Fall 2014 Coralville Connection

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Transcription

Fall 2014 Coralville Connection
Connection
FALL 2014
OLD TOWN HALL
ROLLS ALONG
5TH STREET,
PAGE 5
Reimagining 5th Street:
Rethink. Reconstruct. Renew.
page 2
2-5
6
7
8-9
10-11
12
13
14-15
16-17
Reimagine
5th
Council
Spotlight
Police & Fire
Projects
Library
Little Free
Libraries
Performing Arts
FRY fest
Community
2 CORALVILLE CONNECTION REIMAGINE 5TH
Historic
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future
The 5th Street corridor that stretches
from 1st Avenue to 10th Avenue is the
focus of the City’s “Reimagine 5th”
project, which is a unique opportunity
for the City to maintain an area of historic
significance while fostering growth.
Coralville’s 5th Street, which dates back to the City’s infancy
and was part of the original Highway 6, has been an arterial
hub throughout the community’s development. Today, 5th
Street is home to coffee shops, medical offices, financial
institutions, municipal offices, public facilities, and amenities
such as the Center for the Performing Arts, the Library, and
S.T. Morrison Park.
The convergence of redevelopment along 5th Street,
planned street reconstruction and improvements, and the
implementation of flood mitigation projects—combined
with a goal to maintain a community-friendly and walkable
corridor with trail connections, transit access, historic attractions, and public spaces—bring full circle the project,
“Reimagine 5th: Rethink. Reconstruct. Renew.”
OLD TOWN
Development
Work on Old Town Coralville, the redevelopment of a
previously flood-prone area, began in 2013 following a
visioning process to improve and revitalize the area while
integrating flood protection. Located in one of the oldest
parts of Coralville, Old Town Coralville is south of 5th
Street between Biscuit Creek and 2nd Avenue.
This private development is a multi-year, multi-phase
project. Old Town Coralville includes commercial space,
townhomes, and residential condominiums planned in
conjunction with permanent flood protection and site
elevation. The architecture of the townhomes has been
planned to fit the history of the district, trees and
streetscaping tie into a neighborhood feel, public space is
planned, and a trail will tie into Coralville’s trail system.
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3 CORALVILLE CONNECTION REIMAGINE 5TH
5TH STREET
IMPROVEMENTS
FLOOD PROTECTION
IN ADDITION TO OLD TOWN AND 808 ON 5TH, ADDITIONAL ENHANCEMENTS ALLOW 5TH STREET TO BE REIMAGINED AND RENEWED.
In 2015, 5th Street will be reconstructed and raised from
3rd Avenue to 4th Avenue as it crosses Biscuit Creek for
the final flood protection measure in the neighborhood.
This project is funded by the State of Iowa Sales Tax
Increment Program, which takes a portion of the sales tax
collected by the State and diverts it to the City to be used
for flood protection improvements.
Also in 2015, 5th Street will be reconstructed between
6th and 10th Avenues to install new water main, improve the
storm sewer system, and reconstruct the street pavement.
The sidewalks, brick pavers, lighting, and landscaping that
characterize the central section of the Town Center District,
just a few blocks west, will be extended east into the
four-block stretch of 5th Street. The street reconstruction
projects will also allow the overhead private utilities that
currently line 5th Street from 1st Avenue to 10th Avenue
to be relocated underground.
Other improvements along 5th Street have already been
completed, including the construction of ponds on Biscuit
Creek for stormwater quality and management, the creation
of earthen flood protection berms along Biscuit Creek in
coordination with the Old Town Coralville project, and the
May 2014 relocation of Old Town Hall (see page 5). In
2013, the 1876 Schoolhouse was refurbished with a new
roof, landscaping, and bell.
A FEW BLOCKS WEST OF OLD TOWN, THE 808 ON 5TH PROJECT BROKE GROUND IN 2014.
The location of this mixed-use development on the south
side of 5th Street at 8th Avenue within the Town Center
District places it adjacent to the Old Town project.
The private development includes two five-story buildings, each with four floors of residential condominiums
with a mix of one and two bedroom homes, located above
18,000 square feet of commercial space with parking for
tenants located below ground. 808 on 5th offers offstreet parking for commercial customers at the front of
the building, private parking for commercial patrons and
residents in the back of the building, and a stormwater
design that includes pervious pavers to reduce runoff and
a bio-retention cell to capture and infiltrate stormwater.
Construction of the second building will begin in 2015.
While 808 on 5th brings new development to the area,
the project has a unique connection to Coralville’s past
(see “The Story of the Fester Building,” page 4).
319.248.1700
www.coralville.org
808
217+
4 CORALVILLE CONNECTION REIMAGINE 5TH
New Life
Fesler Building
TO A DEMOLISHED
BUILDING
TOP: THE PIED PIPER MURAL, PAINTED IN 1966 BY
Constructing the 808 on 5th project (see
page 3) requires the removal of three
buildings to make room for new structures. Rather than traditional demolition,
Blue Sky Developers Inc. worked with
a local contractor and property owners
on a “demanufacturing” process that
allows nearly all of the building materials
to be reused for their original purpose,
and the remainder to be recycled.
Items reclaimed include wood
studs from interior and exterior walls,
insulation bats, light switches, six HVAC
systems, toilets, sinks, mirrors, conduit,
wiring, light fixtures, electrical panels,
shingles, metal
By saving these studs, steel
items from
beams, copper,
the landfill, an ceiling tiles,
estimated 90%
doors, signs,
of the building plumbing materimaterials will
als, and more –
be reused or
including the
recycled.
flagpole. The trim
has already been
reused on another project, and the trusses were lifted off by a crane and will be
used on a building in Hills. The brick
and concrete were used to create higher
ground for cattle on a flood-prone farm
in Hills, and the excavated dirt went to
two private construction projects.
Wanted:
DIANA GREER, TAKEN PRIOR TO DEMOLITION OF
806 5TH STREET
ABOVE: THE CORALVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY AS SEEN
AT 806 5TH STREET ON JANUARY 9, 1967
LEFT: THE FORMER CORALVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY
SIGN AT 806 5TH STREET WAS REVEALED DURING
DEMOLITION IN JUNE 2014.
While materials from the buildings removed for the 808 on 5th project will
be used for projects to last future generations, the demanufacturing process
highlighted the ties that one of the buildings had to Coralville’s past.
In 1956, six years before he became Coralville’s 20th mayor, local resident and business owner Daniel Fesler built a one-story warehouse and gift
shop at 806 5th Street, but within a decade Fesler discontinued his business. In 1966, with the growing town in need of additional municipal space,
the City purchased and renovated the west side of the building. In January
1967, the newly-formed Coralville Public Library, which had been temporarily housed in the basement of the Old Town Hall (see page 5), moved into
their first permanent space at 806 5th Street, sharing the building with
the Recreation Department. As Coralville grew so did the City’s departments
and, in 1971 when the Recreation Department moved to their building on
8th Street, the Fesler building was again renovated and the Library expanded, with the Heritage Museum Foundation sharing space in the back of the
building. For 20 years, the Library operated out of the Fesler building,
moving up the street into its home at 1401 5th Street in 1987.
Back in 1966, a large mural of the Pied Piper was painted on the block
walls of the Fesler building, decorating the children’s reading area of the
then-new Library. Nearly 48 years later, and despite the fact that the building had been under private ownership since the late 1980s, the Library’s
mural remained intact on the walls of 806 5th Street in 2014. While it was
not possible to preserve the original work, care was taken to professionally
photograph the mural prior to the building’s deconstruction, with a largescale photographic reproduction of the mural planned for the current Library.
For consideration in Coralville’s pictorial
history by Arcadia Publishing, contact historian Tim Walch at [email protected] or call 319.338.6650.
MURAL PHOTO CREDIT: BENJAMIN CHAIT, THE CHAIT GALLERIES DOWNTOWN
THE STORY OF THE
BRINGING
MOVING
OLD TOWN HALL CORALVILLE CONNECTION 5
If the 130-year-old walls of Coralville’s historic Old Town Hall could talk . . .
THE Old Town Hall
It started in the late 1880s, when the twolevel brick building known as Coralville’s Old
Town Hall was erected at 405 2nd Avenue
on land donated by the Charles E. Robinson
family; the upper level was to be used as
a church and the lower as a town hall and
community room. Eventually, ownership of
the property reverted back to the Robinson
heirs: three consecutive years passed without
the building being used for church services,
and by clause the townspeople forfeited
their right to use the building.
In 1921, the building was sold to the town
for $2,500. The structure was used as a school
and a church meeting place and, after renovations in 1953, it became fully occupied by
the town for meetings and municipal offices
including water billing, police, and public
works, as well as serving as a temporary space
for the Library. It is estimated that more
Coralville City Council meetings—representing years of resolutions, ordinances, public
comments, and decision-making—were held
in Old Town Hall than in any other location.
See a time lapse of the move at http://youtu.be/UGYlisR8xUU
In the 1990s, the Old Town Hall was
transferred to private ownership and moved
from 405 to 406 2nd Avenue—from the east
side to the west side of the street—to make
way for the development of RiverView Square.
Because the building was moved literally
across the street, the original front door
became the back door, and a new front
entrance was built. Since part of the original
structure was built into the ground, the
base of the building’s lower level was lost.
Following the flood of 2008, the City
again took ownership of the building and
it was leased as a photography studio. But
when development plans were put together
for the Old Town Project, Coralville’s mixeduse development located at the Old Town
Hall site, the story of Old Town Hall began
a new chapter. To keep the historic building
intact, the brick structure would again
undergo a move.
In May 2014, with the same flatbed truck
used during its previous relocation, the stout
red brick building was moved, inch by inch
and aided by hydraulics, less than a fifth
of a mile to its new home at 407 5th Street.
The street-facing side of the building remains
oriented as it was at its previous location, a
relic that is a unique footnote in the building’s
narrative. Standing across from the 1876
Schoolhouse, the two buildings flank 5th
Street, creating a historic entrance to
Coralville’s Old Town District.
...they could tell
stories of the
council meetings,
church services,
social events, and
businesses housed
over the decades.
The bricks could
speak of how they
were placed by
pioneer residents
who donated their
labor, or of the
jail once located
inside the small
structure. Perhaps
the building would
speak of the fact
that it played
such a key role in
Coralville’s history
that it has been
saved twice from
demolition, moved
twice, and occupied
three different
addresses in
Coralville.
www.coralville.org
319.248.1700
6 CORALVILLE CONNECTION CITY COUNCIL
Jill Dodds, City
Council Member
Coralville resident
since 1986; co-owner
and operator of Simple
Abundance Child Care
Coralville is an incredible
community and it is my
mission to support, nurture,
and sustain it as we move
into the future.
CITY COUNCIL MEMBER JILL DODDS
$$#%
""%
Meet Jill Dodds, and you will
meet someone who isn’t afraid
to dig in. In 2008 when Jill, a
childcare business owner, had
the opportunity to work with
the City to update a child
care ordinance, Jill’s interest
in municipal government
was piqued.
Over the next three years,
Jill attended as many Council
meetings and work sessions as
she could, read the Council
agenda packets, became informed on issues, researched,
asked questions, and listened.
After a successful run on the
ballot in November 2011, she
began her term on the Coralville City Council in 2012.
%
as a Council representative
on the Metropolitan Planning
Organization of Johnson
County. Proactive in caring
for our community’s future,
Jill participated in the team
to develop a post-construction
stormwater ordinance, and
she was on the steering committee for the 2014 Coralville
Community Plan.
With a passion for connecting
area resources and residents,
Jill was an advocate for the
City’s donation to the 1105
Project, which partners essential community services under
one roof to reach more clients
and enhance services (learn
more at www.the1105project
.com). Her involvement with
Jill, who spent 16 years as a
the Coralville Ecumenical
registered nurse in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Food Pantry to alleviate food
inequity in the community has
University of Iowa Hospitals
encouraged support by the
and Clinics, has served on
numerous local and state com- City, as well as business owners
and residents. And, in 2013
missions representing early
childhood care and education, when the Coralville Community Garden was launched,
including the State Child
Care Advisory Council. She has her participation helped initibeen a Council liaison to the ate garden plots for the food
pantry and the “Plant a Row
Parks and Recreation Commission, and currently serves for the Hungry” program.
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Now in his second term, Bill
Hoeft began his seat on the
City Council in 2010. Living
in the greater Coralville area
since the early 1990s, Bill’s law
enforcement and education
background helped to pave
his path to city government:
as a former corrections officer
and former Iowa City police
officer, Bill was a member of
the Police Citizens Review
Board in Iowa City and taught
government and economics
classes at the high school level
before being elected to the
Coralville City Council.
Bill has served as a Council
liaison to the Parks and
Recreation Commission and
the Fire Department, as a
Council representative for the
Iowa River Landing Development, and is a Council liaison
for the Coralville Arts
Commission.
CITY COUNCIL MEMBER BILL HOEFT
Bill Hoeft,
City Council Member
Coralville resident since
2003; screenwriter
Council Connection
City Council
Meetings
CORALVILLE RECOGNIZED FOR
Coralville is one of 17 cities in Iowa that has been identified by the Carrie
Chapman Catt Center at Iowa State University as having gender equity
on all key appointed boards and commissions. Effective January 2012,
the State Code of Iowa required that all appointed boards and
commissions in the state have gender equity. Coralville joins DeWitt,
Montezuma, Tiffin, and Wilton in East Central Iowa in this achievement.
A Certificate of Equality was presented to the City Council in June 2014.
Bill points to forgivable loans
as one of the ways that Coralville has worked to partner
with and expand local businesses, while creating additional jobs in the community.
We are a community of fewer
than 20,000 residents and
economically speaking, have
no comparable community in the
entire state of Iowa. I take a lot of
pride in that, and so should you.”
Watch
GENDER EQUITY ON BOARDS
One of Bill’s goals as a Council
member is to ensure the continued success of ongoing
projects such as the Iowa River
Landing. The Iowa River Landing, Bill points out, is on land
that suffered contamination
after decades as an industrial
park; its transformation would
not have been possible without
the City’s crucial role in cleanup and revitalization, spanning
the terms of numerous Council
members working toward a
common goal. “Nationally,
Coralville continues to be held
up as a successful example
of how to address challenging environmental issues in
a blighted area,” remarks Bill.
Be Informed
• Coralville City Hall, 1512 7th St.
• 6:30 pm, second and fourth Tuesday of the month
(unless otherwise noted)
• Work sessions, open to the public, follow most meetings
• Check www.coralville.org for changes
• Live: Mediacom channel 5/118-8 digital
• Live and on demand: www.coralville.org/coralvision
• Rebroadcast: Wednesdays: 7:00 pm, Sundays: 1:00 pm
• Agenda packets, meeting minutes, and work session
notes at www.coralville.org
• Automatically receive City Council agendas and
minutes! Sign up at www.coralville.org/signup
www.facebook.com/CityofCoralvilleIowa
@Coralville_IA
POLICE & FIRE CORALVILLE CONNECTION 7
POLICE DEPARTMENT NEWS
CLIMBING THE
FIRE DEPARTMENT
LADDER
The Coralville Fire Department, which is
ISO Class 2 rated, is pleased to announce
the promotions of three of its members.
Brandon Feddersen was promoted from Lieutenant to
Captain. Brandon, who has been a member of the Coralville Fire Department since 2004, is active with new
recruit training for the department and is a member of the
Johnson County Underwater Recovery team. He is a career
firefighter with the Cedar Rapids Fire Department and is
a paramedic with Johnson County Ambulance Service.
Nic Pruter was promoted from Lieutenant to Captain.
Nic joined the Coralville Fire Department in 2008 and
spends many hours each year training new recruits and
department members for annual training requirements.
Nic works full time as a fire safety inspector at the
University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
Tom Bair was promoted from Firefighter to Lieutenant.
Tom joined the Coralville Fire Department in 2009. His
responsibilities include training the special operations
team members, who specialize in confined space rescue,
high and low angle rope rescue, and water rescue. Tom
works full time as a bioinformatics research scientist at
the University of Iowa.
NEW CORALVILLE
POLICE SWORN IN,
LT. COMPLETES
ADVANCED TRAINING
New Police Officers
The Coralville Police Department welcomed
three new police officers to its ranks in the
spring of 2014: Kyle D. Nicholson,
Cody D. Vry, and Bradley D. Clark.
The officers, who filled vacancies as a result
of a retirement and two resignations, began
their field training under the supervision of
an individually-assigned Field Training Officer.
All three are attending the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy basic training at the Cedar
Rapids Police Department, and are expected
to be on their own by the end of December.
Lt. Summers Completes
Advanced Training
Lieutenant Deborah Summers has graduated
from the Administrative Officer’s Course through
the Southern Police Institute at the University
of Louisville in Kentucky. This is an intensive
13-week academic course for law enforcement
administrators from a highly respected academic
institution. Lt. Summers joins Lt. Shane Kron
and Sgt. William Clarahan at the Coralville
Police Department in achieving this academic
and professional level of training.
Local Option Sales Tax Referendum to Appear on November Ballot
In the November 4, 2014 election, voters in Coralville, Iowa City, North Liberty, Tiffin,
and University Heights will cast their vote on a one percent local option sales tax.
The local option sales tax referendum was added to the November ballot after
the Iowa City City Council approved sending the referendum to voters. By state
law, if a city has more than 50% of the county population (which Iowa City
does), it may put the tax on the ballot; all cities that share a border must vote
as one group on the measure. To pass, more than 50% of the total votes cast
in the five combined communities must support its adoption.
Each city must draft their own ballot language about how the local option
sales tax revenue would be used in that community. Coralville’s ballot language
for the local option sales tax will be available at www.coralville.org and
www.johnsoncounty.com/auditor/index.html following the August 26 Coralville
City Council meeting.
www.coralville.org
319.248.1700
8 CORALVILLE CONNECTION PROJECTS
The major flood protection measures implemented by Coralville since the
2008 flood were put to the test—and proven successful—when substantial
rainfalls threatened the banks of swollen creeks and the Iowa River in
July 2014 and June 2013.
Staying
Dry
All flood protection
improvements built
since 2008 were
designed to protect to
one foot above the
2008 water levels.
Funding for these
projects included City
funds, a $27.1 million
I-JOBS I grant,
$13 million in Community
Development Block
Grants, $7.2 million
in U.S. Economic
Development
Administration funds,
$450,000 in Federal
Emergency
Management Agency
alternate project funds,
and a $3.6 million
I-JOBS II grant.
FALL 2014
Since 2008, the City of Coralville has made
significant improvements and investments
to protect low-lying areas from floodwaters
on Biscuit Creek, Clear Creek, and the Iowa
River. Residential and commercial areas that
flooded in 2008 have subsequently been
protected through the following work:
✓ Reconstructed and raised the 1st Avenue
Bridge over Clear Creek to allow water
at the 100 year flood level to pass
underneath.
✓ Improved the storm sewer system on 1st
Avenue from Clear Creek to 6th Street.
✓ Constructed four storm water pump
stations along the Iowa River from Clear
Creek to Interstate 80. These pump
stations provide gates that are closed to
stop Clear Creek from backing up into the
City’s gravity storm water collection system
when Clear Creek water levels are high;
they also pump out local rainfalls when
the gates are closed.
www.facebook.com/CityofCoralvilleIowa
Coralville
Flood Mitigation
Projects Pay Off
✓ Constructed earthen berms for flood pro-
tection along the former Edgewater Drive.
✓ Installed duckbills and sluice gates in
10 locations in the existing storm water
system to prevent back-up of high water
levels in the Iowa River and Clear Creek
from flooding surrounding neighborhoods.
✓ Constructed earthen berms, permanent
and removable flood walls along the north
side of Clear Creek from Highway 6 to 1st
Avenue and along Biscuit Creek from Clear
Creek to 5th Street, and retention ponds
along Biscuit Creek.
✓ Constructed two new storm water pump
stations on Clear Creek west of 1st
Avenue, upgraded two existing storm water
pump stations, and flood-proofed the 3rd
Avenue sanitary sewer lift station.
✓ Constructed flood protection improvements
along the Iowa River from west of Rocky
Shore Drive to the north end of the Iowa
River Power Company Restaurant parking
lot. This project raised the CRANDIC railroad embankment, raised and lengthened
the CRANDIC railroad Clear Creek Bridge,
and constructed earthen berms and
permanent and removable flood walls.
✓ Constructed a floodwall on the south side
of Clear Creek between 1st Avenue and
the CRANDIC Railroad.
Two additional projects will complete
Coralville’s flood mitigation plans: the elevation of 5th Street, with construction planned
for 2015 (see article, page 3); and a combination of permanent and temporary flood
protection on the south side of Clear Creek
from 1st Avenue to Highway 6, with construction planned for 2016 and 2017.
@Coralville_IA
PROJECTS CORALVILLE CONNECTION 9
Coral Ridge
Avenue
Improvements
Update
Construction continues on the halfmile stretch of Coral Ridge Avenue
(formerly Highway 965) from north
of the Holiday Road/Heartland Drive
intersection to immediately north of
the Oakdale Boulevard intersection.
The project, which is expected to be
complete in summer 2015, will widen
the roadway to a four lane road with
a raised median and add new roadway
lighting, a trail with underpass just
north of Holiday Road, streetscaping,
storm sewer improvements, and green
stormwater management.
Coralville Transit Intermodal Center
Construction on Coralville’s new transportation hub, the Coralville
Intermodal Facility, began in July 2014. Located in the Iowa River
Landing northwest of the East 9th Street/Quarry Road intersection,
this connection point for mixed-mode commuting is located within
easy access from I-80 for drivers, will connect to the trail system for
pedestrians and cyclists, and will bring transit stops directly to the
Iowa River Landing.
This transportation center will serve as a transit hub; provide parkand-ride parking spaces; car charging stations; bike lockers, restrooms,
and showers; and space for the Iowa Bicycle Coalition. Construction
of the facility is funded in part by federal grant funds, and revenue
generated from the park-and-ride program will fund the facility’s
operational costs. The construction is anticipated to be complete in
summer 2015. A second phase with a daycare, as well as additional
parking spaces, will develop pending additional grant funding.
Traffic Signals at
1st Avenue &
Oakdale Boulevard
Increased traffic at 1st Avenue
and Oakdale Boulevard led to the
installation of traffic lights at the
northeastern Coralville intersection.
With the fall 2013 completion of the Oakdale Boulevard extension to Dubuque Street NE, the
1st Avenue and Oakdale intersection experienced an uptick in traffic as anticipated. Traffic
studies by the Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County indicated that traffic
signals at the intersection were warranted, and in August 2014 traffic signals were installed.
The camera-activated signals are triggered by traffic, rather than controlled by a timer.
Advance warning signs were installed to notify motorists of the new signals. Motorists and
pedestrians are advised to use caution in this area while drivers adapt to the new signals.
www.coralville.org
319.248.1700
10 CORALVILLE CONNECTION LIBRARY
Check Outt !
it
SEPTEMBER IS NATIONAL
LIBRARY CARD SIGN-UP MONTH
One of the simplest ways to connect to a multitude of free books, resources, e-books, audiobooks,
digital magazines, movies, and media is with a library card. The first card is always free, and the
Coralville Public Library offers free replacement cards during September. To get or replace a card,
stop by a public service desk with a photo ID (proof of address is also needed for new cards).
It’s a Mystery
Celebrating 20 years of
discussing mysteries together;
new members are welcome!
Second Wednesday of the month | 10:00
September 10
Light of the World
by James Lee Burke
A detective and his partner are on vacation with
their families, but soon
they are after a serial
killer.
October 8
Death Was in the Blood
by Linda L. Richards
A Los Angeles detective
was raised a debutante.
Now she’s infiltrating her
former class to find out
who’s threatening a
young Olympian.
November 12
The Lost Ones
by Ace Atkins
Life as the sheriff in rural
Mississippi is supposed to
be peaceful, but stolen
guns, drug lords, and
missing children mean
there is no rest.
September 21-27
Celebrate our freedom to
read whatever we want!
FALL 2014
Discuss drama’s place in literature!
Last Thursday of the month | 10:00 am
September 25
Uncle Vanya
Play by Anton Chekhov,
adapted by David Mamet
Guests from Dreamwell Theatre’s
production will join the discussion.
October 30
Kimberly Akimbo
Play by David Lindsay-Abaire
Guests from Riverside Theatre’s
production will join the discussion.
November 20
Why Torture is Wrong and
the People Who Love Them
Dark comedy by Christopher Durang
Guests from Dreamwell Theatre’s
production will join the discussion.
A book-based film series for adults.
Fresh popcorn is provided.
Wednesday, September 3, 6:00 pm
Rebecca
Starring Laurence Olivier and Joan
Fontaine, directed by Alfred Hitchcock,
based on the novel by Daphne
du Maurier.
Wednesday, October 29, 6:00 pm
The Thing
Starring Kurt Russell and Wilford
Brimley, directed by John Carpenter,
based on the story Who Goes There
by John W. Campbell.
Wednesday, December 17, 6:00 pm
The Shop Around the Corner
Starring James Stewart and Margaret
Sullavan, directed by Ernst Lubitsch,
based on the play by Miklos Laszlo.
/LEUDU\6HULHV([SORUHV
/RFDO/LWHUDU\/DQGPDUNV
Literature, art, and Iowa roots converge at the Iowa River
Landing, where eleven literary sculptures bring the written
word to life. Each sculpture, created by an Iowa artist, is based
on a work in the collection housed in the Iowa Writers’ Library,
located in the Coralville Marriott Hotel and Conference Center.
In the fall and winter of 2014, the Coralville Public Library
will host a series of talks in the Iowa Writers’ Library about the
works that inspired the Iowa River Landing Sculpture Walk.
Members of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and other University
of Iowa faculty will join the discussion to celebrate writing and
the visual arts in Iowa. For more information, call 319.248.1850.
Information about the sculptures is available at
www.coralville.org/IRLsculptures.
@CoralPubLibrary
www.facebook.com/coralvillepubliclibrary
Join Us for a
LIBRARY CORALVILLE CONNECTION 11
COMMUNITYREAD
The Distance Between Us by Reyna Grande
Tuesday, September 23 | 7:00 pm (This year’s “One Community, One Book” selection)
Immigrants have long faced the challenges of families that live across borders—some going ahead
to the new country and sending for the rest later. What was it like to grow up in such a family in
the 20th century? The September 23 discussion at the Coralville Public Library is sponsored by the
UI Center for Human Rights. Reyna Grande will also speak at the Pomerantz Center in Iowa City
on October 4 at 7:30 p.m.
Little Wolves by Thomas Maltman
Tuesday, October 28 | 7:00 pm (This year’s “All Iowa Reads” selection)
Set on the Minnesota prairie in the late 1980's during a drought, Little Wolves features the
intertwining stories of a father searching for answers after his son commits murder, and a pastor’s
wife who returns to the town for mysterious reasons. A penetrating look at small-town America,
Little Wolves weaves together elements of folklore and Norse mythology. Learn more at
www.iowacenterforthebook.org/air.
Youth andFamily
P r o g r a m s
Children under Age 3 & Caregivers | Wee Read
Thursdays, 10:15 or 11:15 am (August 28-December 18)
(The program is repeated; choose either time.)
Rhymes, songs, finger plays, and books.
Approximately 20 to 25 minutes.
TEEN PROGRAMS
College Planning Night
Thursday, October 9 | 7:00 pm
A free presentation offered by Coralville Public Library and the Iowa College Access
Network (ICAN). High school sophomores, juniors, and their parents can learn about
preparing for, visiting, and selecting a college; the application and admissions process
and requirements; understanding costs; scholarships; and making successful transitions
to college. For more information, contact Karen Stierler at 319.248.1850 or at
[email protected]
Ages 3-5 | Preschool Storytime
Tuesdays, 10:30 am (August 26-December 16)
Listen to stories, sing, and participate in a range of
activities. Approximately 30 minutes.
Celebrate Teen Read Week
Grades K-6 | Kids Create
First Thursday of the month, 2:30 pm
Features a different activity each month. Signup starts one
week in advance online or at the Children’s Desk.
Approximately 1 hour.
Teens Vote for Top Ten Reads
All Ages | Family Storytime
Saturdays, 10:30 am
Stories, music, poems, and activities. Approximately
30 minutes.
All Ages | Family Night at the Library
Second Monday of the month, 6:30 pm
Family nights are for all ages and involve crafts, games,
stories, or music—or any combination! Approximately
1 hour.
R.E.A.D.
Third Sunday of the month, 1:00-3:00 pm
Children can improve their reading skills by reading aloud
to a licensed therapy dog from the Therapy Dogs of Johnson
County. Signup for 15-minute time slots starts one week in
advance at 319.248.1850 or at the Children’s Desk.
October 12-18
The Coralville Public Library, along with 5,000 libraries across the United States, will
celebrate Teen Read Week with special events and activities encouraging teens to read
for fun. Watch www.coralvillepubliclibrary.org/teens for details!
The Teens' Top Ten is a "teen choice" list of favorite books of the previous year.
To help select the 2014 Teens’ Top Ten:
1. Read some of the 2014 Teens’ Top Ten-nominated books on display
at the Library.
2. Readers ages 12 to 18 can vote at www.ala.org/yalsa/reads4teens
between August 15 and October 15.
3. The ten books to receive the most votes will be named the 2014 Teens'
Top Ten. The winners will be announced the week after Teen Read Week.
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Are too many fines keeping you from the Library?
Check out the Food for Fines program. During the
month of September a non-perishable food item
donation will pay your library late fines*, and donations
will benefit the Coralville Ecumenical Food Pantry!
The pantry loves to receive:
• Monetary donations
• Peanut butter
• Canned meats or fish
• Rice
• Hearty soups or stews
• Canned fruit
• Macaroni and cheese
• Canned vegetables
• Beans (canned and dried) • Crackers
*Does not apply to fees for damaged or lost items.
1401 5th Street
www.coralvillepubliclibrary.org
319.248.1850
12 CORALVILLE CONNECTION LITTLE FREE LIBRARIES
little free
take root
libraries
A
in local
parks
good book may be found just a short walk away and at a surprising location!
These five new Little Free Libraries in Coralville’s public spaces are
supported by the Coralville Public Library and the Friends of the
Coralville Public Library, who monitor the little libraries and help
keep them stocked with books.
1876 Schoolhouse
WHERE: 310 5th St.
CONSTRUCTED BY: Zachary Rohm, West High graduate and member
of Boy Scout Troop #207, for his Eagle Scout project.
ABOUT: This miniature schoolhouse represents Coralville’s community
landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Auburn Hills Park
WHERE: Between Knowling Dr. and Auburn Hills Dr., at the point
where the trail makes a “Y”
CONSTRUCTED BY: Zachary Rohm, West High graduate and member
of Boy Scout Troop #207, for his Eagle Scout project.
ABOUT: Each of Zachary’s Little Free Libraries is unique and resembles
an aspect of the architecture found at the same location.
Central Park
WHERE: 501 6th St.; at the shelter
CONSTRUCTED BY: John Gross, local retired businessman and
Boy Scout volunteer.
ABOUT: John built and donated twelve Little Libraries in the area,
each dedicated to one of the twelve points of the Boy Scout Law.
“Being Obedient” is in the shape of a tent, complete with guy lines
and roof stakes.
Kiddie Korral Park
Five “little free libraries” have cropped up in
Coralville’s public parks since early 2014; the
dollhouse-sized, hand-crafted “book houses”
which promote literacy and build a sense of
community are also growing in Coralville
neighborhoods. These free book exchanges are a
worldwide trend, making outdoor book boxes
available to neighbors or anyone who wants to
pick up a book and share another in return.
FALL 2014
WHERE: 8th St. and 12th Ave.; near the playground
CONSTRUCTED BY: The University of Iowa Women’s Club “Women
with Hammers”
ABOUT: A bright red bookhouse is the newest little library in
Coralville’s parks.
North Ridge Park
WHERE: 2250 Holiday Rd.; at the west side of the playground
CONSTRUCTED BY: Zachary Rohm, recent West High graduate
and member of Boy Scout Troop #207, for his Eagle Scout project.
ABOUT: Each of Zachary’s Little Free Libraries is unique and
resembles an aspect of the architecture found at the same location.
Official Little Free Libraries are registered, numbered, and have a
charter sign. The five little libraries in Coralville’s public spaces will
become an official part of the Little Free Library network in fall 2014.
To learn more about Little Free Libraries and view locations of
registered book exchanges, visit www.littlefreelibrary.org
PERFORMING ARTS CORALVILLE CONNECTION 13
U P CO M I N G
EVENTS
CORALVILLE CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 1301 5th St. Coralville, IA 319.248.9370
AUGUST
22 & 23 Bye, Bye, Birdie (a minimally-staged production)
Celebrate the Center’s 3rd birthday!
Sponsored by Hills Bank
SEPT
30 Music Playathon
12-14
Fundraiser for the Iowa City Community School District
Music Auxiliary
SEPTEMBER
12-14 The Lion, The Witch, and TheWardrobe
Presented by Young Footliters, Sponsored by Hills Bank
18 & 20 Sue Gilbert in Catchin’ the Babies
NOV
11
NOV
21-23
Presented by City Circle Acting Company
20 New Play Festival
Presented by City Circle Acting Company
Sponsored by Heuer Publishing
21 Autumn Abroad
Orchestra Iowa Chamber Players
26-28 West Music Steinway Extravaganza
Featuring B.K. Davis
OCTOBER
3 An Evening of Opera
ConcertIA benefit concert
4 MetroMix Chorus
10-19 Xanadu
TICKETS
•
•
•
•
Presented by City Circle Acting Company
Sponsored by The Luxe Zone and Mike & Jan Finlayson
FOR MOST EVENTS NOVEMBER
ARE AVAILABLE AT
6-9 Gian Carlo Menotti’s The Consul
319.248.9370
www.coralvillearts.org
Coralville Recreation Center, 1506 8th St.
Coralville Center for the Performing Arts Box Office
1301 5th Street
Wednesday-Friday: 11 am-1 pm and 4-6 pm;
Saturday: Noon-4 pm
www.facebook.com/coralvillearts
@CoralvilleIAArt
Presented by The University of Iowa School of Music
11 DiNO-Light:
CORBIAN Visual Arts and Dance
in collaboration with Lightwire Theater
13 Lorie Line
The 25th Anniversary Christmas Special
21-23 Pandora’s Circus
A Cirque-inspired theatrical event
25 Flutes for Food
29 Festival of Trees
at the Coralville Center for the Performing Arts
14 CORALVILLE CONNECTION FRY FEST
a celebration of all that is Hawkeye
The Hawkeye Season Kickoff Scores
a Touchdown in Coralville
FRY fest
> CHECKLIST
$!
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$!
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?
Record attempt
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of the greatest Hawkeyes
of all time.
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• 75+ vendor me Class Panel Discussio
Fa
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319.337.65
Guinness World
Friday, August 29, 2014,
Record Attempt
all day
Whether you call it “bags,” “baggo,”
“bean
bag toss,” or “cornhole,” help break
Coralville’s Iowa River
the Guinness World Record for the world’s largest organized
Landing and the Coralville
cornhole tournament. Register at www.FRYfest.com
Marriott Hotel and
Conference Center
Celebrate the Quarterbacks
of Hayden Fry
www.FRYfest.com
FRY fest VI celebrates the quarterbacks
All events are free,
of Hayden Fry with appearances by Ryan
Tom Grogan, Chuck Hartlieb,
except the High Porch Driscoll,
Chuck Long, Tom Poholsky, Randy Reiners,
Picnic Concert.
Phil Suess, Matt Sherman, and Mark Vlasic.
ade
r
a
P
n
o
Herky arewell
Final F
At 140 lbs, 6’1” per bird and sporting a Superman pose, the flock of 84
statues from the 2014 Herky on Parade gather at FRY fest for a final photo op!
The one-of-a-kind statues from this public art project will be auctioned to
support the United Way of Johnson and Washington Counties, with some
available for silent auction at FRY fest. www.herkyonparade2.com.
CONCERT LINEUP
4:00 pm Beverage garden opens
(inside concert grounds;
must be at least 21
years old)
5:30 pm Jake McVey
7:00 pm Craig Campbell
8:30 pm David Nail
LOCATION
The High Porch Picnic Concert will
be held in the parking lot south of
the Marriott Hotel and Conference
Center, next to the tradeshow.
CONCERT TICKETS
Prices
$15 through August 24
$20 beginning August 25
Where to Buy
• www.FRYfest.com
(through Aug. 24)
• In person (through Aug. 28)
• Coralville City Hall
• Coral Ridge Mall (Guest
Welcome Center)
• Hy-Vee (Coralville location)
• Iowa City/Coralville Area CVB
• MidWestOne Bank (all Johnson
County locations)
• At FRYfest (on Aug. 29)
High Porch PicnicConcert
A “high porch picnic” is a Texas expression for “an exceptionally good time” and is a
great way to describe Coach Fry’s glorious career as one of college football’s most unique
coaches. Concert and beverage garden proceeds benefit Coralville’s 4thFEST celebration.
DAVID NAIL
Grammy-nominated David Nail scored his first number one single with “Let It Rain” from 2011’s criticallylauded album, The Sound of a Million Dreams. His ability to make tales of heartbreak and loss deeply relatable
define him as an artist, while songs like “Broke My Heart,” “Burnin’ Bed,” and “Lyle County” are infectious
with deliberate grooves that carry the listener along.
In spring 2014, Nail went Platinum with the love song “Whatever She’s Got” from the album I’m a Fire;
it was his second number one and the fastest-rising single of his career so far.
CRAIG CAMPBELL
Craig Campbell became one of the most successful new artists of 2011 when his self-titled debut album
spawned the hits “Family Man” (a Top 15 hit), “Fish,” and “When I Get It.” His mesmerizing single “Outta My
Head,” from the album Never Regret, rose to the Top 15 on the country music charts, and “Keep Them Kisses
Comin’” became his first Top 10 single.
While FRY fest will attempt to break a Guinness World Record with a cornhole tournament, Campbell uses
his passion for the game to bring awareness to an important cause: he holds an annual Craig Campbell
Celebrity Cornhole Challenge to benefit colon cancer research.
JAKE MCVEY
Jake McVey, who grew up working on his parents’ Iowa farm, has become one of the most in-demand young
acts in country music. Performing 300 shows in 2013, he was named one of the top ten touring acts by
Billboard magazine. With his high-energy stage show, he has opened for Martina McBride, Dierks Bentley,
Sugarland, Keith Anderson, Jason Aldean, and Little Big Town, and McVey’s skill as a guitarist has elicited
comparisons to Brad Paisley and Keith Urban.
16 CORALVILLE CONNECTION UPCOMING EVENTS
LABOR DAY HOLIDAY l Monday, September 1
City Offices & Library: Closed
Transit: No buses running
Recreation Center & Indoor Pool: Open
Outdoor Aquatic Center: Open; last day of the 2014 season
Trash & Recycling: No Monday pickup; routes collected one day later
than usual the week of September 1.
COMMUNITY SHRED DAY l Saturday, October 4
When: 8:00 am to noon
Where: City Hall parking lot, 1512 7th St.
What: Residents can bring unlimited cardboard boxes with personal
papers to be destroyed at the North Cedar Recycling facility. Sponsored
by the City of Coralville with thanks to North Cedar Recycling. North
Cedar Recycling is NAID certified by the National Association for
Information Destruction.
FALL MAYOR’S CLEAN UP WEEK l October 6-10
What: Free pickup of large trash items
When: Set items curbside up to 24 hours before or by 7:00 am on
trash collection day
Accepted: Large items that won’t fit in a bag, like furniture or bathroom
fixtures.
Not accepted: Appliances, construction materials, electronics,
or hazardous materials.
Please: Tag other extra garbage bags as usual
More info: 319.248.1740
TRICK OR TREATING l Friday, October 31
When: 5:30 to 8:00 pm
Where: Throughout Coralville
VETERAN’S DAY HOLIDAY l Tuesday, November 11
City Offices & Library: Closed
Transit: Running normal schedules
Recreation Center & Indoor Pool: Open
Trash & Recycling: No Tuesday pickup; Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday routes collected one day later than usual.
HELP CORALVILLE’S LUMINARIAS SHINE ON l Sunday, December 14
Volunteers Needed: Save the date for Coralville’s 34th annual Aisle
of Lights. Luminaria supplies and distribution are coordinated by local
volunteers, sacks and sand are donated by local businesses, and all
residents are invited to participate.
Ways to continue Coralville’s luminaria tradition:
• Be a neighborhood block captain: pick up free sacks and sand from
a designated location for your neighborhood, and invite neighbors
to set up luminarias, or
• Be an area coordinator: work with neighborhood block captains.
To volunteer, contact Jim Albrecht at 319.631.3845, or City Hall at 319.248.1700.
FALL 2014
www.facebook.com/CityofCoralvilleIowa
@Coralville_IA
th Coralville
COMMUNITY CORALVILLE CONNECTION 17
The Coralville Connection
FEST
OFFICIAL SPONSOR
City of Coralville
TITLE SPONSOR
s
p
o
n
s
o
r
s
Hills Bank and Trust Company
PRESENTING SPONSOR
General Growth/Coral Ridge Mall
PREMIER SPONSORS
Basket Auction
FRY fest
BrrrFest
STARS & STRIPES ($2,500 +)
Scheels
Watts Group
West Bank
808 on 5th
BLUE ($1,500 - $2,499)
Coralville Marriott Hotel &
Conference Center
Great Western Bank
Meardon, Sueppel & Downer
Quality Care
University of Iowa Community
Credit Union
Veridian Credit Union
WHITE ($500 - $1,499)
Paula Bakey
Barker Apartments
Jim & Jan Barnes
Bill & Sheila Boyd
Build to Suit
Diehl Law Offices
GEICO Insurance
Hampton Inn/Holiday Inn
Howard R. Green Company
Hy-Vee
Iowa City/Coralville Area CVB
Iowa Pediatric Dental Center/
Laser Wash
Jill Irvin
Keith & Connie Jones
Lenoch & Cilek Ace Hardware
Mark’s Styles and More
Meardon, Sueppel & Downer
Larry & Dee Marshek
Bonnie McFarland
Melody Lodge Cabins
MidWestOne Bank
Paula Muzzin
Don & Anne Peterson
RDG Planning & Design
Rockwell Collins
Harry Russell
Josh & Jess Schamberger
Becky Schulz
Shoemaker Haaland Professional
Engineers
TrueNorth Companies LC
Two Rivers Bank
US Bank
Veenstra & Kimm
Vrban Fire Protection
Skip & Pat Wells
RED (up to $499)
Bachmeier Interiors
Backpocket Brewery
Beauty Biz
Barry & Roxie Bedford
Ellen Bigelow
Body Moves Fitness & Wellness Center
Nolan Bogaard
Rex & Michele Brandstatter
Brown Deer Golf Club
Buffalo Wild Wings
Dr. Benita Caldwell
Campus Towing/Off Campus Auto
Repair
Linda Carlson
Carolyn's Place
Ted & Kay Carpenter
Casey's
Coral West Dental
Coralville Center for the
Performing Arts
Coralville Police Department
Coralville Public Library
Coralville Parks and Recreation
Department
Leslie & Nancy Cullers
D'aversa Salon
Bob & Sue Dvorsky
Harry & Pattie Ehmsen
Electric Beach
Europa Salon and Spa
Jim & Carol Fausett
First Trust and Savings Bank
Forever Green
Freedom Security Bank
Gay and Ciha Funeral Home
Ghurtie's
Laurie & Jim Goodrich
Gregory Properties
Golf USA of Coralville
Golfzilla
Leonard Greenwood
Tom Hamilton
Jim & Lori Harrington
Kelly & Nancy Hayworth
Hodge Construction Company
Hunan
IHOP
Iowa Children's Museum
Iowa Gymnest
Iowa Office Services
Pamela Kacmarynski
Larry & Terry Kaeding
Doug & LaVonne Kahler
Dirk Keller
Kiera Mae Photography
Steve & Jane King
King's Auto Repair
Konomi
Kum & Go
Ken Krizan
is published quarterly for the
citizens of Coralville, Iowa,
to keep them informed of city
policies and developments.
If you have comments or
suggestions concerning this or
future issues, please contact:
Lensing Oak Hill Funeral Services
Liberty Bank
Howard & Dorothy Lewis
Linn County REC
John & Diana Lundell
Massage Heights
Richard & Doris Myers
Military Surplus
MMS Consultants
Monica's
Larry Nelson
Neumann Monson Architects
Norm & Lisa Novak
Dr. William H. Olin Jr.
Olive Garden
Keeley Porter
Rachel Porter
Randy's Carpet & Interiors
Janelle Rettig
Russell's Locksmith
Audrey Safmas
Scratch Cupcakery
Servpro
Shive-Hattery ArchitectureEngineering
Dolores Slade
Lynn Snyder
Kyle Soukup
St. Thomas More Church
Standard Pest Control
Roman & Judy Steciw
Mary Sundblad
Tallgrass Business Resources
The Luxe Zone
Theisen's
Rick & Sandra Thorington
Town Square Family Foot Care
Neil & Joyce Trott
Trumbull Consulting
Two Rivers Bank
Twisted Sisters
Vesta
West Music Co.
Greg Wanzek
Kelly Wenman
Ron & Bev Wenman
Woofables
Yummy's Gourmet Cakes
Yuppy Puppy Salon and Spa
IN-KIND
Anonymous
Billion Auto
Business Radio
Costco
Daily Iowan
Fox / KXIC
Gazette
Harry's Custom Trophies
Iowa City Motorsports
KCJJ
Old Capitol Screen Printing
Pearson
Running Wild
Super 8
Thanks to the Coralville Fire Department and the 4thFEST volunteers!
Hills Bank
and Trust Company
Member FDIC
Jenn Coleman, Editor
Coralville City Hall
PO Box 5127
Coralville, IA 52241
[email protected]
John Lundell
Mayor
[email protected]
Jill Dodds
Council Member
[email protected]
Tom Gill
Council Member
[email protected]
Laurie Goodrich
Council Member
[email protected]
Mitch Gross
Council Member
[email protected]
Bill Hoeft
Council Member
[email protected]
Ellen Habel
Asst. City Administrator
[email protected]
Kelly Hayworth
City Administrator
[email protected]
City Departments
City staff welcome comments, suggestions, and concerns.
319.248.1823
Animal Control
319.248.9300
Brown Deer Golf Club
319.248.1720
Building
319.248.9370
Center for the Performing Arts
319.248.1700
City Hall
319.248.1894
FAX
319.248.1731
CoralVision T.V.
319.248.1720
Engineering
319.248.1835
Fire
911
Emergency
911
Johnson Co. Joint Communications Center
319.248.1780
Parks & Maintanence
319.248.1800
Police
911
Emergency
319.248.1850
Public Library
319.248.1890
FAX
319.248.1750
Recreation Center/Indoor Pool
319.248.1899
FAX
319.248.1720
Rental Housing Inspections
319.248.1740
Streets & Sanitation
319.248.1790
Transit
319.248.1715
Utility Billing
319.248.1745
Wastewater Treatment
319.530.6224
Emergency After Hours
319.248.1770
Water Plant
319.530.6225
Emergency After Hours
For hearing impaired dial
711 or 1.800.735.2942
Relay Iowa
www.coralville.org/letusknow
a celebration of all that is Hawkeye
www.coralville.org
319.248.1700
Connection
PRSRT STD
U.S. Postage
PAID
Iowa City, IA
Permit No. 61
City of Coralville
1512 7th Street
P.O. Box 5127
Coralville, Iowa 52241
Postal Customer
Coralville, IA
Fall Leaf Pickup
What: Curbside pickup of fall leaves is available on
regular garbage days, just like yard waste pickup.
When: Through November 30 or the first winter snowfall.
How: Place leaves curbside in Coralville biodegradable yard
waste bags, or in a 33-gallon container with an annual
yard waste sticker, or mulch/compost leaves for your
own use.
• Biodegradable Coralville yard waste bags are available
at Coralville Hy-Vee, Lenoch and Cilek Ace Hardware,
Theisen’s, and City Hall for $1 per bag.
• Annual yard waste stickers can be purchased
for $25 at City Hall
Don’t place leaves in plastic
bags; they cannot be recycled
Don’t rake leaves into streets,
ditches, or drainage ways –
this clogs storm drains
Loose leaf piles are not collected
Leaf
Collection
Tips
Stormwater Cost
Share Program
Feeds Fall Lawns
The fall season is an ideal time for deep tine
aeration and composting of lawns. Deep tine
aeration creates macro-pores in the soil with
tines longer than four inches, which provide
deep drainage, break through soil layers, and
allow grass to form deeper roots. Spreading a
layer of compost over the top is a soil quality
restoration recipe for yards to soak up more
rain water and build a greener, sustainable
lawn without chemicals. For residents considering ways to improve their lawn’s health,
funds may be available through Coralville’s
Stormwater Cost Share Program.
If you are a Coralville resident or business
property owner, the City will contribute half
the cost, up to $2,000, to help incorporate
water quality practices into your landscaping
and lawn care. The program can also help
address situations such as missing topsoil or
poor drainage. Enrollment is required before
completing the work. For more information,
contact:
Amy Foster, Stormwater Coordinator
[email protected]
319.248.1720

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