WA Carter High School - Document Tracking Services

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WA Carter High School - Document Tracking Services
W.A. Carter
High School
2010-2011 School Accountability Report Card
Principals
Christine Foote
[email protected]
Felicia Limbrick
[email protected]
District Administration
Harold L. Cebrun, Sr., Ph.D.
Superintendent
James Wallace, Ph.D.
Casey Cridelich
Felix Avila
Associate Superintendent, Personnel Services
Jasmin Valenzuela
Assistant Superintendent, Educational Services
Robin McIver-Brown
Senior Director of Categorical Funding
Rhonda Kramer
Senior Director of Personnel
Board of Education
Joanne T. Gilbert
President
Joe Ayala
Vice President
Joseph W. Martinez
Clerk
Michael G. Ridgway
Member
Edgar Montes
Member
Kristina Fernandez
Student Member
www.rialto.k12.ca.us
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
The mission of the Rialto Unified School
District is to provide high levels of learning for
all students and to inspire people to set goals that
maximize their potential.
District Vision
The Rialto Unified School District will be a leader in providing a quality
education that prepares all students for their future.
Principals’ Message
The 2010-11 school year marks the seventh year of existence for Carter High
School. The Class of 2011 has the distinction of being the sixth graduating class of
Carter High School. Our school has developed into an excellent house of learning. The
leadership efforts of our outstanding staff, coupled with a supportive parent/guardian and
business community, have greatly influenced the success of Carter High School. We have
refined our vision to reflect our goals for student success with the involvement of the entire
school community. When Carter High School opened, “Creating a Family Oriented Learning
Environment,” was the central theme of the school’s vision. As Carter has begun to establish
its traditions and school culture, the vision has been modified to encourage cultural and social
awareness, respect, and collaboration as a means to empower students to be life-long learners
who contribute and lead in a global society.
Linden Avenue • Rialto
.
N
0
, CA
263
923
77
•
Assistant Superintendent, Business Services
(90
9)
Associate Superintendent, Student Services
00
1
-4
4
85
3 Fax
1
3
7
74
District
5
)
Mission
Statement
9
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•
Carter High School is reaching new heights of rigor by increasing our Advanced Placement offering
during the 2010-2011 school year. Grade 11 students were able to choose from new AP courses such
as AP English Language and AP U.S. History. The increase in AP courses allows Carter students
the opportunity to earn college credit and increase their GPA to make them more competitive in the
application process for the CSU/UC programs across California. Carter celebrated its third and final
group of International Baccalaureate diploma candidates. The IB program has been a valuable program
for many of our students and Carter High School prides itself on responding to students academic
needs.
Community & School Profile
Nestled below the San Bernardino Mountains, the City of Rialto lies in the western portion of the San
Bernardino Valley. Rialto is 60 miles to the east of Los Angeles and 103 miles north of San Diego.
Located in northern Rialto, Carter High School operates
on a traditional calendar schedule. The school served
2,498 ninth through twelfth grade students during
the 2010-11 school year. Student demographics are
displayed in the chart.
Rialto Unified School District served 27,026 students in
grades kindergarten through twelve during the 201011 school year. Comprised of 19 elementary schools,
five middle schools, three traditional high schools,
one alternative high school, one continuation high
school, and a community day school, the district
offers instruction on both traditional and yearround schedules.
1
Student Enrollment by Ethnic Group
2010-11
Percentage
African American
25.8%
American Indian
0.4%
Asian
1.4%
Filipino
0.6%
Hispanic or Latino
61.7%
Pacific Islander
0.2%
White
9.3%
Two or More
0.2%
None Reported
0.4%
Published: February 2012
Discipline & Climate for Learning
Class Size
The goal of Carter High School’s progressive discipline program is to provide
students with opportunities to learn self-discipline through a system of
consistent rewards and consequences for their behavior. The school-wide
discipline plan, which reflects the district’s behavior code, is implemented
in a consistent and positive manner. Well-managed classrooms, and clearly
defined expectations and consequences have resulted in an environment
where learning flourishes.
The chart shows the average class size by subject area, as well as the
number of classes offered in reference to their enrollment.
Class Size Distribution
Classrooms Containing:
Average
Class Size
Parents/Guardians and students are informed of discipline policies at the
beginning of each school year through mass mailings, Back-to-School Night,
and the Parent/Guardian Information Brochure. Rules are reinforced at
assemblies and within each classroom.
09
Suspensions & Expulsions
Suspension Rate
09-10
10-11
08-09
09-10
10-11
599
1044
576
6895
8625
5662
23.3%
40.7%
23.1%
25.1%
31.7%
21.0%
12
38
17
147
142
77
0.5%
1.5%
0.7%
0.5%
0.5%
0.3%
Expulsions
Expulsion Rate
10
11
09
10
11
09
10
11
English
28
24
28
18
35
21
45
47
47
32
30
37
Mathematics
32
23
27
4
36
18
28
49
38
45
22
31
Science
31
28
32
5
13
5
28
26
25
28
31
34
Social Science
31
28
31
6
11
8
19
21
11
35
34
33
Leadership at Carter High School is a responsibility shared among district
administration, the principals, instructional staff, students, and parents/
guardians. Primary leadership duties at the school have been assumed by
Principal Christine Foote and Principal Felicia Limbrick since July 2009. Staff
members are encouraged to participate on various committees that make
decisions regarding the priorities and direction of the educational plan. These
teams ensure that instructional programs are consistent with students’ needs
and comply with district goals. Avenues of opportunity include: Leadership
Team, English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC), School Site Council
(SSC), Departments, PLC Guiding Coalition, Parent Involvement Team (PIT)
and Instructional Leaders Team.
Homework
Homework is a fundamental part of the learning process that helps to develop
academic and study skills, as well as promote student responsibility and
self-discipline. Homework is assigned on a nightly basis for all grade levels
and major subject areas. Each teacher determines the appropriate level of
homework for his or her students. Students are expected to complete their
homework assignments in a timely manner and to the best of their ability.
Parents/Guardians are encouraged to provide a supportive environment for
homework activities and to review homework assignments with their child.
School Enrollment & Attendance
School districts receive financial support from the state for the education
of the students they serve based on how many students attend each day.
Most importantly, attendance is critical to academic achievement. Student
attendance is carefully monitored to identify those students exhibiting
excessive absences.
Attendance, tardy, and truancy policies are clearly stated, consistently
enforced, and consequences are fairly administered. Parents/Guardians are
advised of their responsibilities, including proper notification of when and why
students are absent. The school staff makes daily phone calls to parents/
guardians when children are absent. When a student has repeated tardies
or unexcused absences a letter is mailed home, and a parent/guardian
conference may be scheduled.
Student Recognition
Positive recognition creates a learning environment that fosters respect for the
individual and promotes self-esteem. In addition to verbal praise, the following
awards and recognition programs are ongoing at Carter High School: Noontime activities, Certificates, Rallies, Announcements, School Newspaper,
Honor Roll & Senior Awards Nights, Sports Assemblies, Positive phone calls/
postcards to parents, Parent Link, School Marquee, Achievement Luncheons
and CAHSEE Proficiency Field Trip.
In the event of habitual truancy, students may be referred to the District’s
School Attendance Review Board (SARB). The SARB is utilized when
students
have
persistent
Enrollment Trend by Grade Level
attendance and behavior problems
in school, and when the normal
2008-09 2009-10 2010-11
avenues of classroom, school, and
9th
657
667
655
district counseling are not effective.
The chart illustrates the trend in
10th
676
661
638
enrollment at the school over the
11th
656
629
626
past three years.
12th
578
606
579
Extracurricular & Enrichment Activities
Students are encouraged to participate in academic and extracurricular
activities, which are an integral part of the educational program. Activities
and programs include the following: Junior ROTC, National Honor Society,
Interact, Associated Student Body (ASB), Art Club, Competitive Speech,
Thespians, Ceramics Club, Science Club, After-school sports activities,
Dance Team, Academic Decathlon, Athletic Club, AVID Club (Advancement
Via Individual Determination), MESA (Mathematics Engineering Science
Achievement), O.L.A. (Organization of Latin American Cultures), B.S.L.A.
(Black Student Leadership Association), Key Club, and Girls Empowering and
Motivating Self (G.E.M.S.).
Dropout &
Graduation Rates
In a continuing effort to reduce the student dropout rate, Carter High School
has developed instructional alternatives for students with difficulties. Among
the programs offered, counseling, attendance incentives, referral to alternative
schools, and teacher intervention have proven to be most effective.
Parent & Community Involvement
Parents and the community are very supportive of the educational program at
Carter High School. Parents are encouraged to become involved in their child’s
education by volunteering at the school, participating in school activities, and
joining the School Site Council, English Learner Advisory Committee, Parent
Involvement Team (PIT) and Booster Clubs.
Graduation & Dropout Rates
Numerous programs at the school have been enhanced due to generous
contributions and donations from local businesses and service organizations.
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
09
33+
Students
School Leadership
District
08-09
Suspensions
11
21-32
Students
By Subject Area
The suspensions and expulsions table below illustrates total cases for the
school and district for all grade levels, as well as the percentage of total
enrollment. Suspensions are expressed in terms of total infractions, not total
number of students, as some students may have been suspended on several
occasions. Expulsions occur only when required by law or when all other
alternatives are exhausted.
School
10
1-20
Students
2
07-08
08-09
09-10
Dropout Rate
4.30%
2.90%
3.70%
Graduation Rate
81.13%
85.18%
82.27%
Published: February 2012
Counseling & Support Staff
Due to the state fiscal crisis, additional funding from the State of California that
would provide an opportunity to offer district-wide professional development
through “Buy Back Days” has not been available for the past three years.
Rialto Unified School District (RUSD) has worked within the state fiscal
crisis to provide an alternative plan of action for staff development, and has
established a comprehensive District-wide Professional Development Center
(PDC). The PDC provides ongoing staff development in a variety of formats
throughout the school year (i.e. after school, on-site, weekends, and during
instructional breaks). In addition to the PDC, teachers have access to online
materials as another alternative professional development format. Finally,
with district and union collaboration, early release/collaboration days have
been established at secondary schools to support RUSD’s commitment to
on-going professional development.
In addition to academics, the staff strives to assist students in their social
and personal development. Staff members are trained to recognize at-risk
behavior in all students. The school values the importance of on-site
counseling and has procedures in place to insure that students receive the
services they need. Staff members are devoted to helping students deal with
problems and assisting them to reach positive goals. The counselor-to-pupil
ratio is 1:625. The chart displays a list of support services that are offered to
students.
Counseling & Support Services Staff
Number
of Staff
Full Time
Equivalent
Academic Counselor
4
4.0
At Risk Counselor
1
1.0
Career Technician
1
1.0
Health Clerk
1
1.0
Language Development Strategist (LDS)
1
1.0
Librarian
1
1.0
Library Media Technician
2
2.0
Nurse
1
1.0
Psychologist
1
0.8
Resource Specialist Program (RSP)
Teacher
4
4.0
08-09
09-10
10-11
10-11
Special Day Class (SDC) Teacher
7
7.0
Fully Credentialed
95
111
113
1124
Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist
1
0.5
Without Full Credentials
7
1
1
1
WorkAbility Specialist
1
1.0
Working Outside Subject
0
0
2
13
For additional support in their profession, teachers may enlist the services
of the District’s Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment (BTSA) support
provider and/or the Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) Program.
Teacher Assignment
Rialto Unified School District recruits and employs only the most qualified
credentialed teachers. During the 2010-11 school year, Carter High School
staffed 113 fully certificated teachers who met all credential requirements in
accordance with the state guidelines.
Teacher Credential Status
School
Teacher misassignments reflect the number of placements within a school for
which the certificated employee in the teaching or services position (including
positions that involve teaching English Learners) does not hold a legally
recognized certificate or credential.
At-Risk Interventions
Carter High School offers guidance counseling, intervention classes and
tutoring for students who may be falling below grade-level standards. Summer
school courses are also offered through the district.
Teacher vacancies reflect the number of positions to which a single designated
certificated employee has not been assigned at the beginning of the year for
an entire year. For the 2011-12 school year, the most current available data
are reported.
English Learners (EL)
English Learner (EL) students designated as Level I or II are placed in the
Newcomer Program at Rialto High School. Level I or II individuals are assigned
to appropriately credentialed teachers and offered sheltered instruction using
English Language Development (ELD) materials. EL students who are at
Level III, IV, or V are integrated into mainstream classrooms at Carter High
and provided with English language support. The school offers tutoring to the
parents/guardians of EL students so that they may better support their child’s
educational and homework needs at home.
Misassignments/Vacancies
Special Education
Students with special education needs are accommodated with a variety
of options and in the least restrictive environment possible. An Individual
Education Plan (IEP) is developed for any student with emotional, social, and/
or developmental disabilities. The IEP defines the individualized instruction a
special needs student will receive, which may include placement in one of the
Special Day Classes, the Resource Specialist Program, and/or sessions with
other members of the support staff.
09-10
10-11
11-12
Misassignments of Teachers of English Learners
0
0
0
Misassignments of Teachers (other)
0
0
0
Total Misassignments of Teachers
0
0
0
Vacant Teacher Positions
0
0
0
Highly Qualified Teachers
The Federal No Child Left Behind Act requires that all teachers in core
subject areas meet certain requirements in order to be considered as
“Highly Qualified” no later than the end of the 2006-07 school year. Minimum
qualifications include: Possession of a Bachelor’s Degree, Possession of an
appropriate California teaching credential, Demonstrated competence in core
academic subjects.
Teacher Evaluation & Professional Development
NCLB Compliant Teachers
A constructive evaluation process promotes quality instruction and is a
fundamental element in a sound educational program. Evaluations and formal
observations are designed to encourage common goals and to comply with
the state’s evaluation criteria and district policies. Temporary and probationary
teachers are evaluated annually and tenured teachers are evaluated every
other year.
Evaluations are conducted by the principal, who has been trained and certified
for competency to perform teacher evaluations. Evaluations are based on
the “California Standards for the Teaching Profession,” which include the
following: Engaging and Supporting all Students in Learning; Understanding
and Organizing Subject Matter for Student Learning; Assessing Student
Learning; Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student
Learning; Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for all
Students; and Developing as a Professional Educator.
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
District
3
% of Core
Academic
Courses
Taught
By NCLB
Compliant
Teachers
% of Core
Academic
Courses
Taught By
Non-NCLB
Compliant
Teachers
School
99.1%
0.9%
District
97.7%
2.3%
High-Poverty Schools in District
97.7%
2.3%
Low-Poverty Schools in District
N/A
N/A
Published: February 2012
Advancement Via Individual Determination
The Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) Program targets students with grade point averages ranging from 2.5 to 3.5, and who may be the first
of their families to attend college. Through AVID, the school provides activities to prepare students for success in post-secondary education. Communication,
organization, note-taking, writing, and study skills are instructional emphases in AVID.
Student Achievement & Testing
Rialto Unified School District has developed a comprehensive assessment and accountability plan to ensure that information regarding student performance
is used to continuously improve the instructional program and to communicate with parents/guardians about their child’s achievement. In addition to the
Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program, teachers utilize district Benchmark Assessments, Common formative assessments, classroom
observations, class work, homework, report cards, and reports to determine whether each student is performing below, at, or above grade level standards.
English Learner (EL) students take the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) every year until they have been re-classified as “English
proficient.” Some learning-disabled students take the California Alternative Performance Assessment (CAPA) in lieu of the California Standards Test (CST).
California Standards Test (CST)
The California Standards Test (CST), a component of the STAR Program, is administered to all students in the spring to assess student performance in relation
to the State Content Standards. Student scores are reported as performance levels: Advanced (exceeds state standards), Proficient (meets standards), Basic
(approaching standards), Below Basic (below standards), and Far Below Basic (well below standards).
The first table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) in English/language
arts, mathematics, social science, and science, for the most recent three-year period.
California Standards Test (CST)
The second table displays the percent of students, by
group, achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level
(meeting or exceeding the state standards) for the
most recent testing period.
For detailed information regarding the STAR Program
results for each grade and performance level, including
the percent of students not tested, see the CDE STAR
Results Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov.
Subject
School
District
State
2009
2010
2011
2009
2010
2011
2009
2010
English/Language Arts
32
38
40
37
40
42
49
52
2011
54
Mathematics
9
11
15
33
37
38
46
48
50
Science
31
33
44
40
46
52
50
54
57
History/Social Science
23
24
35
27
29
36
41
44
48
*Scores are not disclosed when fewer than 10 students are tested in a grade level and/or subgroup.
California Standards Test (CST)
Subgroups
English/
Language
Arts
Mathematics
Science
History/
Social
Science
District
42
38
52
36
School
40
15
44
35
African American/
Black
32
10
33
25
*
*
*
*
Asian
64
41
*
69
Filipino
60
40
*
*
Hispanic or Latino
39
15
42
36
Subject
American Indian
Pacific Islander
White
*
*
*
*
62
27
76
55
Males
36
17
46
39
Females
43
13
41
31
Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged
40
15
45
36
English Learners
7
5
15
14
Students with
Disabilities
13
11
*
8
*Scores are not disclosed when fewer than 10 students are tested in a grade level
and/or subgroup.
Physical Fitness
Percentage of Students in Healthy Fitness Zone
In the spring of each year, the school is required by the state to administer a physical
fitness test to all ninth grade students. The physical fitness test measures each
student’s ability to perform fitness tasks in six major areas: Aerobic Capacity, Body
Composition, Abdominal Strength, Trunk Extension Strength, Upper Body Strength,
and Flexibility. Students who either meet or exceed the standards in all six fitness
areas are considered to be physically fit or in the “healthy fitness zone” (HFZ).
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
4
2010-11
Grade Level
Four of Six
Standards
Five of Six
Standards
Six of Six
Standards
9
23.5%
23.5%
29.4%
*Scores are not disclosed when fewer than 10 students are tested
in a grade level and/or subgroup.
Published: February 2012
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is a federal law enacted in January 2002 that reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). It mandates
that all students (including students who are economically disadvantaged, are from racial or ethnic minority groups, have disabilities, or have limited
English proficiency) in all grades meet the state academic achievement standards for mathematics and English/language arts (ELA) by 2014. Schools must
demonstrate “Adequate Yearly Progress” (AYP) toward achieving that goal. The Federal NCLB Act requires that all schools and districts meet the following
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements:
• Participation rate on the state’s standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics.
• Percent proficient on the state’s standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics.
• API as an additional indicator.
• Graduation rate (for secondary schools).
Schools that do not meet the AYP standards and are poor performing could face possible consequences, such as additional tutoring and replacing of staff.
Also, students would be allowed to transfer to schools (within their district) that have met their AYP, and the former school would be required to provide the
transportation to the new site. Results of school and district performance are displayed in the table.
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
School
District
No
No
Made AYP Overall
English Language
Arts
Mathematics
English Language
Arts
Mathematics
Participation Rate
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Percent Proficient
No
No
No
Met AYP Criteria
No
API School Results
Yes
Yes
Graduation Rate
No
Yes
Academic Performance Index (API)
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a score on a scale of 200 to 1,000 that annually measures
the academic performance and progress of individual schools in California. The state has set 800 as
the API score that schools should strive to achieve.
Statewide Rank: Schools receiving an API Base score are ranked in ten categories from 1 (lowest) to
10 (highest), according to type of school (elementary, middle, or high school).
Similar Schools Rank: Schools also receive a ranking that compares that school to 100 other schools
with similar demographic characteristics. Each set of 100 schools is ranked by API score from 1
(lowest) to 10 (highest) to indicate how well the school performed compared to similar schools.
The first table displays the school’s statewide and similar schools’ API ranks and API point changes
by student group. “C” means the school had significant demographic changes and will not have any
growth or target information.
The second table displays, by student group, the 2011 Growth API at the school, district, and state
level.
Growth API
School
Number
of
Students
District
Growth
Score
Number
of
Students
Growth
Score
Growth
Score
1,700
715
18,885
746
4,683,676
778
Black or African American
422
677
2,688
712
317,856
696
Asian
22
827
193
852
398,869
898
Filipino
13
850
101
895
123,245
859
1,071
714
14,686
747
2,406,749
729
156
802
942
783
1,258,831
845
1,695
678
18,805
739
2,731,843
726
English Learners
418
673
7,606
726
1,521,844
707
Students with Disabilities
149
472
1,825
547
521,815
595
White
Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
5
2009
2010
2
3
3
Similar Schools
2
3
3
08-09
09-10
10-11
Group
All Students at the School
Actual API Change
28
15
C
Black or African American
Actual API Change
24
-7
C
27
C
17
C
Hispanic or Latino
Actual API Change
Actual API Change
All Students at the School
Hispanic or Latino
2008
Statewide
37
White
State
Number
of
Students
API School Results
-1
Socioeconomically Disadvantaged
Actual API Change
6
19
C
28
C
English Learners
Actual API Change
55
Students with Disabilities
Actual API Change
27
9
C
Published: February 2012
Federal Intervention Program
Schools and districts receiving Federal Title I funding enter Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make AYP for two consecutive years in the same content
area (English/language arts or mathematics) or on the same indicator (API or graduation rate). After entering PI, schools and districts advance to the next level
of intervention with each additional year that they do not make AYP.
Federal Intervention Programs
School
Program Improvement (PI) Status
District
Not in PI
In PI
First Year in PI
-
2004-2005
Year 3
Year in PI (2011-12)
-
# of Schools Currently in PI
-
11
% of Schools Identified for PI
-
36.67%
Textbooks & Instructional Materials
Pursuant to the settlement of Williams vs. the State of California, Rialto Unified School District held a public hearing to determine whether or not each school
had sufficient and good quality textbooks, instructional materials, and/or science laboratory equipment. The date of the most recent resolution of the sufficiency
of textbooks is August 24, 2011.
All students, including English Learners, are required to be given their own individual textbooks and/or instructional materials (in core subjects), for use in
the classroom and to take home if necessary. Additionally, all textbooks and instructional materials used within the district must be aligned with the California
State Content Standards and frameworks, with final approval by the Board of Education. The table displays information collected in September 2011 about the
quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and other instructional materials used at the school.
District-Adopted Textbooks
Grade Levels
Subject
Publisher
Adoption Year
Sufficient
% Lacking
9th-12th
English/
Language Arts
Prentice Hall
2002
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Foreign
Language
DC Heath
2006
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Foreign
Language
Glencoe
2000
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Foreign
Language
McDougal Littell
2007
Yes
0.0%
10th
Health
Holt, Rinehart &
Winston
2004
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Mathematics
Houghton
Mifflin
2006
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Mathematics
Key Curriculum
2002
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Mathematics
McDougal Littell
2002
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Science
Holt, Rinehart &
Winston
2002
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Science
Holt, Rinehart &
Winston
2007
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Science
Prentice Hall
2007
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Social Science/
History
Houghton
Mifflin
2006
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Social Science/
History
McDougal Littell
2006
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Social Science/
History
Prentice Hall
2005
Yes
0.0%
9th-12th
Visual and
Performing Arts
Glencoe/
McGraw Hill
2005
Yes
0.0%
For a complete list, visit http://www.axiomadvisors.net/livesarc/
files/36678500102830Textbooks_1.pdf
Library Information & Computer Resources
The school’s library, staffed by a full-time credentialed librarian and two library media technicians, is stocked with thousands of educational and recreational
books, video- and audio-tapes, periodicals, and reference materials. Students visit the library on a regular basis and are encouraged to visit before school,
during breaks, and on Saturdays with their families.
Computer skills and concepts integrated throughout standard curriculum prepare students for technological growth and opportunities. In addition to 20 library
workstations, each classroom contains Internet-connected computers for student use. Students also have access to four computer labs, which contain a
combined total of 120 workstations, and a mobile lab with 30 laptops. Students receive computer-assisted instruction on a regular schedule.
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
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Published: February 2012
Additional Internet Access/Public Libraries
For additional research materials and Internet availability, students are encouraged to visit the public libraries located in the cities of Rialto and Colton, which
contain numerous computer workstations.
Science Lab Equipment
Carter High School stocks an adequate supply of equipment for its students. Inventory includes, but is not limited to, microscopes, slides, ring stands, clamps,
support rings, utility clamps, test tubes, test tube holders, test tube brushes, crucible tongs, flasks, beakers, and Bunsen burners. Specific equipment exists for
specific courses such as Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science. Software for labs and lab demonstrations has also been provided for newly adopted
courses. For a complete listing of inventory, please contact the school office at (909) 854-4100.
Curriculum Improvement
Carter High School’s curriculum is written in compliance with the state framework and model curriculum standards dictated by the California Department of
Education. The district’s Curriculum Committee is the primary leadership team responsible for monitoring and evaluating the curriculum. Decisions concerning
curriculum improvement are then made through a collaborative effort among school representatives, ensuring that all changes are school-wide, not isolated to
a single class or grade.
Completion of High School Graduation Requirements
In addition to fulfilling District graduation requirements, students in California public schools must pass both the English/language arts and mathematics
sections of the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to receive a high school diploma. For students who began the 2010-11 school year in the twelfth
grade, the table displays the percent who met all state and local graduation requirements for grade 12 completion, including having passed both portions of the
CAHSEE or received a local waiver or state exemption.
Completion of High School Graduation Requirements
School
District
State
All Students
90.3%
73.4%
*
Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged
88.3%
80.1%
*
African American/Black
92.1%
83.1%
*
American Indian
0.0%
71.4%
*
Asian
100.0%
97.1%
*
Filipino
100.0%
100.0%
*
Hispanic or Latino
97.6%
79.7%
*
Pacific Islander
50.0%
66.7%
*
White
96.6%
88.3%
*
English Learners
74.6%
65.0%
*
Students with Disabilities
54.1%
54.8%
*
* Data was not available at the time of publication.
College Preparation
The school’s counseling staff organizes and chaperones numerous group tours of area colleges throughout the year. The 2010-11 school year was the final
year Carter High School received funds from the GEAR UP grant. The program provided funding for additional academic counseling staff and assists students,
parents/guardians, and teachers in gaining access to higher education through academic support, information, and enrichment programs.
Students at Carter High School are encouraged to take University of California/California State University (UC/CSU) preparatory courses if they plan to attend
a four-year university. All students must pass each course with a grade no lower than a ‘C’.
UC/CSU Course Enrollment
Percentage
2010-11 Student Enrolled in
Courses Required for UC/
CSU Admission
72.6%
2009-10 Graduates Who
Completed All Courses
Required for UC/CSU
Admission
11.5%
* Duplicated Count (one student can be enrolled in several
courses).
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
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Published: February 2012
Admission Requirements for California’s Public Universities
University of California
Admission requirements for the University of California (UC) follow guidelines set forth in the Master Plan, which requires that the top one-eighth of the state’s
high school graduates, as well as those transfer students who have successfully completed specified college course work, be eligible for admission to the UC
system. These requirements are designed to ensure that all eligible students are adequately prepared for University-level work.
For general admissions requirements, please visit the UC Admissions Information Web page at http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/.
California State University
Eligibility for admission to the California State University (CSU) is determined by three factors:
• Specific high school courses
• Grades in specified courses and test scores
• Graduation from high school
Some campuses have higher standards for particular majors or students who live outside the local campus area. Because of the number of students who apply,
a few campuses have higher standards (supplementary admission criteria) for all applicants. Most CSU campuses have local admission guarantee policies for
students who graduate or transfer from high schools and colleges that are historically served by a CSU campus in that region. For admission, application, and
fee information see the CSU Web page at http://www.calstate.edu/admission/admission.shtml.
International Baccalaureate Classes
Carter High School offered the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program for the last time during the 2010-11 school year. The IB program will be replaced
by Advanced Placement (AP) classes. The IB Program was designed through an International cooperative effort and is based in Geneva, Switzerland. This
Program offers an academically challenging curriculum emphasizing the philosophy of learning and the integration of disciplines for the last two years of high
school.
Advanced Placement Classes
# of Courses
Advanced Placement Classes
Carter High School offers college-bound students many opportunities to get a head start on their future. In addition
to college preparatory classes, Carter High has an Advanced Placement (AP) program including Physics, English
Language, U.S. History, European History and Calculus. During 2010-11, Carter High School spent its last year
offering International Baccalaureate (IB) classes in the subject areas of Fine & Performing Arts, Foreign Language,
Science, Social Science, and English.
District Core Values
English
3
Foreign Language
1
Mathematics
1
Science
1
Social Science
4
Totals
10
Percent of
EXCELLENCE: We strive towards excellence in our pursuit of student achievement.
Students in AP
2%
SAFETY: We provide a safe educational environment.
Courses
COMMUNITY: We build positive partnerships for the benefit of our students and community.
DIVERSITY: We embrace and celebrate the diversity, history and collective cultures in our community.
INTEGRITY: We respect and value our relationships based on honesty and compassion, and we are transparent in our actions.
ACCOUNTABILITY: We are responsible for unleashing the maximum potential of each student, recognizing that our roles are critical in their success.
Workforce Preparation
Carter High School strives to graduate citizens who are fully capable of functioning and prospering in society. The school’s workforce preparation program
prepares students to succeed through the development of conceptual thinking, effective communication, and the ability to apply knowledge and skills learned
in the classroom to real-world contexts. Curriculum and instructional strategies that foster critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, and academic skills are
consistently taught to ensure work-readiness.
The school addresses the needs of all students, as well as those in career preparation, through professional development, guidance, and counseling from
school personnel regarding career paths and courses of study. The Career Center, work experience, use of technology, and community service projects are
made available to heighten student awareness of options for education, training, and employment beyond high school.
The following Career Technical Education (CTE) programs offered at the school:
• Careers in Education
• Child Development
• Computer Applications
• Construction Technology
• Customer Service Occupations
• Drafting I & II
• Emergency First Responder
• Floral Design & Sales
• Hospital Health Careers
• Internship
• Introduction to Business
• Introduction to Computer Keyboarding
• Introduction to Vocational Nursing
• Medical Terminology
• Sports Therapy and Fitness
• Transitional Partnership Program
• Web Page Design
• Video Production
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
8
Published: February 2012
The following courses are offered at off-site locations through the Regional Occupational
Program:
• Advanced Law Enforcement
• Automotive Repair
• Culinary Restaurant Management
• Entrepreneurship
• EKG Technician
• Fundamentals of Law
• 3D Animation
Enrollment & Program Completion in Career/
Technical Education (CTE) Programs (Carl
Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act)
Response
Question
All of the listed courses incorporate state-adopted CTE model curriculum standards, meet
district graduation requirments, and/or satisfy entrance requirements of the CSU/UC systems. All
courses are evaluated based on mastery of “employment readiness standards,” both basic and
industry-specific, results of career-technical skills assessments, and/or placement of program
completers in employment, post-secondary education, or the military. For more information
about Career/Technical Education and/or the District’s Regional Occupational Program, please
contact Peggy Wheeler at the Alternative Education Center.
How many of the school’s pupils
participate in CTE?
850
What percent of the school’s pupils
complete a CTE program and earn a
high school diploma?
0.3
What percent of the school’s CTE
courses are sequenced or articulated
between the school and institutions of
post secondary education?
0.2
California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)
The California High School Exit Exam is primarily used as a graduation requirement in California, but the results of this exam are also used to determine
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for high schools, as required by the Federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. The CAHSEE has an English language/
arts section and a math section and, for purposes of calculating AYP, three performance levels were set: Advanced, Proficient, and Not Proficient. The score
a student must achieve to be considered Proficient is different than the passing score for the graduation requirement. The first table displays the percent of
students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level for the past three years. The second table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at each
performance level in English language/arts and math separately for the most recent testing period.
CAHSEE By Subject
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
School
District
State
School
District
State
School
District
State
English
42.0
41.0
52.0
46.0
44.0
54.0
51.0
46.0
59.0
Mathematics
40.0
40.0
53.0
38.0
41.0
54.0
53.0
53.0
56.0
CAHSEE By Student Group
English
Mathematics
Not
Proficient
Proficient
Advanced
Not
Proficient
Proficient
Advanced
All Students
District
54.0
26.0
20.0
47.0
38.0
16.0
All Students
School
49.0
29.0
23.0
47.0
35.0
17.0
Male
53.0
25.0
22.0
47.0
32.0
21.0
Female
45.0
32.0
23.0
47.0
32.0
21.0
African American
53.0
25.0
21.0
57.0
30.0
13.0
Hispanic or Latino
51.0
28.0
21.0
47.0
38.0
15.0
White
20.0
42.0
37.0
20.0
39.0
41.0
English Learners
91.0
9.0
-
71.0
26.0
2.0
Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged
65.0
23.0
12.0
60.0
32.0
8.0
Students with
Disabilities
94.0
4.0
2.0
91.0
9.0
-
School Safety
The safety of students and staff is a primary concern of Carter High School. All visitors to the campus must sign in at the office and wear a visitor’s pass at
all times. Supervision is provided to ensure the safety of each student before school, during breaks, at lunch, and after school. Supervision is a responsibility
shared among parent/guardian volunteers, teachers, and administrators.
To further safeguard the well-being of students and staff, a comprehensive School Site Safety Plan has been developed by the School Site Council. The Safety
Plan was most recently updated in spring 2011 and revisions and updates are reviewed immediately with the staff. Key elements of the Safety Plan focus on
the following:
• School rules & procedures • Current status of school crime • Child abuse reporting procedures • Policies related to suspension/expulsion • Safe ingress & egress of pupils, parents/guardians, & school employees
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
• Disaster procedures/routine & emergency drills
• Notification to teachers
• School-wide dress code
• Sexual harassment policy
9
Published: February 2012
The school is always in compliance with the laws, rules, and regulations pertaining to hazardous materials and State earthquake standards. Safety drills,
including fire, earthquake, and code yellow, are held monthly.
School Facilities
Carter High School, originally constructed in 2002, is currently comprised of nine permanent classroom buildings, a cafeteria/multi-purpose room, a library, a
theater, four computer labs, a staff lounge, athletic fields, a gymnasium, a stadium, and administrative offices. During the 2010-11 school year, the site was
able to have several projects completed: re-sodding of the football field, half paid for by the district and the other half by the school; fencing around the bike
racks installed; and lettering on Building H, the County Library, re-painted. The chart displays the most recent facilities inspection as of November 2011. Any
deficiencies listed in the chart are added to the work order process when time and funding is available.
School Facility Conditions
Date of Last Inspection: 08/18/2011
Overall Summary of School Facility Conditions: Exemplary
Facility Component
System Status
Items Inspected
Good
Systems (Gas Leaks, Mech/
HVAC, Sewer)
X
Interior
X
Cleanliness (Overall
Cleanliness, Pest/Vermin
Infestation)
X
Electrical
X
Restrooms/Fountains
X
Safety (Fire Safety,
Hazardous Materials)
X
Structural (Structural
Damage, Roofs)
X
External (Grounds, Windows,
Doors, Gates, Fences)
X
Fair
Deficiency & Remedial
Actions Taken or Planned
Poor
Boys Locker Room Restrooms are not stocked
with toilet paper. (Remedied
8/18/11).
Cleaning Process:
The school provides a safe and clean environment for students, staff, and volunteers. The district’s Board of Education has adopted cleaning standards for
all schools in the district. Basic cleaning operations are performed on a daily basis throughout the school year with emphasis on classrooms and restrooms.
A joint effort between students and staff helps keep the campus clean and litter-free. The principals work daily with the school’s custodial staff to develop
sanitation schedules that ensure a clean, safe, and functional learning environment.
Maintenance & Repair:
A scheduled maintenance program is administered by the school’s custodial staff on a regular basis, with heavy maintenance functions occurring during
vacation periods. Additionally, a scheduled maintenance program is administered by Rialto Unified School District to ensure that school grounds and facilities
remain in excellent repair. A work order process is used when issues arise that require immediate attention. Emergency repairs are given the highest priority;
repair requests are completed efficiently and in the order in which they are received.
Deferred Maintenance Budget:
The district participates in the State School Deferred Maintenance Program, designed to assist school districts with expenditures for major repair or replacement
of existing school building components. Typically this includes roofing, plumbing, heating electrical systems, interior or exterior painting, and floor systems. In
2011-2012, the district did not allocate additional funds towards the deferred maintenance budget as allowed per statute revisions made by the state legislature
at the beginning of the 2009-2010 fiscal year. During the 2011-2012 school year, the district’s governing board approved deferred maintenance projects for the
school, including asphalt/concrete repairs and replacement and phone/intercom equipment upgrade.
School Site Teacher Salaries
The table illustrates the average teacher salary at the school and compares it to the average teacher salary at the district and state (based on fiscal year 200910 financial statements).
Average Teacher Salaries
School & District
School
$71,211
District
$70,800
Percentage of Variation
0.58%
School & State
All Unified School Districts
Percentage of Variation
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
$69,207
2.89%
10
Published: February 2012
Teacher & Administrative Salaries
The table displays district salaries for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type
and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of the district’s budget, and compares these figures to the state averages for
districts of the same type and size. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found at the CDE website, www.cde.ca.gov.
Average Salary Information
Teachers - Principal - Superintendent
2009-10
District
State
Beginning Teachers
$45,996
$42,017
Mid-Range Teachers
$70,584
$67,294
Highest Teachers
$91,139
$86,776
Elementary School Principals
$106,103
$108,534
Middle School Principals
$114,129
$112,893
High School Principals
$116,371
$123,331
Superintendent
$225,000
$226,417
Salaries as a Percentage of Total Budget
Teacher Salaries
40.0%
39.4%
Administrative Salaries
6.2%
5.3%
District Expenditures & Revenue Sources
The expenditures per pupil data is based on 2009-10 fiscal year audited financial statements. The table reflects the direct cost of educational services, per
average daily attendance, excluding food services, facilities acquisition and construction, and certain other expenditures. This calculation is required by law
annually and is compared with other districts state-wide.
Expenditures per Pupil
School
Total Expenditures Per Pupil
$6,257
From Restricted Sources
$890
From Unrestricted Sources
$5,222
District
From Unrestricted Sources
$4,430
Percentage of Variation between School & District
17.87%
State
From Unrestricted Sources
$5,455
Percentage of Variation between School & State
-4.27%
In addition to general state funding, Rialto Unified School District received state and federal categorical funding for the following support programs:
• Title I, Part A, Educationally Disadvantaged Children
• Title II, Part A, Teacher/Principal Training and Recruiting
• Title III, LEP Student Program
• Title IV, Part A, Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities
• Title V, Innovative Programs
• Economic Impact Aide (EIA) - Limited English Proficient
Data Sources
Data within the SARC was provided by Rialto Unified School District, retrieved from the 2010-11 SARC template, located on Dataquest (http://data1.cde.
ca.gov/dataquest), and/or Ed-Data website.
Dataquest is a search engine, maintained by the California Department of Education (CDE), which allows the public to search for facts and figures pertaining
to schools and districts throughout the state. Among the data available, parents and community may find information about school performance, test scores,
student demographics, staffing, and student misconduct/intervention.
Ed-Data is a partnership of the CDE, EdSource, and the Fiscal Crisis and Management Assistance Team (FCMAT) that provides extensive financial,
demographic, and performance information about California’s public kindergarten through grade twelve school districts and schools.
Contact Information
Parents/Guardians who wish to participate in Wilmer Amina Carter High School’s parent involvement committees, school activities, or become a volunteer
may contact the office at (909) 854-4100. The district’s website (www.rialto.k12.ca.us) provides a variety of resources for parents/guardians, students, and
community members.
Wilmer Amina Carter High School
11
Published: February 2012

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