiect. along
with Kevin O'Reilly. Marty Mertell and
Mark Holly. "We are really blessed to have
so much talent at the midfield, it gives us
added flexibility." adds Tiemey.
The Tigers look to rejjeat as the I C A C
diampions and gain their second consecutive NCAA berth. The laxman open
tlieir season on April 4. hosting Buffalo
State University at 3:00 p.m. Overall, the
Tigers face thirteen teams with Ithaca College. St. Lawrence University and State
I'niversitv of New York at C^ortland as the
toughest tests.
— J O H N HARRINGTON
Due to the
unusually
nice weather, the
lacrosse team was
able to get
outside
for some
workouts.
Senior
midfielder
Mike Kelly runs upfield in Tuesday 's
practice.
In the Tiger goal is three year starter
Andy Demetres. Last season Demetres
mmpiled a 10 2 mark with a 68.8 save
{jercentage while achieving a 7.80 goals
against mark. "Andy has always been a
27
TAB A D S
S a l M and Sarvlcaa
Announc*m«nts
P r o f e s s i o n a l T y p i n g done at home
Term papers, theses, letters, legal
briefs, resumes, research proposals,
tables, etc All work done on IBM Correcting Selectric typewriter Choice of
type styles Fast, a c c u r a t e service at
reasonable rates
Call Louise,
244-3533 (Brighton)
P r o f e s s i o n a l T y p i n g for all of your
typing needs Fast. A c c u r a t e Monday—Friday.
8 a m —8 p m
424-1231
Is is t r u e you can buy jeeps for $44
t i r o u g h the U S G o v e r n m e n t Get the
facts today' Call (312) 742-1142 ext.
4165
A L A S K A N J O B S : $5,000 to $30,000
per summer Earn enough during the
summer, study and play during school.
For complete report of employers, addresses, wages, etc send $6 95 to
Alaskan Job Service, Box 40235-N,
Tucson, Arizona 85717 Money back
guarantee' Immediate reply'
Lutheran W o r k s h o p , 10 30 a m , Sundays, College-Alumni Union, Clark Dining r o o m
Interpreted
All a r e
welcome Ottered by Lutheran Campus Ministry at RIT-NTID (475-2137)
R E W A R D offered for return of 3 juggling pins (2 gold/black and 1 silver) in a
iMiite laundry bag lost on c a m p u s
3-12-84 Call Mike at 271-7749 or contact CU info desk
E x p e r i e n c e d w r i t e r seeks writing and
editing whicti can be done at home
Also available as a writing tutor Call
473^328
For S a l e — C A S I O musical keyboard
16 r h y t h m s , a d j u s t a b l e
tempo,
transpose feature, 22 key k y b d ,
RAM/ROM music cartridge and power
adapter included Brand New, $170 or
b o Model PT-50 Call 359-1761 Ask
for Tom,
B e d r o o m Set by Henredon Circa 76
king size canopy bed, ladies dresser
with Hutch, Armorie, two night stands
and large framed mirror for $2,200
Dining room table, four side chairs and
two a r m chairs, two 18 inch leafs and
custom heat pads also by Henredon
-$800 Call S, Schultz at 244-1690
Keep trying
Brand N e w C a s i o M u s i c a l Instrument model PT-50 for sale 22 key
monophonic kybd 16 rhythms, 20 tempo speeds, RAM/ROM musical cartridge
(included),
transpose
feature—Great buy (includes power
adapter) $170 or b o Call 359-1761
day or night Ask for Tom
F i l m m a k e r s . Super-8 E k t a c h r o m e
Type ' A, ' ASA 160, save $$$, $7 50
per cartridge Call Steve or Elliot at
334-7253 after 6 p m
A s s i s t a n t D i r e c t o r needed for CAB,
Public Relations Call x 2 5 0 9 o r s t o p b y
A p p l e C o m p u t e r s and peripherals for
sale Check my prices—Call Al at
4 2 4-7356
M o t o r s c o o t e r : P200E by Vespa. top of
line, fast, 2200 miles, luggage rack,
windshield brackets, for sale at $800,
fvjrryi Call 244-1690 before 5pm Mon
thru Sat
Circa 76 B e d r o o m Set by Henredon:
King sized 4 poster canopy frame: 2
mght stands, ladies dresser and hutch,
men s a r m o n e (dresser) and large
framed hanging mirror Call 244-1690
before 5pm Mon to Sat For sale at
$2200
For Sale: B&W enlarger (Cavalier)
with Bogen easel and lenses $75 or
make offer 458-5098 eves
D i s h w a s h e r — F o r sale
Portable,
General Electric, asking $30 Call C B
at 334-5877
Want t o e a r n e x t r a $$? Set your own
hours, days, nights or weekends The
RIT Child Care Service needs sitters
Call 424-1244 M-W-F between 12 and
2, Horton Child Care Center
Do Y o u N e e d A S i t t e r ? The RIT Child
Care Service can help you find one If
interested, call 424-1244 M-W-F between 12 and 2, Horton Child Care
Center
28
W a n t e d : Bassist to play hard rock For
m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c a l l D a v e at
475-3594
Are y o u a t h l e t i c a l l y i n c l i n e d ? Want
to improve your performance^ You
can, through a technique known as Imagery Training Call the Counseling
Center at x2261 before April 2 to learn
more
Want t o learn t o s t r e n g t h e n y o u r efforts at b e i n g m o r e a s s e r t i v e ? If you
have already participated m an assertiveness group, you may want to learn
rtKire Contact the Counseling Center
at x2261 before April 6 for more information
Attention
RIT
Ski
Team
M e m b e r s — T h e r e will be nominations
on Monday, April 2nd We will also
hand back money from the meet entry
fees All members must attend
RIT Ski T e a m will hold nominations on
April 2nd Look for posters and listen
to WITR for details Open to everyone
Members must attend
The O u t d o o r E x p e r i e n t i a l E d u c a t i o n
p r o g r a m is offering a 21 day adventure to the Colorado mountains from
June 1st to June 21st Activities included in this expedition are: rock climbrig, rafting, wilderness backpacking
and a three day environmental refurbishing project to help enrich this environment $395 Inludes all transportation from Rochester, meals, instruction and most equipment RIT Physical
Education Credit and NTID General
Studies Credit available Interpreted
for the deaf For m o r e information, call
Bill Morrissey (x6491) or Debra Wahl
(X2628/TTY)
The 3 r d A n n u a l J u m p Rope-forHeart will be m the RIT gym Sunday,
April 8th, l - 4 p m Join in and make RIT
rijmber 1 again Entry forms are at the
Cage m the PE bidg
Unity H o u s e P r e s e n t s : For Color
Q r l s Who Have Considered Suicide
When The Rainbow Is Enuf April 20,
1984, 8 p m In Ingle Auditorium Admission free
Get p s y c h e d ! Bruce Davidson is
coming to RIT. April 10 Sponsored by
Photo House
Passover is c o m i n g — A p r i l I 7 t h 2 4 t h " Come into the Hillel Cffice for
rrxjre information regarding Seders
and Meal Plan Cr call 475-2135
RIT/NTID F a c u l t y W e e k at H e n r y ' s !
April 9-16 Treat yourself to the finest
(Jning on c a m p u s Join us for lunc h — 4th
floor,
building
1
Remember—It s YCUR week Watch
for details
A d d t o A c a d e m i c s + + •¥ A p p l i c a t i o n s are now being taken for the
following positions working in Student
Directorate Academics: Assistant
Director, Policy Council person and
Course Evaluation Committee person
Applications available at the SD office
R u s s i a n s Paired w i t h R o c h e s t e r ?
Come find out about the "Pairing Project," an exchange program tjetween
Russian and American cities April 3.
1pm, 1829 Room in the Union
I n t e r e s t e d in j o i n i n g the Rainbow
100 User s Group R(100)UG
contact Phil regarding exchange of ideas
and public d o m a i n s o f t w a r e at
889-1637 after 5pm
Housing
Female R o o m m a t e Wanted—Summer quarter
C w n room — Racquet
Club townhouse Non-smoker Give a
call to Sandy or Marleen, 334-6392
One b e d r o o m a p a r t m e n t tor rent at
Elmwood Manor Cn a bus line $315
includes heat, hot water and appliances
Available May 1st
Call
461-1443 day or night.
S u m m e r S u b l e t at Ciearview Farms
Modern 2 b d r m with dishwasher, air
conditioning and wash-dry Wegmans
& gasoline 200 yards away Available
June 1st $375 plus utilities Call
889-2089
Personals
Patti a n d J a c k - P W and DW
S c o t t , Phil, Howard, Rich—will you
do our nails next, your s look so nice
J.R.S
Katie Scarlett
askyg question
Love, " L a u r "
Darlin",
bout the
"Lemmie
cahpee'"
H o w a r d "Jew" know where the beach
is''
I d o k n o w h o w t o d o w n s h i f t and if
you don't believe me, let's go pass a
snowplow on Perkins Road (ninety-five
rmles per tiour, minimum)
S l u t — w h i c h one of the Brothers is
gonna put your fire out t o n i g h f
J P — you so cheerful in the morning
and
that hair! The Ouaiity Inn
Snoozers
Scott — Did you get the cheeze out of
your hair y e f — t h e moon
S u b j e c t s W a n t e d for brainwave and
speechrending study Earn five dollars
per hour In exchange for your participation Phone Doctor Samar at
475-6338 for details or to make an appointment
M i l l e r B r e w i n g C o m p a n y and Phi
Kappa Tau Fraternity present Wrist
Wrestling Tournament 1984, March
31 For m o r e details call 475-3890
Had a " m e m o r a b l e " time at Phi Sig's
Around the World Party; thank you
PSK you're a real fraternity'
A c t u a l l y , the whole thing was a frame
up There is still only one girl for me
— t h e king
W h a t ' s Y o u r F a n t a s y ? Denise is a
photo student wishing to illustrate your
fantatsies, dreams or nightmares. If
you'd like to help out with her progect,
drop off a page or two of your detailed
fantasies in the dream boxes located
n the CU and library lobbies, the CC-
SA office If she can use your fantasy
r her photography you can get a print
f r o m her
Serious
Entenes
Only
NC SMUT PLEASE'
To P a t c h e s — Get psyched for human
sexuality M C N T H ' Rememljer three
times a day I love y o u ' ' —your chubby Scarlet C Hara
To t h e B l o n d e girl w h o works in the
game room Let's go out sometime
—your secret admier''
P i n k y — I told you I w o u l d ' — A l a n
S p a r k y — meet me at the Miami
Beach Hotel —love, Kukia
Walk Tall T i g e r s : we luv ya and we re
proud Ot ya " ' — J J &J
A t t e n t i o n : the tigers want a date with
B a b s o n s a m e t i m e next
year'
— D e d i c a t e d TIGER fans'
M a r t i n — the best things in life are
worth waiting for' —love. Donna
K a r e n — do you prefere men who eat
c e l e r / ' —love, RAIL STUD
W e d , n i g h t b l a c k j a c k c l u b will meet
in Fred's room at 2:00 Donna, where
are y o u '
Hail
WarJohn!
I,
Sylvester
Goodfellow, shall rid the galaxy of your
bartiarion hide Beware the yellow
thorn, for with in its color is the flame
to ignite your funeral pyre. Friday Tar<Js to Racquet Club has been cancelled
Lt, S.— W h e e ' No cold hands, only
w a r m hearts' xoxo Congrats to my
favorite grad, officer and g e n t l e m a n '
loving you always Cricket
H o u s t o n ? ? ? L e t s G o " from your
prez
Baby B l u e Eyes
toves you
H,M,
someone
still
" S u p e r m a n " — You're right, a hard
man is good to f i n d — uh, or was it a
good man is hard to f i n d ^ —just call
me " L o i s "
C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s — J e r e m y , Reporter;
AMY, CAB, Doug, CCSA and ail of the
new director Good luck with your
respective organizations Jimmy
C o n g r a t u l a t i o n J i m M e y e r s ! ! You'll
make an EXCELLENT c h a i r m a n !
Director of Propaganda
Cheryl is good on a bottle but needs
practice swallowing Pegan Is just like
her m o m Carolyn likes fat, juicy, succulent pickles, Gretchen needs a face
lift
O p u s w e m i s s y o u ! Please return
real soon, maytie the same time and
place as last year'
B r i a n — thanks, Patty
Kathy IS not a babbling Brooke
J — We had a great w e e k e n d " Next
t i m e , d o n ' t get l o c k e d in t h e
bathroom' If you do - I'll send you a
wake-up call' H o k a / ' Hokay F i n e " !
—J
Peggy, Happy Birthday. Big John and I
wanna help you say good bye to your
terrible teens Love ya always Me
Karen and Debbie, R e m e m b e r — o n l y
go for real men They're the ones w h o
drink either skimmed milk or water,
and sometimes wear bandanas'
Matt, Leroy, and C w e n we re sorry
we know it s HARD to admit that your
bananas aren't as big as the CNE at
d n n e r love, NP, HL & TG
To M a r k TIsdel and Bob McBlane:
please, please, don't go to Albany next
year' Tons of girls lust tor you two, m e
March 30.
1984
one of them Must you go to Albany
just to get girls' Love, plenty here love
you CM.SC.DS.BA.JS.PU.MT&BM
To T h e O z m Dudes (Brian and Mark)
D o n ' t b e s u p r i s e d it y o u f i n d
yourselves tied to a tree and your
foreheads slapped till you beg for mercy'' '
Revenge
is
sweet.
Douchbagette
May I please have a ram check on that
sirloin steak dinner'' It sounds to good
to miss Laurie
J e r e m y learned to h u m in fourth
grade Who Cares''
I s o m e b o d y spends four years of their
life with you—suport them.
I a m afraid of success
Hi H i , Mihai'
R e b e c a — Did I spell your name r i g h f
Hey J u l i e — I think it's time for
another taco night' GET's G B
C y r u s s h o o t s bone-tiead spider webs
with U of R w o m e n Ttiey fiave astro
turf at the U of R so the girls don't
graze
S c o t t — W h y are you such a farmer''
Let's g o to Chi-Chi s — G B
Hey C l i p - h e a d - t h i s here Buffaloborn and raised bone fiead will clip you
down, turkey
Meryl loves M e r y l
L o n g a r m — g e t a real car Someday
you'll learn how to play hockey' Life is
tough when you a r e an eraserhead
Ha' H a ' The almigtity sfiort one
Ugly M a n C n C a m p u s is c o m i n g April
18-24 Call 475-3329 for more information and to schedule your ugly man for
pfiotography by April 2 Sponsored by
Alphi Phi C m e g a . the national service
fraternity that tias Stewart Place as a
member
J & M — H o w d o you like my old apartm e n f Don't keep it too clean, it may
go into sfiock' G B
B o n e h e a d — Y o u know tfiat I a m the
real
cliphead
Buffalo
is f o r
bonetieads. Nashville is tor clipheads
Reporter is for Ixineclips
U G L Y ! You may have stopped a few
potential goals m your day. but m a n .
wfiy don't you take a b a t h ' ' Get a real
f a r i c u t ' Sincerely, your captain
D e b — t h e next time I don't c o m e
home, d o n t call M o m . wtiatever you
do' I a m a big girl who can take care ot
ferself Lecture m e all you want, but
keep m y parents out of it' P S . Nice
tfiought and good intentions, but otherwise
D e b — l e a v e the kid alone She isn't
twelve, a n d unless you're forty w h y
don't you leave the mothering to those
more qualified'' Come on. give m e a
break, I need Laurie tiere
Paul—Let s tiave a few more interesting conversations—I just m a d a
large i n v e s t m e n t in t o w e l s a n d
mouthwasfi
Tfie name of the girl in the "Thriller
Time " a d is Genny Screamer
C h a r l e s — C a l m down n o w ' H o w
about anottier tiappy tiour' Nice tiaircut' Stop drooling now, it's only a
woman Your L I Friend
J i m — m y d a d needs the r e f n g " " ' "
Please give m e a call (x22l2), a n d
we ll work out a time or wtiatever''
T o d d — t t i e absolute best of luck for
you in Salzburg Sorry I don't stay in
toucti, but y o u know tiow ttiings g o
We ll get together m Iowa City
sometime, I've got some great friends
tfiere' J,
C L I P — y o u strobe-faced clip-tieaded
four-eyed Cannon shooter—Get a real
camera, like the p r o s — N i k o n tiead
Ricti ttie trainer—keep weightlifting little fella, you're still just a puppy
K—Too b a d you re underage I think
tfiat definitely takes him off m y calendar No matter wtiat y o u say, tie's a
scum
J i m M y e r s — I know your girlfriend is
only eight years old, but you gotta admit, stie s a cutie Don't let tier near
me (or m e near her) or you'll be doing
your talent searcti in anottier tiigh
sctiool
Is J I M G L E A S C N alive? Information
regarding tiis wtiereabouts stiould be
directed to Jeremy's refrigerator, at
Jim's ajjartment
Roger—ttiank G o d y o u ' r e a country
boy' Trust m e , I won't put ttie milk in
ttie cabinet anymore
J a y — w h y on earth would you w a x a
r o wax floor'' You failed the Julia Ctiild
test, sorry By ttie way. wtiere s m y
tomato''—Skipper
Skip —sorry
S t e p p a n o — T w o is b e t t e r t h a n o n e ,
but w h i c h is t i e t t e r ? S q u i r e
Gino —Why
do they
call y o u
•'Squire''"
Doug a n d L i s a — s p e c i a l tapes to be
played at 6 a m on WRUR. your 88 5
FM station tor ttie morning
SAM
Crime
Peace
paper
A B R A M S — c o u l d y o u read
a n d Punistiment a n d War a n d
for Friday, please Ten page
to follow
T & A — T t i a n k s for your tielp Y o u
know I need it, a n d besides, i t ' s not
easy being stiort Fifty signature color
e s u e to follow
B u f f a l o T r a i n e r — C n e day w e tiave t o
go to Cassidy's Remember, Syracuse
t a p p y tiour G B
W h y d o e s G l e n B o e h m e r write so
many tab a d s ' ' Doesn't he tiave
anyttiing better to do, or does tie just
not like girls''
If y o u e n d o n a b a d n o t e it means
ttiat you tiad a conversation witti someone at least at your level
Darlene —leave m e alone
Life is
lougti enougti wittiout worrying atX)ut
tab ads O k a / '
S o m e o n e h e l p m e — i m tired a n d
tBven t tiad vodka in ttiree days Also,
I a m being held captive a n d forced to
listen to Wtiolly Intolerable Radio
Trasti
Hey L i t t l e G i r l — t i o w about a road
trip'' Let s go to C a m p Vick' Love y a '
Q e n ttie tab ad writer
T o m — w e tiate you in real life, too
Keep your moutti stiut a n d people
won't know tiow overbearing you are
Cfi, get a real tiat, l o o
H a n s — W t i a t did your moltier ttnnk
wtien you told her y o u ' d be a stripper''
Has she ever c o m e to w a t c h ' ' I won't
tell
Jeremy needs an apartment!
Raj n e e d s g o v e r n o r s !
Lois n e e d s a real c u c u m b e r !
There's n o m o r e , so you d better stop
reading
K e n — y o u r mother tias a wooden
bigfoot for a gooneygoogoo
ICELANDAIR IS STILL
YOUR REST VALUE
TO EUROPE.
LUXEMBOURG
ROUNDTRIP FROM:
'499
NEW YORK
'599
DETROIT
'599
BALTIMORE WASHINGTON
'599
CHICAGO
ALSO LOW COST SERVICE TO PARIS, FRANKFURT AND NICE.
REMEMBER, ONLY ICELANOAIR FLIES YOU TO THE BREATHTAKING
BEAUTY OF ICELAND. AND INCLUDES ALL THESE EXTRAS:
• Frof df lu.xc motorcoach from Luxembourg to select cities in
Germany, BelKtum and Holland. • Bargain train fares to Switzerland
and France. • Super Saver car rentals from $69 week in
Luxembourg. • Free wine with dinner, cognac after.
Super APF.X Fares May I June y. iys4 T Hi day stay. 14 day advamc purctiase required,
Icelandair to Luxembourg Luxair connectinu servxe lo ottier destinatHms, Purctuse tickets
in 1°, S All fares sub)ect to ctun);e and Kovemment approval. See your travel agent or c a l
MMk555-1212 for ttie toll-free Icelandair number in vour area.
ICELANDAIR
tMwmmiwMtmwmusimuintuitm
29
W H A T S HAPPENING
Friday, March 30
F I L M & V I D E O — T a l i s m a n presents T e n d e r Merc i e s at 7:30&9 3 0 p m in Ingle Call 475-2509
UR Friday Features O c t o p u s s y at 7 15&lO:15pm
at the Strong Auditorium Call 275-4127
International M u s e u m of Photography presents
Magic T o w n at 8 p m at the George Eastman House.
900 East Ave Call 271-4090
Fairport Public Library Friday Evening Film Series
On t h e W a t e r f r o n t at 7pm at the Library. i Village
Landing Free Call 223-9091
M U S I C — W I T R 89 7 FM presents M o d e r n M u s i c in
the M o r n i n g with Mike B and Ed (rom 7am-10am:
M i d - m o r n i n g m i x with Heidi Irom I 0 a m - 1 2 p m .
M o d e r n M u s i c a n d M o r e from 12pm-i l p m ; F r i d a y
N i g h t F i l e t from 11pm-2am
WRUR 88 5 FM presents Jazz in t h e M o r n i n g f r o m
6-11am
Eastman School of Music presents P r i s m c o n c e r t
at 7&9pm at the Eastman Theatre Free Call
275-3111
D R A M A / D A N C E — T h e Conundrum Players present
C o u n t i n g t h e W a y s and L a u g h s , Etc. at 8 p m at the
Calvary St Andrews Church, 68 Ashland Ave/95
Averill
Reservations are r e c c o m m e n d e d
Call
442-5117 or 271-5730
LECTURES.
SEMINARS
&
W O R K S H O P S - M e m o r i a l Art Gallery Architecture: The Art We Live In Series " A r t s and Crafts
Gardens m England and A m e r i c a " at 10am at the
Gallery Auditorium, 490 University Ave, Call
275-3081
R A D A R — A n d r e w s D o r m ACAD/Perkins (day). Andrews D o r m ACAD/Perkins (night)
O T H E R - A q u a r i a n Self-Discovery Center yoga
d a s s and healing circle at 7pm at the Center, 1750
East Mam Call 288-4933
SUNY Brockport Fantasy and Science Fiction Conference Call 395-2480
Saturday, March 31
F I L M & V I D E O - T a l i s m a n presents Tender Merc i e s at 7 30&9 3 0 p m in Ingle Call 475-2509
UR S a t u r d a y
Spectacular
Liquid
Sky
at
7:15&10pm at the Strong Auditorium
M U S I C — W I T R 89 7 FM presents Reggae S o u n d s
from 5-9pm with Sister Denise, Reggae Internat i o n a l f r o m 9pm-10pm and T h e U n i q u e Beat from
12am-4am
WRUR 88 5 FM presents Jazz in t h e M o r n i n g f r o m
6-11am
Eastman School of Music presents the E a s t m a n
O p e r a T h e a t r e at 8pm at Cutler Union
Call
275-3500
DRAMA/DANCE—Conundrum
Players present
C o u n t i n g t h e W a y s and L a u g h s , Etc. at 8 p m at the
Calvary St Andrews Church, 68 Ashland/95 Averill
Call 442-5117 or 271-5730
LECTURES,
SEMINARS
&
WORKSHOPS-Rochester
Museum
&Science
Center Face to Face Series " M u s i c a l Instruments
as Expressions of Cultural Identity" at 2pm at the
Auditorium, 657 East Ave Call 271-4320
Dance workshops presented by the Community
High School for Jewish Sudies at 7 45pm at the
Temple Beth-El Call 461-9015 or 461-5125
RADAR —Lowenthal/Wiltsie
(day),
Perkins/Lomb/Lowenthal (night)
O T H E R — R o c t i e s t e r Museum & Science Center
Spring Antique Show and Sale from 10am-6pm at
the Center, 657 East Ave Call 271-4320
SUNY Brockport Fantasy and Science Fiction conference Call 395-2754
Sunday, April 1
FILM & V I D E O - T a l i s m a n Great Directors Series:
K a g e m u s h a at 6 4 5 p m and Y o j i m b o at 10pm txith
r Ingle Call 475-2509
Memorial Art Gallery presents E u r o p e A f t e r t h e
Rain at 3 p m at the Auditorium. 490 University Ave,
30
Call 275-3081
900 East Ave Call 271-4090
M U S I C — W I T R 89 7 FM presents T h e A n s w e r from
8-10am featuring contemporary Christian words and
music w i t h B J Stewart, E l e c t r o n i c S o u n d s from
I 0 a m - I 2 p m , P s y c h a d e l i c S u n d a e at 6 p m with
Mike and Mick. J u s t Jazz at 9 p m with Tony
Gasparre
Rochester M u s e u m & Science Center Classic Film
Series Y o u B e l o n g t o M e at 2&8pm at the
Eisenhart Auditorium, 657 East Ave Call 271-4320,
WRUR 88,5 FM presents Jazz In t h e M o r n i n g f r o m
6-1 l a m
Eastman School of Music presents E a s t m a n Ranlet c o n c e r t at 3pm at the Kilbourn Hall Free
Tickets are required Gall 275-3111
Eastman School presents the E a s t m a n O p e r a
T h e a t r e at 8pm at Cutler Union Call 275-3500
D R A M A / D A N C E —Jewish Community Center
presents a evening of f o l k d a n c i n g f r o m 7-10pm at
the Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave All are w e l c o m e
Call 461-2000
11th Annual Isreal Folk Dance Festival at 7 15pm at
the Wilson Arts Center of the Harley School Call
461-9015 or 461-5125
Conundrum Players presents C o u n t i n g T h e W a y s
and L a u g h s , Etc. at 8 p m at the Calvary St Andrews
Church, 68 Ashland/95 Averill Call 442-5117 or
271-5730
RADAR—Perkins/Lomb
Dorm ACAD(night)
(day).
Wiltsie/Andrews
OTHER—Episcopal
Mass at 10:30am in the
Resource Room of Peterson Hall, sponsored by
Vine, the RIT Episcopal Campus Ministry Open to
all. Interpreted for the hearing impaired
Call
475-2247 (voice/TTY) for further information,
Lutheran Worship at 10 30am in the Clark Dining
Room in the College Union Interpreted for the hearing impaired. All are w e l c o m e Offered by Lutheran
Campus Ministry at RIT/NTID Call 475-2137
Non-denominational worship at 10am at the
Aquarian Self-Discovery Center, 1750 E M a m St
Call 288-1933,
Rochester Museum & Science Center Spring Antique Show and Sale from 1 l a m - 6 p m at the Center,
657 East Ave Call 271-4320
Easter Seal Telethon on WRCC-TV 8 Support Easter
Seal
M U S I C — W I T R 89 7 FM presents M o d e r n M u s i c in
the M o r n i n g with Mike B and Ed from 7-10am: M i d nrxjrning M i x with Heidi from I 0 a m - 1 2 p m , M o d e r n
M u s i c and M o r e from 12pm-1 I p m
WRUR 88 5 FM presents Jazz in t h e M o r n i n g f r o m
6-11am
Eastman School of Music presents a Kilbourn c o n cert with the Bill D o b b i n s Trio at 8 p m at the
Kilbourn Hall Call 475-3500
LECTURES, S E M I N A R S & W O R K S H O P S - R I T
Community for a Nuclear Freeze presents political
journalist M a r k H a r e of the City Paper speaking on
the Ground Zero Pairing Project between the USA
» i d the USSR at 1pm in the 1829 room of the College Union Free and open to the public Educate
yourself Have you hugged a Russian today
RADAR —Perkins/Wiltsie
(day),
Andrews
ACAD/Perkins (night),
O T H E R — C a r e e r s Fair at the UR from 7:30-9:30pm
at the Wilson Commons Call 275-4127,
Wednesday, April 4
F I L M & V I D E O - U R Wednesday Cinematheque:
Fanny a n d A l e x a n d e r at 9 p m at the Strong
Auditorium Call 275-4127
International Museum ot Photography presents A n ton t h e M a g i c i a n at 8pm at the George Eastman
House, 900 East Ave Call 271-4090
M U S I C — W I T R 89 7 FM presents M o d e r n M u s i c in
the M o r n i n g with Mike B and Ed from 7-10am, M i d nrxjrning M i x Heidi from 10am-12pm,
Modern
M u s i c a n d M o r e from 12pm-11pm, T h e A v a n t
Garden with the Gardener from 1 1 p m - l 2 a m
WRUR 88 5 FM presents Jazz in t h e M o r n i n g f r o m
6-11am
UR Welles-Brown Recital Series M a r g a r e t K a r a m ,
m e z z o - s o p r a n o at noon at the Welles-Brown room
of the Rush Rhees Library Free and open to the
public Call 275-4127
Monday, April 2
Eastman School of Music presents the Jazz Ensemble IV at 8 p m at the Kilbourn Hall Free Call
275-3111
M U S I C — W I T R 89.7 F M p r e s e n t s M o d e r n M u s i c
in t h e M o r n i n g with Mike B and Ed from 7-10am,
M i d - m o r n i n g M i x with Heidi from 10am-12pm:
M o d e r n M u s i c a n d M o r e from I 2 p m - l i p m
RIT Jazz Ensemble rehearsals from 5-7pm in Ingle
/Vuditorium All are w e l c o m e to c o m e and listen
RIT P h i l h a r m o n i a r e h e a r s a l s from 7 30-9 30pm in
Ingle Auditorium, All are w e l c o m e to c o m e and
listen
LECTURES, S E M I N A R S & W O R K S H O P S - S U N Y
Brockport Writers Forum Poet Ellen Bryan-Voigt at
8pm at the Kiefer Room of the Drake Memorial
Ubrary Free and open to the c o m m u n i t y Call
395-2480
WRUR 8 8 5 FM presents Jazz In t h e M o r n i n g from
6-11am
Eastman School of Music presents a concert with
the E a s t m a n Jazz L a b B a n d at 8 p m at the Kiitjourn
Hall Free and open to the public Call 275-3111
Eastman School of Music presents the B i l l D o b b i n s
Trio at 12 30pm at the H o w a r d Hanson Hall and
E a s t m a n O p e r a T h e a t r e at 8 p m at Cutler Union
Call 275-3037
M E E T I N G S — R I T Community for a Nuclear Freeze
meets at 5 3 0 p m in M-1 on the Mezzanine Level of
the College Union Open to the public,
RADAR —Wiltsie/Lowenthai/Perkins (day),
Perkins/Lomb/Wiltsie (night)
O T H E R — P l a n n e d Parenthood of Rochester &
Monroe County, Inc will offer fertility awareness
(natural family planning) classes for single and married people April 9 Call 546-2595
Tuesday, April 3
FILM
&VIDEO —International
Museum
of
Photography presents The F i a n c e e with a lecture
proceeding at 8 p m at the George Eastman House,
Nazareth College presents " W o m e n and Eating
O s o r d e r s " at 7pm at the A-14 Room of the Arts
Center Free Call 586-2525 ext 393
M E E T I N G S — R I T scuba club meets at 8 p m in M2 in
the College Union All divers are w e l c o m e
RADAR—Lowenthal/Andrews
Wiltsie/Andrews D o r m (night)
D o r m ACAD (day),
Thursday, April 5
F I L M & V I D E O - T a l i s m a n presents T h e C e l l u l o i d
C l o s e t at 7 3 0 p m in Ingle Call 475-2509
International M u s e u m of Photography presents On
P r o b a t i o n at 8 p m at the George Eastman House,
900 East Ave Call 271-4090
M U S I C — W I T R 89 7 FM presents M o d e r n M u s i c in
the M o r n i n g with Mike B and Ed f r o m 7-10am, M i d m o r n i n g M i x with Heidi from I 0 a m - I 2 p m , M o d e r n
M u s i c a n d M o r e from 12pm-11pm
WRUR 88 5 FM presents Jazz in t h e M o r n i n g f r o m
6-11am
DRAMA/DANCE—SUNY
Brockport presents a
Black D a n c e S y m p o s i u m at the Hartwell Hall, Call
395-2153 for a full schedule
MEETINGS—Gamma
E p s i l o n Tau
business
meeting at 7pm in the College Conference Room of
BIdg 07
R A D A R — P e r k i n s / L o w e n t ha I / W i l t s i e ( d a y ) .
Perkins/Andrews D o r m ACAD/Wiltsie (night)
March 30, 1984
A l f m d o Leal
^ Faniouis B^ll igfiter
By Gosh,
F r o m A p r i l 2 to A p r i l 27 we are p r o m o t i n g p h o t o g r a p h i c
accessories that can be used t o " a d d t o " or create
new results w i t h y o u r p h o t o g r a p h i c s h o o t i n g or p r i n t i n g .
Stop i n a n d talk shop w i t h o u r f r i e n d l y a n d competent staff. A s k t o see o u r t w o K o d a k slide shows:
I m a g i n a t i v e Use o f Fillers and T h e Beginning o f P h o t o C o m p o s i t i o n . W e w i l l also have m a n y creative
samples o f h o w these products can enhance y o u r images. S t a r t i n g this A p r i l , stop t a k i n g snap shots! L e t us
show y o u h o w easy it is t o be creative w i t h p h o t o g r a p h y !
" T ' l e s e
a r e
S o m e
o l
S,
o/o
Check fcr Specials c n :
•
•
•
•
•
Shade+
Marshall Oils & Pencils
Gipe Masked slide mounts
Dr. Martin Dyes
Much More
P
RIT Bookstore
Monday thru Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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