Science Cross Curricular

Comments

Transcription

Science Cross Curricular
GRADE 3
Copyright © Macmillan/McGraw-Hilll School Division, a Division of the Educational and Professional Publishing Group
of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
All rights reserved. Permission granted to reproduce for use with McGRAW-HILL SCIENCE. No other use of this
material or parts thereof, including reproduction, distribution, or storage in an electronic database, permitted without
the prior written permission of the publisher, except as provided under the United States Copyright Act of 1976.
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Two Penn Plaza
New York, New York 10121
Printed in the United States of America
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 079 06 05 04 03 02 01
Table of Contents
Unit A
Looking at Plants and Animals
PROJECT THEME: Grey Wolf Nature Films
Activity 1: Your Living Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Activity 2: Who needs it? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Activity 3: Parts of Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Activity 4: Metamorphosis Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Activity 5: Parts of Nature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Activity 6: Animals Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Culminating Activity: Our Nature Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Unit B
Where Plants and Animals Live
PROJECT THEME: Knapsack State Park
Activity 1: Big Tree Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Activity 2: Pizza Food Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Activity 3: Bird Watch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Activity 4: Foxes and Rabbits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Activity 5: The Perfect Ranger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Activity 6: Endangered Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Culminating Activity: Environmental Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Unit C
Our Earth
PROJECT THEME: Ace Granite, Rock Detective
Activity 1: The Case of the Mysterious Rocks
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Activity 2: The Case of the Flowing Faucet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Activity 3: The Case of the Daily Diary
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Activity 4: The Case of the Puzzling Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Activity 5: The Case of the Shrinking Roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Activity 6: The Case of the Missing Sister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Culminating Activity: Ace’s Mystery Playhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Unit D
Cycles on Earth and in Space
PROJECT THEME: Planet Earth Travel Agency
Activity 1: Earth’s Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Activity 2: Earth Travel Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Activity 3: Stars and Greek Myths
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Activity 4: Moon Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Activity 5: A Million Earths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Activity 6: Venus Telescope Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Culminating Activity: Solar System Facts and Fiction . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Table of Contents
Unit E
Forces and Motion
PROJECT THEME: A Moon Room Museum
Activity 1: Who Started Us on Our Way? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Activity 2: How Much Would I Weigh on the Moon? . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Activity 3: Space Shuttle Simulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Activity 4: Working in Space Is Tough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Activity 5: Moon Movers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Culminating Activity: The Moon Room Brochure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Unit F
Looking at Matter and Energy
PROJECT THEME: Matter Land Fun Park
Activity 1: What in the World? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Activity 2: Tickets, Tickets, Tickets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Activity 3: The Big Dipper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Activity 4: Super Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Activity 5: Fun House Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Activity 6: Backward Poems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Culminating Activity: Dream Ride
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Teacher Support
Unit A: Looking at Plants and Animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Unit B: Where Plants and Animals Live . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Unit C: Our Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Unit D: Cycles on Earth and in Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Unit E: Forces and Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Unit F: Looking at Matter and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Name
Date
Your Living Community
Activity 1
Connection to Social Studies
Science helps you understand communities in social studies.
Gray Wolf Nature Films is planning a film
called “Your Living Community.” The film will
look at how parts of a community are like living
things. Help Gray Wolf plan the film. First use a social
studies book to read about the parts of a community listed below.
Think about how traits such as growth, change, development,
response to changes, and communication can describe both
communities and living things.
Complete the chart below. Write how different organisms and parts of a
community show each trait.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Community
Trait
How a community
shows the trait.
How an organism
shows the trait.
A school
growth
A school grows when
it gets more students.
A tree grows taller.
A city
change
A family
development
A state
response
to changes
A team
communication
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapter 1
1
Name
Date
Who Needs It?
Activity 2
Connection to Language Arts
Science helps you compare needs.
Gray Wolf Nature Films is making a film about the needs of
organisms. The film will compare an organism’s needs to the
needs of everyday things.
A. Circle the correct answer for each comparison.
1. Organisms need food for energy. This is
similar to the way a car needs
a. wheels
b. windows
.
c. gasoline
2. Organisms need oxygen to burn fuel. This is
similar to the way a campfire needs oxygen
.
to
a. burn
b. barbecue
c. smoke
3. Organisms need water to get rid of waste.
This is similar to the way a house
.
needs
b. a roof
c. windows
B. Write your own comparison. Have a classmate
solve it.
2
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapters 1–2
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
a. plumbing
Name
Date
Parts of Plants
Activity 3
Connection to Langauge Arts
Science helps you understand that most of the foods we eat grow
on plants.
Gray Wolf Nature Films is making a series of short films about
foods that come from plants. Use the descriptions below. Write
which part of the plant each food comes from.
Type
Description
part of plant that contains seeds; non-green; may or may not
be sweet; must have seeds
Flower
green or non-green petals
Stem
green trunk of a plant
Roots
underground part of plant; not green
Leaves
green vegetable part of plant
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Fruit
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapter 1
3
Name
Date
Metamorphosis Math
Activity 4
Connection to Math
Science uses math to organize data and solve problems.
Gray Wolf is making a film on the development of a frog.
Use the data in the table to plan when they can film the
stages of metamorphosis.
Read the table and answer each question.
1. How many days after eggs are laid do they
hatch?
days
Metamorphosis
of a Tadpole
Day
Event
2. On what day can Gray Wolf film tadpoles
swimming?
1
Eggs are laid
7
Eggs hatch
3. How many days after the egg hatches do
the hind legs appear?
days
10 Tadpole swims
4. Once the hind legs appear, how many days
does Gray Wolf have to wait to film the
front legs?
days
36 Hind legs appear
54 Front legs appear
72 Tail disappears
6. A tadpole is 30 days old. How old is the tadpole
when its hind legs appear?
days old
7. A tadpole hatches on July 1. On what date might
it swim?
4
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapter 2
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
5. After the front legs appear, how many
days does it take for the tail to
disappear?
days
Name
Date
Parts of Nature
Activity 5
Connection to Social Studies
Science helps you understand and compare parts of a system.
“Parts of Nature” is Gray Wolf’s movie about organisms and
their parts. In the movie, body parts are compared to the parts
of a car.
Use this picture and what
you know about the parts
of an organism to answer
the questions.
1. Name three parts of a car that move
and three parts of an organism that move.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. Name a part of a car that protects and a part of an organism that
protects.
3. Compare a car’s bumper to the cell membrane. How are the two the
same? How are they different?
4. Which parts of a car are like the organs of an organism? Explain.
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapter 2
5
Name
Date
Animal Groups
Activity 6
Connection to Reading
Use science and reading to put together the main ideas about kinds
of animals.
You have been hired by Grey Wolf Nature Films to write the
outline for a movie called “Animal Groups.” The movie will be in
three parts—each on a kind of animal.
You have a choice of three out of five kinds of animals to show in the
movie. Choose from fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals.
For each kind, you and a partner decide on one main idea to show in the
movie and example of an animal that best shows that idea. Write your
choices below.
1st Animal Choice:
Main Idea
Animal that best shows the idea
2nd Animal Choice:
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Main Idea
Animal that best shows the idea
3rd Animal Choice:
Main Idea
Animal that best shows the idea
6
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapter 2
Name
Our Nature Film
Date
Culminating Activity
Connection to Art and Language Arts
Science information can be shared by using the visual arts.
Gray Wolf Nature Films wants to make a new nature film. Your
job is to make storyboards and a screenplay for the film.
Storyboards are pictures of what you will see in a film. A screenplay
is the words for a film.
Procedures
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Plan Decide on a topic for your
nature film. You can use topics
such as the needs of organisms,
animal communication, life cycles,
development of plants or animals,
the cell, or body parts.
Research Use books, magazines, films, the
Internet, and other sources to find out as much as you can
about your topic.
Work in Groups Assign a job to each group. Some groups may prepare
a storyboard. Other groups might work on the screenplay.
Produce Present your storyboards and screenplay together. Have a class
member narrate the film. If possible, use music, video, or other special
effects. Have fun!
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapters 1–2
7
Name
Date
Big Tree Real Estate
Activity 1
Connection to Reading and Language Arts
Science helps you draw conclusions from text and write ads
about a habitat.
What if animals could write advertisements
for their habitats? In Knapsack State Park they
can go to the Big Tree Real Estate office.
A. Read the following ads and anwer each question
FOR SALE: Lovely 2-leaf lily pad. Sunny pond location with
excellent fishing. Nice view. Lots of flies. Hop to shore. Good place
to bring up tadpoles. Inquire at Big Tree Real Estate. Ask for
Ranger Rita.
1. Which animal do you think posted this ad?
2. Which words in the ad helped you identify the animal?
3. Which animal do you think posted this ad?
4. Which words in the ad helped you identify the animal?
B. Now work with a partner to write a habitat want ad. Trade ads
with classmates. See if you can identify each other’s animal.
8
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 3
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
NEEDED: A nice dark corner. I am young, on-the-go, and need a
place to set up a web site. I’m clean, quiet, and have 8 legs. Do
you have a place for me? Call Ranger Rita at Big Tree.
Name
Date
Pizza Food Chain
Activity 2
Connection to Social Studies
Science helps you understand how farm products become food
on our tables.
Ranger Rita bought cheese pizza for everyone at the Ranger
Station. While eating, she realized that the cheese in the pizza can
be shown as a food chain.
.
.
.
.
.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
.
.
.
1. Make a food chain for another food found in pizza. For example, you
can make a food chain for tomatoes, olives, pepperoni, or dough.
What food will you make a chain for?
2. Put together all the food chains from your class. Include the
Mozzarella Cheese chain. Now you have created a food web.
Display your Pizza Web in class.
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 3
9
Name
Date
Bird Watch
Activity 3
Connection to Math
You can use subtraction to compare results of a nature watch.
Bird watching trips are fun at
Knapsack State Park. On one trip, visitors
watched cattle egrets follow cattle
in their search for food.
Use the tables to answer each question.
Cattle Egret Watch
Cattle Egrets
26
Cattle
17
2. How many more Downy
Woodpeckers than Great
Horned Owls did the group see?
3. How many more Belted
Kingfishers than Great
Horned Owls did they see?
Birds Seen
Great Horned Owl
21
Downy Woodpecker
38
Belted Kingfisher
25
Northern Mockingbird
40
American Robin
40
4. How many more American
Robins than Downy Woodpeckers did they see?
5. How many more Northern Mockingbirds than
Great Horned Owls did they see?
10
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 3
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
1. How many more cattle egrets
than cattle did visitors see?
Name
Date
Foxes and Rabbits
Activity 4
Connection to Math
You can use numbers to play a game of competition.
Many foxes and rabbits live in Knapsack State Park. Foxes are
predators. Rabbits are prey. How does competition affect the
survival of these two animals? To find out, play “Foxes and Rabbits.”
Follow the steps below to play.
1. Choose to be a rabbit or a fox. Take turns moving from GO.
Toss the number cube. Move your game piece the number
of spaces on the cube.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. If the fox catches the rabbit, remove the rabbit from the game.
Then start over at GO.
3. If the rabbit reaches END without getting caught, remove a fox
from the game. Then start over at GO.
4. Keep playing until all foxes or all rabbits are gone.
5. Play another game with a “fast” rabbit by adding 2 to each number
the rabbit rolls. How does this affect the game?
6. Play a game with a “fast” fox. How does this affect the game?
7. Make other changes to the speed of the fox and rabbit. How does
each change affect the game?
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 4
11
Name
Date
The Perfect Ranger
Activity 5
Connection to Art and Language Arts
Science helps you create and label a drawing of a perfect organism.
Sometimes Ranger Rita
dreams about the perfect
ranger. The perfect ranger
would have custom
adaptations that would help
him or her do the job.
Look at the adaptations
on the ranger shown. How
would the webbed feet help
the ranger do her job?
Create a perfect organism. You might make a perfect hiker,
a perfect pet, or a perfect student.
1. Begin by making a drawing of your perfect organism. Include as
many adaptations as you can think of. Use your imagination!
2. Label each adaptation. Explain how each adaptation would work.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
3. Could your adaptations really exist? Explain.
12
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 4
Name
Date
Endangered Snapshots
Activity 6
Connection to Language Arts and Reading
You can write a letter to show your support for a threatened or
endangered animal.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Ranger Rita is concerned about endangered and threatened
animals throughout the country.
Red Wolf
Endangered
Location: Texas
Cause: Hunting
American
Lobster
Threatened
Location: Texas
Cause: Hunting,
pollution
Ivory-Billed
Woodpecker
Endangered
Location:
Louisiana
Cause: Habitat
destruction
Gila Monster
Threatened
Location: Arizona
Cause: Hunting
California
Condor
Endangered
Location:
California
Cause: Hunting,
pollution
Humpback
Whale
Threatened
Location: Florida
to North Carolina
Causes: Hunting
Polar Bear
Endangered
Location: Alaska
Cause: Hunting,
Cause: Habitat
destruction
Indiana Bat
Endangered
Location:
Indiana, Missouri,
Kentucky
Cause: Habitat
destruction
Help Ranger Rita by choosing an animal to support. Write a letter
to the editor of a local newspaper. Be sure your letter provides
information about what people can do to save the animal. Also include
information about how communities can work together to help the
animal. Do additional research on the animal.
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 4
13
Name
Date
Environmental Survey
Culminating Activity
Connection to Math
You can take a survey and show the data to comprehend people’s
concern for the environment.
Each year Ranger Rita takes a survey about the environment.
You can take your own survey on the environment.
A. Think of 4 or 5 questions to ask in your survey. You might use
these questions.
1. Should a building be built if it destroys animal habitats?
2. Is the environment more important to you than jobs?
3. Do you support laws to save our environment?
List other questions to ask.
C. Survey students in other classes. Record each answer with
a tally mark.
D. Write a report. What do the results of your survey say about
people’s concern for the environment? What conclusions can you
make from the data? What methods would you suggest lawmakers
use to help the environment?
14
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapters 3–4
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
B. Prepare the questionnaire. List each question in a table.
Make a column for Yes answers and a column for No answers.
Name
Date
The Case of the Mysterious Rocks
Activity 1
Connection to Reading
Science helps you draw conclusions from information.
Ace Granite is a detective. She loves
mysteries. She also loves rocks.
Wait—there’s the phone. Could it be
a new case for Ace?
Voice: Ace Granite? I need your help. I found some
interesting rocks. I don’t know what type they are. Here are some clues:
Granite is a rock formed from lava. It is usually light pink or gray in
color. Shelly limestone is a sedimentary rock. It is made when broken
seashells are pressed together for a long time. Sometimes you can see
shell designs in shelly limestone. Slate and marble are two rocks formed
by heat and pressure. Slate is dark gray and shiny. It splits easily into thin
slices. Marble is smooth and can be white with streaks of different colors.
Help Ace solve the mystery. Underline the words above that are clues.
Then use the clues and the descriptions to identify each rock.
Description of the Rock
Type of Rock
1. Hard, light pink rock
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. Hard, light gray rock
3. Shiny, black rock in thin slices
4. A limestone rock with shell designs
5. White rock with streaks of green
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 5
15
Name
Date
The Case of the Flowing Faucet
Activity 2
Connection to Math
Math helps you do a science experiment.
The Water Savers Club had a big problem.
“Only you can help us, Ace,” they said.
“We need to know which wastes more
water: A wide open faucet that runs for 30
seconds or a dripping faucet that drips for
1 hour.”
“Hmm,” Ace said. “I need to try an experiment.”
Procedures
A. Turn the faucet on wide open for 30 seconds. How many quarts of
water do you fill? Round to the nearest whole quart.
quarts
B. Now let the faucet drip for one full hour. How many quarts of water
do you fill? Round to the nearest whole quart.
quarts
2. How many quarts of water would a drip waste in 2 hours?
quarts
3. Why might dripping faucets be more of a problem to the
environment than open faucets?
16
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 5
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
1. Which wasted more water—the open faucet or the dripping faucet?
Name
Date
The Case of the Daily Diary
Activity 3
Connection to Language Arts
Keeping a science diary can be helpful.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Mayor Wendy Yin called Ace on the phone.
“Ace, you’ve got to help us,” she said. “We need to find out
what kinds of resources people in the city use. Can you think of a
way to keep track?”
“Sure,” Ace said. “Why don’t you keep a Resource Diary?”
“A Resource Diary?” Wendy said. “What’s that?”
“Here, take a look at my diary,” Ace said. “I keep track of the
renewable and nonrenewable resources I use.”
Write your own Resource Diary. Keep track of the resources you
use in one day. Underline the renewable resources in red and the
nonrenewable resources in blue.
1. How many resources are renewable? Make a list of them.
2. How many resources are nonrenewable? Make a list of them.
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 5
17
Name
Date
The Case of the
Puzzling Passwords
Activity 4
Connection to Language Arts
You can use science words to solve a puzzle.
Gus Gumly came to Ace with a big problem. He forgot his
computer passwords. Gus is a computer whiz with many passwords.
To keep track of all his passwords, Gus made the puzzle below.
“It contains 14 of my passwords,” Gus told Ace. “They’re hidden
so well that I can’t find them anymore. Can you find the passwords
for me, Ace?”
G
R
E
N
E
W
A
B
L
E
P
W
O
R
M
S
A
N
D
A
L
E
O
W
E
V
U
O
S
E
R
W
C
P
A
Z
M
B
A
A
G
U
O
R
L
T
O
P
S
O
I
L
T
B
U
A
E
K
C
O
R
B
A
A
T
O
N
R
Q
P
I
Y
W
S
N
S
S
T
F
S
A
L
G
P
S
E
U
E
S
A
V
A
L
E
A
I
R
D
R
L
I
M
E
S
T
O
N
E
F
G
Now create your own word puzzle. First draw a grid of boxes. Fill in
the boxes with other science words. Make your words go up, down,
backwards, and forward. Trade puzzles with a classmate and solve.
18
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 5
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Help Ace. Circle the 14 words which are about resources.
Name
Date
The Case of the Shrinking Roof
Activity 5
Connection to Math
You can choose a mathematical method to solve a problem.
Rufus the Roofer came to see Ace. Rufus
builds roofs of all sizes, shapes, and colors.
“I’m in a jam, Ace,” Rufus said. “I built a clay roof
last year for Mr. Groober. The roof was 20 cm
thick. When I measured the roof this year it was
only 16 cm thick. The roof shrank!”
“Hmm,” Ace said. “Sounds like erosion to me.
I can use mental math to solve this one.
20 – 16 = 4. It eroded 4 cm.”
Choose a method to solve the problems below. Use mental math, pencil
and paper, or a calculator if necessary.
1. A roof was 24 cm last year. Now it is 18 cm. How many centimeters of
the roof did erosion take away in 1 year?
cm
2. Suppose the roof in exercise 1 erodes the same amount again next
year. How thick will the roof be then?
cm
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
3. What if a 20 cm roof erodes 2 cm each year. How thick will it be after
5 years of erosion?
cm
4. How many years will it take for the roof in exercise 3 to erode
completely?
years
5. A 25 cm thick roof loses 5 cm to erosion each year. How long will it
take for the roof to erode completely?
years
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 6
19
Name
Date
The Case of the Missing Sister
Activity 6
Connection to Social Studies and Language Arts
Science helps you write a postcard and follow a route on a map.
“Ace, you’ve got to help me find my sister,” said Archie Shell.
“Her name is Turtle Shell. She’s been missing all month. All I have
are these postcards from 5 cities.”
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
A. Ace knows that Turtle went to the 5 cities marked on the map. Read
the postcards for clues and use the map to find Turtle.
20
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 6
Name
Date
Activity 6, page 2
1. Read the card for clues. From which of the 5 cities did Turtle send
the first card?
2. Use the postcard clues to find when Turtle visited each city. Then
draw lines on the map from city to city to show Turtle’s route.
3. Where did Turtle end her trip?
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
B. Oops! Turtle took a wrong turn on the way home to Vermont. Select
another city on the map. Use books or maps to find out about the
geography in that city. Then write a postcard with clues as to Turtle’s
location.
Share your postcard with a classmate. Ask your classmate to use
the card to find the city where Turtle is now.
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 6
21
Name
Date
Ace’s Mystery Playhouse
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts
Science helps you write a play.
Now it’s time to put your knowledge of
rocks and resources to work by staging
a Mystery Play starring Ace Granite.
First work as a class to develop ideas.
1. Think of a mystery. Perhaps someone or something
is missing. Perhaps something was stolen. Think of ideas
that use what you know about rocks and resources.
2. Think of suspects. Who did it? When, where, and how did they do it?
Name the characters.
4. Work in groups. Each group should write one act of the play.
Work together to make sure all the acts fit together.
5. Plan the performance. Give everyone a job. Some students will be
actors. Others will help with backstage tasks such as music, props,
costumes, and setting up.
6. Perform your mystery. Invite other classes to the performance.
Make sure you have fun!
22
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapters 5–6
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
3. List clues. Think of clues that will help Ace solve the case.
Name
Date
Earth’s Weather
Activity 1
Connection to Math
Science and mathematics can help you organize facts about
Earth’s weather.
The Planet Earth Travel Agency needs to describe the weather
for each place a traveler will visit. You may need research materials
to help you on this assignment.
You are working for the agency. Help them decide on how to describe
the weather on any day in any place.
Name four properties of the weather. For example, one property is
air temperature.
For each property, include as many of the following as you can:
• Describe what the property is.
• Name an instrument that helps measure the property.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
• Tell what units are used to measure the property.
Property 1
Property 2
Property 3
Property 4
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 7
23
Name
Date
Earth Travel Calendar
Activity 2
Connection to Social Studies
Map skills helps you understand the different seasons in different
hemispheres due to Earth’s tilt.
The Planet Earth Travel Agency needs
to complete their calendar for the year.
Below is a list of popular events.
Find the location of each event on a world map. Think about the climate
needed for the event. Then, consider the different seasons in the
northern and southern hemisphere due to Earth’s tilt. Write the name of
the event under the month in which it might take place.
Events
January
July
February
August
March
September
April
October
May
November
June
December
1. Mid-Winter Festival,
Peru, South America
2. Spring Corn-Planting Fair,
Iowa, USA
3. Fall Harvest Festival, South Africa
5. Spring Soccer Tournament,
Cameroon, Africa
6. Winter’s Almost Over Days,
Minnesota, USA
7. Summer vacation, India
8. Surf’s Up Beach Party, New
Zealand
9. Spring vacation, Mexico
10. Corn-Harvest Days, Brazil
24
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
4. Ski-Jump Competition, Argentina
Name
Date
Stars and Greek Myths
Activity 3
Connection to Reading
Science helps you interpret pictures.
Groups of stars in the sky form constellations. Ancient Greeks
gave names to constellations that they thought looked like animals
and people. We still use these names today.
A. Read the Greek myth. Find the picture that shows the animal or
person in the myth. Draw a line matching the constellation to
the myth.
Greek Myth
Constellation
1. Orion was a Greek hunter that
used a club and a shield.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. Scorpius was a scorpion sent
to stop Orion.
3. Pegasus was a winged horse.
B. Many constellations were named for Greek myths. Research a
constellation. Write the myth and draw the constellation. Find out
where and when you can see the constellation in the night sky.
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
25
Name
Date
Moon Map
Activity 4
Connection to Social Studies
Science helps you use directions on a map.
Planet Earth Travel Agency has plans for using the Moon as a
vacation resort. Use the Moon Map to find the locations described.
Write the location for each plan.
1. This deep crater is located
between the Ocean of Storms
and the Sea of Vapors. It is a
good spot for a restaurant.
2. These rugged mountains border
the edge of the Sea of Serenity.
Planet Earth Travel Agency plans
hiking trails here.
4. The Souvenir Shop can be at the crater which is just northwest of
the Sea of Crisis.
5. Is it a good idea to put hotels, restaurants, and businesses on the
Moon? Why or why not?
26
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
3. Apollo 11 landed about 200 miles
north of this crater near the Sea of
Nectar. Its 18,000 ft. walls would be right for a hotel.
Name
Date
A Million Earths
Activity 5
Connection to Math
You can use number sense to comprehend a science fact.
Did you know that the Sun is so large that 1,000,000 Earths could
fit inside of it? How much is 1,000,000? First, let’s see how much 100 is.
1. Use counters to make a group of 10. Work together to combine
groups of 10 to make 100. How many groups of 10 do you need to
make 100?
2. Draw a picture of what 100 looks like. Label your groups of 10.
3. Work as a class to combine your groups of 100 to make 1,000. How
many groups of 100 do you need to make 1,000?
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
4. You would need to make the number 1,000 one thousand more
times to show 1,000,000—a million! Draw a picture of what you
think the Earth would look like next to the Sun. Remember 1,000,000
Earths can fit inside the Sun.
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
27
Name
Date
Venus Telescope Tour
Activity 6
Connection to Reading and Art
Science helps you interpret diagrams and draw the phases of a planet.
The planet Venus moves in its own
orbit around the Sun. It reflects light
from the Sun. Like the Moon, Venus
has phases. Take a tour with a telescope
to view the phases of Venus as seen
from Earth.
1. From Earth, Venus will look like this during
phase 1. How are phases 1 and 5 alike?
Draw a picture to show what Venus will look
like in phase 5 in the box provided.
3. During what phase will Venus look like this?
4. During what phase will you not be able to see Venus at all?
28
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. During what phase will you see a “full”
Venus like this?
Name
Date
Solar System Facts and Fiction
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts and Reading
Science helps you research facts, write a book, and make a poster.
The Planet Earth Travel Agency publishes a book
for travelers called Solar System Facts and Fiction.
It lists statements that are true (facts) or not
true (fiction).
A. Determine whether each statement below is fact or fiction. Find out
by researching the topic in books and magazines. Circle Fact if the
statement is true and Fiction if the statement is not true.
1. Fact or Fiction? The Sun travels across the sky every day.
2. Fact or Fiction? It takes Earth a year to orbit the Sun.
3. Fact or Fiction? When it is noon where you live, there is a place on
Earth where it is midnight.
4. Fact or Fiction? Earth is closer to the Sun during the summer.
5. Fact or Fiction? Part of the Moon has never been seen directly
from Earth.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
6. Fact or Fiction? It takes 29 Earth years for Saturn to orbit the Sun.
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapters 7–8
29
Name
Date
Culminating Act., p.2
B. Choose one of the statements which you said was a fact. Write a
paragraph about it. Explain how you know the statement is true.
D. Work in a group to publish your own book of facts and fiction for
travelers. Do more research. Find interesting facts about Earth, the
Sun, the Moon, and the other planets. Draw pictures to show some
of your facts. Edit your work and publish the book.
30
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapters 7–8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
C. Choose one of the statements which you said was fiction.
Write a paragraph about it. Tell why it is fiction and not fact.
Name
Date
Who Started Us on Our Way?
Activity 1
Connection to Social Studies
Science can help you learn about people in history.
The Moon Room has an exhibit about Isaac Newton.
The exhibit sign gives the following information about him.
Isaac Newton was interested in why and how things move. He
observed apples fall to Earth from trees. Then he described gravity. Isaac
Newton also helped to find a way to measure pushes and pulls. The
newton is a unit that is used to measure pushes and pulls. It is named
after Isaac Newton. His discoveries helped scientists find a way to escape
Earth’s gravity to travel to the Moon.
A. What does the exhibit tell us? Complete each sentence.
1. Isaac Newton was interested in why and how things
.
2. Isaac Newton described the force called
.
3. Pushes and pulls are measured with a unit called the
.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
B. The newton describes the force needed to move something. Label
each picture Lots of Newtons or Not a Lot of Newtons.
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 9
31
Name
Date
How Much Would I Weigh
on the Moon?
Activity 2
Connection to Math
Science helps you use a table to compare the weight of objects on the
Moon and Earth.
You need to prepare an exhibit about gravity on the Moon. You
know that Earth’s gravity is about six times stronger than the
Moon’s gravity.
A. Complete the table. Multiply the Moon weight by 6 to find the
Earth weight. You can use any strategy to multiply.
Moon weight in pounds
1
2
Earth weight in pounds
6
12
3
4
5
6
7
B. Use the table to compare the weight of objects on the Moon
and Earth.
1. On the Moon, a rock weighs 5 pounds. About how many pounds
does it weigh on Earth?
pounds
3. A bag of tools weighs 18 pounds on Earth. About how many
pounds would it weigh on the Moon?
pounds
4. A child weighs 42 pounds on Earth. About how many pounds
would he weigh on the Moon?
pounds
32
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 9
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. A baby weighs 12 pounds on Earth. About how many pounds
would she weigh on the Moon?
pounds
Name
Date
Space Shuttle Simulator
Activity 3
Connection to Art
Understanding how safety belts work can help you grasp the concepts of
force and motion.
The Moon Room has a ride called The Shuttle-Seat Simulator.
Riders must use safety belts. Look at the picture and read the
description. Then draw a circle around the picture that shows what
motion would happen.
1. You are sitting in a car. The car suddenly moves. Your body tends
to remain at rest. Which way would your body move?
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. You are sitting in a fast-moving car. The driver slams on the brakes.
Your body tends to keep moving. Which way would you move?
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 9
33
Name
Date
Activity 3, page 2
3. The space shuttle is standing still. You are waiting for the rockets to
launch you into space. Which way is the force of gravity pulling you?
Write instructions for using safety belts on the Shuttle Seat Simulator.
Tell riders when and how they should use safety belts.
34
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 9
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
4. The space shuttle is landing on the Moon. It coasts along the Moon’s
surface. Then you come to a quick stop. Which way would your body
keep moving?
Name
Date
Working in Space Is Tough
Activity 4
Connection to Reading
Science helps you draw conclusions from information.
An exhibit in the Moon Room shows astronauts at work.
In space, there is no air to breathe,
no food to eat, and no water to drink.
People need these things to survive;
so astronauts have to carry their
supplies with them. Astronauts go
outside the shuttle to explore and
experiment. They need energy and
machines to work. They have to wear a
special space suit and a machine which
helps them move in space. They carry
life-support systems, too. Without important new space
tools, astronauts could not live or work in space.
Use what you know and the above paragraph to answer the questions.
People on
Earth
Astronauts in
Space
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
1. Do they need food?
2. Do they need air?
3. Do they need energy to
do work?
4. Do they need special
clothes to go outside?
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 10
35
Name
Date
Moon Movers
Activity 5
Connection to Language Arts and Art
Science helps you understand graphic information and use it to
make a design.
Simple machines help people do work on Earth and on the Moon.
A. Draw a line from the simple machine to where it is used in
the compound machine.
1.
lever
wheel and axle
2.
3.
inclined plane
4.
5.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
pulley
wedge
6.
screw
36
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 10
Name
Date
B. What simple and compound machines do
astronauts use? Research using books and other
reference materials. List what you find.
Activity 5, page 2
C. Now you are ready to design a Moon Craft. Moon crafts help
astronauts explore and gather rock samples. They have machines
which drill into the Moon to get soil samples. They help the
astronauts plow to get rock samples. They also help split
rock samples.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Draw your Moon Craft below. Use simple machines in your design.
Draw a line to show where each simple machine is found in your craft.
How did you use simple machines in your craft?
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 10
37
Name
Date
The Moon Room Brochure
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts, Social Studies, and Art
Science helps you plan, design, and write a brochure.
Brochures are small booklets that
provide information about a place
or thing. Make a brochure for the people
who visit the Moon Room.
A. Begin by planning what the brochure will tell visitors. Answer
the following questions. Then, think of other questions visitors
would have about the Moon Room. Make a list of the questions and
answers.
1. What will visitors learn about Isaac Newton?
2. What will visitors learn about gravity?
3. Explain why safety belts are important in space shuttles.
4. What do astronauts need to live and work in space?
B. List the exhibits in your Moon Room. Make a map of the Moon
Room which shows all the exhibits. Title your map.
• Tell visitors what they will see and learn.
• List and describe each exhibit in the Moon Room.
• Show a map of the Moon Room with each exhibit labeled.
• Include a colorful cover.
38
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapters 9–10
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
C. Using all the information above, make your brochure. Be sure it
includes the following points:
Name
Date
What in the World?
Activity 1
Connection to Language Arts
Science helps you ask questions to categorize things.
Play “What in the World?”—a game about matter. The object
of the game is to ask questions and identify things as matter
or nonmatter.
First, work together to make 6 or
more cards. Think of things which
are matter and things which are
nonmatter. Matter has mass and
takes up space. A rock is matter.
Nonmatter does not have mass
or take up space. The number 6 is nonmatter.
To Play:
1. Stack the cards face down. Have your partner choose a card.
2. You need to identify what is on the card. Ask “Yes” or “No” questions to identify the item. Think of questions such as these:
“Can I hold this thing in my hand?”
“Does it have a definite shape?”
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
“Is this thing hard or soft?”
3. When you think you know what is pictured on the card, name it.
Also tell whether it is matter or nonmatter.
4. Make a list of the objects. Score 10 points for each card you identify
correctly. Your partner scores 1 point for each question that you ask.
5. Switch roles and play again.
6. Tally the final score. The player with the most points wins.
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 11
39
Name
Date
Tickets, Tickets, Tickets
Activity 2
Connection to Math
Calculation and comparison skills can be used to solve science problems.
Matter Land Park has three parts. Ice Land features solids,
Water Land covers liquids, and Air Land is about gases. It is time
to buy tickets. Which part of the park will you visit? Look at the
ticket lines.
1. Which ticket line is longest?
How many people are on that line?
people
3. How many people would need to move from Water Land to Ice
Land so that each line has the same number of people?
people
4. Look at the lines for Ice Land and Air Land. How many people
would need to move from Air Land to Ice Land so that each line
has the same number of people?
people
5. You want to go to the area of the park which interests you.
Pick Ice Land, Water Land, or Air Land. Write what you might
see there on a separate piece of paper.
40
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 11
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
2. Are more people in line for Ice Land or Water Land?
Name
Date
The Big Dipper
Activity 3
Connection to Social Studies
Maps can help you understand science concepts.
It’s time to ride the Big Dipper—Matter Land’s roller coaster.
The Big Dipper is made mostly of steel. Steel is a mixture of the
elements iron, carbon, and oxygen. Complete the questions and
discover how steel for the Big Dipper was made.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
1. Iron for the Big Dipper came from the Mesabi Iron range which is
near Lake Superior. Which states border Lake Superior?
2. The iron was put on a ship in Duluth, Minnesota. The ship sailed
through two lakes to get to Gary, Indiana. Which lakes did it pass
through?
3. The solid iron metal was melted at a steel factory at a temperature
of 3,000 degrees. The iron went from solid matter to what state of
matter?
4. The liquid iron was turned to steel by mixing it with carbon and
oxygen. Cooling the liquid steel turns it into what state of matter?
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 11
41
Name
Date
Super Cup
Activity 4
Connection to Art
Art helps you design a new product.
You are thirsty after going on the rides at Matter Land
Park. But the mango juice you buy is warm. How can
you prevent cold drinks from getting warm on a hot
day? Design your own Super Cup!
A. Conduct an experiment.
1. Use as many different types of cups as you can. Double up the cups.
Line up a foam cup or a plastic cup. Place a paper cup inside of a
foam cup or a foam cup inside of another foam cup. Think of your
own ideas.
2. Fill each cup with an equal amount of ice water. Test to see which
type of cup keeps water the coldest.
3. Time how long it takes the ice to melt in each cup. Which material
insulates best?
B. Design your Super Cup.
2. What material is your Super Cup made of?
3. Draw a design of your Super Cup. Decorate the Super Cup if you
like. Use your imagination!
4. Make a model of your design to see how well your design works.
42
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 12
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
1. Use what you learned about insulation to design your Super Cup.
Your Super Cup should look good, be the perfect size, and keep
drinks very cold.
Name
Date
Fun House Mirrors
Activity 5
Connection to Reading and Art
Science helps you draw visual images of text.
You are at the Fun House Room of Mirrors. When light hits a
mirror straight on, the light is reflected straight back. When light
hits a mirror at an angle, the light is reflected away at the
same angle.
A. Look at these mirrors. The lines show the direction of light.
1. Draw an arrow to show how the
light will be reflected.
How do you know?
2. Draw an arrow to show how the
light will be reflected.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
How do you know?
B. When light hits a mirror and is reflected back, does the light bend?
How can you tell?
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 12
43
Name
Date
Backward Poems
Activity 6
Connection to Reading and Language Arts
Science helps you read and write a poem.
Read the Backward Poem by holding it in front of a mirror. Then,
write the poem in the lines provided.
Matter, matter everywhere
It matters very much
All things are made of matter
That you can feel and touch
erehwyreve rettam ,rettaM
sag ,diuqil ,diloS
rettam fo edam era sgniht llA
.ssam evah dna emulov evah tahT
rettamnon si ygrenE
emas eht lla srettam ti tuB
rettam fo edam era sgniht llA
y t i ci r t c e l e d n a y g r e n E
taeh dna thgil era os dnA
ygrene evah ton did uoy fI
.teef ruoy evom ton dluoc uoY
Think about all the things that need electricity to work. Write your own
poem about electricity. If you like, make it a Backward Poem. Write the
poem on thin paper. Darken the letters. Turn the paper over and trace the
letters you darkened.
44
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 12
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
.seman rieht tahw rettam oN
Name
Date
Dream Ride
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts and Art
Science helps you design an amusement park ride.
Now you can design your own Dream
Ride for Matter Land Park. What kind of
ride will you build?
Procedures
A. Brainstorm ideas with your group. Will you design a roller coaster, a
water ride, an animal ride or another kind of ride? Will your ride be
scary? Will it make you dizzy?
B. Plan your Dream Ride. Think about its properties.
1. How large will it be? Describe its size.
2. What shape will it be?
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
3. What colors will it have?
4. Will your ride only consist of solids? Or will liquid or gas be
used to make the ride?
5. What material will the ride be made of? Will it have iron, as
found in a ship, or steel, as found in a bridge? Maybe it will have
aluminum as found in an airplane, or other materials.
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapters 11–12
45
Name
Date
C. How will your ride run? What energy source
will it use?
Culminating Act., p.2
D. What will your ride be called? Give it an exciting name.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
E. Draw the design of your ride. Include all of its features.
F. Make a model of your ride. Use clay, cardboard, or other materials to
make the model. Display the model in your classroom.
46
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapters 11–12
Project Theme
Gray Wolf Nature Films, pages 1–7
Concepts •
•
•
•
•
•
•
Compare traits of communities with those of living things.
Make comparisons of different needs of organisms.
Identify and correlate different foods with parts of plants.
Calculate to understand metamorphic events.
Compare parts of organisms to parts of a car.
Compare animal groups.
Collect and organize information to create a nature film.
Overview In this unit, students use a fictional film company, Gray Wolf Nature Films,
to explore the characteristics of living things. Students use social studies
skills to understand communities and to compare parts of a system; math
skills to organize data about metamorphosis; language arts skills to compare
needs and to identify foods; and reading skills to write main ideas for
animals groups. The unit culminates as students work together to use
artistic and writing skills to plan and produce a nature film.
Getting Introduce Gray Wolf Nature Films to the class. Have students describe nature
Started films that they have seen. Ask, What do film makers need to think about in
getting their job done? Discuss students’ ideas.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Grade 3 Unit A:Related
Looking at Plants and Animals
Activity
Related
Subject
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Programs
Chapter 1: Plants
Lesson 1: How Living Things Are Alike
Activity 1:Your
Social Studies
Living Community,
p. 1
Communities: Adventures in
Time and Place, Grade 3,
pp. 8–13
Chapter 1: Plants: Lesson 2:
The Needs of Plants;
Chapter 2: Animals
Lesson 4: The Needs of Animals
Activity 2: Who
Needs It?, p. 2
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, pp. 282–287
Chapter 1: Plants
Lesson 2: The Needs of Plants
Activity 3: Parts
of Plants, p. 3
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, pp. 276–277
Chapter 2: Animals
Lesson 5: How Animals Grow
Activity 4:
Metamorphosis
Math, p. 4
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Grade 3, pp. 140–143
Chapter 2: Animals
Lesson 6: Parts of Animals
Activity 5: Parts
of Nature, p. 5
Social Studies
Communities: Adventures in
Time and Place, Grade 3,
p. 314
Chapter 2: Animals
Lesson 7: Kinds of Animals
Activity 6: Animal Reading
Groups, p. 6
McGraw-Hill Reading, Grade
3, Book 2, Animal Fact and
Fable, pp. 160–173
Chapters 1 and 2:
All Lessons
Culminating
Activity: Our
Nature Film, p. 7
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, pp. 138–139
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Art, Language
Arts
Use with Chapters 1–2
47
Scoring Rubric for Integration Activities
Score
Criteria
4
Accomplished all of the activity’s objectives.
3
Accomplished more than half of the activity’s objectives.
2
Accomplished less than half of the activity’s objectives.
1
Little or no accomplishment of activity’s objectives.
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Your Living Community, page 1
Objectives: • Identify characteristics of a community and living things.
Introduce: Point out that traits such as growth, change, development, reproduction,
response to changes, and communication are all characteristics of living
things. Define and give examples for each characteristic, if necessary.
Teach: Refer students to the idea of community in their social studies books. Point
out that communities grow, change, and develop just like living things. As
an example, ask, How do communities grow? Students should recognize
that communities can grow in population, space, number of buildings, and
so on.
Close: Have volunteers share their entries in the chart.
Assessment: Students compare traits of communities and living things.
Modification: ESL students may need assistance using the trait in a verb form.
Answers: Descriptions will vary.
Activity
Who Needs It?, page 2
Objective: • Compare needs of living things.
Introduce: Introduce relationships in which structures are analogous, such as a car’s
wheels and a dog’s legs. Both are used for locomotion. Give examples.
Teach: Read the directions and guide students through the first problem. Students
should understand that a car gets energy from gasoline in the same way
an organism gets energy from food. Have students complete the page.
Close: Let students share their answers and explain their thinking. Ask volunteers
to read their comparisons and have the class find the answers.
Assessment: Students should be able to describe each relationship.
Modification: Have students draw pictures to make visual analogies.
Answers: A. 1. c 2. a 3. a B. Comparisons will vary.
48
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapters 1–2
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Connection to Language Arts
Activity
Connection to Language Arts
Parts of Plants, page 3
Objectives: • Identify foods as parts of plants to understand where foods originate.
Introduce: Tell students that five different parts of a plant can be eaten as food: the
flower, stem, roots, leaves, and fruit. Define each plant part. Focus on
fruits, which are not always sweet, but always do contain seeds.
Teach: Go over an example of how to use the page. You might ask, What part
of the plant is a cucumber? Students should be able to use the Description
to see that cucumbers contain seeds so they must be fruits. Give as many
examples as are needed. Help students identify all the foods in the activity.
Close: Go over the students’ answers. Have students suggest foods that are not
on the list. Categorize them in class.
Assessment: Students should be able to identify foods as parts of plants.
Modification: Students can research additional foods from each part of the plant and
display their findings.
Answers: carrot: root; lettuce: leaves; cabbage: leaves; spinach: leaves; apple: fruit;
peas: fruit; celery: stem and leaves; broccoli: stem and flowers; corn: fruit;
cherries: fruit; onion: roots; peach: fruit
Activity
Connection to Math
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Metamorphosis Math, page 4
Objectives: • Use data from a table to solve problems about metamorphosis.
Introduce: Review the concept of metamorphosis. Present the data in the table. Point
out that the dates shown are averages and that the timing of
metamorphosis can vary.
Teach: Focus on the information in the table. Ask a sample question, such as: How
many days pass between when the tadpole first swims and when its hind
legs begin to grow? Help students see that they need to subtract,
36 days – 10 days = 26 days. Give other examples, if necessary.
Close: Have volunteers show their solutions on the board.
Assessment: Students should be able to use the information in the chart to
solve problems.
Modification: Students can write additional problems using data from the table.
Answers: 1. 6 2. Day 10 3. 29 4. 18 5. 18 6. 36 days old 7. July 4
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapters 1–2
49
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Parts of Nature, page 5
Objective: • Understand the function of body parts to compare parts of systems.
Introduce: Compare a car to organisms. Ask students, How are the two alike and
different? Students should be able to see that a car has moving parts and
so on, but they should also recognize that a car is not alive or made out of
cells. Review what children know about cells.
Teach: Go over the first problem, if necessary. Have volunteers find parts of cars
and organisms that move, such as: windshield wiper and wheels for the
car, and legs and eyes for the organism. Have students complete the page.
Close: Have volunteers read their answers to the class.
Assessment: Students should be able to see similarities and differences between a car
and living things.
Modification: Bring in model cars for students to see the parts.
Answers: All answers will vary. 1. car: windshield wiper, wheels, steering wheel;
organism: legs, eyes, heart 2. car: bumper; organism: shell 3. comparisons
will vary. 4. engine, battery; they have a specific function.
Activity
Connection to Reading
Objective: • Identify and contrast main characteristics of three vertebrate groups.
Introduce: List in separate columns on the board five groups of animals listed in the
activity. Ask each student to do likewise on paper. Have each student write
one characteristic of each animal.
Teach: Collect students’ lists and with volunteers record responses on the board.
Allow students to discuss and evaluate responses, to select those which
best show contrasts between groups. Students may have references.
Close: Working in pairs, students select three out of the five groups and complete
the page by writing only three characteristics of the three groups to best
show contrast.
Assessment: Students share their answers with the class and have an opportunity to
adjust their lists based on other responses.
Modification: You may have students work in groups of three and have each member
research one animal group.
Answers: Fish: have scales and fins, gills, live in water, cold-blooded; amphibians: live
part of life in water and part on land, have gills and then lungs (as with
frogs), thin skin, cold-blooded; reptiles: cold-blooded, thick scales, lungs;
birds: warm-blooded, feathers, wings, beaks; mammals: warm-blooded,
fur/hair, feed milk to young. Animals may vary.
50
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapter 2
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Animal Groups, page 6
Culminating Activity
Connection to Art and Language Arts
Our Nature Film, page 7
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Objectives: • Integrate science concepts into narrative and artistic formats.
• Use creative abilities to write and draw.
Introduce: Discuss the process of movie making. Point out that all movies must be
carefully planned. Then tell the students that they can write a screenplay
for a nature film and create storyboards to show key scenes from the film.
If possible, display examples of both a screenplay and a storyboard.
Demonstrate how they work together to create a film. Provide paper and
art materials for students to create their storyboards and screenplays.
Provide available reference materials.
Teach: Lead the class in selecting a subject for a nature film. Guide them to
choose a topic on which reference materials are available. Have students
consult books, magazines, films, and the Internet as they do research on
the subject. Block out the film by making an outline of the screenplay and
thumbnails of the storyboards. Then organize the class into groups to
complete the project. Make sure storyboards are numbered and
correspond closely to the screenplay.
Close: Present the finished work in class.
Assessment: Students write and illustrate information about a nature topic in a clear
and well-organized way.
Modification: Assign students with artistic inclination to make storyboards while
students who need practice in verbal skills can write the screenplay.
Unit A · Looking at Plants and Animals
Use with Chapters 1–2
51
Project Theme
Knapsack State Park, pages 8–16
Concepts •
•
•
•
•
•
•
Develop ads using provided examples as outlines.
Collect and organize data to create a food chain.
Compare and contrast data from a table.
Relate science concepts in a board game.
Make a design using scientific information.
Research and develop ideas to write an informative letter.
Collect and organize data to write a survey report.
Overview In the Knapsack State Park project, students use the theme of a state park to
learn about the environment. Students use language arts skills to write a
habitat want ad, label an adaptation diagram, and write a letter to support
an endangered animal; math skills to compare bird watching data and play a
game of competition; reading skills to draw conclusions about predators and
prey. The unit culminates as students use organizational skills to take a survey
and write a report that assesses how people feel about the environment.
Getting Introduce Ranger Rita as the chief forest ranger for Knapsack State Park, a
Started picturesque park nestled in the mountains. Discuss the responsibilities that
forest rangers assume to protect and preserve the natural environment.
Activity
Related
Subject
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Programs
Chapter 3: Relationships
Among Living Things
Lesson 1: Ecosystems
Activity 1: Big
Tree Real Estate,
p. 8
Reading,
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Reading,
Grade 3, Spiders at Work,
pp. 228–239;
McGraw-Hill Language
Arts, Grade 3,
Advertisements, pp. 9, 97
Chapter 3: Relationships
Among Living Things
Lesson 2: Food Chains
and Food Webs
Chapter 3: Relationships
Among Living Things
Lesson 3: Roles for Plants
and Animals
Chapter 4: Ecosystems in
Balance
Lesson 4: Competition
Among Living Things
Chapter 4: Ecosystems in
Balance
Lesson 5: Adaptations for
Survival
Chapter 4: Ecosystems in
Balance
Lesson 6: Changing
Ecosystems
Activity 2: Pizza
Food Chain,
p. 9
Social Studies
Communities: Adventures
in Time and Place,
Grade 3, pp. 300–305
Activity 3: Bird
Watch, p. 10
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Grade 3, Tables,
pp. 20–21
Activity 4: Foxes
and Rabbits,
p. 11
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Grade 3, Problem Solving,
pp. 12–13
Activity 5: The
Perfect Ranger,
p. 12
Art and Language McGraw-Hill Language
Arts
Arts, Grade 3,
Summarizing, pp.
188–189
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Language
and Reading
Arts, Grade 3, pp.188–189
McGraw-Hill Reading, Tell
Me More, Grade 3,pp. 86–107
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Grade 3, Surveys,
pp. 152–153
Chapters 3 and 4:
All Lessons
52
Activity 6:
Endangered
Snapshots, p. 13
Culminating
Activity:
Environmental
Survey, p. 14
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Materials
number cubes
Use with Chapters 3–4
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Grade 3 Unit B: Where
Plants and Animals Live
Scoring Rubric for Integration Activities
Score
Criteria
4
Accomplished all of the activity’s objectives.
3
Accomplished more than half of the activity’s objectives.
2
Accomplished less than half of the activity’s objectives.
1
Little or no accomplishment of activity’s objectives.
Activity
Connection to Reading and Language Arts
Big Tree Real Estate, page 8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Objective: • Draw conclusions and write ads about the animals and their habitats.
Introduce: Bring newspaper real estate ads into class. Analyze two or more ads. Point
out that the purpose of the ad is to sell a house.
Teach: Define habitat as the place where an organism lives. After students read
the advertisements and answer the questions, have them work in pairs to
write their own habitat want ad. Stress that each ad should use a real
estate format to describe a habitat. Provide paper for the students to write
their ads.
Close: Have volunteers read their ads. Class members should try to guess the
habitat the ad describes.
Assessment: Students should write ads that accurately describe habitats.
Modification: Learning disabled students can fill in blanks in ads that contain
missing words.
Answers: 1. frog 2. Possible answer: lily pad, tadpoles, flies 3. spider 4. Possible
answer: web, 8 legs
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 3
53
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Pizza Food Chain, page 9
Objective • Create food webs and food chains for common foods.
Introduce: Contrast the Mozzarella Cheese food chain on the activity with a food
chain in a habitat such as a pond. Point out that the chains are similar
in form but different in purpose. A food chain shows step-by-step
food relationships. The cheese chain shows step-by-step
manufacturing relationships.
Teach: Help students get started with their own chains. For example, a tomato
sauce chain might show tomatoes planted (on a farm), harvested, shipped,
bottled, and bought by a pizza shop. Provide paper for students to draw
their food chains.
Close: Once chains are complete, help students assemble food webs.
Assessment: Chains should be logical, informative, and present accurate information
in the correct sequence.
Modification: If learning disabled students have trouble thinking of steps in a chain,
provide the steps and have the students arrange them.
Activity
Connection to Math
Objective: • Use a table to subtract two-digit numbers.
Introduce: Review the concept of how populations depend on each other. Explain
that relationships may be mutually beneficial, such as the clown fish and
anemone. A relationship may also have no effect on the other side, such as
the cattle egret and cattle. The cattle egret follow cattle wherever they go,
knowing that cattle disturb insects which they can eat. The cattle aren’t
helped or harmed by the egrets. As birds, the egrets could find food in
other places.
Teach: Work with students to complete the subtraction of the cattle egret watch
and have them share answers. Discuss their strategies for subtracting.
Remind them that when you compare two numbers, you need to subtract.
Have students complete the activity.
Close: Have volunteers give their answers in class.
Assessment: Students should use a table and subtract to compare data of birds seen on
a bird watching trip.
Modification: Have counters available for students who cannot do subtraction with
pencil and paper.
Answers: 1. 9 2. 17 3. 4 4. 2 5. 19
54
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 3
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Bird Watch, page 10
Activity
Connection to Math
Foxes and Rabbits, page 11
Objective: • Understand predator-prey relationships and play a game of competition.
Materials: number cubes
Introduce: Provide color counters or cut out pieces to represent foxes and rabbits.
Demonstrate how to play the game. Go through the directions step by
step. Discuss how the game relates to actual survival situations.
Teach: Encourage students to make adjustments in speed for each animal to vary
the outcome of the game. Stress that the goal of the game is not to have
one animal “win,” but to have both animals survive as long as possible.
Close: Discuss the outcome of the game. Ask students, Which animal seemed
more successful, predator or prey? Have students discuss how the game
compares with a real predator-prey relationship.
Assessment: Students should recognize that predator-prey relationships are finely
balanced and can vary greatly due to a small change in the abilities of the
predator or prey.
Modification: Gifted students may wish to graph the results of each game so they can
draw conclusions about each competitive situation.
Activity
Connection to Art and Language Arts
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
The Perfect Ranger, page 12
Objective: • Draw a picture to show an understanding of adaptations.
Introduce: Review the concept of adaptation. Define adaptation as a characteristic
that helps an organism survive. Give examples of different kinds of
adaptations, such as a turtle’s hard shell or a duck’s webbed feet.
Teach: Present The Perfect Ranger on the activity page. Discuss each adaptation,
focusing on its usefulness. Then have students create their own perfect
organism with its own set of unique adaptations. Encourage students to be
creative. Provide paper for students’ drawings.
Close: Display the drawings and have students explain each adaptation.
Assessment: Adaptations should be well-reasoned and useful.
Modification: Have students create animals with humorous adaptations.
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapter 4
55
Activity
Connection to Language Arts and Reading
Endangered Snapshots, page 13
Objectives: • Read information about endangered and threatened organisms.
• Communicate the causes of, and ways to limit, animal endangerment.
Introduce: Define an endangered animal as an animal that is in danger of becoming
extinct while threatened species are organisms whose populations have
diminished greatly. Provide research materials such as magazines and
books that deal with endangered species.
Teach: Have children read the page. Determine their comprehension by asking
questions such as: What caused the animal to become endangered or
threatened? After children decide on an animal to support, have them
work with a partner to do their research. Help them think of specific
suggestions they will include in their letter. Have them consider issues
such as, What can be done to save this animal? How can people in the
community work together in this cause? Provide paper for students to
write their letters.
Close: Have students read their letters to the class.
Assessment: Students should be able to gather information about an endangered
or threatened animal, then write a letter to communicate ways to help
save it.
Modification: Have students search the Internet for the names of congressional
representatives whose jurisdiction includes the habitat of the endangered
and threatened animals. Let them write letters specifically for
the representatives.
Culminating Activity
Environmental Survey, page 14
Objectives: • Design a survey to find out how people feel about environmental issues.
• Collect and analyze data.
Introduce: Review environmental issues studied in class.
Teach: Introduce the activity and divide the class into survey teams. Have each
team complete their list of questions. Review the questions to insure they
are simple and direct. After the data is collected, help the teams make
tables and write reports to analyze their data. Provide paper for students
to write their questionnaires and reports.
Close: Have students present their data to the class.
Assessment: Reports should include conclusions that students draw from their survey,
based on evidence that they collected.
Modification: Use a computer graphing program to display the data.
56
Unit B · Where Plants and Animals Live
Use with Chapters 3–4
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Connection to Math
Project Theme
Ace Granite, Rock Detective, pages 15–22
Concepts •
•
•
•
•
•
•
Draw conclusions.
Experiment to calculate rates of water flow.
Organize and collect data to write a diary.
Locate hidden words within a puzzle.
Calculate rates of erosion.
Analyze data to find different geographical locations.
Develop ideas to write and perform a play.
Overview In Ace Granite, Rock Detective, students solve mysteries along with Ace
Granite, a fictional private eye. Students use language arts skills to write
a postcard, keep a diary, and solve a puzzle; math skills to compute erosion
and water flow rates; reading skills to identify types of rocks; social studies
map skills to follow a route. The unit culminates as students use their
writing skills to create and perform a play.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Getting Begin by introducing students to Ace Granite, a detective who solves
Started mysteries that involve rocks, resources, and other Earth Science concepts.
Grade 3 Unit C:
Our Earth
Activity
Related
Subject
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Programs
Chapter 5: Earth’s
Resources
Lesson 1: Minerals and
Rocks
Activity 1: The
Case of the
Mysterious
Rocks, p. 15
Reading
McGraw-Hill Reading,
Grade 3, Book 1, The
Sun, the Wind, and the
Rain, pp. 174–199
Chapter 5: Earth’s
Resources
Lesson 4: Water in Sea,
Land, and Sky
Activity 2: The
Case of the
Flowing Faucet,
p. 16
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Grade 3, Customary
Capacity, pp. 436–437
Chapter 5: Earth’s Resources Activity 3: The
Case of the Daily
Lesson 5: Saving Our
Diary, p. 17
Resources
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Language
Arts, Grade 3, Diary,
p. 247
Chapter 5: Earth’s
Resources
Lesson 5: Saving Our
Resources
Activity 4: The
Case of the
Puzzling
Passwords, p. 18
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Language
Arts, Grade 3,
Dictionary, pp. 30–31
Chapter 6: Forces Shape
the Land
Lesson 7: Slow Changes on
Land
Activity 5: The
Case of the
Shrinking Roof,
p. 19
Math
McGraw-Hill
Mathematics, Grade 3,
Subtraction Sentences,
pp. 110–111
calculator
Chapter 6: Forces Shape
the Land
Lesson 8: Fast Changes on
Land
Activity 6: The
Case of the
Missing Sister,
p. 20
Social Studies,
Language Arts
Communities: Adventures
in Place and Time, Grade 3
pp. 36–43 McGraw-Hill
Language Arts, Grade 3,
pp. 202–203
geography
books, maps
Chapters 5 and 6:
All Lessons
Culminating
Language Arts
Activity: Ace’s
Mystery Playhouse,
p. 22
Unit C · Our Earth
Materials
red pencils,
blue pencils
McGraw-Hill Language
Arts, Grade 3, Play,
p. 554
Use with Chapters 5–6
57
Scoring Rubric for Integration Activities
Score
Criteria
4
Accomplished all of the activity’s objectives.
3
Accomplished more than half of the activity’s objectives.
2
Accomplished less than half of the activity’s objectives.
1
Little or no accomplishment of activity’s objectives.
Activity
Connection to Reading
The Case of the Mysterious Rocks, page 15
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Objective • Read a paragraph for comprehension and draw conclusions about rocks.
Introduce: Discuss different types of rocks: igneous rocks such as granite and basalt
are formed from lava; sedimentary rocks such as limestone, conglomerate,
and rock salt are formed when rocks and/or animal and plant remains
compress together over a long time; and metamorphic rocks such as
marble and granite are formed by high heat and pressure. If possible,
share samples of each.
Teach: Introduce the activity and the Ace Granite character. After reading the
paragraph, students should read the descriptions in the table, find clue
words in the text, and identify the type of rock.
Close: Have volunteers share the clues they found.
Assessment: Students should be able to read a paragraph and draw conclusions from
the information given.
Modification: Take students on a field trip to obtain rock samples. Have them research
properties of rocks so that they can write clues about their identity.
Answers: 1. Granite 2. Granite 3. Slate 4. Shelly limestone 5. Marble
58
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 5
Activity
Connection to Math
The Case of the Flowing Faucet, page 16
Objectives • Explore how much water is wasted at an hourly rate.
Materials: quart containers and clock or watch
Introduce: Ask, Which will use more water—the wide-open faucet for 30 seconds or
the faucet that drips for 1 hour? Have students make predictions.
Teach: Help students conduct the experiment. Point out that the data should be
rounded to the nearest whole quart.
Close: Discuss how much water is wasted in a typical home.
Assessment: Students should be able to make accurate estimates of the amount of
water that is wasted.
Modification: Pair disabled students who cannot reach sinks with a student who
can help.
Answers: A. and B. Rates will vary based on flow. Typical data: 4 quarts per
half-minute for an open faucet; 3 quarts per hour for a dripping faucet.
1. The open faucet
2. Answers will vary; should be double the answer of question 1.
3. Answers will vary.
Activity
Connection to Language Arts
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
The Case of the Daily Diary, page 17
Objective • Identify resources as renewable or nonrenewable and keep a daily diary.
Introduce: Review students’ understanding of renewable and nonrenewable
resources. Have them suggest examples of each.
Teach: Have a volunteer read the diary excerpt on the activity page. Help students
understand why different resources belong to each category. As students
begin the page, make sure they keep their diaries organized. Provide
paper for students to write their diaries.
Close: Go over diary entries as a class. Make a list of the different resources
that students use.
Assessment: Students write diary entries which correctly identify resources as
renewable or nonrenewable.
Modification: Go over vocabulary words such as natural gas and gasoline with
ESL students.
Answers: Diaries and responses to questions 1 and 2 will vary.
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapter 5
59
Activity
Connection to Language Arts
The Case of the Puzzling Passwords, page 18
Objective • Identify concept words for resources and solve a puzzle.
Introduce: Review what students know about rocks and resources.
Teach: Go over how to solve the puzzle. Have a volunteer locate one word, as
students circle the word. Provide paper for students to make their
own puzzles.
Close: Have volunteers identify each word.
Assessment: Students should locate on a puzzle 14 words that have to do with rocks
and resources.
Modification: Provide clues of one or more letters in each word for students who have
trouble completing the puzzle.
Answers: RENEWABLE, WORMS, SAND, RESOURCE, TOPSOIL, ROCK, AIR, LAVA,
LIMESTONE, PLANTS, SOIL, WATER, SUBSOIL, NATURAL
Activity
Connection to Math
Objective • Understand how erosion can change matter.
Introduce: Have a volunteer read the example at the top of the activity page. Draw
a diagram of the roof on the chalkboard. Point out that clay roofs must
be repaired yearly or they will deteriorate.
Teach: Go over the example by asking, How can I solve this problem? Most
students can subtract 20⫺16 in their heads, so they would use mental
math as the method. Each student can choose mental math or paper and
pencil as a method (allow calculators only if necessary). There is no right
or wrong method.
Close: Have volunteers show how they solved each problem on the board.
Assessment: Students should use whichever method they like—mental math or pencil
and paper (calculator, if necessary)—to solve problems.
Modification: Learning disabled students might need help drawing a diagram.
Answers: 1. 6 cm 2. 12 cm 3. 10 cm 4. 10 years 5. 5 years
60
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapters 5–6
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
The Case of the Shrinking Roof, page 19
Activity
Connection to Social Studies and Language Arts
The Case of the Missing Sister, page 20
Objective • Use geographical clues and map skills to find locations.
Introduce: Review how to use a map. Have volunteers find locations such as Mexico,
Canada and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.
Teach: Introduce the activity page and help students read aloud the introduction
and the postcards. Direct students’ attention to the date of each postcard
and the other clues on the cards—geographical clues, events such as
earthquakes. Make reference books and maps available. Then have pairs
of students work together to complete the page.
Close: Have volunteers go over the route as they share their answers.
Assessment: Students should be able to find a map route from date and geography
clues on postcards, then write similar clues about another city.
Modification: Pair strong readers with students that might have difficulty assimilating
the details on the postcards.
Answers: A1. Seattle 2. Lines drawn from Seattle-Miami-San Diego-Denver-Chicago
3. Chicago B. Clues will vary.
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Ace’s Mystery Playhouse, page 22
Objective • Use unit concepts to create and perform a play.
Introduce: Lead the class in brainstorming ideas for a mystery by asking questions
such as, What is missing? Who took it? Help students keep the plot simple.
In case ideas are not flowing, you might want to prepare a simple plot
outline ahead of time.
Teach: Outline the plot on the board. Assign groups to write different sections of
the play. Remind students to write in dramatic form and identify each
speaker. Assemble and photocopy the play, then help students choose roles
for the production. Be flexible in how you stage the performance. Provide
paper for students to plan and write their plays.
Close: Perform the play in front of an audience.
Assessment: Students should create and perform a mystery play which focuses on a
concept that relates to rocks and resources.
Modification: Hearing impaired students may perform the play using sign language.
Unit C · Our Earth
Use with Chapters 5–6
61
Project Theme
Planet Earth Travel Agency, pages 23–30
Concepts •
•
•
•
•
•
•
Organize weather information.
Organize events in a monthly calendar.
Read to comprehend diagrams.
Find different locations on the Moon.
Count to visualize large numbers.
Visualize a planet in different orbital positions.
Organize and collect data to create a book.
Overview In this unit, students use the fictional Planet Earth Travel Agency to explore
the solar system. Students use organizing to describe weather properties;
reading skills to interpret pictures of constellations; map skills to find real
and fictional locations; math skills to explore large numbers; The unit
culminates in an activity in which students use research skills to publish
a book.
Grade 3 Unit D: Cycles
on Earth and in Space
Activity
Related
Subject
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Programs
Materials
Chapter 7: Earth’s Weather
Lesson 1: The Weather
Lesson 3: Describing
Weather
Activity 1:
Earth’s Weather,
p. 23
Math
McGraw-Hill
Mathematics, Grade 3,
Temperature, pp. 460–461
television
or radio
Chapter 8: Earth in Space
Lesson 4: How Earth Moves
Activity 2: Earth
Travel Calendar,
p. 24
Social Studies
Communities: Adventures
in Place and Time, Grade 3
pp. R5–R7, R10–R11
world map
Chapter 8: Earth in Space
Lesson 4: How Earth Moves
Activity 3: Stars
and Greek
Myths, p. 25
Reading
McGraw-Hill Reading,
Grade 3, Book 2, The
Terrible Eek (other
cultures), pp. 14–33
Chapter 8: Earth in Space
Lesson 5: Phases of the
Moon
Activity 4: Moon
Map, p. 26
Social Studies
Communities:
Adventures in Place and
Time, Grade 3 pp. 50–51
Chapter 8: Earth in Space
Lesson 6: The Sun and Its
Planets
Activity 5: A
Million Earths
p. 27
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Grade 3, Multiplying,
pp. 178–179, 236–237
Chapter 8: Earth in Space
Lesson 6: The Sun and Its
Planets
Activity 6: Venus
Telescope Tour,
p.28
Reading, Art
McGraw-Hill Reading,
Grade 3, Book 1, Opt: An
Illusionary Tale, pp. 80–101
Chapters 7 and 8:
All Lessons
Culminating
Activity: Solar
System Facts
and Fiction, p. 29
Language Arts,
Reading
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, pp. 200, 202–203
McGraw-Hill Reading, A Very
Good Place to Visit, Grade 3,
pp. 378–381
62
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
counters
Use with Chapters 7–8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Getting Introduce the fictional Planet Earth Travel Agency and its theme “the agency
Started that goes around the world and beyond.” Let students brainstorm a list of
what they know about the Sun and the Solar System.
Scoring Rubric for Integration Activities
Score
Criteria
4
Accomplished all of the activity’s objectives.
3
Accomplished more than half of the activity’s objectives.
2
Accomplished less than half of the activity’s objectives.
1
Little or no accomplishment of activity’s objectives.
Activity
Connection to Math
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Earth’s Weather, page 23
Objective • Organize weather information.
Introduce: Discuss why a travel agency might have to describe weather to travelers
deciding on a destination. Explain that weather changes daily but that
there are overall patterns in weather throughout a year that might help a
person decide on a place to visit: it’s warm all year in Hawaii, but very cold
in winter in Alaska.
Teach: If a radio or television is available, have students listen to a weather report
(or tape-record a report to play). Students take notes on the weather
properties they hear and name the properties from the weather report.
They work in pairs to complete the task.
Close: Pairs share their findings with the class.
Assessment: Pairs decide, based on what they heard, what they may want to amend in
their reports and submit final reports.
Modification: You may wish to assign different properties to pairs and then have pairs
share their work to present a complete report.
Answers: Air temperature: warmth of air above Earth’s surface, thermometer,
degrees (Fahrenheit and Celsius); air pressure: the force on an area from
the push of air, barometer (inches and millibars); wind: speed and direction
of moving air, anemometer (speed, knots or miles per hour), weather vane
(direction); precipitation: the amount of water (in any form) that falls from
the atmosphere, rain gauge, inches.
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 7
63
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Earth Travel Calendar, page 24
Objective • Use a map to identify seasonal differences in the hemispheres.
Introduce: Discuss how a travel agency serves its customers. Then introduce the
activity page. Tell students that the agency makes a calendar of important
events in locations around the world. Inform students that their task will
be to determine which month the event could take place.
Teach: Review the northern and southern hemispheres as you discuss how the
Earth’s tilt creates seasonal climates. Point to the Mid-Winter Festival in
Peru. Have a volunteer locate Peru on a world map. Students should
recognize that midwinter in Peru occurs during July or August, and can
date the festival in either month. Have students complete the calendar.
Close: As students share their responses, help them see that there is more than
one possible answer for many of the events.
Assessment: Students should apply what they know about seasonal differences in the
northern and southern hemispheres to plan the events.
Modification: Have students work in pairs to complete the activity.
Answers: Possible responses: 1. July 2. April 3. April 4. August 5. November
6. March 7. August 8. December 9. March 10. February
Activity
Connection to Reading
Objective • Interpret illustrations of constellations.
Introduce: Explain that the stars we see at night are like our Sun. Review the term
constellation. Explain that ancient Greeks thought some constellations
looked like the animals and people in their stories, which are known
as myths.
Teach: Explain that each picture in the activity shows a different constellation.
Have students read a myth and match the constellation the myth is
describing. Then have them research other constellations such as
Centaurus or Canis Major. Provide paper for students to write the myth
and draw the constellations.
Close: Have students share their research findings.
Assessment: Students will match Greek myths to the constellations illustrated, then
research a constellation.
Modification: You can have pairs of students work together on researching the
constellations. Create a sky map of the constellations for classroom display.
64
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Stars and Greek Myths, page 25
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Moon Map, page 26
Objective
Introduce: Refer students to the Moon map on the activity page. Point out that the
Moon, like Earth, has recognizable geographical features. Many of them
are craters—huge pits created by meteor hits—mountains, and “seas.”
Teach: Demonstrate how to use the compass rose. Introduce the terms NE for
northeast, SE for southeast, NW for northwest, and SW for southwest.
Present students with one sample problem. Then have students complete
the page.
Close: Let students share their answers to question 5. Discuss whether tourism
might occur on the Moon in this century.
Assessment: Students should use cardinal and intermediate directions to find locations
on a map of the Moon.
Modification: Have students write questions that can be answered with the Moon map.
Answers: 1. Copernicus 2. Caucasus Mountains 3. Theophilus 4. Cleomedes
5. Responses will vary.
Activity
Connection to Math
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
A Million Earths, page 27
Objective • Represent the numbers 100 and 1,000 to explore larger numbers.
Introduce: Explain that the Sun and the Moon don’t look very large in the sky due to
their distance from Earth. Let students share their ideas about the size of
Earth, Moon, and Sun.
Teach: Present the fact introduced on the activity page: “The Sun is so large that
one million Earths could fit inside it.” Have students share their
perceptions of the number one million. Group students in pairs. Tell them
they will first work together to show the number 100, then work as a class
to explore how to show the number 1,000. Provide counters such as cubes
if possible.
Close: Have students share their drawings of 100. Help them see the pattern of
10 in the numbers 100 and 1000.
Assessment: Students should represent the numbers 100 and 1,000 as they explore the
concept of larger numbers.
Modification: You might explore the concept of volume by having students fill a
container with 100 counters, then combine 10 containers to show 1,000.
Answers: 1. 10 2. Drawings will vary but may show 10 groups of 10. 3. 10 4. Drawings
will vary but should show Earth significantly smaller than the Sun.
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapter 8
65
Activity
Connection to Reading and Art
Venus Telescope Tour, page 28
Objective • Apply an understanding of position and light to Venus’ orbit around
the Sun.
Introduce: Inform students that like the Moon, Venus also has phases. They are
difficult to see because Venus is farther away from Earth than the Moon.
Teach: Ask students to imagine that they are viewing Venus through a telescope
from Earth. Use phase 1 to point out that light would appear on the right
half of Venus, leaving the left half in shadow, as shown. Then ask, Where
would the shadow be in stage 5? Students should see that the right half of
Venus would now be in shadow. Then have students complete the activity.
Close: As students share their work, ask, Which phase is like an eclipse?
Assessment: Students should use a diagram of Venus’ orbit around the Sun in relation
to Earth to interpret and draw diagrams of different phases of Venus.
Modification: Make models of Earth, the Sun, and Venus. Demonstrate Venus’ orbit as
students take turns holding Earth. Use a light source as the Sun.
Answers: 1. Phases 1 and 5 are mirror images. 2. 3 3. 2 4. 7
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts and Reading
Objective • Research and write a book with facts and non-facts about the
solar system.
Introduce: If possible, read aloud The Magic School Bus Lost in the Solar System by
Joanna Cole. Help students see that while the book is filled with what we
assume to be facts, the story itself (of the class trip) is fictional.
Teach: Explain that in order to establish whether a statement is a fact, an
authoritative source, such as a science text or encyclopedia, must be used.
Present the activity page and organize students into groups. Make
resources available for their research. Help each group publish their books.
Close: Have groups of students share their books.
Assessment: Students should use resources to check the accuracy of statement about
the planets, then combine the statements into a book.
Modification: Have students make a travel poster about one of the planets.
Answers: A1. Fiction 2. Fact 3. Fact 4. Fiction 5. Fact 6. Fact B., C. Answers will vary.
66
Unit D · Cycles on Earth and in Space
Use with Chapters 7–8
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Solar System Facts and Fiction, pages 29–30
Project Theme
A Moon Room Museum, pages 31–38
Concepts •
•
•
•
•
•
Draw conclusions from past discoveries.
Calculate weights of objects on Earth and the Moon.
Relate motion concepts with diagrams.
Read for comprehension.
Make a design using graphical information.
Organize information into a brochure.
Overview In A Moon Room Museum, students explore exhibits that show force,
motion, gravity, and their relation to Moon exploration. Students use social
studies skills to understand the significance of Isaac Newton’s findings; math
skills to compare weight on the Moon and Earth; art skills to see how safety
belts work in a space shuttle; reading skills to draw conclusions from
information on astronauts; and language arts skills to apply graphic
information to draw a design for a Moon craft. In the cumulative project,
students plan and design a brochure that introduces and guides visitors
through the exhibits.
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Getting Ask students what they know about the Moon. Explain that they will create
Started exhibits for a new Moon Room Museum. Discuss children’s experiences at
museums. Provide examples of different exhibits.
Grade 3 Unit E:
Forces and Motion
Activity
Chapter 9: How Things
Move
Lesson 2: Forces
Activity 1: Who
Started Us on
Our Way?, p. 31
Related
Subject
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Programs
Social Studies
Communities: Adventures in Time and
Place, Grade 3, p. 246
Chapter 9: How Things Move Activity 2: How
Much Would I
Lesson 2: Forces
Weigh on the
Moon?, p. 32
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics, Grade 3,
Multiply by 6, pp. 228–231
Chapter 9: How Things Move
Lesson 1: Motion and Speed
Lesson 2: Forces
Lesson 3: Changes in Motion
Activity 3: Space
Shuttle Simulator,
p. 33
Art
Chapter 10: Work and
Machines
Lesson 4: Doing Work
Activity 4:
Working in Space
Is Tough, p. 35
Reading
McGraw-Hill Reading, Grade 3, Book 1,
A Very Cool Place to Visit, p. 378–381
Chapter 10: Work and
Machines
Lesson 5: Levers and
Pulleys Lesson 6: More
Simple Machines
Activity 5: Moon
Movers, p. 36
Language Arts
and Art
McGraw-Hill Language Arts, Grade 3,
Explanatory Writing, pp. 118–136
Chapters 9 and 10:
All Lessons
Culminating
Activity: Moon
Room Brochure,
p. 38
Language Arts,
Social Studies,
and Art
Communities: Adventures in Time and
Place, Grade 3, p. G7; McGraw-Hill
Language Arts, Grade 3, pp. 118–136
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapters 9–10
67
Scoring Rubric for Integration Activities
Score
Criteria
4
Accomplished all of the activity’s objectives.
3
Accomplished more than half of the activity’s objectives.
2
Accomplished less than half of the activity’s objectives.
1
Little or no accomplishment of activity’s objectives.
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Objective • Read and apply information about a famous scientist in history.
Introduce: Explain that Isaac Newton’s observations and discoveries helped inventors
design and build the first elevators. Newton’s experimentations also helped
make Mae Jamison the first African American woman to travel in a space
shuttle. Discuss how machines such as elevators and space shuttles help us
move and work in spite of gravity.
Teach: Review the concepts of the newton. Ask students where they think the
word came from. Introduce the activity page.
Close: Have students share their answers. Ask volunteers to explain how they
decided which object required the larger force to move it.
Assessment: Students should be able to compare whether a lot or a little amount of
force is required to move objects. They should identify how Isaac Newton
first observed gravity in action.
Modification: Have students research other contributions Isaac Newton made, such as his
Laws of Motion and calculus.
Answers: A1. move 2. gravity 3. newton B. space shuttle: a lot of newtons; toy
rocket: not a lot of newtons
68
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 9
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Who Started Us on Our Way?, page 31
Activity
Connection to Math
How Much Would I Weigh on the Moon?, page 32
Objective • Use a table to compare weight of objects on Earth and the Moon.
Introduce: Discuss how weight is related to gravity. Weight is the pull of gravity on
an object. Explain that the pull of gravity is about the same anywhere
on Earth, so the weight of an object would also be about the same.
Teach: Explain that the weight of an object on Earth is about 6 times more than
the weight of that same object on the Moon. Point to the table on the
activity page. Help students see the pattern of multiplying 6. You should
encourage the use of any strategy—repeated addition, skip counting on
a number line, or multiplication—to complete the table.
Close: Ask students about how much they would weigh on the Moon.
Let volunteers share their weights and lead the class in doing
the multiplication.
Assessment: Students should be able to use any strategy to complete the table, then
use it to compare weights on Earth and the Moon. Students should
understand that things weigh more on Earth than on the Moon because
of the difference in gravity. Earth’s gravity is stronger than the Moon’s
because Earth has a greater mass than the Moon.
Modification: Allow students to use a calculator to complete the table.
Answers: A. 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 B1. 30 2. 2 3. 3 4. 7
Activity
Connection to Art
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Space Shuttle Simulator, page 33
Objective • Relate safety belts to the effect of force and motion.
Introduce: Ask students to explain why it is important to wear safety belts when they
are riding in a car. Discuss other places where safety belts are used. Help
students see the importance of using safety belts in all moving objects.
Teach: Ask students to demonstrate the postures pictured in the diagrams in
exercise 1. Discuss what happens when a car begins to move (or
accelerate). Discuss what happens when a car stops. Then have students
complete the page.
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapter 9
69
Close: Ask, What force is acting in all of the pictures? Explain that the force of
gravity is always acting on us on Earth. Explain that when astronauts are
in a space shuttle in space they are weightless because there is very little
gravity acting on them.
Assessment: Students should be able to see how safety belts work to keep you safe
when traveling in any moving object. They should be able write
instructions that describe how and why people should use safety belts.
Modification: Encourage students to draw a picture of what their Space Shuttle
Simulator will look like. Make sure that they label the parts.
Answers: 1. Picture with arrows pointing toward child. 2. Picture with arrows
pointing forward. 3. Picture with arrows pointing toward the child.
4. Picture with arrows pointing forward in direction body is moving.
Activity
Connection to Reading
Objective • Draw conclusions from reading information about astronauts working.
Introduce: Discuss the needs of all living organisms—air, water, nourishment. Ask
students to describe some things that astronauts might need that people
on Earth might not need.
Teach: Ask students to read the text, then draw conclusions as to what we need
on Earth and what astronauts need in space.
Close: Ask volunteers to share the rationale to their answers. Discuss the kinds of
special clothes and machines people might need on Earth. For example,
people need special machines for different jobs, such as plowing, drilling,
and moving objects.
Assessment: Students should read information about astronauts, draw conclusions from
the text, and recall prior knowledge to answer questions about life on
Earth and in space.
Modification: Have students imagine that they are going to take off in a space shuttle
going to the Moon. Ask them to make a list of what they will need to take
with them on their space mission.
Answers: 1. Yes, yes 2. Yes, yes 3. Yes, yes 4. Check student’s rationale.
70
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapters 9–10
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Working in Space Is Tough, page 35
Activity
Connection to Language Arts and Art
Moon Movers, page 36
Objective • Apply knowledge of simple and compound machines to a design.
Introduce: Review what students know about simple and compound machines.
Teach: Have students explain what each compound machine in the pictures does.
Then let them share ideas about the machines astronauts might use in
space. Discuss how simple machines could be used on a machine that
moves on the Moon. Have materials available for research.
Close: Have volunteers share their Moon Craft designs. You might create a display
of the Moon Crafts designs in the class.
Assessment: Students should be able to identify where simple machines are used in
various compound machines, including their own design.
Modification: Have pairs of students build their Moon Craft models using materials such
as straws, shoe boxes, string, and paper clips.
Answers: A1. Dump truck 2. Farm cart 3. Ramp 4. Crane with pulley 5. Plow 6. Drill
B. Lists will vary. C. Designs should use one or more simple machines.
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts, Social Studies, and Art
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
The Moon Room Brochure, page 38
Objective • Plan and design an informative brochure.
Introduce: Bring in a variety of brochures to share with students. If possible, include
one from a museum. Help students realize that brochures use words,
pictures and maps to describe a product, place, or service. Provide paper
and art materials for students to make their brochures.
Teach: Explain that students will plan and design a brochure for visitors of the
Moon Room Museum. Have students examine the sample brochures. After
they plan what the brochure will tell visitors, they should make a map that
shows the exhibits, finalize the copy, and design the brochure. You might
need to help students brainstorm a list of exhibits.
Close: Be sure students complete each task in the checklist. Then have groups
share their brochures.
Assessment: Students should create a brochure that describes Moon exhibits and
includes a map of the museum.
Modification: If available, let students create their brochures on computers. You might
have teams of students make the Moon exhibits for a Moon Room
Grand Opening.
Unit E · Forces and Motion
Use with Chapters 9–10
71
Project Theme
Matter Land Fun Park, pages 39–46
Concepts •
•
•
•
•
•
•
Play a matter identification game.
Calculate and compare different quantities.
Relate geographical locations to understand chemical processes.
Use science concepts to make a design.
Draw conclusions from visual images and text.
Read backward material using science concepts.
Plan and organize data to model an amusement park ride.
Overview In the Matter Land Fun Park, students use an amusement park theme to
learn about matter and energy. Students use language arts skills to
categorize things; math skills to compare the number of people in ticket
lines; map skills to follow the manufacturing of iron; art skills to design a
new product; and reading and art skills to draw images of text. The unit
culminates as students create their own amusement park ride design.
Grade 3 Unit F: Looking at
Matter and Energy
Activity
Related
Subject
Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Programs
Chapter 11: Matter
Lesson 1: Properties of Matter
Activity 1: What
in the World?
p. 39
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, Comparing,
pp. 282–287
Chapter 11: Matter
Lesson 2: Comparing Solids, Liquids,
and Gases
Activity 2:
Tickets, Tickets,
Tickets, p. 40
Math
McGraw-Hill Mathematics,
Pictographs, Grade 3,
pp. 154–155
Chapter 11: Matter
Lesson 2: Comparing Solids, Liquids,
and Gases
Lesson 3: Building Blocks of Matter
Activity 3: The
Big Dipper, p. 41
Social Studies
Communities, Adventures in
Time and Place, pp. 36–43,
316–318
Chapter 12: Energy
Lesson 4: How Heat Travels
Activity 4:
Super Cup, p. 42
Art
Chapter 12: Energy
Lesson 5: How Light Travels
Activity 5: Fun
House Mirrors,
p. 43
Reading, Art
McGraw-Hill Reading,
Grade 3, Book 1, Opt: An
Illusionary Tale, pp. 80–101
Chapter 12: Energy
Lesson 7: Paths for Electricity
Activity 6:
Backward
Poems, p. 44
Reading,
Language Arts
McGraw-Hill Reading, Opt: An
Illusionary Tale, Grade 3, 80–102
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, Poems, pp. 66–67
Chapters 11 and 12:
All Lessons
Culminating
Activity: Dream
Ride, p. 45
Language Arts
and Art
McGraw-Hill Language Arts,
Grade 3, Explanatory Writing
pp. 118–136
72
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapters 11–12
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Getting Introduce Matter Land Fun Park to students as a place that has rides and
Started attractions with a matter and energy theme. Let children discuss their
experiences at amusement parks. Encourage students to think about the
kinds of rides that the park might have. List the students’ suggestions on
the board.
Scoring Rubric for Integration Activities
Score
Criteria
4
Accomplished all of the activity’s objectives.
3
Accomplished more than half of the activity’s objectives.
2
Accomplished less than half of the activity’s objectives.
1
Little or no accomplishment of activity’s objectives.
Activity
Connection to Language Arts
What in the World?, page 39
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Objective • Ask questions to identify and categorize items as matter or nonmatter.
Introduce: Ask students, Are all things made of matter? Help students distinguish
between matter and nonmatter. Give examples of nonmatter including
ideas such as happiness, and forms of energy such as heat. Provide paper
and necessary art materials for students to make their cards.
Teach: Make the cards shown on the page and model how to play the game.
Show how to identify each object in a systematic way. For example, ask,
Does this thing have weight? Students should recognize that a rock has
weight while the number 6 does not have weight.
Close: List the objects that students pictured on their cards. Let the class
confirm that each is matter or nonmatter.
Assessment: Students should be able to ask questions to distinguish matter
from nonmatter.
Modification: Select items from newspapers or magazines. Have students determine
whether they are matter or nonmatter.
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 11
73
Activity
Connection to Math
Tickets, Tickets, Tickets, page 40
Objective • Calculate and compare to find solutions to problems.
Introduce: Draw a picture of two lines, one with 4 people, the other with 2. Ask,
Which line would you get into? Most students should be able to choose
the shorter line. Next, ask, How would you move people so that each line
has the same number of people? As students guess, test their answers by
changing the lines.
Teach: Tell students they can guess and test to solve the problems on the page.
Encourage them to draw diagrams as necessary.
Close: Have volunteers show how they solved each problem.
Assessment: Students should be able to determine how the number of people in line
changes as modifications are made.
Modification: Change the number of people in the lines, then re-do the problems.
Answers: 1. Air Land; 14 2. Water Land 3. 2 4. 3 5. Answers will vary.
Activity
Connection to Social Studies
Objective • Use map skills to follow a manufacturing process.
Introduce: Display objects made of steel, such as a stapler. Point out that steel is a
mixture of different metals including iron.
Teach: Review that when a solid melts, it turns to liquid and when a liquid is
cooled, it changes into a solid. Introduce the page and guide students
through the route that iron ore takes.
Close: Have volunteers explain their answers.
Assessment: Students should use a map and what they know about matter to follow
the steps in manufacturing steel.
Modification: Use the map to show the route of how steel is delivered to factories and
businesses after it is manufactured.
Answers: 1. Minnesota and Wisconsin 2. Lake Superior and Lake Michigan 3. liquid
4. solid.
74
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 11
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
The Big Dipper, page 41
Activity
Connection to Art
Super Cup, page 42
Objectives • Determine materials that insulate best.
• Use design skills to create a functional object.
Introduce: Ask, What is the best way to keep a cup of ice from melting? Ask students
to give reasons to support each suggestion.
Teach: Help students set up their experiments. Students should recognize that
insulation—covers on top, extra thick cups—keep drinks cold. Once
students settle on an insulation strategy, tell them to design their Super
Cups. Stress that the cups should be imaginative as well as good insulators.
Provide paper for students to design their Super Cups. If possible, provide
cups of different material, cup covers, and ice water.
Close: Have students present their designs to the class.
Assessment: Students should make a design for an insulated cup which is convincing,
well-presented, and supported by scientific concepts.
Modification: Have students design hot-drink containers. How would hot-drink
containers be different from cold-drink containers?
Activity
Connection to Reading and Art
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Fun House Mirrors, page 43
Objective • Draw images of reflected light using text descriptions.
Introduce: Explain that a mirror is an opaque object that reflects light. Discuss the
various places mirrors are used, including for safety and in scientific
equipment such as microscopes and telescopes.
Teach: Explain that mirrors reflect light in different directions depending on the
origin of the light. Provide visual examples by using a mirror and asking
students from different locations to describe what they see.
Close: Have volunteers share their drawings.
Assessment: Students should be able to read text about mirrors and draw conclusions
about how mirrors reflect light.
Modification: Distribute some safe mirrors and invite students to experiment with them.
Answers: A. The mirror with the girl standing in front of it should have an arrow
pointing directly back to the girl. The mirror with the boy and girl in
different corners should have an arrow pointing toward the boy. B. Light
does not bend when a mirror reflects it. When light hits a mirror, the light
is reflected away at the same angle.
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapter 12
75
Activity
Connection to Reading and Language Arts
Backward Poems, page 44
Objectives • Use concepts of reflection to read backward poems.
• Identify properties of matter and energy.
Introduce: Write the word HELLO backward and ask, How can I read this word?
Show that you can use a mirror to read the word. Then have the class
try writing words backward.
Teach: Have students use a mirror to read the poem. Then, have students write
their poems in conventional (non-backward) form. Have students write
their own poems about electricity. When the poems are complete, help
students transform them to Backward Poems, using mirrors, through-thepage writing, or direct writing. Provide paper and necessary materials for
students to write their poems.
Close: Have students read each others’ poems.
Assessment: Students should write poems in backward form on the topic of electricity.
Modification: Have students write poems in which letters are written in conventional
form but word order is backward.
Culminating Activity
Connection to Language Arts and Art
Objectives • Understand how matter and energy apply in a real-world setting.
• Design an amusement park ride.
Introduce: Arrange children in groups and introduce the activity. Review concepts of
matter and energy as necessary.
Teach: Encourage students to design their rides with science concepts in mind. If
possible, provide clay, cardboard, and other materials so students can
make models of their rides.
Close: Have children share their designs. Display the rides to make a replica of
Matter Land Fun Park in the classroom.
Assessment: Children design an amusement ride supported by scientific concepts.
Modification: Have students change the energy source for their rides.
76
Unit F · Looking at Matter and Energy
Use with Chapters 11–12
© Macmillan / McGraw - Hill
Dream Ride, page 45–46