Scene: The magazine from SITA UK

Transcription

Scene: The magazine from SITA UK
THE MAGAZINE FROM SITA UK | WINTER 2014
WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES
TO IMPROVE URBAN RECYCLING
A LOOK BACK AT KEY
DEVELOPMENTS IN 2014
RECYCLING IN
THE UK
WHAT CAN WE
EXPECT IN 2015?
PAGE 03
PAGE 05
PAGES 06-07
PAGE 10
NEWS IN BRIEF
HAVE YOUR SAY!
Our transformation from a company that simply managed waste, to one that extracts maximum
value from the materials we collect, or handle, on behalf of our customers continues to take
shape – marked by our significant investment in new material treatment facilities.
We have made good progress in building many of these new facilities over the last year,
particularly at our new energy-from-waste (EfW) plant in Suffolk, which is now up and running
and will be officially open next year.
In 2015, we will continue to develop and expand our offer to customers, through new
infrastructure, with the opening of a large materials recycling facility (MRF) in Birmingham and
two solid recovered fuel (SRF) plants, in Rugby and at Tilbury docks. These facilities enable
us to manufacture sustainable fuels for energy-intensive industries using waste material
that would have historically gone to landfill.
Thousands of our customers and
stakeholders receive this publication,
and we’d like to know what you think?
Let us know if you find Scene a good
read and what we could improve to
make this magazine more interesting
and relevant to you.
Have your say and vote for the article that
speaks to you the most by contacting us at
[email protected] – the first
50 readers to get in touch will receive
a gift from us.
As the company moves further into this manufacturing area we have introduced
new methods of working within the company, including updates to our information
technology systems.
We realise that lean, efficient manufacturing and the capture of information for analysis
will be important, both for us and our customers, in designing and delivering the
right service solutions.
We look forward to working with both our existing and new customers to deliver
quality services that help make your sustainability ambitions a reality.
David Palmer-Jones
Chief Executive Officer, SITA UK
CONTENTS
FIND OUT MORE
03 THE UR[BIN] ISSUE
Working with communities to
improve urban recycling.
05 IN RETROSPECT
A look back at key developments
in 2014.
08 ECODESIGN
Ecodesign for televisions.
10 FUTURE GAZING
What can we expect in 2015?
The RSA's Great Recovery
and SITA UK are collaborating!
06-07
IF YOU HAVE ANY COMMENTS ABOUT SCENE
OR YOU WOULD LIKE TO FIND OUT MORE,
PLEASE EMAIL [email protected]
OR WRITE TO KATARZYNA MALINOWSKA AT SITA UK,
SITA HOUSE, GRENFELL ROAD, MAIDENHEAD,
BERKSHIRE, SL6 1ES.
WWW.SITA.CO.UK
Digital tool puts UK recycling
on the map.
09 Q&A
An interview with Kevan Sproul,
Director of Human Resources.
11 SITA TRUST
The success of Landfill Tax.
PRODUCTION: ISO14001/9001 accredited mill,
NAPM ISO 9706 accredited. Manufactured from
100% waste from Green Field Park. FSC® recycled
100%. Printed by an ISO14001 environmentally
responsible print company. Printed using soya
based inks on 100% recycled FSC® paper.
DESIGN: K4 Creative | www.k4creative.com
THE UR[BIN] ISSUE
THE
UR[BIN]
ISSUE
"Peo
ple
just
kno
don
w w
't
hat
be
can
rec
ycle
Man
d"
che
ster
IN SEPTEMBER, SITA UK AND KEEP BRITAIN TIDY LAUNCHED A NEW
REPORT CALLED THE UR[BIN] ISSUE - AN IN-DEPTH STUDY INTO ATTITUDES
TOWARDS RECYCLING IN THE UK’S TOWNS AND CITIES.
hile recycling rates have improved greatly
since 2000, figures released by Defra in late
November 2014 show that the rate of recycling in the
UK is slowing down – whilst we are recycling around
43 per cent of our waste, we are way behind other
leading EU countries such as Belgium (56 per cent)
and Austria (62 per cent).
ENGAGEMENT
W
Encouraging people to recycle in towns and cities
is one of the big challenges we need to tackle if we
are to make a step-change in recycling, so the idea
behind the report was to speak to residents and find
out what they think could help.
Our research took place in Lewisham in London and
Manchester. These areas were chosen because they
have high levels of multi-occupancy households
where recycling can often be more challenging.
Research took the form of citizen’s jury panels
and participants came up with 10 insightful
suggestions on how to improve recycling in
our towns and cities – these have been divided
into three main areas: (see right).
The findings were echoed by an online poll of 1000
households in the UK. It is clear that the Government,
communities and waste management companies all
need to work together to raise awareness, both of
the benefits of recycling and its inherent value, and
to create an environment where it is convenient
and easy to treat waste as a resource.
1
Create new and deeper public debate on the value of resources and waste.
2
Continue to invest in communication.
3
Profile the environmental, social and economic benefits of the waste and resource sector.
MOTIVATION
4
Enable local authorities to introduce local tax rebates for recycling more and reducing waste.
5
Rebuild trust in recycling and demonstrate local community benefits.
INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICE PROVISION
6
An overarching framework to drive greater consistency
in terms of waste and recycling infrastructure and
service provision across England.
7
Food waste collections for all households by 2016.
8
City and town council planning requirements should
include household recycling obligations for
developers (particularly for flats).
9
We need a revolution in the provision of recycling on the go.
10
Eco-design for waste prevention and recycling.
"We
shou
ld s
impo
prea
rtan
d
rec
t me
ycli
ssag
ng c
e
s:
rea
and
tes
save
jobs
s mo
ney
Lew
"
isha
m
"It i
s im
por
to u
tant
se w
hat
ava
is
ilab
le, w
it is
hilst
ava
ilab
le"
Lew
isha
m
t I
tha
ad
an
el b
e
o
f
t
e
"I
out
com
o
t
n
fi d
had
is to
h
c
t
n e
e
orta
t lik
imp
even
e
h
g"
ut t
clin
abo
ecy
r
of r
e
t
s
che
Man
If you are interested in finding out more about the report and its findings you can listen to a recording of a webinar organised by
Letsrecycle.com, where Tim Burns, Evidence and Policy Manager at Keep Britain Tidy and SITA UK’s Gev Edujlee, Director of External Affairs,
present the key findings of the report and answer questions from the audience.
You can listen to it on http://www.letsrecycle.com/events/webinars/ and download the report from www.sita.co.uk/downloads
03 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
CIRCULAR ECONOMY
THE WORLDS OF DESIGN
AND WASTE COLLIDE
AS THE GREAT RECOVERY
COMES TO SITA UK IN SURREY
THE
CIRCULAR
ECONOMY
THE RSA’S (ROYAL SOCIETY FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT
OF ARTS, MANUFACTURES AND COMMERCE) GREAT
RECOVERY AND SITA UK ARE COLLABORATING ON
A VERY EXCITING PROJECT.
his collaboration will help the industry tackle
the issue of bulky waste. Sophie Thomas,
RSA Co-Director of Design shares with us details
of the project:
T
"The RSA’s Great Recovery project has been engaging
designers and manufacturers with issues of waste,
resource use and the circular economy since 2012.
The first focused design residency, run by the Great
Recovery in partnership with SITA UK, kicked off
on 01 December at the Leatherhead community
recycling site and waste transfer station.
"A small group of designers are examining the
bulky waste stream, which includes domestic items
such as carpets, furniture and mattresses, of which
1.5 million tonnes are collected in the UK each year.
Most of these items currently end up in landfill or
energy-from-waste facilities, but much could be reused.
"The 10-day residency project takes place between
December and early February and will involve
exploring Surrey waste and re-use sites with a
group of chosen designers.
"The ultimate aim is to discover new opportunities
for designing out waste and recovering maximum
material value from the bulky waste stream.
By bringing creative value to traditional waste
sites and by ‘immersing’ designers in current
disposal processes, we hope to uncover challenging
hotspots and finally to develop designs for new
products or services that can be shared as
best practice in the industry."
04 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
mas
ign
ie Tho
f Des
Soph
tor o
c
e
ir
o-D
RSA C
A DATE
FOR YO
UR DI
ARY
L
etsrec
ycle.co
m hosts
22 Jan
a web
uary 2
inar o
015 at
n
1.00pm
- 2.00p
If you
m.
are in
tereste
out ab
d in fin
out ind
ding
ustria
a circ
l soluti
ular e
ons fo
c
o
n
r
o
free lu
my, tu
nchtim
ne in to
e sess
this
ion.
Sophie
Thoma
s will b
the ro
e inve
le of d
stigat
esign
ing
econo
in the
my, wh
circula
il
e
SITA U
r
Stuar
t Hayw
K's
ard-H
Develo
igham,
pment
Technic
D
ir
ector,
how w
al
will tell
e take
us abo
a circ
conce
ut
ular e
pt fro
conom
m philo
y
and pr
sophy
actica
to
ta
ngible
l indus
trial s
olution
s.
Registe
r at:
www.le
tsrecy
cle.com
/events
/webin
ars
IN RETROSPECT
SPOTLIGHT
ON 2014
JANUARY
)
(Scotland
The Waste
e
m
a
c
ns
Regulatio
requiring
into force,
t
to presen
businesses
bles
la
c
y
c
re
their dry
some
(and for
e)
food wast
s,
se
es
in
bus
ction.
le
ol
c
r
fo
separately
HERE’S A LOOK BACK AT KEY EVENTS
AND DEVELOPMENTS THAT
SHAPED OUR INDUSTRY THIS YEAR.
FEBRUARY
SITA UK launched its
report Mind the Gap,
warning of
a shortfall in
residual waste
treatment capacity.
MAY
The Wa
ste Reg
ulations
Routem
ap was
launche
d to he
lp
council
s meet
the
require
ment fo
r
separa
te colle
ctions.
d of
lmes, Hea
Chris Ho
n
e
e
t the Gr
Waste a
k
n
nt Ba
Investme
a report
d
e
h
lis
pub
e
the wast
g
n
supporti
ore
m
r
fo
's call
industry
st
wa e
nt in UK
investme
ity.
c
nt capa
treatme
JULY
AUGUST
OCTOBER
SITA UK launched an interactive UK recycling map.
The parliamentary Environment, Food and Rural
Affairs Committee published its report on waste
management in England, calling for greater
engagement from Defra.
The new MRF Regulations came into force.
Retailers in Scotland started mandatory charges
for single-use carrier bags.
The ESA Educational Trust launched a report on
waste crime in England, for which the spring
budget pledged an additional £5 million towards
enforcement. The House of Lords Science
& Technology Committee published its report
Waste or Resource? Stimulating a bioeconomy.
The report’s recommendation that a 'waste
champion' be appointed within BIS was adopted
by the Government.
The inaugural Resource Event.
APRIL
The European
Commission adopted
the statement
'Towards a circular
economy,' with
a legislative proposal
to review recycling
and other wasterelated targets.
MARCH
The London Mayors' Infrastructure Plan
called for 40 new recycling facilities
in the capital by 2050.
Defra delivery body WRAP
unveiled plans to apply for
charitable status in
order to diversify
funding and
increase flexibility.
NOVEMBER
The ESA and CIWM formed a new partnership
working body, Resources & Waste UK.
Karmenu Vella replaced Janez Potocnik as
Environment Commissioner of the European
Union, taking over responsibility for the circular
economy package.
Peter Gerstrom, CEO of Cory Environmental, took over
the chairmanship of the ESA from David Palmer-Jones.
Defra published the latest recycling figures for
England, confirming flat-lining recycling rates.
JUNE
David Palmer-Jones
was appointed
President of FEAD,
the European
Federation of Waste
Management and
Environmental
Services.
SEPTEMBER
RWM and CIWM held their annual conference
and exhibition.
The Pledge4Plastics campaign was launched, to
boost recycling of plastic packaging in the UK.
SITA UK and Keep Britain Tidy
published The Ur[bin] Issue,
an inquiry into boosting
urban recycling.
DECEMBER
of the
option
The ad
Work
mission
EU Com
e
th
mme is
Progra
ular,
c
ti
r
a
in p
focus c
ir ular
r the c
whethe
age,
k
y pac
w,
econom
r revie
e
d
n
tly u
curren
t.
c
vive inta
will sur
05 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
RECYCLING IN
THE UK
DIGITAL TOOL
PUTS UK
RECYCLING
ON THE MAP
EARLIER THIS YEAR, AS PART OF A NATIONAL STUDY,
KEEP BRITAIN TIDY ASKED HOUSEHOLDERS WHAT THEY
WOULD DO TO IMPROVE PARTICIPATION IN RECYCLING
ACROSS THE COUNTRY.
he findings of the study, which was commissioned
by SITA UK, were published in a report called
The Ur[Bin] Issue in which Keep Britain Tidy made ten clear
recommendations to help improve recycling performance,
based directly on feedback from householders (there's more
information about the report on page 3).
T
One of those recommendations, which were made to
everyone involved in the recycling sector, was to continue
to invest in communication and to create a deeper public
debate on the subject – leading to more engaged and
motivated recyclers.
As such, we took the decision to publish and update an
interactive digital map to collate and present publically
available recycling data for each local authority across
the country, in an easy-to-use format.
SITA UK commissioned the spatial analytics team at planning
and economics consultancy, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners
(NLP), to produce the UK recycling map, which primarily
colour codes councils based on their recycling performance
relative to the national average – enabling residents to see
how their own performance shapes up against neighbouring
authorities and the rest of the country.
We want to keep the map updated annually and the tool was
updated in November to show the latest annual recycling
figures for English local authorities, as published by Defra
on 18 November.
We hope that people find this tool useful and we would like
to thank WRAP and Resource media for providing much of
the raw data that made it possible.
06 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
ABOUT THE MAP
The online digital tool allows users to click
on individual local authorities to view a range
of information about recycling services and
performance for each authority, which was
compiled from a number of different, largely public,
data sources.
Current data on waste collection schemes
and materials was provided by WRAP and the
household recycling rate figures are those
reported by the Scottish Environmental Protection
Agency (SEPA) for 2013, the Department for
the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra)
for 2013/14, StatsWales for 2013/14 and
DOENI for 2013/14.
The colour coding of the map aims to group local
authorities relative to the national average recycling
rate and the UK’s EU 2020 target of 50 per cent.
Basing the average recycling rate for England
(43.5 per cent) in the middle of the scale, local
authorities falling below 30 per cent have been
coloured red, those between 30-40 per cent
coloured amber, 40-50 per cent yellow,
50-60 per cent green, and those achieving
60 per cent + have been coloured dark green.
www.ukrecyclingmap.co.uk
RECYCLING IN
THE UK
CLICK ON
INDIVIDUAL LOCAL
AUTHORITIES TO
VIEW A RANGE OF
INFORMATION
THE COLOUR CODING OF THE MAP
AIMS TO GROUP LOCAL AUTHORITIES
RELATIVE TO THE NATIONAL AVERAGE
RECYCLING RATE AND THE UK’S EU
2020 TARGET OF 50 PER CENT
07 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
ECODESIGN
ECODESIGN
FOR TELEVISIONS
Gev Eduljee, Director of External Affairs, SITA UK
THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION HAS TAKEN A SMALL BUT
IMPORTANT STEP TO INTRODUCE RESOURCE-EFFICIENT
AND CIRCULAR THINKING INTO PRODUCT DESIGN.
evision of the Ecodesign Directive to include
consideration of resource efficiency alongside
energy efficiency has always been regarded as a
key piece of work, but this is a slow and painstaking
process as the Commission works its way through
the myriad product types on the market.
R
However, a start has been made, with the
Commission’s proposals to revise the ecodesign
standards for televisions and electronic displays.
The proposals introduce, for the first time, not just
consideration of the product’s energy efficiency,
but also of its recyclability and potential for re-use.
Manufacturers have voluntarily agreed to provide
information into a centralised database about
average material composition of the units to
support the development of recycling technologies,
for example of valuable rare earth materials such
as indium. The presence or absence of certain
hazardous materials (such as mercury) must be
indicated on the unit, and plastic parts must
also be marked; again to facilitate recycling.
Perhaps most radical is the requirement to prepare
an ‘end-of-life report’ containing information relevant
for disassembly, recycling and/or recovery when the
product reaches the end of its operating life.
08 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
This report is to include an exploded diagram
of the product with labelling of the targeted
components, and detailed documentation of the
sequence of the dismantling operations needed to
access these components (unscrewing, removing,
snap-fit, etc). Information that has tended to be
treated as proprietary will now be placed in
open-source form and shared with dismantlers
and recyclers – a huge step in opening up the
re-use and recycling market.
The Commission could no doubt have gone
further – for example requiring products to
incorporate a minimum recycled content.
SITA UK BLOG
Keep an eye out for blog posts
from Dr Gev Eduljee, our Director
of External Affairs and other
contributors on the SITA UK blog:
www.puttingwastetogooduse.co.uk
But the current proposals are a promising start
and a reference point for other product types
when they come up for consideration in 2015
as part of the work programme on the
Commission’s Circular Economy package.
Passionate about what they do, our
contributors are sharing insights into
recycling and waste management as well
as their views on wider policy, economic
and environmental affairs.
Q&A
THE RECYCLING
AND RESOURCE
INDUSTRY IS
CHANGING AND
SO IS SITA UK
Kevan
Directo
Sproul
r of Hu
man Re
source
s
WE ASKED OUR DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES, KEVAN SPROUL, ABOUT
HIS VIEW ON THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF THE GREEN JOBS MARKET.
READ ON TO FIND OUT ABOUT SOME OF THE CHALLENGES FACING SITA UK’S
HR TEAM, AND HOW THESE ARE SHAPING THEIR PRIORITIES FOR 2015.
YOU HAVE RECENTLY CELEBRATED
A 12-YEAR MILESTONE AT SITA UK.
WHAT HAS MADE YOU STAY IN THE
INDUSTRY FOR OVER A DECADE?
IN OUR LAST ISSUE (SCENE, SUMMER 2014),
WE TALKED ABOUT PROMISING GROWTH
IN THE GREEN JOBS MARKET. WHAT ARE
YOUR HR PRIORITIES FOR 2015?
I enjoy my job, the people I work with and the
fact that the industry and our company are going
through a transformation. Our developing processes
require employees with different skills and experience
than those historically found within SITA UK.
Increasingly we have discussions around the
topic of employer brand. These have made me
wonder what makes people join SITA UK. What is
the overall message and impression that we give
to potential employees?
We have had to seek these skills and experience
in new and different ways. This has certainly
presented a number of challenges to my HR team.
Of course there are many individual and often
personal reasons for joining - career, promotion,
location, etc. However, one reason most people give
in their top two or three reasons, was their wish to
'be green' or to 'give something back to society.'
CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THESE
CHALLENGES?
The first challenge is how, and where, to find
these individuals. Once we've found them, we
must convince them that SITA UK does more than
just collect waste – and that the challenges of our
production process can offer them a rewarding
future career.
Change is a constant word here at SITA UK, and
the above just scratches the surface of what we
are currently up to.
Perhaps this rationale should form the basis for our
employer brand, because there are few things that
will commit an employee to an organisation more
than an alignment behind its social responsibility.
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN STARTING OR PROGRESSING YOUR CAREER WITHIN THE
RECYCLING AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT INDUSTRY KEEP AN EYE OUT ON KEVAN'S
POSTS ON THE SITA UK BLOG - WWW.PUTTINGWASTETOGOODUSE.CO.UK
09 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
FUTURE GAZING
FUTURE
GAZING
THE CHALLENGES AND
OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE
RECYCLING AND RESOURCE
INDUSTRY IN 2015.
WHAT CAN WE EXPECT?
or UK waste-watchers, the main event in
2015 will undoubtedly be the May elections.
None of the major political parties has revealed their
election manifestos, but pre-manifesto discussion
documents from the Conservative 2020 Group and
the Liberal Democrats suggest progressive policies
aimed at furthering the circular economy – such as
introducing landfill bans with ambitious resource
efficiency and recycling targets.
F
However, the extent to which the environment will
be a significant factor in the election is debatable.
Even the European Commission’s circular economy
proposals are being re-framed as a package for
jobs and economic growth; the major UK parties
are clearly thinking along similar lines. But with
Defra in danger of ceding its responsibility for
remains to be seen. Associated with separate
collection and recyclate quality, the new
MRF Regulations and its sampling and reporting
requirements will bed down in 2015.
Another issue to watch is that of the tax liability
associated with the landfilling of waste fines.
HMRC consulted on a physical test in June 2014,
and is currently engaged in discussions with our
industry to finalise a roll-out of the test in 2015.
waste to other departments, notably to DCLG
and BIS, the concern is that post-election it may
still not have the resources nor the funding to
engage with our sector on the sort of far-reaching
policy ideas that are under discussion.
On the regulatory front, many issues and
challenges will roll over into 2015. Waste crime
remains a high priority for our sector – we want
the Environment Agency to be adequately funded
to tackle this issue.
Separate collection of recyclates will become
a legal requirement from 01 January, subject to
considerations of practicability – ‘TEEP’ in short.
How this plays out in England, with the threat of
legal challenges hanging over local authorities,
WE WILL ALSO WATCH WITH INTEREST AS DEFRA UPDATES ITS ROLLING
ANNUAL RECYCLING PERFORMANCE FIGURES AS 2015 UNFOLDS.
10 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
We will also watch with interest as Defra updates
its rolling annual recycling performance figures as
2015 unfolds. There is still time to bridge the gap
of six percentage points between now and the
50 per cent target in 2020, though another
almost-flat increase in 2015 will put pressure
on Defra to come up with a Plan B.
But potentially the most important discussions
on the policy front in 2015 will be conducted in
the committees and parliament of the EU.
The Commission’s circular economy package
contains ambitious targets and wide-ranging
proposals to update key Directives such as the
ecodesign directive, to introduce circular economy
thinking into product design and production.
If adopted, they will have far-reaching implications
for the UK and future infrastructure requirements.
SITA TRUST
SITA
TRUST
UPDATE
SITA UK DONATES ITS LANDFILL TAX CREDITS TO SITA TRUST, AN
INDEPENDENT FUNDING ORGANISATION DEDICATED TO MAKING LASTING
IMPROVEMENTS TO THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND COMMUNITY LIFE.
USING THE FUNDS DONATED BY SITA UK, SITA TRUST HAS, TO DATE,
ALLOCATED MORE THAN £100 MILLION IN SUPPORT OF PROJECTS TO
ENHANCE COMMUNITIES AND ENRICH NATURE.
OVER 3,500 PROJECTS HAVE BEEN UNDERTAKEN SINCE 1997 THANKS TO
THIS FUNDING. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SITA TRUST, INCLUDING ONLINE
APPLICATIONS FOR ITS FUNDS, VISIT WWW.SITATRUST.ORG.UK.
THE SUCCESS
OF LANDFILL TAX
SITA TRUST’S KEY DATES OF 2014
andfill Tax is paid per tonne of material
that ends up in a landfill site – it has
escalated year on year, and the rate for 2014-15
is £80 per tonne. The purpose of this tax is to
make it expensive to put waste into landfill,
in turn encouraging us to design out waste.
FEBRUARY
Landfill operators can voluntarily redirect some
Landfill Tax liability (5.1 per cent) to support a range
of projects through the Landfill Communities Fund.
SITA UK has been donating its Landfill Tax credits to
SITA Trust since 1997.
HM Treasury announces a cut to the Landfill Tax diversion rate to 5.1 per cent,
cutting £10m from the value of the fund.
L
SITA Trust spends its 100 millionth pound. The recipient is a community hall in
Bradley near Wolverhampton.
MARCH
APRIL
SITA Trust supports nine projects with almost £150k through its fast track fund.
The Landfill Communities Fund is ultimately a selfdefeating scheme – the tax is definitely doing the job,
as recycling and re-use rates have increased since
1997’s base level and less waste is going to landfill.
Therefore in 2015 the Landfill Communities Fund,
although still a vital funding stream to communities
in the UK, is likely to be little bit leaner. As a model
of best practice in the Landfill Communities Fund,
SITA Trust is currently assisting the Treasury by
suggesting improvements to the scheme and its
flow of funding.
JUNE
60 significant biodiversity projects are supported with over £2.1m.
AUGUST
SITA Trust donates over £80k to seven projects through its fast track fund,
including its smallest grant to date – just £480!
SEPTEMBER
The largest consolidation project in generations is completed at Hadrian’s Wall.
SITA Trust is the main donor having staked half a million pounds.
OCTOBER
Funds allocated to 26 projects near SITA UK operations, over £882k offered.
NOVEMBER
Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury visits SITA Trust projects and discusses
future improvements to the Landfill Communities Fund.
DECEMBER
HADRIAN'S WALL, SCOTLAND
IMAGE CREDIT: KIRSTIE MACKIN
Funds will be allocated to fast track applications – successful applicants
will hear the good news in time for Christmas.
11 | SCENE | WINTER 2014
LET CHRISTMAS
LEFTOVERS BE A THING
OF CHRISTMAS PAST!
We’ve come up with some ideas for what to do with your surplus wrapping paper, so that you
can keep up the Christmas spirit from the comfort of your work area. We’re firm believers in
‘waste not, want not,’ and we hope you can use these ideas to reduce, reuse and recycle to
remove the burden on your bin at this time of year!
•
KEEP IT TIDY WITH AN UPDATED DESK ORGANISER.
•
MAKE FILING A DELIGHT BY COVERING AN OLD CEREAL BOX WITH WRAPPING PAPER
TO CREATE A DOCUMENT FILE.
•
NEVER LOSE YOUR PLACE AGAIN WITH A BEAUTIFUL BOOKMARK – JUST WRAP THE
OFF CUTS FROM YOUR DOCUMENT HOLDER (OLD CEREAL BOX) WITH SOME PRETTY PAPER.
•
DECK THE HALLS! CUT LOTS OF STRIPS OF WRAPPING PAPER AND CREATE A
PAPER CHAIN TO KEEP THINGS FESTIVE.
HELPING YOU REDUCE WASTE
THIS CHRISTMAS
to good
We’re all about putting waste
r Christmas stocking this year?
you
in
nge
ora
r
e!
the
urit
ano
favo
ng
our
ecti
Exp
with the peel – here’s
been looking at ways to deal
use here at SITA UK, so we’ve
ANER
MAKE YOUR OWN CITRUS CLE
1. Fill a jar with orange peel.
vinegar.
2. Top it up with white distilled
sionally.
four weeks, giving it a shake occa
it in a cool, dark place for two to
3. Pop a lid on the jar and leave
food waste bin.
ge peel for compost or put it in your
y bottle or similar and use the oran
spra
a
into
ar
vineg
the
n
Strai
e–
4.
ose cleaner in your office and hom
ented citrus cleaner as an all purp
ge-sc
oran
new
your
use
can
5. Now you
ing.
diluted with water for light clean
it’s wonderful neat or can be
DID YOU KNOW?
water stains on metal stuff too –
Orange peel makes short work of
a great polish.
just give it a rub with the peel for
For more festive tips, visit our
.com/SITAUK
Facebook page at www.facebook

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