Middle Wrinkle, February 2012

Comments

Transcription

Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
1
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Robert J. Kaiser Middle School
Middle Wrinkle
Literary-Art Magazine
Volume 11 Edition 2
February 2012
Free to all students and faculty
Robert J. Kaiser Middle School
45 Breakey Avenue
Monticello, NY 12701
Awards from Columbia Scholastic Press Association
One Gold Medalist
Four Medalist
Ten First Place
One Silver Medalist
Awards from the National Council of English Teachers
One rating of Excellent
Two ratings of Above Average
Awards from the American Scholastic Press Association
Eleven First Place
Two First Place with Special Merit
Most Outstanding Middle School Literary-Art Magazine 2002
Most Outstanding Intermediate School Literary-Art Magazine 2011
Goals:
The goals of the Middle Wrinkle are to demonstrate exemplary examples of literary
and art pieces from students in the Robert J. Kaiser Middle School. The students are in
grades 6-8. Students or teachers may submit any pieces of student work to be considered for print in the Middle Wrinkle. The pieces are selected by the advisers based
on content, originality, and quality of work. The Middle Wrinkle staff meets after
school to work on art and written material.
The students and advisers decide the format of each edition based on the material accepted for print. The font used is Tahoma size 12. This font was chosen because it is
easy to read. It is used throughout the magazine. Occasionally, a title may use a different font for variation. Occasionally Word Art is used for titles. Some Microsoft Clip
Art is used in small quantities. The Middle Wrinkle is fully funded by the Monticello
Central School District’s budget.
2
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Teachers Who Contributed Students’
Writing
Cherise Barasch
Debora Bausenwein
Timothy Potts
Jamie Volpe
Christine Worthington
Art Adviser
Elizabeth Bassett
Teachers Who Contributed Students’
Artwork
Jennifer Ducey
Adviser
Debora Bausenwein
Student Editor:
Somaya Bracy
Principal
Deborah Wood
Front Cover:
Love is Eternal
Travis DeGroat
English Language Arts Director
Theodore Kusulas
Back Cover:
Illustration III
Ashley Hendrickson
Student Distributors
Shyan Barnes
Tahyrah Fore
Deven Rubin
Lorenze Massey
3
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Sad
5
Somaya Bracy
Dinosaur Dinner
Desean Hunter
From the Heart
Tabitha Peplowski
The Pizza People from Pluto
6
Desean Hunter
Lake George Trip
Tiffany Leonard
Jackie Robinson
7
Raymond Reynolds
Little Turtle
8
Pedro Valentin
Bumper Car
Aaron Terpstra and William Waterton
Kyle’s Car
Kyle Klopchin
Warm and Cozy
9
Klara Walker
Eating Dinner
Samuel Stanford and Scott Hughes
Firework
10
Bengy Francisco and Tommy Nola
Archaeologists Have a Lot of Homework
11
Sara Mapes
Do Archaeologists Study Records?
Sara Mapes
Stratigraphy
Sarah Mapes
Tools
12
Sarah Mapes
Archaeology Pictures
13
Sarah Mapes
Diary Entries based on the novel, The
Witch of Blackbird Pond
14
Entry 1
Darius Rodgers
Entry 2
Elizabeth Martinez
Diary Entries following a prompt
from Mrs. Moskowitz
15
Entry 1
Jonathan Pabon-Lopez
Entry 2
16
Darius Rodgers
Found Poetry from Chapter 4 of The
Witch of Blackbird Pond
17
Poem 1
Jonathan Pabon-Lopez
Poem 2
Emily Maxwell
Poem 3
Elizabeth Martinez
Poem 4
18
Brittany Wood
Poem 5
Jaison Rivera
Letter Home About the Hardships in
Jamestown
19
Anthony Mendez
Red
20
Cassidy Swensen
Turtle
Cyara Beatty
Illustration I
21
Ashley Hendrickson
Illustration II
22
Ashley Hendrickson
Jonathan Livingston Seagull and
Elder: “Speaking Without WordsTelepathically”
23
Jose Colotla
4
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Dinosaur Dinner
By Desean Hunter,
Grade 6
Sad
By Somaya Bracy,
Grade 6
I look out the window. I watch rain fall.
A raindrop falls down the window like
cool water in a bath. A tear trickles on
my cheek it feels like a comforting hug
from the ones I love.
Dinosaurs, dinosaurs, what do you eat
“Sir, I dine on green leaves and he dines
on red meat”
“I eat green leaves and never eat others
But he eats his friends and even his
brothers”
I dine on green leaves, which makes me
a vegetarian
He dines on red meat, which makes him
a barbarian
When it comes
from the HEART,
it’s TRUE...
Tabitha
Peplowski
Grade 6
From the Heart
5
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
The Pizza People from Pluto
By Desean Hunter,
Grade 6
Once upon a time on the planet Pluto there were
little clumps of dough. One day Alexander T. Timbleton
was thrown into the sun. Three years later Alex came
back as a pizza person. He told how the sun was a factory
and when you get to the sun the suntoids (rhymes with
mantoids) flatten you, put sauce on, then whatever toppings you want. Then they throw you back to Pluto. A few
days later all the pizza people eat each other. Only two
pizza people survived and they started a whole new generation of pizza people.
Lake George Trip
By Tiffany Leonard,
Grade 6
When I went to Six-Flags in Lake George, my grandparents and I had a great time. We went there for my birthday. I
got to see a lot of characters and go water tubing. My grandparents and I got soaked in water then we went on a fake
log down a waterfall. We had a great time.
They had these mobile cars that we can drive and I got
to drive one. After that we went to go get pizza at town. We
watched “Lake George Got Talent.” Franklin Stine was dancing and he took my prize that I won and took a picture with
it. When we got back to the campsite, I had more pizza and
a lot of S’mores then I went to bed. I got bit up by mosquitoes. The next morning I got up at 7:00 and I looked for
wood. I came back and we had breakfast.
On my birthday everyone called my grandma’s phone
to say “Happy Birthday” to me. But then that same day I was
walking to the showers, I fell on the road because I tripped
on a rock. I was fine.
6
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Jackie Robinson
By Raymond Reynolds,
Grade 6
Early Years:
Jackie Roosevelt Robinson was born
in Cairo, Georgia in 1919. He was the first
African American player on a major league
baseball team. During his career he was
awarded three of baseball’s highest honors: Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable
Player, and Inducted into the Hall of Fame.
Jackie was also known as a civil rights activist, he also worked with several civil
rights movement leaders including Malcolm
X and Martin Luther King, Jr. His great success in sports changed the United States
by breaking down racial barriers. At an
early age, Jackie was influenced by his
brother Mack who was the silver medalist
at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. Another
great moment in his athletic career occurred when he was a student at the University of California at Los Angeles. He became the first student to succeed in four
different sports. They were track, football,
basketball, and baseball. In 1941 Jackie
decided to leave college and join the military. While in the army the Jim Crowe laws
limited a colored man’s freedom. By the
end of 1944, after leaving the army, Jackie
moved to Texas to play baseball in the negro leagues.
Middle Years:
Jackie was scouted by Ricky Branch,
the president of the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Jackie Robinson’s batting average was .297
and he hit twelve homeruns in his first season. When he started playing with the
Dodgers, many other players on the team
ignored him. Many baseball fans hated him
just because he was black. Many people
were impressed and attracted by his dynamic play. Jackie would always remember
what Mr. Ricky said to him, “Color didn't
matter to fans if the black man was a winner.”
Final Years:
After about ten years of playing with
the Dodgers, he hung up his uniform and
he retired. Following his baseball career,
Jackie became a businessman. He became
a civil rights activist and a father of three
children. He worked for NAACP (National
Association for the Advancement of Colored People). He had contact with many
leaders in government and the civil rights
movement, such as Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., Nelson Rockefeller, and John
F. Kennedy. Jackie also cared deeply about
and tried to work with children in his community.
On October 24, 1972 at the age of
53, Jackie Robinson died of a heart attack.
Jackie’s spirit lives on and provides an example to us all of real strength and courage in the face of adversity. Jackie gives us
a heroic image that will never fade.
7
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Little Turtle
By Pedro Valentin
Grade 7
Bumper Car
By Aaron Terpstra and
William Waterton
Grade 7
There it goes another shell grows.
Stick your head out so you can let it
show.
I know you’re slow, but let it go.
So everyone knows how you flow.
Ka-zoom! Bam! Pow! It’s the bumper car.
I’m waiting on line.
They stop I can’t choose one
I’m next! I see the dangerous beast that
Charges through others.
All of a sudden I see the go kart’s sparks
Flying like eagles
It was like it called me from the start
Woo Hoo it’s going fast
I’m glad it chose me!
8
Kyle Klopchin
Grade 6
Kyle’s Car
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Warm and Cozy
By Klara Walker
Grade 7
A flower patch is like mother’s kisses
So warm, comforting, and safe
When I go to the park the swings are
Like a hug from my strong father.
When I am asleep my bed is like
A band-aid when I am hurt
My dad’s chair is like a chocolate
Cake from my grandma.
Eating Dinner
By Samuel Stanford and
Scott Hughes
Grade 7
I stomp-stomp down the
stairs
I scoot-scoot into my chair
I slurp-slurp while sipping my
drink
I scrape-scrape eating my
salad
I scoot-scoot pushing in my
chair
I splash-splash my plate in
the sink
I stomp-stomp back up the
stairs
Then I snore-snore in my bed
9
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Firework
By Bengy Francisco and
Tommy Nola
Grade 7
Fireworks, fireworks shoots
into the air
Bang! Zoom! Pow! There
they go.
All the children and adults
are happy as can be.
They all scream and shout,
“Ooo, aahhh.”
10
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Archaeologists Have a Lot of Homework
By Sara Mapes,
Grade 6
Archaeologists have a lot of homework.
They have to research their location. They
have to take pictures of their location. They
have to study records. They have to leave
their location the way they found it. Archaeologists can’t just start their job. They have to
do homework first.
11
Do Archaeologists Study Records?
By Sara Mapes,
Grade 6
Archaeologists must study records. Records give archaeologists the
information they’re probably looking for.
Records tell you the location. Records
tell you some of the artifacts that are in
that location. Records tell you if a different group was already at that location.
Records might tell you how old the artifacts are. Records can give you time periods. Records are part of their homework. They study records.
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
12
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
13
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Diary Entries Based on the Novel
The Witch of Blackbird Pond,
Written by Elizabeth George Speare
Entry 1
by Darius Rodgers,
Grade 7
Entry 2
By Elizabeth Martinez,
Grade 7
1687
1687
Dear Diary,
Today was a horrible day. First, Kit
and I got a job at a dame school. We
teach the children letters, numbers, and
how to read.
The children really like Kit. They
like her nice clothes. They bring her gifts.
Kit was getting bored, so she came
up with a great idea. She started by writing little poems about the kids and by telling a story. So, then, she had the children
act out the story from the Bible.
The playacting got out of control.
Mr. Kimberley, who had come to inspect
the school, set the kids home and dismissed Kit. When I heard that they were
dismissed, I cried. Kit ran out of the
house.
Sincerely,
Mercy Wood
Dear Diary,
I was so excited about the play at
school that I was in, but there was a fight
that happened. The fight was supposed
to be fake, so I jumped in. So this is how
the fight started. The teacher put three
boys who were going to be robbers in the
play, but they did not like the boy who
they were supposed to rob. Now, it gets
to that part and the boys were playing
seriously, then it turned into a fight. So, I
was more excited about the fight than
the play, so I jumped in. An old guy came
in and started to hit us with a stick.
Love,
Jonathan Ashby
14
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Diary Entries completing a prompt from Mrs. Moskowitz
Entry 1
By Jonathan Pabon-Lopez,
Grade 7
When they got to the cabin,
my mom took the doll from me. But I
asked her, “Why are you taking the
doll Grandpa made me?”
My mother said, “It could be
cursed because Kit, AKA the Witch,
could have cursed the doll.”
“Are you sure, Mother?”
“Yes, I am sure.”
Faithfully,
Prudence
April 1687
Dear God,
I am illiterate, and I have
never learned to read or write, but I
have convinced John Holbrook to
keep my secrets and record my feelings as a diary entry. We have been
traveling with a strange woman
named Kit, and she has made me
question the nature of my strict
mother, Goodwife Cruff.
I feel sad because my mother
slaps me around and I felt embarrassed because many people were
looking at me. I felt stupid and dumb.
Then we went to dinner. I felt
dumb just standing there like a tree
trying to stand straight and get someone to feed me. My mom was sitting
down on a chair and I was standing
right behind her in sorrow. My parents
would eat the good food and leave
me the leftovers. “I lost my appetite.”
My mother didn’t respond. I waited a
couple of minutes and said, “Can we
go to our cabin now?” But my mother
didn’t respond. I waited a couple of
minutes and she said, “Yes, we can
go to our cabin now.” They got up
and left to go to the cabin.
15
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Entry 2
By Darius Rodgers,
Grade 7
April 1687
Dear God,
I am illiterate and have never learned
to read or write, but I have convinced John
Holbrook to keep my secrets and record my
feelings, as a diary entry. We have been
traveling with a strange woman named Kit,
and she has made me question the nature of
my strict mother, Goodwife Cruff.
I like Kit because she was the one
who got my doll from under the water. My
mother did not like Kit because she thinks Kit
is a witch. My mom is so mean that she hits
me in the back of my head just for crying for
my doll that fell into the water. The way I
felt about that, God, is that I just wanted to
run away. But when Kit gave me the doll
from under the water, I felt that she should
be my mom.
Faithfully yours,
Prudence
16
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Found Poetry from Chapter 4 of The Witch of Blackbird Pond
Poem 1
By Jonathan Pabon-Lopez,
Grade 7
Kit lived in Barbados
Now lived in Wethersfield
Bright peacock blue paduasoy
Seven trunks
Pounced on the dresses
Widow Brown
Dresses and petticoats
Womenfolk
Katherine unpack
Poem 2
By Emily Maxwell,
Grade 7
Seven trunks full of clothes
Minister preached against slit sleeves
Light blue wool
Heavy blue wool
Half-hearted
Dresses and petticoats and slippers
Ripple of silver
Red satin petticoat
Ribbons and bows
Bright peacock blue paduasoy
Poem 3
By Elizabeth Martinez,
Grade 7
Dresses, petticoats, and slippers, and such
I’ve seen the ladies in Hartford
I don’t know said Mercy doubtfully
And so many ribbons and bows
I’ve never felt anything so soft
Judith was back at the mirror
Kit dived impulsively into the trunk
Rachel shied away from the mirror
Judith was not so easily intimidated
“Do as I say!” he thundered
I gave her the dress
17
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Poem 4
By Brittany Wood,
Grade 7
Well, dresses and petticoats
And slippers and such
Mercy’s laugh was a ripple of silver
Kit, how soon are you going to open
them?
Right now if you want
Mercy was shocked
Oh, Mercy! There’s always work
I don’t know
New cousin every day
He would forgive us
Oh, come on, Kit
Poem 5
By Jason Rivera,
Grade 7
But we don’t! We can’t even imagine!
Dresses and petticoats and slippers and
such
Please, you must have them
Try it on
Why, it’s perfect
It makes your eyes look almost green!
Judith was breathtaking
Wear that on Sunday!
What is the meaning of this?
Give it back to her at once!
18
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Letter Home About the Hardships in Jamestown
By Anthony Mendez,
Grade 7
Dear Father,
I finally landed in the New World, but
we are facing many dreaded hardships. We
were apparently hostile to the natives, the
diseases were fatal, and we have a feeling
that they’re spies in the crew. We worked
on a fort to hold our specialty items and
survival tools. Yet, we are still to find not
even an ounce of fresh water. The gold is
invisible from sight. We still have a bit of
fortune, however, it is not enough.
One of the big problems here is
starving. We have not found a single piece
of meat or poultry. Instead, we had to eat
our horses. We even turned to cannibalism
and ate the bodies of fallen voyagers. Most
would not hesitate to do so.
Since then, we were fighting the Indians. We stole their food to make them
suffer and for us to eat. We started trading
with them, but it wasn’t enough. We almost
declared war, and we should have.
19
The diseases were fatal. The
crew had been drinking that salt water.
We think it’s the water, but rumors say
that there have been Spanish spies
around. I think they’re poisoning us.
The paranoia has gotten to us.
The Indians, disease, spies,
starvation, and salt water are what we
suffered through. I think that nothing
can be worse than this. I hope to see
you at the end. Tell the family I said
hello.
Your son,
Anthony
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Cassidy Swensen
Grade 8
RED
Cyara Beatty
Grade 7
Turtle
20
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Ashley Hendrickson
Grade 8
Illustration I
21
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Ashley Hendrickson
Grade 8
Illustration II
22
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Jose Colotla
Grade 8
Jonathan Livingston Seagull and Elder:
“Speaking Without WordsTelepathically”
23
Middle Wrinkle, February 2012
Ashley Hendrickson
Grade 8
Illustration III
24

Similar documents

February 2013 - Monticello Central School

February 2013 - Monticello Central School One Gold Medalist Four Medalist Ten First Place One Silver Medalist Awards from the National Council of English Teachers One rating of Excellent Two ratings of Above Average Awards from the America...

More information