July 2011

Transcription

July 2011
QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND
EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE
E-NEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Welcome...
Welcome to the July 2011 issue of the Queensland Social and
Emotional Well Being (SEWB) Workforce E-Newsletter.
This E-newsletter follows the successful 2011 SEWB
Workforce State Gathering and Regional Forums recently held
at Palm Cove in May 2011. Feedback from delegates was very
positive and reflected the efforts made by the QAIHC team in
organising the event.
As well as an article on the 2011 State Gathering, this edition
of the E-Newsletter includes stories on the Cherbourg
Dormitory Reunion, Bruce Adams’ inspiring journey, wet
season activities at Pormpuraaw, the Laura Dance Festival
and the Expression of Interest for the Regional Social and
Emotional Well Being Coordinator, Central & South West
Queensland.
Please send in stories about initiatives that are happening in
your communities for future E-Newsletters so we can share
and learn from each other.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
2011 Queensland SEWB Workforce
State Gathering
Palm Cove, Cairns
Novotel Rockford, Palm Cove was the Venue for the Queensland
SEWB Workforce State Gathering held on 3, 4 & 5 May 2011. The
theme of this years State Gathering was “Communication, Education,
and Inspiration”. Delegates from all of over the state from as far
west as Cunnamulla, north as Bamaga and south from Brisbane
all came together to share experiences and enjoy opportunities for
networking.
Representatives from SEWB Workforce Support Units in WA and
NT also attended. A pre-gathering BBQ was held in the evening of
the 3 May 2011 where delegates were welcomed with a wonderful
performance by the local Aboriginal dancers.
The State Gathering officially kicked off on 4 May 2011 with a
welcome by respected local Elder & Traditional Owner, Seith
Fourmile. A Keynote address by Dr Vicki Grieves on “Aboriginal
Spirituality: Aboriginal Philosophy” set the scene for the rest of the
day and provided an insight into “The Basis of Aboriginal Social and
Emotional Well Being”.
Successful SEWB initiatives were shared with presentations on the
Pormpuraaw Community Justice Rehabilitation Centre (Rowoor),
Cherbourg Dormitory Reunion, a moving personal story by Bruce
Adams and the ‘Walk with Me. Talk with Me” Suicide Awareness
DVD.
Yarning Circles for BTH & Link-Up Workers, Alcohol and Other Drugs
Workers and Mental Health Workers identified some of the key issues
these workers come across in their day to day activities back in their
communities, and what strategies they could put in place to address
these. Lots of robust communication resulted in some innovative
ways of working together to provide comprehensive services to our
communities.
Guest presenter, Ash Dargan ended the day with an inspiring,
spiritual and emotional presentation on the “Healing Our Way”
program which he developed to reduce the rates of re-offense by
Aboriginal males exiting the justice system in Tasmania.
Day 2 commenced with a Keynote Address from Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, Mr Mick Gooda.
Mick gave an informative and powerful talk on key issues that he
wants to address during his tenure in this role. These include Lateral
Violence & Constitutional reform to recognise Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people in the Australian Constitution. His presentation
was touching and well received.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
SEWB Workers featured again, sharing successful SEWB initiatives
Ash Dargan closed the Gathering with another moving, inspirational
within their local communities. These included presentations
presentation.
on “Traditional Cultural Healing” by Peter & Marilyn Wallace and
Uncle Ron Harrigan, “Voices United for Harmony” a community
Overall the feedback on the State Gathering was very positive. There
based singing initiative healing program, the “Link-Up Art Initiative”
was particular interest in the sharing of experiences and stories
and “Yundu Wawu Junkaji Janay” a Royal Flying Doctor Service
from workers in different regions. As always, the renewal of old and
community focussed program.
development of new friendships and networks was an important part
of the State Gathering.
A presentation on “Well Being in the Workplace” by Toni Mehigan
focussed on tips for self care and looking after yourself. How to
release/reduce your stress with the use of a laughing program
provided much fun and really value added to the day.
Participants at State Gathering 2011 - Palm Cove.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
MY STORY – Bruce Adams
Pic: Bruce Adams
The last twelve months has proven a big year for Bruce Adams
Growing up, he felt that to be a part of the crowd and to become a
after completing the client program at Stagpole Street Drug and
man, he had to join in the drinking. Bruce was offered opportunities
Rehabilitation Unit in (SSDARU) Townsville.
of work and training over the years, but these were rejected in favour
As a residential client at SSDARU, Bruce underwent intensive case
management and has achieved his goal of being sober and having
of his drinking habits. The result of his alcoholism was stints in and
out gaol for the last twenty five years.
a better lifestyle. On the 4 January 2010 Bruce made a decision
The last time Bruce was in gaol he attended some courses and
that after decades of alcohol abuse and a life of crime to satisfy his
was thinking of making a change. He decided not to go back to his
addiction, this life was not for him anymore.
community at Mornington Island because he knew he would get back
Bruce was born on Mornington Island forty three years ago and
started drinking at the age of fourteen. Before he was of legal
age to drink at the local canteen, he was already a heavy drinker.
His access to alcohol was mostly from older relations and other
community members. Bruce saw the alcoholism and violence in his
community and thought that this was accepted normal behaviour.
into the same pattern of life. He also realised there would be a lack
of services and support to help him change. When he was released
from prison in Townsville he ended up spending twelve months on
the streets drinking again. Bruce was tired of living on the streets
and felt it was time to make that change. He was aware of the
Stagpole Street Drug and Rehabilitation Unit and went there and was
accepted as a residential client on that day.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
MY STORY – Bruce Adams (cont’d)
Bruce felt safe and happy there, particularly knowing that he had
Bruce is undertaking further professional development by enrolling
made the first step to his sobriety. He decided to engage in the
in certificate training courses. Unfortunately the recent cyclone
programs and welcomed the support of the staff and in particular
Yasi prohibited Bruce from attending his first Indigenous Men’s
from his caseworker, Mervyn Prior.
Leadership Workshop in Canberra, although he’s looking forward to
After six months at the rehabilitation unit, Bruce was achieving his
the next one.
short term goals. He was then focusing toward his long term goals
Bruce was a guest presenter at the Queensland Social and
of having his own place to live and making a better life. Bruce was
Emotional Wellbeing Workforce State Gathering and Regional Forums
feeling confident and stronger and felt he was ready to undertake
to be held 3 – 6 May 2011 at the Rockford Novotel Palm Cove.
more responsibility for himself and life’s choices. His caseworker
The feedback Bruce received was overwhelmingly positive and
began helping him to look for his own place to live by making
particularly inspiring.
applications to real estates for a unit. As Bruce didn’t have a rental
history, he received at least six rejections from his applications.
Unexpectedly one day Mervyn was contacted from Townsville
Rentals to offer a unit for Bruce. They said that although he didn’t
About SSDARU
have a real estate history they were willing to give him a go. They
appreciated the efforts that Bruce had made and were confident of
Stagpole Street Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Unit (SSDARU) is
the follow up support that he would get from SSDARU.
a 30 bed residential rehabilitation service. The Service provides
For five months Bruce was happily settling in to his unit making it a
safe, happy and dry environment. Mervyn continued his support and
follow up to Bruce on his after care. Then another opportunity came
knocking when Tamra Bridges, the coordinator of SSDARU offered
Bruce a full time position at the rehab. Tamra explained that because
of the experiences that he had been through, the organisation felt
pathways for people suffering from substance misuse issues to
overcome their dysfunctional lifestyle through self empowerment and
establishing a sense of self and identity. Stagpole Street is an entity
of Congress Community Development and Education Unit which is an
Indigenous non government organisation governed by an Aboriginal
board of directors from throughout North Queensland and Cape York.
that he would be a valuable resource, both as a role model and an
Stagpole Street has a strong cultural under current to its program
additional asset to the staff. Bruce wholeheartedly agreed to take the
and provides therapeutic healing environment to help clients deal
position and to start in January 2011.
with a range of complex issues. The program is a holistic approach
Since then Bruce has been enjoying his job as a Community
Engagement Officer. At the rehab he is involved with men’s
business supporting the men in the program. He has been out in the
community talking to people living on the streets about the merits
which includes the following therapeutic components – social and
emotional wellbeing, health promotion and education, recreation and
diversionary activities, employment, education and training, life skills,
cultural empowerment.
of rehabilitation using his own life experience as an example. He’s
Stagpole Street receives referrals from throughout North Queensland
also a regular visitor talking to the youths at the Cleveland Youth
including Cape York and Far West and Central Queensland. Clients
Detention Centre. Bruce is also involved in the After Care Program
who complete the program and transition into the community stay on
for the rehab clients who have moved on from the Unit. These clients
average 6 months and are having ongoing support from the service
also look forward to the off site cultural activities. In his new role,
following their transition. Stagpole Street is fortunate to have a range
Bruce has also been a guest speaker to other community groups and
of staff with a wealth of knowledge that is committed, motivated and
networks.
passionate about working in the Indigenous drug and alcohol sector.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Cherbourg Dormitory Reunion
Article by Matthew Malone
Link-Up (Qld) was honoured to host the Cherbourg Dormitory
Reunion from 15 to 18 April 2011.
learn to move on and live their life’, but Matthew’s view is that this
is a simplistic ideal, and it often represents a denial of the reality of
most given situations. It has also been said that the time spent in the
Cherbourg Dormitory has left a gap and that this gap is a miserable
Link-Up (Qld) is aware of the impact of separation on individuals
existence of survival. For healing to happen it needs to be done
and the family unit and recognised that the Dormitory System
properly and appropriately and the Cherbourg Dormitory Reunion
was an instrument of this practice. The Cherbourg Dormitory
had scope for that.
system was established in the early 1900’s and played a big part in
institutionalising boys, girls and single mothers on Cherbourg and
from around the State.
We at Link-Up (Qld) would like to honour the fond memories that
people hold of their dormitory experiences and we would like to
acknowledge the pain and suffering inflicted as a result of their
Matthew Malone (Casework, Link-Up Qld) was the project co-
dormitory experience. In bringing people together for this reunion,
ordinator for this event, which holds a special place for him, due
we know that emotions would run high and old wounds re-open.
to his experiences as a child having spent some 6 years in the
Yes, there were moments of sadness and many people shed a tear,
system. Matthew’s vision for this project was to create a platform
but there was also a lot of laughter and some people’s light shone
for people to share their stories in a supportive environment, to shed
brightly throughout the gathering. Many of the participants took what
the negatives associated with such trauma and find ways to move
they could from this gathering, emotionally. For most of them it was
forward. This reunion provided opportunities for people to do just
the fond memories of each other and the security of knowing each
that and to share their experiences in a safe place where their voices
and every one was not alone in life or in their journey.
could be heard, unhindered. Most people would say ‘one should just
Participants enjoying themselves at one of the workshops
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Wet Season activities at Pormpuraaw
Article by Liz Pearson
The Alcohol and Drug Service (AODS) of the community controlled
Family Services, Pormpur Paanth Aboriginal Corporation (PPAC) in
Pormpuraaw western Cape York Peninsula organised wet season
activities that included “Healthy Babies are Our Future” Expo;
Activities included damper baking on hot coals, humpy making, art
and carving displays and spear making. Speeches were delivered
by the Mayor, Police, State School Principal, BTH Counsellor – Bev
Holroyd and Health Services including the Chairwoman Nazareth
Doolah of PPAC.
community actioned initiatives such as the March Against Violence
The three day event concluded with a Kup Murri, and historical
and Cultural Activities for National Sorry Day, 26 May.
photographic exhibition and film footage of Pormpuraaw from the
The AOD Service invited local and regional services like Link-Up,
Queensland State Library archives.
RAATSICC, ACYHC, RFDS, QH PHCC to celebrate, re-affirm and
share cultural knowledge and skills, storytelling, dance, art, and
practices highlighting the strengths of the community and the strong
bottom-up approach to addressing issues; being responsive to the
social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community
in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a
human being and raise awareness of the harmful effects drugs and
alcohol have to decreasing this.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
A Deadly Community Social & Emotional Well Being Event
Laura Dance Festival- Cape York Peninsula
A Celebration of Song, Dance, Story & Culture
Over 4,000 people camped on Country invited by the Traditional
Owners – Ang-Gnarra People to gather and celebrate the 19th Laura
Aboriginal Dance Festival from 17 – 19 June 2011. The Program
was jam packed from the ‘Welcome to Country” ceremony, to strong
3 year old performer from Lockhardt River.
cultural dance and musical performances, to having on hand 77 stall
holders to feed, inform and entertain all week-end.
This stellar event achieved what it set out to be and some more; and
once again the event has validated cultural identity, strengthened
optimism and vitality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
and communities which all contributes to improved social and
emotional well being.
– the old songs since time immemorial, the rhythm of the feet, the
dust on the bora ground – the little ones dancing with family, the
enthusiastic clapping and vibe in the air – kindred spirits – all one
mob – this is connection and reconnection – to each other – to
Country.
Since its inception the Laura Dance Festival has always been a
highly successful drug and alcohol free event. Local, Interstate and
International visitors have had the opportunity to appreciate the rich
diversity of culture, the story behind the dance, the acknowledgment
of the hard yakka and discipline that each dancer gives to the dance
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Dance Groups and Communities involved were
Kawanj, Injinoo, Pormpuraaw, Mossman, Kuranda,
Wujal Wujal, Hopevale, Lockhart River, Yarrabah,
Djarragun College, Wangetti, Shalom College,
Kowanyama, Yidinji, bmaga, Mapoon, Woorabinda, and
Whuntuna-Jabah and Manta Nganampa from South
Australia.
Sandi Taylor, the Regional Social and Emotional
Well Being Workforce Coordinator, for Far North
Queensland, had the opportunity to promote QAIHC
services at the Festival. This was done in partnership
with our member organization Apunipima Cape York
Health Council.
For more information please refer to the website:
www.lauradancefestival.com
Thank you to Kathi Gibson-Steffensen, Project Officer,
Community Development, Apunipima for these
amazing photos.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Recommended Websites for Social and Emotional Well Being
The following websites contain useful information on SEWB issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
1.
ACROSSnet. Australians Creating Rural Online Support Systems.
https:// www.acrossnet.net.au
2. AIPA. The Australian Indigenous Psychologists Association.
Publication (download PDF) ‘Living on the Edge”: Social & Emotional Well Being & Risks & Protective Factors for serious
psychological Distress among Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people.
http://www.indigenouspsychology.com.au
3. Australian Indigenous Health Info Net.
Report ‘A review of the social and emotional well being of Indigenous Australian people’ by Darren Garvey.
http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au
4. Australian Institute of Family Studies.
Includes AIFS Research, Major Research Projects, and Clearinghouses, in particular ‘Closing the Gap’ clearinghouse.
http://aifs.gov.au
5. AIHW – Australian Institute of Health & Welfare.
http://www.aihw.gov.au
6. Australian Policy Online.
http://www.apo.org.au
7. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, CAEPR.
‘Measures of Indigenous Well Being and their Determinants” presented by Doctor Nicholas Biddle.
http://caepr.anu.edu.au Lecture Series 2011.
8. Kulunga Research Network.
Toolkit – ‘Start Stronger, Live Longer Resource Manual Guide for Aboriginal Health Workers’
http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au
9. The Lowitja Institute.
CRAH Discussion Paper 9.2009 ‘Aboriginal Spirituality: Aboriginal Philosophy. The Basis of Aboriginal Social and Emotional
Well Being’ by Vicki Grieves.
http://www.lowitja.org.au
10. Department of Health, Western Australia.
Strong Spirit, Strong Mind Resources. (Drug & Alcohol Resources)
http:// www.health.wa.gov.au
11. Why Warriors Pty Ltd.
Provides cross cultural training and consultancy services. Established by Tim and Richard Trudgen. Publication – ‘Djambatj
Mala: Why Warriors lie down and die’
http://www.whywarriors.com.au
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Farewell Natalie
Natalie Chapman, the Social and Emotional Well Being Regional
dedication and inspiration over the past 12 months and wish her
Coordinator for Central and South West Queensland finished in her
well for the future.
role on 15 July 2011. We wish to thank Natalie for her enthusiasm,
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
QUEENSLAND ABORIGINAL AND ISLANDER HEALTH COUNCIL
Expression of Interest
REGIONAL SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING
WORKFORCE COORDINATOR
CENTRAL AND SOUTH WEST QUEENSLAND
Expressions of interest are called from interested and suitably
qualified individuals to apply for an exciting opportunity to join
QAIHC – Sector Development Unit in the role of Regional Social and
Emotional Well Being Workforce Coordinator – Central and South
West Queensland.
PURPOSE OF THIS POSITION:
The position of Regional Social and Emotional Well Being Workforce
Coordinator monitors and co-ordinates professional support and
training for OATSIH funded Bringing Them Home (BTH), Link Up,
Mental Health and Substance Use workers, collectively known as the
SEWB workforce.
LOCATION: Rockhampton
POSITION REPORTS TO: State Manager Workforce Development
APPLICATION:
•
A short response (maximum 1-2 pages) on how your
experience, abilities, knowledge and personal qualities would enable
you to achieve the key skill requirements.
•
Your current CV or resume, including referees. Referees
should have a thorough knowledge of your work performance and
conduct.
•
Email responses to: [email protected]
CLOSING DATE: Friday 12 August 2011
CONTACT PERSON:
Dion Tatow
Email: [email protected]
Robert Skeen
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (07) 3328 8500
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
QAIHC WSU staff help Aussie Diamonds win
World Netball Championships 2011
Lenny Dahlen, Dion Tatow and Aussie Diamond Caitlin Bassett with the World Netball Champions trophy.
What a lovely city and country Singapore is -it certainly made us feel
welcome. Dion Tatow – State Manager Workforce Development,
Lenny Dahlen – Regional SEWB Workforce Coordinator South East
Queensland and Caleb Meredith (Dion’s cousin) recently travelled
north of the equator to Singapore to witness the best of the best in
the wonderful world of international netball. 16 teams, lots of netball,
past & present international, club & social players mixed it with us on
the sidelines in support of our teams.
We were not only there to support our beloved Aussie Girls but also
the athletic Fijian netball team. We had worked with Simone Nalatu
at QAIHC who represented Fiji in the positions of Centre (C) and
Wing Attack (WA) at these world championships.
From the onset, our Diamond girls hit the ground with awesome
displays of great attacking netball, swift passes and supreme
movement down the court.
Up to the quarter finals everything went by the book for our Aussie
Girls, the only hick up we thought was the quarter final against
Malawi. Malawi play an unorthodox style of netball which the Aussie
girls are not used too but won in a reasonable fashion to secure a
semi final berth against Jamaica.
The Aussie girls really needed to connect on court and that’s just
what they did against Jamaica winning the game in convincing
fashion 82 - 46. After watching the play off for 3&4 (which the
England team won against Jamaica), we needed to calm our nerves
before our girls took the court for the grand final. After downing a
couple of beverages we where ready to support our team to the hills
and back. Being in the second row for the final and being captured
on International TV all around the world was one of the personal
highlights of our trip, not to mention the unbelievable grand final
game that emerged. From the first whistle it was all or nothing as
neither team gave away too much possession on both attack and
defence. Both teams were breathtakingly outstanding and gave the
7,512 strong crowd much to cheer for. The Aussie girls (Diamonds)
eventually ran out winners in Extra time with a 58 to 57 win. What
a game, what an experience, one that we will never forget and will
cherish for the rest of our lives.
Please note: As keen supporters of this exciting event, Lenny and Dion
paid their own way. for this trip.
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QUEENSLAND SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BEING WORKFORCE ENEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 JULY 2011
Contact QAIHC
QAIHC Social and Emotional Well Being Workforce Support Unit
RHONDA DAHLEN
Administrative Support Officer
[email protected]
(07) 3328 8500
SANDI TAYLOR
Regional SEWB Workforce Coordinator – Far North Queensland
[email protected]
(07) 4081 5681
JOSEPHINE SMALLWOOD
Regional SEWB Workforce Coordinator – North & North West Queensland
[email protected] (07) 4721 0744
CURRENTLY VACANT
Regional SEWB Workforce Coordinator – Central & South West Queensland
[email protected]
(07) 4930 4802
LENNY DAHLEN
Regional SEWB Workforce Coordinator – South East Queensland
[email protected]
(07) 3328 8500
ROBERT SKEEN
SEWB Training and Program Coordinator
[email protected]
(07) 3328 8500
DION TATOW
State Manager
[email protected] (07) 3328 8500
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