Annual Report | 2008 - 2009 - Canadian Centre for Victims of

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Annual Report | 2008 - 2009 - Canadian Centre for Victims of
CANADIAN CENTRE FOR VICTIMS OF TORTURE
Accredited Member of the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT)
Tibetan Dancers at the First Light Celebration
Children at our annual holiday party
Yoga class at the Scarborough office
LINC students in class
ANNUAL REPORT
2008-2009
Charitable Reg. 13332 7908 RR002
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Table of Contents
Mandate
3
A message from the Executive Director
4
A message from the Chair
5
Report of the Legal Committee
6
Report of Public Education
7
Report of Health Committee
9
Report of the International Committee
10
Program Manager Report
12
Settlement Program
14
Children Program
16
Volunteer Program
19
English as a Second Language and computer Training Program
21
Board of Directors
23
Financial Report
24
CCVT Programs
26
Health Network Members
27
Legal Network Members
28
Partnering Organizations
29
CCVT Staff
32
Interns and Students
34
CCVT Volunteers
34
Statistics
36
Donors & Special Thanks
42
Funders: Government and Foundation
45
TABLE OF FIGURES
Figure 1: New Clients by Country
36
Figure 6: Marital Status
39
Figure 2: Previous Clients by Country
37
Figure 7: Education
40
Figure 3: Source of Referrals
38
Figure 8: Type of Torture
40
Figure 4: Gender of Clients
38
Figure 9: Internal Client Referrals
41
Figure 5: Age Category
39
Figure 10: External Client Referrals
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Mandate
The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
(CCVT) aids survivors to overcome the lasting
effects of torture and war. In partnership with
the community, the Centre support survivors
in the process of successful integration into
Canadian society, works for their protection
and integrity, and raises awareness of the continuing effects of torture and war on survivors
and their families.
The CCVT gives hope after the horror.
CCVT clients on a field trip to Niagara Falls
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A Message from
the Executive Director
Torture continues to be used as an instrument of power to oppress, intimidate, instill fear, and silence individuals and communities. This scourge is practised in over 100 countries, and as a direct
and brutal attack on the very essence of human dignity, it has become the most serious violation of
international human rights. The practice of torture is so fundamentally at odds with the notion of
civilized life that it is prohibited at all times, under all circumstances. The prohibition of torture is
recognized universally and enshrined in all major international human rights conventions. It also is
a firmly rooted principle of customary international law.
Although torture has been outlawed universally for over half a century, it continues to be practised
Mulugeta Abai in about two-thirds of countries world wide. In many cases, torture and other forms of mistreatExecutive Director ment are used routinely during criminal interrogations, in the fight against terrorism, in armed
conflict or simply as a tool in ordinary law enforcement.
The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT) has been in the struggle to stop torture and to assist the victims of
its aftermath for over 30 years. During this time, CCVT has assisted over 18,000 clients from 123 countries. In the year
that ended March 31, 2009, the Centre assisted 1,959 clients from 78 countries.
Our Centre added space to accommodate the increase in clients and to enhance delivery of programs. The Youth Program is growing with an increased case load. The Scarborough Centre now has 7 staff, including new Volunteer Coordinator, Hodan Yusuf. In addition to the direct services we provide in our Scarborough office, a new computer literacy
class was initiated by Juliette Ntege, the administrative assistant. We applaud her efforts in building this new, fullfledged program. To support the program, additional computers were installed for use by learners of all ages. Currently
we are negotiating with the Toronto District Board of Education to start ESL Classes at our Scarborough location.
Our Volunteer Program under the leadership of Chizuru Nobe was expanded thanks to funding received from the Trillium Foundation. Currently we have volunteer coordinators in both locations. A key contribution of the Volunteer Program is our annual fundraising which was once again a success. Thanks is due to Chizuru Nobe, Manager of Volunteer
Services, Hillari Blumfald, the new Volunteer Coordinator in our downtown office, Teresa Dremetsikas, Manager of
Programs, Huda Bukhari, Settlement Manager, Larrissa Gregorovich, volunteer, Tony Boston, Board Chair, and all the
staff who worked long hours to make it happen.
The Centre, in partnership with physicians and psychiatrists in private practice and Mount Sinai Hospital, started providing clinical services at its downtown location. Currently five psychiatrists provide treatment and documentation at the
Centre. Exploration is underway for providing primary care in the coming year. The Health Committee and CCVT senior staff are discussing the development of guidelines for treatment of PTSD.
Our policy and research under the leadership of Ezat Mossallanejad is progressing well. Last year we started a Certificate
Course in partnership with Atkinson College at York University, and 36 participants completed the course and received
certificates. This training is now in its second phase which will continue for the year. We are grateful for the support and
commitment from York University.
CCVT’s client-centered, innovative work is not possible without the guidance of the Board, the dedication of all Board
committee members, Dr. Wendell Block, Dr. Lisa Alderman, Dr. Debra Stein, Dr. Marlinda Freire, Dr. Clare Pain, Dr.
Donald Payne, Dr. Rosemary Meier, Dr. Tripler Pell, the hard working staff and volunteers, and our funders and donors.
My work at the Centre is made easy, rewarding and fruitful thanks to a dedicated team of staff, Board members, volunteers and the generosity of our funders and donors.
Mulugeta Abai
Executive Director
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
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A Message from
the Chair
November 13th, 2009, marked the First Light Celebration – our second at The Suites at
1 King West. The evening reinforced the breadth of support for the important work of
CCVT, with a packed hall (210 people – a sell-out), vibrant performances of world music – Zimbabwean, Arabic and Cuban, and compelling speeches from our host, Jian
Ghomeshi, and CCVT’s friend Sarah Polley.
The board of directors’ major area of focus through much of the year was on completing the strategic planning process. This was a lengthy and complex process, given the
many strands of the organization’s work. At the time of writing, the board has approved the strategic directions, and the implementation plan is under development. The
strategic directions will be posted on the CCVT web site, and will be used to provide a
framework for work planning at every level of the organization. The strategic directions commit CCVT to: •
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Tony Boston
Demonstrate and continually improve and promote the effectiveness of
Chair,
Board of Directors
CCVT’s service delivery model and its ability to anticipate and respond
to relevant local, national and international issues and trends.
Building CCVT’s capacity and leadership role as an information, research and training resource.
Building partnerships locally, regionally and nationally for service delivery, research, public education and training.
Build the internal capacity to support these strategic directions.
The other major development through 2009 was the expansion at both the Scarborough and downtown locations.
The board reviewed these expansion plans carefully, and the result is substantial improvement in the capacity of
CCVT to serve our clients, and improvements in the office space and other resources to accommodate staff, volunteers and students.
The training partnership with York University continues to be a great success, and the expansion of medical services on-site has been another significant achievement and tribute to the commitment of the participating physicians and psychiatrists.
The volunteer program, an essential and substantial component of CCVT’s activity, has been well supported with
two additional contract staff.
The atrocities that necessitate the role of organizations such as CCVT continue to be prevalent in many countries,
and the need for CCVT’s specific expertise is undiminished.
On behalf of the board of directors I would like, once again, to congratulate Mulugeta and the management team,
all staff and volunteers for their hard work, their commitment to supporting victims of torture, to building the capacity of other organizations to work with this population, and to supporting global efforts to address the conditions that lead to torture. I would also like to thank CCVT’s funders for their ongoing support.
This Annual General Meeting marks the end of my term as chair of the board. However, I intend to remain active
as a volunteer with CCVT for the foreseeable future. I thank the membership for the opportunity to contribute.
Tony Boston
Chair, Board of Directors
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Report from
the Legal Committee
The Legal Committee deals with legal matters arising from the CCVT mandate
with the view of making the CCVT work more effective in serving its clients.
The Committee is specifically active in the field of policy analysis, legal support
and research. It is also involved in monitoring national and international human
rights instruments regarding torture, survivors, refugees and other uprooted people.
The Legal Committee is in place:
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addressing issues arising from CCVT clients;
active in policy analysis, legal support and research;
monitoring national and international human rights instruments
regarding torture, survivors, refugees and other uprooted people.
Ezat Mossallanejad
CCVT Policy Analyst
Involvement over the past year:
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Canada’s Compliance with Human Rights Instruments Report:
Non-Citizens in Limbo (published in First Light Journal, www.ccvt.org)
Non-Citizens in Limbo presentation at the Canadian Council for Refugees
Citizenship Act: monitoring recent changes and working closely with the Canadian Council for
Refugees and the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants to attempt to minimize the
negative impacts of those changes.
Clients’ Refugee and Immigration Issues: immigration limbo, legal obstacles to family reunification, various inadmissibility concerns and legal matters concerning Children’s Aid Society,
Citizenship and Immigration Canada and the Immigration and Refugee Board.
Legal Aid Ontario: CCVT staff continues as a member of Legal Aid Ontario’s Immigration and
Refugee Law Advisory Committee and keeps the Legal Committee posted about new developments, especially those that may affect CCVT clients.
Co chairs: Andrew Brouwer and Richard Wazana
Members: Hillary Ivans Cameroon
Staff Support: Ezat Mossallanejad, Aislinn Clancy, Jackie Gakumba,
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Report from
the Public Education
Committee
Mandate
The function of the public education committee is to contribute to the implementation of the organization’s mandate to raise awareness of the effects of torture and war on survivors and their families and to work for their protection and integrity. The Committee strives to increase public awareness of torture, its effects and its global dimensions, and to contribute to the development of human rights theory and practice. CCVT is a learning centre focusing on issues related to torture and human rights. Activities include research, production and distribution of learning materials, onsite training and education programs for staff, volunteers, students, and the community, as well as
public forums and presentations - locally and globally.
Training and Education
It is unfortunate that in the first decade of the 21st century torture is still being perpetrated in many countries. Despite some positive developments in the USA, the continuing negative impact of the September 11, 2001 terrorist
attacks on that country can still be felt. Some states, including advanced industrial ones, continue to sanction torture in the name of “excessive measures” against suspected terrorists. While we must warn the public about the
evil of terrorism, we also need to work against torture. All these have prompted CCVT to increase its public education efforts.
Given that a large number of refugees and other uprooted people are survivors of torture and other horrible crimes
against humanity, CCVT focused its public education during the past year on refugee protection.
Collaboration
In its public education work, CCVT collaborated closely with the Canadian Council for Refugees, the Canadian
Centre for International Justice, Ryerson University, Amnesty International and the branch office of the United
Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. CCVT staff continued to play a major role as a member of the Speakers’ Bureau of the United Way which provides wonderful opportunities to educate non-profit agencies as well business communities about the scourge of torture and the need for rehabilitation of survivors.
Partnerships
During the past year, the CCVT continued successful partnerships with:
• Centre for Refugee Studies, York University on a certificate course in Refugees and Forced Migration Issues.
This course provided students with insight about the Canadian refugee determination system as well as of the
international conventions and remedies applicable in the refugee context;
• Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto linking community research and academic research. Along with professors from the University of Toronto, CCVT supervised two students doing their research on: 1) limbo and
its impacts on refugees and survivors of torture; and 2) the problem of impunity;
• Canadian Council for Refugees in its pilot program, Pathways to Gender Justice - Second Phase.
Following are some examples of CCVT public education work in the past year:
• Two panels on genocide in different periods of history against different people: Armenians, Assyrians, Rwandese, Darfurians, and Tamils;
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Participation in a project initiated by one of its former students: Rehearsal for Revolution - Popular Theatre
with Refugee Youth Survivors of Torture, Trauma and War;
Workshops to different ethnic communities in Toronto about settlement services for refugees and survivors
Workshops for students and teachers on prevention, eradication and exposure of torture as well as the need for
rehabilitation of survivors: Carlton University (Ottawa), Seneca College (King Campus), School of Law, University of Toronto, School of Social Work, Ryerson University (Toronto), Wilfred Laurier University
(Waterloo);
Collaboration with FCJ Refugee Centre in publication of the Refugee Update, a journal of refugee protection
in Canada;
Presentation to a large audience at the Trinity St. Paul United Church for World Refugee Day;
Ongoing workshops to CCVT clients on various issues affecting their lives: migration, refugee process, mental
health, life skills, sponsorship, etc;
Active participation in a 3-day settlement conference in Prince Edward Island where CCVT led a workshop on
the impact of torture and trauma on the meaningful settlement and integration of survivors;
Frequent workshops to different groups of students at several Toronto high schools;
Workshop on Canada’s Compliance with the UN Human Rights Instruments at Wellesley Institute, Toronto.
Learning Materials
CCVT’s journal, First Light, continues to provide valued and critical commentaries on current issues along with
information on the Centre’s programs and activities. The last issue contains articles and research by CCVT staff,
volunteers, clients and supporters.
Chair: Susan McGrath
Members: Regine King and Mulugeta Abai
Staff Support: Ezat Mossallanejad, Chizuru Nobe, Teresa Dremetsikas, Viola Byegeka
CCVT Forum on Armenian Genocide
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Report from
the Health Committee
The mandate and tasks of the Health and Program Committee are:
• To develop and advise as needed in the implementation of guidelines for the assessment of clients and
the provision of services.
• To collaborate with the executive director and other committees of the CCVT Board in fulfilling the
mandate of the centre.
• To collaborate with the personnel committee in staff development
• To work with the public education committee and the volunteer committee to promote public and professional education.
The fiscal year of 2008-2009 was a busy and successful year for the Health and Program committee. The committee has been meeting once a month on a regular basis. Throughout the year and as the need arises, the committee
was consulting and providing advice and feedback to the management and staff of the center. In addition, the committee worked vigorously to recruit healthcare providers and was able to explore more resources for the clients
who have limited or no health coverage.
To summarize, the committee had successfully implemented the following activities:
• To empower and build the capacity of the staff, Dr. Debra Stein organized and implemented a workshop on relaxation techniques for CCVT staff.
• With the collaboration of CCVT management, the committee recruited more healthcare providers and
had secured four in- house psychiatrists to provide services to the client at CCVT
• As part of networking and partnering with other institution, committee members had visited Seaton
House to learn more about how the primary healthcare services was worked at the shelter
• The center and the committee are committed to build and enhance the professional capacity of the staff.
With that line, the committee organized and implemented a training workshop on trauma for the staff.
• To understand better the health needs of the population that the center serves, the health committee had
developed a questionnaire for the clients to carry an assessment of the clients Health needs.
• The committee is actively involve in two international mental health conferences that are scheduled for
October and November 2009
Co-chairs: Marlinda Freire Dr. Wendell Block
Members: Dr. Donald Payne, Dr. Rosemary Meier, Dr. Debra Stein, Dr. Lisa Andermann, Dr. Marlinda Freire,
Dr. Tripler Pell , Dr. Clare Paine and Rene Ferguson
Staff Support: Dr. Teresa Dremetsikas, Selamwit Yohannes and Dr. Mohamed Ahmed
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Report from
the International
Committee
The CCVT International Committee monitors the activities and services of a network of organizations supporting
survivors of war and torture and makes necessary recommendations to the CCVT Board of Directors. This Committee aims to monitor and to respond to the global issues related to prevention, incidence, and eradication of torture. During the past year, the International Committee was involved in the following activities:
Nomination
CCVT supported the nomination of the Asociación Civil de Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo by Senator Daniel Filmus
as a candidate for the Nobel Peace Prize. The Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture (CCVT) and the Asociación
Civil de Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo have similar histories. Both were established in 1977 as advocacy, human
rights and service agencies. Both combined efforts to address gross human rights abuses and to provide direct support to survivors. Both were eager to address the problem of impunity as the main hindrance to long-term prevention of torture, genocide, forced disappearances and other crimes against humanity. Both paid special attention to
children as innocent victims of war, torture and other crimes of international nature. Both organizations participated as experts at the International Conference on War-Affected Children (September 2000) in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Canada’s Compliance with the Human Rights Instruments
In collaboration with the Legal Committee, CCVT’s International Committee worked on writing an effective report on
Canada’s compliance with the UN Human Rights instruments. This work was done at the invitation of the Canadian
government for NGO collaboration in the February 2009 Periodic Review of Canada by the United Nations Human
Rights Council.
Protection of human rights workers and torture survivors
The International Committee monitored the persecution of human rights workers across the globe and helped
CCVT to intervene in the following instances:
upon the arrest of Dr. Kitwe Mulunda Guy in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on June 26, 2008. He was
arrested in the town of Lubumbashi following his participation in a radio program on torture and impunity to commemorate the UN international day in support of victims of torture;
the Omar Khadr case;
Uganda Conference, Strategic Planning Meeting of the East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders
(EHAHRD) Network in Entebbe;
three-day international conference in Bangkok on Poverty and Social Protection;
international conference organized by the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT) in Copenhagen, Denmark.
Protection of Canadian Citizens against Torture
Through its efforts, CCVT continued to call attention of the public and the Canadian government to the need for
protection of Canadian citizens overseas.
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Optional Protocol
The International Committee continued to monitor developments regarding An Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture, dealing with the mandate of the UN Committee against Torture to enter and monitor conditions in places of detention. The Committee urges the Canadian government to ratify the Optional Protocol to the
United Nations Convention Against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
(Optional Protocol or OPCAT). In December 2002, the United Nations adopted the OPCAT, an international instrument that stands to make an important contribution to preventing torture and ill-treatment worldwide. The OPCAT lays out a framework for regular national and international level inspections of detention centers, toward
identifying and remedying the conditions that encourage and allow torture and ill-treatment.
Conflict in Gaza Strip
CCVT expressed its deep concern about the escalation of hostilities in the Middle East.
Letter to U.S. President Obama
CCVT appealed to the United States to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the
Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court.
Canadian Centre for International Justice
CCVT continued its collaboration with the Canadian Centre for International Justice (CCIJ) whose mandate is to
address the global problems with impunity and with bringing torturers, war criminals and people who have committed crimes against humanity to justice in Canada.
Chair: Susan McGrath
Members: Hoda Zaghloul, Mulugeta Abai
Staff Support: Ezat Mossallanejad, Chizuru Nobe and Teresa Dremetsikas
.
Selamawit Yohannes CCVT Settlement and Trauma Counselor
at the International Conference organized by
The International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims
(IRCT) in Copenhagen, Denmark
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Program Manager
Report
The year was a year of growth and development. It was a year of growth as our staff number increased in response to an increase in resources. It was a year of development with a
concerted effort for training staff and volunteers. Some of the training topics include:
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Accounting for Value Added by Volunteers in Non-profit Organizations
Web development using Dream Weaver
Leaders for Change
Immigration Settlement Adaptation Conference
OCASI Professional Development Conference
Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans & Queer Refugees
Ontario Human Rights Code
Refugee and Migration Issues
Outcome Evaluation
Teresa Dremetsikas
Program Manager
CCVT’s Settlement Program was consolidated in the Scarborough branch and now it has four Settlement /
Trauma Counselors and one Children and Youth Counselor.
The Settlement Counselor title has been changed to Settlement/Trauma Counselor to better reflect the work done
at the Centre and to recognize the expertise that exists within the counseling team.
Five different support groups ran this year: Ethiopian/Eritrean, Somali, African Francophone, Tamil, Rwandese.
In addition, a number of social events were organized to foster welcoming communities: Picnic, Day in Support
of Victims of torture, Holiday Party and World Refugee Day .
CCVT increased visibility in the community through partnerships with the following
agencies/ Institutions:
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Store Front Scarborough Centre
Toronto District Board of Education
Toronto Public Library , Scarborough branch
San Lorenzo Community Centre
The Canadian Oromo Community Association
York University Refugee Studies
Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
The Mental Health Program was strengthened and substantially expanded. It now has four psychiatrists providing in-house services, debriefing sessions and self care for clients and staff. The psychiatrists also provide free
consultation and training services to staff.
ESL/LINC Computer Program: Our LINC classes are supported by our computer lab to assist learners to master the language as well as to develop beginner and intermediate computer skills. English conversation circles and
yoga classes were strengthened to develop seniors program.
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Children and Youth Program: Our Homework Club and recreational activities during the summer are popular
and meet the vital needs of youngsters. This year reading club and fitness activities for youth were incorporated
in the program activities.
Volunteer Program: Over 100 new volunteers were recruited and trained this year. The Volunteer Program
delivers core services for clients and constitutes a nucleus that ensures that the Centre remains community based
while building welcoming communities. Services provided include: Income Tax clinic set up entirely by volunteers, assisting clients in accessing services including transporting them or escorting them to appointments, translating at doctors and lawyers offices and assisting in several resource fairs.
Public Education: CCVT’s profile was raised through participation and presentations of staff, volunteers and
clients in several conferences and events locally, nationally and internationally including:
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CCVT forums on genocide
Immigration and Refugee Board
Ryerson University
Family Service Association
OCASI
Sexual Assault Centre in Hamilton
World War II Conference organized by the Netherlands
Canadian Council for Refugees Conference in Vancouver
International Conferences in: Peru, Thailand, Uganda, and Denmark
Successful partnership between CCVT and York led to a certificate course on “Forced Migration
and Refugee Issues”.
Volunteers, clients and staff at the Holiday party
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Settlement Program
Huda Bukhari
Manager,
Settlement Programs
Thilaga Jeganathan
Settlement Coordinator Scarborough
Through the Settlement Program, CCVT plays a critical role in the adjustment of newcomer survivors fleeing war
and torture. In order to meet the needs of this unique community, an innovative service approach is used that supports and encourages the growth and development of our clients. Backed by a unique network of physicians, consultants, lawyers and a crisis intervention model, CCVT Trauma Counselors provide supportive services throughout the different phases of the settlement process. For survivors, this includes supportive one-on-one counseling,
referral to our networks of physicians, lawyers and consultants, crisis intervention, and support groups as well as
provision of information and orientation sessions. Settlement staff is well trained and equipped to meet the special
needs of our clients.
CCVT’s Trauma Counselors provide service in Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Dari, Farsi, French, Kinya-Rwanda,
Kirundi, Lingala, Luganda, Oromo, Pashtu, Runyankore, Spanish, Somali, Swahili, Tamil, Tigrinya and Urdu.
The language skill and diversity of CCVT counselors facilitates gradual settlement and adjustment of clients as
they strive to overcome the challenges and barriers they face upon arrival in a safe environment.
This past year, staff attended several training events to increase the already rich pool of skills and cultural competencies they embody. A few examples of the many topics of training sessions include:
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Solution-focused Counselling
Treating the Homeless Mentally Ill – Barriers and Opportunities
Focus Group for Women and Seniors
Counseling for Newcomers Living with HIV/AIDS
Case Management in Settlement
Immigration law:
-H &C and Sponsorship Breakdown
Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Training
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Discussion at CCVT in support of the
CCR Gender Project
Ethiopian/ Eritrean Coffee at the Open House
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The increase in clients reflects an addition of 20 new countries from which clients are fleeing war and torture as
they make their way to safety in Canada. The top ten countries from which clients are fleeing are led by countries from the African and Asian continents. Our statistics show that 46% of our clients are newcomers from the
African continent, 35% from the Asian, 10% from the Americas and 9% from Europe.
Settlement Services were provided to a total of 828 new clients from 56 different countries. 61 % were female
and 39 % were male. The make up includes 77 % adults and 23 % youth/children.
This past year CCVT added an African Women’s Support Group to the weekly Somali, Tamil and Rwandese
women’s support groups. These groups respond to issues and needs facing this vulnerable population and fill the
gap left by separation from extended family support.
Orientation sessions for our clients included a variety of topics aimed at providing essential information to newcomers. The following list is a selection:
Health Issues:
Mental Health
Public Health
Women’s Health
Stress Management
Healthy Nutrition
Food Banks and Nutrition
Recreational Activities: Knitting
Education Issues:
School Support
Bullying Awareness
Parental Involvement in their
Children’s Education
Employment Issues:
Volunteerism
Interview Skills
Employment Skills
Housing Issues:
Subsidized Housing
Finance Issues:
Budgeting
Ontario Works Benefits
Legal Issues:
Domestic Abuse Prevention
Group/Family sponsorship
Immigration and Refugee Law
Somali women support group
sawing workshop
Ethiopian/Eritrean women support
group on a field trip
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Child and Youth
Program
The Child and Youth Program grew stronger and served more
families than in previous years. The statistics provided here
demonstrate the scope of our services and our ability to meet
some of the needs of children, youth and parents who have experienced the atrocities of torture and/or war.
CCVT provides referrals to medical professionals for specialized treatment and documentation, social and recreational activities, public education initiatives, individual and family counseling, informational and social groups, tutoring, befriending, advocacy and many other activities. CCVT staff supported
Aislinn Clancy
Mbalu Wembo
both newcomers with issues related to being new to Canada
Child & youth
Child/Youth Program
and those more established with individual issues and conCounsellor/Coordinator
Counsellor
cerns. Child and Youth staff served 140 new client children
and youth at the downtown office and 113 at the Scarborough office. Families seeking our services predominantly
came from Iraq, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Afghanistan, Eritrea and those born in Canada to newcomers. The following
services were provided:
Homework Club/School Support
Helping children with their learning after school continues to be where CCVT makes a considerable investment.
Tutors who are staff, volunteers, university students and trained teachers provide support to 50 children at each
location to complete homework tasks with success and to improve their literacy and math skills which gives students confidence. CCVT conducted 105 after school support sessions three days a week for children ranging in
age from 5 – 18 years old. The participants made use of CCVT’s technology resources to do research and prepare
assignments, while staff provided coordination, outreach, assessment and healthy snacks.
Many people who live in poverty and are new to Canada have few resources to enroll their children in engaging
and educational activities. In response to that need, CCVT offered the following summer programs:
Summer Quest
With the support of CCVT survivors and their children, CCVT continued to access fun and recreational activities
for free. CCVT helps bridge the gap between new families and their community by offering them the opportunity
to explore wonderful family attractions. With the help of the Child and Youth staff, 40 – 60 children and youth
enjoyed the Toronto Botanical Gardens, the Ontario Science Centre, and canoeing at Harbourfront Canoe and
Kayak Centre. For most of the participants, it was their first time to visit and experience these parts of Toronto,
and many called it the highlight of their summer.
Summer Reading Club
Based on observation and analysis in the Homework Club, CCVT implemented its first Summer Reading Club in
partnership with the Toronto Public Library’s Leading to Reading. This summer club responded to Homework
Club volunteers’ desire to narrow the gap of illiteracy and to strengthen literacy skills among newcomer survivors.
Thirty children participated in the summer reading club. We look forward to continuing this valuable service
which recognizes that tending to the welfare and learning of children is a therapeutic way to overcome the pain of
dislocation.
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Youth
With a focus on community engagement and capacity building, the youth volunteered at the Toronto Green Community wrapping gifts using eco-friendly material and at Cabbagetown Regent Park Museum giving tours and museum history to visitors. These activities help recently arrived youth gain work experience, build their confidence,
develop presentation skills, and gain hours towards their 40 hours high school community service. Youth were
involved in summer program planning and implementation. Through a partnership with Toronto District School
Board, CCVT held summer activities at Robert Service Senior Public School where youth had a chance to play
volleyball, basketball and soccer
Youth living at Covenant House shelter and in the community participated in information sessions, volunteer work,
leadership workshops and other social events.
CCVT sees the value in supporting children and youth who were born to parents who experienced war and torture
and those at the immigration holding facility on Rexdale Boulevard. CCVT conducted 27 play sessions at the
Centre helping alleviate much of the stress children experience while in detention. The sessions provide children
opportunities for active play, arts and crafts, songs and theatre as well as educational activities. For many it helped
them to adapt to an abnormal situation and to let out the energy they aren’t able to through normal child centered
activities they might otherwise enjoy with family, friends and at school.
Group programming is an essential part to the CCVT Child and Youth Program. We continue our regular programs as well as organizing events during the year such as information sessions for youth and outings during the
March break.
Youth Summer activities: Canoe Trip
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Community building and outreach continues to remain our priority. This year the child/youth program formed partnership with community groups such as
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CCVT Scarborough Reading club ,
The city of Toronto parks and forestry department,
Covenant House,
Yonge Street Mission Volunteer Program,
The Toronto Public Library leading to reading program,
CCVT Scarborough Focus On Youth partnership,
The Toronto District School Board and University of Toronto research project on “Effect of Homework Club on the Academic, Social and Emotional development of children of parents who are Victims of Torture”.
We hope that we will continue to have a positive relationship with children, youths and their parents or caregivers,
while also improving their confidence to navigate their lives in a new school system and community. We continue
to offer these important programs while continuing to monitor the unaddressed needs of individuals through individual support.
Homework club
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Volunteer Program
CCVT volunteers provide a ray of hope in a world where everyday we hear of horrible events happening and where the existence of unimaginable cruelty and brutality
is confirmed in the stories that our clients bring into our Centre. When we sometimes can’t help but feel as if the world is falling apart, CCVT volunteers make us
believe in best of human nature. They create a community of care. They are ordinary people who show extraordinary kindness to our community.
This year, CCVT Volunteer Program again increased its volunteer base. More and
more community members realize that the issue of torture is not an individual issue
but a social one. Volunteers provide support in all aspects of CCVT operations
through Befriending, ESL Tutoring, Interpretation/ Escorting, Public Education/
Outreach, Social Events, Homework Club and Office Support. Without the willing
help of motivated volunteers we would not be able to provide many of the vitally
important programs on which our clients rely.
Here are some highlights from volunteer activities:.
Chizuru Nobe Ghelani
Training/ Workshops
Manager,
• Initial training for new volunteers: Between April 2008 and March 2009, seven
Volunteer Services
orientation sessions were held for 101 new volunteers recruited for the program;
• Volunteer meetings on relevant topics including: Armenian Genocide, Working
with Tibetan Survivors of Torture, War-affected Children and Youth of Northern Uganda, and the International and Domestic Problem of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation.
Volunteer-led Program
• Seventy-three Befriending/ESL matches made;
• Approximately three hundred cases are assisted through interpretation/ escorting program. Our volunteers
speak more than 20 languages altogether;
• Eight-week tax clinic sessions attended by a total of 120 clients both in the downtown office and Scarborough office;
• Five English Conversation Circles held on a weekly basis at both CCVT locations providing opportunities
to practice speaking skills in a fun, safe environment;
• The weekly Homework Club for elementary and high school students both in downtown and Scarborough
office.
Social Events
• World Refugee Day celebrations held at the Metro Hall on June 20th, 2008;
• Two successful events for United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture on June 25th,
2008 which included open houses at both downtown office and Scarborough office and a Volunteer Appreciation Party at the Cecil Community Centre;
• The Annual Picnic at High Park on August 10, 2008;
• The Sixth First Light Celebration & CCVT Award Ceremony held at 1 King West Suite on November 14,
2008;
• Annual General Meeting and Holiday Party held at the Bickford Centre on December 14, 2008.
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
With the generous support of our passionate volunteers, CCVT Volunteer Program will continue to expand our
program in 2009-2010. Together we can nurture a culture that promotes healing among survivors and awareness in
our community about human rights violations such as torture and war. We thank all of our committed volunteers
who make differences not only in our clients’ lives but also in our community at large.
The following are the members of the Volunteer committee:
Chair: Shannon Ryan
Members: Jason Baker, Charles Larry Bongomin, Laura Parsons
Staff support: Chizuru Nobe Ghelani, Huda Bukhari, Viola Byegeka
Tibetan youth dancers
Volunteer conducting a Conversation Circle at the
CCVT Scarborough Office
Volunteers, Clients and staff at the Picnic
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
English as a Second
Language
&
Computer Training
Program
Abdul Abubaker
LINC/ESL
Coordinator
For the past 19 years, the CCVT English Language Program
has been a key component in the recovery and successful rebuilding of the lives of survivors of torture and organized violence. In collaboration with the many other CCVT services
and in partnership with the community, the English as a Second Language and Computer Training programs support survivors in the process of successful integration into Canadian
society, fostering hope after the horror.
Elena Solokhina
Computer Instructor
Nurturing
The ESL/LINC and Computer Instruction courses at CCVT are adapted specifically to the learners’ abilities and
needs, and they are designed for language proficiency and skills development. The programs nurture the individual and cater to the needs of adult learners who suffer from debilitating imprints that make learning harder and
more strenuous. Our qualified and specially trained teachers offer a curriculum that is shaped to help students acquire skills for their immediate and long term life goals. The classroom atmosphere and supportive environment
provide clients with encouragement, hope, community, social context and the help they need to progress with their
language and social skills.
Safe Haven
Experiencing torture, war and other forms of organized violence results in stress for survivors. CCVT meets the
challenge of teaching English as a Second Language and resettlement by addressing the needs of our clients within
a “safe haven” where clients are made to feel welcome and where virtually all specialized services are found in one
organization.
Fostering Interpersonal Connections
A unique feature of CCVT’s ESL/LINC Program is that it encourages interpersonal connections as a deliberate
objective through mediating links between survivors and the community. Clients attend ESL not only to learn the
language, but to socialize and to be among others who have come from similar traumatic situations. They come to
the “family” where they know they are accepted. Many of our ESL clients are seniors who are able to socialize
with the other students in the classrooms which helps to break their isolation and to foster interaction with younger
ESL clients.
The Classroom
Involvement in ESL programs gives our clients access to our trained settlement staff which responds to other needs
and provides services which would otherwise be beyond the client’s reach. CCVT ESL classrooms are not the
ordinary learning environment, but rather the language instruction efforts create a unique and specialized classroom for people who are torture survivors and who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Class levels range from low beginner to advanced. Every year CCVT provides language training for approximately 300 clients from 78 countries. Clients stay in our English as a Second Language Program for an average of
3 to 18 months, moving through proficiency levels at their own pace. Classes are provided on CCVT premises so
that clients and teaching staff have access to counselors when emotional or other needs arise.
Funding
The ESL/LINC program is funded in part by the Federal government’s Language Instruction for Newcomers to
Canada (LINC) project, the Toronto District School Board, and through fundraising efforts.
CCVT Language Program Expertise
We constantly seek ways to improve our programs through collaboration with instructors, counselors, CCVT Computer Training Program, CCVT volunteers and partner agencies in Europe. The CCVT language program has accumulated significant expertise in delivering services to traumatized immigrant and refugee learners, and in providing workshops and seminars for ESL and educational professionals. CCVT has developed a reputation as a leading
organization that offers effective curriculum and instruction as well as professional insight into newcomer and
refugee learner issues.
Tutoring, Conversation Circles and Befriending
In cooperation with the Volunteer Program, we enhanced our English Tutoring and Befriending Programs to reach
a significant number of our students. We also introduced two conversation circles facilitated by volunteers to
strengthen communication skills among low-beginner and intermediate level students. We now have a successful
computer-assisted English language course that benefits our students tremendously.
Success for Recovery
The CCVT language program continues to be a critical component of a successful recovery program for our clients. It is often the first point of contact with their new home in Canada for our clients. CCVT and its English as a
Second Language Program are sources of strength and support that help our clients resume their lives with independence, confidence and dignity.
Computer Program
This program educates our clients in new technology including basic and advanced instruction in MS Office, the
internet, e-mail, and office procedures. The new skills can help them find employment. Classes were attended by
47 students (29 women and18 men).
Computer Class graduation. October 2008
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Board of Directors
Tony Boston
Social Worker, Consultant
Strategic Planning and
Community Development
Chair, Board of Directors
Member, Fundraising and
Personnel Committee
Regine King
Doctoral Candidate
Secretary
Member, Health Committee
Prof. Susan McGrath
Associate Professor,
Faculty of Social Work, York University.
Director of the Centre for Refugee Studies
Chair, Public Education
Tina Lopes *
Organizational Development Consultant
Member, Personnel and Strategic Planning
Member, Personnel and Strategic Planning
Shannon Ryan
Executive Director, The Black Coalition for
AIDS Prevention
Hilary Evans Cameron
Lawyer
Co-chair, Legal Committee
Jasmine Artis
Supervisor, Successful Employment
Strategies and Success in Motion
Operation Springboard
Member at large
Nancy Slamet *
Community Worker and Advocate
Member at large
Mohan Doss
HR Consultant
Member, Personnel Committee
Blas Austria
Director of Finance
Working Women Community Centre
Treasure
Renee Ferguson
Social Worker/Client Care Coordinator
Access Alliance Multicultural Health and
Community Services
Member, Health Committee
Aberra Mekonnen
Executive Director, Oromo Canadian
Community Association of GTA
Member, Personnel and Strategic Planning
Richard Wazana
Immigration Lawyer
Co-chair, Legal Committee
Dr. Marlinda Freire
Psychiatrist, Hospital for Sick Children,
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine,
Department of Psychiatry
University of Toronto
Co-chair, Health Committee
Caleb Mabano *
Financial Specialist
Treasure
Hoda Zaghloul *
Dentist
Former Program Officer at UNESCO
Community Liaison Officer at
Pace Law Firm
Chair, International Committee
* Resigned
23
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Financial Report
Consolidated Schedule of Operations
Year Ended March 31, 2009
Revenues
Citizenship and Immigration
Canada - ISAP
2009
2008
982,606
933,581
319,246
335,953
164,617
183,503
232,542
244,797
30,000
24,511
22,950
22,500
96,116
71,116
23,311
23,311
Citizenship and Immigration
Canada - LINC
Donation\Fundraising
United Way
United Nations
City of Toronto
Ministry of Citizenship
− NSP
Ministry of Citizenship
− Pay equity
Interest and sundry income
7,180
(3,703)
4,663
875
32,533
-
Honorarium
Foreign Exchange gain
Total Revenues
1,915,764
1,836,444
1,890,418
1,773,051
25,346
63,393
Total Expenses
Excess of Revenues
Over Expenses
24
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Consolidated Statement of Expenses
Year Ended March 31, 2009
Expenses
Wages and benefits
Exchange Loss
2009
1,394,149
-
2008
1,256,225
13,596
Fundraising Expenses
Program supplies and expenses
Stationary & admin supplies
Rent and Common Expenses
55,891
101,694
23,986
51,909
76,870
61,102
13,520
58,623
Travelling - Participants
49,641
33,031
Conferences and Meetings
Telephone
Maintenance and cleaning
Bookkeeping
Resource production
Mortgage interest
21,476
19,666
22,748
30,108
2,000
5,455
17,920
16,483
25,326
30,989
100
5,287
Utilities
11,029
10,072
Postage and courier
Insurance
Printing and photocopying
Interest and bank charges
Professional fees
6,985
9,871
7,641
(829)
5,417
7,289
9,960
7,019
521
4,826
Equipment rental\repair
11,383
11,139
Development and travel
11,790
3,202
Dues and fees
Publicity
Amortization
2,235
2,387
23,147
3,206
823
8,851
Funded Capital Purchases
17,870
97,071
2,769
1,890,418
1,773,051
Volunteer support
TOTAL EXPENSES:
25
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
CCVT Programs
• Mental Health: mutual support groups,
crisis intervention, individual and group
therapy, coordinated professional services
including legal, medical and social care
which provide treatment, documentation
and legal support. The use of group therapy
assists survivors in learning to cope with
the torture experience and transforms it into
one that is understood and objectified.
• Settlement Services: employment, housing, language, skills training, social assistance, applications for family reunification, sponsorships, orientations based on the
client’s needs are provided to assist in settlement, Volunteers also facilitate the settlement process by providing interpretation,
escorting, Befriending and English tutoring.
• Children & Youth Program: individual
and family counselling, specialized settlement services for children, crisis intervention, homework club, support groups for
children, youth and parents, recreational
and empowerment activities that incorporate conflict resolution, mentoring, peer
support and story-telling.
• Volunteer Program: a Befriending Program that assists survivors in rebuilding
their connections to others as well as to
the greater community; an ESL Tutoring
Program to help students learn and practice their English; Escorting and Interpreting for survivors at different appointments (medical, legal, social) More than
200 volunteers assist in all programs of the
CCVT and hold monthly meetings, usually
with a guest speaker. A structured orientation
program prepares volunteer befrienders to
work with torture survivors within a context
of community understanding of global issues. The “CCVT Newsletter” is sent to all
volunteers each month, which provides information on CCVT events, volunteer opportunities and job postings. A volunteer guide
has also been prepared.
• Public Education: responds to numerous requests for information, assistance and consultations on torture and the effects of torture as well as regularly producing resource
materials. CCVT’s semi-annual publication
“First Light”, is produced which discusses
issues related to the CCVT's mandate and
ongoing work.
• Language Instruction and Computer
Training: English as a Second Language
courses which are specifically designed to
meet the needs of survivors and include a
strong life skills component. Classes include all levels of literacy: beginners, intermediate and advanced. Computer courses
in Microsoft Office and Windows are provided at introductory and intermediate levels.
• International Projects: CCVT is associated with a coalition of Centres which support victims of organized violence, repression and torture, in exile or in their own
countries
26
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
CCVT Health Network
Psychiatrists,
Psychologists
Dr. F. Allodi
Dr. L. Andermann
Dr. R. Berdichevsky
Dr. G. Devins
Dr. M. Freire
Dr. X. Fornazzari
Dr. M. Gholamain
Dr. O. Gozlan
Dr. S. A. Hassan
Dr. T. Lo
Dr. R. Meier
Dr. C. Pain
Dr. D. Payne
Dr. J. Pilowsky
Dr. R. Ruskin
Dr. J. Santa Barbara
Dr. R. Stall
Dr. P. Stewart
Dr. D. Stein
Other
Specialists
Dr. C. Degani, General Surgeon
Dr. S. Singer, Ophthalmologist
Dr. S. Sliwin, Plastic Surgeon
Dr. P. Wade, Hearing Specialist
Dr. M. Ryhanian, Dentist
Family
Doctors and
General
Practitioners
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Dr. E. Alemayehoo
Dr. J. Blakeney
Dr. P. Berger
Dr. W. Block
Dr. N. Degani
Dr. H. Getu
Dr. W. Black
Dr. W. Etzkorn
Dr. M. del Junco
Dr. S. Gazeley
Dr. T. Kiran
Dr. K. Ruleau
Dr. M. Goodman
Dr. J. Irazusta
Dr. R. Klein
Dr. A. Pyper
Dr. L. Richmond
Dr. A. Stern
Dr. J. Sugiyama
Dr. A. Vaezi
Dr. J. Weinstein
Dr. M. Wiebe
Dr. L. Maskarentas
Dr. T. Pell
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
CCVT Legal Network
Aida P. Abraha
Michael F.Battista
Robert Blanshay
Raoul Boulakia
Michael Brodzky
Larry Butkowsky
David Buzaglo
Michael Campell
Juan F. Carranza
Woodbine Centre
Tollis Chan
Laurence Cohen
Susan deLint
Chantal Desloges
Esther Dressler
Marshall Drukarsh
Ralph Dzegniuk
Lorne A. Faratovitch
Joseph S. Farskas
Daniel M. Fine
Jeffrey Goldman
Mendel Green
Stephen Green
Evan Green
Shoshana Green
John Grice
Isak Grushka
John M. Guoba
Peter E. Haber
Marchand Hagan
Kenneth N. Hagon
Toba Hamersted
Marc Herman
Rita Hisar
Barbara Jackman
Ravi Jain
Anthony Kako
El Farouk Khaki
Catherine Kerr
Mitchell E. Korman
Michael Korman
Benjamin A. Kranc
Marianne P. Kroes
Peter J. Kroshak
Daniel Kwong
Douglas Lehrer
Cynthia Mancia
Harry Mann
Harvey S. Margel
Jack Martin
Lisa McCullough
Adam Mclver
Kevin McTavish
Melissa Melvin
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Jegan N. Mohan
Dr. Randal Montgomery
David Nakelsky
David Orman
Norris J. Ormston
Pamila B. Pohani
Joel Rosen
Lisa Rosenblatt
Roger Rowe
Geraldine Sadoway
Geary B. Shorser
Maureen Silcoff
Donald C.Simmons
Belva Spiel
William A. Sullivan
Leonard Susman
Byron J. M. Thomas
Helen Trentos
Helen Turner
Paul Vandervennen
Patricia Wong
Ian Wong
Rodney L. H. Woolf
Susan J. Woolner
Peter J. Wuebbolt
David P. Yerzy
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Partnering Organizations
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Abasaruzi Missionary Church
Access Alliance Multicultural Community Health
Centre
ACCESS Employment Toronto
Accessible Community Counselling and
Employment Services
Across Boundaries
Adam's House
Adelaide Resource Centre for Women
Afghan Association of Ontario
Afghan Women's Counselling & Integration
Community Support Organization
Afghan Women's Organization
African Community Services of Peel
Africans in Partnership Against Aids
Albanian Community
Albert Campbell Public Library
Applegrove Community Centre
Arab Community Centre of Toronto
Auberge Francophone
Barbara Schlifer Commemorative Clinic
Berhan Semai-Pastor Onatan
Bickford Centre - TDSB
Birkdale Women's Shelter
Bloor Information & Life Skills Centre
Brampton African Community Services
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Canadian Arab Federation
Canadian Centre for International Justice
Canadian Council for Refugees
Canadian Red Cross
Canadian Tamil Youth Development Centre
Canoraaa (Centre Francophones des jeunes de
Toronto
CAS North York
Casa de las Americas
Catholic Community Services of York Region
Catholic Cross Cultural Services
Catholic Immigration Centre
Cedrabrae Library
Centre for Ethics
Centre for Information & Community Services of
Ontario
Centre for Spanish Speaking Peoples
Centre Francophone du Toronto Metropolitan
Centre Medico-Social Communautaire
Charity Village - COSTI Branch
Chinese Family Services of Ontario
Christie Refugee Welcome Centre
City Adult Learning Centre (CALC)
Community Microskills Development Centre
Community Resources Connections of Toronto
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Partnering Organizations
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Cornwall & District Immigrant Service
Corvette Family Resource Centre
COSTI
Council of Agencies Serving South Asians
(CASSA)
Covenant House
Culture Link
Davenport-Perth Neighbourhood Centre
Dixie-Bloor Neighbourhood
Downsview Family Health Centre
Dr. Roz's Healing Place
East End Community Health Centre
East Metro Youth Service
East Scarborough Boys and Girls Club
East Scarborough Community Festival Market
Eglinton - Kennedy Public Library
Eritrea Canadian Association of Ontario
Eritrean Canadian Community Centre of Metropolitan Toronto
Ethiopian Association in Toronto
Family Residence - Lido Motel
Family Service Association in Scarborough
FCJ Hamilton House Refugee Project
Fife House Foundation
Flemingdon Neighbourhood Services
Frontline Youth Network
Goodwill Employment Centre
Hamilton Urban Core Community Health Centre
Highbrook Learning centre
Hong Fook Mental Health Association
Humber River Regional Hospital
Inter-Cultural Neighbourhood Social Services
International Charity Association Network (ICAN)
Iranian Canadian Newcomer Association
Islamic Community of Afghans in Canada
Islamic Social Services & Resources Association
Jane Alliance Neighbourhood Services
Jewish Vocational Services
Job Start (Formerly C.A.W.L)
Jones Avenue School - TDSB
JVS Toronto
Kensington Bellwood Community Legal Services
LAMP Ask Community Health Centre
Latino-Canadian Community Association of Scar-
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
borough
Lawrence Heights Community Health Centre
Le Regoupement des Femmes Immigrantes
Francophone
Legal Aid Ontario
Madina Mosque
Malton Neighbourhood
Mathew House
Maytree Foundation
Mennonite New Life Centre of Toronto
MIDAYNTA Association of Somali Service
Agencies
Mount Sinai Hospital
Mujer
Multi-Cultural Inter-Agency Group of Peel
Neighbourhood Legal Services
New Experiences for Refugee Women
Newcomer Women's Services Toronto
North American Muslim Foundation
North York Community House
OASIS Centre des Femmes
Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI)
ODSP - Scarborough
Omar Bin Khattab Mosque
Ontario Works Offices
ON-TRACK for Women
Oromo Canadian Community Association of
GTA
Operation Springboard
Parkdale Community Information Centre
Parkdale Community Legal Services
Policultural Immigrant Community Services
Polycultural LINC Program
Red Cross
Regent Park Community Health Centre
Reh'ma
Rexdale Women's Centre
Riverdale Immigrant Women’s Centre
Romero House
Salahedin Islamic Centre
San Lorenzo Latin American Community
Centre
Scarborough Community Residential Area
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
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Scarborough East Community Festival market
Scarborough East Ontario Early Years Centre
Scarborough Goodwill
Scarborough Housing Help Centre
Scarborough Village
Second Base Youth Shelter
Settlement and Integration Services
Organization (SISO)
Shelton Institute for Mental Health
Sick Kids Hospital
Sistering
Skills for Change
Sojourn House
Somali Canadian Association of Etobicoke
Somali Immigrant Aid Organization
Somaliland Canadian Society
South Asian Family Support Services
St. Christopher House
St. James Town Library
St. Joseph Immigrant Women's Centre
St. Michael's Hospital
St. Paul Trinity Church
St. Stephen's Community House
Storefront
Sudanese Settlement Community
Tamil Eelam Society of Canada
Toronto District School Board (TDSB)
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Thorncliffe Neighbourhood Services
Toronto Chinese Community Services
Association
Toronto Hostel Services Unit, Family
Residence
Toronto Public Health
Tropicana Community Services
Organization
Vision Africana 2000
War Child Canada
Warden Woods Community Centre
West Hill Community Services - Family
Resource Centre
West Scarborough Legal Services
West Scarborough Neighbourhood Centre
West Way Medical Clinic
Women's College Women's Health in Women's
Hands
Woodgreen Community Centre of Toronto
Working Skills Centre
Working Women Community Centre
YWCA of Greater Toronto
YWCA Family & Social Services
YMCA LINC Assessment Centre
Yonge Street Mission
Young Diplomats
Youth Assisting Youth
Colleges/ Universities
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Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
George Brown College
Humber College
School of Social Work - York University
Faculty of Social Work - University of Toronto
Ontario Institute for Studies on Education
Ryerson University
Wilfrid Laurier University
Winston Churchil Collegiate Institute
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Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
CCVT Staff
Mulugeta Abai
Executive Director
Ezat Mossallanejad Teresa Dremetsikas
Program Manager
Policy Analyst/
Researcher/
Settlement/trauma
Counsellor
Chizuru
Nobe Ghelani
Manager,
Volunteer
Services
Thilaga Jeganathan
Settlement
Coordinator/ Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
Huda Bukhari
Settlement
Program Manager
Abdurahman
Abubakar
LINC/ESL
Coordinator
Aislinn Clancy
Child & Youth
Coordinator/
Counsellor
Mbalu Wembo
Child/Youth
Program Counsellor
Delfina
Vega de Paiz
Administrative
Assistant/ Office
Coordinator
Mohamed Rabi
Amed
Settlement/ Trauma
Counsellor
Jackie Gakumba
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Selamawit
Yohannes
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Gabriela Agatiello
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Ermelina Balla
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
* resigned
** end of contract
32
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Malini
Pararajasingham
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
Counsellor
Michelle
Emamnazar
Settlement /Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
Counsellor
Viola Byegeka
Settlement&
Community Outreach
Facilitator
Tigist BekeleMekonnen
Administrative
Assistant
Juliette Ntege
Administrative
Assistant
Scarborough
Dave Burt
LINC Instructor
Catherine Raine
LINC Instructor
Jane Desmond
LINC Instructor
Munni Subhani*
LINC Instructor
Elena Solokhina
Computer Instructor
Hodan Yusuf
Volunteer
Coordinator
Scarborough
Hillary Blumfald
Volunteer
Coordinator
Marcia Casado
LINC Teacher
Assistant
Elizabeth Jones
ESL Instructors
Toronto Board of
Education
Susanna Cluer
ESL Instructors
Toronto Board of
Education
Soraya Attai*
Settlement/ Trauma
Counsellor
Scarborough
Sarah Al-Tekreeti
Settlement/Trauma
Counsellor
Diana Lika**
Settlement/ Trauma
Counsellor
Tanya Mouland
LINC Supply
Instructor
Terri Iwaskow
LINC Instructor
33
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Interns and Students
Meg Wolfe-Wylie
Christian Van der Pol
Faculty of Medicine
University of Toronto
Ivy Bojmic
Monica Korolczuk
Centre for Ethics
University of Toronto
B.A in Ethics program
Alexis Oikle
George Brown College
Social Service Worker
Falis Abdulle
Monarch Park
Collegiate Institute
Coop Program
CCVT Volunteers
Abbas Essop
Abbey Sinclair
Abdelkader Filali
Abhilash Kaimal
Abtin Obar
Adil Ahmad
Aldina Muslija
Alexander Teleki
Alexandra Cutean
Ali Bangi
Ali Hayes
Alia Miller
Alice Schuda
Alison Mills
Alqi Beqo
Amal Mohamed
Amanda Sparkman
Ameil Joseph
Ana Laura Pauchulo
Ann Harrington
Anna Kim
Anne Piper
Anthony Steward
Ariel Condino
Arturo Aguilar
Ashmeet Lazaro
Aspa Tzaras
Aurore Ryobara
Azar Nafarynejad
Barakat Ali
Barbara Yealland
Barry Trentham
Becky Curran
Bedri Ahmed
Behnaz Afaghi
Benamar Benatta
Bonnie Kim
Brent Bell
Brice Sopher
Brigitte MukamutaraCailen Elliott
Candace Joseph
Candice Beth
Carl Gerber
Carla Young
Caroline Matthews
Carrie Holterman
Catherine Carroll
Catherine Chhina
Cathy Miller
Changkeun Lee
Charles L. Bongomin
Cherylin Gilad
Christine Hakim
Claudia Ponce
Claudia Ramirez
Curtis Puncher
Dan Mohamed
Danielle Coghlan
Danielle White
Deborah Morrish
Delna Press
Denada Likaj
Diana Baek
Dogan Dogan
Dorna Mossallanejad
Ed Tarter
Elisa Minakis
Elise Danielle Thorburn
Elizabeth Melo
Ellen Dyer
Emily Boulter
Emily Chan
Emily Rosser
Erin Kobayashi
Erin Pease
Erin Shaw
Eun-ji Jeoung
Farzad Aghakajouii
Farzeen Patel
Fiona Thomas
Florence Mulera
Geoff Fridd
Grace Sunagawa
Gurbir Singh
Hamayoon Dostyar
Hamideh Babaki
Hanna Caplan
Heather Douglas
Hellen Hajikostaninou
Hilary Moore
Hillari Blumfald
Hodan Yusuf
Hussam Majbour
Ian Sutcliffe
Icel Samarzadeh
Iraj Emad**
Iraj Soltani
J. Michelle Kelly
Jackie Fitz
Jacqueline Ho
Jake Senger
34
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
James Shaw
Jarrett Hasson
Jason Baker
Jennifer Arango
Jessie Carson
John Faustmann
Ji-Hyun Jang
Jocelyn Mills
John Clark
Josh Goodbaum
Julie Cannon
Julie Chamberlain
Justine Johnston
Kalsang Phuntsok
Karen Sue
Karlee-Anne Sapoznik
Kate Mcleod
Kathleen Pattinson
Kathryn Barber
Katie Stock
Kiandokht Gharib
Kimlan Hokan
Kirsten Mikadze
Krista Craven
Lambert Boenders
Laura Parsons
Leonore Clauss
Leticia Akparah
Liz Chamberlain
Lori Habermehl
Louise Lee
Luis Martin Flores Garcia
Madalene Arias
Mahsa Kamali
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Maiwand Noor
Manuela Pechova
Mara Herscovitch
Maral Momeni
Maureen Neville-Michaud
Margaret Godoy
Margaret Munene
Mari Hotta
Maria Corfe
Marijke Anbeek
Mariko Tanaka
Marjorie Marshall
Marlene Yaqub
Masooma Aftab
Matthew Nigh
Megan Sandhu
Mehrdad Pojhan
Melany Bleue
Michael Moreau
Michele Woodey
Michelle Antemia
Michelle McCullough
Mike Jackson
Miko Belayneh
Mita Patel
Mohammed Jacquesson
Monika Payseur
Monireh Mohammadi
Moreen Mirza
Moussa Sabzehghabaei
Ms. Anja Kortenaar
Muriel Kramer
Naomi Sarah Ball
Nashwa Tawfiq
Natasha Matthew
Navdeep Singh
Negar Shahyar
Natasha Matioug
Noel Palmer
Pamela Sostorics
Patricia Chraiteh
Pauline Akello
Peter Locker
Rabila Attai
Rahel Yirgaw
Rahma Mohamed
Ricardo Rivera
Robin Mackinnon
Rodrigo Lopez
Ron chernysh
Rosa Torabi-Parizi
Ruth Mathiang
Rwakibaale Muhanga
Samantha Goodspeed
Sandra Chan
Sandra Diaz
Sara Fard
Sarah El-Shaarawi
Seema Gajria
Senight Wolde
Seol Baek
Serena Dimitrakopoulos
Shabnam Mohsenzadeh
Shaheynoor Talukder
Shilpi Desai
Shpresa Vrenezi
Smiljka Tasic
Srijeeta Verma
Susan S Wurst
Susan Weinert
Tad Palmer
Tania Natscheff
Tanya Mayhew
Tim Carpentier
Toma Shamani
Tomas Orellana
Ushanker Sivanathan
Vahagn Karapetyan
Vannessa Sears
Vasu Sivapalan
Victoria Zeppa
Wendy Sandy
Yllka Daci
Yodit Tsegaye
Zeeshan Esack
Zehra Abbas
Zorana Alimpic
Zulma Mejia
* Currently on staff
** deceased: Mr. Iraj Emad was a wonderful volunteer who always responded to last-minute requests for an interpreter. We miss him terribly.
It is easy to make a buck it is a lot tougher
to make a difference
Tom Brokaw
35
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
CCVT Survivors
Figure 1. New Clients by Country
with Convention Refugee or Landed Immigrants
Status:
April 2008 - March 2009
Total new clients: 828 Countries: 56 Female: 367
Adult
Country
Afghanistan
Albania
Angola
Bangladesh
Bosnia
Brazil
Burma
Burundi
Cameroon
Chad
Chechnya
China
Colombia
Congo D. R
Cuba
El Salvador
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Guatemala
Guinea
Guyana
India
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Ivory Coast
Jamaica
Kenya
Child/Youth
F
38
8
1
4
M
34
4
2
2
8
6
4
2
1
3
8
5
3
15
3
25
24
1
2
3
11
35
1
1
Male: 210 Children/youth: 251
3
3
3
1
1
12
14
1
1
16
20
1
1
1
F
13
1
M
23
6
4
1
4
1
3
6
2
3
2
1
9
1
3
3
6
7
5
4
3
1
1
3
4
38
5
34
1
Adult
Total
Country
108
19
1
12
2
3
11
24
13
4
2
3
10
30
2
9
47
48
1
2
7
3
36
127
1
1
2
2
Kosovo
Lebanon
Liberia
Mali
Morocco
Nepal
Nicaragua
Niger
Nigeria
Pakistan
Palestine
Philippines
Romania
Russia
Rwanda
Serbia
Somalia
Sri Lanka
St.Vincent
Sudan
Tajikistan
Tanzania
Thailand
Turkey
Uganda
Ukraine
Vietnam
Zimbabwe
1
1
1
15
1
11
91
1
8
1
1
1
1
7
1
3
1
TOTAL
367
36
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
F
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
4
Child/Youth
M
15
F
M
1
1
1
5
1
5
4
2
6
4
36
6
9
1
3
8
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
6
2
1
1
210 126 125
Total
24
1
3
2
1
2
1
2
4
12
1
1
1
3
30
1
24
144
2
14
1
1
1
1
14
1
4
2
828
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Figure 2. Previous Clients by Country
April 2008 - March 2009
Total new clients: 1131 Countries: 67 Female: 597
Male: 337 Children/youth: 197
Children/Youth
Country
Afghanistan
Albania
Angola
Bangladesh
Bosnia
Botswana
Burundi
Cambodia
Cameroon
Canada
China
Colombia
Congo
Croatia
Czech Rep.
Egypt
El Salvador
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Gabon
Ghana
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
India
Iran
Iraq
Israel
Ivory Coast
Jamaica
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Adult
F
M
6
17
29 14
3
5
3
1
1
2
1
27 10
9
2
21
2
2
1
2
9
11
26
8
1
5
5
2
3
4
84 34
102 37
1
4
5
4
2
1
8
16
5
2
8
4
4
1
1
16 12
2
3
1
1
Total
F
4
16
M
9
1
5
4
1
4
1
4
1
1
1
19
18
1
15
16
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
36
59
9
4
1
3
46
11
25
10
3
22
34
1
11
2
7
152
173
2
4
9
3
30
9
14
6
1
28
5
1
1
Country
Kenya
Kosovo
Kyrgyzstan
Lebanon
Liberia
Mexico
Nigeria
N. Korea
Pakistan
Palestine
Papua N.G.
Peru
Romania
Russia
Rwanda
Serbia
S. Leone
Somalia
Sri Lanka
St. Vincent
Sudan
Swaziland
Sweden
Tanzania
Togo
Trinidad
Turkey
Uganda
Ukraine
Venezuela
Zimbabwe
TOTAL
37
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Adult
F
M
14
2
17
11
2
3
5
1
19
38
19
10
3
5
3
1
1
2
1
1
5
3
30
12
1
1
1
8
48
24
1
1
3
3
1
6
3
1
8
10
5
2
2
4
3
597
337
Children/
Youth
F
M
1
1
2
1
2
9
1
10
3
4
3
15
1
1
8
1
2
112
85
Total
18
31
2
3
8
76
33
3
8
1
3
1
1
8
46
1
2
12
95
2
4
3
1
6
3
1
9
17
2
2
7
1131
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Figure 3. Sources of Referral
ESL
Hospital
1% Other
0.5% Self School
3%
Church
4% 1%
Psychologist 5%
1%
Lawyer
20%
Physician
1%
Community Agency
64%
Figure 4. Gender Distribution
Males
39%
Females
61%
38
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Figure 5 Age Distribution
Child/Youth
23%
Adult
77%
Figure 6. Marital Status
Divorced
4%
Widowed
4%
Separated
5%
Married
32%
Common-Law
2%
Single
53%
39
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Figure 7. Education
Illiterate
2%
Primary
22%
Post Secondary
33%
Secondary
43%
Figure 8. Type of Torture
Both
21%
Physical
32%
Psychological
47%
40
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Figure 9. Internal Client Referrals
350
Number of Referrals
300
277
300
250
200
150
120
100
73
69
48
50
65
14
5
b
Cl
u
rin
g
Ho
m
ew
or
k
Tu
to
g
Es
co
rti
n
In
ter
pr
et
ati
on
/
Su
pp
or
t
G
-L
ES
L
xc
Ta
ro
up
C
IN
ic
lin
g
ra
in
in
rT
Ci
rc
Co
m
pu
te
io
n
Co
nv
er
sa
t
Be
f ri
en
di
n
les
g
0
Figure 10. External Client Referrals
400
355
350
317
Number of Referrals
300
247
250
227
200
151
150
100
33
50
0
Housing
Legal
Volunteer
Social Assistance
41
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Education
Employment
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Individual Donors
E. Vivien Abbott
Howard B. Abrams
Patricia Agius
Martin S. Alford
Helen Szewello Allen
Douglas Alton
Jeanette R. Amdur
Stephen Antle
David Armstrong
Judith M. Arter
Guy J. Barton
Margie Bateman
Morton Beiser
Raul Berdichevsky
Deborah Birkett
Jill E. Blakeney
John Blum
David A. Boag
Donna Bobier
M. Boozary
Bernice Brand
Elizabeth Briemberg
Rachel C. Brown
Barbara Browne
William Bryson
Grace T. Burke
Wendy M. Burns
Bruce E. Burton
Mona Callin
Marco Campana
J Douglas Campbell
Brenda Cardillo
June Caskey
Jal R. Choksi
William Clarke
Barb Cloutier
Bruce Cockburn
Dave Collacutt
Geraldine Connelly
Heather Cooper
Isabel Curtin
S Laurie Curtis
Andrey V. Cybulsky
Andrew & Suzanna
Daviel
T,H.Davies
Hans B. De Groot
Derekde Sa
Rosemund R. Delap
Mark Brett
Kathleen Denomy
John B. Dillon
Donald J. Dodds
Mytle W. Dyer
Diana Dyson
Joan M. Eakin
Vera Ellaschuk
Robert Faust
Margaret W. Feenstra
Helke Ferrie
John Fraser
Peter Busby
Dr. KA Gelmon
Kathleen Giffin
Philip Gold
Brydon Gombay
Angela Goyeau
Catherine Graham
Carol Graham
Barrie Gray
Yvonne Greig
Barbara Grisdale
Douglas Gruner
Ewing Guy
Peter Hajnal
Keith Halfyard
Sarah Hamdi
Ann Harrington
Rhoda E. Hassmann
Douglas Hay
Lorne Heffelfinger
E. Gilmour
Mary Heiberg
Ida C. Henderson
Verna Higgins
Michael J. Jackson
Rosi & David Jory
Grace Kaattari
Linda M. Kangas
Angela King
Peter Klassen
Margaret Knittl
Joy S. Korman
Donald Kumpf
Michel R. Labbé
Catherine Lace
Harinarine Lalla
James R. Lane
Kenneth R. Langdon
Rose Lee
Douglas Lehrer
Carolyn Lemon
Maureen Lennon
Marilyn Lightstone
John Liver
Barbara Lyon
Allan MacKay
Hilary A. MacKenzie
Paul MacKey
Ruth MacLean
Elizabeth MacNamara
Mary I. Macrae
Lynda Maki
Alexander Malycky
Pauline Mazumdar
Jean McClure
Judith McCormack
Carolyn J. McGhee
Edward A. McGivern
Marilyn J. McKim
Catherine McNairn
Rosemary Meier
Paul Michaud
Britt Mollerstedt
Raymond Morris
Anne Morris
Thomas Morris
Helen Nation
Tania Natscheff
Philip Nayman
Christine Nelson
42
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Marina Nemat
Paddi O'Hara
Sheila O'Reilly
E.M. Orsten
Bill Parsons
Jill Peters
Joyce Potter
Elinor Powell
Lisa S. Price
Doug Pritchard
Jane Pritchard
Kevin Reinhardt
George Renninger
Franklin T
Milli Richmond
Mary Jean Riddell
Mary Robinson
Maria Romanec
Charles & Karen
Rosenberg
Harriet Sachs
Geraldine Sadoway
Jeannelle Savona
Joan Schwan
Dona Shar
Barbra Shaw
Martha Shuttleworth
Ann Simpson
Harold Sinkinson
Margaret Sinkinson
Burt Slater
Uwe Storjohann
Christian Therialult
Barbara Thomas
Harvey Thomson
Shelagh Towson
Claire Trevena
Henry Van Essen
Kathryn M. VanderVennen
Stephen Wadhams
Elizabeth F. (Beth)
Wagschal
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Marguerite Wales
Sylvia & Ted Walker
Lenore Walters
Menai Wardle
Frances Warren
Marc Warshaw
Belva Webb
Florea Jen Westney
Martha Whelton
Christopher Whynot
Colleen Whynot
Margaret Whyte
Ruth Wilkins
Geoffrey Williams
Sheila M. Williams
Leib & Sheila Wolofsky
Edward A. Wood
Susan S. Wurst
David & Linda Yake
Barbara Yealland
Hoda S. Zaghloul
Andrew Zarebski
Milton Zaretsky
Estate of Elizabeth Dean Wangenheim
Estate of John Edgar Scott
Estate of Marian Rose Duncanson
Elaine & Brendan Clancy
Melinda Zytaruk
Shani Scherenzel
Brenna Enright
Liz Creal & Tony Boston
Vincent Lam
Vrinda Liza Eapen
Fiona Hoop
E. Jane Hunter
Graham Kennedy
Lucas Meilach-Boston
Manuela Stefan
Gregg Lewis
Raoul Berdichevsky
Jill Blakeney
Paul VanderVennen
Isabel Kann
Dr. Julie D. Maggi
Andrew Cohen
Ali Gholipour
Antonette McDonald
Jian Ghomeshi
Julie Wolfe
Chantal Desloges
Dr. Marlinda Freier
Dr. Gurbir Singh
Justin Dupas
Matthew Johnson
Michelle Millard
Muriel Marsten
Sarah Polley
Olivia Chow
Susan McGrath
Rick Zytaruk
Tony Boston
Raoul Boulakia
Raul Berdichersky
Sharron Richards
Majid Boozary
Donors - Organizations
Alterna Savings
United Way of Calgary, Donors Choice Program
The Sisters of St. Joseph of the Diocese of London
Green & Spiegel
ChumCity Christmas Wish
Wardens of St. Thomas' Anglican Church
The William Rathbone Family Charitable Trust
Harry Rosen Inc.
Beaches Presbyterian Church
Organization of Professional Immigration Consultants
43
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Our Supporters
Fourth Pig
Go Shani
Sweet Birch Traditional Medicine
Green Zebra
Gourmet Galaxy
Mount Sinai Hospital
YMCA
FLIP Publicity & Promotions Inc.
Rosedale Wellness Centre
Jazz.FM91
Corktown Designs
RKW Wine Imports
Research in Motion
The Cranial Therapy Centre
Dell Canada
True Source Seminars
Elmwood Spa
Art Gallery of Ontario
One King West Hotel
& Residence
SOMA Chocolatemaker
Lululemon Athletica
PIKTO
A Taste of Quebec
Segway Ontario
Soulpepper Theatre
Body Blitz
RKW Wine Imports
Abbott Pub
Dell Canada
Fairmountbooks.com
NOW Magazine
Toronto Raptors
The Rusty Fairmount Group
Toronto Community Housing
YWCA
National Film Board
Special Thanks to Our Patrons
Sarah Polley
Jian Ghomeshi
44
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Olivia Chow &
Jack Layton
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Source of Funds:
Government
and Foundations
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
• Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program – ISAP – A
• Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada - LINC
City of Toronto
• Community Services Grant
Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration
• Newcomer Settlement Program (NSP)
Ontario Trillium Foundation
United Way of Greater Toronto
United Nations Voluntary Fund for Torture Victims
Toronto District Board of Education
45
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
2008 –2009 ANNUAL REPORT
Contact Us
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture
Main Office:
Scarborough Branch:
194 Jarvis St., 2nd Floor
Toronto, ON
M5B 2B7
2425 Eglinton Ave. E.
Unit 220, Scarborough, ON
M1K5G8
Tel: 416-363-1066
Fax: 416-363-2122
Tel: (416) 750-3045
Fax: (416) 750-4990
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ccvt.org
46
Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture

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