Report 16-014, Secondary School Review

Transcription

Report 16-014, Secondary School Review
COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE (Public)
Report No. 16-014
19 January 2016
Secondary School Review: International Baccalaureate Program/
Advanced Placement Courses
Key Contact: Peter Gamwell, Superintendent of Instruction, 613-596-8211, ext. 8391
PURPOSE:
1.
To present for information and discussion the results of the International
Baccalaureate Program/Advanced Placement Working Group.
CONTEXT:
2.
The OCDSB’s “Changes to Programs and Program Delivery Structures at
Secondary Schools” (Policy P.105 CUR) was developed in 2002 to guide the
provision of secondary school programming in the District. In 2008, the policy was
updated to include the OCDSB Secondary School Program Framework (SSPF).
The intent of the framework was to provide a structural model for secondary school
programs in the OCDSB. The policy speaks to how changes to programs and
program delivery structures at the OCDSB should be managed to meet the need of
students. While the framework reflected the strategic thinking of the District at its
time of implementation, it does not directly address or incorporate the District’s
current strategic goals; namely, improving equity of access and opportunity for all
students.
Subsequent to this policy revision, the Board approved the establishment of a
secondary school review process. This review was established to provide an
opportunity and a structure for the District to look at decisions with respect to
secondary schools as a collective, rather than as individual entities. The intent was
to build a broader understanding of our secondary schools, and for the resulting
decisions to be well-aligned, positioning our students for even greater success as
21st century learners. Each defined area of focus within the decision-making
framework was a review unto itself, interconnected to the other areas of focus
under the larger auspices of the secondary school review. While a number of
guiding principles were adopted, two specific questions were used to frame the
work:
1) How will the OCDSB ensure equity of access to core services and programs
for all secondary school students?
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Advanced Placement Courses
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2) How will the OCDSB offer a full breadth of programs to all secondary
school students?
To investigate the nature of program delivery and instruction in secondary schools,
six working groups were established in the following areas of programming and
services:
 International Baccalaureate Program (IB) /Advanced Placement Courses (AP)
 Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM);
 Digital Learning;
 French as a Second Language (Secondary);
 School Configurations; and
 Community Hubs
During the 2014-2015 school year, staff was directed to study the Canterbury Arts
program within the context of the Secondary School Review. This direction came
as a result of discussion regarding potential boundary changes to the Hillcrest High
School catchment area. Questions arose concerning whether or not the
Canterbury Arts Program could be viable as a “stand alone” site. The Director
made the commitment that staff would review that issue within the context of the
Secondary School Review. To that end, a seventh working group was established
with the same working mandate as the other six groups. It was also tasked with
reviewing the ‘arts only high school” question.
In most cases, the working groups’ investigations have spanned a four-year
timeframe (2011-2015) and have contemplated the nature/number of programs
that the District would need and will make recommendations based on their
research about the ‘go forward’ plan.
Each Secondary School Review Working Group will present a final report. These
reports will vary in nature; some will be for discussion only and others will require
formal Board approval where changes to the Secondary School Program
Framework are recommended. Each report will also document an additional set of
observations entitled “Future Considerations for Program Enhancement”. These
additional considerations are intended to document the thinking of each working
group. They may include suggested areas for further study, ideas to consider at a
later point in time, best practices, and/or suggestions for implementation. It is
expected that the final reports from all working groups will be brought forward
during the 2015-2016 school year.
While the Secondary School Review mandate identified six specific areas of
investigation, the larger discussion of a comprehensive plan to address long term
enrolment issues and the needs of students and the community is timely. The
findings of each working group shall form one small piece of a larger, holistic
picture of how to plan secondary schools for the future.
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Advanced Placement Courses
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KEY CONSIDERATIONS:
3.
The IB/AP Working Group’s original mandate was to examine the IB program in
relation to other enhanced programming offered at the secondary school level. It
was tasked with reviewing the number and location of the IB program and its
relationship to Advanced Placement and secondary gifted programs in the District.
The group limited its work to an analysis of the IB and AP since Learning Support
Services had identified a review of gifted programming as part of its 2015-2016
work plan. The results of the gifted review will also inform the comprehensive
analysis of all secondary programming at the end of the secondary school review
reporting processes. The issue of whether or not the IB program could stand on its
own without being co-located with a regular composite program was also
contemplated as part of the working group’s review.
The working group focused on two essential questions relating to their review:
 Do the current delivery models for these programs meet the District’s
commitment to offering equitable access to learning opportunities for all
students?
 Do the current delivery models of these programs improve educational
pathways for students?
FINDINGS:
A.
International Baccalaureate (IB) Program
Equity of access and opportunity
The District is committed to reducing barriers to learning and improving the equity
of access and opportunity for students’ educational pathways. While the District’s
guiding principle for secondary school program planning is the community school,
it is recognized that District programs may be offered where the special talents or
interests of students may not be met in the community school (as articulated in the
Secondary School Program Framework). The goal of equity of opportunity in
schools that provide enhanced programming for students is different than equity of
program opportunity to core educational programs. The issue becomes equity of
access for those students who exercise their choice to apply for these optional
programs.
 Where the District offers specialty programming, is there a reasonable plan
for the location of the program(s) in order that students who choose to
attend can do so?
 Are there an adequate number of student spaces offered for subscription?
 Are there financial barriers to students attending the program?
 What is the obligation of the District to provide equitable access for
programs that go beyond the Ministry mandated core programming for
secondary school?
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Advanced Placement Courses
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The OCDSB’s IB program, located at Colonel By SS, was instituted 20 years ago
and over the years its subscription has increased. The program has always been
situated within a composite school model where students from the designated
boundary area attend for regular secondary school courses.
The OCDSB IB program has established its renown and success in IB World
Schools (Appendix A) as well as with students and parents, with the result that
applications for available seats have risen significantly over the years. As outlined
in the group’s final report, significant numbers of students do not have the
opportunity to take part in the IB program (pre-IB) each year. In 2015-2016, 66% of
all eligible grade 9 applicants were declined, due in large part, to the lack of
available spaces, this signals a very real issue concerning access to the program.
Colonel By SS has limited capacity to increase its intake at the grade 9 level due to
its physical plant. While it would be able to accommodate one more grade 9 class,
this would only mean an additional 28 students every year.
The current location of the IB program is in the east end of the District; students
who live in the western areas of the District may face a total commuting time of
over two hours each day. Not only does this situation result in excessive travel time
to attend the day program, but it also prevents many IB students from participating
fully in extra-curricular or co-curricular activities before and after school. It should
be noted that a large percentage of the students attending IB travel from the west
of the District relative to Colonel By SS attendance boundary (Appendix A.1 and
A.2 in Appendix A, final report).
There is a need to address the issue of equity of access to the IB program (for
students who apply and meet the entrance requirements) that arises due to the
current lack of student spaces and geographic location.
Learning opportunities
The District is committed to providing personalized learning opportunities to meet
the individual needs of students.
The IB program offers a very particular type of external certification that differs
from a secondary gifted program and advanced placement opportunities (Appendix
A, final report). However, it is also interesting to note that the attributes identified
in the “IB Learner Profile” (Appendix A.4) reflect the same characteristics and skills
as the OCDSB Exit Outcomes, articulated in the 2015-2019 Strategic Plan: goaloriented, innovative/creative, collaborative, globally aware, resilient, ethical,
digitally fluent, academically diverse, effective communicators and critical thinkers.
As these are the identified goals for all of our OCDSB graduates, it is important to
note that the International Baccalaureate program diploma represents an additional
level of formal certification.
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Advanced Placement Courses
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Stand Alone or Composite School
The choice to place the IB program within a composite school environment is one
aspect that is viewed to be critical to the success of the program. Courses in the IB
program are based on core Ontario curriculum and are also modified to meet the
International Baccalaureate Program requirements for an IB diploma. Grade 9 and
10 IB courses are developed as 'pre IB courses' to position students for success in
the grade 11 and 12 courses. At the same time, regular core Ontario curriculum
courses are offered. Where IB is co-located within a composite school setting, if a
student is not successful in an IB course, he/she still retains access to core Ontario
curriculum courses in English, Geography, History and all Math and Sciences.
The current Secondary School Program Framework’s definition of District
programming does not contemplate the definitions of where programs need to be
co-located with regular composite programs. This is a need to be incorporated in a
future amendment to the Framework.
The IB Working Group provided Director’s Executive Council with the following
options for consideration:
1. Allow an increased intake of eligible IB students in grade 9 at the site in the
east over the next 4 years. The current school’s capacity would allow for an
additional 28 students per cohort;
2. Establish an additional IB diploma school. As the current site exists east of the
centre a school in the west end of the city should be considered to balance
access and reduce transportation time for students. In order to do so, the
OCDSB would have to identify an appropriate school site through an area
review process and follow the IB school authorization process as outlined in
Appendix A.2.
An increase to the cohort at Colonel By SS for September 2016 or 2017 by 28
students at the grade 9 level would proceed. Once an additional site in the west
has been operating for a period of time, the long term impact on enrollment
demands at Colonel By SS can be assessed. Even with an additional site,
enrolment demand at Colonel By may still increase and if so, would precipitate a
future review vis-à-vis colocation at a larger site or trigger a boundary review.
The addition of a new IB site would allow for wider accessibility for a program in
demand by students who are seeking this particular educational pathway. A new
program (co-located with a composite program at the new site) could have the
potential of growing up to 400 students within a four to five year time period.
These students would not be wholly new OCDSB enrolment (although there exists
the possibility of new students coming from other school boards/jurisdictions in the
west) but rather students who would choose to leave their home school to attend
the new IB program located in the west. Currently over 50% OCDSB of the
enrolment in the IB program at Colonel By SS has its home school designation
west of the Rideau River (Appendices A and A.1). This could have an impact on
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Advanced Placement Courses
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the future enrolment at Colonel By SS; the numbers of students living in the east
who may have been declined admission in the past (due to lack of available
spaces) may mitigate this impact significantly. The numbers of eligible students
decline a seat have not been tracked by designated home school in the past. The
potential addition of an IB program in the west aligns with the goal of locating
specialty programs within geographic areas. This goal is also in keeping with the
original mandate and goal of the Secondary School Review.
The choice of a new potential site is always contingent on the accreditation
process (Appendix A.2). The normal accreditation process could take up to two
years to complete but the OCDSB may qualify for an expedited process. This
accelerated process is based on a school district’s history with an IB program. The
IB program at Colonel By SS has been identified by the IB Organization as in the
top 5% of IB schools in North America, based on the size and success of the
examining cohort. The program is currently being reviewed (5 year review cycle).
The results of the review and its international standing may support an application
for an expedited process for a second location. The application for expedited
accreditation would need to be submitted by 1 April annually.
Presently the Secondary School Program Framework defines the only IB program
in the District as being located at Colonel By SS. The framework would need to be
amended to include the language that allows for an IB program in the east and the
west of the District.
What would be different?
There would be increased access to student places in the IB program in the
OCDSB first by allowing an increase in intake at the IB site in the east and
secondly by investigating a new site in the west. Program boundaries would be set
for each program site which may allow for efficient and effective transportation to
be available for students enrolled in the program.
A plan would also need to be developed to address the issue of financial hardship
for those students who wish to attend the program but do not have the resources
to pay the fees associated with the program.
The IB Working Group has also provided a number of observations for enhanced
programming.
Future Considerations for IB Program Improvement/Enhancement
That Colonel By SS administration and the OCDSB IB coordinator would continue
to be widely available to provide presentations and information sessions to improve
understanding of the IB learning experience for all stakeholders.
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Advanced Placement Courses
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Advanced Placement (AP) Courses
Advanced Placement is another delivery model of course enhancement that
supports a segment of learners at the secondary level. These courses allow
students to pursue enhancement according to their strengths and interests in their
own community school. This helps to keep students engaged and interested as
well as potentially reducing their workload in their first year of university or college
since they may receive "placement" going into a post-secondary institution;
meaning they do not have to take a first year post-secondary course in the subject.
Equity of access and opportunity
The District is committed to reducing barriers to learning and improving equity of
access and opportunity for all students across the District. While the AP delivery
model supports the community school principle, the AP Working Group identified a
number of different delivery models for AP courses that are being currently used
across the District. These can be characterized under three headings: course
format (scheduled as a class), extracurricular activity (before or after school as
other extra-curriculars) and independent study (undertaken by a student on his/her
own with some advice from staff). While there is acknowledgement that these
different delivery models have evolved based on local expertise and
circumstances, there is an inequity of the type of support that is offered from
school to school. Advanced Placement opportunities currently are not available in
all OCDSB secondary schools. In the 2015-2016 school year, twelve (12)
secondary schools offered an AP opportunity. While the number of schools has
not increased dramatically, there has been a steady increase in the number of
students who are enrolled in an AP course (Appendix A, final report).
The variation in the delivery model of AP courses in the District is a reflection of the
local situation in a school. Where a school has enough demand from the student
body for a particular AP course, it can be offered as a timetabled section and
staffed as part of the normal staffing component. In other schools where demand
does not warrant a discrete staffing allocation, the AP course materials are
delivered through teacher-led extracurricular activities, and/or through student
independent study with school support for AP exam delivery.
Based on its findings, the working group recommends that there be coordination of
Advanced Placement opportunities in order to increase equity of access and
greater delivery model throughout the District.
What would be different?
In the short term, a staff committee would be established to examine how best to
manage the delivery of AP courses across the District. Due to the variance and
complexity in delivery models, more study on how to meet student needs for this
educational enhancement is needed with more direct involvement and input from
secondary school principals/vice-principals, teachers, students and parents. The
goal of this committee would be to develop a plan that would provide wider
accessibility for students to take advantage of the AP opportunity across the
District.
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Advanced Placement Courses
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The nature of the delivery models, types of courses and number of courses offered
throughout the District and communication with students and parents during course
selection process could form part of the committee’s work. More investigation is
needed.
Future Considerations for AP Program Improvement/Enhancement
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Given the range of the site-based approaches to the delivery model for AP,
a greater understanding of the value of challenging the exam needs to be
examined and shared.
To support greater engagement of schools and students in completing the
AP exams for external moderation, exam coordination should be explored.
The design of an AP Learner Profile should be established reinforcing the
characteristics and skills deemed important as identified with the exit
outcomes of the OCDSB for all students.
Better systemic coordination occurs concerning the acquisition of resources
and the provision of professional development is required for the
accreditation process.
A communications mechanism should be established to facilitate site based
AP coordinators and the AP subject council to share ideas.
RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS:
4.
Staffing
International Baccalaureate Program
Staff in an IB program must attend an IB diploma workshop to learn about
specialized instruction and to attain certification. Where new staff is needed to
support a larger or new program enrolment, there would be a requirement to attend
to the certification process. This is a voluntary process and an implementation
plan would need to take into account the time and finances required for this
training to take place. It is anticipated that if a second site was opened, the staffing
practices currently in place for Colonel By SS IB program would be the accepted
process.
Advanced Placement
While teacher training is available for Advanced Placement (AP) courses, the
majority of AP courses are currently delivered by teachers who volunteer their time
(if offered as an extra-curricular activity) or by a staffing assignment (course
delivery). Both of these situations would continue to apply. It should be noted that
schools rely on the good will and passion of interested teachers who are prepared
to support this enhanced learning opportunity for students.
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Advanced Placement Courses
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Financial
International Baccalaureate
Currently the operational costs of the program, excluding the IB Coordinator’s
position, are covered by the student fees charged for the program. Students’
annual fees are $300 per year. There is a separate charge levied by the IB
Organization for its examinations; this can range from $800 to $1200 (depending
on the number of examinations written over the grade 11 and 12 years). The
school’s annual budget goal for the fee structure is to be cost neutral.
Transportation costs for the existing IB program can be estimated in the $550,000 $650,000 range. This estimate is based on the type of transportation for which IB
students are eligible. Incremental (or decreased) costs of a second site in the west
would need to be analyzed based on the location of the new site and how that
changes the school location (distance) of the newly enrolled students.
Applicants from the coterminous and independent school boards who are accepted
into the program average 35-40 per year (47 in 2015-2016). 40 new students new
to the Board would generate revenues of approximately $500K annually. There
would be incremental costs tied to these new enrolments; namely, staffing costs.
In considering any new site, the District would need to understand that there would
be initial implementation costs; these would mostly be tied to accreditation and
teacher certification. The application process would be a ‘one-time-‘ cost in the
range of $14,000. Annual membership fees are $7,000 (which have been covered
by the student fees). The cost of teacher certification is difficult to estimate as it
would be dependent on the available location of the certification programs at the
time. The decision on how to meet the IB Organization’s requirement for an IB
coordinator would need to be evaluated based on the number of students enrolled
in the new program and the new location.
The issue of financial subsidy for potential students would need further study.
The commitment to open a new District program site brings with it a commitment to
allocate the resources needed to make it a successful program choice for students.
Advanced Placement
The AP organization levies an examination fee of $125 per course, which is paid
by the student. At the present time, other operational costs for the courses
(learning materials, teacher professional development) are being covered by the
school.
COMMUNICATION/CONSULTATION:
5.
The IB/AP working group consulted with principals and staff at the schools where
these programs/courses are offered to elicit observations and advice on program
issues.
Report 16-014 Secondary School Review: International Baccalaureate Program/
Advanced Placement Courses
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A series of joint senior staff and secondary principal planning sessions have been
held tied directly to the issues of the Secondary School Review. These sessions
were developed to get the very best feedback from the field on the development of
potential recommendations.
Staff is anticipated to present its recommendations to Committee of the Whole on
16 February 2016. At that time a formal consultation plan that is tied to all
proposed changes to the Secondary School Program Framework will be
presented.
STRATEGIC LINKS:
6.
The District is committed to its strategic plan to reduce barriers to learning to
improve equity of access and opportunity for all students, and to improve and
increase access to the educational pathways for every student.
GUIDING QUESTIONS:



How can the District best meet the needs of students who are looking to use the
International Baccalaureate Program as a program pathway?
Do the present delivery models of Advanced Placement offer the most equitable
access for students looking for this educational opportunity?
How do we understand District wide specialty programs in the context of our
commitment to equity?
Peter Gamwell
Superintendent of Instruction
(ext.8210)
Jennifer Adams
Director of Education and
Secretary of the Board
APPENDIX
Appendix A – Final Report: International Baccalaureate Program /Advanced Placement
Report 16-014 Secondary School Review: International Baccalaureate Program/
Advanced Placement Courses
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Report No. 16-014 – Appendix A
STUDENT LEARNINGACCOMMODATION PLANNING
SECONDARY SCHOOL REVIEW:
International Baccalaureate (IB) Program
Advanced Placement (AP) Courses
FINAL REPORT
January 2016
1
STUDENT LEARNING – ACCOMMODATION PLANNING
SECONDARY SCHOOL REVIEW:
International Baccalaureate (IB) Program
Advance Placement (AP) Courses
SECTION 1. Background: Current Status in District
Description of Program/Service
The International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma program is a two-year course of study available to
students in grades 11 and 12. As the IB diploma program exists in the OCDSB today, grades 9 serve
as foundation years to prepare students for the rigours of the IB diploma program in grades 11 and 12.
The aim of all IB programs is to develop internationally-minded people who, recognizing their
common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more
peaceful world. Informed by these values, an IB education:
• centres on learners;
• develops effective approaches to teaching and learning;
• works within global contexts; and
• explores significant content.
Working together, these four characteristics define an IB
education.1
The IB diploma program model shows the emphasis of wellroundedness in the IB philosophy of learning.
Delivery Model
Currently, students apply to enter the IB in the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board
(OCDSB) at Colonel By Secondary School (SS) while in grade 8, with 168 spaces available.
Applicants to IB come from a wide variety of schools from within and outside Ottawa. The
chart “IB Applicants to Colonel By SS” represents the variety and volume of applicants over
the past several years.
1
From “What is an IB Education?”, pg 1 (http://www.ibo.org/globalassets/digital-tookit/brochures/what-is-an-ibeducation-en.pdf)
2
The IB diploma program at Colonel By SS is a designated District program in the OCDSB
meaning that students can reside outside of the school boundary and attend the school for
the IB diploma program providing they meet entrance requirements and there is available
space.
The school also attempts to accommodate students transferring from other IB World Schools,
both locally and internationally, into grades 10, 11, and 12. OCENET also works with Colonel
By SS to offer IB students living abroad an exchange opportunity in Ottawa.
A student taking the IB diploma from grade 9 at Colonel By SS will complete a series of
preparatory classes in grades 9 and 10 which helps to better position them for success in
grades 11 and 12.
Applicant Data
Each year the IB program at Colonel By SS receives far more applications than it has
program spaces. Over the last two years, two-thirds of eligible applicants have not been
accepted into the IB program. This amounts to a total of 325 applicants in 2015-2016, 345
applicants in 2014-2015, and 335 in 2013-2014 who have applied and have not been
accepted into the IB program.
Percentage (%) of Applicants
NOT Accepted
2015-2016
2014-2015
2013-2014
66
67
62
3
Retention rates in the IB diploma program at Colonel By SS have improved significantly over
the past three years which has resulted in the current retention rate in the IB diploma program
currently being in the 80 percent range.
All students who complete the requirements of the IB diploma also complete and receive the
Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).
Number of Programs
Colonel By SS is the only school in the OCDSB offering the IB diploma program and
currently offers the following IB diploma courses for students: English A; French B; French ab
initio; Spanish B; History; Geography; Information Technology in a Global Society; Chemistry;
Biology; Physics; Sports, Exercise and Health Science; Mathematics; Visual Arts; Music; Film;
Theory of Knowledge.
Other schools in Ottawa offering the IB diploma include: Ashbury; Elmwood; Collège
catholique Franco-Ouest; École secondaire publique Gisèle-Lalonde; and École secondaire
publique Deslauriers.
Schools in Ottawa offering either the Primary Years Program (PYP) or the Middle Years
Program (MYP) include: Elmwood (PYP and MYP); Académie de la Capitale (PYP); Collège
catholique Franco-Ouest (MYP); École secondaire publique Deslauriers (MYP); École
secondaire publique Gisèle-Lalonde (MYP); École élémentaire publique L’Odyssée (PYP);
and École élémentaire publique Michaelle-Jean (PYP).
Staffing
The IB diploma program at Colonel By SS is staffed from the base staff entitlement (BSE) of
the school. Teachers instruct a balance of IB diploma courses (grades 11 and 12), prediploma courses (grades 9 and 10), and OSSD courses (grades 9 -12).
The IB diploma coordinator position is centrally supported through a 1.0 FTE overlay and is
supported through the Curriculum Services department. The IB coordinator is a member of
the school’s leadership team and reports to the principal of Colonel By SS. This position is a
two year renewable position.
Any teacher instructing an IB diploma course must attend an IB diploma workshop for
specialized instruction and certification. It is also required that the principal, or a designate,
attend a specialized workshop for administrators. Re-training is required upon a change in
curriculum with all subjects on a seven year curriculum review cycle.
Additionally, separate workshops are encouraged for key support staff within the school
including guidance counsellors, librarian, and special education.
Funding
Within Ontario, funding structures for IB programs vary from board to board and school to
school. The OCDSB provides funding in the form of a staffing overlay for the IB coordinator
role in addition to providing student transportation.
4
All operational costs for the IB program are covered by:
• an annual fee of $300 in each of grades 9, 10, 11 and 12.
• IB diploma examination fees, which occur in grades 11 and 12. Examination fees are
charged by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), and Colonel By SS
operates on a cost-recovery model for all examination fees. A student who has
completed all four years at Colonel By SS and challenged for an IB diploma will have
paid exam fees ranging between $800 and $1200.2
Reporting Structures
As part of its agreement with the IBO, Colonel By SS participates in a five year self-evaluation
of its IB diploma program. Successful completion of this process every five years is required
for any IB school to retain its authorization from the IBO to offer the diploma program. The
self-study includes consultation and feedback components from all stakeholder groups –
students, families, staff, and the community – which aligns with the OCDSB strategic goal of
engagement.
Colonel By SS is the OCDSBs only non-semestered secondary school program. Academic
reporting structures for the OSSD follow Ministry of Education guidelines in addition to
compliance with IB reporting periods.
Community Partners
As an IB World School, Colonel By SS
fosters relationships with schools around the
world. The school is seen as a leader in the
Americas for the program that it offers and is
regularly visited each year by other schools.
Colonel By SS belongs to several IB
communities, all of which operate under the
umbrella of the IBO. Please see the graphic
that illustrates the IB community
relationships.
Locally, Colonel By SS relies on its parent
volunteers to help with key tasks associated
with running the program. Parents assist in
each of the two major information sessions
for the programme, help with collecting
applications, and serve as proctors under the
supervision of the IB coordinator during IB
examinations in May.
2
All examination fees are charged by IBO in USD. Over Grades 11 and 12 all students must take a minimum of six subject
examinations although some will opt to take more. This accounts for the range of examination fees.
5
SECTION 2. What the Research Says
Internal Research – The IB program at Colonel By SS, relative to other IB World Schools
Colonel By SS is provided annual research data from the IBO on student performance in IB
examinations. Whereas the average IB diploma score in the world is 29 points, Colonel By SS
students consistently perform above the average at 35 points.3
Furthermore, Colonel By SS has one of the largest diploma schools in the world. In the May
2014 examination session, Colonel By SS had 210 candidates registered for exams, and 271
candidates in the May 2015 session.
4
The following additional data was provided by Quality Assurance based on information
from Trillium in December 2014.
What is the breakdown of identified student groups in the OCDSB grade 12 IB enrolment?
 Of the students enrolled in the IB program, 40% were male and 60% were female,
representing a decrease in enrolment for male students and an increase for female
students (5%) compared to the average of the previous 4 years.
 8% of the students enrolled in the IB program were English language learners (ELLs),
representing an increase in enrolment (2%) compared to the average of the previous 4
years.
 32% of the students enrolled in the IB program were identified as gifted, representing
an increase in enrolment (5%) compared to the average of the previous 4 years.
 4% of the students enrolled in the IB program were identified as having a special
education need (excluding gifted), representing an increase in enrolment (1.5%)
compared to the average of the previous 4 years.
 None of the students enrolled in the IB program self-identified as FNMI, representing a
decrease in enrolment (1%) compared to the average of the previous 4 years.
3
The maximum score on an IB diploma is 45 points. 7 points are awarded for each of 6 subject areas and there are an
additional 3 points awarded combining results in the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge.
4
Taken from the May 2014 IB Statistical Bulletin
(http://www.ibo.org/contentassets/bc850970f4e54b87828f83c7976a4db6/may-2014-stats-bulletin.pdf)
6
External Research – As conducted by the IB Organization
In a study examining the impact of the extended essay (required IB diploma program
component) on student university success in Canada, in comparison with former non-IB
students, former IB diploma program students indicated higher ratings of aspects of inquiry
learning that represent self-regulation of the inquiry process. Additionally, IB students were
less likely to view learning as primarily memorization of information (Aulls and Lemay 2013).5
Other research on IB programs is available on request from the working group.
SECTION 3. What Did We Learn?
Benefit to Students
IB diploma program students show considerable development in many areas. Because the IB
diploma curriculum aims to promote a wide variety of skills and characteristics in students,
students who take part in the IB program make the transition to university and college fairly
seamlessly. The characteristics and skills developed in the IB program very closely align with
the exit outcomes identified by the OCDSB as important for all students.6 They are:
Resiliency:
IB program students regularly face high expectations in their courses.
Adaptability: Life-long learning is something that is embedded into the IB mission statement.
IB program students are regularly required to reflect on their learning inside and outside the
classroom to better understand their own strengths and areas for improvement.
Global Awareness: Each subject of the IB program has a global awareness component
allowing students to gain an awareness of different cultures and practices around the world.
Collaboration: Students in the IB program quickly discover that success is often a collective
and collaborative process.
Innovation/Creativity: IB program students are regularly asked to be innovative and creative in
their studies. With an emphasis on enquiry in the classroom, students develop their own
voices and thoughts.
Critical Thinking: Theory of Knowledge is one of the core components of the IB program. It is
a required course for all IB program students, but the tenants of the program are embedded in
all IB courses. Students are regularly challenged to think about “how they know what they
know” in every discipline.
Effective Communication: The IB curriculum is driven by an enquiry-based approach. The IB
program requires students to acquire an understanding of a second language.
5
Key findings from global research on the impact of IB programs (http://www.ibo.org/globalassets/publications/becomean-ib-school/globalkeyfindings.pdf)
6
In IB students are encouraged to see themselves through the Learner Profile as seen in Appendix D
7
Academic Diversity: In order to achieve an IB diploma, students must complete a diverse set
of examinations in multiple disciplines including the study of language and literature, language
acquisition, individuals and societies, sciences, mathematics, and the arts. This commitment
to well-roundedness is a defining characteristic of IB program students.
Digital Fluency: IB program students develop digital fluency skills that position them well in
our global, digital world.
University Preparedness
Universities offer excellent recognition of the IB diploma program and nearly all offer
advanced standing for students in one or more of the following ways: university credits,
promotion to the sophomore year, or scholarships directly targeted towards IB diploma
graduates.
Challenges
There is currently greater demand for the IB diploma program than can be accommodated
through the number of spaces available to students at Colonel By SS, creating an issue of
access. Hundreds of applicants do not have the opportunity to take part in the IB program
(pre-IB and diploma program) each year.
Transportation times for students in the IB diploma program range, but some students face a
total commuting time of over two hours each day. This is a significant amount of time for
students to spend travelling between home and school.
There is a need to clarify required non course-bound elements of the IB diploma program
such as the extended essay and CAS (Community, Activity, Service) which currently involve
teaching staff within the school, but fall outside of staff’s teaching assignments.
The linking of the IB coordinator to a teaching position creates challenges in the day-to-day
operation of the program. Suggested duties of the coordinator provided by IBO do not align
with regular teaching duties.7 The length of the position’s term, currently two years with an
extension of one year, is too brief.
There is a general lack of understanding of the IB program at a variety of levels. This
suggests that there is an opportunity to increase understanding and awareness for all
stakeholders through increased access to program presentations and information.
SECTION 4. Future Directions
The IB diploma program at Colonel By SS currently receives far more applications than it can
accommodate, limiting access. As Colonel By SS can accept no more than168 students into
the grade 9 IB program, it is recommended that the OCDSB consider the following scenarios.
7
IBO gives the following information about the role of the Coordinator:
https://ibpublishing.ibo.org/server3/apps/handbook/pdf.html?doc=d_0_dpyyy_vmx_1409_1_e&part=4
8
Potential Options
a) Review the current cap on student enrolment for grade 9 and subsequent years to
accommodate additional applicants for a trial period of 4 years (one full diploma cohort
and up to four total cohorts).
b) Open an additional IB diploma school. As Colonel By SS currently sits in the eastern
area of the District, a site in the western area would be optimal. In order to do so, the
OCDSB would have to identify an appropriate school site and follow the IB school
authorization process as outlined in Appendix C.
c) Move the existing IB diploma program from Colonel By SS to the centre of the city as
an IB-only school, increasing spaces available in the school to improve access.
Centralizing the program to the city’s transitway could reduce travel time for students.
In order to do so, the OCDSB would have to apply to the IBO for program relocation
and meet the requirements of relocation.
Additional Considerations for Program Enhancement
The principal/vice-principal at Colonel By SS and the IB coordinator are available to provide
presentations and information sessions to improve understanding of the IB learning
experience for all stakeholders.
There should be dialogue that seeks clarification on the curriculum-related aspects of
additional programming in the IB diploma program.
9
STUDENT LEARNING – ACCOMMODATION PLANNING
SECONDARY SCHOOL REVIEW:
Advanced Placement: Final Report
SECTION 1. Background: Current Status in District
The mandate of the International Baccalaureate/Advanced Placement working group as
delineated in the Secondary School Review (June 2011) was to: gather information about the
state of the International Baccalaureate (IB) program and the Advanced Placement (AP)
offerings from 2010-2011 to the academic year of 2014-2015 in the Ottawa-Carleton District
School Board (OCDSB).
Description of Program/Service
Advanced Placement Preparation (prep) courses are college- and university-level courses
that can be taken in OCDSB secondary schools. AP courses can be taught along with
regular course curriculum; however, AP exams are not considered in a student's overall mark
and there is no AP diploma associated with this opportunity. Students who take AP courses
may receive placement (and/or credit) in college and university, meaning they do not have to
take a first year course. This determination is dependent upon each individual post-secondary
institution’s entrance requirements.
Students are not required to take the AP course in order to challenge the exam. (Students can
challenge an exam for a course no matter what school they attend).
Note: AP courses are available internationally but organized through the College Board
located in the United States. All exams are designed and delivered through the College
Board (www.collegeboard.org).
Delivery Model
Courses are traditionally offered at grades 11 and 12. AP courses cover the Ontario
curriculum but add additional, enriched materials in order to help students prepare for the AP
exam. However students have been accessing AP opportunities in at least two other ways:
through teacher-led extra-curricular activities, and through student independent study with
school support for AP exam delivery.
The following provides the percentage of course delivery models by course areas in the
OCDSB:
10
AP Course Area
Course Format
Extra-Curricular Activity
Independent
Arts
50%
50%
0%
English
60%
30%
10%
History & Social Sciences
33%
67%
0%
Math & Computer Science
67%
0%
33%
Sciences
67%
27%
7%
World Languages & Cultures
25%
25%
50%
Exams for AP courses are offered during the first week of May. For this reason, most AP
courses are offered during the first semester so that the course is finished prior to the exam.
Students then have the option of meeting with teachers and peers on their own during the
second semester for tutoring before the AP exam. Students enrolled in AP courses have the
choice to write or not to write the AP exam.
Number of Programs
More than 500 schools in Canada administered AP exams in 2013. Within Ontario, 215
schools offered 8233 exams for 5307 students. Organized through the College Board, there
are over 30 AP courses available to choose from in a wide variety of subject areas.
The following are enrolment statistics for the delivery of AP courses in the OCDSB:
 In 2014-2015, almost 1,500 OCDSB students were enrolled in AP courses,
representing a 13% increase in enrolment over the average of the previous four years.
 Students were enrolled in AP courses across 13 secondary schools, with 80% of
enrolment concentrated at 5 schools (Cairine Wilson, Earl of March, Nepean, Lisgar
and John McCrae).
 In 2014-2015, AP courses in Mathematics were most in demand, followed by Science
and English.
 Over the past five years, enrolment has steadily increased in AP Mathematics and AP
World Languages (i.e., French as a Second Language) courses and has decreased in
AP Arts and AP History and Social Sciences.
 In 2014-2015, over half of the students enrolled in AP (65%) took 1 AP course, 27% of
students took 2 AP courses, and just under 20% of students took 3 or more AP
courses.
Staffing
The majority of schools (11) indicated that student interest (82%) and having a qualified
teacher who was interested and willing to provide AP opportunity (73%) were the factors that
drove the decision to offer AP opportunities at their school. Of those schools that offer AP
opportunities, very few (23%) indicated that their teachers had completed training through the
College Board (United States). The majority of schools (85%) indicated that they had a
designated AP coordinator to manage this opportunity. The AP coordinator’s position is one
11
that is a school designation. While there is an accreditation process available for this position
through the international AP organization, it is not mandatory that the coordinator have that
certification to coordinate the AP offerings in the school. There is no additional staffing
provided to schools offering AP.
Funding
There is no fee for students to take an AP course; however, the average cost of an AP exam
for students is $125. Schools receive no special funding and some of the drawbacks or
challenges of offering AP opportunities is the expense for teacher training (i.e., conference
fees, travel, accommodation). Training is offered through the College Board (USA) or through
the Canadian Branch of the College Board. As well, there is an associated cost for schools
with textbooks specific to certain AP courses.
Reporting Structures
AP scores show how well students did on the AP exam and also demonstrate a measure of
achievement in a college-level course. This score can be used by colleges and universities to
determine if they will grant credit for what has been learned. A scale of 1 (no
recommendation) to 5 (extremely well qualified) is used with many colleges and universities
granting credit and placement for scores of 3 (qualified), 4 (well qualified) or 5; however, each
college decides which score it will accept. Schools and students receive these results in July,
and students have the option to have their marks sent directly to specific colleges or
universities.
Although it is not a requirement, AP schools may go through a process of accreditation to
offer AP courses or to facilitate students to challenge the exam. Even if not accredited,
schools are required to send in AP course curriculum/teacher syllabus to be approved if
offering AP. The benefits of accreditation include access to professional resources,
membership rates on conferences professional development, and an opportunity to be
involved in governance of the College Board.
SECTION 2. What the Research Says
The following additional data was provided by Quality Assurance based on information available
in Trillium and by an online survey conducted with schools in 2015.
What is the breakdown of identified student groups in the OCDSB grade 12 AP course
enrolment?
 Of the students enrolled in grade 12 AP courses, 52% were male and 48% were
female, representing a decrease for male students and an increase for female students
(3%) compared to the average of the previous 4 years.
 9% of the students enrolled in grade 12 AP courses were English language learners
(ELLs), representing an increase in enrolment (4%) compared to the average of the
previous 4 years.
 27% of the students enrolled in grade 12 AP courses were identified as gifted,
representing a decrease in enrolment (1%) compared to the average of the previous 4
years.
12
 8% of the students enrolled in grade 12 AP courses were identified as having a special
education need (excluding gifted), representing an increase in enrolment (3%)
compared to the average of the previous 4 years.
 1% of the students enrolled in grade 12 AP courses self-identified as FNMI,
representing a decrease in enrolment (2%) compared to the average of the previous 4
years.
What are some of the factors (negative and positive) impacting the delivery of OCDSB AP
courses?
 The decision to offer AP opportunities in OCDSB schools was most frequently driven
by student interest and the presence of willing and qualified teaching staff.
 Very few schools (15%) were working together to deliver AP opportunities.
 The majority of schools (85%) had a designated AP coordinator.
 Some schools expressed interest in a more formal way for AP coordinators to connect,
share information, and learn from each other’s experiences.
 Few schools (23%) indicated that their teachers had completed workshops or training
through the College Board.
 The expenses for teacher training (e.g., conference fees, travel, accommodation) were
cited by some schools as one of the challenges of offering AP opportunities.
 The majority of schools (82%) indicated that AP opportunities were open to all
students.
 Students were most commonly made aware of AP opportunities through their
classroom teachers, guidance counsellors, friends/peers, presentations, and
electronic/print advertisements.
SECTION 3. What Did We Learn?
Benefit to Students
AP provides a structured enrichment opportunity where students are able to pursue
enrichment according to their strengths and interests in their own community school. This
challenging opportunity helps keep students engaged and interested as well as reducing their
workload in their first year of university or college. Students may get "placement" meaning
they do not have to take a first year course but do not receive credit for having previously
taken an AP course. As well, AP courses reinforce the skills and confidence to be successful
at the college or university level.
Challenges
Different delivery models across the District may pose challenges for students wishing to
engage in an AP course. For example, a school may wish to offer the Preliminary SAT (PSAT)
assessment in grade 10. Scores on the PSAT give an indication of who will do well on AP
courses. Other schools may simply seek input from guidance counsellors and subject
teachers to ensure that those students contemplating accessing an AP course be provided
13
with guidance and information about the AP expectations and program. Typically, students
who take AP courses are students who historically have done well academically and have
been encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity. The ability for a student to access an
AP course is highly dependent on the school’s delivery model and the communication about
the availability of the course.
AP courses and expectations increase the workload for students, therefore, the ability of the
learner to take on these additional expectations needs to be evaluated carefully. The delivery
of the AP material is often linear and test-driven, which is somewhat contrary to an enquiry
based learning model.
Funding for teacher and administrative training and ongoing professional development is a
concern. Exams are written in the first week of May and the coordination and supervision of
these exams is a challenge for schools offering AP courses. The role of an AP coordinator
can be very time consuming.
SECTION 4 Future Directions
Future Considerations for Program Improvement
The following observations were offered by the working group for consideration:
 Convene a meeting with secondary school principals, or a newly formed operational
group, to explore alignment across OCDSB schools.
 Develop common learning resources (e.g., B & LT Google group) to facilitate
communication and the sharing of information between AP coordinators and/or AP
subject teachers.
 Engage student voice: Elicit feedback from students having experienced the various
delivery models.
 Engage parent voice: Gather information and feedback from parents regarding their
experience and/or awareness with AP in their community school.
 Contact post-secondary institutions: Interface and gather information on the value of
AP in a post-secondary environment
A central AP exam coordination and location for all students would ease the supervision
scheduling for all schools.
Student awareness and access varies in each school. The influence of classroom teachers,
guidance counsellors, friends and peers, and electronic print media, were the most common
ways that students were made aware of AP opportunities at their school. Many guidance
counsellors and AP coordinators would like to see this opportunity portrayed on option sheets.
A system approach offered at OCDSB schools would be advantageous for communication to
all stakeholders
SECTION 5. Summary
AP courses offer an enhanced learning opportunity for students to explore subjects that
interest them more deeply, develop advanced research and critical thinking skills and, in
many cases, develop self-directed learning skills.
14
Report No. 16-014 Appendix A.1"
Report No. 16-014 Appendix A.2
Report No. 16-014 Appendix A.3
IB Americas: Conditions for the approval of relocation
A school wanting to relocate should submit proof of the following evidence:
1. That the old site will either close down or stop teaching the IB programme.
2. That the new site is ready for teaching at a stipulated date.
3. That the new school facility will come under the same governing body of the old school. If the school
comes under a different governing body or district, proof of support will need to be submitted together
with budgetary requirements similar to those of the application process.
4. That the current Principal will move to the new facility. If the Principal does not move, submit letter of
new Principal showing support to the programme.
5. That the current IB coordinator will move to the new facility. If the IB coordinator does not move, the
school must submit proof of IB training for the IB coordinator designate.
6. That the current trained staff will move to the new facility. If not all trained staff moves, the school must
submit the percentage of staff that will be relocating. If more than 2/3 of teachers move, the school must
submit proof of professional IB training for new teachers. If less than 2/3 teachers move, IB Americas will
assess whether a new authorization process will have to take place.
7. That the students will move to the new facility. If not all students move, the school must submit the
percentage of students that will be relocating. If more than 2/3 of the students move, the school must
submit proof of support of new parents and students to the IB programme. If less than 2/3 students move,
IB Americas will assess whether a new authorization process will have to take place.
8. Name of the new school (if different from previous name).
At the discretion of the IB Americas office, a site visit to inspect the new facility might take place at the
expense of the school. During the visit, an IB Americas representative will inspect the new facility and meet
with the Principal, the IB coordinator and a member of the governing body to ensure that the programme is
properly implemented. Following the visit and confirmation of the above items, IB Americas will
recommend approval of the change to the Director General. Once approved, the IB curriculum and
assessment office in Cardiff will be notified of the name and address change. The school will maintain the
same IBIS school code.
Please submit the above documentation to:
Kelsey Day
Diploma Programme Associate Manager
IB Americas
[email protected]
IB learner profile
IB learner profile IB learn
IB learner prof
IB learner profile IB lear
IB learner profile
IB learner profile
IB learner profile IB lear
IB learner profil
IB learner profile
IB learner pro
file
e
Report No. 16-014 Appendix A.4
The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their
common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.
As IB learners we strive to be:
We nurture our curiosity, developing skills for inquiry and
research. We know how to learn independently and with others.
We learn with enthusiasm and sustain our love of learning
throughout life.
We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as
well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a
range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the
experience.
We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring
knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues
and ideas that have local and global significance.
We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a
commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference
in the lives of others and in the world around us.
We use critical and creative thinking skills to analyse and take
responsible action on complex problems. We exercise initiative in
making reasoned, ethical decisions.
We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination;
we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas
and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the
face of challenges and change.
We express ourselves confidently and creatively in more than
one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively,
listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and
groups.
We act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness
and justice, and with respect for the dignity and rights of people
everywhere. We take responsibility for our actions and their
consequences.
We understand the importance of balancing different aspects of
our lives—intellectual, physical, and emotional—to achieve
well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence
with other people and with the world in which we live.
We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and
experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses
in order to support our learning and personal development.
The IB learner profile represents 10 attributes valued by IB World Schools. We believe these attributes, and others like
them, can help individuals and groups become responsible members of local, national and global communities.
3

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