The Herald January 23, 1935

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The Herald January 23, 1935
HERALD
THE
A M JL^R \i YM^A^
Delivered by boy carrier
for 10 cents per -month.
Phones
Mayweed 7100
Euclid 3201
Price 5 cents at newsstands Sub­
scriptions $1.50 per annum in Cook
county. Outside of county, $2.50.
Serving Maywood, Melrose Park, Bellwood, Forest Park, Hillside, Westchester and Broadview
VOL. LI, No. 4
WEDISESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1935
Published Weekly at 712 S. 5th Av«,
Maywood. HI.
Take
Citizens As k e d Flames Force Three ARRANGEMENTSON
EELKEMA CALLS Bondholders
Forest Park Bank
Families to Street;
t
o
H
u
s
t
l
e
I
n
GENERAL FORUM Case Into Courts Tax Application Damage is $5,000 BIRTHDAY PARTY
WITH FACULTY
NEAR COMPLETION
Outlines Plans and Poli­
cies of Harnnony Be­
tween Adnninistration
and Teachers.
H. H. Eelkema, principal of Pro­
viso high school, called a general
faculty meeting in Room 134 on
Monday, Jan. 7, for the purpose of
announcing plans and
policies
looking to a closer correlation be­
tween the work of the administra­
tive department and that of the
classroom instructors.
After
reviewing
briefly
the
achievements of his administration
to date. Principal Eelkema pre­
sented in some detail those prob­
lems of school procedure which
seem to him most important at
the present time. "An administrator
or supervisor should be thought of
in the light of a consultant rather
than in the light of an inspector
or overseer," said the principal, in
introducing a consideration of the
duties of an administrator. He then
announced a general program of
aims and objectives as connected
with supervisory work as follows:
I.
S.
S.
4.
5.
Reg:ular
teachers'
meeting
the
first Monday of
each calendar
month.
Departmental meetings to be con­
ducted the third Monday of each
month.
An analysis to be made of all
problem students, treating: these
records as case studies, and arrangrin? for individual conferences
with these students.
Individual ten-minute conferences
to be scheduled with each teach­
er; one hour daily, four days a
week, to be devoted to these con­
ferences.
One hour daily on an average
to be devoted by the principal to
classroom visitation.
The primary object of the whole
system, according to Principal Eel; kema is to Improve the general
welfare of the school, without in(Continued on page 2)
To have determined the status of
bonds of the Forest Park Trust and
Savings Bank building, bondholders
have organized and taken the case
into court, it was announced last
week by Dr. Joseph C. Sodaro. The
bondholders are expected to sub­
scribe the remaining $10,000 neces­
sary to start the National Bank of
Forest Park.
The bonds have never been valuated, said Dr. Sodaro, who is or­
ganizing chairman of the commit­
tee that has been working since last
May to establish a national bank.
The new bank is to be capitalized
for $100,000 with a s u r p l u s of
$30,000.
Residents and business men of
Forest Park have subscribed all but
$30,000. Bondholders of the building
of the defunct bank, which will
house the new national bank, have
agreed lately to supply the remain­
ing sum once their bonds have been
evaluated.
Fifty thousand dollars was se­
cured from the Reconstruction Fi­
nance corporation. E. Webbles, for­
merly of Burlington, Iowa, will be
the president; Lee Furnas of Elmhurst, cashier, and Wilbur Hussey,
Fred Seiner, Frank W a l k o w i a k ,
Thomas McQueen and Mr. Gross,
directors.
Melrose Chamber of
Commerce Installs
Officers for 1935
The Melrose Park Chamber of
Commerce installed its officers for
1935 at the Melrose Park Commu­
nity house at a banquet last
Wednesday, which was attended by
many men and women.
The meeting, with Louis Nelson as
toastmaster, gained a spirit of fes­
tivity with community singing be­
fore and during the dinner.
The speaker of the evening was
R. D. O'Brien, general secretary of
the Oak Park Y.M.C.A. He spoke on
(Continued on page 2)
According to a statement made by
Edward C. Hoffman, assessor for
Proviso township, the citizens of
the township are being much too lax
in filing application for assessment
of personal property.
Mr. HolTman further stated that
the people are a third behind in
promptness of payment as com­
pared to figures on the previous as­
sessment.
On Monday letters of warning to
assessable citizens of LaGrange
Park, Brookfield and Bellwood were
mailed, and unless they file appli­
cation within five days the assessor's
office will make an estimate of their
personal property and bill them ac­
cording to the estimate, plus a pen­
alty of 50 per cent.
Similar letters will be sent to
negligent residents of Maywood and
Melrose Park on Monday, January
28, and to residents of Forest Park
on February 2.
There are approximately 20,000
assessable people in the township,
and thus far only 4,500 have filed
application. The amount of money
assessed has been approximately
$40,000, and has been levied per
hundred dollars on the following
scale:
Berkley
$3.17
Bellwood
5.96
Brookfield
5.91
Broadview
5.76
Hillside
4.55
Forest Park
6.03
La Grang:e Park
5.03
Maywood
5.98
Melrose Park
6.96
North Riverside
4.03
Westchester
5.67
Western Spring^s
5.91
To the total rates add park rates
where the same are applicablei as fol­
lows:
Washins:ton School Park..,.
$-54
West Maywood Park
46
Veterans Park
63
Memorial Park
37
Western Spring:s Park
31
Of all the people who have thus
far filed application about 65 per
cent have automobilesMr. Hoffman's office at 7508 West
Madison, Forest Park, will remain
open for one more month.
A mother and her 3-year-old child
were overcome by smoke and three
families were driven In the street
when fire broke out in the basement
of 1910-12 Lake street, Melrose
Park, early Friday evening.
Fred Gaddy of the Central Realty
company below the overhead apart­
ments, carried the mother and child
to safety. Melrose Park firemen led
the other residents through the
smoke filled passage at the rear of
the building to the streets.
Defective wiring in the basement
of the building started the fire
which spread rapidly along the
ceiling and into the barber shop at
1910 Lake street and the realty
company at 1912 Lake street. Mel­
rose Park and Maywood firemen
checked the fire before it did any
damage to th^ upstairs apartments.
The smoke and fire damage was
estimated at $5,000. The work of
the Melrose Park and Maywood fire­
men was hampered by the fire
spreading along the ceiling of the
unexcavated portion of the base­
ment. The building was insured.
Sarlo - Sharp Post
Hears Past District
Commander Murphy
Herb Edwards, past commander of
the first
district of the American
Legion and a legionaire who has dis­
tinguished himself as service worker
for his organization, addressed the
meeting of Sarlo-Sharp post Mon­
day evening. Mr. Edwards repre­
sented Matt Murphy, commander of
Cook County Council of the Legion,
who had been scheduled to appear.
Edwards opened a round table dis­
cussion on his hobby, "service to the
disabled." He paid tribute to the
Melrose Park post for its record
in all branches of Legion work.
Although the weather was sub­
zero, the meeting was well attended.
A good part of the time was devoted
to the show, 'Pirate Gold," which
(Continued on page 2)
Orchestra Furnishing Birthday Party Music
Russ Currie and his or­
chestra who will supply
the dance tunes at the
President Roosevelt's
Birthday Ball on Wednes­
day evening, January 30,
at the Maywood Armory.
Seated, left to right: Bill
Soderburg, Russ Currie,
Bob Greenwell, Alvin McElroy, Frank Heil; stand­
ing, left to right, Bill Fuller
and Jack Cotterell.
Citizens Join Forces to
End Infantile Paralysis;
Ball to Be Given at the
Armory.
Hundreds of Maywood citizens will
attend the President Roosevelt birth­
day ball at the Maywood Armory,
Madison street and Greenwood ave­
nue, on Wednesday evening, Janu­
ary 30, it was announced, this week
by the committee planning the
affair.
By sponsoring this ball, residents
of Maywood join ranks with thou­
sands of other citizens all over the
country in a fight against infantile
paralysis. Because 70 per cent of the
proceeds will go to aid those stricken
with infantile paralysis in this com­
munity, the urgency of sponsoring
the ball has been made stronger and
the response has apparently been
greater.
Support for the affair from the
citizens and organizations of the
village is proof that the ball is ti?2
most popular civic-social event ever
undertaken in Maywood, according
to the committee. In this respect
Maywood will fall in line with hun­
dreds of other cities and villages in
all sections of the country.
A varied program of dancing,
cards and entertainment has been
arranged for next Wednesday eve­
ning. Every detail toward making
the affair a complete success has
been placed in the care of a sep­
arate committee.
Russ Currie and his orchestra, a
group well known to dancers in the
western suburbs, will supply music
for the ball. Bridge and 500 with
prizes, donated by Maywood mer­
chants, to the winners, will be the
(Continued on page 2)
2
THE HERALD
Local V.F.W. Post
to Join in Nation­
wide Radio Program
Arrangements for its participation
In the fourth annual nationwide
"Hello America" radio program to
be broadcast on the evening of Feb­
ruary 14 were made last Monday
night at a meeting of Winfield Scott
Post No. 2193. Veterans of Foreign
Wars of the United States, at the
post hall in the Maywood Masonic
Temple.
The "Hello America" program,
recognized as one of the outstand­
ing patriotic broadcasts of the year,
will feature the radio initiation, by
Commander-in-Chief James E. Van
Zandt, at Washington, of classes of
thousands of new members assem­
bled in more than 3,200 local units
of the organization throughout the
country. It also will include ad­
dresses on timely national subjects
by members of Congress and other
distinguished speakers, and enter­
tainment by famous orchestras and
stage and radio stars.
Post No. 2193 has launched the
most intensive membership cam­
paign of its history in preparation
for the radio initiation. It is planned
to try and reach every eligible over­
seas veteran in this community and
invite him to become a member of
the Winfield Scott Post as a part
of the Commander-in-Chief's class.
Only veterans who have re­
ceived, or are eligible to receive, gov­
ernment campaign medals for active
service in the zones of war are eligi­
ble to the Veterans of Foreign Wars
of the United States, according to
Commander Charles F. Plummer of
Post No. 2193.
"We are deterrnined to have the
largest class of recruits ever initiat­
ed into Post No. 2193 at one time,
prepared for the radio ceremony of
the fourth annual 'Hello America'
program," Commander Plummer
said Monday night. "Our desire for
a greatly augmented membership in
this post and throughout the na­
tional organization is stimulated by
the seven-point legislative program
which we will submit to the 74th
Congress this winter. It is the most
efficient, comprehensive and unsel­
fish legislative program ever formu­
lated by a veteran organization,
dealing as it does with matters of
national importance and the welfare
of American citizens as a whole, in
addition to specific proposals for the
relief of disabled and needy veterans
and their dependents.
"All eligible overseas veterans of
this community are invited to join
with us in our campaign. By affiliat­
ing with the V.F.W. now, in time for
the fourth annual 'Hello America'
program, they will be initiated into
our order in the most colorful and
impressive initiation ceremony ever
held by a veteran organization,"
states Commander Plummer.
Mr. Plummer of Winfield Scott
Post No. 2193 will be glad to see any
interested veterans, at his place of
business on the northeast corner of
First avenue and Lake street, or he
may be addressed at P.O. Box 62,
Maywood.
INJURED IN CRASH
Joseph Arrowesty and Louis
Peters, Melrose Park business men,
were injured when the automobile
driven by Mr. Peters crashed into
a concrete pillar at Washington and
Canal streets, Chicago, at 11:30
o'clock Sunday evening.
Mr. Arrowesty suffered minor
lacerations and a wrenched leg, and
Mr. Peters sustained a severely
wrenched shoulder. Ice formation
on the windshield, obscuring proper
vision, was stated as the cause of
the crash.
HUMANE SOCIETY
A group of Maywood women met
at the home of Mrs. Emily Wag­
ner, 1412 South Fifth avenue,
Thursday evening and organized
what will be known as the Maywood Humane society with Mrs.
Cora Free, 1829 South Twelfth ave­
nue, as president, and Mrs. Wag­
ner as secretary-treasurer. Any­
one interested in humane work and
wishing to join call the secretary
at Maywood 2495. If a pet is lost
or found call Maywood 520 im­
mediately.
YOUR SICK RADIO!
Eelkema Calls General
Forum with Faculty
(Continued from page 1)
creasing the already heavy teacherload. How to stimulate student in­
terest, to the end of the general
scholarship level may be raised;
how to produce an environment
where both teacher and pupil may
work happily and effectively; how
the general supervisor may be of
greater service to Proviso—these
were some of the questions dis­
cussed.
Details relative to discipline, tar­
diness, failures and many other mat­
ters were set forth, with concrete
suggestions as to how they might
be treated. Teachers were invited
to present in writing any criticisms
or suggestions which they might
have affecting these and other
problems.
At a general meeting in the near
future, Mr. Eelkema will present
to the faculty material dealing
with the scoring of tests and meth­
ods of grading by using the stand­
ard deviation in determining dis­
tribution of-grades and interpreting
test. scores.
In closing, Mr. Eelkema spoke
appreciatively of the cooperation
of the teachers, and of the spirit
that has prevailed among them.
"I feel that there is no middle
ground," he concluded. "We must
either advance or move backward.
Obviously we are interested in ad­
vancement. The advancement to
be made at Proviso must be
planned in the light of the local
environment and of the major prob­
lems existing at this time. We
have emphasized service; I want
you to know that it is my desire
to be of service to the students, to
the faculty, to the board, and to
the community."
Details for Birthday
Party Near Completion
(Continued from page 1)
attractions for card players next
Wednesday.
During intermissions Ed Loftus,
entertainer and master of cere­
monies, will present interesting
numbers. Robert and Louise Greenwell, a clever dance team; the Del
Judice brothers, instrumental wiz­
ards; "Phil Baker, Jr." the ac­
cordion artist; "Babe Cain," the
radio entertainer; Frank Wilson,
and the West Suburban quartet will
add to the evening's fun and enter­
tainment.
Ticket Sale for Show
of Maywood Post 133
Swings into Action
Robert Corrigan, general chair­
man in charge of the show being
put on at the Lido on Tuesday
and Wednesday, February 19 and
20, under the auspices of Maywood
Post No. 133, announces that ev­
erything is now ready for the sale
of tickets and in the next several
weeks Legionaires will call on all
the homes in Maywood for this
purpose. The assistance of all the
citizens of our community is so­
licited.
Besides the regular feature pic­
ture and - other items on the Lido
program, a number of special fea­
tures are being arranged and will
be announced later. The entire
membership of Maywood post will
be working to make this affair a
success and the boys will welcome
the assistance of any of their
friends outside of the Legion.
Chairman Corrigan says, "One
way in which our friends can help
us along and at the same time feel
that they have done a charitable
deed to their fellow neighbor is
to buy tickets and let us present
them to some of the people whom
we came in contact with during
our distribution of Christmas bas­
kets. We found many families in
very destitute circumstances and
it certainly would be more than
a treat to them and to the chil­
dren especially if someone would
provide this means of giving them
an evening's entertainment. There
are little children in Maywood who
haven't seen a show in years and
our post members will be glad to
see that the tickets get into proper
hands if any of
our public
spirited citizens wish this oppor­
tunity of doing a little good."
The picture to be shown is titled
"Hell in the Heavens," starring
Warner Baxter and others. A pic­
ture that has received the highest
rating by critics and others and a
very clean aerial war picture that
will grip the spectator from the
first moment to the finish.
ARTS CLUB
B¥ JANET M. BAM
Maywood Arts club will conduct
its next social meeting at the home
of Mrs. D. C. Aubrey, 803 South
Third avenue, Friday evening.
John Nolf, well known artist, will
give an informal talk. Miss Lucille
Smith and Mrs. J. S. Blair are as­
sisting as hostesses.
Sarlo-Sharp Post Hears
Past District Commander
(Continued from page 1)
Sarlo-Sharp post will stage on Feb­
ruary 1 at the Melrose Park the­
atre. Committees are diligently at
work perfecting arrangements for
this show which promises to be one
of the greatest local talent events
ever to be put on in Melrose Park.
Rehearsals are under way in ear­
nest.
Wayne Lemmon, director,
presented several numbers which
are sung in the minstrel part. "Haul
in the Anchor" and "Nagasaki" were
received with loud acclaim. The
minstrel scene in the show is on
board a medieval pirate ship, a most
unusual and colorful setting.
Tickets for the minstrel revue
went on sale Monday evening. J. L.
Urgo, B. R. Jackson, R. Burbey, are
in charge of tickets. Louella Tamm
has charge of the committee on
talent. Legionaires and t h e i r
friends from Melrose Park, Maywood and surrounding towns com­
prise the cast. A complete list of
the headliners will appear in next
week's issue of The Herald. "Pirate
Gold" will be presented on one night
only, Friday, February 1. Tickets
may be procured from members of
Sarlo-Sharp post.
(Continued from page 1)
the available possibilities that Mel­
rose Park has in order to remain an
up-and-coming village. His main
idea was that business men should
create a higher degree of competi­
tion.
After the address of the evening,
Paul Brust installed the following
new ofiBcers and directors:
President—Peter Paul Gaddy.
Vice president—Joseph Arrowesty.
Treasurer—Dr. N. J. Grunt.
Secretary—Elmer Pflug.
Directors — Ralph Bormann, Harry
Homan,
Joseph
DeGrazia,
Peter
F.
Metrik and Michael Laraia.
Shortly after the installing cere­
monies, Dr. P. K. Strzynecki, retir­
ing president, was given a pen and
pencil set by fellow members of the
chamber. Then followed an address
by the president, Mr. Gaddy.
The Bachelor's club was there enmasse and, with A. H. D'Anza speak­
ing in its behalf, presented Mr.
Gaddy and Mr. Arrowesty, members
of the club, with gifts of recogni­
tion.
After the presentation of the gifts
there followed short addresses by
prominent business and professional
men of Melrose Park.
Announcement
We are pleased to announce a
new Medical Department super­
vised by a leading medical spe­
cialist of Cliicago for the painless
removal of TONSILS, VARI­
COSE VEIN.S, and a new pain­
less treatment for rectal diseases.
Try our Battle Creek Treatments
for All Aches and Pains.
Battle Creek Institute
Madison and Harlem Ave.
Oak Park
Off. Euclid 1(M76
Res. Maywood 3619
raimtnilllllllllHIItitllllltnillllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllMIIIIWIHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItinillinilMHHHIIMmtlHHIHIIIIIIIHIIC
MELWOOD SOCIAL CLUB
The Melwood Social club met at
the Veterans Park community house
Friday evening. • Many interesting
1
subjects were discussed.
The club has decided to run a i
raffle instead of a bunco and dance
as it was first intended.
1
New committees were appointed
to replace the old, as their six 1
month terms expired last meeting.
The club will give two banquets S
a year. This was also a subject
highly discussed.
One new member was voted into
the club.
I
Have Your Home |
Warm and Cozy i
Order Your Coal From Us 1
We Carry . . . Green River Valley Coal, No. 6
Vein Western Kentucky Mine Run, Lump,
Egg and Nut, Southern Illinois Coarse Mine
Run, 3rd Vein Pocahontas Mine Run.
HIGH P.-T.A, TO MEET
The Parent-Teacher association of
Proviso high school will conduct its
For Prompt and Cattrteous Service, CaW—
January meeting in the school audi­
torium Thursday evening. The pro­
gram will include members of Pro­
viso high school band, community
Yard Phone Maywood 193
singing led by R. Lee Osburn, and
DSED CARS GOING OP
an address on the "Story of Canned
£ 9th Avenue & Illinois Central
Usee automobile orices are going up- •g
Goods" by C. J. Heintz of the re­
Tracks
one thought that production of the
search division of the American Can Every
marvelous, new cars would make a drug
company of Maywood.
^iiHiiMiHiHniiiiiiiniinmwiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiHiiHiniiHHmmHHmmmiiHiiuuuiiiiiiiiiiiHiiMuiiiiuutiiiiiiiiiiuni
ol used cars.
I
F. J. KOPECKY & SONS
NOW
Is the time to place the order for that moving you are going to do
next week, and if you place your order with us you will get serv­
ice from start to finish.
We'll do our best to leave you smiling with satisfaction. Just call
on any of the phones listed below.
Have It Repaired
Now
Phone Maywood 4253
2 North Sixth Ave., at Main St.
FRED CONNER
Telephone Maywood 3
1833 S. lOth Ave.
Melrose Commerce Body
Installs Officers for 1935
MAYWOOD
Legion Auxiliary
Elects New Head
to Fill Vacancy
(Fill out and send to nearest Legion Post)
When blanks are available for payment of the face
value to Adjusted Compensation Certificates, please
mail one to me at my address.
Mrs. Blanche Erresberger was
elected second vice president of the
American Legion Auxiliary at its
meeting Tuesday night, to fill the
vacancy left by the resignation of
Mrs. Elizabeth Kjelsoe, who recent­
ly moved to Chicago. Mrs. Erres­
berger is membership chairman of
the unit.
Mrs. Carlyn Bludorn was elected
delegate to Cook county council and
Mrs. Nona Hayes, alternate member.
At the executive board meeting
conducted Friday evening at the
home of Mrs. Rasmussen, it was
voted to have the drill team start
its drills for 1935. A special meeting
of the team is called for tonight
(Wednesday) at the home of Mrs.
Eleanor Dore, 2036 South Fifth ave­
nue, at 8 p.m. All members are
urged to attend and bring prospec­
tive members.
Tuesday evening will be the regu­
lar monthly social night. There
will be a short business meeting and
a card party.
Thursday evening the Fifth Dis­
trict will have its monthly meeting
at Austin Town hall. Lake street
and Central avenue, Chicago.
Preparations are being made for
a big presidential birthday party to
be given January 30 at the armory.
Members representing the auxiliary
on the various committees are Mrs.
Eleanor Dore, ticket committee;
Mrs. Grace Mangnall, decorations,
and Mrs. Florence Rasmussen,- re­
ception committee. It is hoped that
the auxiliary will have a big rep­
resentation at this worthwhile bene­
fit which will be so helpful to those
in Maywood suffering from infan­
tile paralysis.
Rebekah Lodge Installs
New Officers Saturday I
The officers of Maywood Rebekah
Lodge No. 376 were Installed before
a crowded house Saturday evening,
at the Odd Fellows hall. The hall
was attractively decorated with |
palms and flowers.
The flag was presented by Mrs.
Hazel Gates, P.N.G., and the tribute
to the flag was given by Prances |
Whitworth, P.N.G.
The installing officers were as fol­
lows;
Deputy President—Ethel Lund, N.N.G.
Deputy Marshal—Clara Baumer, P.N.G.
Deputy Warden—Hattie Biles, P.N.G.
Deputy Secretary — Eugenia Schipper,
P. N. G.
I
Deputy Treasurer—Emma Riley, P. N. G. I
Deputy
Chaplain — Elizabeth
Pratt,
P.N.G.
Deputy
Guardian—Pearl
MacPherson,
P.N.G.
Deputy Herald—John J. Contore. P.N.G.
Musician and Soloist—Beryl Hesterman,
P. N. G.
The installing officers were assisted by the following escorts;
Frances Felsch. Emma Bickheart. Nellie
Wilson, Evelyn Vivian. Florence Cantore, I
Alice Strohauer, Bertha
David,
Esther !
Sauerberg.
The officers-elect were as follows:
Junior Past Noble Grand—Miss Helen |
Strohauer.
Noble Grand—Miss Ruth Parks.
Vice Grand—Mrs. Bernice Polkow.
Recording Secretary—Mrs. Ella M. Mof- '
f®tt.
,
^ ,
Financial Secretary—Miss Velma Parks.
Treasurer—Mrs. Tillie Felsch.
Warden—Miss Alice Strohauer.
Conductress—Miss Jane Gustavison.
Chaplain—Mrs. Lona Munro.
.
Right Supporter Noble Grand—Mrs. Hattie Biles.
Left Supporter—Mrs. Bertha David.
,
Right Supporter Vice Grand—Mrs. Hazel j
Gates.
^
I
Left Supporter Vice Grand—Mrs. Lena |
Meyer.
Inside Guardian—Mrs. Faye Fisher.
Outside Guardian—Mr. Irving Sorenson.
Musician—Miss Ethel Broberg.
MELROSE KIWANIS
Twenty-four members of the Mel­
rose Park Kiwanis club attended
their first meeting of the year under
the newly elected officers Monday
evening of last week at the Com­
munity building in Melrose Park at
6:15 p.m.
George C. Bulk, president, gave
an address regarding the purpose
of a Kiwanis club, and announced
the committees as follows;
Attendance Committee—Ralph Bormann.
Classification Committee—Lawrence Mo­
reno.
Program Committee—John Carson.
Membership Committee—Alfonse Clauss.
Finance Committee—Dr. F. K. StrzyBusiness Standards Committee—George
W. Voelz.
^
Good Will Committee—A. J. Jeschke.
Inter-Club Relations Committee—E. P.
Weissenborn.
Agricultural Committee—William See­
ders.
,
Laws and Regulations Committee—Paul
J. Leitzell.
Sports Committee—Guy C. Guerine.
Publicity Committee—J. Lome Essery,
Reception Committee—Herman Weiss.
Underprivileged Child Committee—Louis
Senese
Auditing Committee—Edward Prignano.
Convention Committee — Joseph Antonello.
..
Grievance Committee—August Rubietta.
Vocational Guidance Committee—Paul
Abate.
Music Committee—Louis E. Nelson.
House Committee—Theodore J. Knoble.
Public AfTairs Committee—R. W. Baur.
Kiwanis Education Committee—Paul W.
(£) C
Brust.
Signature of Veteran
Street address
superintendent of public instruc­
tion, and with several others re­
ceived his appointment from Mr.
Jay Earle Hulet has recently re­ Wieland on January 15. Mr. Hulet
ceived the appointment of chief will move his family to Springfield
clerk in the state department of later in the year.
education in Springfield. Mr. Hulet
has been a teacher of Science in
OFFICE FURNITURE
Proviso township high school since
REPAIRED AND REFINISHED
Sept., 1933, and previous to that
Guaranteed First Class Wort Done at
time was principal of Nokomis town­
Your Office or Our Shop—Call Us tor
ship high school for five years.
Estimates.
Decker Moving & Storage Co.
He went to Springfield on Janu­
Euclid 672—Kedzie 6430
ary 14 to attend the inauguration
of John A. Wieland, the new state
Jay Earle Hulet Gains
Education Appointment
Town
AT ZERO OR BELOW...
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it. Cold morning worries are a tiling of the
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instead you —
Save a Nichei ^
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five gallons of the highest quality gasoline that
money can bliy.
REFINERS
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Two Stations
MAYWOOD
RIVER GRO¥E
on FIRST AVE.
at AURORA &
ELGIN R. R. TRACKS
THATCHER AYE.
3 Blocks South of
Madison Street
at
ST. PAUL R. R. TRACKS
One Block North of
Gl
THE HERALD
Education for
Leisure Term
Starts Monday
i
The Rosary college plan of educa­
tion for leisure, which attracted
more than five hundred men and
women from various sections of Chi­
cago at its inauguration in October,
will continue during the second se­
mester beginning Monday.
In addition to the courses given
Isst semester, the following new
courses are offered: Introduction to
anthropology, offered by the head
of the department of sociology, ad­
ministration ofTiigh school libraries,
offered by the department of library
science, problems of parent and
child, to be given by the head of
the department of education. Other
offerings are business law and in­
troduction to drama. Applications
for other courses will be considered
by the registrar.
The classes will meet from 7;45
to 9 p.m., according to the follow­
ing schedule:
Monday:
Development of Modern Civ­
ilization, Appreciation of Art, Introduc­
tion to Anthropology.
Tuesday: Appreciation of Music, French
Conversation, Drawing, Administration of
High School Libraries, Problems of Parents
and Child.
Thursday: The Liturgy of the Church,
Public Speaking, Business Law, The Art of
Writing English.
other courses will be scheduled
when registration is completed. The
present schedule is tentative. The
new courses will meet for the first
time the week of January 27. These
evening classes do not carry college
credit and no fees are asked.
Oriental Court Giving
Dance on February 9
Triangle Calabrian's
Install 1935 Officers
The Maywood Garden club con­
ducted its recent meeting at the
home of Mrs. F. P. Carson, 306
South Second avenue. Dr. O. M.
Schantz, an authority on trees,
gave an address on that subject,
with photographs for illustra­
tion.
Among trees in this vicinity he
discussed the following; White,
rock and slippery elm: hard or
sugar maple, black maple, soft or
river maple, red maple, black wal­
nut, butternut, white, black, red,
green and blue ash, black cherry,
white, red, bur, chestnut and
shingle oak, cottonwood, aspen,
basswood, ironwood, blue beech
buckeye, black and honey locust
tulip tree, willow, mountain ash,
fruit trees such as wild crab and
hawthorn trees.
A hybrid of the white and bur
oak, discovered by Dr. Schantz,
bears his name in the botanical
form, Quercus Orpheus. An ani­
mated discussion followed the lec­
ture. At the business meeting Mrs.
Carson read a letter from the state
federation regarding the new Lin­
coln Memorial Park of 8000 acres
near Springfield, 111., which is be­
ing promoted by the Garden club
of Illinois, and which will be plant­
ed by the garden clubs of the
state.
The home was decorated with a
profusion of roses throughout the
rooms. These were later distributed
to the members as favors. Mrs. Paul
Lancaster was in charge of the
social arrangements.
Tea
was
served from an attractively ap­
pointed table, with Mrs. McKinney
and Mrs. Schultz pouring.
TREES
By Orpheus Meyer Schantz
Far down within this tender heart of
mine
I hold a deeply rooted love for tre«s.
And when I see an oak or lofty pine,
I feel like worshipping on bended knees.
The beauty of their gray-barked bodies
tall.
Supporting limbs that reach out to the
sky;
With leaves through which the filtered
sunbeams fall.
And mystic moonlight shadows, passing
by.
Their lengthened Images etched pictures
make;
None are there that more pleasures give
to me;
So, if for nothing else than their dear
The Oriental Court, Maywood
Council No. 7, is giving another
affair on Saturday, February 9, this
time in the form of a dance and a
contest, in which any club or or­
ganization is eligible excepting the
Oriental Court.
The contest will be conducted on
the night of the dance. Each ad­
mission ticket to the dance will
entitle the bearer to ten votes,
which he will cast for his favorite
club or organization. The group
sake,
receiving the most votes will be pre­ I will, with heart and hand protect each
tree;
sented with a beautiful silver loving
cup. To date the following have And 1 11 not rest, until I . know that you
learned to know them, and love
been entered in the contest; Ameri­ Havethem,
too.
can Legion Drum and Bugle corps,
The next meeting of the club
Post No. 133; Suburban Bell-Park
A. C.; Maywood Dodgers; and Mel­ will be at the home of Mrs. Clyde
rose Park Trojans.
Cleaver, 1619 South Sixth avenue,
Send in the name of the favorite Monday, February 4. Miss Ethel
club or organization to W. H.
Hughes, 212 Twenty-fourth avenue,
Bellwood.
TRINITY MOTHERS' CLUB
The January meeting of the Trin­
ity Mothers' club will take place in
the gymnasium of Trinity high
school, Lathrop and Division, River
Forest, at 2 o'clock on Tuesday.
The "Past Mothers," with Mrs.
Michael A. McGrath of 725 South
East avenue. Oak Park, in charge,
are arranging cards and refresh­
ments, following the short business
meeting. Assisting Mrs. McGrath
are: Mesdames James Farmer, John
Morris, Mort. Plynn, Junius Deering,
Al. Crowe, John Scanlon, John
Burns, W. H. Potterfield, Lawrence
Harvey, B. Schneider, and Anton L.
Nilles. There will be door prizes,
and a prize for each table. Dona­
tion, 50c.
J-O-Y CLUB
The meeting of the Joy Club was
conducted at the home of Miss Lor­
raine Bower. There were eight girls
present. The evening was spent in
the usual manner.
The next meeting will be on
Thursday, at the home of Mrs. John­
son, 1821 South Fourth avenue, who
is the aunt of Miss Katherine John­
son. The meeting is to start at 7:30
sharp.
Melrose Park R.N. of A.
to Install 1935 Officers
Melrose Park camp, No. 596, R.N.
of A., will conduct its annual in­
stallation of officers Friday at
Eagle's hall, Melrose P,ark.
The officers to be installed are;
Oracle—Mrs. Dora Rounds.
Vice oracle—Mrs. Alice Wall.
Past oracle—Mrs. Ella Barmann.
Chancellor—Mrs. Sophia Wilder.
Recorder—Mrs. Edith Smith.
Receiver—Mrs. G. Karngeibel.
Inner sentinal—Mrs. M. Spriesterbach.
Outer sentinal—Mrs. B. Cupper.
Marshal—Mrs. M. Huff.
Musician—Mrs. Betty Spohnalty.
Flag bearer—Mrs. B. Lavine.
Manager—Mrs. K. Heil.
The following newly elected of­
ficers of the Triangle Calabrian's
Mills, will speak and exhibit Eng­ social club of Melrose Park, were in­
lish pictures.
stalled into office on Sunday at the
regular meeting at the Melrose
Official announcement is made Park Boys' club building. Their
of the fifth annual garden lecture term of office will end on Decem­
study course by members of the ber 31, 1935:
Horticultural staff of the Garfield
G. Serra, president; Angelo Zito, vice
Park Conservatory. The course ex­ president; R. Ventura, secretary; R. Definance secretary; John Orrico,
tends through February and half Rosa,
treasurer; and D. Zito, sergeant-at-arms.
of March and is given at the Gar­
Finance
committee — George
Bellini,
field Park refectory, and comprises chairman; M. Provenzano, John Orrico,
19 lectures. All citizens of the Angelo Zito, Paul Rago, F. De Rosa and
Caldarozzo.
Chicago region Snd their friends Louis
Organization committe:
Rosario Deare invited to participate.
Rosa, chairman; M. Provenzano, Sam
Veniziano, P. Addico, and Joseph Sturino.
Schedule of Lectures
Publicity
committee — Louis
Peters,
Tuesday, Feb. 5, 8 p.m.—"Perennial chairman; M. Orrico, R. Ventura, Louis
Flowering
Plants,
Their
Use
and Carpino, P. Esposito and G. Bellini.
Care." Illustrated with lantern slides.
Entertainment
committee — V.
FioraP. K. Balthis.
mante, chairman; Angelo Zito, Rosario
Thursday, Feb. 7, 2 p.m.—"The Selec­ DeRosa, M. Provenzano and G. Veniziano.
tion, Arrangement and Care of Trees
Refreshments committee — P
Balolo
and Shrubs." Wilham Shatwell.
chairman; G. Pagliaro, D. Zito, Alex
Friday, Feb. 8,
2
p.m. — "Growing Apuzza and Rocco Comforti.
Decorative Plants from Seeds."
A
Speakers of the house—Judge Leonard
demonstration
with
the
necessary DeFranco,
chairman;
Rosario
DeRosa,
materials will be made. Troy Stand­ M. Provenzano, R. Ventura.
ard.
Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2 p.m.—"The Terrarium, Aquarium, and a Discussion
of
the
Materials
Used."
Eldred
The United States Civil Service
Green.
Thursday, Feb. 14, 2 p.m.—"Hardy and Commission has announced open
Tender Bulbs for the Garden." John competitive examinations as fol­
Lundgren.
lows;
Friday, Feb. 15, 8 p.m.—"How to Lay
Elevator conductor, $1,080 a year,
Out the City Yard for Best Effects."
Illustrated with lantern slides. Wm. departmental service, Washington!
Shatwell.
D. C. Experience in operation of
Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2 p.m. — "Window electric elevators required.
Boxes and Hanging Baskets for In­
Junior telephone operator, $1,260 a
door and Outdoor Use." Cyrill C.
Koch.
year, departmental service, Wash­
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2 p.m.—"Pools, ington, D. C. Specified experience
Water
Lilies
and
other
Aquatic
required.
Plants."
Eldred Green.
Thursday, Feb. 21, 8 p.m.—"The Prop­
The closing date for receipt of ap­
agation of Plants, or How to Make plications for these examinations is
New Plants from Old." A domonstra- January 28.
tion with living materials will be
The salaries named are subject to
made.
R. J. Mohr.
Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2 p.m.—"Soils and a deduction of not to exceed 5 per
Fertilizers for the Home and Gar
cent during the fiscal year ending
den."
Juston Ham.
A demonstration by F. L. Eldridge June 30, 1935, as a measure of econ­
of soil testing will be made
omy, and also to a deduction of 3H
Thursday, Feb. 28, 2 p.m.—"Cacti as per cent toward a retirement an­
Ornamental
Plants."
Robert
T.
nuity.
Van Tress.
Friday, Mar. 1, 8 p.m.—"Making a
All states except South Dakota,
PHI DELTA ZETA
New Lawn, Renovating the Old and Vermont, Virginia, Maryland, and
Maintaining." Arthur Jackson.
At the meeting of Lambda chap­
Tuesday. Mar. 5, 2 p.m.—"Insect Pets, the District of Columbia have re­
Disease and to Control Them." Ver­ ceived less than their quota of ap­ ter of Phi Delta Zeta sorority on
non Ashmore.
pointments in the apportioned de­ January 14, at the home of Birdie
Thursday, Mar. 7, 2 p.m.—"The Use of
partmental service in Washington, Jacobs in Forest Park, new officers
Garden Accessories and Notes on
for the coming year were elected
Garden
Maintenance."
William D. C.
West.
Full information may be obtained and results were as follows; Peggie
Friday, Mar. 8, 8 p.m.—"House Plants,
from Fred O. Benn, Secretary of the Benton, president; June Holmes,
the Best Kinds, and How to Grow
secretary; Birdie Jacobs, treasurer,
Them." An exhibition or house plants United States Civil Service Board
will be made. Frank K. Balthis
of Examiners, at the post office and Dorothy Koch, membership
chairman.
Tuesday, Mar. 12, 2 p.m.—"Iris, Peo­ Maywood, 111.
nies
and
Delphiniums.''
Charles
The president then appointed Car­
Henry D. Oakland, P. M.
Johannsen.
men Rummler, senior delegate;
Thursday, Mar. 14, 2 p.m.—"A dis­
Marie Osenberg, junior delegate;
cussion
of
Plant
Protection,
and
Notes on the Use of the Coldframe
Bernice Rose, chaplain, and Lucille
John Arden Werner, son of Mr McElroy, scribe.
and Hotbed." R. J. Mohr.
Friday, Mar. 15, 8 p.m.—"Annuals for and Mrs. Arthur Werner, 611 South
After the business meeting bridge
the Garden, for Cut Flowers—Novel­
Eighteenth avenue, Maywood, will was played and refreshments served.
ties." Robert Van Tress.
Tuesday,
Mar.
19,
2
p.m.—"Plant celebrate his first birthday anni­ The girls had Myrtle Rosecrans,
Curiosities."
A
display
of
these versary with a party for his rela­
grand director, with them on this
plants will be arranged. Cvrill c
tives and friends on Sunday.
occasion.
Koch,
CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS
ALPHA XI DELTA
The Chicago Alpha Xi Delta
alumnae conducted a central meet­
ing at the Palmer House on Sat­
urday of last week with the westside group, including Maywood, as
hostesses. The main feature of the
afternoon was S. A. Campbell, a
well-known lecturer on the north
woods. Mr. Campbell spends six
months of every year at the sanc­
tuary of Wegimind, Argonne Na­
tional Forest, Three Lakes, Wis. As
he lectures, Mr. Campbell shows
movies which he has taken of the
vicinity around the sanctuary.
OFFICES FOR REJ^T
A few shops, offices
and professional suites
are still available in
this modern, heavily
patronized
building.
Rentals exceptionally
[low. H. F. Darre, Mgr.
BIRTHDAY PARTY
Andrew Culata celebrated his
twelfth birthday by entertaining
twelve friends at his home, 1406
Fifteenth avenue, Melrose Park, on
Saturday. The party's entertainment
consisted of games, with prize
awards; refreshments and accordion
solos by Andrew Voline.
EUCLID 6760
LAKE & MARIOIV
RUILDING
mI
LITERARY FORUM
The Maywood Literary Forum met
Saturday evening with Miss Charolette Troxell, 1235 South Sixteenth
avenue, Maywood.
Refreshments
were served after the meeting.
BRAKES
RELtNEO
By a
Firestone
Expert
Mechanic
Inspevilc^ Free
BAILEY & VOIGTS
ISM LAKE ST., MELROSE PARK
Phone Melrose Park 4424
CUT THEM NOW!
Those numerous monthly pay­
ments that cause so much worry
. . . why not borrow from us the
money you need to pay them in
full? Thus you will consolidate
a lot of pressing obligations into
a single one. The amount bor­
rowed can be repaid to us con­
veniently out of your income, in
gradual installments which you
will never miss. Furniture and
automobiles acceptable security.
AMOUNTS UP TO $300
aywood Finance €orp«
12 SOUTH FIFTH AVE.,
WOOD, ILL.
»
*• » • t •
rr^r»
Block
South of Lido Theatre
PHONE MAYWOOD 7730
rr •
The annual play day of Illinois
Federation of Women's Clubs will
be Thursday, January 31, and will
be celebrated in every district and
almost every club throughout the
state.
Each group will make its own
plans but it will be a day of relaxa­
tion and pleasure whatever the type
of program.
The first eleven districts are co­
operating and will have a Chicago
Frolic at Hotel Sherman. Doors
will open at 10:30—tickets will be
75c, which will include cards, bridge,
contract, five
hundred, or bunco,
with a great many door-prizes, a
style show, dancing on the village
green, a short program, a "Globe
Theater," a chance to have one's
fortune told or hand writing an­
alyzed and many other features.
The American Home department
is sponsoring an exhibit of quilts,
made within the past five years. A
registration fee of 10c will be
charged for each quilt entered and
a fee of 10c will be charged for all
but the exhibitors.
There will be an Indian Welfare
exhibit and sale of articles. It will
be -possible to obtain a buffet lunch
on the first floor.
Mrs. Roy W.
Hoadley, vice-president of Illinois
Federation, and Mrs. James Oliver,
state treasurer, are co-chairmen or
the Chicago Frolic. Tickets may be
obtained from the district president,
Mrs. A. J. Pohlma, or other officers
or from headquarters, 30 West
Washington street.
All club women and friends are
invited to participate and out-oftown club women or friends visiting
in Chicago at the time are urged to
share in this gala day.
FIRST BIRTHDAY
The installation will be public
and all are invited to attend. There
will be refreshments and enter­
tainment.
1.1• • •
Illinois Federation
of Women's Clubs
Set Date for Frolic
a w • ittm
i
R I • • ITrVTI-VI
1 rri'i 111'Ks,
RELIEF ORDERS
WE WILL TAKE CARE OF
THEM WITH VERY GOOD
COAL.
''YES—BUT OUR
HOUSE WAS WARM!"
We Don't Mind the Zero Mornings."
"WE USE 'MADISON FUEL'."
"It's Guaranteed to Keep You Warm and It
Sure Does."
"WHY DON'T YOU
TRY A LOAD?"
"Their Prices Are Reasonable, and Their Coal
Does Not Have That Black Dust in It."
Call Them at Maywood 4717
MADISON
FUEL & SUPPLY CO.
"The Heat Makers"
2010 Madison Street, Maywood, Illinois
Wednesday, January 23, 1935
5'
Sarlo-Sharp Post Aids
'
Application Distributing
Proviso Spotlight
By DOT NEAL
There was a statement in this
column last week that admission to
Ray Lee's Friday night dances
would be 35 cents. The Pageant
carried an ad saying it would be
15 cents. They were both wrong.
Admittance price is one quarter.
Betty Cline goes in a big way for
snickerdoodle. Whatever that is,
the cooking classes are supposed
to be authorities.
Have you seen Bruce Smith In
his ear muffs? That feUow seems
to have a mania for trying to sell
tickets to dances. He, Chuck
Stumpf, and some contemporaries
are looking for a party to go to
Saturday night.
Max Schreiber has formed the
spirit of romanticism, so he tells
Miss Harman.
Bob Clark may not be in Who's
Who yet, but give him time, and
he may follow in his father's foot­
steps. His father is Thomas Cur­
tis Clark, the poet.
That Stutt girl does find the
cutest hats. Or perhaps it's the
way she wears them that gives
them that certain thing?
Hoxie Hahn had his hair combed
down flat two nights in a row! Bill
Johnson brushed his, too, but
Johnny
Tiefenthal's
was
wild
enough to make up for both of
them.
Jack Kavanagh had his feelings
hurt because it was insinuated in
this space several weeks ago that
anyone could beat him at any­
thing. Maybe if he'd have his red
jacket, shirt, or whatever cleaned,
it would be brighter than any other
in school.
Doug Abbot is feeling his years,
or something. He wore knee pants
Monday, and came to school on ice
skates last Thursday.
Shirley Jameson, who has
achieved honor in several ice meets,
was victor in two of the events at
the Maywood pond derby Saturday,
namely; the 25-yard dash for Jun­
ior girls, and the half-mile.
Did you ever see "Horsie" Orist
in action on a typewriter? Oh, well,
at least the boy tries.
Bob Dolan has a terrible time
during 4-A period. He just captured
a monitor post near the social room,
and how can he resist the pleading
of all the girls who want to come
in before the bell rings, when they
look at him so sweetly?
Donn Logan, at 4:07V2 in the
library: "This night life is killing
me. My senior year is certainly dif­
ferent from the freshman year."
The Girls' League dance will be
Friday night. The Glenolians are
furnishing the music. Friends and
former students are welcome if
they have 25 cents.
Stude, reading list of suggested
books aloud: "Confessions of an
Opium Eater."
Lillian Young; "I read it; it was
dopey."
Say, is this turning into what's
supposed to be a joke colyum?
Heaven forbid! I wanna be Wilma
Winchell.
The Senior Hi-Y was the final
victor in the inter-club debate con­
tests. It was represented by Clar­
ence DeWire and Russell Campbell.
The Camera club and College club
were close runner-ups, tying for
second place. Their speakers were
June Lueck and Dorothy Cimino,
Aaron Spolin and Kenneth Skillin.
Keystones and Hayes proved to
be the popular places after the
senior guard dance. A ticklish sit­
uation arose when several of the
fellows found their pockets sadly
depleted. BiU Houlihan saved the
day, however.
Proviso's part of the scoreboard
looked pretty bad Saturday night
when Elgin decided to call it a
night. Several of the first
team
did not get into the game, or per­
haps the local boys would have
made a better showing. The Varsity
club gave a dance in the old gym
after the game. The orchestra
didn't seem to be sure whether it
knew what it was all about or not.
The Girls' League will give a
tea on January 30. There will be
a guest speaker. Miss Alberta Bren­
ner, of Spaulding-Gorham. Miss
Brenner will exhibit table silver,
and speak on its correct use. Only
seniors are invited.
It is said that Sollie Zapler was
so angry about the publicity he
got in last week's Herald that he
couldn't wrestle when the team
went to Hammond. Pat was re­
ported as being in something of
the same state. Don't believe them,
though; they're just modest.
Mrs.
Moliie
Tubbs
Shantytown)
(The
sunshine
of
Barbara Daniels
Cligy Vine (her lady boarder, real gen­
teel*
Lois Reisz
Mrs. Ellen Hickey (who hates gossip)..
Laura Lu Tolsted
Maydelle Campbell (the pretty young
school teacher)
Lorraine Hanley
Simon Rubbels (the grocer, looking for
a wife)
Blandon Stowe
Tom Riordan (a young census taker)....
Merrill Keastor
Queenie Sheba Tubbs (age 12)
Peggy Riley
Methusalem Tubbs (age 11)
Keith Moore
Billy Blossom Tubbs (age 7)..Fred Daniels
Victor Percival Tubbs (age 4t .Dick Dorpals
Eimira Hickey (age 10) .. .Georgiana Gates
Children of neighbors; Marilyn T. ^nkler,
Carl Setzer
Jim Tubbs (the head of the family)
Theodore Andersen
Orchestra: The Royal Aces.
Dr. Preston Bradley to
Speak; Maywood C. of C.
WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Peters, 130
South Fourteenth avenue, enter­
tained twenty-five guests on Sun­
day evening, January 6, in honor
of their first wedding anniversary.
Luncheon was served at midnight
and Mr. and Mrs. Peters received
gifts.
COMMUNITY CLUB
The South Side Community club
conducted its regular meeting Fri­
day.
After the meeting the club was
entertained by the West Suburban
Men's quartet.
The next meeting will be on Fri­
day, February 1.
O. H. Peterson, secretary-elect of
the Maywood chamber of commerce
announces that Dr. Preston Bradley
will be the featured speaker at the
Chamber's installation of officers
Monday evening, February 4, at the
First Congregational church.
Reservations are limited to 200
and may be made by calling Mr.
Peterson at Maywood 7400.
We are authorized distributors £or
RELIEF COAL
Clients have the privilege to choose their deal­
ers. . . . We will give prompt and courteous
deliveries'.
If you want a clean and prompt delivery of
QUALITY coal or coke at reasonable PRICES
call CLAUSS COAL, telephone Melrose Park
BRIDE TO BE
Mrs. Charles Miller, of 1400 South
Second avenue, entertained a group
of friends at a miscellaneous shower
for Miss Virginia Adams, of 1402
South Second avenue, Friday eve­
ning.
The eighteen friends were enter­
tained with games and stunts. Many
gifts were received by Miss Adams,
whose marriage to Blandon Syowe,
will take place March 2.
OFFICE
16th and
Main St.
711
YARDS
25th Ave. and
Le Moyne St.
With Thousands of Unused Miles in Them at the Lowest Cost Per Mile
OTULa
(
ll.
Comic Drama Given in
Guild Hall Friday Night
"Mrs. Tubbs of Shantytown," a
comedy-drama, in three acts, by
Walter Ben Hare, will be presented
by pupils of Mrs. Bessie Stowe at 8
o'clock Friday evening, at the Epis­
copal church guild hall. Fifth ave­
nue and Oak street.
The story of the play is the simple
story of the everyday life of a lady
of unconquerable optimism who
lives in Shantytown with her four
children and her lady boarder, whose
mother was a Virginia Hamm. Mrs.
Tubbs firmly believes "There aint no
use histin your umbrella until it
starts to rain," And with her homely
philosophy is the sunshine of Shan­
tytown.
The cast of characters:
Paul G. Armstrong, department
commander of the American Legion,
has asked EUmer F. Pflug, com­
mander of Sarlo-Sharp Post in Mel­
rose Park to assist in distributing
applications to eligible veterans if
and when the balance of the Ad­
justed Service Certificates becomes
payable.
-i.
This is another instance of the
efforts of the American Legion to
be of assistance to World War vet­
erans even though they may not be
members of the Post.
It is anticipated that more than
$140,000,000 will be payable to vet­
erans scattered throughout the State
of Illinois by the passage of this
legislation. Records in the past
clearly indicate that vets who se­
cured the first
half of their Ad­
justed Service Certificate did not
squander the funds but actually
took care of their obligations, and
for that reason the payment of the
bonus will materially assist every
community in the State of Illinois.
Application blanks will be found
elsewhere in this issue ' of The
Herald.
BARN DANCE
A group of women of St. Eulalia
parish, are arranging a barn dance
at 8 o'clock Saturday evening, in
St. Eulalia auditorium, South Eighth
avenue and Lexington street. Mrs.
Ann Wareham is chairman and her
committee includes: Mesdames L.
Albert, M. Markey, Mae Quinlan, B.
E. Cote, Theresa McKee, Mary
Marchin, L. Mirabella, Vera Price,
Marie Sipchen, Margaret McBride,
Emily Weeg, and the Misses. Mar­
guerite Wareham and Lorrain Cote.
\\junjxjoLnJjujGL
S/lCfiir BAOA.
)
LOOK THIS LIST OVER
1934
1932
1930
1933
1934
1933
Ford Deluxe Fordor
$535.00
Willys "6" Sedan..
250.00
Chrysler "70" Sedan..... 250.00
Ford Deluxe Fordor
475.00
Ford Deluxe Tudor
495.00
Dodge Coach
485.00
1931
1932
1933
1932
1933
1931
Oldsmobile Coach
350.00
Ford Deluxe Tudor
. 350.00
Ford Deluxe Coupe R/S. . . 425.00
Oldsmobile Cabriolet
395.00
Plymouth Deluxe Coupe. . . 410.00
Chrysler Coupe
235.00
FIFTY OTHERS TO CHOOSE FROM
SNOW BROS.
AUTHORIZED
DEALERS
SALESROOMS OPEN EVENINGS
1011 SOUTH BOULEVARD
and
652 MADISON STREET
OAK PARK
OAK PARK
Telephones Euclid 7100 and Austin 4422
6
THE HERALD
THE HERALD
E D I T O R I A L
Published Every Wednesday at Maywood, flMnois
712 South Fifth Avenue
Phone Maywood 7100
AN UNENVIABLE RECORD
Cook county established one record in 1934 of which none
of its citizens is proud. More than twelve hundred men,
women and children were slain by automobiles during the past
twelve months.
We may boast of our modern achievements, science, inven­
tion and generosity to mankind, but should hang our heads
in shame if we do nothing to prevent the ruthless slaughter
of motorists and pedestrians.
During the past three decades Chicago has had two appal­
ling disasters, the Iroquois theatre fire where 605 persons were
burned and crushed to death and the overturning of the East­
land in the Chicago river with the loss of 812 lives. Auto­
mobile fatalities in Cook county during 1934 exceeded each
of these disasters and nearly equalled the casualties of both.
The sinking of the Lusitania, an overt act which helped
plunge the United States in the World War caused the loss of
1,198 lives. In gruesome comparison there were 1,258 deaths
from automobile mishaps in Cook County in 1934, an increase
of more than one hundred over the preceding year.
Nearly 36,000 persons were killed by automobiles in the
United States in 1934. During the World War, 39,374 mem­
bers of the American Expeditionary Forces were killed in
action.
Since the World War approximately ten times this num­
ber of fatalities have occurred in the United States from
automobile collisions which were preventable if drivers and
pedestrians had displayed ordinary caution and courtesy.
LETTERS
"MANY TH.INKS"
On behalf of the Chicago Tuber­
culosis Institute and the Christmas
Seal committee of the Maywood
Twentieth Century club, I want to
take this opportunity to thank all
those who in any way helped to
ma!:e the annual Christmas seal
sale a success.
Especially the committee wishes
to extend its thanks to Superinten­
dent Eugene La Rowe and all the
principals, teachers and pupils of
school district No. 89; to the prin­
cipals, teachers and pupils of the
parochial schools and to H. H.
Eelkema, principal; Miss Helen Rob­
inson, the nurse, and the faculty
and pupils of Proviso Township
high school.
The seal sales this season total
$935.73, approximately $130 more
than last year.
Following is a statement of
amount of seals sold by the various
units:
Proviso high school
Washington school
Roosevelt school
Garfield school
St. James
St. Eulalia
Lincoln school
Irving school
Emmerson school
Ev. Lutheran school
Mail sale
Miscellaneous
MRS. PRANK G.
UNSOUND POLITICS
$185.06
37.65
34.58
180.76
5.64
8.56
85.33
123.28
78.96
7.80
148.35
39.76
Views and News
from Readers
are kept well informed on all af­
fairs by the Civic Bulletin. Henry
W. Tolsted puts in his full time as
president. If he runs again this
spring he should be given an over­
whelming vote of confidence. Maywood must keep its political good
sense 1
JOHN PUBLIC.
A BANK
We need a bank in Maywood for
the purpose of extending credit to
honest business men, but since a
bank is in the credit business, and
credit must deal with character and
personalities, I am positive that a
government owned bank will not
take the chances of an honest pri­
vate banker.
OSCAR LISSNER.
"CLICK-CLICK"
In these times of agitation on
communism, nazism, those other
abbreviations of ours the P.W.A.,
C.C.C., etc., the radio on educa­
tion, the economic question, the
money problem discussions, together
with constant reading and the ra­
dio, I gather the impression that
Professor Einstein's theory is to
the general public a foregone con­
clusion, that the professor is right
and is the only one who thinks
he knows. The rest of us just won­
der what it is really all about.
Now comes Mayor La Guardia of
New York with the threat of build­
ing a municipally owned electric
and power plant. In my opinion I
am entirely in sympathy with this
movement, for I would like to live
long enough to be able to have
relativity, electricity, gas^ meters,
kilowatts and therms diagnosed.
In my humble home in Maywood,
I have two piercing-eyed monsters
hung on the basement wall which
radiate forth the click-click, show­
ing that life exists in these dinosauers, and from
which each
month the pocket-flash youth re­
moves the relativity. A few days
following there comes the sad news
of the amount of your economy
during the past month.
With only my wife and myself
in our bungalow we must submit
to the wants of what constitutes, in
the Public Service Co.'s opinion,
the share I must contribute for
the privilege of enjoying light and
gas. Based on this last year's sum­
mary this tribute was $68.57 for gas
and $74.70 for electricity, or ap­
proximately $5.71 and $6.23 per
month.
No redress, no alternative. In
other words, no check-ee, no
light-ee, no gas-ee, and I am going
nuts-kee.
The "liberal" platform suggested
in this column last week is silly and
•unsound. One rusty nail in the
plank suggests the legalization of
liquor. This town has never been
wet and doesn't intend to be. Last
year the people went to the polls
and emphatically expressed them­
selves against red noses. Elections
jost money. There will never be
another vote on this, subject, so
advocates of drunkenness would do
well to move elsewhere.
Rivaling the evils of drinking and
dancing is gambling. It still amazes
this writer how anyone can have
nerve enough to suggest the legali­
zation of horse race betting. The
harvest of tainted dollars the village
might reap from licenses would poi­
son its reputation. The beer baron,
baron racketeers of the liquor in­
dustry started handbook betting so
that they might get the honest dol­
lar of the workingman who was too
wise to kill himself with alcohol.
Unfortunately this town is infested
with a few people who seek lower
water rates and reduced taxes only
so that they will have more money
to squander on the ponies.
W. p. ARNOLD.
Other things mentioned in the
"liberal" platform are too unsound
HOARDING FUNDS
to be even worthy of comment.
Had it ever been my desire to
Maywood has always on the whole
a political position, I would
had honest, conservative officials.
the game of hide and seek,
That is why it is ahead of its neighsyt,
become a "yesman" to some
bors morally. It has pure, whojjcg
boss.
some water, beautiful trees
I prefer to follow the adparks, and good streets. Ci'
my father, who on nu­
merous occasions warned me, that
my conscience shall not be for sale
for political profit.
So for reason thereof I voice my
opposition to the present village
administration for some of their
actions:
1. Who so heroicly boast in their
(civic bulletin) about the village
treasury surplus. I ask what good
does gold or silver to anyone when
it is locked up in a vault?
In a time when a great per­
centage of the unemployed in
Maywood have to exist on the
barest necessities of life.
In last week's issue of this paper
Hon. Mr. Tolsted, president of
Maywood tells us through his
health commissioner Dr. Peters
that we have good drinking water
in Maywood.
Would it not show greater in­
telligence and prove to be more
effective if Mr. Tolsted would think
of the future, because the coming
years will reveal the damage it has
done to the boys and girls who
have been stunted in mind and
body during this heart breaking
time of unemployment.
However this childish play to
store up loads of metal in our
village treasury safe, will not per­
suade me that the reservoir water
is the best to wash with.
OSCAR LISSNER.
OUR BACKWARD NEIGHBORS
Maywood has stepped far ahead
under the administration of Henry
W. Tolsted. Without extra tax he
has given us an incinerator and a
reservoir, not to mention numerous
street improvements already made
plus others to follow. It is true,
with considerable complaint from
certain selfish and stubborn citizens,
water rates were boosted slightly to
help pay for the reservoir, but these
same citizens who complained are
finding themselves compensated by
lower fire insurance rates.
When other towns were misguid­
ed by the repeal of prohibition,
Maywood, through its sane leader­
ship, remained dry. Many of those
who then clamored for liquor now
appreciate the wholesome business
houses and stores of this town.
Others are die-hards. They point
to the many autos constantly parked
in the business districts of Forest
Park and Melrose Park as signs of
trade. Some of these, however, are
cars of rowdies and drunkards who
haunt the taverns. Maywood is not
behind in respectable business. >
Things have smoothed themselves
out. Even former critics of the ad­
ministration are back under the
fold. One need only read the Civic
Bulletin to convince himself that
Maywood is a Utopia, financially
and otherwise, in comparison to
many of its slow-stepping neighbors.
You're a Bum
With the 1935 models well on
their way, the time of year Is
rolling around when the sins of
the past catch up with us. You
take your car to an agency for
appraisal, and you learn the cold,
hard truth. Your battered old
1934 model still may look wonder­
ful to you and not an hour older
than the day you bought it, but
to the man who is taking it in
trade it's a broken down, shabby,
noisy, worthless wreck, the kind
of a car a person of your calibre
should be ashamed to drive.
In the first
place, you never
kept the proper amount of air in
the tires and they wore unevenly.
You permitted tlie water in the
battery to run too low. The door
you slammed ever so slightly now
squeaks. Some thoughtless fellow
parked too close and banged a
fender, knocking about $50 worth
of value off your car. You didn't
change the oil every 1000 miles
and the motor sounds like a boiler
factory.
After this analysis, you decide
your a lazy, shiftless, no-account
person and don't deserve a new
car—so you go ahead and buy one
anyway.
For Diversion Seekers
Just in case Martha Delaplaine
slips up anfl fails to recommend
ROSEN-MANTELL
Mr. and Mrs. A. Rosen of 537
Roscoe street, Chicago, announce
the marriage of their daughter,
Florence, to N. A. Mantell of Gary,
Indiana, son of Mr. and Mrs. I.
Mantell of 1509 St. Charles road,
Maywood, which took place Thurs­
day, January 10. The couple left
for an extended trip through the
east.
DR. WARING HERE
Dr. Mary F. Waring, president
of the National Association of Col­
ored Women, will speak at 4 o'clock
Sunday afternoon, January 27, at
the Canaan M. E. church, 619 South
Thirteenth avenue, Maywood. The
service is under the auspices of the
children's league.
MAYWOOD CHAPTER O.E.S.
"Heaven's My Destination" by
Thornton Wilder, the man who
everybody had given up for vlost,
here's hearty applause for it and
the comment that you're gypping
yourself if you don't read it before
the week's out. It's short—about a
two and a half hour sit.
The doggerel un tne title page
tells an awful lot;
George Brush is my name.
America's my nation
Ludington's my dwelling place
And Heaven's my destination.
Change George Brush to any
male you can think of, switch
Ludington to the name of his town,
and you'll be reading about the
person about whom you're think­
ing—and you'll never know the
difference.
•
•
•
The Borax Shop
Furniture men all know the term
"borax" when applied to a certain
type of furniture store, a type which,
you may be thankful, are con­
spicuous by their absence in this
town, although they say it's a
treat to go into one. When you
get a borax store located and want
to have some fun, go in and act as
though you have a little money,
and intend to buy furniture some­
where but at present you're just
shopping around.
First, the salesman, who is on a
strictly commission basis, will show
you everything in the store. If
there are five floors
of furniture
he will walk you up the stairs. This
is to wear down your resistance.
After he is all through, you say
you like the furniture but the
prices , are too high. Then you
start to walk out.
This throws the salesman into
confusion. He'll pick out a set,
a really beautiful set marked in
the neighborhood of $200 which
cost his firm maybe $75 and offer
it to you for $20. You recognize
that this is a tremendous bargain
and, not having $20 on your per­
son at the time, you make a de­
posit of $10.
The sad part isn't revealed to
you till you get home. The sales­
man calls you up then and in­
forms you that the particular piece
you selected was sold just an honr
before you bought it, and won't
you come in and pick out some­
thing else?
You go back in a day or two and
ask for your money back and you're
told that they're very sorry, bi(t no.
refunds are allowed. So you're
hooked. But all furniture men in­
sist it's worth the price of ad­
mission.
Maywood chapter, Order of East­
COLONEL CITIZEN.
ern Star, will meet in the lodge
rooms in the Masonic Temple, South
Fifth avenue, and Oak Street, at
HEALTH IN ILLINOIS
Although vast improvement is 7:30 o'clock Monday evening, Jan­
uary 28. The initiatory work will
still possible in this state and can be done by the new officers.
be achieved at reasonable expense,
health conditions in Illinois are
much superior to those that prevail
in Eui'opean countries generally, ac­
cording to Dr. Prank J. Jirka, di­
Brings a Fresh
rector of the state department of
Crop of Smart
public health, vho bases his opinion
upon records recently published by
the League of Nations. The general
death rate, the loss of infant life,
the mortality from diphtheria and
the prevalence of diphtheria were
Prints! Navy and
at a much lower level in Illinois
White! New
during 1933 than in either England,
France, Germany, Irish Free State,
Sophisticated
Poland, or Scotland, the statistics
Pastels!
show. The prevalence and losses
from tuberculosis were also lower in
Illinois.
$^.95
"Infant mortality and the losses
from diphtheria are among the most
sensitive and accurate indices to
prevailing health conditions," Dr.
All
Jirka said, "because favorable rates
Sizes
indicate an intelligent and extensive
application of nearly all of the prin­
ciples of preventive medicine. In
These are the kind
1933, England, with the most fa­
of dresses that sow
vorable rate among the leading
the
seeds
of
a
European nations, had an infant
smart wardrobe.
mortality rate twenty-six per cent
The designs are
higher than that in Illinois. The
fresh, the colors
loss of infants was 63 per 1,000
new, and the styles
births in England and only 50 in
are ever so refresh­
Illinois, while fatalities from diph­
ing in their smart
theria in England were at the rate
simplicity. M a n y
of 6.3 per 100,000 people and 1.7 in
have little jackets
Illinois.
and capes to com­
"Had the infant death rate in
plete them.
England prevailed in Illinois the
number of babies lost would have
Peacock Blue — Raspberry — Cray
been greater by 1,370. Had the
Black — Brown
^
^
English death rate from diphtheria
prevailed there would have been
Formerly $7.95—Now
492 instead of 134 fatalities from
that disease in this State during
1933.
"The economic savings that have
resulted from the prevention of
diphtheria, typhoid fever, tuber­
901 S. 5th Ave.
Phone May. 2714
culosis and the various ailments of
Maywood*s
Oldest Dress Shop
infancy run well into millions of
dollars annually."
SPRING
DRESSES
6
$5.95
Ellis Style Shop
Join Our
Merchari'
dise Club
Wednesday, January 23, 1935
Commander of Maywood
Legion Is Improving
Commander Frank J. Clark of
Maywood Post- 133, American Le­
gion, is reported to be showing a
gradual progress towards recovery.
Commander Clark has been a pa­
tient in Hines hospital for nearly
a month and was in very serious
condition at first, due to stomach
ulcers. The post is carrying on
under the leadership of Vice Com­
manders Harry T. Smith and Wally
Swenson.
Next meeting night is Monday
at the Legion hall and as this is
the social meeting night an at­
tractive program and good refresh­
ments have been provided.
The entertainment will consist of
vocal numbers by the "Three
Chanticleers," comprised of Ralph
Ellis, Herrick Van Gunten and
Charles Schuster. Cornet solo by
Bill Fuller and clarinet solo by
Rus-s Currie. Prank Heil will ac­
company on the piano.
The post memoership is well up
to the mark of previous years and
the entire program of the post for
the year is going along nicely. Exservice men of the community are
invited to attend this social meet­
ing Monday and all meetings of
Maywood post at any time.
E. w. D.
AXIOMATIC WORK
Free classes are continuing at 8
p.m. every Monday at the home of
Miss Ruth Blanchard. 1011 South
Seventh. All truth seekers welcome.
7
LITERARY FORUM
Miss Charlotte Troxel, formerly
of River Forest, entertained the
Maywood Literary forum on Satur­
day evening at her home at 1235
South Sixteenth avenue. The forum
consists of thirty members who
meet for the purpose of criticizing
manuscripts before submitting them
for publication. Miss Beth' Hutch­
inson, a former English Instructor
of the adult educational faculty. Is
the founder of the Literary club.
A brief business discussion opened
the meeting, alter which two un­
usual poems were read. They were
followed by an informal essay, a
sketch written in the "stream of
consciousness" manner, and sev­
eral short stories. The literary por­
tion of the evening was closed
with the reading of a chapter of
a novel which is being written by
one of the club members.
Before the social hour, authentic
information pertaining to the ex­
isting conditions in Russia was
presented by a club guest who re­
cently returned from a month's
visit in Petrograd. Living with
American residents in the Russian
manner, he was well able to ob­
serve the people's mode of living
and governmental activities which
are denied the tourist.
A discussion of Russia contin­
ued
until
refreshments w e r e
served.
Maywood Rotarians Hear
Indian Chief Thursday
Members of the Maywood Ro­
tary club will have a somewhat
unique entertainment at the meet
ing Thursday noon at Guild hall.
Chief Evergreen Tree, a Pueblo In­
dian, will be there in full cere­
monial garb and will entertain the
club with Imitations of bird and
animal calls.
At the meeting Thursday the
members were addressed by Dr. E.
Scott of the University of Wis­
consin Research Foundation. Dr.
Scott went through the use of
numerous slides, lectured on vita­
min "D," and explained its uses
and where it is obtainable.
PAST NOBLE GRANDS
The Past Noble Grands club of
Maywood Rebekah lodge, met at
the home of Mrs. Ella Moffett, 600
South Eighth avenue. Wednesday
evening, for the annual meeting.
After reports were heard the elec­
tion of ofiQcers took place, re­
sulting in the following being
elected: Mesdames Tillie Felsch,
president: Elizabeth Pratt, vice
president: Ella Moffett, secretary,
and Emma Riley, treasurer.
The business meeting was fol­
lowed by bridge and the prize win­
ners were Mesdames Florence Cantore, Eva Ruge, Hattie Biles. Jean
Schipper, Tillie Felsch and Frances
Felsch. Refreshments were served
by the hostesses, Mrs. Molfet and
Mrs. Pearl McPherson.
DEATH OF J. W. HESS
The sudden aeath of Joseph W.
Hess of 1109 North Twelfth avenue,
Melrose Park, was a shock to his
neighbors and friends.
Mr. Hess passed away on January
8 at the Westlake hospital.
He was bom in Sanok, Poland,
on January 21, 1880. He came to
Melrose Park in 1919.
Funeral services were conducted
at 10 a.m. Thursday, January 10, at
Holy Family church. Fifty-second
and Justine streets, Chicago. Mass
was said by Rev. T. Francis Niziol.
He was a member of the Inter­
national Association of Machinists
Lodge No. 126.
Interment took place at Arlington
cemetery in Elmhurst.
He is survived by his wife Domi
cela, three sons, Edward, Charles
and Stanley, and daughter, Jenny.
CARD PARTY
combination dance and card
party with a raffle as a grand
finale will be given in the St.
Simeon's Recreation hall, Washing­
ton boulevard and Marshall avenue,
Bellwood, on Wednesday evening,
February 6.
Sheldon E. Kirchman is chair­
man of the group arranging the
affair. Lloyd Scott, Fred Credity,
Arthur Runnion and Harry Burnham are on the committee helping
Mr. Kirchman, while Rev. E. I.
Dankowski, the pastor, is honorary
chairman and Rev. Paul Koepke,
assistant pastor, is also taking a
prominent part in the arrange­
ments. Tickets are 35 cents.
A
White Enamel
SAUCE PAN
1 qt. size "Vollrath" or
"Polar" quality.
Regular 70c Value
Special
3-PC. SET
V-8 POWER • FORD ECONOMY • AND NOW
Vollrath Quality
Sauce Pans
1, 1V2 and 2 qt. size
Reg. $1.95 Value
Special
$1 00
"Betty Bright"
MOPS
Special
5 Lbs.
FLAXOAP
Dri-Brite
IN THE NEW
FORD V8
WAX
1 pt. size
49c
HOUSE BROOMS
4 sewed corn
I
T MAKES no difference where you sit in the
new Ford V-8. Even back seat passengers
enjoy "the comfort of a front seat ride."
It took a major engineering development to
make this possible—the Full-floating Springbase
with Comfort Zone Seating. Notice how the
springs are mounted beyond the axles . . . how
the seats are cradled in the easy-riding zone
between the springs. Notice what a difference
this makes—in everyone's comfort?
But Comfort Zone Riding is only one reason
why you'll want a Ford V-8 in 1935. You'll want
it for its V-8 power—for the beauty of its stream­
lined body and interior appointments—for its
new roominess—its new easy-pressure brakes
and clutch—its new, larger tires—the safety of
its w e l d e d , all-steel b o d y a n d safety g l a s s a l l
around (at no extra cost)!
Low in first cost . . . more economical to
operate than any other Ford ever built . . . the
1935 Ford V-8 is, at the same time, designed
to meet the needs of everyone. It's a new auto­
mobile value. See it today.
A U T H O R I Z E D F O R D D E A L E R S
495
A M n TTP
P. O. ft Detroit
Universal
Cree/it Co., the Authorized
Finance Plan.
^c
MOP STICKS
9c
SILVERMAN'S
HARDWARE
STORE
Sen Will
Treat
You
Right''
WE DELIVER
718 South Fifth Avenue
Maywood 236
8
THE HERALD
CHURCH ANNOUNCEMENTS
bring one or more friends and help make
this interesting work a success.
The
Women's
council will continue
serving
the weekly Thursday
evening
dinners in tfee future.
Mrs. John Gabbert will lead the devotionals following
the dinner.
BAPTIST
SECOND BAPTIST
Rev. J. W. Coleman will occupy
his pulpit on next Sunday morning
CONGREGATIONAL
and evening. Theme: "Out and
Out for Christ" at the Second Bap­
tist church.
PLYMOUTH CONGREGATIONAL
Rev. Coleman addressed the Hi league
The service at Plymouth Congre­
at the First Methodist church on Sun­ gational
church, Fifth at Van
day. Theme: •"Problems and Possibilities
of the Negro Race."
He also addressed Buren, will be a Communion serv­
the C.C.C. camp Sunday morning at 8 ice Sunday.
a.m.
Life."
Theme:
"The
Missing
Link
of
The Reverend Mrs. Mattie Miller, as­
sociate pastor of the Metropolitan Com­
munity church of Chicago, addressed the
Women's Missionary society on Sunday at
the special afternoon program.
The deacons and deaconesses' boards
met Monday evening of last week in its
regular business meeting.
Mrs. Evans,
the newly elected Sunday school super­
intendent, is doing a fine job in his
school.
FIRST BAPTIST
, Sunday services at the First Bap­
tist church, corner Randolph and
South Fifth avenue, aje: At 11
a. m. the minister. Rev. William S.
Jacobs, will preach the third sermon
in the series on "Great Convictions
of the Christian Faith." His topic
will be: "Concerning Man."
The topic of the Communion Medita­
tion which will be given by the pastor,
William L. Halfaker, is "Travelling Into
the Wind." All who are seeking to live
the Christian life and who reverence the
significance of
the Communion
table,
whether members of Plymouth or any
other church, are cordially invited to
join in the service at 11:00.
The church school convenes at 9:45.
In the evening at 6:30. the Young
People's forum will be led by Miss Char­
lotte Strong
and the topic
will
be,
"Shall We Be Broad-Minded or HighMinded?" Out-of-school young people are
Invited to this meeting.
At 6:30 the Young People's Fellowship
will be led by Robert Keating and will
discuss the topic, "Movies and the Social
Problem."
High school freshmen and
sophomores are invited to this meeting.
Everyone is urged to tune in the morn­
ing devotional services broadcast from
the seminary each morning at 7:45. ex­
cept Sunday. Students and faculty share
in the leadership.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
The final
service in the Sunday evening
series will be an address by Miss Susan
"As a Man ThinKetli" is the ser­
Ferguson of India at 7:30 o'clock.
This
mon subject upon which Rev.
series of Sunday evening services has been
under the auspices of the young people of Ralphe A. Harris of the First Con
the church. Miss Ferguson has been asked gregational church will preach at
to repeat an address which she gave this 11 o'clock Sunday morning.
past summer at the Lake Geneva summer
The music for this service led by Miss
school. The public is invited.
During the week: Midweek service at Emma N. Ewen will be as follows:
7:45 p. m., Wednesday evening at the home Anthem—"Rejoice O Ye Righteous"..
Ashford
of Mrs. T. S. VanGunten, 1501 South Sixth
Soloists—Mrs. Engel, Miss Ewen,
avenue. Tuesday. 6:30 p. m., Sunday school
Mr.
Willson
council of Chicago Baptists at North Shore
Scott
church. The First Baptist church in May- Solo—"Repent Ye"
Harvey D. Roland
wood conducts a Bible school for all ages
Miss Lela Hammer at the organ will
at 9:45 a. m. Sunday mornings.
The play:
school meets in the church building in the
Handel
assembly room of the Baptist Home for Prelude—"Largo"
Offertory—"Elegy"
Massenet
Aged People, where the young people's de­
Postlude—'Toccata'*
D'Evry
partment may be found.
The little church or nursery is main,
tained during the morning worship serv
ice for the convenience of parents.
All departments of the church school
meet at the regular hour of 9:45. There
are classes for all ages. Why not bring
your children to Sunday school and then
First Church of Christ, Scientist, stay for the adult Bible class? This
class, under the direction of Mr. Harris, is
meets at 502 South Second, corner studying
the "Teachings of Jesus" and
Pine street. Services Sunday at some very worth while questions are
10:45; Sunday school at 12 noon; brought up and discussed. All are wel­
Wednesday evening meeting at 8. come.
Sunday evening at 6:30 the Young peo­
Reading room, 504 Washington ple's group are having a pot luck din­
boulevard; hours, daily, 11 a.m. to ner at the parsonage.
The regular meeting of the teachers and
4 p.m.; Wednesday evenings, 7 to officers
of the church school which was
7:45; Saturday, 7 p.m. to 9.
postponed lasc week because of inclement
weather will meet tonight (Wednesday) at
"Life" was the subject of the les­ 8 in the church.
son-sermon in all Churches of
Ladies' night given by the Men's club of
Christ, Scientist, on Sunday, Janu­ the church is scheduled for Thursday eve­
ning at 6:15.
ary 20.
A cooking lesson will be given at the
The golden text was, "The life home of Mrs. Harris, 511 North Seventh
avenue, at 2:30. Saturday.
was manifested, and we have seen particulars call Maywood 1113.For further
it, and bear witness, and shew unto
you that eternal life, which was
with the Father, and was mani­
fested unto us" (1 John 1:2).
Among the citations which com­
prised the lesson-sermon was the
following from the Bible: "My son,
attend to my words; incline thine
ear unto my sayings. Let them not
depart from thine eyes; keep them
in the midst of thine heart. For
they are life unto those that find
them, and health to all their flesh.
Keep thy heart with all diligence;
for out of it are the issues of life"
(Proverbs 4:20-23).
The lesson-sermon also included
the following passages from the
Christian Science textbook, "Science
and Health with Key to the Scrip­
tures," by Mary Baker Eddy: "Un­
less the harmony and immortality
of man are becoming more appar­
ent, we are not gaining the true idea
of God; and the body will reflect
what governs it, whether it be truth
or error,^ understanding or belief,
spirit or matter. Therefore 'acquaint
now thyself with Him, and be at
peace.' Be watchful, sober, and
vigilant. The way is straight and
narrow, which leads to the under­
standing that God is the only Life"
(p. 324).
CHRISTIAN
FIRST CHRISTIAN
The First Christian church is
located at 1101 South Sixth ave­
nue, one block south of Madison.
Sunday 'ichool Is at 9:45 with graded
classes for all ages.
Morning church
service Is at 10:50 a.m.
Mr. Crutcher
will speak on "Consecration."
The eve­
ning service is at 7:30 p.m. The subject
will be "Theosophy." the first
in a series
on "Modern Cults."
Junior C. E. meets at 2:30; Senior
C. E. meets at 6:30 p.m. Thomas Capp
Is the leader.
The Women's council will meet in the
annex at 2:30 for the regular monthly
missionary study. The topic for discus­
sion is "Japan," and our own women
will give a discourse on the different
subjects.
Mrs. earner and Mrs. Scidmore will be hostesses. Every woman to
CALVARY
COMMUNITY
Services for next Lord's day at
Calvary Community church will
consist of the church school ses­
sion at 9:45 and the worship serv­
ice at 11 o'clock. The pastor. Rev.
A. J. Michael, will have for the
subject of his sermon a question
frequently asked in the Scriptures
but seldom considered, "How Much
More?"
Junior choirs, with special anthem. The the committee has planned an ice skating
Rev. Merrell E. Boulton is pastor.
frolic for those who skate. Those who do
The
Young
Womens'
guild
of
the not are invited to attend an indoor party
church is giving a Carnival of Nations which has been carefully arranged to in­
program at the church parlors Thursday sure a good time for all.
and Friday evenings.
There will be
Junior and children's choirs meet at 7
PEACE EVANGELICAL
varied
forms of
entertainment,
"The p. m. Friday.
Black
Forest,"
moving
pictures
and
ex­
"The Romance of the Jew" will
of curios. All are invited andi» the
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
be Rev. Selmikeit's topic Sunday, at hibits
price is nominal.
Rev. Kluender will preach next
Peace Evangelical church. TwentyMr. and Mrs. Edward T. Motts and
seventh and Grand avenues, Bell­ family left Sunday for South Bend, Ind., Sunday morning on "The Office of
where they will reside after living in the Ministry" at Saint Pauls Lu­
wood. The English service com­ Maywood
for five
years. Mr. and Mrs.
mences at 10 o'clock and the Ger­ Motts were actively interested in St. theran church, Eleventh avenue and
John's English
Lutheran church,
Mr. Lake street, Melrose Park. German
man at 11 o'clock.
Motts having served as superintendent service commences at 9:30. English
The Sunday school and high school Bible
of
the
Sunday
school
for
several
years.
service, in which the holy sacrament
department session will be conducted at
At the annual meeting of St. John's
9 o'clock.
will be distributed, commences at
In the evening a seven-reel motion pic­ English Lutheran church on Tuesday of 11 a. m.
last week, encouraging reports were given
ture, "Christus" will be shown.
Confessional service for communicants
There will be two shQwings of this pic­ by all the organizations and officers of
Mr. Doering will be at
ture, the first
beginning at 6 o'clock will the congregation. The pastor gave a re­ at 10:30 a. m..
be given over to children under 14 years view of the evidences of material advance­ the organ, and has selected the following
ment;
enlarging
the
church,
installation
numbers:
Prelude,
Allegro in E fiat,
by
of age and a donation of 10 cents will be
asked. The second showing will begin at of pipe organ, etc., during the past 10 Read; Offertory, Intermezzo, by Steane;
Postlude
in
E
fiat
by
Abernethy.
years.
All
the
organizations
are
active.
8 o'clock and is given over to adults. A
Each Wednesday evening until Lent, a
free will silver offering is to be asked Messrs. Edward Schabow, Edward Schip­
during this {-howing.
As this picture is per and F. R. Sanneman were elected as midweek vesper service is conducted com­
mencing at 7:45 o'clock. Pastor Kluender
very educational for every Christian, we members of the council.
will continue his discourse in marriage
invite the public to participate.
with the subject: "The Duties of Christian
At 8 o'clock on Tuesday evening the
FIRST LUTHERAN
Husbands and Wives."
Young People's league of Peace Evangelical
"Faith in Christ the Saviour, a
church are staging an Evans filmdom
On Thursday evening the Men's club is
fashion fur show at the Memorial Park Gift of the Spirit of God," is the showing a sound film, "The King of Kings,"
building, Washington boulevard and East-' message from the Lord Sunday at from 7 to II o'clock. Also an afternoon
ern avenue, Bellwood. The latest in Paris First Lutheran church.
showing for children and others, com­
and Hollywood inspired styles will be dis­
mencing at 2 o'clock.
Morning worship at 10:30 o'clock, pre­
played. Fashions that one meets strolling
down Hollywood's sunny boulevards, over ceded by the Sunday school at 9:45.
PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN S
the tea cups in a cozy little cafe or for And Vespers at 7:30 p.m.
ORGANIZATION
a casual afternoon at home and models
Midweek prayer service will be con­
as winsome as any of the film
colony's ducted at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Junior church services will be
best known stars will pass in review, Adam Thorell, 508 North Fifth avenue, at conducted Sunday at 11 a.m.
members of the Young People's league and 8 o'clock Wednesday evening, and the
The Book club will meet with
the church acting as mannequins for Miss Sunday school teachers gather for a spe­
Evelyn Mason, the smart young radio cial meeting immediately thereafter.
Mrs. E. T. Morgan, 1418 South Six­
stylist, who will describe the filmdom
At 10 a.m. Saturday, the Confirmation teenth avenue at 2 p.m., Monday.
fashion creations.
class meets, and at 1:30 p.m., the Chil­
Another attraction of the evening will dren's chorus, both in the church par­ The program, "Poets and Poetry of
be "The Proviso High School String Oc­ lors.
the Southwest," will be given by
tette," famous for their harmonious and
Mrs. J. L. Lewis and Miss Jennie
mellow rendition of classical music. They
LUTHERAN
ZION
Palmer.
will give numerous musical selections.
Lutheran Zion church is at Oak
A donation of 25 cents will be asked
The Girl Scouts will meet at the
for this evening's entertainment and en­ street and Twenty-third, Bellwood.
church at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Mrs,
titles every one to participate in the
Sunday, the Bible class and Sunday J. A. Meyer in charge of the older
drawing of a beautiful iox fur scarf pre­
school will begin at 9 o'clock.
German troop; Miss Dorothy Mclntyre will
sented as a door prize.
services at 10.
In
this
service
the
newly
elected have charge of the younger girls.
FIRST EVANGELICAL
church ofBcers will be installed.
Thurs­
At 7 p.m., on Wednesday, the
Announcements of the First Lu­ day at 8, Lutheran training course will first
aid class for Girl Scouts over
theran church are:
be held in the basement of the church.
At 8 o'clock Friday night, the Luther twelve will meet at the Maywood
Today (Wednesday) —
league will give a social.
The young Health Center. This is sponsored
At 8:00 p.m.—The Prayer and Praise
folks of the congregation are invited.
by the Community Scout council.
Service.
At 9:00 p.m.—The Adult choir re­
The Plunkett luncheon will be
EMMANUEL LUTHERAN
hearsal, directed by Mr. Paul J.
Knaak.
Sunday at Emmanuel Lutheran served at 1 o'clock, Wednesday,
January 30, at the church. Those
Sunday—
church, 1901 South Nineteenth ave­ having
9:30 a.m.—The Sunday school session,
luncheon tickets make final
"Make Sunday Meaning­ nue, there will be Sunday school at report to circle leaders not later
9:45 a.m. and divine worship at 11 than Monday.
ful."
11:00 a.m.—Morning worship—the Rev. a.m. with a sermon by the pastor.
Following the luncheon an en­
H a r o l d R. Youngberg
Rev. John M. Bramkamp, D.D.
preaching — the
sermontertainment will be given by the
The
Luther
league
will
meet
at
6:30
subject
is "The Lovable
p. m.
women of the church, Mrs. Eugene
Dreamer."
In spite of the slippery sidewalks, the LaRowe, president of the women's
2:00 p.m.—Junior Christian Endeavor attendance at the Leadership Training
—Miss Knaak and Miss class Friday evening was greater than on organization in charge.
Pauls are in charge.
The afternoon's program is an­
the opening night.
Dr. Schaefer of the
Christian Endeavor — a Seminary, has supervision of the class, nounced as follows:
brief resume of the topic but Student Reichmann presented
the
Organ selections by Mrs. B. W.
by Miss Dorothy Zuehlke chapter on "The Power of My Influence."
—and reports from each This Friday evening Student Volkmar will Foster.
of the four departments.
present the third chapter of "My Life" on
Vocal solos, Mrs. F. L. Radclifle.
Tuesday—
"The Course of My Development."
"Kid Gloves," a one-act play,
7:30 p.m. — The
Girl
Scout
troop
The Luther league will conduct its
directed by Miss Mary Lewis and
meets at the church—Miss Aske- monthly social Tuesday evening.
vold
and Miss Tonkin
are
in
presented by Mrs. K. H. Ward, Mrs.
charge.
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
L. A. Clapp, Mrs. J. E. McCulWednesday, January 30—
''The Supreme Court Rules" is the lough, Mrs. C. A. Walcher, Mrs., A.
7:30 p.m.—The Third Quarterly con­ subject for Rev. J. M. Bailey's ser­
C. Silber, Mrs. R. F. Van Eman and
ference
and
Communion
service
will be conducted; District Super­ mon for Sunday at 8:30 a. m. and Miss Mary Lewis;
intendent,
the
Rev.
John
G. 10.45 a. m. at Grood Shepherd Lu­
Schwab, will be present on that theran. Sunday school and Bible
CLASS ENTERTAINED
occasion—have reports ready.
EVANGELICAL
class at 9:30 a. m.
JEWISH
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Dr. Milton A. Saffir, rabbi, will
speak at the late evening services
this Friday night at 8 o'clock on
"Where Do We Stand Now?" In
this talk Dr. SafBr will give a report
of the accomplishments in the Maywood Jewish community during the
past three months and will discuss
plans for the future.
The pastor's class will meet on each
Tuesday evening immediately after the
close of school.
The women of the Missionary society
Friday night Dr. Milton E. Smerling will
are to meet at the home of Mrs. Frank
Ripley, 33 South Eightenth avenue, for a discuss "The Jew in Dentistry" at the
luncheon meeting on Wednesday, Jan­ open forum.
Regular Sabbath services are conducted
uary 30. One of the study books will be
at sundown Friday and at 9 a. m. Saturday
reviewed at this meeting.
morning.
The Sabbath candles this week
At 8 o'clock on Wednesday evening,
January 30, the Girls' Missionary guild should be kindled at 4:38 p. m. A class in
Bible
meets
every Saturday afternoon at
is sponsoring a community program in
the church.
The "Life of Christ" in 3:30 p. m.
A
regular
meeting of the Congregation
seven reels of motion pictures will be
presented. These pictures were taken in will be conducted next Monday evening.
All
members
are
urged to be present.
the Holy Land and represent the actual
The B'nai Israel Sisterhood will give a
places where Jesus lived and worked.
card
party
for
the
benefit of the educa­
The program will be one and one-half
hours in length.
No admission will be tional fund Sunday evening at 7:30 o'clock
at
the
Hebrew
Institute
hall, 433 South
charged but a free-will offering will be
Thirteenth avenue.
Six door prizes will
received.
be given.
Mrs. Blanche Berebitsky is
chairman of the affair, and she is assisted
by Mesdames Silverman, Wallace, Center,
D. Kahn, I. Kahn and Osher. Mrs. Minnie
Koven is president of the sisterhood.
Merchants are urged to co-operate by
generous donations with the various com­
mittees
that are soliciting merchandise
GOSPEL TABERNACLE
the United Talmud Torahs bazaar
Sunday morning Pastor Douglas for
which will be given in Chicago February
will preach on the subject, "The 2 to 17. Merchandise coupons (used In­
Confederation of Nations and the stead of cash in making purchases at the
bazaar) may be obtained any evening from
Roman Dictator" from the 13th Dr.
SafQr.
The proceeds of the bazaar
chapter of Revelation, at the Taber­ go to the various Hebrew schools in Chi­
cago,
including
the
Maywood Hebrew
nacle, 1940 South Ninth avenue.
In the evening Dr. Barry of Maywood school.
will occupy the pulpit while the pastor is
preaching in the Church of the Open Door,
Chicago, at the afternoon and evening
services. Dr. and Mrs. Barry will also be
at the young people's meeting to take
charge of the meeting.
The midweek prayer meeting will be
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN
conducted tonight with the pastor taking
up the Sunday school lesson at the open­
St. John's English Lutheran
ing of the meeting. The choir will practice church services are at 10:45 a.m.
after the prayer meeting.
Friday night the Scoflield Bible class will Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Classes
for all ages. The sermon theme
meet for its first
review.
Tuesday the Gleaners Ladies' Bible class will be "The Influence of God's
will meet at the home of Mrs. Douglas,
2015 South Thirteenth avenue, for its Power on Personality."
monthly meeting.
The music is led by the Senior and
LUTHERAN
The anniversary dinner is to be given at
6:30 p. m. Thursday in the church parlors.
Tickets may be purchased for 50 cents
from any Ladies' Aid members. Mrs. Clar­
ence Engel is in charge of the kitchen.
Mrs. Grosse is arranging the program, and
Mrs. Nora Berg is head of the dining room
arrangements. All are urged to attend.
On January 29 the Senior Walther league
is to have a special meeting, mostly rec­
reational. Miss Kathlyn Jones, Miss Vir­
ginia Krueger and Miss Anne Bailey are
on the committee. If the weather permits.
Open
Evenings
The members of Mrs. Louis Jen­
sen's class of the First Baptist Sun­
day school, met at the home of
Kendall Rouse, 801 North Fourth
avenue, Friday evening.
Twelve
young men and ladies spent the
time discussing arrangements for
the class and elected ofBcers for
the coming year. Refreshments and
a social hour concluded the eve­
ning.
Phone:
EUCLID 3200
for
Reservation
9
Wednesday, January 23, 1935
NEIGHBORHOOD METHODIST
METHODIST
FIRST METHODIST
"Epistles of Christ" will be Dr.
Bertram G. Swaney's sermon theme
next Sunday morning at 10:45
o'clock at the First Methodist
church. This will be the third and
last in a series of sermons which
he has been preaching on the gen­
eral theme, "The Gospel."
The church choir will provide special
musical features.
An invitation is ex­
tended to all in the comniunity who are
able to "attend this service.
In the 5:00 o'clock vesper service, the
church will observe "Covenant Sunday,"
•which Is being used throughout Method­
ism to renew the interest of Methodists
in their vows.
The church school session at 9:30 a.m.,
and the Hi-League meeting at 6:30 p.m.
offer programs to all who attend.
In
addition to these Sunday services, the
various departments of the church carry
on their activities throughout the week.
The First Methodist church Is to pro­
vide a noteworthy privilege to the peo­
ple of the entire community on Sunday,
February 3, when Bishop Ernest Lynn
Waldorf of the Chicago area will preach
in the service beginning at 10:45 a.m.
Bishop Waldorf
preached in the Chi­
cago temple Sunday afternoon to 1.500
Methodist official board members from
Chicagoland churches.
Twenty-one at­
tended
from
First
church,
Maywood.
Friends in all the churches are invited
to come and hear this famous church­
man-when he comes to Maywood as guest
preacher.
FREE METHODIST
Services will be conducted at the
usual hours Sunday at the Free
Methodist church, 608 North Fif­
teenth avenue.
At 9:45 the Bible school study hour be­
gins. Classes are provided for each age
group. The morning worship service, with
a sermon by the pastor, O. L. Mullet, be­
gins at 11 o'clock. Quiet hour at 3:30 at
the parsonage for the young people. Please
bring lunches and stay for the evening
services.
Class meeting, led by F. M. Huston, at
7:15 p. m. Preaching of the Word at 8
o'clock by Pastor Mullet.
Wednesday night prayer meeting at 7:45
in the church basement.
Thursday afternoon prayer circle at the
home of Mrs. Alyce Warman, 1411 North
Sixteenth avenue, at 2:30.
Friday evening young people's service
at the parsonage at 8 o'clock.
Griffith
Chapel will give the program.
The public is invited, to attend the
above services.
MELROSE
PARK
METHODIST
Sunday services are at the usual
hour at the Melrose Park Methodist
church.
Church school, 9:45 a. m. with classes
for all ages.
Preaching service is at 11 a. m.
The pastor. Rev. D. K. Englund, will
be in his pulpit.
The choir will sing.
The evening service is at 7:45.
All
friends and members are invited to all of
these services.
At 8 p. m. Wednesday, midweek service
to which all are invited.
Thursday. 7:30, choir rehearsal with
Mrs: Lila Englund in charge.
Friday. 8, Ladies' Aid society will hold
a package social.
Tuesday evening, .January 29, Vaughn
Shoeniaker, the well known cartoonist of
Chicago Daily News, will deliver a chalk
talk, in , the church. The. members of the
Brotherhood will have charge, loose offer­
ing.
The church Invites all the men of*Melrose Park and members of the surround­
ing churches to hear this message.
An increasing number has been
PRESBYTERIAN
finding help in the current series
of services on "Victorious Living"
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
at Neighborhood church, Nineteenth
and Washington boulevard. The
All the usual services Sunday at
final sermon in this series will be the First Presbyterian church are
given Sunday morning on the theme as follows;
"The Conquest of Death." Morning
9:45, Sunday school.
worship is at 11 and Sunday school
11, morning church service.
with classes for all at 11.
11, junior church—Miss Jennie Palmer,
Tonight (Wednesday) the Bible study
group will begin a new series of studies
on "The Teachings of Jesus.' This week's
session will be at 7:30 at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Otto Dodegge, 431 South Twentysecond avenue.
Friday evening
the Senior Epworth
league will join the young people of our
Mexican Methodist church. Polk and Sholto streets, Chicago, for a devotional and
social program.
director.
6:45, Young People's service—Miss Dor­
othy Reynolds, leader.
The usual Scout meetings Tuesday eve­
ning.
Choir rehearsals Thursday
evening—
6:45, junior choir; 8, senior choir.
On Wednesday evening, January 30, a
Plunkett luncheon will be given at 1 p. m.
—to be followed by an entertainment.
Sunday evening the High School league
is entertaining the young people of the
Elmhurst Epworth league. They will begin
a discussion of "The Movies and Charac­
ter," based upon the scoring of a picture
which they will see during the week. It is
expected that several weeks will be devoted
to this study.
I AnnaK. Meyer, M.D., D.O
Monday the Neighborhood Men's club
will enjoy a New England baked bean sup­
per at 6:30. All men of the community are
invited to attend.
The supper will be
served for 15 cents a plate.
4 OSTEOPATHIC and ELECTRICAL
I
TREATMENTS
I 101 N. Oak Park Ave., Phone Euc. Z14
OSTEOPATHY
The Presbyterian Social Union's first
banquet of the new year will be given
Thursday evening at the Union League
club. The speaker will be the Rev. Ralph
W. Sockman, D.D., noted Methodist clergy­
man of New York City.
His subject,
"Twentieth Century Pioneers."
The beginners and primary rooms are
in the process of renovation—the decor­
ators finished their work the past week
and this week the curtains for the win­
dows are to be put in place.
EVER READY CLASS
!
The Ever Ready Sunday school
class of the Bellwood Baptist
church, met at the home of the
teacher, Mrs. L. L. Klnne, 149 South
Twenty-first avenue, Saturday aft­
ernoon. A short devotional meeting
was followed by business and a so­
cial time with the serving of re­
freshments.
The Largest Dept. Store in Proviso Township
WE ACCEPT
RELIEF ORDERS
HOME DEPT. STORE
Telephone Melrose Park 2143
OF A. T. STILL SCHOOL
15S Broadway
Melrose Park
LAST THREE DAYS
FINAL AND LAST CHANGE TO ATTEND THIS MOST DARING, SENSATIONAL SELLING
EVENT EVER WITNESSED IN NORTHERN ILLINOIS
AUCTION SALE
FURNITURE AND RUGS
A WORD TO THE PUBLIC
We opened this sale with a definite purpose in mind—our creditors demanded cash. We had to raise
$12,000 at once in order to stay in business. From the terrific response received from our good cus­
tomers and friends to date we are pleased to say that not only is our goal in view but from all indi­
cations we will pass it by a considerable margin. We thank each and every one of you for helping
us put this great sale over, and invite you to attend the final three days of this once in a lifetime
opportunity.
EVERYTHING GOES — NOTHING RESERVED
NOTHING HELD BACK
MAKE YOUR OWN SELECTIONS FROM THIS GREAT STOCK OF FURNITURE AND RUGS.
HAVE THEM PUT UP FOR AUCTION AND BUY AT YOUR OWN PRICE.
Livingroom Suites
Coil Springs
Dressers
Studio Couches
Diningroom Suites
Lamps
Pictures
Innerspring Mattresses
Bedroom Suites
Mirrors
Cedar Chests '
Elec. Washing Machines
Breakfast Sets
Oriental Rugs
Gas Ranges
Magazine Baskets
Lounging Chairs
Domestic Rugs
Cribs
Novelties, Occasional
Occasional Chairs
Occasional
Tables
High
Chairs
Pieces
and Hundreds of
Steel Beds
End Tables
Wood Beds
Chests of Drawers
Other Items.
{T TODAY-FRIDAY and SATURDAY
:
•
2:30 P. M.
f"HOTKOL"^
Extra Coarse Coal
Easy to Start
Lower Priced
(Prices Subject to Change
Without Notice)
PER TON IN
4-TON LOTS
k
CASH PRICE
J
TWO QUALITY COALS
"BIu-FIame** Mine Run
"Stamaco" Nut
We Now Fill Relief Coal
Orders
STANDARD
Material Company
1321 South 4th Avenuo
Phone Maywood 5400
7:30 P. M.
A $75.00 ENGLISH LOUNGE
Also other valuable prizes will be given away each afternoon
and evening absolutely free. No purchase required.
The First 2S Ladies Entering Our Store After 1:30 EacR Afternoon During This Sale Will
Receive a Valuable Surprise Gift Absolutely FREE.
»5^s
Add 50c Per Ton for Less Than
4 Tons
FREE
TWO SALES
DAILY
BROADWAY
Furniture
Company
106-108 Broadway
MELROSE PARK, ILL.
LLOYD H. VANDENBERG, Auctioneer
REMEMBER THIS SALE POSITIVELY CLOSES SATURDAY NIGHT
10
Th e He r a l d
Bell - Park Takes
Bellwood Teachers
in 37-35 Contest
Playing before a throng of gram­
mar school children, the Bell Park
hoop toosers matched shots with
the sharp shooting Teachers* team
of Bellwood and were able to eke
out a 37-35 victory in three spec­
tacular overtime sessions. The con­
test was played last Friday at the
Wilson school.
Three overtime periods were nec­
essary to decide the victor. Two
charity tosses by Michaels and a
field goal by Barsema kept the score
stil! even. Two more baskets for
each team resulted in another over­
time.
In the final overtime, Pink and
Lekawitch dropped in four points
but again the "Tieting Teachers"
tied the count to 35 all. Amidst a
bedlam of yells, the elongated Fink
crashed through the teachers' de­
fense, dumping in the winning baskibt.
In the Bell Park bowling teams,
Hohnke's Snipers and Krause's
Tanglers are perched in first place.
Bosco
Bowlers
Dickman and Trenkler had a hard
job on their hands when they tack­
led the Saxon Brothers. They beat
them two out of three; the two
games they won, winning by 2 pins
apiece.
Weiss and Mahnke won three
straight from the Bailey-Voigts
team. M. & J. Service Station came
back to life and gave the Hart Mo­
tors a coat of whitewash.
what became of the 600 sure this
week boys? Bill Collins was the only
one who got one. Was it the new
pins? W. Collins, 607; Rau, 571:
Jinookie, 590; Wilder, 586; Josie, 571.
imports
Melrose Park Gains 8th
Straight Win Sunday
The Melrose Park basketball team
won their eighth consecutive vic­
tory Sunday night at the Maywood
Armory, when they trounced the
Novack Sporting Goods, 40 to 27.
The game was fast, but rather
rough and for a while it seemed
as though Melrose Park was in for
a tough evening. In the last half
they scored 23 points to forge way
ahead of the Novacks and cinch
another victory.
V. Wilson, Melrose Park center,
was the high point man of the
game, sinking 4 .baskets and one
free throw. Pechukas took second
honors with 8 points. G. Wilson
did a great job at guarding.
Sunday night Melrose Park wUl
play Carroll A.C., a Chicago Eve­
ning American tournament game.
The Maywood Bears and P. L. A.C.
will play the preliminary grames at
the Maywood Armory. First game
at 7 p.m.
Se c t i o j v
RECREATION NOTES
Noted Bowlers to Give
Exhibition Sunday Night
The Annual Maywood Ice Derby
Hank Marino, considered one of
was conducted at Maywood Park the leading bowlers in the world,
Saturday. Fourteen events were will give an exhibition at the Greater
scheduled and close races in the Oak Park Recreation Center, 1112
shorter events were the feature of North boulevard, at 9:30 Sunday
the midget, juvenile and junior boys. night.
Championships of 1934 were again
Mr. Marino, hailed as one of the
retained by Shirley Jamison who greatest money bowlers of his day
again won both the 75-yard dash will roll six games with two of the
and quarter mile In the junior girls' best local bowlers, George Clark and
division; P. Fierce, men's senior 75- Bob Shourek. Following the match,
yard dash; Marie Clarke, senior he will give an hour's exhibition of
girls' 75-yard dash and half mile; his prowess.
J. Logan repeated the senior men's
Bowlers of the west suburban area
distance honors of 1934 but would are
invited to see the match and
have had a race if P. Pierce had the exhibition.
not fallen at the turn of the last
lap.
Winners in all events were as fol­
TEMPLE BOWLING
lows: Boys' midget, P. Fierce, Nolan
LEAGUE
Swift, Gerald Webtser; 75-yard dash,
boys, juvenile, H. Bill, G. Seabrooke,
M. Oill; 75-yard dash, girls' junior,
..
W. L. Total Ave.
33 12 38179 848
S. Jamison, M. Meyer and D. Sav­ Walton
29 16 37308 828
age; 75-yard dash, senior girls, M. Moutaw
..... 29 16 37287 828
Clarke, R. Chaplick and F. Kirsch27 18 36334 807
23 22 36868 817
off; 75-yard dash, boys' junior, E. Schumacher
i . 21
24 37025 822
Crowe and E. Moreno; 75-yard dash, Lawbly ,
20 25 36763 815
men's senior, P. Fierce, J. Logan Fuller
15 20 35344 786
and C. Ruppel.
14 31 35992 799
14 31 35636 792
The following were the winners in Gallond
INDIVIDUAL
AVERAGE
the distance events: Boys' midget,
% mile, Francis Fierce, Nolan Swift Art Jeshke
10^
and E. Selke; boys' juvenile, G. Sea­ Warren
, .........
lit
brooke, H. Bill, M. Oill; girls' junior, Nordholm
jgj
Vs mUe, S. Jamison and B. Pritchv
ard; girls' senior, % mile, M. Clarke, Schumacher
170
179
R. Chaplick and P. Kirschoff; boys' Laubly
W. Gallond
176
juvenile, 1 mile, G. Seabrooke, H. A.
Jesehke
* 17=:
Bill and M. Oill; boys' junior, Mo­ Meyer
;. ..
. * 175
reno, Crowe and Roundy; men's
175
Mame
173
senior 2 mile, J. Logan and R. Bill. Moutau
*
J73
,172
BASKETBALL
Walton
*....
170
Teams
Won Lost
Pet.
Saxon Bros
33
15
.687
Weiss & Mahnke
27
.562
21
Hart Motors
23
.511
22
Line-up:
Dickman-Trenkler
23
22
.511 T . ^
fg ft. p.
fg. ft. p.
M. & J. Ser. Sta
22
26
.458 Landa, P
3 0 0 De Meese
2 10
35
Vaily-Voigts
13 .
.270 Wilson, B. ....3 0 1 GoetscheLN. ..3 3 3
Players and Club ,
G. T.P.
H. Wilson, V. ....4 1 2 Tlapa
1 0 2
Pago, M.-J. Ser. Sta
48 9401 195 Wilson, G
2 0 2 Goetschel, S ..11 1
Jinookie, Weiss & Mahnke 45 8678 192 Pechukas, W...4 0 3 Bennett
3 1 o
Kueh!, Dickman & Trenk. 24 4588 191 Zeinfeld, L. . . . 3 1 l McBratney ...0 1 0
Gray, Saxon Bros
48 9138 190 Landa, B
00 0
Turso. Saxon Bros
48 9116 189
Lietz, Dickman-Trenkler... 48 9082 189
Totals
19 2 9
ToiaU
10 7 6
Brittish, Weiss & Mahnke. 48 9057 188
w.
Ti. Dickman. Dickman-Trenk.. 15 2828 188
Snippers
21
12 G. Sorvillo, Hart Motors.. 33 6166 186
Tanglers
. '..'.ll,.'..
21
12 Rau, Hart Motors
45 8297 184
Babblers
18
15 Hinman, Bailey-Voigts ... 24 4417 184
Tigers
.»
.*
IIII! 14
19 Wilder, Saxon Bros
48
8805
Chislers
13
20 Kroening, M.-J. Ser. Sta... 48 8787 183
183
Slackers
.'..*.*.*{11!*. 12
21 Nelson, M.-J. Ser. Sta
45
8153 181
At 1:30 p.m. on Sunday. February
Line-up;
Josie, Saxon Bros
48 8659 180 3, Medinah Country club will be
Elliott, Weiss-Mahnke .... 36 6477 179
Bel! Parks <37)
Tcachers (35)
host
to the skating fraternity of
36 6443 178
b. ft. p.
b. ft. p. Hunter, Saxon Bros
36 6438 178 Chicagoland, as well as to the out­
Lekawitch, L..1 0 1 Hattenhaver .1 0 0 Bock, Hart Motors
Wiedenb'k, A. 0 0 1 Aurand ..
0 0 0 M.Sorvillo, Dickman-Trenk. 27 4743 175 standing speed and figure skaters of
45 7847 174
Barsema, J. ..2 0 0 Doweidt ..
0 0 1 Vertuno. Hart Motors
the United States and Canada, and
F*ink, S
5 0 0 Michaels
5 2 0 Collins, Weiss & Mahnke.. 42 7321 174
Kejmpf, C. ...510 Dunk
Smith,
Hart
Motors
45
7840 174 to the Olympic team which will rep­
"A" DIVISION
9 0 0
L. Lommatzsch
.*.*.* *'
170
Williamson, B 5 0 1 Mohr
0 1 0 Wallace, Bailey-Voigts ... 36 6272 174 resent this country in the next
Hi"
ill
The Mohawks won from the AndMson
Ethertpn
. . . . 1 0 0 Karlson, Dickman-Trenk... 39 6782 173 Olympic games to be conducted In
159
American Can 73A, 29-13 and the De Graff
Conger
.0 0 3 Nunziato, Bailey-Voigts... 21 3635 173
100
February,
1936.
The
proceeds
of
Bailey, Bailey-Voigts
48 8252 171
Colts remained league leaders by K"™
.....v....'.;;.:::;;;;; lit
Hengels, M.-J. Ser. Sta... 48 8239 171 the carnival will go to the United
^"11"
168
Moehl, Bailey-Voigts
15 2510 167 States Olympic Skating Committee their fourth game with the A&P.
Frees
167
Mead, Weiss-Mahnke
48 7993 166
The gong of the last game brought Engel
.V.
.V.V.*.*
.
*
*
.
*
167
under
whose
jurisdiction
the
team
Meyn, M.-J. Ser. Sta
48 7838 163
to a close a thrilling encounter be­ Gustafson .......
*
166
Carl. Bailey-Voigts
44 7148 162 will be sent to Europe to compete
tween the Maywood A.C. "A" and Dunlap .....
High team, three games: Saxon Bros., with the nations of the world.
wells
Ill
the Teachers. The Teachers kept Travis
Hank Marino, voted the world's 2992.
163
An admission price of 55c (includ­ within a few points throughout the Nelson
Second high game, three games: Dick­
162
most popular bowler, will be at the man-Trenkler,
2919.
ing tax) will be charged for this game. A shot and the gong was one Hamel
J...162
Mayrose Alleys at 9 p.m. on Fri­
High single game, team: Saxon Bros., event in order that the greatest
G. Gallond
iri
short at 38-37.
day. He will give an exhibition 1050.
Losch
16,
number
of
fans
may
have
an
oppor­
Second high single game, team: Dick­
and free instructions.
Mahlke
160
Mohawks (:39)
Aner.Can. 73A (13)
man-Trenkler. 1031.
tunity to see this great aggregation
.* .* .* .* * *.* 159
B. P. P.
B P P Carlson
High individual, three games: S. Gray, of skaters on a single afternoon.
W. Lommatzsch
* * *' 153
Newberg.f.
9 11 Adainson.f. 0
713.
Van
Borg.f.
0
0
0
Stearns.t,
0
158
Martens Fuel Oil furnished the
Second high individual, three games:
Kingery.f,
0 0 1 Ronfcetti.f.
2
;
157
weekly upset in the House League Turso. 693.
Cain,f.
0
0
0
Martin,f.
1
156
High single game, individual: Nelson, De Train—Seegers
at the Mayrose Alleys Wednesday
Stenstrom
^
155
42 7524 179 Wilc&x.c.
0 0 3 Kohn.c.
2
254.
Bowman
Winters—Carson's Ins
48 8388 175 Kolb,c.
0 0 0 Behrns.f.
0
evening.
The tailenders taking
Second high single game, individual: Bracco—Panther A, C
41 7137 174 Laraski.g.
10 2 Macklin.g.
0
. V . . . . , ; : ; w i
three games from Willow Tavern.
Gray, 253.
Berg
14Y
F. Kwain—Royal Blue
47 8129 174 Pechukas.g. 3 2 0 Luring.g.
0
Won
L.
Seegers and Homan continued in
Pet. Hoyne—Safety Tire
48 8259 172
146
Snow.g.'
0
Heppner
23
25
.483 Prince—Carson^s Ins
Kramer
145
48 8240 172
a tie for first
place by winning Munro
Colts («S)
A 4; P (0)
2
26
.462 De Ano—Panther A. C
Einbeck.
141
42 7212 172
three from Alf. Claus Coal.
B. F. P.
B. F. P. Benn
Watts
24
24
.500 Schneider—Carson's Ins
146
36 6161 171 Landa. E.,f. 3
0 1 Prazier,D..f. 0 0 2 Aubrey
Meyn
22
26
.462
143
Maywood A.C. won two from Neitzel
Risweiler—Safety Tire
48 8193 171 Smith,f.
10 0 Frazier.R.,f. 10 3 Hyde
26
22
.546 Cervenka—Safety Tire
140
48
8099
169
Mohawk A.C.. Hey Floral took two Martin
0 13 Langguth
27
21
.567 Silisky—Andrews Hdw. ....45 7561 168 Zeinfeld,f. 12 1 2 Holmes.c.
'
140
Dowd,f.
3 0 0 Spratt.J .g. 113 Colberg
Player
Q.
from J. Carson Insurance. Gaddy
T. P.
Ave. Morkos—Royal Blue
139
48 8058 168 Wilson,c.
5 3 0 Spratt.S..g, 0 n n Kingdon
39
7088
181 Ginn—Carson's Ins
139
Insurance won two from Dutch Heppner, RE
48 8037 167 Landa, F,,g. 3 0 0
33
5892
178 Collins—Safety Tire
Schroeder
131
48 8036 167
Masters and Pabst Blue Ribbon won Whisler,
1-0 0
Neitzel, P
45
7801
173 Walnut—Andrews Hdw. ...48 7996 '167 Seeman,g.
High games: Art Jesehke, 246; Bull, 226.
Landa,W.,g. 2 10
the odd game from Evans Cleaners. Watts, C. E....
45
7293
163 Novicki—Seegers
48 7954 166
High team, three games: Laubly, 2793.
48
7842
163 Bender—Andrews Hdw. ... 48 7897 165 Gardner,g. 0 0 0
Gaddy Insurance had high game Ross
Second
high team, three games: Wal­
Preiss, E
45
7339
163 Zito—Panther A. C
Teachers (37)
37 6083 164 Maywood AC
ton, 26';9.
and high series, 984 and 2853.
Munro, H
38
6121
B. P. P.
161 Ravanen's—Panthers A. C..39 6356 163
B. P. P
High
single
game, team; Laubly, 1005.
Teams—
W.
45
7235
L.
160 G. Kwain—Royal Blue
Ave. Glosser, C.
0 2 Etherton,f. 3 1
39 6336 162 Moore,f.
Second high single game, team: Bull,
Gaddy Ins. Co
32
39
Landa,B.,f.
6270
22
0 1 Ryan.f.
0 0
160 Martin—Panther A. C
913 Reischl, S.
33
5264
159
1004.
Severs and Homan
32
48
22
7690
160 Freckles—Andrews Hwd
2 0 Murphy, f.
4 1
900 Warner, P. C
48 7620 159 Liptow.c.
High individual, three games: Art Jeseh­
Hey Floral Co.
32
42
22
159 Ruffo—Andrews Hdw
1 2 Michael.f.
2 0
898 Martin. E
6701
42 6575 156 Strelka,g.
ke, 653.
Maywood A. C
..31
45
7174
23
0 0 Aurand.c.
1 1
159 Harmon—Royal Blue
905 Meyn, H
42 6452 154 Wayman,g.
Second high individual, three games;
Sherman,g.
Alt. Claus Coal Co
28
Savage,
R
21
3244
1
2
Mohr.g.
2
0
26
154 Damiani—Seegers
900
...45 6900 153
A. Jesehke, 638.
Evans Cleaners
.....26
48
7394
VanEman.g. 3 4
26
896 Catlin, V
154 Nelson—Seegers
39 5973 153
High single game, individual, Puerner.
I'abst Blub Ribbon,
28
45
890 Worthington, R
26
6782
150 Gust—Royal Blue
,...39 5940 152
258.
"B"
DIVISION
42
Mohawk A. C
24
6290
889 Watts, S
30
149 Nunzaito—Seegers
42 5971 142
Second higli single game, individualWillow Tavern
24
Phipps,
R.
8
The
Ballous
"B"
went
from
sec­
1197
883
30
149
Meyer, 256.
High team, three games—Safety Tire,
42
J. Carson Ins. Co
23
6190
876 Schultz, J
146 2741.
ond place to a tie for first in their
31
39
Martens Fuel Oil ........22
868 Knopf, A . J
146
5722
32
Second hfgh team, three games—Car­ win from the Maywood A.C. "B .
45
Dutch Master Cigars
20
6534
145 son's Ins., 2720.
34
875 Watts, C. M
FKOM FLORIDA
Moss Rose upset the Dodgers 25-20
Manthy, A
39
5644
144
High single game, team—Carson's Ins.,
I.VDIVIDI'AL AVERAGE
Timothy McGarry, former resi­
Larson. N
48
6857
142 963.
and the Bears lost to the Spartons
Suberkup, T. ........ 27
flayer and Club—
140
G. T.P.
3801
Second high game, team—Safety Tire, 13-21. Last night's games saw the dent of Forest Park, arrived from
Paso—Gaddy
36
4983
136 950.
9428 196 Webber, P.
league leaders ousted, second place Havana, Cuba, where he has spent
Brady—Hey
48
6638
138
9883 194 Smith. C
High individual, three games—Ginger,
27
Fi^ Rau—I'abst
team go to fifth and four teams the last two months with Albert
132 643.
3572
.. .54 10432 193 Livingston
Merkling,
F.
........
48
Rusk—Willow
130
6256
10397 193
The standings follow; Sabath who is president of the In­
Second high individual, three games— tied for first.
D<» Grazia—M. A. C
27
122 Magnus, 631,
. . .54 10388 192 Zieike,
3294
Ball»us "B*' <47)
Maywood AC "B" (8) ternational Racing association there
42
Hoover—M. A. C
112
4718
. . .48
9090 189 Garrett, S.
High single game, individual—Ginger,
B. P. P.
B. F. P. in that city.
42
Harris—Pabst
110 255.
4657
7936 189 Wickenlin. H
Lund.f.
9
2
2
Mills.f.
0 1 0
Lehnhardt,
W
6
Grenier—Hey
967
161
10163 183
Second high single game, individual— Barlow,f.
Mr. McGarry was press agent for
4 1 0 Conrad,f.
0 0 1
Gray—Evans
High team, three games: Martin, 2450. Silisky, 244.
. . .48
8998 187
Lindman.c.
6
0
1
Compton.c.
0 0 4 Mr. Sabath at the Oriental race
Second high team, three games: Neitsel,
Laubly—Masters
2811 187
Roundy,g.
2 0 4 Seeman>g.
3 1 2 track at Havana.
Both spent a
Franz—Mohawk
. . .54 10079 187 2437.
Barker.g.
1 0 0 Longley.g,
0 0 1 week deep sea fishing off the coast
High single game, team: Watts, 892.
L. Frillman—^Martens .. ...48
8964 187
ENTRY BI.ANK
Mess
R.ase
(^5)
Second high single game, team: Net*el,
Dodgers
(2»)
Pike—I'abst
.. .54 10078 187
MAYWOOD RECREATION BOASD—
of Florida.
B. F. P.
Scbiumaker—Claus
B. F. P.
.. .54 10010 185 888.
PI-NG-PONG TOrRN.\MENT
Allen.f.
1 0 1 GeUing'r. A.f. 1 1 1
High individual, three games: C. Glas<
Abraytis—Claus
. . .54 10000 185
Nicolai.f.
(For
Maywood
residents
18
years
of
3 1 3 Ermisch.f.
Swan>son—Seegers .....
2 0 3
FREED IN SUIT
7771 185 ser, 596.
age and over.)
Petrosky.f. 3 1 2 Dwoi'n,A,f. 0 3 4
Second high individual, three games:
G. Sorvillo—Evans
. . .51
9414 185
The village of Melrose Park was
Wilson.c.
1 3 1 Brillo.c.
Kroening—Seegers .... ...54
2 0 2
I would like to enter the Maywood
9946 184 H. Munro, 591.
Fdwards.g. 1 1 2 Martens.g.
High single game, individual: R. Whis­
W. Frellman—Claus ... . . .53 9697 183
Ping-Pong Tournament, sponsored by
0 0 0 freed in a suit for $25,000 last week
Baumg'tn.g. 0 1 1 Dwoi'n.V.,g. 1 1 2
Warner—Mohawk .... ...54
the Recreation Board of Maywood.
9869 183 ler, 265.
in the Superior court of Judge
Hessler.g.
0
0
Second
high
single
game,
individual:
C.
1
Gellin'r,C.g.
Please
enter
my
name
in
the
follow­
E. Martin—Gaddy
1
1 3 Peter Schwaba of Cook county aris­
...54
9856 183
^
ing divisions;
Swangren—Carson .... .. ;42
Spartons (^1>
7655 182 Ross, 248.
Bears A.C. (13)
R. Martin—Willow ....
B. F. P.
9244 181
B. F. P. ing from an accident on November
1. Women's Singles
JUNIOR LEAGUE
Miller,F.,f.
Gurso—Gaddy
1 3 3 Judelson.f.
9770 1R1
2 0 2 8, 1932, in which Fred Winters was
2.
Women's
Doubles
Miller,R..f.
Haertel—Claus
. . .54
0 0 1 Cohen,f.
9758 181
The Panther A.C. handed the An­
0 1 0 killed and H. A. Asing received
Cassiert—^Martins
McCorm'k.f. 0 0 0 Robins.f.
3 Mixed Doubles
..,48
8653 180 drew Hardware team its third white­
1 1 2 critical injuries. Attorneys for the
Browning.c. 2 1 2 Sherman.c. 0 0 1
M. Sorvillo—Evans ....
9720 180
4. Men's Singles
Miller, P..g. 2 0 3 Schwartz.c. 0 0 0 village were Paul Brust and Guy C.
Seso—M. A. C
.. .54
9714 180 wash in three weeks, not bad.
5.
(
)
Men's
Doubles
Cutter.g.
Ireland—Seesers
0 0 0 Zienfeld.g.
9679 179
2 0 1 Guerine.
The suit was filed
by
The whitewashing went on a lit­
Miller.H..g. 3 1 1 Asher.g.
Bull—Masters
2687 179
0 0 0 Asing.
Enclosed $.
for entry fee.
Wtlteck—Seegers .......51
Zussman.g. 0 1 3
9095 178 tle farther than that when the
CStristenson—Masters .. .. .33
Simonor.g. 0 0 1
5886 178 Carson's Insurance team dished out
Pofe%or—Car.son
...54
9563 177 one to the Royal Blue team.
POLICE DANCE
Signed
STANDINGS
D9^;Train—Evans
...54
9562 177
"Tickets for the Melrose Park
"A" DIVISIO?*
The Seegers and Homan team who
Gaddy—Gaddy
...54
9557 177
High team, three games—Evans Cleaners, have finally come back to life won
Won Lost
Pet. police department dance are going
29M.
Maywood Colts
4
0
1000 fast, was the report this week. The
Phone Number
Second hisb team, three games—Willow two games from the strong Safety
Maywood A.C. "A"
3
1
750 dance is set for Saturday evening,
Tire team.
TaTern, 2910.
Mohawk A.C.
3
1
750 February 2, at the Bellwood Me­
High single game, team—Evans CleanAmer. Can 73A
i
Teams— .
2
•W.
L.
Doubles Partner
333
Ave.
ersw 1059.
Teachers
^
i
Panther A. C
2
12
333 morial ballroom, Washington bou­
850
Sceond high single game, team—Hey Safety Tire
A & P Food Stores."
Q
Address
3
. . .29
19
000 levard and Eastern avenue, Bell­
836
FUwral Co.—1035.
Research Dept. Amer. Can 0 • 3
Carson's In.<5.
24
000 wood. E<Jdy Allyn and his orches­
834
High individual, three games—De Grazia, Andrews Hdw
Phone Number
27
814
"B" DIVISION
tra will play.
678.
Royal Blue ......... .. .19
29
807
wonI Loj
Pet,
Second high individual. ' three games— Seegers & Homan.,.. . . .15
Entry fee 10c for singles, 20c for
33
795
Ballous
1
666
Grenier, 677.
each doubles team.
INDIVIDITAL AVERAGE
Dodgers
WHEN Y O V NEED HELP
1
666
High single game, individual — Gaddy.
Player and Club—
G. T.P.
(Entry blank antf entry fee must
Moss Rose
666
1
267.
If ypu want garden worlf done, windows
Ginger—Panther A. C
48 8800 183
reach
the
rt
creation
office
by
Monday.
Spartons
1
666
Second hi«h single game, individual— Magnus—Safety Tire
washed, painting or other service, don't
21 3827 182
January 28.)
2
333 fail to consult want ads In this journal
Babovtce Ireland, 258.
Paiiman—Carson's lns.\....15 2741 181
Maywood A.C. "B"...... 0
3
000 Many kinds of service are offered.
Medinah Skating Event
Is Set for February 3
Wednesday, January 23, 1935
State Parent-Teacher
Congress March 19-21
Proviso Sports
To Telegraph Largest
Greeting in History j
HELLO WORLD
Western Union has placed its na­
January 14, 1935, baby boy born
Authoritative talks, conferences
tionwide system of telegraph offices
and demonstrations on home eco­ to Mr. and Mrs. Donald Davis, 144 at the disposal of the President's
nomics to acquaint homemakers North Ashland avenue, La Grange. Birthday Ball committee for receiv­
By BILL JOHNSON
January 14, baby boy born to ing 25c from each person who places
with methods of intelligent buying
his signature on a multiple-signa-1
Mr.
and Mrs. Clarence Strong, 1210 ture birthday greeting which will;
and determining quality in foods,
The Hammond, Indiana, high was 12-7 at the half. The second textiles and other home products, South Seventeenth avenue, May- read "Happy Birthday, Mr. Presi-:
school gym was the site of the half yielded one point for the locals.
wood.
dent. I am proud to know that the
Elgin's lightweight limit was 145 will be outlined at the Midwest Con­
•wrestling match between the Ham­
cost of sending this greeting will
ILLINAE CLUB
mond and Proviso squads, in which lbs. as compared to Proviso's 135, ference on Homemaking at the Ho­
help on the great fight against in­
the latter lost by a score of 49 to 2 and this weight advantage seemed tel Sherman, March 19-21, the ex­
The annual benefit bridge meet­
paralysis, to which you have
too much for the locals to compete ecutive committee of the Illinois ing of the Chicago Illinae club will fantile
last Thursday afternoon.
given your leadership and loaned
Congress of Parents and Teachers
with.
The
score
at
the
half
stood
Tuesday of last week the Hinsdale
be given at 1:30 o'clock Saturday your birthday."
decided today.
quintets visited Proviso and issued 12-7, in favor of Elgin, with New­
afternoon, January 26, at the Blue
Signatures from every city, town
Organizations
represented
at
the
man
being
the
high
point
man
with
35-30 and 26-8 defeats to the local
Parrot Patio, 1120 Westgate avenue. and hamlet will be mailed to New
January
meeting
where
plans
for
6.
The
line-up:
heavyweight and lightweight teams,
York, where they will be bound into
the March conference were launched Oak Park.
Proviso (15)
Elgin (21)
respectively. Four nights later the
The proceeds from the party will what probably will be the greatest
Guiney,f.
Conners,f.
include;
Heavies were beaten, 52-31, while Mosemart.f.
birthday greeting in history. One
Gradt.f.
National Congress of Parents and go to the student loan fund of the hundred per cent of the money will
the Lights succumber, 27-13. The Walters,!,
Cun'gham,f.
university. All graduates of the uni­
Teachers,
American
Red
Cross,
Jeschke,f.
Thielc.
opposition for the Proviso teams in
be turned over to the National Birth­
Newman,c.
Cook.c.
Medical Women's National Associa­ versity are urged to attend and day Ball committee, which will ar­
the latter two games was Elgin.
invite their friends. Tickets will be
Wolf,c.
Miller,g.
tion,
General
Federation
Women's
In two Suburban League swim McDough,g.
range for proper credit for each
Conners,c.
Clubs, Illinois Federation Women's fifty cents and may be obtained in
Heileman.g.
meets held in the Proviso pool last Haller.g.
0'Conner,g.
Clubs, Conference of Jewish Wom­ advance from any member of the community^
Thursday afternoon Oak Park was
Gehr.g.
en's Organization, Girl Scouts of committee or at the door.
victorious in both—the Seniors win­
POLICE BULLETIN
There will be a prize for each table and
America, Chicago Tuberculosis In­
ning, 45-19, the Juniors, 41-23.
In the Senior swim meet the lo­ stitute, Conference of Club Presi­ following the bridge, tea will be served.
Many requests have been received
The
committee
in
charge
are
as
follows;
The Proviso wrestling defeat was cals dropped the 160-yard relay and
by the Suburban Area and Country
Miss Alice A. Royston, chairman.
the first in four starts for Coach medly races. John Winters led the dents and Program Chairmen, Chi­
Towns association to extend its
Mrs Charles E. Cessna, Jr.
cago
Association
for
Child
and
Par­
summer's boys this year. The In­ scoring for Proviso by garnering a ent Education, Women's Advertising
Miss Charlotte Barrett
Police Bulletin to municipalities out­
Mrs. Donald Trumack
diana grapplers did not have In second place and a tie for first place Club of Chicago, Chicago Branch of
side of Cook county, it was learned
Miss Helen Galaty
mind to pin their opponent, but to in the 100-yard back stroke and 40- American University Women, Home
this week. The bulletin performs
Mrs. Chne Gray
out-wrestle them and thereby gain yard free style events, respectively. Economics Division, Illinois Depart­
Mrs. Ray Grieving
a clearing service for police depart­
Miss
Virginia
Gunderson
a time advantage. By Hammond Tye of Oak Park, tied Winters in ment of Education, Big Sisters,
ments and officials of various sub­
Mrs. Gordon K. Harper
receiving eight time advant?ages out the latter event—both being leading Catholic Women's League, Chicago
urban towns, and promotes co-op­
Mrs. A. M. Houser, Jr.
Miss
Harriet
Iverson
of the ten bouts a Proviso defeat free-style swimmers of the Subur­ Board of Education, Chicago and
eration along police lines. Chief
Miss Blanche Kerr
was inevitable. Page and Zapler of ban League. Ortman and Sisson Cook County Federation of Women's
Richard Bailey of Maywood police
Miss Margaret MouHon
Proviso each scored a point for their captured third places in the 100- Organizations, Chicago Women's
department, announced this week
Miss Adele Landgrebe
Mrs. Louis River
team by gaining time advantages. yard free style and breast stroke Club and the Wisconsin, Indiana,
that the bulletin has enlarged con­
Mrs. G. P. Robinson
The following Proviso wrestlers lost races, respectively, while Caruso Michigan and Illinois congresses of
siderably since its first
issue last
Mrs. E. G. Staley
by time advantages; Justus, Baum- ended his prep swimming career by
year. The fee charged each depart­
Miss Emily Smith
Parents and Teachers.
Call Mrs. Louis River for reservations- ment for this service is $12 a year.
gart. Stein, Russel, Ginder, Klean, placing third in the diving unit.
Village 9713 by Thursday, January 24.
Lawlor and Churchill.
J. Wolff won the 40-yard back
CIVIC ORCHESTRA
The Heavyweight basketball team stroke race in the Junior meet and
The Civic orchestra, Frederick
could not overcome its first half also placed third in the 40-yard free
jinx in the Hinsdale game and was style race. Clark came in third in Stock, musical director and Eric
DeLamarter, conductor, will give
behind, 24-7, at the intermission. the 40-yard breast stroke.
the first
concert of its season at
Hinsdale was bewildered in the sec­
PROVISO
SPORTLIGHTS
Orchestra Hall at 3:30, on Sunday
ond half as the locals scored from
The Heavyweight and Lightweight afternoon, January 27.
all points on the floor, but fell short
cage teams travel to Waukegan Fri­
of victory by six points.
The soloist of the occasion will
day
night for two league games at be Elizabeth MerriU Hubbard, of
In the Elgin varsity game the first
half jinx seemed to have disappeared 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Lake Forest.
as the first quarter yielded the score
Senior and Junior swim meets at
of Proviso 11, Elgin 11, but the Fox
MENDELSSOHN CLU^
river cagers began to sink their Winnetka against the New Trier
On the evening of January 31, the
shots and finally won over a fight­ teams tomorrow afternoon at 4
Chicago Mendelssohn club will give
ing Blue-and-White team, 52-31. The o'cock.
one of its concerts at the First Bapline-up of the Elgin game was as
For all the wrestling enthusiasts a tist church of Oak Park, under the
follows:
match between the Calumet and auspices of the Woman's Society of
Proviso (31)
Elgin (52)
Flood,f.
Proviso squads will be held in the that church. Tickets are now avail­
GraLf.
4 2
rarney,f.
Thissell,f.
3
Proviso Gym Thursday afternoon. able at the church office, 820 On- |
Cronin,c.
Cahill,f.
6
tario. Oak Park, or at the door.
Admission, 10c.
Urbelis,c.
Hughs.c.
1
Haumiller,c.
Geister,g.
Billing,g.
Allen,g.
Ableman,g.
2
2
2
0
3
SENSATIONAL
DRY CLEANING
OPPORTUNITYI
Mizen,g.
Buck.g.
Sagelw'ch.B. 2
Haberk'n,g. 0
After sixteen minutes of play in
the Hinsdale game the Red-andGrey team found Coach Kassell's
boys not far behind, as the score
SUITS
DRESSES
COATS
Maywood Players to Give
"Before Morning" Soon
Early in February the Maywood
Players will present a three-act play
written by Edna and Edward P.
Riley. "Before Morning" is entirely
different from anything previously
staged by this group, being ultra­
modern in its setting and story. A
little mystery—a little humor and a
lot of the other side of the lives of
theatrical people seldom known to
the theatre going public.
"Before Morning" brings again to
the people of Maywood new faces
in the cast as well as some of the
more familiar ones.
Miss Nadine Snow, trained since
childhood on the legitimate stage,
returns to Maywood especially to
play the lead in this intense drama
of the happenings that take place
"Before Morning."
MAKE NEW OFFICE
The board of education of School
District No. 89 at the regular
monthly meeting January 11 cre­
ated the position of assistant su­
perintendent.
Principal C. H. Pygman of the
Garfield school was later chosen
for the new position and will take
up his duties February 1. Walter
B. Eriksen of Ludington, Michi­
gan, has been chosen to succeed
Mr. Pygman in the Garfield school
principalship.
Mr. Eriksen will arrive in Maywood the latter part of this week
to prepare for his duties at Gar­
field February 1.
FENWICK MOTHERS
The regular monthly meeting of
the Fenwick Mothers' club will be |
conducted on the first Friday, Feb­
ruary 1, in the school gymnasium.
The address for the afternoon will
be given by the Reverend L. E. Nu­
gent, whose subject is "Catholic Ac­
tion." After the address there wiU |
be a prc^ram by Fenwick students.
The hostess of the afternoon is Mrs. |
J. T. Maher, sophomore mother, as­
sisted by other sophomore mothers.
Arrangements are being made for
an evening card party Friday, Feb­
ruary 15, with Mrs. Tom Collins, 155
North Elmwood, Oak Park, as chair­
man.
Cleaned and Pressed
for
$
Fr*e PicV-Up
and Delivery
you
Plus Ins.
take no chances when you buy
Consumers Coal or Coke. Every ton
is sold with our unconditional guarantee of
high quality, correct weight and customer
satisfaction
HATS
CI«an«d and r«s h a p t d. Factory
*tyU
TIES
Look Ilka
if for
naw.
I
69c
DRAPES
Jk Q
Renaws Ufa and
color
^
# ^
FUR COATS
49c
Claaned and
glazed
$1.95
It must satisfy you or we
will remove it and refund your money.
When you buy fuel, get the best. It is
cheaper in the long run because it con­
tains more heat, less ash and impurities
BACALL
CLEANERS
"25 Years of Reliable Service"
S LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
For Prompt Service Call
and lasts much longer.
FOREST PARK
OAK PARK
(Snsiaprs Qmpany;
406 THOMAS ST.
FOREST 506
801 N. HARLEM
EUCLID 800
AUSTIN
MAYWOOD
1550 N. MASON
MERRIMAC 2662
1031 SOUTH 17th AVE.
MAYWOOD 4200
MAIN OFFICE AND PLANT
6400
637 Des Plaines Ave.. Forest Park
Phone Forest 304
.408-12 ST. CHARLES RD.
.
MAYWOOD 567
THE HERALD
Comments on 1934 Chamber of
Commerce by Retiring President
Esquire's Editor Speaks
in Series at Proviso High
MAYWOOD
LIBRARY
Legion Resumes School
Award Program Thurs-
Arnold Gingrich, editor of Es­
The annual school award program
quire magazine, spoke to the com­
of the Sarlo-Sharp post of the
By BEN SILVERMAN
The circulation desk at the main American Legion was resumed
ness for our stores and other busi­ bined writing classes of the Proviso
With the closing of the year 1934, ness institutions; promoting and high Adult Education school Fri­ Library has been improved by the Thursday of last week when Byron
the Mayw^ood Chamber of Commerce protecting the retailers in the inter­ day of last week, pointing out in his addition of a new section which was Jackson was introduced to eighth
is privileged to look back upon a est of our city was one of our major discussion of "Rejection Slip Mag­ installed recently. The new section grade classes in the six Melrose Park
successful and busy year of its ex­ enterprises, and to this end the azines" that if young writers would forms a hollow square with the older schools by Elmer Pflug, commander
istence. The Chamber activities question of how to prohibit the dis­ sell their work today they must front section. By dividing the area of the post. Legionaire Jackson has
hummed lively during the year. Of tribution of outside handbills was cater to the fast growing prole­ allowed for charging and discharg­ taken over the work of Americanism
course the officers worked very hard taken up with our village president. tarian publications.
ing books, more patrons may be officer of the post.
throughout the past term, the splen­ We i-equested the abatement of this
The award is made by the Legion
Mr. Gingrich was the-third in a served at the same time. Patrons
did co-operation of the active mem­ nuisance, and also suggested an or­ series of prominent newspaper and are asked to return their books at to a boy in each graduating class
bers cannot be overlooked, as there­ dinance to prohibit the practice of magazine men to speak to the stu­ the left side of the new desk sec­ for excellence in the qualifications
in lies the success of any organiza­ solicitors, peddlers and other trans­ dents of writing. This is being tion as they come in.
of honor, courage, scholarship, lead­
tion—the personal responsibility as­ ient vendors of merchandise.
The opposite side of the desk pro­ ership, and service. Before grad­
done to link the classroom study
sumed by each officer and active
We also urged, at the beginning with the advice and experiences of vides space for self-charging of uation the children ballot on
member.
of my term, our fellow-business men men who have been successful in books, leaving both sides of the members in the class whom they
THE INSTALL.ATIOX
front section for checking and consider outstanding in these quali­
It was indeed a source of encour­ to add the sales tax as an item of the publishing and writing field.
"The old time pulp magazines stamping books by the desk assist­ ties of character, and the boy and
agement to see the enthusiasm dis­ merchandise cost. It was a ques­
ants. The new section provides girl receiving the greatest support
played by everyone present at the tion of life or death for small mer­ which were devoted to "escape" fic­ space
inside for the registration in all points is declared the winner
tion, are giving way to the maga­
installation banquet given on Janu­ chants.
SALES DAYS
zines which deal almost exclusively files, and cupboard space for circu­ to receive the Legion plaque and
ary 15 at the Proviso high school;
It was indeed a satisfaction to me with social and economic problems, lating magazines, shelves for special the certificate of honor.
over two hundred people attended
Speakers present ibe five subjects
reference books and shelves to take
the dinner and enjoyed the group to, see the enthusiasm displayed by said Mr. Gingrich. Even the fiction care
of books as they are returned separately. Mr. Jackson addressed
singing dif-ected by Lee Osburn; the the merchants on the occasion of of these magazines is tinted with and discharged.
the schools on the subject of "Hon­
music furnished by the school or­ our March Dollar Day, April Red- race questions, problems of modern
Interesting books that have been or." He stated that this quality
and other social ques­
chestra under the direction of Mr. Tag Day, Spring Opening Sale, the economics
transcends all of the other four in
added to the library recently:
Nelson, and the address given by Three-Day Home Coming Sale in tions.
Seeding. F.—Six Proud Walkers.
Free that none of the others are of avail
"Young writers who would sell fiction.
Mr. Eelkema, principal of the school. June, the Fall Festival and Christ­
unless the individual builds into
Duryee, W. B.-—Living From the Land.
The spirit manifested by those mas Sale. All of these events paid their stories and articles to rejec­
his character the practice of honor­
present bespoke the existence of true their way and helped to strengthen tion slip magazines today must of 630.
Miliar, Edna S. V.—Wine From These able conduct and dealings with his
friendship of business and profes­ Maywood's position as a trading cen necessity appeal to such tendencies," Grapes.
821.
fellow men. He stressed truthful­
said Mr. Gingrich.
sional men, the satisfaction being ter.
Niles, Blair—Maria Paluna. Rental fic­
ness and the readiness to play the
THE
MEETINGS
tion.
Speaking
of
his
own
publication.
so great that another event was pre­
Nordhoff. C.—Men Against
the Sea. game of life in a square, clean way.
During the fiscal year close to Esquire, Mr. Gingrich said that
pared for April 18 with our well
Rental Action.
The next series of addresses will
known Major George Lee as the 2,000 persons attended our two- fiction appearing in it is required
Rak, Mary K.—A Cowman's Wife. 917.9. be made by another member of the
speaker. The Major's talk, coupled weekly and monthly dinner meet­ to be built around development of
Riesemann. Oskar von—Rachmaninoff's
post on February 7.
780.9.
with an unusual and interesting pro­ ings, and many prominent and characters. Classifying the kinds Recollections.
Smith,
A.—Modern
Beauty
Culture.
into three groups, Mr. 646.7.
gram arranged by Claudius Collisi, gifted speakers were secured for our of fiction
W.C.T.U. MEETS
made the evening an enjoyable one meetings. The outstanding men Gingrich said that the "meet, pull
Tchernavin, Tatiana—Escape Prom the
The Maywood Women's Christian
were;
Joseph
T.
Meek,
editor
of
the
Soviets.
921.
them apart, draw them together,"
for more than 200 persons present.'
Wrightr Milton—Inventions, Patents and Temperance Union will meet Tues­
Most of the entertainers were grade Illinois Journal; W. W. Caslow, the and the "incident, ej^lanation, con­ trade-marks.
608.
day in the basement of the MayMain
Street
Crusader;
Senator
Roy
school children — musicians, tap
clusion of incident" types of fiction
wood public library.
Wood,
Judge
Frank
Padden,
of
the
do
not
find
places
in
Esquire.
dancers and tumblers. Frank Wil­
There will be a round table dis­
"Barretts of Wimpole
son, celebrated yodeler, also con­ Superior Court; Rev. Bertram G.
of two important subjects;
REALTORS' BANQUET
tributed to the evening's jollifica­ Swaney, of the First M.E. church;
Street" Soon at Yale cussion
the cause and cure of war; and
H. W. Tolsted, our village president;
tion.
W. H. Grotjahn and Lester R.
H. H. Eelkema, principal of the Carson attended the annual ban­ In Norma Shearer's new picture, permanent registration. The dis­
AT THE UDO
The theatre party given at the Proviso high school; Major George quet of the Illinois chapter, Ameri­ "The Barretts of Wimpole Street," cussion will include some articles
Lido by the Chamber at midnight, Lee, J. S. Warterfield, Percy Wilson, can Institute of Real Estate Ap­ that opens Sunday for a three-day by Senator Nye.
A report of the last Cook County
Saturday, June 2, was a successful of Better Housing Bureau; Edward praisers, at the Palmer House Friday engagement at the Yale theatre,
event socially as well as financially, J. Hayes, the American Legion of last week. Six hundred members people will have the pleasure of meeting will also be given.
Mrs. P. D. Pauls will be hostess.
the proceeds of the performance be­ Commander, and many others.
and guests were present to hear dis­ seeing three winners of the annual
ing used to defray the expenses of
motion
picture
academy
award
ap­
BETTER HOUSING DRIVE
courses by J. Howard Ardrey of
HEALTH CONFERENCE
the World's Fair Information Bu­
The last outstanding activity was Washington, D. C., deputy admin­ pear together.
An infant welfare conference will
reau of last year.
They are Miss Shearer, who stars be conducted by Maywood Public
the Federal Housing Program, spon­ istrator, FHA; Frederick M. BabTHE PICNIC
sored by the Chamber during the cock of Washington, D. C., chief as Elizabeth in the famous tale of Welfare Organization at the Health
The annual picnic was given in month of October, with Dr. C. J. of appraisal section, real estate and poetic love; Fredric March, who Center, 405 Madison street, on Fri­
August, at the Green Gardens. All Lovejoy as general chairman, and construction division, FHA; Dr. plays opposite as the ardent Rob­ day from 1:30 to 3:30. Dr. R. R.
Maywood stores closed at 12, noon. other active members of various Ernest M. Fischer, economic ad­ ert Browning, and Charles Laugh- McLallen will be in charge assisted
The program of the day was ar­ committee heads. The drive was
FHA; Percy Wilson, director ton, most recent winner of the by the public health nurse. Alma
ranged by Mr. Collisi and his com­ successful and it helped not only visor,
award, who shines as the diaboli­ Regez, R.N.
region 7, FHA; John L. Haynes, cal
mittee. Plenty of prizes were do­ the building industry, but it also of
father.
nated by Maywood's business men had a good effect on aU other lines. valuation engineer of the Federal
The
performance of each is so
for races and games. Everybody had The canvass was under the leader­ Securities and Exchange commis­ finished, so smooth and rich that
sion, of Washington D. C.; Walter comparison is impossible. Never
a good time.
ship of J. K. Richardson and had S. Schmidt of Cincinnati, Ohio,
F.ALl, FESTly.^L DINNER
was there a more tender Elizabeth,
produced over $50,000 in pledges for
The last great social event was repair work. A great part of it is president-elect of the National As­ a more poetic Browning, or a more
sociation of Real Estate Boards; demoniac elder Barrett than these
on Monday, September 24, to in­ now under construction.
Joseph B. Hall of Cincinnati, presi­ three present.
augurate our post-summer activitifes,
CONCLUSION
dent-elect of the American Insti­
with distinguished people as guests
In
conclusion,
I
want
to
say
that
TRUE KINDRED
and speakers and a record turn-out the Maywood Chamber of Commerce tute of Real Estate Appraisers.
Wade Booth, "singing stranger"
of members and friends.
Maywood Conclave, True Kindred,
was
a
civic-minded
body,
devoted
its
of the NBC; the Chicago Sym­
'Edward J. Hayes, national com­
and resources to business and phonic choir with seventy-five will conduct the public installation
THEATRE
mander of the American Legion, energy
of officers on Friday evening in the
civic
affairs,
and
to
those
things
presented an interesting talk and H. which improve conditions and add to voices, and Freddie Ellis and his hall of the Maywood Masonic Tem­
MADISON ST. and 5+h AVE.
orchestra injected variety into the ple, South Fifth avenue and Oak
H. Eelkema, principal of the high
In the Heart of Maywood
development of the community. program.
street.
school, gave an address on school re­ the
PHONE MAYWOOD 1090
Maywood
is
sadly
in
need
of
a
lationship to the business of the strong organization tq develop trade
DOORS OPEN 6 P.M.
community. The entertainment was
business, and unless a larger
Week Days
provided for through arrangement and
percentage
of
it
can
be
worked
up,
with R. L. Osburn, head of Proviso's not only will the merchants suffer,
music department, with several tal­ but the village as a whole will also
ented members of the school.
suffer. The backbone of every thriv­
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
ing town is a well developed busi­
The Chamber is an organization ness center.
for business principally and other
In complete frankness, I must
direct community service, and not state that I feel that many incom­
for pleasure only. Therefore, my pleted projects might have been
first announcement to greet the year more easily and successfully ended
was the call to organize a bank. had I had the co-operation of a
EVERY DAY UNTIL 6:30
Letters were sent out to every or­ greater number of business and pro­
Except Sunday
ganization in Maywood, inviting fessional men throughout. A few
After 6:30 and
them to participate in forming a members were and are interested,
Al! Day Sunday
bank. An executive committee was sincere workers. However, it is not
appointed and they are busily en­ a one-man job. Public institutions
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
gaged in developing plans and to cannot be built by one or a few
Ben Lyon — San Marifza
strengthen Maywood's position for officers regardless of their eager and
Erich von Stroheim Vince Barnetf
a bank when the right time will untiring efforts. Such a tremendous
in
come.
undertaking can only be successful
BUSINESS BUREAU
through the co-operation of many
CRIMSON ROMANCE
A Better Business Bureau was es­ men and women, and until one joins
tablished. the purpose of which was that group, which constitutes the
to investigate complaints from cus­ Maywood Chamber of Commerce,
SATURDAY
tomers of local stores; to watch ad­ one is not doing his share toward
2 BIG FEATURES 2
vertisements in order to see that making Maywood a better place in
KEN MAYNARD
merchandise is correctly represent­ which to live and to work. Business
in
"IN OLD SANTA FE"
ed, and to protect the patrons and men, professional men, and all other
Also
business men of village stores.
loyal and devoted citizens—I appeal
BILL BOYO
FIFTH AVENUE BUS SERVICE
to you—let 1935 find not a slacker
in
Better bus service was re-estab­ in this community.
lished on North Fifth avenue due to
CHEATERSf f
the efforts of the Chamber and vil­
A.A.U.W.
lage officials, after several confer­
Everett Owen of the Oak Park
ences with Mr. Collett of the trac­ high school faculty, will speak on
tion company, who agreed to operate "Economic Problems in Internation­
busses on North Fifth avenue giving al Relations" at the meeting of the
THE
30-minute service during the day. International Relations Group of
This service had been abandoned the American Association of Uni­
before.
versity Women at 8 o'clock Tuesday
AN AIRPORT IN MAYWOOD
Due to the efforts of the Cham­ evening, February 5, at the home of
ber, the question to re-establish the Mrs. A. E. Joslyn, 814 William,
airport at Maywood, on the Hines River Forest.
Hospital grounds, was presented by
BRIDAL SHOWER
Congressman T. J. O'Brien to the
Miss Irene Wassman, 919 North
Post Office Department in Washing­
ton, who promised to give the sug­ Twelfth avenue, was hostess at a
gestion careful consideration. Ihe bridal shower in honor of Bernice
Chamber will endeavor to follow up Engbrecht.
Aeroplane bunco was played with
the matter closelv.
STARRING
BUSINESS BUItDING
awards going to Miss Ruth HuppenNORMA SHEARER
This was one of the most impor­ bauer. Miss Adele Laube, Mrs. Mil­
FREDRIC MARCH
tant activities of 1934. Our program dred Kramer, Mrs. Mildred Schroe­
was to secure more and better busi­ der and Mrs. Margaret Lipton.
CHARLES LAUGHTON
YALE
ADULTS
3 days
BARRETTS
OF
WIMPOLE
STREET
13
Wednesday, January 23, 1935
WANT ADS
HERALD WANT ADS BRING RESULTS
Herald Building
712 South Fifth Avenue
Telephone
Maywood 7100
FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF PATRONS
Herald Want Ads can be placed at The Service Bureau, 1140 Lake Street, Oak Leave#
Building, Oak Park; 6 North Michigan avenue. Tower Building, Chicago, or 5625 West
Lake street, Chicago.
If your name appears in the local telephone directory you may telephone, bring or mail your •
advertisement to this office
any time during the week until 11 A. M. Tuesday and it will be
classified. The office is open until 8 P. M. MONDAY. Ads forwarded by mail should be addres'sed
to THE HERALD, 712 South Fifth Avenue. Maywood.
RATES: 40 cents for first 20 words or less; 2 cents per word thereafter.
For the protection of our advertisers, replies to blind ads will not be delivered ""'ess the
release card is presented. The release card may be secured only during business hours (Noon Sat­
urdays) but will be mailed upon request.
TO RENT—LIGHT, SUNNY llOl^SEkeeping rooms, 3 blocks to Lake and
Harlem district; very reasonable. Phone
Forest 1561-J.
tc23 4625 34
LOST — A SECRETARY'S BOOK.
Finder please return, and no •jue^tions
WANTED—^VO^rA^' — COLORED OR will be asked. Ph'-'ne May\vo«.«l 6693.
tc2.^ 6373 52
rtliite for j^eneral hou^^ework; experi­
enced; stay nights. 1825 .South 12th av.,
USED AUTOMOBILES
jr.-iywood.
p23 6401 40
HELP WANTED (Domestic)
WANTED—WHITE GIRL, COOK, ASsist housework; some laundry; stay;
ferences. Phone Forest 4164.
tc23 5,630 40
HELP WANTED (Miscellaneous)
WANTED—MAN FOR GOOD NEARby Rawleigh route; real opportuntty for
right man. Write Rav.-leigh Co., Dept.
1LA-438-OK, Freeport, HI., or .see Victor
\\\ Krage, 2016 South 16lh st., Maywood,
ill.
pl6 23 6296 41
An error not the fault ot the advertiser which lessens the value ol the advertisement will be corrected by republication in the next issue il we are notified before the Monday following publication.
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
Maywood
TO RENT — LOW RENTAL APARTments, 2 and 3 rooms, heated; cooking
gas included, and furniture. See Mr. Hill,
1002 South 7th av., corner Madison.
p23 30 6393 20
FOR SALE —WEI.L-BUILT 5-ROOM
brick bungalow; furnace heat; good
condition; garage; a decided bargain at
$4,500; property clear. (The lot thrown TO RENT—FIVE ROOM FURNISHED
apartment, close to transportation; easy
in.) F. C. Pilgrim & Co. Phone Village
5100—Maywood 4061.
tc23 6418 3 to heat. Call 1006 South 14th av., 2nd
flat.
r23 30 6359 20
FOR SALE — 5-ROOM WELL-LOHALLS AND AUDITORIUMS
cated bungalow, near "J-"; $4,000;
terms. B. Schottler, 408 St. Charles rd.
TO RENT—LODGE HALLS, LARGE
tc23 6423 3
auditorium, for dances, parties, associa­
tions, etc., at nominal rates.
Maywood
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
Masonic temple, 200 South 5th av. Phone
(Miscellaneous)
Maywood 2486, Melrose Park 1795.
ctf7 5159
$150.00 CASH—$25.00 MONTH
5-room corner bungalow, hot air heat,
laundry, fruit closet, 2 car garage, shrub
bery and trees; taxes and assessments
paid; guaranteed title; near "L'* station
and schools; only $3,500. Phone May^
wood 1555.
tc23 6372 3
HOUSES TO RENT
(Unfurnished) Maywood)
, Mo ESbert=Real Estate
ROOMS TO RENT
HOTEL MAYWOOD
FINEST IN TOWN
510 Oak street, one blocl south of
C. & N. W. Railway station.
VERY SPECIAL WINTER RATES
In.^pect our ultra modern rooms; as low
as $1S per month.
Phone Maywood 4770.
Ictf 8 15 3462 29
TO RENT — WELL FURNISHED
room, suitable for one or two; private
entrance; convenient to Hines hospital;
reasonable rent; also garage to rent. 2038
South Third av. Phone Maywood 5933.
tc23 6351 29
TO RENT—DESIRABLE ROOM SUITable for one or two, adjoining bath,
hot running water at all times, steam
heat; $3.00 per week. 1836 South 5th av.,
apt. 14.
p23 6378 29
903 South Fifth Ave.
Phone Maywood 505-7762
TO RENT — BEAUTIFUL LARGE
room; fine
neighborhood; real home
5-room bungalow
—$25.00
FOR SALE OR TRADE—STUCCO 2 2>^-room modern apartment
27.50 surroundings; $3; garage. Phone Mayflat, clear; excellent condition; best
6-room residence
— 30.00 wood 2541-M. 217 South 17th av., Mayjicighborho'od ; will take vacant, bungalow
wood.
pl6 23 6249 29
First and last—See our listings,
or house. Address particulars to F-lOO,
tc23 6420 23
The Herald.
tc23 30 2 6340 3
TO RENT—A TTRACTIVE WELLTO RENT—AT 645 SOUTH 19TI1 AV.,
furnished room, west and south ex­
FOR SALE—IN BELLWOOD; BRICK
5-room bungalow, $35; also
6-room posure, sititable for two persons.
Fine
5-room and floored attic; corner bunga­
residence located at 1235 South 17th av.; location and home surroundings.
405
low, $4,200; 2-flat frame, 50-foot lot,
glazed sleeping porch, newly decorated, South 2nd av., Maywood.
tc23 6405 29
$3,000. B. Schottler, 408 St. Charles rd.,
one-car garage, two blocks to "L" and
Maywood.
tc23 6424 3
stores, $40 month. J. H. Rhode, phone TO RENT—LARGE, NICELY FURMaywood 2770, or any local broker.
nislied warm front sleeping room; suit­
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
tc23 6404 23 able for one or two; transportation. 201
(Vacant) MisceUaneous
South 4th av.
tc23 6374 29
FOR SALE—VAC.^NT I.OTS; CHOICE TO RENT — FIVE-ROOM BUNGAlows,
$30.00;
6*room
house,
$30.00;
lots, $600; paved streets ; near "L" and
TO RENT—LARGE FRONT ROOM IN
Madison st. B. Schottler, 408 St. Charles three-room flats, $15.00; furnished bunga
private home; located near north side.
Babcock, 103
jd
c23 6421 6 low near '*L,'* $37.50.
Phone Maywood 2837 or call at 513 North
South 5th av. Phone Maywood 464 or 4th av.
tc23 6366 29
FOR SALE — WELL-LOC.VIED COR 2762 for personal service.
tc23
6379
23
ner lot, 80x134 feet, for sale at bar
BOARD AND ROOM
gain; zoned for residence. Davies Realty
TO RENT — LARGE FURNISHED
Shop, 1209 South Fifth av.
tc23 6396 6
5-ROOM BUNGALOW $30.00
room with twin beds; suitable for two
Newly decorated, large sleeping porch, gentlemen; board if desired. 416 South
APARTMENTS TO RENT
large
lot,
shrubs
and
trees;
near
*'L'
6th av. Phone Maywood 2404.
(Unfurnished) Maywood
station. Phone Maywood 1555.
tc23 6370 32
IT IS NOT WISE TO WAIT UNTIL
tc23
6371
23
Spring to give thought to moving. In
HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS TO RENT
vestigate now while selections are choice.
TO RENT —LIGHT, CLEAN ROOM
TO
RENT
—
HOUSES
AND
BUNGAOor rental list of fiats, bungalows and
for one or two; not in a private home;
lows reasonably priced ; located in May
houses is at your service. Swartz Real
wood, Melrose Park and Bellwood. Pea­ use of reception room; hot and cold soft
Estate, 1104 St. Charles rd. Phone May
water, steam heat, shower; gas stove;
wood 69.
*<:23 6383 17 cock, 609 Lake st., Maywood.
tc23 6414 23 laundry with wash machine; $5.00 week.
1800 South 16th av.. Apartment B.
TO RENT—IN ONE OF MAYWOOD'S
tc23 6353 34
best apartment buildings; newly deco WE HAVE THE BUNGALOW YOU
want
to
rent
at
the
price
you
want
to
rated; 4-roora steam heated apartment
piy.
Call
and
look
over
our
big
free
TO
RENT—TWO-ROOM
FURNISHED
free frigidaire; soft water; close to trans
apartment; light and cheerful; gas, light
portation. 1010 South 1st av.
Phone rental list. Wm, Lawrence, 517 Madison
tc23 6429 23 and heat included; garage. 804 South
Maywood 2748.
tc23 6406 17 St., Maywood 1665.
8th av. Phone Maywood 1830.
tc23 6402 34
TO RENT—THREE-ROOM FLAT, 2ND TO RENT—5-ROOM BUNGALOW, 2
car garage, $30.00; close l/'th av. *'L
floor; clean and all bright rooms; stove
heat; near Lake street; $12 a month station. Phone Village 5100 - Maywood TO RENT—LARGE FRONT ROOM,
4061.
tc23 6419 23
completely furnished for light house­
Inquire 515 North 9th av., 2nd floor.
keeping; excellent location; private home.
p23 6336 17
TO RENT—SEVERAL GOOD BUNGA 518 North 4th av. Phone Maywood 4093.
lows and houses; 5 to 11 rooms; $25 to
tc23 6367 34
TO RENT — REASONABLY PRICED
flats and apartments, located in May $75 per month. Davies Realty Shop, 1209
TO
RENT
—
THREE
NICE,
CLEAN
South
Fifth
av.
tc23
6395
23
wood, Melrose Park and Belhvood. Pea
rooms for light housekeeping; private
cock, 609 Lake St., Maywood.
tc23 6415 17 TO RENT—SIX-ROOM BRICK BUN bath and entrance, real kitchen, **L" trans­
galow, 2-car garage, $27.50. Cummins portation; adults only. 1228 South 14th
tc23 6365 34
TO RENT—4-ROOM FLAT, FURNACE & Bossv, 811 South 5th av., Maywood. av., Maywood.
tc23 6271 23
heat, adults only, $20,00 month.
TO RENT — ONE OR TWO WELL
North 7th av. Phone Maywood 2999.
furnished rooms for light housekeeping;
tc23 6432 17 TO RENT—SIX-ROOM HOUSE, HOT
water heat; newly decorated; North newly decorated; near al) transportation;
Maywood;
$40.
Phone
Maywood
1628.
rent greatly reduced. 116 South 6th av.,
TO RENT — 5-ROOM FLAT, HOT
p23 6341 23 Maywood.
ctf23 2074 34
water heat, garage, $25.00. 308 South
10th av., Maywood. Phone Forest 471.
TO
RENT—8ROOM
HOUSE,
WELL
TO
RENT—2
ROOMS
AND
KITCHENtc:-3 6407 17
located. Z. C. Smith. Phone Maywood
ette, hot water heat, gas, electric;
17,
ctfl7 4S34 23 private entrance, one-car garage.
1908
APARTMENTS TO RENT
South Sih av. Inquire in rear.
(Furnished) Maywood
TO RENT —BUNGALOWS, HOUSES
p23 6390 34
and flats; low rent. B. Schottler, 408
St. Charles rd.
tc23 6422 23 WILL RENT MY 5-ROOM BUNGANEW FIREPROOF BUILDING
low furnished for my room and board.
HOUSES TO RENT
ULTRA MODERN
407 South 22nd av. Phone Bellwood 6156.
(Furnished) Miscellaneousp23 6394 34
Beautifully furnished 1-2-3-rcom apart­
ments ; quiet, high class; new low rentals. TO RENT —LOVELY 5-ROOM COMTO
RENT—B
E
A
U
T
I
F
U
L,
LARGE
pletely
furnished
bungalow,
with
ga
219 North 2nd av. Phone Maywood 4764,
living room and bedroom combined,
ctflO 3470 30 rage; heat furnished; very reasonable.
use of kitchen, shower, Frigidaire. 1010
Cummins and Bossy, 811 South Fifth av
TO RENT—LAftGE 2-ROOM APART Maywood.
p23 6428 34
tc23 6416 26 South 13th av., Doherty.
ment, neatly furnished and newly deco­
rated; steam heat, fas, electric nnd hot TO RENT—FIVE ROOM BUNGALOW, TO RENT —2 ROOMS FURNISHED
for light housekeeping; private entrance,
completely furnished and heated; a real
water furnished; side entrance; garage
close to Hines hospital. 2125 South 6th
home; adults only. 420 South 22nd av.
if desired. 400 South 15th av.
tc23 6398 34
^
p23 6408 26 av.; call evenings.
• ^
tc23 641(\ 20
1
-
j^OST—BOY'S WHlSf WAICH IN OR
near Proviso hiji'h schooK January 10;
reward for return. Phone Mayw<»o»l 55.
p23 6339 52
CLOTHING FOR SALE
FOR SALE —BC^Y'S LOXG PANT
suit, size 16; leather coat, size 14;
knicker suit, s^ize 14; new overcoat, size
36; leather coat, size 6; all in excellent
condition. 1612 South 8th av.
Phone
Maywood 3531.
tc23 6380 45
FOR SALE —LADY'S BLACK WIXter coat, size 38; genuine fox collar;
worn very little; will sell very cheap.
1926 South 7th av., >[ay\vood. p23 6382 45
FOR SAl-ll— 1932 CHEVROLET DE
Luxe coiij'c. Inquire .'^18 Ma<li''on st.
Phone May\vo<>d 'Jn64.
ic23 63.-^7 53
USED MOTOR TRUCKS AND
. MOTORCYCLES
FOR SAT.i: — cm:VROLET TRUCK,
ly'j tons, 1930 model; stake b'-ftly 9x6;
in very good condition ; almost new tires;
$150.00.
Ph"ne lliPside 6134.
tc23 6.^34 54
AUTOMOBILES WANTED
WANIED TO BUY —USED TRUCK,
stake or jianeled body; must be rea­
sonable. Ad'lress 1*-110, Ihe lleraUl.
u 2i 63S6
AUTO SERVICE
FOR COMPLElb: AI TOMOBD^E REpairs, battery, tire and ignition service
call A. & C. Motor Service, Maywood
9531. We als« carry full line of India
and Goodrich tires. Vi-it our shop, 1000
St. Charles rtl.
tc23 63S5
BATTERIES AND
ITRES
FOR
WIT-LARD
JJAITERIES
OR
HOUSEHOLD GOODS FOR SALE
Goodrich Silvertown tires or tire and
FOR SALE—JANUARY CLEANANCE battery service, see Robert Madsen, 19(h
sale. Just a few of the many bargains av. and Ma«li,^on S t . , M.iywood 3935.
listed offered during this sale, at and be­
tc2 9 16 23 30 6045
low cost. Terms arranged if desired.
BULK BEER
Crome Plated Floor Lamp
$4.95
6x9 Rugs
6.75
L E H M A N N — W HOLESALE—A.SK
Inner-Spring Mattresses
8.95
about our high proof bottle beer; bulk
Maple Finished S-Pc.' Dinette Set
12.75
beer sold at a favorable price. 1305 South
Bed Spring-Mattresses Complete
14.75
First av. Phone Maywood 363.
2-Pc. Parlor Sets
39-50
tc2 9 16 23 30 <j044
7-Pc. Dining Room .Sets
39.50
Also several lots sHglitly used storage
CARPENTERS, CONTRACTORS.
furniture including upright Grand and
JOBBERS
Midget pianos at a sacrifice.
CARPENTER
CONTR.\CTOR.
REPAIR
VICTOR FURNITURE & STORAGE
work of all kinds; time r contract;
4809 11 W. Lake St.
and guaranteed; esti­
Open Tiies., Thurs. and Sat. Evenings. all work financed
Frank P. Tye, 608 North
23 6409 46 mates free.
Seventh av. Phone Maywood 5023.
ctf7 657
REDUCED FOR JANUARY CLEARance—Dining room set, $12.00; daven­
CATCH BASINS
port, $8.00; wardrobe, $6.00; all enameled
gas range, $9.(K); walnut buffet, $12.00;
CATCH
BASINS
CLEANED,
REbooks, 5c to $1.00; full line of furniture
paired and rodded; fioor drain installed.
and house furnishings. Suburban Furni­
Call O'Connell, 7226 Madison st. Phone
ture Co., 415 Lake st. Phone Maywood
Forest 4239.
tc2 9 16 23 30 6043
9512.
Open Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday evenings until 9 p.m.
MAYWOOD CATCL BASIN CLEANER
tc23 6427 46
—catch basins cleaned; also repaired
and drains rodded; work done reasonable;
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE—TWO why not trade at home? Call George NielVictrola heaters, cook, combination son. Phone Maywood 4J49.
tc23 C3tl
gas stoves. Large lot good used furniture,
roll-top desk, chair, piano, organ at re­ CLEANERS OF CURTAINS, RUGS. ETC.!
duced prices. We deliver. 511 Madison
St., Maywood.
tc23 6392 46 C U R T A I N S W A S H E D A N D
stretched, reasonable; called for and
FOR SALE — THREE-PIECE LIVING delivered; quilts and blankets washed. 145
room suite, baby buggy, crib and mat­ South 21st av. Phone Maywood 6254.
I
tc23 6430
tress, in good condition ; bargain. 1246
South 16th av. Phone Maywood 7718.
WASHED
AND
tc23 6376 46 C U R T A I N S
stretched; work guaranteed; \ ork called^
FOR SALE—VERY CHEAP, COMBI- for and delivered. Phone Metrose Park
nation stoves, garbage burners, soft coal 1277.
tc2 9 16 23 30 6C37,
heaters, gas ranges, beds, coil springs,
COAL
mattresses and dressers. 1204 Randolph
I
St., Maywood, 2nd floor,
rear. tc23 6362 46 MOROCCO OR WILMINGTON COAL
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—PIANO
in good condition^ and radiant fire gas
heater. Call evenings, 1825 South 8th av.,
Maywood.
p23 6377 46
FOR SALE — IT'S POSSIBLE FOR
you to find just what you want at our
outlet store. Jackson Storage and Van
Co., 5940 Chicago av.
ptf7 5125 46
FOR SALE —LARGE USED RUG,
solid color, also Morris chair; very rea­
sonable.
2131 South 6th av.
Phone
Maywood 3112.
tc23 6387 46
MOVING TO SMALLER APARTment, forced to sell twin beds, dresser,
•>4-sizc bed, and 6 oak chairs. Call Maywood 8640.
tc23 6412 46
FOR SALE—CHEAP, REED BABY
buggy, large baby bed and ice box.
Plione MaywocKl 6.S73.
tc23 6360 46
MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE
direct from mines; screenings, $4.75;
mine run, $5.75; lump egg, $6.
Morris Coal Sales Corporation
514 Lake St.—Maywood 307.
tc23 636«
CENTRAL ILLINOIS MINE RUN,
$5.90; egg, $6.35. These prices are for
4-ton lots; 25c off for cash. Schneider
Brothers, formerly at Forest 2522, now
Melrose Park 2103.
1612 Main st.
tc23 6400
SPECT.^L — CARBON HILL COAL,
$5.50 per ton in load lots, 50c extra
for smaller orders.
\^'est Town's Coal
Sales, 1112 St. Charles rd. Phone Maywood 80.
tcl6 23 6263
A GENUINE NO. 6 SEAM ILLINOIS
egg coal at $6.85 per ton; a real value
for that money. Phone Melrose Park 711.
Clauss Coal.
tc23 30 6364
DRESSMAKING
FOR SALE — WATER SOFTENER TIME TO GET STARTED ON YOUR
spring wardrobe. Join our dressmaking
Salt. Melrose Park Feed Mills, 2905
class. Mrs. Allenfort. Phone Maywood
Lake st. Phone Melrose Park 739-773.
0363
tc2 9 16 23 30 6053 49 1305.
ELECTRIC
WANTED TO BUY
REFRIGERATORS
FOR SALE—5 CUBIC FOOT REFRIGROOSEVELT USED FURNITURE
erator, almost new; cost $145; only $75.
Store. We buy and sell everything. Home Electric Appliance Co., 5309 (ThiStoves especially needed. 6912 Roo,sevelt cago av. Phone Village 7170.
road, Oak Park. Phone Village 7819.
tc23 7S56
tc23 6397 51
ELECTRICAL WORK
WANTED TO BUY'—BOOKS, EVERYA.
A.
WESTOWN'S
VACUUMAVASHthing in used furniture and household
ing machine repair service; no service
goods. Phone Forest 623.
tc23 6354 51
call charge; expert workmanship. 1332
Marengo, Forest Park.
Phone Forest
LOST AND FOUND
4029.
tc2 9 16 23 30 0042
LOST — SMALL FEMALE WIRE
EXTERMINATING
haired terrier, white with brown on left
side of head, stub tail. 1709 South 6th
MA-PEX
PRODUCTS—DIVISION
OF
av.
tc23 6399 52
Maywood Pest Exterminator; moth­
FOUND — LADY'S WHITE GOLD proofing, exterminating, fumigating, jani­
wrist watch, l7jewel, 18 karat case, tors' supplies, ooaps, powders, etc. 1206
white gold bracelet. 134 South 36th av., South First av. Phone Mayw^ood 4175.
tc23 6345
Maywood.
'
p23 6389 52
THE HERALD
EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES
PRINTERS
MR. EMPLOYER — WE HAVE OFfice, factory, hotel, restaurant, domestic,
laundry help. Men for odd jobs. Prompt
service at Carter Agency. Phone Maywood 4710. 645 South 13th av.
tc23 6413
BUSINESS
CARDS,
LETTERHEAUS.
enveiopes, statements, billheads, circuJara. blotters, direct by maiL Let ushgure on your printing needs. Pioneer
Publishing Co., 1140 Lake St., Oak Park,
III.
Phone Euchd 3200, Mansfield 3800;
HOUSEKEEPER, MOTHER'S HELP- no order too large nor too smalL
ers, maids, waitresses always in demand.
*cttl2 1009
Mrs. Leona Taibleson can place you. Con­
RADIOS
sult her for a position. 112 South 11th
av. Phone Maywood 8464.
tc23 6346
FOR SALE—RADIOS. SEVEN AND
eight-tube guaranteed console radios,
FURNITURE REPAIRING
$8.95 each.
Midgets, $5.65; all-electnc
A BROKEN CHAIR WHEN RE- chassis, $3.95; Philco auto radios, $9.50;
paired and upholstered by us in most Radio Parts Headquarters, Kessel Radio
cases is better than when new; refinished; Co., 610-612 South Fifth av., Maywood.
recaning. remodeling and mirrors resil South Fifth av., Maywood.
p23 6355
vered. Nelson, phone Maywood 5695.
ctf4 5324 FOR SALE—7-TUBE ALL-ELECTRIC
radio, in attractive cabinet, $10.00. 1402
HAIRDRESSING AND SHAMPOOING West Lake-^st. Phone Melrose Park 9790.
tc23 6426
ESTELLE WORTS BEAUTY SHOPPE.
Exquisitely curled permanents (deep,
RADIO SERVICE
natural and lasting waves with ringlet
ends). $3.50 to $5.'50 complete artistic PHILCO OWNERS — HAVE YOUR
finger waving; s^fe eyelash dyeing; facials
set repaired by Philco factory trained
cosmetics, etc.
405 South Twenty-first men. Philco authorized service; prompt,
av. Plione Maywood 9138.
tc23 5352 capable, efficient. We repair any make of
radio. Echo Radio Shop, 18th av. and St.
DRENE SHAMPOO AND FINGER Charles, Maywood. Phone Maywood 562.
wave, 50 cents; permanent waving,
tc23 6384
$3.50 and $5. Gwendolyn Beauty shop,
513 Walnut st. (downstairs). Phone May^ RADIO SERVICE, 50c; ALL WORK
wood 163.
tc23 6349
done in your home; ten years' expe
rience service manager. Suburban Radio
FLORENCE'S HOME BEAUTY SHOP. Service, phone Maywood 7350.
Shampoo and finger wave, 35c; permafc2 9 16 23 30 6047
nent wave, $2.50, $3.50 and $5. 609
Lake st. Phone Maywood 3657.
ALL MAKES OF RADIOS REPAIRED
tc23 6350
50c per call; 24 hour service; estimates
free. Complete line ol parts carried
PAIRICIAN BEAUTY SHOPPE, 903
stock. Phone Maywood 578.
tc23 6347
South 5th av.; permanent wave $3.50
and $5.00; shampoo and set 50c; finger
RADIO SERVICE AND SALES. ALLwave alone 35c; experience
operators
electrical equipment repaired.
Tubes
only. Phone Maywood 1055.
tc23 6348
tested free. 1402 West Lake st. Phone
Melrose Park 9790.
tc23 6425
HEALTH RESORTS
W H E A 'J- O N
HEALTH
RESORT,
Wheaton, Illinois. A nursing home for
aged chronic convalescents and rest pa
tients. Graduate nurses. Massage, baths
etc. Phone ^'Iieaton 51.
niptf 23 4637
FOR COMPETENT, HONEST RADIO
service call Maywood 4253. Fred Con­
ner, 1833 South 10th av.
tc23 6431
INSTRUCTION
MADE TO ORDER, LOW AS $3,75
chairs; $5,50 davenport; prices include
labor and materialsestimates free. Phone
Mansfield 1810. Modern Slip Cover, 5243
Madi,son.
ctf23 7633
SLIP COVERS
MRS. BESSIE M. STOWE, TEACHER
of Expression and Dramatic Art, an­
nounces the opening of a class for instruc­
tion in breathing, diction, harmonic
training, inflection, interpretation, reading,
speaking, and voice placing, on Thursday
afternoon, February 7, at 4 o'clock at
1403 South 13th av. Anyone interested
may obtain full information by phoning
Maywood 1569, 3541 or 312.
tc23 6358
WILL TRADE 9-TUBE R. C, A, ELECtrie radio for piano.
Will sell baby
bed and mattress, like new, $4.00, Phone
Maywood 3280.
tc23 6403
TIMROTH SCHOOL OF DANCING.
All types of dance, adiilt, tap and exer­
cise course; class work $1.50 a month;
special tap class 25c lesson; beginners
and advance pupils. 1411J.4 South 5th
av. Phone Euclid 2385.
p23 30 6335
TO BE GIVEN AWAY — TO GOOD
home, small kitten. 1001 North ISth
av,, Melrose Park, Phone Melrose Park
3496.
nc23 6333
TO EXCHANGE
TO BE GIVEN AWAY
VIOLIN, MANDOLIN, GUITAR, TO BE GIVEN AWAY — YELLOW
banjo, piano, harmony, etc. The Schuchcat, part Angora, male, 3 years old;
mann Studios (established 1896), 303 also black male kitten. To good homes
Franklin av., River Forest. Phone Forest only. Phone Maywood 520.
nc23 6434
2919.
ptf23 4524
A FEW MORE CHAIRS AVAILABLE TO BE GIVEN AWAY—THREE PUPpies, female, 4 months old. Phone Mayat Mrs. Crail's Kindergarten for se­
nc23 6433
mester beginning Januarj' 28. Transporta­ wood 2820,
tion furnished.
Register at 514 South
TYPEWRITERS
8th av, or call Maywood 7887.
tc23 6411
ALL
NORTH
MAYWOOD KINDERGAR- BOUGHT, SOLD, REPAIRED.
makes rented, $3,00 monthly, 4 months,
ten will enroll for kindergarten and
sub-primary classes. Cab service. Rea­ $7; applied if purchased. Austin Type­
sonable terms.
617 North Third av. writer Exchange, 5509 Lake, Phone Aus­
p23 7852
Plione Maywood 5679.
tc23 6417 tin 4740,
JUNK
WANTED TO BE GIVEN AWAY
WE PAY HIGHEST PRICES—Rags, pa­
per, batteries, tires, and metal of all
kinds; we also buy second hand furniture.
For service, call Reliable Junk Dealer,
phone Maywood 3663. Diamond, 1204 Ran­
dolph street, Maywood.
tc23 6344
WANTED — DON.\TION OF USED
upright piano and used victrola records.
Sisters of Mt, Carniel School, 1115 North
23rd av.
Phone Melrose Park 686,
nc2j 6338
I PAY GOOD PRICES FOR RAGS,
paper, magazines, batteries, tires and
metals, iron of all kinds. H. Berman, 640
South 14th av. Phone Maywood 8542.
tc23 6343
LAUNDRIES
VACUUM CLEANERS
FOR SALE—LATEST BEATER TYPE
model 725 Hoover; like new; cost
$79.50; only $39.50; Hoover Dustette,
cost $17.50, only $9. Home Electric Ap­
pliance Co., 5309 Chicago av. Phone Vil­
lage 7170.
tc23 7902
S U B U R B A N HOME LAUNDRY.
WASHING MACHINES
Quality service laundry, dry cleaning,
rugs and dyeing; curtains our specialty. WASHING MACHINES, VACUUM
cleaners, sewing machines repaired, re­
Particular housewives phone Forest 4122.
We solicit a trial.
p23 30 6388 built; wringer rolls for all washers; belts
for washers and vacuum cleaners; several
rebuilt vacuum cleaners and washers for
PERSONAL
sale; easy payments. A. W. Powers, 15
THE FIRST SPIRITUALIST CHURCH, years in the business. 703H South 5th
152 South Fourteenth av. (cor. Oak st.) av. Phone Maywood 511.
p23 6342
Lyceum, 1 p. m.; German, 3 p. m.; Eng­
lish, 7:45 p. m. Si>eaker, Mr. Curt Egar; FOR SALE — USED WASHING MAchines, $5; wringer rolls and parts for
subject, "Spiritual Principles." Healing,
Buy
Mrs. Mary Hackert and others. Message all makes at big discount prices.
circles Tuesday and Friday evenings, 8 any new washer from us on terms of
p. m., lliursday, 2 p. m. Rev. L. Hansen, only $1 weekly. Kessel Radio Co., 610-612
pastor; readings daily. Phone Maywood S. Fifth av., Maywood.
p23 6356
8191.
tc23 6381
SEVERAL GOOD WASHING MAchines will be sold for repair charges,
NOTICE
$7 to $15. Home Electric Appliance Co.,
THIS IS TO NOTIFY MEMBERS 5309 Chicago av. Phone Village 7170.
that the Proviso Animal Rescue league
tc23 7859
has, on January 21, 1935, disbanded. A
new organization is forming. Mrs. McDon­
WINDOW SHADES
ald, secretary-treasurer.
p23 6391
J. P. QUIGLEY. WINDOW SHADES,
Vei.etian blinds; old shades reversed
Thf" unexpected has happened and used
cats are in demand. Our Want ads of­ and cleaned. 7330 Harrison St., Forest
fer used car values and those who expect Park. Phone Forest 2991 or 4006.
to buy a used car are advised to read
CtflO 4635
them carefully.
pictures are very worth while and
all thank Judge Senese for giving
the opportunity of seeing them.
SCHOOL NEWS OF
DISTRICT 89
GARFIELD NEWS
Holidays are over and all are
back at work. They had a fine rest
and although they don't like to ad­
mit it, they really are glad to get
back to school.
The first day back in school, an
announcement came from the office
asking the boys and girls of each
room for their group to form two or
three New Year's resolutions. These
were sent to the principal's office.
Here are a few of them:
To try to be good citizens at all
times in rooms, halls, basements
and playgrounds:
To show good sportsmanship;
To develop good school room
habits:
To be tidy housekeepers:
It should be the aim of each
child to develop the habit of being
responsible for himself in all
school activities.
Everyone enjoyed the hot dog sale
given at Garfield on Thursday, Jan
uary 17. They go for the hot dogs
at Garfield.
AU enjoyed the movie last Thurs­
day. There was one reel which told
us the story and showed scenes
which were connected with the writ
ing of some of the patriotic songs.
In another reel the students took
a trip on an electric ship from New
York to San Francisco by way of
the Panama Canal. The reel on
"Magic or Science" had them puz­
zled, for some of the late scientific
developments seem just like magic.
As usual the cartoon offered many
laughs.
The basketball team played their
first game Tuesday, January 8, with
Saint Eulalia. Although the boys
played a good game, St. Eulalia won
out. The team is looking forward
to the next game, backing the team
for victory next time.
Plans for the annual room bas­
ketball tournament are in progress.
It may be next week. Each room
has a team which is coached by one
of the players on the basketball
team. The games are played before
school in the morning, noon hour
and after school. Due to such large
crowds it is necessary to charge ad­
mission which is 5c to each in­
dividual game or a season ticket
may be purchased for 15c. Since
there are about ten games in the
tournament, most of the boys and
girls buy season tickets. The teach­
ers say that they are good training
for sportsmanship and for good
conduct on the part of the specta­
tors. Anyway, they are lots of fun.
Have you heard about the moni­
tor system? The boys and girls of
the school are taking over the du
ties of helping conduct the school.
Each room has monitors for differ­
ent duties. Each monitor, when he
is on duty wears an arm badge of
purple and white which has the
letter S. S stands for service and
the monitors give freely of their
service in helping to conduct lines
or the care of the wash rooms and
various other duties. The monitor
is usually chosen for one week at
a time and in this way every boy
and girl gets a chance to give serv­
ice to his school.
Since the P.-T.A.'s of District 89
were planning a joint meeting at
the high school in February, Gar­
field P.-T,A. decided not to have a
January meeting. There was such
an interesting meeting planned for
February that they decided to give
up the January meeting rather than
the one in February. The joint
meeting at the high school will be
conducted February 11.
The three eighth grades took a
trip to the Planetarium on Wednes­
day, January 16. They left the
school about 12 o'clock, going first
to the Field Museum and took a
conducted tour through the various
exhibits. Then they went to the
Planetarium for a lecture at 3
o'clock. This is in connection with
work in science.
The students think they have
quite a grownup library at Garfield,
for several reasons. First of all,
they have a card catalogue, and
what's more, they know how to use
it. Then there are subscriptions to
fourteen magazines including Popu­
lar Science, Popular Mechanics,
Scientific American, and National
Geographic. They are bound in
bright brown bindings which make
them easier to read and much bet­
ter looking.
The teachers aren't neglected,
either, for the school subscribes to
six professional magazines for them.
During the month of November,
the average circulation was 70 books
a day: considering the fact that
only 300 boys and girls use the
library, that's a pretty good record.
Elmer Pflug, commander of the
Sarlo-Sharp Post of the American
Legion, and Mr. Jackson, chairman
of the Americanization division,
spoke to the graduating class
Thursday. This was the first of a
series of talks which the Legion
gives every year to the eighth grade
of each school in Melrose Park.
Mr. Jackson spoke on "Honor."
The day before vacation began, 142
books were issued, and on the day
the students returned to school, 123
books were taken.
Forty new books have been added
to the shelves since September, and
in addition, have had thirty-two
The second grade have a new pet.
favorites rebound. Their new covers
are bright blue and red and green, Donald Martin brought a fantalled
goldfish
to school.
and it's a joy to find
these old
friends dressed up so nicely. The
A group of third grade children
most popular of the new books
are Jim Davis, The Call of the Wild, in Miss Murray's room presented a
Teenle-Weenle
play Thursday af­
Smoky, The Trumpeter of Krakow,
The Jolly Roger, and Under the Li­ ternoon in the gym. The audience
lacs, which at one time had 34 was made up of rooms 1, 2, 3 and
4. The children prepared their own
reservations.
A library board is organized to play, writing and learning their
carry out all sorts of activities and lines from the stories read in class.
projects. There are representatives They assembled their own costumes
from each room who are members and stage properties. The cast for
of the board and who form the the play was as follows:
Frances Cerniglla
nucleus of various committees to Lady of Fashion
Christine Milstead
take care of programs, publicity,
Corrine Faillo
posters, methods of earning money, Dutchman
Frances Kalasardo
Elma Fioravantl
and any other activities suggested
Policeman
Donald Hendricksen
by board members. We also have a Doctor
Grace Fracasso
staff of librarians, who have learned Cowboy
Jack Collins
Indian.
Graham Dobbie
all the duties of a librarian and how
Clown
Judith Ann Luzzi
to discharge them efficiently. On Grandpa
Joseph Bono
days when library periods are de General
Herman Fablani
Housekeeper
Lydia
FanelU
voted to free reading, these girls
Teenie-Weenles—Lorraine Walker,
take complete charge of the library, Other
Ina Rae Evans.
with the librarian acting merely as
supervisor.
EMERSON NEWS
The students are working now on
a new project, a newspaper which
will contain general school news,
By Jeanette Andermano
but especially news and views of the
Friday, January 18, Room 21 gave
library, with book reports of new a candy sale. The money will help
books and books that need adver­ pay for the curtains in the art room.
tising. It will be a splendid oppor­
Intramural teams have been or­
tunity to call everyone's attention
ganized for both volley and basket­
to books he is sure to like.
The school joined the Junior ball games. Departmental children
Literary Guild, and each month it who are not on the regular teams
receives from them the book select­ are on the intramurals. There are
ed by such people as Angelo Patri, five basketball and four volley ball
Carl Van Doren and Mrs. Roosevelt teams.
as the best book of the month for
The "Fireflies" and the "Gogetboys and girls. As members the
students also receive a small maga­ ters", both volley ball teams, started
zine called "Young Wings" which the season with a score of 3 to 1
gives news of books for boys and in favor of the "Fireflies." In bas­
girls. The latest selection is Dobry, ketball the "Cardinals" and the
The "Cardinals"
a fascinating story of a little Bul­ 'Bears" played.
garian boy who wanted to be an won, 18-0.
artist. The book is written by Mon­
The P.-T.A. conducted its month­
ica Shannon and illustrated by the ly meeting January 7. As usual the
Bulgarian artist about whom the P.-T,A. gave a dollar to the room
story is written.
having the most parents present.
For the third time room 21 got the
There have been two glee clubs reward.
organized in the departmental
grades. Miss Crandell has charge
The ways and means committee
of the boys' glee club and Miss of the P.-T.A. sponsored a lunch on
Williams of the girls' glee club. January 16. 'The lunch was en­
They have regular practices and are joyed by all. When the eighth grade
going to sing at some of the P.-T.A. had finished
their lunch, a class
meetings and assemblies.
meeting was conducted in room 21.
MELROSE PARK
The social science classes
had a series of standardized
The eighth grade scored very
in the reasoning problems.
classes did well in the factual
ROOSEVELT
have
tests.
high
AU
tests.
The series of spelldowns in the
seventh grade ended Friday. The
side led by Madelyn Maleto won.
Billy Trenkler stood up the longest
on the other side.
The Roosevelt school conducted
its P.-T.A. meeting the evening of
January 14, After a brief business
meeting, a comical movie was
shown after which refreshments
and pleasant informal conversation
were enjoyed. The Mothers' Circle
met January 15, with an unusual
attendance of forty. The hot dog
sale luncheon on Thursday was very
successful under the influence of
highly inclement weather.
The seventh grade class gave a
The fifth
grade at Roosevelt is
"Surprise Shower" for Miss Owens,
who is leaving Friday. She, in re­ interested in the clay work evolving
turn, gave each and every one an books, sea chests, and refrigerators
out of cubical forms. Tractors and
ice cream Dixie cup.
covered wagons were original re­
Donald Cortapassi was taken to sponses to cylindrical forms. The
the Oak Park hospital for an ap­ first lesson in figure work resulted
pendicitis operation, Wednesday, in several figures
expressing quite
January 16. This was unfortunate definite emotion. One cowboy, legs
in various ways as Donald's attend­ astride, hat tilted, cocked hip pistols
ance was perfect until this occur­ toward high heaven. A little wom­
rence.
an stretched out her arms in mute
appeal to contrast with a contented
A program organized and exe­ but gossipy neighbor, hands folded.
cuted entirely by the third grade And a little lady waves her spoon
was presented in the Citizenship industriously over a bowl on a near
club meeting January 17.
table.
The basketball team had a prac­
tice game with Grant school Janu­
WASHINGTON
ary 15, and won, 27-5. The lineup
is as follows: Joe Beltrame, Angelo
The Washington P.-T.A. spon­
Venzlano, f: Clifford Augustine, c,
sored a school luncheon on Wed­
and John Baldo, g.
nesday, January 16. The students
We extend our deepest sympathy were allowed to choose from the
to Miss Ricci, whose father passed following menu: hot dogs, potato
salad, jello with cookies, pop, choco­
away last week.
late and white milk. Each item was
Theresa Bellino, Matalie Caselli, priced at 5 cents. The room moth­
Beatrice Johnson, Anna Mannoia, ers served and prepared the lunch­
Rose Dantino, Martha Slgnorella, eon which was enjoyed by all who
Gertrude Young, Leo Catenacci, stayed at school that noon.
Richard Hahn, Bernard Rossi, Wil­
liam Skrlne and Julius Tralna from
The volley ball and basketball
the eighth grade have had perfect teams have played three games and
attendance this semester.
have won all of them.
STEVENSON NEWS
Judge Louis Senese, Jr., showed
his moving pictures of Italy at the
school on last Wednesday. In spite
of the slippery sidewalks and streets
there was a good attendance.^ The
A group of representatives from
the Joliet township high school
came to Washington school Wed­
nesday, January 16, to view the fin­
ished mural in the first grade room.
Miss Smith also showed them the
paintings in other buildings of the
district.
15
Wednesday, January 23, 1935
John Brennan; leadership training,
W. C. Robb of Maywood; activities,
Col. A. D. Rehm; Sea Scouting,
Commodore R. H. Piatt; cubbing, E.
L. Hebal; reading, Holland C. Pile;
ten-year program, E. J. Faltysek.
Members at large are; Harry L.
Judd, J. R. McGregor, H. J. Doh­
erty, Benjamin Barsema, W. F.
Sims and C. H. Strawbrldge of
River Forest, and Dr. E. F. Krauss
of Maywood.
District chairmen, who also sit on
the area board, are: J. L. Kirsch,
Oak Park; R. H. Quayle, River For­
est; R. J. McEvoy, Maywood, Bell­
wood, Broadview and Melrose Park;
Emery A. J'arichy, Forest Park;
Theodore E. Blehl, Elmwood Park,
Franklin Park and River Grove.
HELLO, SCOUTS AND SCOUTERS!
This column is run for the Proviso
District Boy Scouts of America.
Watch for this column each week
and learn more about your organi­
zation. Troops are encouraged to
send in items about the activities
LINCOLN P.-T. A.
in their respective troops. Appoint
The
Uincoln
Parent-Teacher asso­
a troop reporter and make him re­
sponsible for getting in your news ciation will conduct a filmdom fash­
items. All news should be addressed ion show and card party at 8:00 p.m.
to: Boy Scouts of America, Proviso o'clock, Friday, February 1. A door
District, Box 81, Maywood, Illinois.
prize of a fur scarf will be given.
THE NATIONAL JAMBOREE
Admission is 25c.
Aueust 21-.'!0, 163.)
Historian's Exhibit
at Proviso Opens at
3:30 Friday Afternoon
This is the week of the historical
exhibit at Proviso high school. The
Historians, newly organized U.S.
History club, is the sponsor and the
exhibit will be open to the public
Friday afternoon and evening from
3:30 until 9, Saturday from 2 to 9,
and Sunday from 2 to 6.
Club members have been busy
locating articles of historical inter­
est owned In the community and a
surprising collection of Interesting
and educational exhibits have been
gathered. The members feel, how­
ever, that there Is much material
that they have not uncovered and
are asking for help in making this
event as valuable as possible. If
anyone has material that tells a
story of the past, call Mr. Marshall
at the high school any afternoon or
evening and arrangements will be
made to pick up and display it to
the best advantage.
The firearms
exhibit which will
show the evolution from the earliest
type of flintlock down to the most
modern type of weapon and will be
complete and of the greatest his­
torical interest. It will go back well
over 200 years for its first exhibit
and will show weapons employing
every method of loading and firing
that the ingenuity of man has been
able to devise.
The purpose of the Historians is to
make this initial exhibit the fore­
runner of later ones on a still more
ambitious scale and lay the ground
for a permanent exhibit of histori­
cal objects to be housed in the high
school.
MEETINGS OF P.-T.A.'s
The Parent-Teacher organizations
of District No. 89, public schools,
will have a joint meeting on Feb­
ruary 11, in the Proviso high school.
Further details of this meeting will
appear in The Herald next week.
Republican Club Show at
Proviso Auditorium Soon
Paul Ash Enterprises will present
an all-star vaudeville revue Satur­
day and Sunday, at the Proviso
Township high school auditorium.
First avenue and Madison street,
under the auspices of the Eighth
District Regular Republican club.
Paul Ash Enterprises offer the
theatre going public of the West
Towns this newest 1935 festival of
fun as the big smashing hit of the
season. Featuring:
The Vandas Versatile Dancers
Carmen Camillo
Lois Tamm and Allen Child,
the two sweethearts.
The Dixiana Serenaders
LeRoy and Kenneth and Betty Anderson
and a host of other Stars.
Staged and Produced
by Percy Venable.
Two shows nightly, 7:30 and 9:30.
Tickets now on sale, and may be
procured from any Republican Pre­
cinct Committeempn, or at the door.
Admission, adults 50 cents; children,
25 cents.
Washington, D. C.
*'It is appropriate that we are planning
for the celebration of the Twenty-fifth
Anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America,
which will culminate in a great National
Jamboree here in the Nation's Capitol.
"I much hope that it wil be possible to
bave every nook and cranny, every section
of our nation, represented."
FRANKLIN FOOSEVELT.
<The above is a copy of the letter as It
appeared in '•Scouting.")
Proviso District will also celebrate
the Twenty-fifth anniversary of
Scouting in America by having a
banquet the evening of February 12.
Dr. Ray O. Wyland, of the National
Staff, will be here to speak to the
Scouts and Scouters. Watch for
full details in later issues of The
Herald. There have been millions
of boys who have been Scouts in the
past twenty-five years. We are
proud of the fact we belong and at
the above mentioned banquet Dr.
Wyland is going to take an impres­
sion back to the National headquar­
ters that Scouting here is equal to
any in the nation. Don't miss the
details concerning this great cele­
bration.
DID YOU KNOW?
That Scouting is the greatest
boys' work movement in America
and in the world—reaching 57 na­
tions, representing 91 per cent of
the world's population?
It is reaching more boys than all
the boys' work movements combined
—at least 3,500,000 since its organi­
zation. The Handbojjk for Boys is
stated to have had in these years a
larger circulation tlian any book.
It Is the greatest boys' crusade of
the century.
METHODISTS ORGANIZE TROOP
The Men's Club of the Neighbor­
hood M.E. church have organized a
troop of Scouts. Judge Geo. W.
Carr, president of the club, has ap­
pointed the troop committee con­
sisting of Ray D. Greger, chairman;
John C. Irwin, C. G. Karlson and
F. R. Shields. Harry Culbertson has
been appointed Scoutmaster and
Charles Culbertson, assistant Scout­
master. The following boys are
charter members: George Hillyer
John Irwin, Keith Irwin, Raymond
Parchmann, Paul Rice, Willard
Scheibbin, Donald Khlsttenthwalte,
Donald Kramer, Bruce Sidmore
Donald Hawkins, James Patasob
and James Parchmann. This is the
baby troop of the district and from
all indications will soon be giving
the "grown-up" troops a real chase.
TROOP 121, BELLWOOD
Troop 124, under Scoutmaster K.
A. Montag, are completing their reregistration for the new charter
year. This will be the second year
for the troop and from reports it
will be even a bigger year in ad­
vancement. At the time of the
Commissioner's visit last meeting
all were busy building bird houses
and getting ready for the return of
the feathered friends in the spring.
A Scout is kind to all wild life.
Will see you again next week,
Scouts.
Bruce W. Strong, of Oak Park,
vice president of the Rotary Club
and leader in civic affairs, was
elected president of the Oak Park
Area Council, Boy Scouts of Ameri­
ca, at its annual meeting Tuesday
night, at Grace Episcopal church.
Mr. Strong has the distinction of
being the first president of the local
council to come up from the ranks
of Scouting. He was a Boy Scout
in Indianapolis, rising to the office
of Patrol Leader, and later continu­
ing his Scouting in Flint, Mich. Mr.
Strong has served during the past
year on the Oak Park Area execu­
tive board as chairman of the ac­
tivities committee and is a troop
committeeman and member of a
Sea Scout ship committee.
Chairmen of standing committees
for the ensuing year are: Finance,
C. A. Willard; Court of Honor, E.
H. Bensler; health and saffety, Dr.
Gilbert E. Pond; camping, Roy J.
Hotchkiss; civic service, Gustaf
Lindberg;
educational
publicity,
Harry J. Springer; organization.
Washes seven pounds of clothes — effi­
ciently, safely. Lovell cushion roller is
adjustable to five convenient positions.
$2 DOWN—Only 69c a week
Liberal New Terms
on Electric Laundry Equipment
Accept this easy plan that will
save you time, labor and money.
# Now it is easier than ever to free yourself of the drudgery of the
weekly wash day. New, easy terms —$2 down, the balance for as
low as 69c a week, payable monthly on your Electric Service bill—gives
you the tremendous advantages of electric laundry equipment.
Ask about this purchase plan. Ask about Free Home Trial of washers
and ironers at your nearest Public Servicc Store.
Only $59.50
There's nothing too delicate, too diffi­
cult to iron on this Conlon. Sit in com­
fort, iron a whole day's washing—quickly,
easily, beautifully. Knee and fingertip
control.
$2 DOWN—Only 69c a week
Liberal allowance for your old washer toward purchase of several models of Thor washers
To cover interest and other costs, a someu hat higher price is charged
for appliances sold on deferred payments. To the prices quoted in
our advertisements, and marked on our merchandise, substantially
3% is to be added on account of additional tax expense.
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY
OF_ NORTHERH ILLINOIS
16
THE HERALD
Everybody is talking about' the
Oak Leaves Cooking School ami Better Homes Institute!
Good news spreads quickly, and this is really good news. The Western Suburbs are
going to have a cooking school that will be not only informative, but authoritative.
It will be conducted by a nationally known expert on home economics, and many
angles of this interesting subject will be discussed and demonstrated.
Under The Personal Direction of Dorothy Ayers Loudon
Mrs. Loudon's name will be familiar to readers of The Ladies' Home Journal and
The Woman's Home Companion for these magazines have carried many articles from
her pen. The valuable home making suggestions and new recipes that have won
her national prominence will make it well worth your time to attend each session of
the cooking school, to which there is no admission charge. Mrs. Loudon will bring
to you new ideas in home management, cookery, shopping, entertaining, and home
decoration. Plan now to attend each day, you may be sure that your friends will all
be there.
Valuable Prizes Given Every Day
Each day many baskets, loaded with all sorts of groceries will be given away. Be­
sides these there will be many other valuable prizes given at every session, and you
will have the opportunity to enter your name for the larger prizes, the value of which
is indicated by the fact that one of them will be a beautiful Grunow Refrigerator.
The Herald Readers Are Invited to Attend Every Session
JANUARY 30-31 AND FEBRUARY I
9:30 TO 11:30 A.M. EACH i>AY
LAMAR THEATRE
OAK PARK