Annual Report | 2006 - 2007 - Canadian Centre for Victims of

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Annual Report | 2006 - 2007 - Canadian Centre for Victims of
2006-2007
Annual Report
Accredited Member of the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT)
Charitable Reg. 13332 7908 RR0001
CCVT ANNUAL
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Table of Contents
2
Mandate
4
A Message from the Executive Director
5
A Message from the Chair
6-7
Report of the Legal Committee
8-9
Report of Public Education
10-11
Report of Health and Program Committee
12
Report of the International Committee
13-14
Settlement Program
15
Children’s Program
16
Volunteer Program
17-18
English as a Second Language and Computer
Training Program
19
Board of Directors
20
Financial Report
21-22
CCVT Programs
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CCVT Health Network
24
CCVT Legal Network
25
CCVT Staff
26
Interns and Students
26
CCVT Volunteers
27-28
CCVT Survivors—New Intake and Previous Clients
29-34
Special thanks
35-36
Funders: Government and Foundations
37
Contact Us
38
Table of Figures
Figure 1: New Clients by Country
Figure 6: Marital Status
32
Figure 2: Previous Clients by Country 30
Figure 7: Education
33
Figure 3: Source of Referrals
31
Figure 8: Employment Skills
33
Figure 4: Gender of Clients
31
Figure 9:Type of Torture
34
Figure 5: Age Category
32
Figure 10: Client Referral
34
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Mandate
"Hope after the Horror"
The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT)
aids survivors to overcome the lasting effects of torture and war. In partnership with the community, the
Centre support survivors in the process of successful integration into Canadian society, works for their
protection and integrity, and raises awareness of the
continuing effects of torture and war on survivors
and their families. The CCVT gives hope after the
horror.
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A Message from the Executive Director
The past year was a year of renewed momentum for the CCVT.
Being a community -based organization permits us to work with
large number of NGOs to provide services that address the multiple effects and complex needs of the survivors of torture and
war. Our community orientation has enabled us to develop and
refine an interdisciplinary approach where medical, legal and
social care professionals can work together to provide support
for highly vulnerable populations from 64 countries that chose to
make Canada their home.
Mulugeta Abai,
Executive Director
During the past twelve months CCVT has assisted 879 clients,
by providing a range of therapeutic services. We have collaborated with national and international agencies to strengthen the
global human rights movement and to hold governments accountable to international human rights treaties and conventions. CCVT provided training on torture and its effects to frontline workers, educators, health professionals, Immigration and
Refugee Board members, and graduate students in social work.
CCVT has also received visitors from Germany, Australia, the
United States, China, Kenya, Uganda, Cambodia, France and
Russia.
The Centre has been able to further consolidate its Scarborough satellite office in an under-serviced area identified
as priority neighborhood by United Way of Greater Toronto. CCVT also participated in international conferences in
the United States, Europe, Asia, and within Canada. Some of the major issues we addressed in our day-to-day
work included: promoting the Istanbul protocol, advocating on behalf of Canadians detained oversees, opposing
secret trials and detentions, the deportation of refugees to countries that practice torture, and the delay in Canadian immigration hearings and family reunification. The CCVT remains a strong voice for survivors of torture.
On June 26th the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture was organized. The theme was
“Exile of Trauma and Challenges to Settlement.” A hundred participants from 40 agencies came from all over Ontario, including representatives of the Federal and Provincial governments. There were two panel discussions on
the following topics. “The Role of Volunteers in Creating Hospitable and Welcoming Communities," and “Investing
in the Future - Empowering Child and Youth Survivors.” The event's success would have not been possible without
the dedication of the staff, the guidance of the board and its standing committees of the board, our volunteers and
our donors and funders, including: Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Ontario Region; the Ontario Ministry of
Citizenship, the United Way of Greater Toronto, the City of Toronto and the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Torture Victims.
I would like to thank all the retiring board members: Hari Narine Lalla, Chair, Board of Directors, for his vision, leadership and guidance; Dr. Donald Payne, Co-Chair of the Health Committee and a long time supporter of CCVT,
and Adeena Niazi, a longtime board member, for their commitment and support over the years.
Mulugeta Abai
Executive Director
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
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A Message from the Chair
As I come to the end of my second three-year term as Chair of the
CCVT Board of Directors, I am reminded of my first contact with this
organization. I had just retired from the old City of Toronto Board of
Education in 1996 where I was the Coordinator of the Equity Studies Centre. My former boss, Edward Gordon, was one of the founders of the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture, and was also
Chair of the Board. He invited me to be one of the new directors of
this organization. He had been an outstanding supervisor, whose
encouragement and support greatly contributed to the many successes in the programs for which I was responsible. I did not hesitate to take up his offer, and have remained with this organization,
with an interruption for one year, when I went to Beijing to work for
the Peoples Education Press as a writer of classroom textbooks (in
English).
I freely admit I had never heard of CCVT before this. I had never
worked in the settlement sector before, so I had much to learn. I
had been a high school teacher, and later a Board of Education
administrator, responsible for training teachers in the Board’s Antiracism and Antidiscrimination policies, and working with them in
adapting the curriculum to meet the requirements of these policies.
This was a very interesting period working with a tremendous number of teachers who struggled to work on human rights issues.
Sadly, just as I was about to retire, Mike Harris was elected the new
Premier of Ontario, and I managed to escape the consequences of
Hari Lalla, Chair, CCVT Board of Directors
his policies on education.
Everyone has heard about Amnesty International, but few within my
circle of friends and colleagues had heard of Canadian Centre for the Victims of Torture. I learned that people
such as Dr. Allodi, Dr. Berger, and Trevor Bartram who were associated with Amnesty International were also
some of the founders of CCVT. I came to learn that there were many people from a variety of occupations and professions who were interested in CCVT. They include a network of psychiatrists and other health colleagues, lawyers, and a network of experienced workers from the settlement sector whose expertise lay in organizational
change, communication, and personnel policies, and an amazing network of volunteers, many of them university
students engaging their idealism in work related to those done at CCVT.
Over the years, I have come to know the staff, and I leave impressed by their dedication to their clients and their
dedication to all that occurs at the Centre. They are in demand as trainers, and workshop leaders, throughout the
province, and in the rest of Canada, and elsewhere. This year, we have added many new staff to add to the vibrancy here. One of the staff, Teresa Dremetsikas, our program coordinator, has been with the organization for 20
years. Congratulations, Teresa. Another staff, Ezat Mossallanejad, has recently published a book entitled Torture
in the Age of Fear. His expertise in the field of torture is such that he is frequently sought out to speak at many
gatherings. It has been my great pleasure to witness the work of the Executive Director, Mulugeta Abai. He is wellknown and highly regarded in the settlement community. Mulugeta has been the chief architect of CCVT’s good
health as an organization. No problem escapes his attention, and he is quick to solve them, while at the same time
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seeking the Board’s permission and advice. At Board meetings, he comes well-prepared with updates on the latest
projects, while preparing the Board for future ones. I will miss working with him, and my sincere hope is that he will
take vacations more regularly.
CCVT has a terrific Board of Directors, most of whom do difficult work in a variety of standing committees. Our
meetings are well attended; we know this by the increasing frequency of achieving quorum. We have finally met
CCVT’s obligations on Pay Equity, updated and approved the Personnel Manual, and overhauled CCVT’s Procedures for Responding to Complaints of Discrimination or Harassment. The Fundraising Committee has organized
the fifth annual First Light Celebration at the Grand Hotel to observe our thirtieth anniversary. We have successfully opened a satellite office in Scarborough at which a large number of clients have enrolled. This office is managed by Thilaga Jaganathan, one of our most experienced counsellors.
As the hot spots around the world proliferate, as governments continue to torture their own citizens, as countries in
the Western Hemisphere continue to debate whether they should torture prisoners, as a candidate for the post of
attorney general of the United States refuses to define torture, we realize that at CCVT we have much work to do
to alleviate the suffering of our clients, the victims of injustice at the hands of their governments.
It has been a privilege and an honour to be associated with such an important organization.
Hari Lalla
Chair, CCVT Board of Directors
CCVT Staff
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
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Report from the Legal Committee
The CCVT Legal Committee is presently composed of three lawyers and a staff member of the Centre who acts as
liaisons and brings the legal problems of the CCVT clients to the attention of the Committee. The Legal Committee
deals with legal matters arising from the CCVT mandate with the view of making the CCVT work more effective in
serving its clients. The Legal Committee is specifically active in the field of policy analysis, legal support and research. The Legal Committee is also involved in monitoring national and international human rights instruments
regarding torture, survivors, refugees and other uprooted people.
During the past year, the CCVT Legal Committee involved in the following areas of policy support:
Feedback on the IRB Guideline
Legal Committee has been monitoring the implementation of the Immigration and Refugee Board’s Guideline on
Vulnerable Persons Appearing Before the IRB. This non-binding Guideline has been implemented by the 3 divisions of the IRB, specifically the Refugee Protection Division, since December 15, 2006. The CCVT has maintained ongoing communication with the sister agencies as well as the Canadian Council for Refugees to assess
the effectiveness of the Guideline in addressing problems of the victims of torture, war, genocide and other crimes
against humanity.
Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (CAT)
Along with the CCVT International Committee, the Legal Committee is involved in monitoring international accession to this important human rights document. Canada has not yet ratified the Protocol. The government has repeatedly mentioned that the Protocol must be implemented at the provincial level. This needs coordination between the Federal and Provincial governments. On the basis of advice from the Legal Committee, the CCVT would
make a new request to both levels of the government for the rapid ratification of this crucial instrument in the prevention of torture.
Clients’ Refugee and Immigration problems
Throughout the year, the Legal Committee provided the CCVT with advice on the following issues: Immigration
limbo, legal obstacles to family reunification, and different kinds of inadmissibility problems. With close assistance
of the Legal Committee, CCVT made its best efforts to accelerate landing of vulnerable survivors of torture. Following are some specific cases the Legal Committee worked on this year:
• A client who was hospitalized in a mental health hospital and was going to be transferred to the forensic section
• Clients who were posed criminally inadmissible and had been asked to attend interviews at CBSA.
• Clients who are in limbo due to security concerns
• A client who was wrongfully arrested in Paris (France) on drug suspicion and was tortured in France.
• A client whose case was in a criminal court with the possibility of diversion.
Legal Committee also worked on other matters including:
Assistance with the effective participation at the joint meeting of the Human Rights Watch Toronto and the Amnesty International on the question of Diplomatic Assurances against torture.
• Discussion on the lack of access to detention centers in Ontario by doctors.
•
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Working with CBSA
CCVT made effective connections with the Canada Border Security Agency in dealing with cases of clients who
were deemed inadmissible and were under potential or actual deportation or removal orders. In some cases, we
succeeded in changing the condition of clients’ release. The greatest success we had was in the case of a client
who is a survivor of severe torture and has been living in Canada for the last 16 years. The CBSA accepted our
recommendation and withdrew his deportation order.
Legal Aid Ontario
CCVT continues to act as a member of the Legal Aid Ontario’s Advisory Committee and monitors the new developments, especially those that may affect CCVT clients.
Clients in Detention
CCVT is following the conditions of Immigration detention centres in Greater Toronto Area (GTA). We work with
two big coalitions one under the umbrella of the UNHCR legal office in Toronto and the other led by the Toronto
Refugee Affairs Council (TRAC).
Members: Richard Wazana, Hilary Evans Cameron, Douglas Lehrer
Staff Support: Ezat Mossallanejad
With help of Legal Committee, CCVT plays an effective role at a bi-annual Canadian Centre for
Refugee (CCR) conference
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Public Education
Mandate
The function of the public education committee is to contribute to the implementation of the organizational mandate
to raise awareness of the continuing effects of torture and war on survivors and their families and to work for their
protection and integrity. The committee strives to increase public awareness of torture, its effects and its global dimensions and to contribute to the development of human rights theory and practice. CCVT is a learning centre on
issues related to torture and human rights. Activities include research, the production and distribution of learning
materials, onsite training and education programs for staff, volunteers, students and the community, and public forums and presentations - locally and globally. During the past year, the committee focused particularly on the protection of Canadian citizens overseas against torture, impunity, the need for absolute prohibition of torture, the principle of non-refoulement to torture and the holistic rehabilitation of survivors of war and torture.
Training and Education
It is unfortunate that in the first decade of the 21st century torture is being perpetrated in 2/3 of the world’s countries. The continuing impact of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States has led some states,
including advanced industrial ones, to sanction “excessive measures” against suspected terrorists. While we must
warn the public about the evil of terrorism, we also need to work against torture. All these have prompted CCVT to
increase its efforts towards public education.
Following are some examples of workshops and presentations CCVT made in the past year:
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Workshops on the holistic services of CCVT to newcomers in COSTI Reception Centre in Toronto.
A presentation to a group of Kurdish, Iraqi, Iranian and Pakistani activists about torture and trauma.
A full-day symposium of the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime (CRCVC) in Ottawa.
Presentations on torture and CCVT services at the Toronto Northern Collegiate and the Vaughan Public
School.
A presentation to a group of Bell Canada staff members as a part of United Way Speakers Bureau.
A workshop to a group of 45 students at the Centre of Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Waterloo.
A workshop to a group of 75 students, community activists, care-givers and service providers at the Department of Media Studies, University of Buffalo.
A presentation on impunity, torture, rehabilitation, and the CCVT settlement services at the meeting of UN
Committee in Canada, Metro Hall, Toronto
A workshop to a group of supporters and volunteers of the Red Cross about torture as well as the rehabilitation
and settlement of survivors.
A workshop to a group of 45 students at the School of Social Work, York University.
A presentation on refugee in limbo to a group of lawyers and law students from the University of Toronto and
the York. A client of the CCVT who has been in limbo for the last 13 years spoke at the meeting.
Two presentations on the impact of limbo on mental health and on separated children who are survivors of torture at the meeting of the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto.
Two radio interviews along with an Iraqi client of the CCVT on situation in Iraq and the problems of the Iraqi
clients of the Centre.
A workshop on personal finance for CCVT clients.
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Followings are some meetings CCVT attended between 2006-2007:
• A youth roundtable on safe community.
• A half-day symposium on relationship between China and Canada at University of Toronto .
• A joint meeting of the Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Canada Border Security Agency, the UNHCR
branch office in Toronto, and sister NGOs. Issues discussed included: collaboration on protection, enforcement, detention, removal of refugee claimants, refugees and landed immigrants in Canada as well as the best
ways of serving clients.
• A panel discussion on the genocide prevention at Carlton University, Ottawa, organized by the All Party Parliamentary Group for Prevention of Genocide and the Carlton University
• Two bi-annual 3-day conferences organized by the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in the year 2006-7.
• An informal meeting with the Toronto Sun on the impact of torture on Iraqi clients, which result was published
in an article by Sandy Naiman the next day.
• A joint outreach meeting of the Iranian and Afghan communities.
• A film screening at the National Film Board of Canada of a film on women and Islam.
• A meeting of community workers who help newcomers at the FCJ refugee centre.
• ISAP conference of 2007 in Niagara Falls, organized by the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration.
• A conference on the settlement and human rights, organized by the Iranian LGBT community at the University
of Toronto.
• A meeting of the Toronto group of the Canadian Centre for International Justice (CCIJ).
• A meeting of the community and Legal workers and the UNHCR Legal Officer on providing effective services to
those who are in Immigration Detention Centers.
• Consultation meetings with the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto.
• A meeting organized by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health at the North York Civic Centre.
Learning Materials
CCVT’s journal First Light continues to provide valued and critical commentaries on current issues along with information on the Centre’s programs and activities. The last issue contains articles and research works done by the
CCVT staff, volunteers, clients and supporters. This edition will serve as a valuable record of the concerns and efforts that resulted in the creation of CCVT. First Light along with other research reports and public education materials are available on the CCVT web site.
Members: Susan McGrath, Seema Saadi, Mulugeta Abai,
Teresa Dremetsikas, Ezat Mossallanejad, Chizuru Nobe
CCVT Policy Analyst, Ezat Mossallanejad (second
from left) at International meeting on impunity
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Report from the Health
and Program Committee
Report from the Health Committee
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The tasks of the Health and Programme Committee are:
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To develop and monitor the implementation of procedures and guidelines for the assessment of clients and the
provision of services.
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To collaborate with the executive Director and other committee of the CCVT Board in fulfilling the mandate of
the Centre.
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To collaborate with the Personal Committee in staff development.
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To work with the Public Education Committee and the Volunteer Committee to promote public education.
The activities for this year include the recruitment of resident in Psychiatry to work at CCVT.: This year’s placement was Dr. Chetana Kulkarni who delivered most needed mental health services to children and Youth. Members of the network and staff made presentations on the issue of Mental Health and Torture this year included:
Faculty of Social work University of Toronto, Centre for Refugee Studies, York University and George Brown College.
Co Chairs: Dr. Lisa Anderman and Dr. Donald Payne
Members: Dr. Rosemary Meier, Dr. Debra Stein, Dr. Wendell Block
Staff Support: Mohamed Ahmed and Teresa Dremetsikas
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Report from
the International Committee
CCVT International Committee is monitoring the activities and services of a network of organizations that support
survivors of war and torture and makes necessary recommendations to the CCVT Board of Directors. This committee is also working towards monitoring and responding to the global issues related to prevention, exposure and
eradication of torture. During the year 2006-2007 the International Committee was involved in the following activities:
Protection of human rights workers and torture survivors
The international Committee monitored the persecution of human rights workers across the globe and helped
CCVT to intervene:
• Based on repeated requests from our Iranian clients as well as sister agencies, the International Committee monitored the cases of torture and gross human rights violations in Iran. We wrote to the governments
of Iran and Canada to work towards the immediate release of the Iranian journalist Mr. Akbar Ganji, the
Canadian-Iranian philosopher Dr. Ramin Jahanbegloo and other Iranian human rights supporters - writers,
journalists, union activists and detained women.
• Based on International Committee’s monitoring of the escalation of hostilities in the Middle East and the conditions of human rights workers in the area, we maintained ongoing communication with the government of Canada for its intervention. We wrote to the Prime Minister Stephen Harper in connection with the evacuation of
Canadian citizens from dangerous hotspots in south Lebanon. We requested him to act as an honest broker
and use Canada’s human rights records to contribute towards an immediate ceasefire in this turbulent region.
We appealed to him to rely on the moral authority of the Canadian society and utilize all bilateral as well multilateral means to stop war in Lebanon.
• We made a number of interventions with the offices of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in
Turkey and Geneva as well the governments of Canada and Turkey about the plight of Iraqi, Kurdish, Syrian
and Iranian asylum seekers and refugees in Turkey. Special cases were brought to attention of the CCVT by
our clients whose relatives lived without protection in Turkey.
International meeting and conferences
Following are activities at various international events during 2006-2007:
• A presentation on “The Trauma of Forced Migration” to the International Conference on Forced Migration
organized by the University of York.
• NGOs consultation meeting with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (Pre-Executive Committee)
• Executive Meeting of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.
• Three-day Conference of Religion and Peace organized by John Humphrey Centre in Edmonton, Alberta.
• A presentation on the global practice of torture to a public meeting organized by the United Nations Association in Canada, on the occasion of the anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
• Annual human rights conference of the Department of Foreign Affairs in Ottawa.
• First general assembly of the International Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims (IRCT) in Berlin, Germany.
• Two-day symposium on torture, impunity war crimes and crimes against humanity in commemoration of
Raul Wallenberg at York University.
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Protection of Canadian Citizens against Torture
CCVT spared no time in bringing the public and the Canadian government’s attention to the plight of Canadian citizens who were sent to other countries to be tortured or ill-treated (the practice of rendition). We specifically supported the cases of our client Mr. Ahmed Abou El-Maati as well as Zahra Kazemi, Mr. William Sampson and Mr.
Maher Arar and we provided our feedback to the government of Canada. We asked for government’s intervention
in the case of a client of the CCVT who had been tortured and maltreated by police in Paris, France.
Optional Protocol
The International Committee continued to monitor developments regarding An Optional Protocol to the Convention
against Torture, dealing with the mandate of the UN Committee against Torture to enter and monitor conditions in
places of detention. On December 1, 2006, we wrote to the Prime Minister of Canada and urged for the government’s ratification of the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention Against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (Optional Protocol or OPCAT). In December 2002 the United Nations
adopted the OPCAT, an international instrument that stands to make an important contribution to preventing torture
and ill-treatment worldwide. The OPCAT lays out a framework for regular national and international level inspections of detention centres, with a view to identifying and remedying the conditions that encourage and allow torture
and ill-treatment to take place.
CCIJ
During the past year, CCVT continued with its collaboration with the Canadian Centre for International Justice
(CCIJ). The CCIJ is now incorporated as a non-profit NGO. The mandate of CCIJ is addressing the global problem
of impunity and bringing torturers, war criminals and people who have committed crimes against humanity to justice in Canada.
Members: Regine King, Ima Madadi, Mulugeta Abai, Teresa Dremetsikas, Ezat Mossallanejad
CCVT Executive Director, Mulugeta Abai (top left), participated in the first general assembly of the International Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims (IRCT)
in Berlin, Germany
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Mr. António Guterres, the UN High Commissioner
for Refugges addressing at the Pre-EXCOM meeting
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Settlement Program
Since its inception, Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture has been providing settlement services to survivors and
their families. The Settlement Program helps survivors overcome the lasting effects of torture and war by providing
them with specialized services through community based approach. In 2006/2007 the Settlement Program had
many successes and overcame many challenges. In entering its second year, CCVT Scarborough office offers a
well-established and well-known settlement program assisting survivors and their families in Scarborough. The
total number of clients seen this year reached 879. Of these, there were: 324 women, 284 men, and 271 children
and youth. 234 clients were seen at the Scarborough branch.
In 2006-2007, CCVT Settlement Program offered a full range of services including:Initial needs assessment, Referral to community services, Information and orientation, Counseling, Employment-related services, and Crisis intervention. These services are available in many different languages including, Albanian, Amharic, French, Tamil,
Arabic, Tigrinya, Spanish, Farsi, Dari, Kinyarwanda, Lingala, Somali, etc.
Clients participated in different social events, including: the UN International day in Support of Victims of Torture;
the Annual Picnic, Family Day, Refugee World Day, and the Holiday
Party.
The Support groups for survivors this year featured:
• a Somali women's group
• a Rwandan group
• a mixed African women's group
• a Tamil group
The CCVT counseling team made presentations to other agencies including:
• The Ottawa Community Immigrant Services Organization (OCISO).
• The Cedarbrook Community Centre
• The Ontario Human Rights Commission
• The Centre of Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Waterloo
• The Department of Media Studies, University of Buffalo
• Nelson Mandela Public School
• The Iranian and Afghan communities
Specialized Counselling Service
Professional development Sessions this year included:
CPR, Cross Cultural Communication, Trauma and Torture, and 6 individual courses taken under the PET (Professional Educational Training Project).
Teresa Dremetsikas
Settlement Coordinator
Tamil Support Group
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Children’s Program
Here at the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT), we provide support to all members of the family, those
directly or indirectly impacted by war and persecution. Also, we support many young individuals who are rebuilding
a sense of family in Canada. The child and youth program at CCVT is an essential part of the holistic support we
provide to our clients, created in response to the expressed and ever-changing needs of torture survivors.
In the 2006 – 2007 fiscal year, there were many exciting developments in the Child and Youth program. The most
exciting new change is the initiation of a CCVT Child and Youth program in Scarborough. The expansion of the
child and youth services has meant that activities are more accessible and effective. Since March of 2007, the
Scarborough branch has provided homework help, employment advice, parenting information sessions, summer
outings, a girls club and countless individual sessions to many young individuals and families. This expansion, in
addition to the developments at the downtown office, has brought about many successful outcomes for our staff
and clients.
For example, young adults have gained meaningful leadership skills, built their knowledge of Canadian systems of
employment and education while also expanding their network of contacts through many group activities. These
activities involved the Youth Future Pathways meeting where number of newcomer youths from high schools
across Toronto met with mentors from various universities to discuss the possible academic pursuits that are available in Canada. Also, young adults participated in employment information sessions, a March break day and joined
CCVT staff at rainbow cinema for a movie.
Meanwhile, parents seek the support of CCVT in their effort to provide their children with the tools they need to
have a successful future. Parents of over 55 children feel empowered when making use of the tutors available at
the homework club, and through our volunteer program. Caregivers become more settled as they learn about the
educational system and child welfare system through the information sessions. Also, Caregivers feel more
equipped to parent their children in Canada, with the support of CCVT settlement counselors who provide information, emotional support and resources As a result, many children are learning, succeeding in school, experiencing
less of a cultural gap with their caregivers and peers, joining community sport programs, meeting new friends and
visiting special attractions in Toronto.
Reflecting on the activities and accomplishments of the 2006 – 2007 fiscal year, we as staff, clients and stakeholders learn from the successes and challenges of the year and look forward to the coming year and the new developments it might bring. For example, we anticipate the development of more group services for both parents
and young adults. The CCVT staff hopes to continue building new partnerships with schools, child and youth services and levels of government. These initiatives will be made possible by pursuing additional outreach activities to
increases in the number of new clients and broaden the number of
public education sessions.
In summary, CCVT provides referrals to medical professionals for
specialized treatment and documentation, social and recreational activities, public education initiatives, individual and family counseling,
informational and social groups, tutoring, befriending, advocacy and
many other activities. These services were provided to 271 children
and youth who were born in many different countries namely; Somalia, Ethiopia, Congo, Rwanda, Afghanistan and Kenya.
Aislinn Clancy & Mbalu Wembo
Child & Youth Counsellor
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Summer Youth Outing - Toronto Zoo
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Volunteer Program
Celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT) gives us a great opportunity
to acknowledge the dedication and commitment in our volunteer program. CCVT Volunteers are passionate, caring and hardworking members of our community. They come from all walks of life – university students, lawyers,
mothers, high school students, teachers, engineers, truck drivers, refugees and survivors of torture… the list goes
on. Regardless of the differences in their background, there is one thing in common – they all want to help.
At CCVT, we believe that torture is not an individual problem, but rather a social infirmity. Since its inception,
CCVT deliberately chose the community based model in order to address the issue of social trauma. All programs
are carefully designed to break the physical, psychological and emotional isolation. Our goal is not just the healing
of individuals, but the building and strengthening of healing communities. Volunteers contribute to creating healing
communities by connecting survivors of torture with the host community. In practical terms, they provide support
as interpreters, ESL tutors, homework club helpers, computer tutors, receptionists, and befrienders. With over 250
volunteers, the centre spreads awareness of torture. It aims to foster norms of trust and reciprocity in the community.
Here are some of accomplishments in the Volunteer Program during 2006-2007.
Training/ Workshops
• Initial training for new volunteers. Between April 2006 and March 2007, eight orientation sessions were held for
the ninety eight new volunteers recruited for the program.
• A daylong training session was held for volunteers interested in participating in the befriending program.
• Volunteer Meetings on relevant topics. Topics for this year’s sessions included: Women Fleeing Persecution; A
Look at the Situation of Refugees from a Woman’s Perspective, Walking with the Children; the Vision of GuluWalk, Anti-Discrimination 101, Darfur genocide, Crossing Culture, and Haiti-Canada’s other occupation.
Volunteer-led program
• Forty-five Befriending/ ESL matches made during 2006-2007
• Six tax clinic sessions attended by a total of ninety one clients both in the downtown office and Scarborough
office
• Three conversation circles held on a weekly basis which provide ESL students at both CCVT locations
(downtown and Scarborough) with the opportunity to practice their speaking skills in a fun, safe environment
• The weekly homework club for elementary and high school students
Social Events
• World Refugee Day celebrations held at Dundas Square on June 20th, 2006
• Two events on June 26th, 2006 to mark the United Nations Day in Support of Survivors of Torture: a talent
show, sing-a-long and celebration with clients as well as the North American Premiere of the movie the Secret
Life of Words held at the National Film Board.
• The Annual Picnic in High Park on July 30th, 2006
• United Walk at the Queen’s Park on September 9th, 2006
• Fourth First Light Celebration held at Enoch Turner School House on November 23rd, 2006
• Annual General Meeting and Holiday Party held at Bickford Centre on December 17th, 2006
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
17
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
We recognize our volunteers as a pillar of CCVT. They touch lives with their generous spirit. The CCVT Volunteer
Program continues to grow and we look forward to welcoming more community members to our team of volunteers
in the coming year.
Chizuru Nobe,
Volunteer Coordinator
Volunteer Advisory Committee: Tony Boston, Mia Toose, Jen Spinner, Laura Parson, Jason Baker, Delna Press,
Victoria Zeppa
Homework Club
Adrian Bradbury, co-founder of
GuluWalk, with Mita Patel, CCVT
volunteer at Volunteer Spotlight
Night. May 2006
18
June 26, 2006 - North American Premiere of the
movie the Secret Life of Words: Actress Sarah
Polley (left) and Dr. Abdel Hamid Afana, the President of International Rehabilitation Counsil for
Torture Victims (IRCT)
AGM & Holiday Party
December 2006
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Olivia Chow, CCVT First Light
Celebration Auctioneer
November 2006
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
English as a Second Language and
Computer Training Program
In the past 17 years, the CCVT English Language program has been a key component in successfully rebuilding of
the lives of survivors of torture and organized violence. Our English program caters to the needs of adult learners
who suffer from debilitating imprints that make the learning process harder and strenuous. Our classes are specially adapted to the learning abilities and needs of CCVT clients. Our teachers are specially trained and our curriculum is adapted to help students acquire skills related to their immediate life goals. The classroom atmosphere
and supportive environment provide clients with encouragement, hope, community, and the help they need to progress with their language and social skills.
Class levels available to our clients range from low beginner to advanced. Every year the CCVT provides language
training for approximately 300 clients from 60 countries. Clients stay with our English language Programs for an
average of 3 to 18 months, moving through language proficiency levels at their own pace. Classes are provided
solely on CCVT premises so clients and teaching staff will have access to counselors in case counseling for emotional or other kinds of difficulties become necessary. The ESL program is funded in part by the federal government’s Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) project, through the Toronto District School Board,
and through fundraising efforts.
We are constantly seeking for ways to improve our programs through collaborative work with instructors, counselors, CCVT computer program, CCVT volunteers and partner agencies in Europe. The CCVT language program
has accumulated significant expertise in delivering services to traumatized refugee learners, and in providing workshops and seminars for ESL and educational professionals. CCVT has already developed its reputation as an active and leading organization that can provide curriculum and delivery practice. as well as professional insight into
newcomer and refugee learner issues.
In cooperation with the volunteer program we have enhanced our English tutoring and befriending program to include a significant number of our students. We have also introduced two conversation circles -facilitated by volunteers- to assist low beginner and intermediate level students in their communication skills. And we now have a successful computerized English language lab program that benefits our students tremendously.
Despite challenges, the CCVT language program continues to be a
critical component of a successful recovery program for our clients. It
is also the first point of contact with their new home in Canada for our
clients. The English program at the CCVT has become a source of
strength and support that helps our clients resume their lives with
independence, confidence and dignity.
This year the CCVT 's Computer Program provided basic and advanced instruction in MS Office, the internet, e-mail, and office procedures -to educate our clients in the new technology, and to help them
find employment. 55 computer students, (38 women, 17 men), attended these classes. 23 women and 6 men graduated.
Abdul Abubaker
LINC/ESL Coordinator
LINC Graduation
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
19
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Board of Directors
Hari Lalla
Curriculum Coordinator Anti-Racism and
Multiculturalism, Toronto Board of
Education (retired)
Chair, Board of Directors
Caleb Mabano
Financial Specialist
Treasure
Seema Saadi
Adeena Niazi
Executive Director, Afghan Women’s Counseling and
Integration Community Organization
Member, Personnel Committee
Community Work
Member, Public Education
Nancy Slamet
Tony Boston
Social Worker, Consultant
Strategic Planning and Community Development
Secretary, Board of Directors
Member, Fundraising and Personnel Committee
Ima Madadi
Bilingual Programme Administrator, Employment
Insurance Office, Federal Government of Canada
Member, International Committee
Community Worker and Advocate
Member at Large
Aberra Mekonnen
Executive Director, Oromo Canadian Community
Association of GTA
Member, Fundraising Committee
Hilary Evans Cameron
Dr. Donald Payne
Lawyer
Member, Legal Committee
Psychiatrist
Co-chair, Health Committee
Richard Wazana
Immigration Lawyer
Member, Legal Committee
Regine King
Mental Health Counsellor, Canadian Mental
Health Association
Member, Health Committee
20
Dr. Marlinda Freire
Psychiatrist, Hospital for Sick Children,
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto
Co-chair, Health Committee
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Financial Report
Consolidated Schedule of Operations
Year Ended March 31, 2007
Revenues
2007
2006
Citizenship and Immigration Canada – ISAP A
469,905
349,748
Citizenship and Immigration Canada – LINC
251,954
252,696
Donations
United Way
United Nations
City of Toronto
Ministry of Citizenship
- NSP
- Pay Equity
174,859
183,522
27,785
22,500
174,070
183,518
22,800
22,500
78,336
23,311
45,622
23,311
(-186)
0
(-37)
0
718
6087
1,204,919
1080,315
1,158,349
1,041,191
46,570
39,124
Interest and sundry income
Foundations
Honorarium
Expenses
Excess of Revenues Over Expenses
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
21
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Consolidated Statement of Expenses
Year Ended March 31, 2007
Expenses
2007
2006
Wages and benefits
Partnerships/Sponsorships
Fundraising expenses
Program supplies and expenses
788209
0
51,807
68,512
613,608
0
66,307
76,954
Stationery and supplies
Common expenses
Traveling expenses
Conference and meetings
Telephone
Maintenance and cleaning
Bookkeeping
Resource Production
Mortgage interest
Utilities
Postage and courier
Insurance
Printing and photocopying
Interest and bank charges
Professional fees
Equipment rental
9,418
20,972
36614
9,562
17,403
21,975
27,433
0
5,528
12,971
5,991
9,518
8,206
(-952)
22,188
11,005
8,300
16,672
28,180
1007
11,697
15,724
17,229
681
5,043
11,462
4,584
7,348
4,235
1,977
13,310
12,131
Development and travel
Dues and fees
Publicity
2,279
2,344
556
4,935
1,949
120
Amortization
9,271
16,817
Funded Capital Production
20,880
91,730
Rent
Total
24,444
9,191
1,186,134
1,041191
Note: For the complete audited financial report, please contact CCVT at 416-363-1066
22
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Programs
• Mental Health: mutual support
groups, crisis intervention, art therapy,
individual and group therapy, coordinated professional services including
legal, medical and social care which
provide treatment, documentation and
legal support. The use of art assists
survivors in learning to cope with the
torture experience and transforms it into
one that is understood and objectified.
• Settlement Services: employment,
housing, language, skills training, social
assistance, applications for family
reunification, sponsorships, orientations
based on the client’s needs are provided
to assist in settlement, Volunteers
also facilitate the settlement process
by providing interpretation, escorting,
Befriending and English tutoring.
• Children’s Program: Art and Play
Therapy, mutual support groups,
settlement services, mental health.
• Volunteer Program: a Befriending
Program that assists survivors in
rebuilding their connections to others
as well as to the greater community;
an ESL Tutoring Program to help
students learn and practice their
English; Escorting and Interpreting
for survivors at different appointments
(medical, legal, social) More than 200
volunteers assist in all programs of
the CCVT and hold monthly meetings,
usually with a guest speaker. A structured
orientation program prepares volunteer
befrienders to work with torture survivors
within a context of community understanding of global issues. The “CCVT
Newsletter” is sent to all volunteers
each month, which provides information
on CCVT events, volunteer opportunities
and job postings. A volunteer guide has
also been prepared.
• Public Education: responds to numerous
requests for information, assistance and
consultations on torture and the effects
of torture as well as regularly producing
resource materials. CCVT’s semi-annual
publication “First Light”, is produced which
discusses issues related to the CCVT's
mandate and ongoing work.
• Language Instruction and Computer
Training: English as a Second Language courses which are specifically
designed to meet the needs of survivors
and include a strong life skills component. Classes include all levels of literacy: beginners, intermediate and advanced. Computer courses in Microsoft
Office and Windows are provided at introductory and intermediate levels.
• International Projects: CCVT is associated with a coalition of Centres which
support victims of organized violence,
repression and torture, in exile or in
their own countries
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
23
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Health Network
Psychiatrists, Dr. F. Allodi
Psychologists Dr. L. Andermann
Dr. R. Berdichevsky
Dr. Gerald Devins
Dr. M. Freire
Dr. Fornazzari
Dr. Mitra Gholamani
Dr. Oren Gozlan
Dr. S. A. Hassan
Dr. Tat Lo
Dr. R. Meier
Dr. Clare Pain
Dr. D. Payne
Dr. J. Pilowsky
Dr. R. Ruskin
Dr. J. Santa Barbara
Dr. Richard Stall
Dr. Stewart
Other
Specialists
24
General
Practitioners
Dr. J. Blakeney
Dr. P. Berger
Dr. Wendell Block
Dr. N. Degani
Dr. H. Getu
Dr. M. Goodman
Dr. Y. Hailemeskel
Dr. Irazusta
Dr. R. Klein
Dr. A Pyper
Dr. L. Richmond
Dr. A. Stern
Dr. J. Sugiyama
Dr. D. Thow
Dr. A. Vaezi
Dr. J. Weinstein
Dr. Miriam Wiebe
Dr. Debra Stein
Dr. Degani, General Surgeon
Dr. Singer, Ophthalmologist
Dr. Sliwin, Plastic Surgeon
Dr. Wade, Hearing Specialist
Dr. Ryhanian, Dentist
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Legal Network
Michael F. Battista
Raoul Boulakia
Michael Brodzky
Larry Butkowsky
David Buzaglo
Michael Campell
Juan F. Carranza
Tollis Chan
Laurence Cohen
Nancy Elliot
Lorne A. Faratovitch
Joseph S. Farskas
Daniel M. Fine
Monica Franklin
Jeffrey Goldman
Mendel Green
John Grice
Isak Grushka
John M. Guoba
Peter E. Haber
Marchand Hagan
Kenneth N. Hagan
Kenneth Hahn
Toba Hamersfield
Marc Herman
Rita Hisar
Barbara Jackman
Douglas A. Johnson
Anthony Kako
Sergio Karas
Catherine Kerr
El-Farouk Khaki
Mitchell E. Korman
Michael Korman
Benjamin A. Kranc
Marianne P. Kroes
Peter J. Kroshak
Douglas Lehrer
Lorne Lichtenstein
Cynthia Mancia
Harry Mann
Harvey S. Margel
Kristin Marshall
Jack Martin
Caroline McChesney
Lisa McCullough
Adam McIver
Kevin McTavish
Jegan N. Mohan
Dennis S. Morris
Connie Nakatsu
David Orman
Norris J. Ormston
Pamila Bhardwaj Pohani
Patrick Roche
Joel Rosen
Lisa Rosenblatt
Roger Rowe
Geraldine Sadoway
Harvey Savage
Regina L. Senjule
Geary B. Shorser
Maureen Silcoff
Donald C. Simmons
Catherine Smee
Belva Spiel
Thampiah Sripathy
Nathan Sritharan
William A. Sullivan
Leonard Susman
Byron J.M. Thomas
Helen Turner
Paul Vandervennen
Patricia Wong
Ian Wong
Rodney L.H. Woolf
Susan J. Woolner
Peter J. Wuebbolt
David P. Yerzy
Leon Damonge
Richard Wazana
Hilary Evans Cameron
Mehras Yousefi
Chantal Desloges
Ameend Sherazee
Carole Dehan
Andrew Brouwer
Tim Wichert
Hedayat Nezami
Mary Thatam
Ann Bergenstein
Avvy Go
Marjerie Hailey
Lena Anani
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
25
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Staff
Mulugeta Abai
Executive Director
Ermelina Balla
Settlement Counsellor
Marina H. Bihi
Group Facilitator
Marion Abel*
LINC Instructor
Malini Pararajasingham
Group Facilitator
Abdurahman Abubakar
LINC/ESL Coordinator
Samar Nejar**
Teaching Assistant
Catherine Raine
LINC Instructor
Mohamed Rabi Ahmed
Settlement Counsellor
Elena Solokhina**
Computer Instructor
Daniela Alfaro Lili
Settlement Counsellor
Dave Burt
LINC Instructor
Munni Subhani
LINC Instructor
Aislinn Clancy
Child & Youth Counsellor
Teresa Dremetsikas
Settlement Coordinator
Delfina Vega de Paiz
Administrative Assistant
Ana Krneta*
LINC Instructor
Ambaro Guled
Group Program Facilitator
Mbalu Wembo**
Child/Youth Program Counsellor
Thilaga Jeganathan
Settlement Counsellor
Jackie Gakumba
Settlement Counsellor
Mohamed Ali Haji
LINC Computer Assisted Language
Instructor
Sandra Monteath****
ESL Instructor, Toronto Board of
Education
Chizuru Nobe
Volunteer Coordinator
Susanna Cluer
ESL Instructor, Toronto Board of
Education
Elizabeth Jones
ESL Instructor, Toronto Board of
Education
Jane Desmond
LINC Instructor
Diep Nguyen
Settlement Counsellor
Emma Firsten-Kaufman
Child & Youth Counsellor
Hodan Mohamed***
Outreach Worker
Viola Byegeka
Settlement Counsellor
Maria Callejas*
Child/ Youth Program Counsellor
Marcia Casado
Teaching Assistant
Selamawit Yohannes
Settlement Counsellor
*resigned
**maternity leave
***contract ended
****transferred
Juliette Ntege
Administrative Assistant
Ezat Mossallanejad
Settlement Counsellor
Henry Scott Cowan
Computer Instructor
Interns and Students
Hoda Samater
Faculty of Social Work
University of Toronto
Mariyate Piriya Wijayasundar
Faculty of Social Work
Ryerson University
26
Melisa Panuelos
Women Studies
University of Toronto
Esther Li
Faculty of Medicine
University of Toronto
Petra Okeke
Faculty of Social Work
University of St. Thomas New Brunswick
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Volunteers
Abba Emmanuel Chima
Abdollah Heydari
Abuashrof Chowdhury
Adam Pepler
Adil Amad
Adrianna Stipanovich
Adrienne Abrahamson
Ahava Trivedi
Aitana Guia
Alan Campbell
Alexander Teleki
Ali Bangi
Ali Hayes
Alice Schuda
Alison Mills
Amal Mohamed
Aminah Hussain
Ana Drandic
Ana Jofre
Andrea Cameron
Andrea Jones
Andrew Lee
Andrew Webster
Andrew Captan
Anka Drandic
Ann Harrington
Anna Pashin
Anne Bain
Anne Pyke
Ariel Condino
Arijana Arpadzic
Arturo Aguilar
Asli Koca
Ayesha Anwari
Barakat Ali
Barbara Yealland
Barry Trentham
Benamar Benatta
Bonnie Kim
Brian Hubbs
Brice Sopher
Caitlin Maxwell
Candace Joseph
Candice Beth
Carl Gerber
Carol Brailey
Carrie Wong
Catherine Carroll
Catherine Legere
Catherine Taman
Changkeun Lee
Charlotte Hell
Cherylin Gilad
Christopher Linhares
Cindy Cross
Claudia Ponce
Claudia Ramirez
Colombe Karangwa
Connie Lin
Curtis Puncher
Daniel Blumenfeld
Daniel Huizenga
Daniel Oduro Sem
Danielle Coghlan
Danielle White
Daphna Sharan
Darren McKee
Dejana Milinkov
Delna Press
Diana Karolina Grimaldos
Diane Dadian
Dianne Oliphant
Diep Nguyen
Dina Aloi
Dirk Leemans
Donna Nicoloff
Ed Tarter
Elham Alizadeh
Eli Malinsky
Elisa Minakis
Emily Chan
Erin Fitzgerald
Erin Pease
Erin Valade
Eun-ji Jeoung
Euridice Correa
Feven Tefferi
Feven Yacob
Fisnik Brovina
Gabriela Agatiello
Gabriela Gonzalez
Geoff Fridd
Gillian Dowie
Gina Jamal
Guiseppina Caccia
Guler Turhan
Gurbir Singh
Hang-Sun Kim
Hanna Caplan
Hasan Al-Batram
Hassan Sesay
Hassen Mohammed
Heather Douglas
Heather Lash
Hodan Yusuf
Julie Hodson
Ibrahim Ben Kalown
Ima Madadi
Indira Rodrigo
Ira Gandasaputra
Iraj Emad
Iraj Soltani
Irina Nigay
Irina Tsamtsourova
Isabel Drever
Ivana Ljubic
Ivana Miletic
Ivana Vijica
Jackie Fitz
James Moffat
Jamie McMillan
Janani Shanmuganathan
Jane Gallagher
Janet Haddock
Jasmine Chatha
Jason Baker
Jennifer Spinner
Jeremy Speight
Jessie Carson
John Faustmann
Jill Barber
John Clark
John Sakeris
Jonathan de la Cruz
Josh Goodbaum
Joyce Nyokabi
Julie Chamberlain
Julie de Corneille
Julie Hodson
Jun Morikawa
Kamau Ngugi
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
27
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Kaori Shimamura
Karen Ensslen
Kate E. Dadey
Kate Mcleod
Kathleen Fodrek
Kathleen Pattinson
Kathlene McGuinne
Keely Anderson
Kevin de Jesus
Kimberly Gibbons
Kimberly Murdoch
Kimlan Hokan
Kirsten Lam
Kofi Achampong
Krista Craven
Lambert Boenders
Larissa Goodyear
Laryssa Carter
Laura Chuard
Laura Hodgson
Laura Monteith
Laura Parsons
Leonore Clauss
Lori Habermehl
Lorie Nunez
Luis Martin Flores GarciaLynn Hanley
Madina Hadi
Maija Puddle
Majella Skrinda
Mala Pasha
Manuela Ocrainschi
Mara Herscovitch
Maral Momeni
Marc Rosen
Mari Hotta
Maria Socorro Molin
Marian Raty
Mariko Tanaka
Mark Duff
Mark Hajnal
Mark Zbogar
Martin Mark
Mary Goward
Mary Mitsios
Meena Nallainathan
Meghan Kelday
Melanie Shulman
Melissa Coward
Melissa Haw
Mia Toose
Michael Bird
Michael Moreau
Michele Woodey
28
Michelle Gabowicz
Mita Patel
Mona Hassanien
Monika Payseur
Monireh Mohammadi
Moumita Saha
Moussa Sabzehghabae
Anja Kortenaar
Muhammad Asif
Muneeba Karolia
Muzaffer Aydin
Myriam Garcia
Nadereh Kolayni
Nadia Halim
Nadia Mia
Najwa Al Hasani
Nalina Sathi
Nancy Rizzo
Naomi Sarah Ball
Nashwa Tawfiq
Natalia Simanovsky
Natalie Ramtahal
Natasha Matthew
Negar Shahyar
Nerrida Kogitz
Maureen Neville
Nicky Sidhu
Nicola Carty
Natasha Matthew
Nooreen Pirbhai
Olena Yonenko
Parna Bhattacharjee
Patricia Chraiteh
Patrick Riley Tucker
Peter Tanuseputro
Rahma Mohamed
Rakesh Bhardwaj
Ranka Bulajic
Rebecca Lee
Rebecca Sargent
Regine King
Remy Harerimana
Renee Ferguson
Rheba Adolph
Rita Benkhalti
Robin Wills
Rodrigo Konigs
Ron chernysh
Roxana Baciu
Rufus Dickinson
Ruth Mathiang
Ruwan Chandrasekara
Saime Coskun
Sam Dughman
Samah Dawood
Samarra Hyde
Sanam Islam
Sanda Kazazic
Sandra Morelli
Santiago Marsden
Sarah El-Shaarawi
Sasmita Rajaratnam
Serena Dimitrakopoulos
Sevda Mansour
Shahin Kara
Sharareh Faghihi
Sharona Freudmann
Shira Taylor
Shirley Camia
Shruti Vora
Sidrah Ahmad
Simon Dickie
Sonam Choedon
Srijeeta Verma
Suha Diab
Susan Weinert
Suzanne Robertson
Suzanne Shub
Tamara Caldwell
Tamara Ticoll
Tania Natscheff
Tania Pisa
Taras Hladyak
Tebello Morojele
Thomas Foster
Timothy Lwanga
Tola Ajao
Toma Shamani
Tomas Orellana
Toni Prinss
Tony Boston
Umbereen Inayet
Valerie Pigeon
Vasu Sivapalan
Vicky Burrus
Victoria Zeppa
Vitor Franceschini
Vongdy Un
Wendy Sandy
Woinshet Tekle
Yao Chen
Yared Mela
Zehra Abbas
Zorana Alimpic
Zulma Mejia
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Survivors
Figure 1. New Clients by Country: April 2006 - March 2007
Total new clients: 778
Countries: 61 Female: 267
Male: 258 Children/youth: 253
Country
Adults
F
M
Children/Youth
F
M
Total
Country
Adults
F
M
Afghanistan
9
7
10
12
38
Ivory Coast
2
1
Albania
11
13
8
4
36
Jamaica
3
1
1
4
4
Angola
7
Azerbaijan
2
Bangladesh
5
Bolivia
22
15
Kosova
3
3
1
1
Kyrgyzstan
1
1
2
Lebanon
2
4
5
1
2
7
6
26
Liberia
8
5
13
Mauritania
1
2
2
Mexico
8
4
Mongolia
1
1
Montenegro
1
8
1
5
2
1
China
7
4
Colombia
5
4
Congo Dem.
Rep.
Costa Rica
26
5
1
1
Djibouti
2
3
10
Egypt
7
2
9
1
1
1
11
1
2
1
9
4
5
26
1
2
3
14
Morocco
1
1
1
10
Nigeria
3
10
6
12
53
Pakistan
7
11
2
2
22
2
Palestine
3
2
5
7
17
2
Russia
4
1
4
1
10
1
Rwanda
6
9
10
10
35
1
Somalia
17
7
6
4
34
1
Sri Lanka
34
20
4
1
1
El Salvador
4
5
Cameroon
Ecuador
6
Jordan
Burundi
Chile
2
Kenya
1
1
3
12
1
Chechnya
Total
2
Bosnia
Canada
Children/Youth
F
M
1
2
19
58
Eritrea
12
7
5
2
26
Sudan
7
6
Ethiopia
18
25
19
13
75
Syria
1
2
1
4
Ghana
1
1
Tanzania
1
2
2
5
Granada
1
1
Turkey
1
7
5
2
Uganda
4
9
1
Guinea
Guyana
1
1
2
Haiti
3
2
2
Ukraine
5
USA
1
Uzbekistan
5
1
1
14
2
15
2
15
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
Yemen
1
3
2
2
Honduras
1
India
3
2
Iran
13
31
4
5
53
Zimbabwe
Iraq
5
10
5
3
23
Grand Total
267
1
258
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
141
1
5
1
6
112
778
29
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
CCVT Survivors
Figure 2. Previous Clients by Country: April 2006 - March 2007
Total previous clients: 101 Countries: 23 Female: 57 Male: 26 Children/youth: 18
Country
Adults
Children/Youth
F
M
Afghanistan
2
1
Albania
10
6
Angola
1
1
Azerbaijan
1
1
Burundi
1
1
Cameroon
1
Congo Dem. Rep.
1
Eritrea
1
Ethiopia
7
Iran
5
Iraq
1
1
2
4
3
4
Macedonia
1
1
Mexico
1
1
9
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
Sri Lanka
1
2
1
2
4
3
2
1
Tanzania
1
Turkey
1
Venezuela
1
Grand total
57
11
2
1
18
3
1
2
Rwanda
17
1
1
Nigeria
30
3
1
Kosova
Somalia
M
1
Cuba
Pakistan
F
Total
26
1
2
1
1
4
2
1
26
12
6
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
101
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Figure 3. Source of Referrals
27.3%
80
22.8%
70
60
18.3%
16.6%
50
12.8%
40
30
20
1.7%
10
0.3%
Po
l ic
e/
Co
ur
t
Ho
sp
it a
l
Cl
ie
nt
s
Se
lf
Ag
en
cy
un
ity
O
th
er
Co
m
m
La
wy
er
0
Figure 4. Gender
Female
54%
Male
46%
Female
Male
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
31
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Figure 5. Age Category
Seniors
5%
Children & Youth
32%
Adults
63%
Adults
Seniors
Children & Youth
Figure 6. Marital Status
Widowed
9%
Common-Law
3%
Divorced
5%
Single
33%
Common-Law
Married
43%
Divorced
Married
Separated
Separated
7%
Single
Widow ed
32
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Figure 7. Education Category
140
43.3%
120
29.4%
100
21.1%
80
60
40
3.1%
3.1%
20
ra
du
at
e
ec
on
da
Po
st
-s
Po
st
-g
ry
y
Se
co
nd
ar
ar
y
Pr
im
Illi
te
ra
te
0
Figure 8. Employment Skills
Business
5%
Unskilled
23%
Clerical
1% Farmer
2%
Homemaker
1%
Other
13%
Business
Clerical
Farmer
Homemaker
Other
Professional
Skilled
Trades
1%
Student
5%
Skilled
13%
Professional
36%
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Student
Trades
Unskilled
33
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Figure 9. Type of Torture
500
450
400
350
Physical
300
Psychological
250
200
Physical &
Psychological
150
100
50
0
Physical
12.5%
Psychological
56.9%
Physical &
Psychological
30.6%
Figure 10. Client Referral
Others
(in-house
programs and
services)
76.4%
Physician
9.9%
Psychologist/Psychiatrist
Psychologist/
Psychiatrist
13.8%
34
Physician
Others (in-house
programs and services)
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Special Thanks
Franca Young
Howard Family Foundation Inc.
Zindel V.Segal
Oscar G.Rogers
Society of the Sacred Heart
(Canada)
Wallace Ronald Compton
Linda M Kangas
Verna Higgins
Uwe Storjohann
Martha Shuttleworth
Frank Rothe
Robin Pacific
Allan MacKay
Belva Webb
Katharine Mary Thompson
Congregation de Notre Dame
Margaret Reid
Bains Granek
The Sisters of St. Joseph of the
Diocese of London
Ian F G Baxter
Joan and Jeffrey Schwan
E.M. Orsten
Margaret G. Norman
Thomas Goldstein
Rosemund R. Delap
Eleanor Wilson
Beverley King
Paul H Reinhardt
Edward C. Hopper
Tim H. Dunn
Beverley Davis
John Warren
Frances M.Ball
Wayne Snell
St. Andrew's United Church
Yezdi Antia
Anne O'Conner
Richard Vernon
Claire Trevena
Betty May Sims
Mary Black
Genevieve Holden
David Walsh
Jal R. Choksi
Victoria Lee
The Move Dance Collective
Nancy Maguire
Wallace Bankert
Jean Millar
Hilary A MacKenzie
Carolyn Archibald
Freda Muriel Fennell
Yvonne Greig
Angela Goyeau
Doug & Jane Pritchard
The Ben and Hilda Katz Charitable
Foundation
Alkis Kontos
Congregation of the Sisters of the
Presentation
Mary Ann Jansen
Margaret C Creal
Roberto Fuerte
Raoul Boulakia
Gerri Mac Donald
Olivia Chow
Patrick Case
William A. Sullivan
Fouad Captan
John & Mrs Barbara Buttars
Bill Bryson
Judith Dueck
Edward Gordon
Kathryn Mary VanderVennen
Geraldine Sadoway
Contreras McLennan
Hari Lalla
Charles & Karen Rosenberg
Ali Vakili
Montessoriworks Inc.
Roshan Jamal
Murtaza Alibhai
Haregua Getu
Midaynta Community Services
Rachelle Sender
Rose Brac
Ima Madadi
Paulina Wyrzykowski
Raul Berdichevsky
Rosemary Meier
Wendel Block
James Sugiyama
Tina Lopes
Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation
Susan McGrath
Andrew Zarebski
Anne E. Mills
David Young
Henry Jackh
David & Rosi Jory
Norman J. Brown
Marguerite Wales
Ian F G Baxter
Elizabeth D. Wangenheim
Jason Anderson
Margaret Carruthers
William C. Graham
Eileen D.Brown
Santa Barbara Family Foundation
Bruce Cockburn
The William Rathbone Family
Charitable Trust
Wardens of St. Thomas' Anglican
Church
Green & Spiegel
J Richard Turner
Ronald Trojcak
John M. Sherlock
Ann Harrington
Daniel McDonald
Julie Salveron
Ruth Smalley
Deborah Birkett
Cranford & Renate Pratt
Martin S. Alford
Geraldine Connelly
Lynnette Dalton James
Margarita & Vincent H.C. Lam
Harold& Margaret Sinkinson
Just Havelaar
John Blum
Isabelle Bradbury
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
35
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Special Thanks
Wendy M. Burns
Mona Callin
Marco Campana
Helen Nation
Robert J. Zettel
Barbara Browne
Maureen O. Termehr
Andrey V. Cybulsky
Douglas Lehrer
R Catherine McKeen
Thomas Morris
Michele O'Keefe
Sheila M. Williams
Arthur Gregg
Ewing Guy
Alexander Malycky
Mary Jean Riddell
Frances Choy Kam Hing
Peter Busby & Dr. KA Gelmon
Richard B. Gilman
Janet Mason
Paul Arsenault
Angela King
Shelagh Towson
Marnie Schaetti
Jeanette R. Amdur
Bruce E. Burton
Debby Copes
Hans B De Groot
Mytle W. Dyer
Donald Moors
Raymond and Anne Morris
Lisa S. Price
Sid Shniad
Annette Horton
Carolyn Lemon
Murray MacBeath
Pauline Mazumdar
Yvonne Chmielewski
Gerald & May Cohen
Franklin T & Milli Richmond
Grace T. Burke
J Douglas Campbell
Marie Dunn
36
Douglas Gruner
B L. Kirby
Jean McClure
Erma L Parker
Ron Philipp
Joy S. Korman
James R. Lane
Barbara Yealland
Sylvia Lee
Denelda M. Pearson
Margaret Knittl
Derek de Sa
Barbara Grisdale
Soula Hardy
Mary Robinson
Maria Romanec
Stephen Wadhams
Beth Wagschal
John Green
Mary Heiberg
Howard B. Abrams
Helke Ferrie
Rhoda E. Hassmann
James Ironside
Catherine McNairn
Douglas Hay
Mary I. Macrae
Lynda Maki
Theresa McGee
Carolyn J. McGhee
Bill Parsons
Rodney Stokoe
Rachel C. Brown
Dona Shar
Heather E Watson
Martha Whelton
Sheila O'Reilly
Michael Bullock
Dave Collacutt
Heather Cooper
Philip Gold
Grace Kaattari
Marilyn Lightstone
Margaret Whyte
Melissa S. Williams
E. Vivien Abbott
Carola Conle
Rita Johnson
Thomas S. Kuttner
Marilyn J. McKim
Pamela Sims
William Clarke
Martin 'Bert'
Slater
Ann Simpson
Claire M. Barrett
Christopher Whynot
Geoffrey Williams
Morton Beiser
Andrew & Suzanna Daviel
Kevin Reinhardt
Henry Van Essen
Menai Wardle
Florea Jean Westney
June Caskey
Sylvia & Ted Walker
United Way of Calgary
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Source of Funds:
Government and Foundations
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
• Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program – ISAP – A
• Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada - LINC
City of Toronto
• Community Services Grant
Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
• Newcomer Settlement Program (NSP)
Toronto District Board of Education
United Way of Greater Toronto
• Membership allocation
United Nations Voluntary Fund for Torture Victims
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
37
CCVT ANNUAL
REPORT
2 0 0 6- 2 0 0 7
Contact Us
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Main Office:
Scarborough Branch:
194 Jarvis St., 2nd Floor
Toronto, ON
M5B 2B7
2425 Eglinton Ave. E.
Unit 220, Scarborough, ON
M1K5G8
Tel: 416-363-1066
Fax: 416-363-2122
Tel: (416) 750-3045
Fax: (416) 750-4990
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ccvt.org
38
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture

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