FFINAL_NOVEMBER 11pm.indd - Heart and Stroke Foundation of

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FFINAL_NOVEMBER 11pm.indd - Heart and Stroke Foundation of
HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION OF ONTARIO
ANNUAL REPORT 2005
Rocco Rossi
CONTENTS
Rocco Rossi
Message from the CEO
1
Celebrating Excellence
16
The Difference: Excellence in Research
3 –4
Heartfelt Thanks
17
Prevention a Powerful Answer
6 – 11
Message from the Chair
19
Financial Review 2005
20 – 21
Volunteers & Donors are the Foundation 12 – 15
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
MESSAGE
from the CEO
It
is a little under a year since I joined the Heart and
care strategy. As a result, the Ontario Ministry of Health and
Stroke Foundation of Ontario and it’s a privilege to
Long-Term Care has committed to spending $30 million
work with so many dedicated and talented people.
a year to operate 26 stroke care centres in the province.
Throughout our organization, from researchers to volunteers
This Ontario Stroke System brings together all aspects of
to survivors and their families, there is a sense of shared
stroke care, including prevention and coordinated care from
goals. We are all in it together.
diagnosis to rehabilitation, and is truly a North American first.
Our mission is set out clearly before us — research,
The Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke
education and advocacy aimed at reducing the burden of
Recovery is a unique facility linking top stroke researchers
heart disease and stroke. And what the Foundation does
from the Ottawa Health Research Institute, Baycrest Centre
best, we do by making connections.
and Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences. It’s
For example, the Foundation is taking AIM (Area of
Investment in Mission) at high blood pressure. Only 16%
of Canadians with high blood pressure have it diagnosed
about making connections to create a whole that is greater
than the sum of its parts.
Of course, huge challenges remain. For example,
and under control. We are working with family physicians,
obesity threatens to remove years from the lifespan of
nurses and pharmacists to help reverse these shocking
our children. Between 1981 and 1996, overweight and
statistics.
obesity has tripled among Canadian children. The children
The Foundation has also recently created a vital
portrayed on the cover can and should be part of a
connection with the new Northern Ontario School of
generation that is largely free of heart disease and stroke,
Medicine. We will be an important partner, providing
but instead could be part of a generation that dies at a
scholarship support to students who will become the
younger age than their parents.
doctors of tomorrow.
Connections of a different sort saw the Foundation
The Foundation provides the vital sparks that fuel the
engine that delivers the research, the educational materials
playing a crucial role in Ontario’s milestone smoke-free
and the partnerships, provided we can maintain that
legislation. Thanks to our partnership with the Ontario Lung
critical connection to you — our donors, volunteers, staff,
Association, the Canadian Cancer Society (Ontario Division),
researchers and partners.
the Non-Smokers Rights Association, the Ontario Medical
Association and a courageous provincial government, we
Together I believe we will build a future of generations
free from heart disease and stroke.
are all breathing cleaner, healthier air.
Partnership with the provincial government also helped
the Foundation create the model for a comprehensive stroke
Rocco Rossi
Chief Executive Officer
Together I believe we will build a future of
generations free from heart disease and stroke.
Keeping our kids fit is shaping up to be a major challenge.
THE DIFFERENCE:
EXCELLENCE in RESEARCH
The past 12 months have given us another
year of remarkable achievement for the Heart
and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. We are
creating an entirely new model to help deal
with the province’s continuing problem
of high blood pressure. Our continued
advocacy of anti-smoking legislation finally
paid off, making the air in so many more
public places a whole lot healthier. This year
saw major expansion of the Ontario Stroke
System following the model established by
the Foundation. And, last but not least, our
researchers continued to uncover the root
causes of heart disease and stroke that lead to
new treatments and methods of prevention.
2005 has reaffirmed what we have long
known — that research, patient care, public
health policy and advocacy are intertwined
like strands of a thread. By connecting in this
way, we maximize the strength, flexibility and
insightful sense of purpose that we need to
fulfill our mission.
RESEARCH ADVANCING
AT AN UNPRECEDENTED RATE
The Heart and Stroke Foundation’s ongoing tradition of
supporting world-class science means today’s research
climate is producing advances at an unprecedented rate.
Since its inception, the Foundation has invested over
$500 million in life-saving research into heart disease
and stroke, currently funding more than 250 investigative
teams in hospitals, universities and research institutions across
the province. Here are some of the highlights.
THE MAGIC NUMBER IN
90% OF HEART ATTACKS
Heart and Stroke Foundation researcher, Dr. Salim Yusuf,
believes in looking at the big picture. Dr. Yusuf studied more
than 30,000 people in 52 countries, and has identified nine
risk factors that account for 90% of first heart attacks.
Smoking, abnormal blood lipids, high blood pressure,
diabetes, abdominal obesity, stress, poor consumption of fruit
and vegetables, alcohol intake and lack of exercise are the
important risk factors, says Dr. Yusuf. His research could
lead to a uniform strategy for preventing heart attacks
— regardless of age, sex, race or geographic region.
RESEARCH GETTING KIDS ATTENTION
— ONLINE
One in four Canadian children is now either overweight
or obese. Many are being diagnosed with “grown up”
illnesses like atherosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries), and
hypertension. Heart and Stroke Foundation investigator,
Dr. Gary Goldfield and his team in Ottawa are tackling this
problem with a behaviour modification approach using
the Internet to counsel kids about healthier lifestyles.
This approach targets kids where many of them live these
days — in front of the computer — and is designed to
transform their unhealthy behaviours and attitudes
into healthier ones.
3
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
THE DIFFERENCE:
EXCELLENCE in RESEARCH
con’t.
STROKE REHABILITATION IN 3D
ONTARIO A WORLD PLAYER
The future of stroke rehabilitation is today’s reality at the
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario researchers excel
Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery
when compared with the USA, Japan, UK, France, Italy,
(HSFCSR). Patients are testing a virtual reality data glove
Germany and Canada. A recent international analysis
which creates a computerized 3D image of the hand.
of heart and stroke research ranked Heart and Stroke
Moving the images provided by the glove is helping
Foundation of Ontario scientists as global leaders in
patients regain manual function. And in another futuristic
several crucial research areas including cardiovascular
development, patients are wearing the Life Shirt, which
and neurological medicine.
monitors heart rate and anxiety levels.
“The Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for
Stroke Recovery is the first organization of this
approach is the next revolution in the field of
KEEPING OUR
PROMISE TO THE
NEXT GENERATION
stroke, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation
Ten years ago, Emily LaRose
kind. They unite different medical disciplines
in the quest to transform stroke discovery. This
Centre for Stroke Recovery is leading the
was born with a heart condition
charge, serving as a beacon for the global stroke
that prevented blood and
community. The core of Scientists, Clinicians
oxygen from getting to her
and Clinician-Scientists in the Centre of Stroke
heart. She was small and
Recovery is unsurpassed.”
blue, and her prognosis was
Dr. Steven C. Cramer
not good. But today, thanks to
University of California, Irvine
Emily LaRose
donations to Heart and Stroke Foundation research, Emily
External Scientific Advisory Board
is a healthy, happy-go-lucky little girl. We’ve come a long
Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre
way in treating congenital heart conditions like Emily’s,
for Stroke Recovery
and now after two open-heart surgeries, she leads a
pretty normal life.
THE ANSWERS ARE IN YOU. HELP US REACH OUR GOALS.
SUPPORT VITAL RESEARCH. VISIT www.heartandstroke.ca
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
4
PREVENTION
a POWERFUL ANSWER
In 2002, 74,626 Canadians died from heart disease and
TAKING THE MESSAGE
INTO OUR SCHOOLS
stroke. Heart disease and stroke combined are the most
Educating children about the importance of living a heart-
common cause of death and hospitalization. One in
healthy life is the best hope of preventing heart disease
three deaths and almost one out of every five days of hospital
and stroke in the next generation. Every year, through our
care in this country are attributed to heart disease and stroke.
Heart&Stroke Jump Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart
Almost 40% of us will develop heart disease and stroke over
programs, we show over 500,000 Ontario students and
our lifetime. So in one way or another, these diseases will
their parents that physical activity is good for their heart
touch us all.
health. They also learn that by raising funds for vital research,
THE SCOPE OF THE PROBLEM
• 1.3 million have some form of heart disease
they are helping to improve the heart health of their families
• About 300,000 are living with the effects of stroke
and their whole community.
It is estimated that each year there may be:
• Between 70,000 to 75,000 heart attacks
MAKING A MOVE
ON HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
• 50,000 strokes and “mini-strokes” (transient
Over 40% of Canadians are unaware they have high blood
pressure — the leading risk factor for stroke and a major risk
ischemic attacks)
HEALTH EDUCATION AND PREVENTION
— A WEALTH OF RESOURCES
The best approach to heart disease and stroke is to stop
them before they start. Our free healthy living materials are
helping Canadians to do just that. Whether it’s achieving and
maintaining a healthy weight, controlling high blood pressure,
enjoying a healthier diet or becoming physically active, we
have the tools needed to reach these goals. With numerous
print resources available, plus a comprehensive Web site and
free monthly e-newsletter there’s expert help and guidance
for everyone. It’s all available at www.heartandstroke.ca
or 1.888.HSF.INFO (473.4636).
factor for heart disease. To get to the heart of the matter, the
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario High Blood Pressure
Strategy has been developed to encourage individuals to get
their blood pressure checked regularly and to start making
lifestyle changes that make a difference. The Foundation is
partnering with the Ontario College of Family Physicians, the
Ontario Pharmacists Association and the Registered Nurses
Association of Ontario.
The Foundation created the Heart&Stroke Blood Pressure
Action PlanTM — an interactive online health tool that provides
a personal risk profile including risk factors and tips on
controlling blood pressure. The Action Plan has been met with
enormous success — with over 81,000 Ontarians visiting the
site, 99% of whom completed a risk assessment and received
a personalized health action plan tailored to their needs.
www.heartandstroke.ca/bloodpressure
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
6
BATTLING OBESITY
Obesity is a growing problem in this country — and with almost
60% of Canadians overweight or obese, it now poses one of the
biggest public health threats we have ever faced. The Heart and
Stroke Foundation is tackling this problem head on by funding
obesity-related research, helping develop and support effective
policies to prevent obesity by focusing on nutrition and physical
activity, and supporting public health initiatives.
In 2005, the Active Healthy Kids
Canada Report Card gave Canada
a D when it comes to keeping our
kids physically active. Almost 26%
of our children and adolescents are
overweight or obese. To reduce the
epidemic of inactivity and obesity among our children, the
Heart and Stroke Foundation is working to get and keep kids
active for life. Through exercise-based in-school fund raising
programs like Heart&Stroke Jump Rope for Heart, our food
labeling and nutrition information initiatives and our ongoing
public education efforts, we are making important strides
in getting kids — and adults — on the road to more active,
healthier lifestyles and better heart health.
Jumping for Heart
Jade Morash (left), Melissa Morrow (right)
Anne Hathaway Public School
PREVENTION
a POWERFUL ANSWER con’t.
YOUR ADVOCATE FOR CHANGE
STROKE CARE – BETTER THAN EVER
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario speaks out for
50,000 strokes occur each year in Canada and almost
the hundreds of thousands of Canadians affected by heart
16,000 Canadians die from stroke. With the creation of the
disease and stroke. The Foundation has a long and successful
Coordinated Stroke Strategy, the Foundation played a
history of working with government and health officials to
leadership role in developing a model of stroke care
bring about public policy change to improve Canadians’
to ensure Ontarians have access to the best stroke
heart health.
care possible. Through the Heart and Stroke Foundation of
LEGISLATING TOBACCO OUT OF OUR AIR
As a long-time advocate for change to tobacco legislation,
we continue to be instrumental in leading public education
campaigns to build support for smoke-free legislation and
establishing partnerships with government and health
Long Term Care announced a $30 million annual commitment
to support Regional and District Stroke Centres, Secondary
Prevention Clinics, public awareness and stroke prevention
programs. Ontario is now an international leader in stroke
care and the Foundation plays a key role in supporting the
officials. The Foundation has been involved in key areas
of tobacco control issues including tobacco-related pricing,
labeling, advertising and sponsorship. With the passage of the
Smoke Free Ontario Act in June 2005, Ontario now boasts
the most comprehensive anti-smoking laws in North America.
ELIMINATING THE TRANS FAT FACTOR
Scientific evidence shows that trans fat increases the
incidence of coronary heart disease. In fact, there is no
known safe level of trans fat consumption. While Canadians
are becoming increasingly aware of the heart-health risks
associated with trans fat, our consumption of trans fat is
one of the highest in the world. This highlights the need
for ongoing advocacy efforts. The Heart and Stroke
Foundation of Canada co-chairs a multi-stakeholder
Trans Fat Task Force that brings together government,
health professionals, NGOs, and industry to reduce
trans fat in Canada’s food supply to the lowest
possible levels.
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
Ontario’s advocacy efforts, the provincial Ministry of Health and
8
implementation of best practice stroke care and professional
education. In addition, a highly successful public awareness
campaign was launched in partnership with the government
of Ontario to improve recognition and response to stroke
warning signs.
From left to right:
Dr. Amit Shah, St. Thomas General Hospital Emergency Department
Jake Fehr, Paramedic with Emergency Services
Sue Langley, Stroke Survivor
Photo courtesy of the Southwestern Ontario Stroke Strategy
PREVENTION
a POWERFUL ANSWER con’t.
THE FOUNDATION
OF YOUR COMMUNITY
•
Ethnic community engagement through delivery
of targeted health information resources and local
At the Heart and Stroke Foundation, we believe that the
health symposia
family and the community are twin pillars in maintaining
•
Championing enhanced stroke care prevention,
health. In an ideal world, prevention of heart disease and
treatment and care in designated Regional and
stroke would be the best treatment of all. The Foundation
District Stroke Centres and Prevention Clinics
is doing all it can to get us there.
•
A vital source of health information, the Foundation’s
Annual Heart&Stroke Clinical Update: doctors
and health care professionals from Ontario and
research leadership allows us to deliver leading edge
beyond take home the latest findings and
information about heart disease and stroke to you and
recommendations on heart disease and stroke to
your healthcare professional, sooner. We’re at work in
apply in their communities
your community building healthier hearts and lives.
•
Annual Stroke Collaborative: hundreds of stroke
With 32 area offices across the province, the Heart and
clinicians, educators and administrators from
Stroke Foundation of Ontario is ready to help you get the
communities across the province gather to share the
support you need. Here are some of the many ways we are
making connections that put heart health as a priority for
latest innovations in stroke care
•
communities across Ontario:
stroke risk factors, conditions, treatments and more
•
•
Life-saving CPR training programs
•
Health CheckTM food information program that
makes choosing healthy foods easier
•
Comprehensive Web site for heart disease and
Free monthly e-newsletter Heart&Stroke
[email protected] with the latest information and help in
adopting a healthy lifestyle for you and your family
www.heartandstroke.ca/subscribe
Health education community presentations and
symposia — in hospitals, schools, businesses and
community associations
•
Working collaboratively with local heart health
networks, health industry partners and professionals
GET INVOLVED IN HELPING US BUILD HEALTHIER COMMUNITIES.
CALL OR VISIT YOUR LOCAL HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION
OFFICE AND ASK HOW YOU CAN HELP.
VISIT www.heartandstroke.on.ca TO FIND THE OFFICE NEAREST YOU.
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
10
VOLUNTEERS & DONORS
ARE the FOUNDATION
CANVASSING IS A FAMILY AFFAIR
FOR THESE VOLUNTEERS
A REMARKABLE VOLUNTEER
Canvassing for the Heart and Stroke Foundation is a family
the last 13 years smashing records. As a participant in the 50km
affair for the Stroud family of Windsor. Each February
Becel Heart&Stroke Ride for Heart, one of the Foundation’s
homemaker Beth Stroud puts on her boots, gloves, and
most important fund raising events, Brooks has become the
“something to keep my ears from falling off” and canvasses
stuff of which legends are made. Over 12 years he has raised
door to door. And when Mom heads off to brave the icy
more than $250,000 in pledges. Now Bob Brooks is retiring
sidewalks, Jonathon and Jennifer — students at the University
from the Ride for Heart. His sponsors knew it was his last ride,
of Windsor — know they will not be far behind. “I slot the
so they helped him break his own annual record by raising
kids in wherever they’re needed,” says Stroud who as a zone
$55,289.33. He says he’s passing his sponsor list on to his
officer is responsible for over 100 canvassers. Husband,
son, Ian, who has been a rider for the last 3 years. And so the
Michael, works for the federal government and cannot make
“Brooks tradition” continues. Our heartfelt thanks to you, Bob,
time to do intensive canvassing. But he’s always there to
for being such a valued Foundation volunteer these past 13
drive Beth and the kids wherever necessary, pick them up at
years. Hats off to you — and, go Ian!
A leading Canadian investment banker, Bob Brooks has spent
the end of a hard evening’s work, and pitch in delivering or
picking up canvasser kits. “He also makes a great mug of hot
chocolate,” says Beth Stroud. She has been canvassing for
over 20 years now. It all began when her late father-in-law
had a heart attack. “That’s how I got involved. I wanted to
help out in some way,” says Beth Stroud. “Now it’s a family
tradition — one we are all really proud of.”
Bob Brooks and son Ian
Beth Stroud
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
12
PROFESSIONALS BRING FINANCIAL
EXPERTISE TO $25 MILLION CAMPAIGN
A GENEROUS PHILANTHROPIST
Volunteer leaders have important roles to play at the
firm, has many philanthropic interests, but became interested
Foundation, and no one knows that better than Ned
in heart health after his father suffered two heart attacks.
Goodman, Donald Lenz and Wilfred Posluns. The same
J R Kingsley Ward, President of VRG Capital, a financial service
Witnessing his father’s recovery fueled Kingsley’s interest
dedication and passion that established them as leaders in
in the Foundation’s mission. He was a lead volunteer for the
business also uniquely qualify them to guide the $25 million
Black and White Polo Ball, a themed event in support of the
“A Mind To Give” campaign in support of the Heart and Stroke
Foundation, serving as Co-chair for five years.
Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery (HSFCSR).
Wilfred Posluns is Managing Director of Cedarpoint
Kingsley’s bond with the Foundation remains strong.
This year, he made a substantial stock gift. He did so knowing
Investments. He has a strong philanthropic heritage, and has
the value of his stocks will directly support heart and stroke
served with organizations like the Jewish Community Centre
research and that a stock transfer is a straightforward
of Toronto. He is currently Chairman of the Board for Baycrest,
donation method.
an HSFCSR partner institution.
Ned Goodman is CEO of Dundee Corp. In 1999, he and
his wife, Anita, founded the Goodman Institute of Investment
Management at Concordia University. He has been a
committed volunteer to many organizations.
Don Lenz is Managing Director at Newport Partners, and
has also lent his support to several charitable organizations,
recently serving as a Director of Cancer Care Ontario.
Posluns, Goodman and Lenz know that the Heart and
stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery is on the verge
J R Kingsley Ward
of breakthrough discoveries. In this $25 million campaign,
success is the only option.
Ned Goodman
Wilfred Posluns
Don Lenz
PLANNED GIVING IS A SMART WAY TO CREATE A LEGACY OF GIVING AND
MAKE A DIFFERENCE. VISIT www.heartandstroke.ca/onplannedgiving
Nika Rolczewski, Toronto, walking in the Cheerios Heart&Stroke Mother Daughter Walk,
on the 4 month anniversary of losing her mother to heart disease, with Rocco Rossi, CEO
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
14
VOLUNTEERS & DONORS
ARE the FOUNDATION
con’t.
THE HEART OF A WARRIOR
“I am not Tour de France material
MEDIA WITH HEART
— GETTING THE MESSAGE OUT
but I am a weekend warrior,”
Getting important health and prevention messages out to
says Denys Calvin, who set a
millions of Canadians is something the Foundation simply
brilliant pace in the 2005 Becel
cannot do on its own. But, when you have the strength
Heart&Stroke Ride for Heart. He
of Canada’s largest media conglomerates behind you,
describes the Ride as a wonderful
it can make all the difference. In 2005, Standard Radio,
event, a great cause, and lots of
Alliance Atlantis and CanWest Mediaworks stepped up
fun. Calvin, 45, a managing director
to provide over $2 million dollars worth of radio and
of Equity Capital Markets for TD
TV airtime to promote our cause. Standard Radio
Securities, says that although there
is also the distinguished recipient of the Heart and
is no significant history of heart
Stroke Foundation of Ontario Corporate Excellence
disease or stroke in his family,
Denys Calvin
Award for their nearly decade-long support of the
it is the excellence of the event
Becel Heart&Stroke Ride for Heart and the Cheerios
that grabs him. His teenage kids — daughter and son — are
Heart&Stroke Mother Daughter Walk.
“mildly bemused” by their father’s passion for the Ride.
Last year, Calvin encouraged his sponsors to increase their
contributions if he could do the 75 kilometre course at
an average 28km per hour. In fact he did it at 32km per
hour and raised over $33,487 from 186 supporters for the
Foundation. This year, Calvin worked with an anonymous
sponsor. “I raised $52,000 and the sponsor kicked in
$45,000.” That’s $97,000! Heartfelt thanks from the
Foundation!
HARRY AND JOYCE
DEVOTED TO MAKING A DIFFERENCE
Harry and Joyce are a devoted couple who recently celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary. But, nine years ago, Harry
was struck with an unexpected heart attack.
Fortunately, Harry made a full recovery, but it
compelled him to think about the future of their estate.
Harry and Joyce already supported the Foundation’s lifesaving work, but they wanted to do more.
They named the Foundation as the owner and beneficiary
of their life insurance policy. Harry and Joyce know that their
support will continue to benefit the work of the Foundation,
even after they’re gone. In the meantime, they receive tax
receipts for their premium payments, which translate into
tax savings.
Harry and Joyce
CELEBRATING
EXCELLENCE
HEART&STROKE AWARD
FOR VOLUNTEER EXCELLENCE
TONY GRAHAM AWARD
FOR EXCELLENCE IN BOARD SERVICE
Presented to volunteers with at least five years of service, who
Honouring outstanding achievement and performance by
demonstrate vision and strategic ability, add value through
a member of the Foundation Board of Directors.
leadership excellence, deliver on commitments and contribute
Elaine Roper
high quality results, are proud advocates of the Foundation’s
mission, and work to heighten the Foundation’s profile
DOUG SHEPPARD CHAPTER AWARD
Presented to the Chapter that achieves the highest per cent
through delivery of mission-related activities.
increase in revenue over the previous year.
Jill Maslanka, Mississauga Chapter, Central West Region
Blind River Chapter, Ontaro North Region
Al Hockin, Orillia Chapter, Ontario North Region
MARTY ROTHSTEIN AWARD
FOR INNOVATION
BOB LUBA AWARD FOR
EMPLOYEE EXCELLENCE
Recognizing volunteers or staff (individual or team) who
Recognizing a staff member who furthers the mission by
develop and/or implement an innovative idea that increases
making an exceptional contribution that has meaningful
impact on revenue growth, quality, innovation, productivity
or people.
the Foundation’s profile in the community and furthers the
Foundation mission.
The Heart&Stroke Lottery Team
Kari Flannery, Regional Manager, Central West Region
HEART&STROKE AWARD FOR
CORPORATE EXCELLENCE (PROVINCIAL )
Recognizing corporations that significantly promote the mission
of the Foundation, increase awareness of the Foundation in
the community, and generate third-party revenue.
RICK GALLOP AWARD FOR
PIONEERING LEADERSHIP
Recognizing pioneering leadership in the development and
execution of an idea/project that results in positive long-term
impact and significance for the Foundation
The Vision 2020 Research Task Force and Staff
BMO Fountain of Hope Employees’ Foundation
Implementation Team
Desjardins Financial Security
Standard Radio Stations
Mackenzie Financial Charitable Foundation
LUC VANNESTE AWARD FOR VOLUNTEER
& STAFF TEAMS (PROVINCIAL)
Honouring exemplary achievement by an area office
volunteer and staff team in the areas of revenue growth, cost
control, volunteer and community development, innovation
and teamwork.
Brampton Area Office
Darryl Sittler and Bayer executives present a
$81,000 cheque to Rocco Rossi, CEO, Heart and
Stroke Foundation of Ontario, June 1, 2005
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
16
HEARTFELT
THANKS
CORPORATE SUPPORTERS
The Heart and Stroke Foundation
of Ontario would like to thank the
following corporations for their
commitment to the health and wellbeing of Ontarians.
3M Canada Company ECCO
ACNielsen Company of Canada
AstraZeneca Canada Inc.
Bayer Inc.
Bell Canada, Employee Giving Program
BioBake Inc.
BMO Fountain of Hope, Employees’
Foundation
Boston Pizza
Cadbury Schweppes (Welch’s)
Canadian Egg Marketing Agency
Canadian Tire Corp
CNC Global Inc.
CIBC
Contract Furniture Source
Desjardins Financial Security
Dofasco Inc.
Fortinos
Gallo Wines
General Mills Canada Corporation (Cheerios)
GoodLife Fitness Clubs
IBM Charitable Fund
Industrial Alliance
John Deere Foundation of Canada Inc.
JSI Data Systems Ltd
Juve Jesus & CIBC World Markets
KPMG
Loblaw Brands Limited
Mackenzie Financial Charitable
Foundation
Mandarin Charitable Foundation
Munich Re Canada
Nexinnovations
Ontario Produce Marketing Association
OPG Employees’ & Pensioners’ Charity Trust
ORIMS
Pete’s Tofu
Petro Canada
Pfizer Canada Inc.
Pinto Memorial Concert
RBC Foundation
sanofi-aventis
Scotiabank
Sears Employee Charitable Fund
Sprint Canada
Sunstar Butler
Swarovski Canada
TD Bank Financial Group
Telus
The Catherine and Maxwell Meighen
Foundation
Torys LLP
Unilever Canada (Becel)
Weight Watchers
Winners Merchants International
Woodington Lake Golf Club
MEDIA PARTNERS
1460 CJOY/Magic 106.1
570 News
96.7 CHYM FM
97.3 EZ Rock
Alliance Atlantis
Brampton Guardian
Canada.com
CanWest Media Works
Global TV
Chatelaine
107.5 DAVE FM
KICX FM 106.7
Kitchener-Waterloo Record
Metro Toronto News
National Post
Now Magazine
ONESTOP Media Group
Outdoor Broadcast Network
Pedal Magazine
Rogers Television
Standard Radio Stations
Mix 99.9
Newstalk 1010 CFRB
The Chronicle Journal
Toro Magazine
Wave 94.7 FM
Viacom
Zoom Media
LEADERSHIP DONORS 2005
We would like to thank all our donors
of 2005, who have all helped us
advance our mission. A special thanks
to these donors ($4,000 and up) who
have shown philanthropic leadership.*
Frank Anderson
Kathryn Balls
The Carol and Howard Bernick
Supporting Foundation — In support
of the “ Irwin Bernick Summer Medical
Student Scholarship
R. W. Cousins
Larry Daiter
Mary L. Dickinson
Andrew Faas
Lilojean Frid
Jack Kay
Mr and Mrs John Knebel
Ferne Ledgett
Robert Luba
Brent Maxwell
Margaret Isobel McDonald
Daniel and Cindy McPhee
Peter Misek
Floyd and Sharon Misner
Helen A. Nash
Rocco and Rhonnie Rossi
Brian Thomson
Ted Velikonja
Kingsley Ward
*This list reflects our most generous individual donors of 2005. Every effort has been made to achieve accuracy and to respect each donor’s
preference regarding anonymity. To make enquiries or corrections, please contact Janet Grant in the Major Gifts, Stewardship office at
(416) 489.7111 x 397 or [email protected]
BOARD
of DIRECTORS
Elaine Roper
Barry Cracower
Ross Feldman, M.D.
Alastair Ferguson Ph.D.
David Garland, C.A.
Paul Hines, C.A.
Michael LeClair
Dianne Mathieu
Margaret Rand, Ph.D.
Allan Reynolds
Ned Wootton
Anthony Graham, M.D.
Honorary Director
Photos not available for Directors: Guy Beaudin, Ph.D., Gillian Kerr, Ph.D., Gordon Moe, M.D.
HONORARY PATRON
The Honourable James K. Bartleman, O. Ont., Lieutenant Governor of Ontario
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Rocco Rossi
FOUNDATION SECRETARY
Pauline Wijeyesekera
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
18
MESSAGE
from the CHAIR
A
s Chair of the Board and
President of the Heart
and Stroke Foundation of
• Fund raising expertise and ability to respond to a
fast-changing marketplace
• Thorough knowledge of marketplace positioning,
Ontario, I am proud to have the
brand management and public relations strategy
opportunity to work with such a
The Board is supported by leadership volunteers
diverse collection of minds and
skills devoted to a common cause.
Effective stewardship and good
fiscal governance of the Foundation is a goal shared by
all board members. Sound management is the force that
powers the development of new treatments for heart
disease and stroke.
The men and women who comprise our Board are
individuals who bring critical expertise and experience to
the governance, policy and strategy setting requirements of
serving on five Board Committees. In addition, there
are also over 70 local community Chapter Councils.
Collectively these volunteers bring a wide range of
expertise and experience to the Foundation. This range
of talent and diversity of experience, devoted to
sustaining the fiscal health of the Foundation, ensures
that today’s heritage of research and innovation will
continue to evolve in the decades to come.
Frank Anderson
the Foundation. Here are some of the areas of expertise that
lead the Foundation’s business agenda:
• In-depth knowledge of corporate financial planning
and accounting principles to maintain the fiduciary
responsibility of the Foundation
• Business management acumen to leverage assets in
support of enhanced organizational productivity
• Broad-based knowledge of current and emerging
directions in research, diagnosis, treatment and
prevention of heart disease and stroke
• Experience in health promotion practices and
policy development
• Experience in healthcare management
Chair of the Board and President
FINANCIAL
review 2005
Statement of Revenue and Expenditures for the years
Statement of Financial Position as at August 31
ended August 31 (in thousands of dollars)
(in thousands of dollars)
2005
REVENUE
Fund raising revenue
Community-based programs
Bequests and major gifts
Direct marketing
Memorial gifts
2004
27,233
10,335
8,855
6,169
27,371
8,957
9,221
6,154
1,684
54,276
8,843
1,640
53,343
8,777
Net fund raising revenue before lotteries 45,433
Net proceeds of lotteries
18,282
44,566
11,244
63,715
55,810
4,099
12,809
16,908
11,286
1,641
12,927
80,623
68,737
13,076
2,394
15,470
11,697
2,094
13,791
65,153
54,946
34,669
20,056
32,341
18,658
54,725
50,999
10,428
3,947
Corporate sponsorship and other
Less: Direct program costs
NET FUND RAISING REVENUE
Other Income
Realized
Unrealized
OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Fund raising
Administration
NET REVENUE BEFORE
MISSION EXPENDITURES
MISSION EXPENDITURES
Research
Health promotion and community
programs
EXCESS OF REVENUE OVER
EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Accounts receivable
Prepaid expenses and deposits
Inventory
Investments, at market
Endowment funds
Property and equipment
2005
2004
38,903
1,918
1,232
650
42,703
35,117
1,136
1,800
935
38,988
72,961 63,580
297
297
210
245
116,171 103,110
LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 7,430
Research grants and awards payable
32,600
40,030
Deferred contributions
Research grants and awards payable
NET ASSETS
Internally restricted
Unrestricted
Restricted for endowment purposes
Invested in property and equipment
6,782
28,809
35,591
966
3,245
44,241
1,909
4,108
41,608
45,089
26,334
297
210
71,930
47,525
13,435
297
245
61,502
116,171
103,110
Year 2005: Per Cent of MIssion
and Operating Expenditures
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario:
• is the largest non-government funder of heart and stroke
research in Ontario, funding over 250 research teams that
operate in hospitals and universities across the province
• provides millions of Ontarians with information on how to
prevent or manage heart disease and stroke
• has increased its research spending to $35 million annually,
maintaining its position as a national and global leader in
heart and stroke research
Research
49%
Health
Promotion/
Community
Programs
29%
Fund Raising/
Administration*
22 %
*3% represents
administration costs
ABOUT
The data on the opposite page has been extracted and summarized
from the Audited Financial Statements. A complete set of financial
statements is available upon request from the Finance Department
the ANNUAL REPORT
(416.489.7111 ext. 477). Business number 10747-2839-RR0001
HOW IS IT PREPARED?
HOW ARE NON-MISSION RELATED COSTS PRESENTED?
The Annual Report’s financial information is extracted
The Foundation presents non-mission costs in three expense
and summarized from the Foundation’s Audited Financial
categories in its Statement of Revenue and Expenditures:
Statements. These Audited Financial Statements have
direct program costs, fund raising costs and administration.
been prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted
Direct program costs are expenses directly attributable to
Accounting Principles (GAAP), and are audited by the firm,
generating fund raising revenue. In the Audited Financial
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. The Auditors review this Annual
Statements and in this Report, these costs are deducted
Report for consistency with the Audited Financial Statements.
from gross fund raising revenue. Fund raising costs include
They also review the Foundation’s annual Registered Charity
operating and salary costs related to fund raising, but not
Information Return that is filed with Canada Revenue
specifically attributable to a fund raising program.
Agency (CRA).
Administration costs include all other costs that are not
WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR OVERSEEING
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT?
related to fund raising or direct program costs.
The Foundation’s Board of Directors is comprised of community
DOES THE FOUNDATION FILE STATEMENTS
WITH CANADA REVENUE AGENCY (CRA)?
volunteers with extensive financial, business and health
Yes, the Foundation files with CRA, and the Auditors review
expertise. Through its Finance & Investment Committee, the
this annual Charity Information Return. For filing purposes,
Board is responsible for overseeing management’s preparation
CRA requires Lottery revenue to be reported on a gross basis.
of the financial statements, and ensuring that financial and
This differs from the Audited Financial Statements and this
operational controls are in place. The Audit Committee works
Report where Lottery revenue is reported on a net basis.
with the external Auditors in reviewing the financial statements.
The Foundation also performs rotating internal reviews of
WHY ARE CERTAIN FUNDS RESERVED?
financial and operational controls throughout the year.
A portion of Net Assets is set aside to fund future specific
WHY IS LOTTERY REVENUE DIFFERENT
FROM CHARITABLE REVENUE?
research awards. Funds are internally restricted to secure support
Lottery tickets are not tax deductible in accordance with
CRA policies. Charitable organizations are prohibited from
priorities identified and approved by the Board on multi-year
for future multi-year initiatives. The Foundation also reserves
funds to protect itself against unforeseen financial events.
issuing tax receipts for lottery tickets. Lotteries differ from
WHAT IS UNREALIZED OTHER INCOME?
conventional fund raising programs, due to the scope of the
In advance of emerging accounting recommendations, the
prize pool and marketing activities required. On average,
Foundation records investments at market value and reflects
one-quarter to one-third of ticket sales go to support mission
changes in the portfolio value as unrealized other income.
activities. The Lottery has enabled the Foundation to generate
The market value of the investment portfolio is subject to
over $110 million in net revenue over the past nine years to
ongoing market fluctuations. As a result of favourable market
support research initiatives and community health programs.
conditions, this year’s unrealized market appreciation of
In the Audited Financial Statements and in this Report, Lottery
$12.8 million is greater than the entire excess of revenue over
revenues are reported as net proceeds, consistent with the
expenditures during the current year.
presentation by other charitable organizatons.
21
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005
MISSION
STATEMENT
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario is a community-based volunteer organization
whose mission is to reduce the risk of premature death and disability from heart disease
and stroke by raising funds for research and health promotion.
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
WHERE WE ARE
Rocco Rossi
Central Ontario
Ontario North
VICE PRESIDENTS
Durham Region
Barrie
Helen Bozinovski
Newmarket
North Bay
People Resources
Toronto (3 locations)
Peterborough
York Region South
Sault Ste. Marie
Central West
Sudbury
Kasia Czarski
Marketing & Health Information Service
David Johnston
Community & Donor Programs
Brampton
Thunder Bay
Brantford
Timmins
Guelph
Ontario West
Laura Syron
Halton Region
Chatham — Kent
Research, Advocacy & Health Promotion
Hamilton
London
Bill Thomas
Kitchener
Owen Sound
Chief Financial Officer, Finance,
Mississauga
Sarnia
Niagara District
Stratford
Ontario East
Windsor
Systems and Business Solutions
HEART AND STROKE
FOUNDATION OF ONTARIO
Belleville
Brockville
Cornwall
1920 Yonge Street, 4th Floor
Kingston
Toronto, Ontario M4S 3E2
Ottawa
Telephone: 416.489.7100
Fax: 416.489.6885
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.heartandstroke.ca
www.fmcoeur.ca
Business number 10747 2839 RR0001
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario prides itself on making every dollar count.
We make sure that every time you sponsor an event participant, give at the door, or make
a memorial donation, your money fuels the very best research and health education.
Your support contributes to a greater understanding of the root causes of heart disease
and stroke, which results in better diagnoses, treatment and prevention.
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Annual Report 2005