Uniform Guidelines - 124th New York State Volunteers

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Uniform Guidelines - 124th New York State Volunteers
REGULATIONS
FOR THE
UNIFORM AND DRESS
OF THE
th
124 New York Regiment
of Volunteers
2014.
GENERAL ORDERS,} WAR DEPARTMENT,
No. 6. ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Washington, January 2012.
Written and Compiled By Captain Ryan McIntyre
Captain, 124th NYSV
&
Updated and Approved by the Membership January 2014
Table of Contents
Part I – General Rules .................................................................................. 4
Part II -Uniforms and Equipment............................................................... 5
Quartermaster Issued Supplies ................................................................................... 5
Required Uniform Items .......................................................................................... 5
-Forage Cap ............................................................................................................. 5
-Fatigue Blouse ....................................................................................................... 6
-Trousers ................................................................................................................. 7
-Suspenders/Braces ................................................................................................. 7
-Issue Shirt .............................................................................................................. 8
-Private Purchase Shirts .......................................................................................... 8
-Socks ...................................................................................................................... 9
-Footwear ................................................................................................................ 9
Optional Uniform Items ......................................................................................... 10
-Drawers ................................................................................................................ 10
-Dress Coat/Frock Coat......................................................................................... 10
-Greatcoats ............................................................................................................ 11
-New York State Coat ........................................................................................... 11
-Kepis .................................................................................................................... 12
-Vests .................................................................................................................... 12
Required Accoutrements ........................................................................................ 13
-Model 1858 or M1862 “Smooth-Side” Canteen ................................................. 13
-Haversacks ........................................................................................................... 13
-Issue Blanket........................................................................................................ 14
-Rubberized Blanket/Poncho ................................................................................ 14
-Painted Ground Cloths......................................................................................... 15
-Knapsacks ............................................................................................................ 15
-Shelter half ........................................................................................................... 15
Ordnance Supplies ...................................................................................................... 16
Required Leather Accouterments ......................................................................... 16
-Model 1861 .58 cal Cartridge Box ...................................................................... 17
-Cartridge Box Belt ............................................................................................... 17
-Model 1851 Waist Belt ........................................................................................ 18
-Cap Boxes ............................................................................................................ 18
-Bayonet Scabbards .............................................................................................. 18
Weapons and Accessories ........................................................................................... 19
Model 1853 Enfield, .577 caliber Rifled-Musket ..................................................... 19
2
-Model 1861 US Percussion Musket, .58 caliber Rifled-Musket ............................. 19
-Model 1855 Bayonet ............................................................................................... 20
-“Defarbing” your musket and bayonet .................................................................... 20
-Musket Cleaning Kit ................................................................................................ 21
-Cartridges................................................................................................................. 22
-Percussion Caps ....................................................................................................... 22
Camp Necessities ......................................................................................................... 23
-Food and Cooking Items.......................................................................................... 23
-Canteen Half / Mess Plate ....................................................................................... 23
-Utensils .................................................................................................................... 23
-Cup/Dipper .............................................................................................................. 24
-Boiler ....................................................................................................................... 24
-Frying Pan................................................................................................................ 24
-Hardtack................................................................................................................... 25
-Salt Pork/Dry Cured Bacon ..................................................................................... 25
-Coffee ...................................................................................................................... 26
-Personal Items.......................................................................................................... 26
The 124th NYSV Sutler List ...................................................................... 27
3
From the 124th’s bylaws:
“ A member of the 124th New York must come into the possession of and maintain the
uniform, accoutrements, equipment, and arms of a private soldier of the 124th New York
or Civilian in the War of the Rebellion. He may affix no device to his uniform not in
keeping with the reactivated 124th New York…”
Part I – General Rules
The 124th New York State Volunteers, Co. A seeks to portray the Federal infantry soldier
of the Army of the Potomac during the War of the rebellion, 1861-1865. Particular
attention is paid to how the 124th would have appeared at various stages of the war.
General Guidelines:
1. Only natural fibers (cotton, wool etc.) will be worn.
2. Stainless steel is frowned upon, and visible stainless steel (i.e. plate, cup, cutlery,
canteen, buttons and buckles) shall be avoided.
3. Modern eyewear is prohibited. Most soldiers did not wear glasses, but period eyewear
and contact lenses are both acceptable. If you wear contacts, conceal related items
like saline in a pouch or ration bag.
4. Modern wristwatches will not be worn.
5. Plastic bags, coolers and other anachronisms, if used at all, must be keep out of sight
at all times.
6. Anything inappropriate for the time period or unit portrayed in a particular scenario
must be avoided (i.e. Badges, Medals, etc).
7. Modern medicine should be camouflaged by the use of tobacco pouches or tins.
Officers and NCO’s should be informed of any existing medical condition and the
location of your medicine
8. All members will conform to the listed standards below. Officers and NCOs have the
right to deem any uniform piece unacceptable in appearance or authenticity.
9. The 124th NY will lead by example. This means a positive attitude & the desire to
improve our impressions while encouraging others without judgment. We prefer to
take the high road.
4
Part II -Uniforms and Equipment
The following is a list of required and optional items for the 124th NY. Each item has a
list of recommended vendors or 'sutlers' that specialize in making that particular item.
There is also an average cost listed with each item.
Exercise care when reviewing these materials. Suppliers recommended for one item may
not be recommended for others. The current 124th sutler list that accompanies this
document should be reviewed and considered for all purchases. Follow the list and
consult with veteran members of the group before buying! Because of the significant
cost of a complete kit, members are encouraged to purchase goods second hand to
completely outfit themselves. Second hand goods are best bought through the authentic
campaigner forum (authentic-campaigner.com) and the Civil War Reenactors’ Forum
(cwreenactors.com/forum).
Quartermaster Issued Supplies
Required Uniform Items
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Forage Cap
Fatigue Blouse/Sack Coat
Trousers
Suspenders/Braces
Issue Shirts or Private Purchase Shirts
Socks
Brogans
Forage Cap
Forage Caps were issued to the 124th at the beginning of their
enlistment while at Camp Wickham in Goshen, NY. They were
constructed from medium weight wool broadcloth with an
enameled leather chin strap and visor. The 1858 pattern (Type
I) had a small disk crown (4”) with a rounded duckbill visor.
The 1861 pattern (Type II) had a larger disk crown (6”) with a
more squared visor. The “McDowell” pattern had a small or
large disk and a stiff crescent-shaped visor. All models had a
welt around the crown/disk and were lined with brown or black polished cotton. Leather
sweatbands were sewn in by hand.
Army regulations declared that only a company letter was to be worn on the cap. There
is photographic evidence that small brass numbers were used by a few enlisted men of
the 124th NY. Regimental numbers are permitted, but not encouraged. Corps badges
were not worn until the spring of 1863 (Chancellorsville Campaign), and if worn must be
the appropriate badge for the year being portrayed.
No other insignia should be worn on the cap. This includes the infantry bugle, Irish harps
or any other adornment.
5
Of all known photos of 124th NY enlisted men donning a forage cap, all are wearing a
Type II style. Therefore, the preferred styles of forage cap will be the Type II style.
Suggested contractor reproductions are the; M1861 L.J. &I. Phillips Co. Cap, the Geo.
Hoff & Co., the Murphy & Griswold 1862 Cap, or the M. Brooks style cap. Though
there is no evidence that 124th NY enlisted men wore them, Surgeon John Thompson
owned a McDowell style cap. The original can be viewed at the Orange County
courthouse in Goshen, NY. You should always purchase a cap in person, as sizes can
vary.
Recommended Suppliers:
-not making them any more
-Nick Sekela
-Dirty Billy
Average Cost: $95-$125
Fatigue Blouse
Constructed of dark blue wool flannel with a diagonal
weave, a two or four piece body, and a two-piece
sleeve, correct patterns possess a short collar with faced
lapels and cuffs. Sleeves should have a small scalloped
vent in the rear of the cuff. A sack coat is closed with
four US eagle buttons. Hand-sewn buttonholes are
preferred but not required. At Camp Wickham in
Goshen, the 124th was issued sack coats in addition to
their dress coats.
Lined sack coats were issued two (3,685,755) to one
(1,809,207) for every unlined sack coat during the Civil
War. Lined versions should have a one-piece body
lining of linen, domet (cotton & wool blend), or wool
flannel and a sleeve lining of muslin or cotton. The body lining can be of a solid color or
a woven pattern. Unlined versions should have all seams flat-felled. Most original coats
were issued in four sizes (1=36, 2=38, 3=40, and 4=42).
John T. Martin was a contractor for the union army and produced sack coats throughout
the war in both New York and Cincinnati, and is therefore the pattern of choice for the
124th NY. Cincinnati Depot and New York Contract coats were a mix of machine sewing
and hand stitching, while Schuylkill Arsenal pattern coats were completely hand sewn.
Recommended Suppliers:
-W. W. & Company
-Nick Sekela
-CJ Daley
-John Wedeward
-C & D Jarnigan
Average Cost: $85-$225
6
Trousers
Constructed from sky-blue or dark blue kersey
wool with a diagonal weave; a thin tapering
waist band; a three to five button fly; rear
yoke(the area where the waist comes together)
with a raised back; side or mule ear pockets that
start below the waist-band; right-side watch
pocket; and properly vented facing cuffs.
Trousers were machine and hand stitched, with
the majority of the detail work to be done by
hand, especially the buttonholes. Trousers
came hemmed and therefore the raw edge
should not be exposed.
Of the existing photographs of enlisted men in the 124th NY almost half of them feature
soldiers wearing dark blue trousers. Extremely underrepresented in the ranks of the
124th, members should consider purchasing dark blue trousers.
Preferred patterns are New York contractor patterns like William Deering and J.T. Martin
or the Schuylkill Arsenal of Pennsylvania. Federal trousers were issued in four sizes only
(1=32" waist x 31" inseam; 2=34" waist x 32" inseam; 3=36" waist x 33" inseam; 4=38"
waist x 34" inseam).
Recommended Suppliers:
-Stony Brook Company (Chris Sullivan)
- Wambaugh, White and Company
-CJ Daley Historic Reproductions
-C & D Jarnigan
Average Cost: $95-$185
Suspenders/Braces
Suspenders though not normally issued by the Army,
were issued to the 124th at Camp Wickham in Goshen,
NY. Suspenders are not a requirement, and therefore if
your trousers stay up without suspenders you do not
need them.
Plain fabric suspenders of a period pattern are best.
Both adjustable and fixed length suspenders are
acceptable. If adjustable, be sure to avoid suspenders
with clamp-like sheet metal fasteners, which were a post-war invention. While elastic
saw limited use in suspender during the War, avoid 100% elastic suspenders. You can
also use a waist belt or a canteen strap to hold up your trousers. As a side note, military
issued trousers only contained one front button on each side of the trousers to button
suspenders to. Though many suspenders available today have two tabs to attach
suspenders with, those with single attachments should be strongly considered.
Recommended Suppliers:
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-The Sutler of Fort Scott
-Nick Sekela
-E. J. Thomas
- Wambaugh, White and Company
Average Cost: $25-$65
7
Issue Shirt
The issue shirt was the most commonly worn shirt of the
war, and Union casualties at Gettysburg were even
identified through their issue shirts. The shirts came in only
one size (size 42), and had a fold down collar with a single
tin button and functional cuffs fastened with a single tin
button.
Most issue shirts were constructed of undyed domet flannel.
The Schuylkill Arsenal contracted with W.F. Hansell of
Philadelphia, for 20,000 gray twill flannel shirts on August
19, 1862 and tan colored shirts have also been documented,
so these colors are acceptable as well.
The issue shirt is extremely underrepresented in the hobby. Members are encouraged to
purchase an issue shirt.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Wambaugh, White and Company
-Nick Sekela
-C.J. Daley
Average Cost: $75-$150
Private Purchase Shirts
Civilian shirts were not issued and were most often sent
from home or purchased privately. Pvt. William Tomer of
Company D and John Carroll of Co. K are both pictured
wearing civilian shirts under altered sack coats. Civilian
shirts should be carried as a backup to the issue shirt.
Civilian shirts came in a variety of styles. Fall down collars
were worn as well as banded collars with or without a
detachable collar. Shirts came with one, two or no pockets.
The tails of period shirts were much longer than modern
shirts.
Period shirts were pullovers, and a row of buttons did not
extend more than halfway down the front of the shirt. Small
china, glass, shell, mother of pearl, bone or wood buttons were used. Plastic or oversize
wooden buttons are not proper, and should be replaced with more authentic ones.
Recommended Suppliers:
-The Sutler of Fort Scott
-C & D Jarnigan
-Nick Sekela
-Wambaugh, White and Company
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
Average Cost: $35-$100
Socks
Socks can be made of wool or cotton. They can be just about any period color or
combination of colors (i.e. gray, blue, green and/or black). Modern rag wool
hunting/ribbed socks are acceptable when first starting or for parades, but hand-knit wool
socks are preferred in the field. Socks should be knit conforming to 1860s patterns, which
include narrow ribbing (1” or less) at the top of the sock. High-quality cotton socks made
on period machines are also available. Modern cotton and wool socks with elastic cuffs
are not acceptable.
Recommended Suppliers:
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-Wambaugh, White and Company
-Sutler of Fort Scott
-South Union Mills
Average Cost(Wool): $30-$65
Average Cost (Cotton): $9-$15
Footwear
Bootees, or Brogans were made on left and
right lasts from waxed, flesh-side (rough-side)
out leather. The soles were pegged or sewn
using hand and machine stitching. The majority
of shoes contracted by the US Government in
the East had sewn soles. Heel-plates are
optional, but recommended for better wear
when walking on hard surfaces. Be advised that
heel plates greatly reduce your traction on smooth surfaces. Black leather/rawhide laces
are proper to the period. The generic Jefferson Bootee will be the desired pattern of the
124th.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Robert Land
-Missouri Boot & Shoe
-Mattimore Harness Co.
Average Cost: $90-$185
9
Optional Uniform Items
-Drawers
-Great Coat
-Dress Coat/Frock Coat
-New York State Coat
-Kepi
-Vests
Drawers
Federal issue drawers were made primarily out of Canton
flannel, though wool knit, cotton flannel and wool flannel
were also used. Most closed with two tin buttons. There is
no known correct pattern for issue knit drawers, but several
best estimates exist.
Correct pattern civilian drawers are also available and
acceptable. Some drawers of the period were made from
colored fabric, but white or natural fabric was the most
common. The use of drawers reduces itching and chafing
caused by uniform pants.
Recommended Suppliers:
- Wambaugh, White and Company
- CJ Daley Historic Reproductions
-Nick Sekela
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-Army Drawers by Michael Dec
Average Cost: $35-$90
Dress Coat/Frock Coat
Dress or Frock Coat had a nine-button front, two-button
functional cuff, brown or black polished cotton interior,
white cotton lining for sleeves, and two small pockets in
the skirt that extended mid way between the hip and the
knee. They were trimmed with sky blue worsted wool
cord or wool welt. They were issued with raw bottoms
and they came in the same sizes as the sack coats.
At Camp Wickham in Goshen, the 124th was
issued frock coats along with a sack coat. There is
abundant photographic evidence of enlisted men wearing
frock coats up to the end of the war.
Authentic frock coats have always been in scarce
supply and high demand. Pattern, cloth and construction
of this item are time consuming and expensive endeavors,
and an authentic coat can cost anywhere from $300 to $600. Use extreme care when
selecting these coats, as many are made with incorrect material and crude workmanship.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Nick Sekela
-C&D Jarnigan
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-EJ Thomas Mercantile
Average Cost: $175-$600
10
Greatcoats
Constructed of sky-blue kersey with a diagonal weave, overcoats
were single-breasted with a five-button front, a six-button cape
ending at the elbow and a standing collar. Coats were lined with
heavy cotton, jean cloth or wool, with an unfinished bottom and a
single button adjustable strap in the back. Sleeves should also be
lined with off-white muslin. Coats were issued in the same sizes
as the sack coat.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Wambaugh, White and Company
-Nick Sekela
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-C&D Jarnagin - makes a good quality greatcoat, though
a few adjustments should be made to improve its
authenticity.
-Chris Sullivan (Stony Brook)Average Cost: $325-$425
New York State Coat
The New York State Coat was adopted in April 1861, as a
replacement for the Frock Coat. It was a short close-fitting shell
jacket consisting of a six piece body and tube-style sleeves of
dark blue wool. The jackets fastened with eight large ‘Excelsior’
buttons, and most were half-lined in the breast with brown
polished cotton stiffened with burlap. Some contractors also
added an angled external br east "slash" pocket.
The jacket had a short standing collar fastened with a hook- andeye and was piped in either light or medium blue cording. The
sleeves were double stitched about the cuff and lined with white
muslin. Though non- functional, two small ‘Excelsior’ buttons
were sewn on the cuff as a purely decorative device. Shoulder
straps (to hold the cartridge box sling and other equipment straps secure) were similarly
piped, as was a left-side belt keeper. These features were fastened with small ‘Excelsior’
buttons.
Henry Howell purchased one of these coats in the January of 1863 for $5.00. Because
the jacket is listed specifically as a New York State Jacket on his invoice, only the eight
button front is acceptable in the ranks of the 124th.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Kelly, Miles, & Company
Average Cost: $325
11
Kepis
There is evidence Kepi's were worn by members of the 124th.
Kepi’s feature a bound leather bill and a chin strap, both hand
enameled. The crown should sink into the cap and should be
significantly shorter than the forage cap. Kepis should be lined
in black silk or black polished cotton and feature a quilted top.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Nick Sekela
-Dirty Billy – It is recommended that you buy and try
on any hat or cap person either in his store in
Gettysburg or at an event he attends
Average Cost: $90-$125
Vests
Vests were not issued by the government and were privately
procured. The average soldier did not wear one, though some
found they provided extra warmth during the cooler months. A
variety of fabrics were used on the front of the vest, including
many colors of wool or embroidered fabric. Vests commonly
had a raised or shawl collar, and closed with a variety of buttons
(military cuff buttons, coin buttons or glass). The back of the
vest was most often polished cotton or muslin, and the rear tiestraps were secured with a two-pronged metal buckle.
Recommended Suppliers:
-CJ Daley Historic Reproductions
--Nick Sekela
-Bonnie Whitebread
Average Cost: $75-$125
12
Required Accoutrements
-Canteen
-Haversack
-Issue Blanket
-Rubber Blanket/Ground Cloth
-Knapsack
-Shelter half
Model 1858 or M1862 “Smooth-Side” Canteen
The M1858 “Smooth-Side” canteen is the preferred
style for the 124th NY. Originally, the 124th NYSV
was supplied with canteens from the New York
Depot. New York Depot Canteens were made with
two smooth halves soldered together on fixed seam.
The M1858 featured a 5/8” brown russet leather
sling that closed with a japanned tin buckle. The
cork attached to the canteen by means of a stamped
steel chain. By 1862 the government contractors
were producing canteens with cotton or linen slings
because of their inexpensive cost. Also, cotton cord
replaced the steel chain attaching the stopper. A
M1862 canteen should contain a machine sewn, ¾-1” cotton/linen sling and a stopper
attached with cotton chord or natural fiber string.
Both model canteens had a pewter spout and cork stopper, and were covered with
kersey, jean cloth, or blanket material. These coverings were most often brown or gray,
with a smattering of dark blue covers produced in early 1861. Brown wool or grey jean
cloth is preferred.
Original canteens were made from hot-dipped tin. If properly drained and airdried after each event a tin canteen will not rust. Some members use stainless steel
canteens, but the stainless steel canteen must be concealed with a proper wool cover to
hide this anachronism. As well, stainless steel canteens are heavier and hold less water
than the authentic versions.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Wambaugh, White, & Company
-Axel Ulrich
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
Average Cost: $40-$85
Haversacks
Federal haversacks were machine-sewn with flat-felled seams
and painted black with a linseed oil-based paint that slightly
seeps through the cloth. A removable cotton or linen inner bag
with two or three hand-sewn buttonholes is included to keep
foods separate and allow limited washing of the inside of the
bag. The haversack should have a sewn black leather strap
secured with a japanned metal (black lacquer) roller buckle to
close its main flap.
Recommended Suppliers:
-L.D Haning (Tim Welch)
- Leder Arsenal (Jan Berger)
-E.J. Thomas Mercantile
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
13
Average Cost: $55-$75
Issue Blanket
Federal blankets weighed just under 6 lbs and were
constructed of heavy woven wool cloth with
unhemmed edges. Blankets had two broad dark
stripes near each end running parallel to the short
sides of the blanket. Federal blankets have been
incorrectly divided into “Emergency Issue” and
“Standard Issue” based on color. The term
Emergency Issue refers to blankets procured in the early months of
the War that came in variety of sizes, colors and quality. After this
emergency period, regulation blankets were issued in brown, gray,
and a variety of shades in between. Most blankets had bits of shoddy (remnant wool of
various colors) woven into the fabric. The initials "US" were stitched into the blankets to
discourage theft, but this practice was not universally observed. The initials are therefore
optional.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Regimental Quartermaster (Emergency Blanket Only)
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-Nick Sekela
Average Cost: $95-$155
Rubberized Blanket/Poncho
Though the 124th was never issued rubberized
blankets, or ground cloths on a regimental level,
certain companies did have small issues of rubber
blankets. They were also available for sale by
sutlers and were in great demand by the troops.
Both William and Henry Howell wrote home
constantly requesting their parents to send them a
rubberized blanket. The ground cloth was made of
vulcanized rubber cloth with small brass grommets
approximately 5/8" in diameter along the outer
edges. Large grommets and shiny vinyl finishes
should be avoided. While the poncho was exclusively distributed to the cavalry during
the early war, by 1864 the poncho was issued to all troops. Though the rubberized
blanket is preferred, either is permitted
Recommended Suppliers:
-Nick Sekela
-C&D Jarnagin
- Leder Arsenal (Jan Berger)
Average Cost: $75-$100
14
Painted Ground Cloths
An alternative to the rubberized blanket is a painted ground cloth. Made mainly for
civilian use prior to the war, government contactors soon began producing them for
military use. Measuring roughly the dimensions of a blanket, 74”x 48”, ground cloths
were painted with a combination of linseed oil and mineral spirits; the same mixture used
to waterproof knapsacks and haversacks. They should contain eight small 5/8”
grommets.
Recommended Supplier:
-124th Member Jim Meaney
Average Cost: $25-$65
Knapsacks
The 1855 double bag knapsack was a standard
Federal item. Knapsacks were constructed of linen or
cotton canvas painted with a linseed oil-based paint
to waterproof them. They were relatively small, with
the main bag being closed with four flaps and two
buckles and the other "envelope-type" bag being
closed with two rawhide or cloth tape ties. Straps
should be short and made with black medium weight
leather. All cloth parts should be painted with black
boiled linseed oil based paint. When knapsack
becomes worn it may be retouched with a 50/50
mixture of black oil based paint and boiled linseed oil.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Missouri Boot & Shoe
-Nick Sekela
-C&D Jarnagin
Average Cost: $125-$200
Shelter half
The average soldier
carried one shelter half,
regardless of rank or
special circumstances.
This half should be of a
known Civil War pattern,
such as H. S. McComb of
Wilmington, DE, Joseph
Lee of NY, NY, or J.T.
Martin. They should
consist of two or three
panels, contain bone(all periods) or tin(late war) buttons, have hand-sewn buttonholes
and hand-sewn grommets. Shelter halves were buttoned together to form a two-man
shelter tent during inclement weather. In clear weather they were used as an extra top
blanket or used as a sun screen.
Recommended Suppliers:
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-Blockade Runner
-124th Member Sean Otis
Average Cost: $59-$95
15
Ordnance Supplies
Required Leather Accouterments
-Cartridge Box
-Cartridge Box Sling
- Waist Belt
-Cap Box
-Bayonet Scabbard
As a general rule, leathers were constructed of smooth-side out leather of sturdy quality
with tight stitching sewn with pitch covered flax thread. While leathers should be
somewhat shiny, high-gloss patent leather should be avoided.
Contractor marks on leathers are optional. If you chose to have them, C.S. Storms is one
recommended maker mark. The C.S. Storms factory was located near the South Street
Seaport in NYC and the factory produced many equipment sets for the Federal Army. In
May 1862 Storms contracted for 4,000 sets of infantry equipment, and had a further
contract for 15,000 .58 cal. He also had a NY state contract on June 30th 1863 for 2,000
accouterment sets. Between July 8th & Sept. 8th 1863, there were contracts for 8,000
additional accouterment sets. From Jan- May 1865, he had contracts for 11,500 cap
pouches, 5,000 gun slings.
Source: American Military Goods Dealers and Makers 1785-1915" by Bazelon and McGuinn
Duvall Leather Works offers possibly the most accurately recreated leather
accoutrements on the market. He offers a complete set of Federal accoutrements for
$390
Model 1861 .58 cal Cartridge Box
On September 8th 1862 the 124th drew
ordnance supplies from the NY Military Depot in
NYC. On that day they were issued .69 caliber
cartridge boxes to accompany their .69 caliber
Vincennes Muskets. On January 10th 1863 the
124th NYSV traded in their .69 caliber smoothbore
muskets and were issued the 1853 pattern British
Enfield rifled-musket. According to the Ordnance
supply report for 1863 the 124th changed their
muskets and accoutrements. Therefore, the 1861
.58 caliber expanding ball cartridge box is the
proper cartridge box for the 124th.
For safety reasons, the cartridge box must have tins to prevent accidental ignition. The
“US” cartridge box plate helps the flap to fall back over the cartridge box tins and protect
the cartridges from sparks. It should be attached to the box flap by punching two holes in
the flap and securing the plate with a piece of leather shoelace. SNY state plates are
prohibited.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Duvall Custom Leatherwork
-E.J. Thomas Mercantile
-M.B. Young & Co.
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-L.D. Haning (Tim Welch)
Average Cost: $150-$225
Cartridge Box Belt
The standard black waxed leather sling is required. The sling
may be stamped with maker’s marks if desired (i.e. C.S.
Storms, Sproulls Meeker & Co.). The cartridge box sling
should contain an “Eagle” breast plate and should be attached
by punching two holes in the sling and securing the plate with
a piece of leather shoelace.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Duvall Custom Leatherwork
-E.J. Thomas Mercantile
-Dell's Leather Works
-M.B. Young & Co.
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-L.D.Haning (Tim Welch)
-Missouri Shoe and Boot
Average Cost: $35
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Model 1851 Waist Belt
Regulations specified that the waist belt should be constructed of bridle or waxed flesh
leather, 1 7/8” to 2" wide and 42" in length from buckle to keeper. Belts up until the end
of 1863 were issued with a leather keeper and contained a belt plate with “puppy dog”
fasteners. During the last two years of the Civil War, The Model 1864 waist belt was
issued. These had a brass keeper on one end and were worn with a U.S. belt plate with
“arrowhead” fasteners in back on the other end. The use of SNY plates is prohibited.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Duvall Custom Leatherwork
-E.J. Thomas Mercantile
-Dell's Leather Works
-M.B. Young & Co.
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
Average Cost: $50-$65
Cap Boxes
The US “shield front” cap pouch is the preferred cap box. It should
be made of strong leather so it does not easily collapse and contain a
pick loop, nipple pick and fleece.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Duvall Custom Leatherwork
-E.J. Thomas Mercantile
-Dell's Leather Works
-M.B. Young & Co.
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-L.D. Haning (Tim Welch)
-Missouri Shoe and Boot
Average Cost: $65
Bayonet Scabbards
The two- rivet bayonet scabbard for the Model 1855
bayonet is preferred. This bayonet scabbard is
constructed out of smooth-side out leather, with handstitching and secured with two rivets. The seven-rivet
scabbard is also appropriate, it contains all the same
features but is secured by seven-rivets instead of two.
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Recommended Suppliers:
-Duvall Custom Leatherwork
-E.J. Thomas Mercantile
-M.B.Young & Co.
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
Average Cost: $65-$95
Weapons and Accessories
An appropriate weapon is the single largest expense a reenactor will make for their
chosen impression. A new reproduction musket and bayonet with appropriate
modifications or defarbing will cost over $800. Original muskets and bayonets are still
available and can cost anywhere from $1200 to over $5000. The information provided in
this section is meant to be a guide. New members should take considerable time to do
their own research, ask questions and talk to veterans before they make any musket or
bayonet purchase.
Model 1853 Enfield, .577 caliber Rifled-Musket
The Model 1853 Enfield rifled-musket was issued to the 124th NY on January 10th 1863
while in winter camp at Falmouth, Va. There is no documented evidence that exists as
to the model of Enfield that was actually issued to the 124th. However, two original
musket that saw service in the ranks, one belonging to Pvt. Henry Howell & the other
Cpl. David Kidd, are both Tower Model Enfields, marked 1861(Howell’s) &
1862(Kidd’s) on the lock plate.
It has been long debated whether or not Enfield’s were issued to union troops
blued or not during the civil war. Pvt. James Haggerty of Co. E is pictured with a blued
Enfield and therefore we encourage all members to purchase a blued Enfield Musket.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Loyalist Arms
-John Zimmerman (defarbed)
-Lodgewood Mfg.
Average Cost: $500-$700
Model 1861 US Percussion Musket, .58 caliber Rifled-Musket
The Model 1861 US Percussion Musket or “Springfield” (.58 cal rifled musket) was a
battlefield pickup for the 124th NY. It was never actually issued to the Regiment, though
on May 8, 1862 right after the battle of Chancellorsville, Henry Howell wrote in his diary
“…about one third of the regiment has Springfield guns which they picked up on the
battlefield. They are better than the Enfields and easier to keep in shooting order.”
The Model 1861 US Percussion Musket was contracted for production specifically with
the Springfield Arsenal in Springfield, Mass. To meet the demands of the war, the
arsenal contracted the design out to twenty different contractors throughout the war. The
124th will not mandate a specific manufacturer for the US Percussion Musket. Members
should take into consideration that the Springfield arsenal produced more US muskets
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(265,000) than any other contractor during the war. There is also photographic evidence
that the Colt contract version of the US musket saw use in the ranks of the 124th.
Recommended Suppliers:
-The Blockade Runner (defarbed)
-Loyalist Arms
-John Zimmerman (defarbed)
Average Cost: $400-$600
Average Cost Defarbed: $550-$800
Model 1855 Bayonet
The Model 1853 Enfield and 1861 US Percussion rifledmuskets were designed to utilize the Model 1855
Bayonet. The Model 1855 Bayonet is a socket-type
bayonet with a locking ring and a blade 18 inches long.
The key feature of this model is that the blade blends
smoothly onto the neck of the bayonet. British
manufactured bayonets feature a lip where the bayonet
meets the shank (this style of bayonet should be avoided).
It is best to purchase your bayonet with your musket to
ensure they match and fit. Original bayonets can be
purchased for a price slightly higher than reproductions. Originals are made of better
quality steel and can be found in very good condition.
Recommended Suppliers:
-The Horse Soldier - Original Bayonets
-College Hill Arsenal - Original Bayonets
-John Zimmerman - Reproduction Bayonets
-Blockade Runner - Reproduction Bayonets
Average Cost - Reproduction: $40
Average Cost – Original: $125
“Defarbing” your musket and bayonet
Reproduction muskets and bayonets come with a variety of modern markings on them
and often have anachronistic errors due to their modern manufacture. Fortunately there
are a number of companies that will correct or remove these anachronisms and put period
appropriate markings on them. This process is called "Defarbing" and often requires a
skilled and knowledgeable gunsmith. As a general rule, the following guide should be
used when having your musket defarbed.
Enfield – Tower Model Enfield Defarb.
1. All Modern markings removed
a. Lock plate reading “Tower” over top of the date, either 1860-1862
b. 1860's proof marks added to barrel (Provisional, gauge mark, view mark
& definitive proof).
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2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
c. Modern serial number moved and placed under the barrel
d. Ramrod stamped with maker
Stock Striped, Shaved, oiled with linseed oil, and stamped with appropriate
makers mark
Modern hot bluing stripped and replaced with cold bluing(James Haggerty of Co.
E’s musket is clearly blued in his photo)
Tip weld added to Barrel Band Screws
Replace round-eared screw escutcheons with square-eared ones
Replace rounded lockplate screws with flat one.
Correct sling loops installed
Springfield – Springfield Armory Defarb
1. All Modern markings removed
a. Lock plate marked with Springfield Arsenal Stamp, spread eagle, and
dated 1861-63
b. Government proof marks( “V” over “P”, and the eagles head), inspectors
stamps, and date added to barrel
c. Modern serial number moved and placed under the barrel
2. Stock Striped, Shaved, oiled with linseed oil, and stamped with appropriate
makers mark & inspectors mark
*The US Percussion Musket can be defarbed to reflect any of the various contractors
who produced the US Percussion Musket during the War. Each contractor has
different markings associated with their model and hence additional research must be
completed before proceeding with a contractor defarb. An excellent article
pertaining to defarbing US Muskets is “The US Model Rifle- Musket” by Jeff Henion
and can be found in the Columbia Rifles Research Compendium Ed. II.
Bayonet – US Model 1855 Bayonet
1. Remove all modern markings. Stamp the flat of the blade with “U·S”. A dot
should appear between the U and S.
Musket Cleaning Kit
Black powder leaves a heavy residue when fired, and requires immediate cleaning to
prevent corrosion. Period implements (musket worm/wiper) should be used in the field
and modern implements (cleaning rod, cleaning jag, brass brush and bore scrapper) once
the event is over. As a minimum, each soldier should have a nipple wrench and
worm/wiper, and cleaning patches in his cartridge box; and a nipple pick in his cap
pouch. Each soldier should also carry some oil in an appropriate container, either olive
oil or mineral oil are period correct. Emery cloth or a mixture of fire pit ash and vinegar
should be used for light rust removal.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Regimental Quartermaster
-S&S Firearms (original parts)
-S&S Sutler of Gettysburg
-
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Cartridges
Federal issue cartridges were made of natural colored paper
and were enclosed at the end with a piece of linen thread.
Cartridge paper was either unbleached or light brown and
resembled modern day masking paper in weight. Civil War
paper was acid-free and has not discolored over time, and
therefore existing original cartridges are good indicators of
how original cartridges appeared. Once rolled, cartridges
were packed at the arsenals into bundles of ten, wrapped
with coated paper to make them water-resistant and bound
with string. An eleventh paper tube containing twelve caps
was included in each bundle. Since most of us lack the time
to hand roll cartridges per the originals (much less bundle
them), a good deal of latitude exists in this area. While
instructions for assembling cartridges are located on the web, most members find prerolled cartridge tubes to be the best option. Cartridge bottoms should be either folded or
tied. For safety reasons, tubes shall never be closed with tape or staples.
.58 cal rounds will contain no more than 70 grains of black powder. No Pyrodex or
smokeless powder should be used. Cartridges shall not be carried loose in the cartridge
box – proper tins are required.
Recommended supplier
-124th Members Ryan McIntyre & Sean Otis – Pre rolled tubes or Packaged rounds
Average Cost: $7 per package of 10 rolled rounds
$10 – Per package of 40 tubes with tied bottoms
$14 – Per Package of 100 tubes with folded
Percussion Caps
The period rifled-muskets used a percussion cap
ignition system. Percussion caps are small formed brass
tubes, lined with fulminate of mercury. When placed
over the cone or nipple of a musket and struck by the
hammer, a short, hot flame was produced capable of
setting off a powder charge. An eleventh cartridge tube
with twelve caps was included in each package of 10
Cartridges.
Most caps are made of brass and have four wings around the cap. Enough caps should be
brought to both fire rounds and clear the barrel during safety inspections.
Caps are available through the 124th NY. Member Bob Slaughter is in charge of the
distribution of Caps and Black Powder.
Average Cost: $7 per 100
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Camp Necessities
Food and Cooking Items
Food preparation by the soldier varied depending on the circumstances he found himself
in. While in stationary camp he had the luxury of company cooks and a variety of cook
pots and utensils. While on the march each soldier was responsible for carrying his own
cookware or his part of his mess’s cookware, and he lightened his load considerably.
Members should acquire personal cooking items, since heavier equipment is the concern
of the quartermaster.
-Canteen half/ Mess plate
-Utensils
-Cup/Dipper
-Boiler
-Frying Pan
-Hardtack
-Salt Pork
-Coffee
Canteen Half / Mess Plate
Original soldiers were issued a tin plate for their meals that saw service in a variety of
functions. The 124th NY was issued a stamped tin plate upon enlistment and appeared to
have held on to them. Pvt. Henry Howell writes in his diary on May 3rd that the ball that
struck him, slightly wounding him “had a tin plate to pass through”. Many soldiers,
however, found the plate cumbersome, and used a canteen half as a plate instead. Canteen
halves were versatile and could be used as a plate, a frying pan, or a cover to a coffee
boiler. The plate or canteen half was carried in the haversack or knapsack. It is improper
to carry the canteen half strapped to your canteen.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Wendy Osman
-Village Tinsmith
-Most Sutlers carry correct canteen halves
Utensils
A variety of utensils were available to the U.S. soldier. Some were constructed entirely of
metal, while others had wooden handles. Forks most often had three sharp tines, while
knives were broad and flat with a rounded end. Some soldiers did without spoons entirely
and scooped food with the flat of their knife instead. The Quarterly Statement of Issued
Clothing for the 124th NY states that on September 7, 1862, the 124th was issued forks,
knives, and spoons. Being that the issue report states individual utensils were issued,
combination utensils are discouraged until period evidence is discovered to state
otherwise.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Available at most sutlers – ornate utensils are discouraged.
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Cup/Dipper
Soldiers were issued a large tin cup also known as a
‘dipper’. These were used to drink water, prepare
coffee, etc. Cups came in a variety of width and heights,
and nearly any size is acceptable. Some find a smaller
cup easier to store in the haversack, while others prefer
the carrying capacity of a larger cup. John E. Kidd of
company D carried a cup comparable to the large 20oz
cups available today.
Cups should feel sturdy and feature a handle that is
wired to the top of the cup and riveted and soldered to
the side of the cup. The handle and lip of the cup should feature rolled edges and the
bottom of the cup should be smooth. Cups with bottoms that look like modern cans are
unacceptable.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Dixie Tinworks
-Orchard Hill Sutlery
-Village Tinsmith
-Axel Ulrich
Boiler
Soldiers who wanted a vessel larger than their tin cups often took a tin
can and added a piece of bailing wire as a handle. These boilers are much
easier to work with and preferred by some members.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Village Tinsmith
-Axel Ulrich
Frying Pan
Frying pans were useful items for cooking the meat ration. Some soldiers used a canteen
half and a stick, while others would pool their money and purchase a sheet metal frying
pan to be used by three or four of them. Cast iron is too heavy, so stick with a sheet metal
pan. These can often be found at antique stores or at certain sutlers.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Village Tinsmith (think they are retired)
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Hardtack
Hardtack crackers were one of the primary staples
issued as rations to the Union Army. Flour (cracker
meal) and water were mixed together, formed into
squares and baked until all water was removed from the
bread. A soldier was issued 10 crackers a day when on
campaign.
Make Your Own Using the Following Recipe:
Yields 10-12 - 3”x 3” Crackers
3 c. All Purpose Flour
1c. Cake/Pastry Flour
1 tsp. Kosher Salt
1-2 c. Water (or enough to form dough)
The ratio of all purpose flour to cake flour will provide you with a more accurate
consistency to the “cracker” flour government bake houses used during the period.
Combine Flour in a mixing bowl. Add salt to 1 cup of water and dissolve. Add water to
the flour mixing by hand. Continue to add water just until the dough comes together.
The dough should not be sticky. Roll out with a rolling pin to ½” Diameter. Cut into 3”x
3” squares. Assemble on a baking sheet. Before going into the oven take a chopstick and
make 4 vertical rows of 4 equally spaced horizontal dots in the top of the cracker. Bake
on the middle rack in a 375 degree oven for 45mins-1 hour, or until the crackers are stiff
and very lightly browned. Turn off the oven and allow the crackers to sit in the oven
until it is completely cooled. Package the crackers in a poke sack or breathable
container. If stored in plastic the crackers will mold if there is any moisture left in them.
Recommended Suppliers:
-G. H. Bent & Co
Average Cost: $10
Salt Pork/Dry Cured Bacon
Salt Pork or Salt Junk as the soldiers called it, was one of the primary meats issued as
rations to the Union Army. It consisted of cuts of pork cured and shipped in a brine
solution. It is not available commercially in this day and age. Luckily some brave
members have taken it upon themselves to learn the process of recreating salt pork. See
Jim Meaney or Ryan McIntyre if you’d like to acquire some.
A common substitute used by reenactors is dry cured bacon. It keeps well during
a weekend and is equally acceptable for frying at breakfast or boiling for dinner. You will
not be able to find it at many grocery stores; however there are many suppliers via the
internet that are available.
Recommended Suppliers:
-Adams Fair-Acre Farms – Slab Bacon
Local Butcher Shops – Slab Bacon
Scotts Country Hams – Slab Bacon
-124th Member Jim Meaney – Salt Pork
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Coffee
Coffee was the third staple issued as a ration to the Union Army. Soldiers revered and
coveted their coffee ration above all others for its qualities to revive their spirit and warm
their bones. It was issued as raw beans, roasted beans and ground. One variety today that
uses the same processes as in the past is Eight O'clock Coffee that is available at most
grocery stores as whole roasted beans or ground. Modern coffee is often ground much
finer than period coffee would have been. It is best to grind your own beans either in a
period hand grinder or coarsely in a modern grinder.
Personal Items
Personal items should be purchased with an eye for authenticity and are best purchased
with the guidance of a more experienced member. Categories of items are as follows.
Hygiene: toothbrush (bone/wood with natural bristles), comb (bone, wood, or vulcanized
rubber), shaving equipment (Strait Razor with bone or vulcanized rubber handle), hand
mirror (small and unadorned), soap container (small sewn pouch), handkerchiefs and
hand towel (plain fabric, huck towel material works great!), talcum powder (in a small tin
or pouch) is suggested to prevent chafing.
Uniform care: Housewives (small roll-up kits with needles, thread, and buttons were very
common)
Wallets: of the period were either fancy leather billfolds or simple cloth pouches that
closed with a button. Either is acceptable. Dell’s Leather Works is a good source for
leather wallets. Ask Capt. McIntyre for your monthly pay.
Illumination: Candles and matches were issued in camp, but seldom used or need in the
field. Between campfires and moonlight, most people could get around without a light
source. Heavy wooden lanterns were only used in permanent camp, though a few metal
lanterns saw limited service. Lanterns should be avoided in the company street.
Correspondence: Soldiers often carried writing implements, envelopes, paper, stamps and
even diaries. Period newspapers are another excellent item to have in your knapsack.
Excellent reproductions are available from Ryan McIntyre
Watches: Civil War era watches were key wound and relatively expensive. It would be
rare for a private to wear one in camp, much less the field. If carried, watch chains
should conform to period styles. The only known photo of a 124th enlisted man with a
pocket watch is of Oscar Weymar of Co. D an 1864 enlistee.
Tobacco: Tobacco use was generally limited to pipes or cigars. Cigarettes were a novelty
and typically smoked only by high society gentlemen and women. If you do smoke
cigarettes, keep them concealed. Corn cob pipes are not period correct and are
unacceptable.
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The 124th NYSV Sutler List
Below are the approved vendors for the 124th NY. In addition to the list below, the
124th fully approves all goods made by the approved vendors of the Authentic
Campaigner Website
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Army Drawers by Michael Dec
1219 Elkview Drive, Clifford Township, PA 18421
A great source for accurate drawers and shirts.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Axel Ulrich Tinware
The best source for cups, plates, and canteens.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Blockade Runner
931-389-6294
An excellent source of canteens, rag wool socks, and defarbed muskets
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------C & D Jarnigan
(662) 287-4977
Jarnigan has always been a quality supplier. They have a reputation for taking their time.
My advice to you is; if it’s not it stock then go somewhere else.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Chris Sullivan
1-315-343-1557
Chris Sullivan makes some of the finest reproduction trousers on the market. He is
reasonably priced. He produces two different patterns of trousers in both museum and
commercial grades. For about $10 more than most sutlers you can buy a much nicer,
more authentic pair of trousers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------C.J. Daley
1-301-766-7112
C. J. Daley offers a wide array of items. He is currently offering his products on an InStock Only basis.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------College Hill Arsenal
Purveyors of civil war relics, great source for original bayonets
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Dell’s Leather Works
1-845-339-4916
An excellent provider of leather goods, especially canteen and musket slings
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Dirty Billy’s Hats
1-717-334-3200
Dirty Billy is a great source for civilian as well as military hats. It is best to buy from him
either at an event or in his retail store in Gettysburg. He makes one of the best
reproduction forage caps on the market.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------E.J. Thomas Mercantile
(215) 500-1979
Excellent source for uniforms and accoutrements
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Ezra Barnhouse Goods
[email protected]
Offers everything from tinware to personal items.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------GH Bent Cookie Company
Still making the same hardtack they did 150 year ago!
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Joe Hill Haversacks
[email protected]
One of the finest reproduction haversacks on the market
------------------------------------------------------------------------------John Wedeward
608-873-8503
Producer of very authentic sack coats
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------John Zimmerman Master Gunsmith
304-535-2558
One of the cheaper sources to have your musket defarbed. He does also from time to
time offer muskets for sale.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Kelly, Miles & Company
[email protected]
Producers of high quality uniforms and accoutrements. Inquire what is in stock or expect
a long wait
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------L.D. Haning & Co.
(614) 837-5475
Maker of fine leather products & painted goods
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Loyalist Arms
1 (902) 479-0967
A Canadian company that specializes in historic weaponry
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Mattimore Harness Co.
[email protected]
Quality brogans
M.B. Young and Co. Leather
(360) 241-0955
A fine source for leather accoutrements.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Missouri Boot & Shoe Company
1-417-451-6100
One of the best makers of authentic footwear. They also specialize in tarred
accoutrements. This is one of the few sutlers that make’s the New York State style
brogan.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Nick J. Sekela
One of the best sutlers on the market today. His products show and incredible attention
to detail and historical accuracy.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Robert Land Historic Shoes
Robert Land makes the finest shoes and boots on the market today. Take into account
that there may be a wait involved in purchasing shoes from him.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------S & S Firearms
1-718-497-1100
A Supplier of original parts for various civil war era muskets
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------S & S Sutler
1-717-338-1990
An excellent source of everyday soldier’s items as well as uniforms and accoutrements
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Scotts Country Hams
1-800-318-1353
Excellent source of dried meats and slab bacon
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------South Union Mills
615-788-1510
Source for authentic coverlets, blankets, hand knit woolen goods, and straw hats.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------The Blockade Runner
A good source for a variety of items.
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-------------------------------------------------------------------------------TP&H Trading Co.
1-610-2-0327
Tim Bender is one of the finest makers of civilian and military style hats.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Village Tin Smith
1-336-468-1190
One of the best resources for tin ware, very reasonably priced
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Wambaugh, White and Company
517-303-3609
An excellent supplier of uniforms and goods. They are also and excellent place to
purchase correct fabric.
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