congratulations! - the Ceramic Arts Association of WA Inc.

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congratulations! - the Ceramic Arts Association of WA Inc.
PYRE
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
President’s
Report
CAAWA president
Cher Shackleton reviews
recent developments in
the WA world of
ceramics.
1
CAAWA
Happenings
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Graham Hay
Sandra Black
Njalikwa Chongwe
Ruby Neevay
AGM
Study Group
Selective Exhibition
Classes
2
CONGRATULATIONS!
POTOBER
2012
POTOBER 2012 is almost
upon us!
Have you registered yet?
5TH
6TH
3
7TH
and
OCTOBER
2012 @ Central Institute of
Technology
www.ceramicartswa.asn.au
CAAWA Selective Exhibition
2012
2012 Kusnik Award winner Alison Brown
pictured above with her winning work
at the ZigZag Gallery, Kalamunda.
Continued on page 11
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
President’s Report
Well so many things have happened since the last PYRE I hardly
know where to start.
The selective exhibition this year was hosted by the ZigZag
Gallery in Kalamunda. Congratulations to Alison Brown who
was this year's Kusnik Award recipient, and to Mary Wallace
who received the Judge’s award. Dr Ric Spencer, this year’s
selector, awarded five Highly Commended awards. Next year
the members’ exhibition returns to Heathcote Gallery, but at
the earlier time of April. A submission has also been accepted
at the Lawrence Wilson Gallery for an exhibition in 2014, titled
Here and Now. It will be a look at cutting edge ceramic artists.
An invitation to present a submission will go out to ceramic
artists in the next few months.
At the recent AGM the outgoing committee was thanked,
Marie Owens and Lynne Carlin, and the incoming committee
welcomed, with new comers Rosemary Schoen and Jackie
Masters. Jackie has taken up the challenge of the
memberships and Natalie Acton is PYRE's new Editor. The
meeting was followed by a slide presentation and talk by Dr
Stefano Carboni, Director of the WA Art Gallery. The subject
was Islamic ceramics. Images from the MoMA, of 12th century
functional ware adorned with calligraphy lit up the screen.
These are now so highly prized. Sadly 21st century potters have
a long wait to achieve such a status!
The next study group will be on the 20th of September at ECU
with an Ikebana artist Ursula Pagels giving a demonstration
and discussing the types of containers preferred for their floral
arrangements. Not to be missed.
POTober registrations are looking very good and all is on track.
It is almost here!
Welcome to our new editor, enjoy the PYRE.
Cher Shackleton
www.shackletongallery.com
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AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
AGM
CAAWA’s 2012 AGM saw the farewell of committee
members Marie Owens and Lynne Carlin, as well as
the welcoming of new committee members Jackie
Masters and Rosemary Schoen.
A reshuffling of the CAAWA committee for 2012 sees
Njalikwa Chongwe take on the role of Vice President,
Jackie Masters take on the Membership portfolio and
Natalie Acton appointed to the role of PYRE editor.
Thank you also to Janis Heston who has taken on the
position of Social Coordinator and provided delicious
refreshments on the night! The CAAWA committee
now consists of eleven members for the 2012/2013
period.
We were fortunate enough to have guest speaker
Stefano Carboni present a fascinating lecture on
Islamic ceramics. A topic in which he is well versed
after spending sixteen years as Curator and
Administrator in the Department of Islamic Art at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Bowl with cobalt-blue
inscription
Probably Basra (Iraq), 9th
century
Earthenware painted in blue
over an opaque tin-white glaze
Diameter 20.3cm
The Metropolitan Museum of
Art, Harris Brisbane Dick Fund,
1963;
Inv. No. 63.159.4
STEFANO CARBONI
In 2008 Stefano Carboni was appointed as the 11th director
of the Art Gallery of WA. He comes to us after a 16 year
long post as the curator for Islamic art at New York’s
Metropolitan Meuseum.
Originally from Venice, Carboni was born into a family of
art historians, so his chosen career path seems only natural.
First studying Arabic and Islamic art at University of Venice,
he then moved to the University of London’s School of
Oriental and African Studies to complete a PhD in Islamic
art.
He has published widely and lectured at a number of
institutions including NYU, Hunter College of CUNY and the
Bard Graduate Centre for Decorative Arts in New York.
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AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT 2ND AUGUST
2012
The Association has had a productive year and once again it was due to the commitment of the
committee and the support of the members.
Again we start and finish the year with the selective exhibitions.
The 2011 exhibition hosted by Heathcote Gallery was a successful exhibition, bringing a new
audience to CAAWA. Just a few weeks ago at the ZigZag Gallery in Kalamunda, the 2012
exhibition opened. The guest selector this year was writer and curator, Dr Ric Spencer who
presented Alison Brown with the Kusnik Award and Mary Wallace with the Judges Award. My
congratulation to these well deserved winners.
In August CAAWA invited the ever popular Janet De Boos to the Central Institute of Technology
to demonstrate her elegant functional ware. Janet throws with the ease that comes with many
years of experience; her workshop was enjoyed by all who attended.
The end of year dinner at Rosie O’Grady’s was, as always, well attended. A very casual evening
that gives members the opportunity to catch up.
Throughout this year the committee has been preparing for the return of the POTober workshops.
These were an enormous success in 2010 and we hope to repeat this in October. With the focus
this year being colour and texture, there will be plenty to interest the novice as well as the
experienced potters in our midst.
The study group this year presented short demonstrations from Greg Crowe, Helen Dundo and I.
These were well attended. Although the other events Janet Kovesi Watt organised which
included a quiz night, discussions, slide shows, as well as show and tell evenings, did not attract
similar numbers. Several members also opened their homes to show their ceramic collections.
The CAAWA website has become a very popular site. Since the AGM last year, there has been
over 8,000 viewers looking at 37,000 pages. 75% of which are unique viewers, is an indication at
the level of interest both nationally and internationally in ceramics here in WA.
CAAWA Facebook enjoys equal popularity.
In 2013 Heathcote Gallery will once again host the Members’ Selective in April.
2014 will see ceramics included in the exhibition program at The Lawrence Wilson Gallery. Shortly,
ceramic artists will be invited send in a submission for the Here and Now 2014 exhibition. 2014 may
also see the return of more POTober workshops.
The Committee are in the process of planning a survey of Western Australian ceramic artists to be
held in 2015. This will be open to all ceramic artists. The proposal for this exhibition will be
submitted shortly.
With the strong membership the future of CAAWA burns bright.
Thank you,
Cher Shackleton
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AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Profile: Graham Hay
Graham Hay is a busy man. Since first turning
to the medium of paper clay in 1992 it seems
he has scarcely had a moment to spare.
However, he was only happy enough to
make time for a PYRE interview during a
Saturday of teaching, and give us the grand
tour of his state of the art, three-dimensional
ceramic printer.
Graham first came to researching the
technology of 3D printing in 2010. (For those
of you who are as confused as I was prior to
meeting Graham – Yes it’s a printer that
prints out 3D objects in clay!). Drawing on
the knowledge of international artists and
engineers who had also been working with
this technology, Graham became interested
in the idea of printing in paper clay.
Early ceramic printers were developed,
licensed and patented with ZCorp in 2007 by
researchers at Bowling Green State University
in Ohio. This made the first 3D printers very
expensive. In 2010 Graham received a
quote from Dimension 3D Printers for a
commercial,
three-dimensional
desktop
printer for US$15,000. However, as more
people
became
interested
in
the
technology, replicas started popping up
making the technology cheaper and more
accessible. The real breakthrough came
with the RepRap kit set developed by Dr.
Adrian Bowyer at the University of Bath.
What caught Graham’s interest were the
claims that using this now accessible
technology, one could build their own 3D
printer for under AU$1,000. Another key
development in this technology was that the
RepRap
printer
could
in
fact
be
programmed to replicate itself by printing
out it’s own plastic parts. Meaning that aside
from a few parts that could be purchased at
Bunnings, you could essentially print out a
printer to give to someone else.
Commercial companies were therefore
forced to drop their prices and users were
able to develop and upload open source
files to the Internet containing improvements
to the design, and freely available to
anyone who is interested.
With this technology now much more readily
accessible, Graham set out to research how
one could develop the 3D printer to print
objects in clay rather than in plastic. He then
came across Unfold, a Belgium company
working with UK potter Jonathan Keep to
develop such an idea!
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AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
In April 2012 Graham was invited to Central Institute of
Technology as their Artist in Residence at the Aberdeen St
campus. It was here that he received time, space and
funding to bring his idea to fruition. With the help of Curtin
University engineering graduate Robert Vinkovic, Graham
assembled the RapMan 3.2 printer in July. In August
Graham started printing extruder parts to modify the
printer to be able to print clay. This modified RapMan 3.2
is also capable of printing support structures for the
finished ceramic piece to prevent sagging during firing.
Whilst the idea of ceramic printing is well and truly taking
off across the globe, printing in paper clay is an ongoing
development with the paper fibers proving tricky.
Graham continues to experiment and has had some
fascinating results.
2012 saw Roderick Bamford use a modified RapMan to
print ceramic pieces for the Hyperclay exhibition and a
symposium of leading UK experts in the field of 3D printed
ceramics at the V&A Museum in London. Ceramic
printing and 3D printing are undoubtedly growing fields
generating exciting developments in the production,
design and use of objects. With so much open source
software available and the machines themselves
becoming cheaper and more user friendly, it will be
interesting to see how these machines might one day
replace the technology of our current desktop printers.
Whilst there will always be a place and appreciation for
the craftsmanship of the traditional potter, it is through
the drive of artists like Graham Hay that the boundaries of
ceramic art continue to be expanded.
Recently returning from teaching workshops in the US,
Graham’s passion for paper clay has taken him all over
Australia and the world teaching and presenting at
conferences, symposiums and institutions in the UK,
Hungary, Lithuania, Singapore, Pakistan, Norway,
Canada, Sweden and New Zealand. In between all of
this he continues to teach from his Robertson Park studio,
publish articles and work on various studio projects.
For more information on 3D ceramic printing, Graham’s
many creative pursuits or classes at Robertson Park you
can visit his website:
www.grahamhay.com.au
Graham demonstrating the RapMan
3.2 at CIT’s Aberdeen Street Campus
6
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
SANDRA BLACK goes to CHINA
Mid January this year I received an invitation to
again participate in the International teapot
exhibition to be held in the Noble Seafood
Restaurants group in Shanghai. The theme as
also of last year was to be based on the
Chinese Zodiac animals. This year is of course
the Year of the Dragon a very auspicious
animal in Chinese culture. I received the
invitation not only to exhibit but to be a guest of
the restaurant’s owner along with 7 other artists
to attend the opening. Apart from our airfare
everything else was to be paid for us by the
owner.
That
included
6
days
of
accommodation our meals and excursions to
various significant cultural sites in and around
Shanghai. In return we donated 2 teapots and
presented food related gifts to our host Mr Su
XiPei. I had a frenzied 2 weeks putting together
an application to Arts WA for an Artsflight grant
and was successful fortunately in being able to
succeed in getting my airfare costs covered.
The teapot exhibitions have been running since
2006 when the first show a generic teapot
exhibition was setup and curated by Jeng-daw
Hwang a superb teapot maker from Tainan in
Taiwan. In association with the owner of the
restaurant Mr Su XiPei also from Taiwan this
show has been held to promote and support
ceramic artists both in China and abroad and
also the longer term ambition is to build from
these shows a collection of teapots which will
ultimately be housed in a purpose built museum
as a gift for the people of China. This year there
were 50 potters from around the world
participating in this event.
My first introduction to Jeng-daw Hwang came
about from my first trip to Shanghai and
Jingdezhen in 2010. I met up with Trudy Golley
and Paul Leathers in our Shanghai hotel and
Dragon Cloud Teapot – Pierced and
Carved Cool Ice Porcelain
was taken by them to view the year of the Tiger
Exhibition in the restaurant. The experience was
quite overwhelming at first on entrance to this
marble, crystal, red carpeted and gold plated
temple to culinary seafood heaven. I couldn’t
quite imagine an exhibition set up amongst all
the splendour of these glittering surrounds. The
work however was beautifully displayed and
neatly labelled in a series of well lit glass
covered plinths in the main entry hall/gallery
space
and
throughout
the
restaurant.
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AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Risto Hamalainen from Finland and Krisaya
Luengganantakul from Thailand were to join
us later after the opening. We were to spend
the next 4 weeks together in Shanghai and
Haian apart from Sarah Michael who returned
to Denmark at the end of the 6 days in
Shanghai. After a quick trip to our hotel to
register and drop off our luggage we piled
into taxis to get to the exhibition venues and
deliver our pots. This was to be the start of a
full on 4 weeks of sightseeing, work and dining
and above all the most generous hospitality I
have ever experienced during a residency.
Exhibition display in the reception area of
Noble Seafood Restaurant
The exhibition was located in 2 of the
restaurants in Shanghai. Currently there are 3
restaurants in Shanghai and one more in
Beijing.
My initial understanding was that these were
exhibitions in the traditional sense being open
to the general public to admire and purchase
but this misconception was soon put paid to
when the curator informed me that most of the
works were purchased by the restaurant
owner. Non selected works are sent back to
the artists or moved to a private gallery
managed by Hwang Jeng -daw for sale in
Shanghai. Payment was extremely prompt
and within 2 weeks of the opening the money
was transferred.
It’s always a bit nerve
wracking hoping when you send work overseas
that firstly it arrives ok and secondly you will get
paid but in this instance there were no
concerns. If only every gallery was so prompt in
payments!!
I arrived in China on the 11th of April along with
5 other artists. They were Mirta Morigi from Italy,
Janice Hunter, Denmark, Sarah Micheal,
Netherlands, Anne Turn and Merike Hallick from
Estonia.
The exhibition opened on the evening of April
14th with a formal banquet held at the North
Hongmei Road branch of the Noble Seafood
Restaurants. We were driven to the door and
received the red carpet welcome with staff
forming a guard of honour as we entered. A
little overwhelming but fun. Guests arrived,
some were friends of the exhibitors and
invited friends of the owners. We mingled
looking at the exhibition setup, spent time
talking to the guests, photographing and
being photographed. We were then escorted
to the anteroom of the Banquet room to
enjoy champagne and pre dinner nibbles
and again photographed.
Opening speech by Mr Su Xipei. Sarah
Michaels – Netherlands, and Sandra
Black seated next to Mr Su XiPei
8
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
This was to be a constant throughout our visit to
China. The dinner announcement was made
and we entered the banquet hall, a fabulous
space set with fine china, linen cloth’s ,glasses,
crystal chandeliers, beautiful flowers and our
very own printed menu. Also provided were
interpreters who stood at the back of our chairs
to help with conversations with our host and
owner of the restaurants Mr Su XiPei.
Around a 100 guests attended on the long
table setup. We enjoyed a 7 course meal with
each dish beautifully presented. Out came our
cameras much to the amusement of our hosts
as we photographed each dish.
The event was a special one for all of us invited
artists. We were quite overwhelmed by the
kindness, respect and generosity that was
shown to us.
The exhibition will remain for some months at
the restaurant before being moved onto the
other branches of the restaurant in greater
Shanghai and Beijing. At the end of every 3
years of each series of exhibitions a book is
printed and sent to exhibiting artists showing the
works included in each exhibition. At the
completion of our 6 days in Shanghai as guests
of Mr Su Xi Pei we left the city to head off on a 3
day trip to Yixing to explore the making of
traditional teapots. That story can await
another article!
Appetiser – Deep fried squid!
The formal opening consisted of a couple of
short speeches by the curator Jeng-daw
Hwang, Mirta Morigi from Italy and our host Mr
Su XiPei to welcome us.
The end of the meal saw us retire to a private
upstairs lounge for the presentation of gifts to
Mr Su XiPei. We were asked to bring some food
products to our host from our respective
countries. Following the giving of the gifts we
were then supplied with cigars and whisky to
wind up the evening. Also we were presented
with a gift bag of the restaurants special green
and Menghai aged Pu ‘er teas along with 2
catalogues of exhibitions!
Sandra Black wishes to acknowledge the WA
Department of Culture and the Arts for an
Arts Flight grant. I wish also to acknowledge
Mr Su XiPei for his generosity in hosting and
funding the exhibitions at his restaurants and
Hwang Jeng –daw the curator,
photographer, interpreter, organiser and
wonderful guide for our entire time in China.
9
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Ruby Neevay: Ceramic Artist
Ruby Neevay was a ceramic artist who worked as a ceramic decorator on the range of Wembley
Ware figures at Brisbane and Wunderlich Pottery Division, Subiaco, Western Australia.
Ruby joined Brisbane and Wunderlich in 1940 when she was 15 years of age. At the time, the business
had just changed from Calyx Pottery to Brisbane and Wunderlich.
In those days most people stayed in their jobs for many years and Ruby was of this generation, working
45 years at the pottery until she retired at 60. Since then, she has worked in her own business making
ceramic floral tributes for graves. Her career in pottery spanned over 70 years. Ruby’s first work was
fettling jugs. In this process the fragile clay article is hand cleaned and the seams removed. Ruby broke
the first jug she picked up. The fettling process is tedious and slow with some operators only managing
less than twenty articles per shift. With Ruby’s love of pottery and dexterous fingers she began
achieving 60 articles per shift and became the department’s “pacemaker”.
One of the other ladies working with Ruby used to hand paint articles at home. The management at
the time recognised her potential and she was moved into the decorating area. Ruby would join her
friend in decorating during the breaks and helped with guilding ceramic horses. She was asked to join
the decorators working on Wembley Ware and immediately warmed to the new challenge. One of the
popular techniques used on Wembley Ware was aerographing or producing a fine tapered colour
effect using a very small spray gun. This was one of Ruby’s favourite techniques and one she still used
on her floral grave decorations. A German lady joined the decorating team who had previously made
ceramic floral decorations. These flowers were added to some of the Wembley Ware cast pieces. Ruby
was about 26 years old at the time and loved to watch the techniques used in ceramic flower making.
She learnt to make the ceramic flowers herself and to decorate them.
At that time, Ruby’s Uncle died and she asked the management if she could make a ceramic cross
with ceramic roses for her uncle. A cross was made and the management approached local
monumental masons to see whether a market existed as an extension of Wembley Ware.
The Monumental Masons were enthusiastic by the prospect of a local and respected supplier making
the grave decorations.
Over the next 35 years Ruby made thousands of the floral ceramic tributes for cemeteries and
examples of Rubies work can be seen in graveyards all over Western Australia.
As Ruby approached retirement, a new manager was appointed at the pottery and he did not want
to continue with the floral tributes, especially as Ruby was leaving.
This was devastating for Ruby and she embarked on a plan to continue making ceramic flowers and to
call the project Ruby’s Roses. As she had very little technical expertise, Ruby asked the Works Chemist
to help her. The Works Chemist already had a ceramic studio and suggested Ruby produce the
ceramic flowers there. For 30 years Ruby enthusiastically made the floral tributes. Some of the
customers have known Ruby for many years and as a mark of their respect, still call her Mrs. Neevay.
Ruby died last week at the age of 88. She was still making her roses right up to her death.
10
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
SELECTIVE EXHIBITION
2012
As the sun streamed in through the windows of the
ZigZag Gallery in Kalamunda, anticipation rose
when the award ceremony began for the
announcement of this years winners.
Dr Ric Spencer, writer and curator at Fremantle Arts
Centre, selected the winners.
The Kusnik Award, an award of excellence, went
to Alison Brown for her Tideline Series The dome
forms are a combination of slip trailing, molded
and hand built forms with intricate details of sea life
found near her studio.
ABOVE: Danica Wichtermann - Highly Commended
A Colourful Perspective (3 Pieces)
Stoneware, wheel thrown, altered, multiple glazes.
SOLD
The Judges Award, a personal choice, went to
Mary Wallace for her Lotus Tea Set. A combination
of wheel thrown and hand building techniques.
The tray and cups are carved with the lotus
pattern and are presented, with a teapot, in a
celadon glaze.
Highly Commended Awards: Five were given this
year as the selector could not settle on the usual
three.
They were awarded to: Stewart Scambler, Danica
Wichtermann (pictured above, left) Njalikwa
Chongwe, John Blinco and Cher Shackleton.
Many thanks to Gilbert Wines for their sponsorship
this year. Bev Gilbert provided three types of their
wine, all of which were very well received.
ZigZag Gallery staff (Nicola, Marilyn, Cheryl and
Vanessa). Thank you also to Stewart Scambler and
Cher Shackleton who provided the plinths. To
Marie Owens, Lynne Carlin, Christine and John
Blinco for the refreshments. Njalikwa Chongwe,
Helen Dundo and Holly Courtney, who helped with
the set up of the exhibition and the transportation
of artwork.
Images by Cher Shackleton and Vanessa Robinson.
Alison Brown in her Quindalup
Studio
11
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Ikebana Centre
Of WA
Committee
168 Burswood Rd
Burswood, WA 6100
Ph: (08) 9470 1416
September Study Group:
IKEBANA
Ikebana is probably the most famous of all
Japanese traditional arts that is still actively
practiced, not only in Japan but throughout the
world.
Ursula Pagels, director of the Ikebana Centre of WA,
has 32 years experience in the art of arranging
flowers according to some ancient observations
and traditions.
Ursula who teaches Sogetsu, the avant-garde style,
will give a demonstration at the September Study
Group. She will also discuss the types of containers
and vessels favoured by the artists in this expressive
floral art. (Images and info by Roxine Paterson)
SEPTEMBER STUDY GROUP
When & Where?
ECU Ceramics Studio
Mt Lawley – Car park entry from Central Ave
7pm 20th September
*Study group enquiries to Janet: [email protected]
12
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
POTober 2012
5th, 6th and 7th October
Central Institute of Technology
CAAWA proudly presents a smorgasbord
of workshops by international, national
and local ceramic artists with an emphasis
on texture, hand building and colour.
Participants are encouraged to engage
with the demonstrators during three days
of action packed workshops!
Other activities will include a BBQ, a sale
of pottery and an exhibition of the
demonstrators work in the Showcase
Gallery.
DEMONSTRATING ARTISTS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ROYCE MCGLASHEN (NZ)
MALINA MONKS (NSW)
KATRINA CHAYTOR (CANADA)
STEFAN JAKOB (SWITZERLAND)
ADIL WRITER (INDIA)
IAN DOWLING (WA)
GREG CROWE (WA)
NJALIKWA CHONGWE (WA)
ROBYN LEES (WA)
BELA KOTAI (WA)
CATE COSI (WA)
ANDREA VINKOVIC (WA)
Don’t miss out! Register now!
13
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
POTOBER 2012: 5th, 6th and 7th October
Registration Form
RATES
Full Rate (After July 30th)
CAAWA Members (After July 30th)
Student (Full Time)
BBQ Friday evening
3 DAY
$280
$240
$180
$20
1 DAY
$130
N/A
N/A
Return registration to:
Di Sigel, Hon Treasurer, CAAWA C/- 9, Hartington Way, Carine WA 6020
Ph: (08) 94479179
Email: [email protected]
Your Details:
Mr/Ms/Mrs/Miss:
____________________________________________________________________________________
Postal Address:
____________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________P/C:________
Ph:_________________________Mob:__________________________ICE:_____________________
Email:______________________________________________________________________________
PAYMENT DETAILS: (Circle that which applies)
Full Rate
FRIDAY
Member
SATURDAY
Student
Day Rate
SUNDAY
BBQ
$___________ for ____________ days.
Payment by cheque/money order for $________ is enclosed (Made payable to Ceramic Arts
Association of WA).
Please Circle:
Visa
Mastercard
Card No:______-______-______-______ Exp Date:_________
Name on Card: _______________________________ Signed:___________________ Date: ___________
Direct Debit: Westpac Karrinyup BSB: 036027 Acc: 257310 Acc Name: Ceramic Arts Association of WA
v Please notify the treasurer of deposit and please include your name with the direct debit so Di
knows who the money has come from.
For students only: Institution details ___________________________ Lecturer signature _____________________
14
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
COMMITTEE 2012/2013
COMMITTEE SPOTLIGHT:
Njalikwa Chongwe
An artist statement can be a great cure for insomnia so
it was with some trepidation I agreed to send one
through to Natalie for Pyre.
For the last 25 years I have worked in my South
Fremantle running Zinongo Gallery, a ceramic
home/studio.
As an Australian born ceramic artist, with an African
(Zambian father), my work is strongly influenced by
these two different cultures.
The Australian coast and African art have always been
the two key primary creative influences in my work.
While these two influences have been constant
through my creative development spanning some 25
years I've been influenced by a number of other
factors. I hope this leads to discussions of how aspects
of practice and business have changed for other artists
in their studio practices.
Executive Committee
• Cher Shackleton
President
Website Coordinator
[email protected]
• Njalikwa Chongwe
Vice President
[email protected]
• Dianne Sigel
Treasurer
[email protected]
• Janet Kovesi Watt
Secretary
Study Group Coordinator
[email protected]
General Committee
• Jackie Masters
Membership Secretary
[email protected]
• Natalie Acton
PYRE Editor
Facebook Coordinator
[email protected]
• Stewart Scambler
Workshops
[email protected]
om
• Janis Heston
Social Coordinator
[email protected]
• Sandra Black
[email protected]
• Helen Dundo
[email protected]
• Rosemary Schoen
[email protected]
15
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
I opened the studio with my wife, Jacqui,
but fortunately she had the common sense to
take a different path in life and join the world of
education, leaving me to the studio and the
mud in the hope that I may get it out of my
system someday. Unfortunately this hope has
been in vain and I continue to mindlessly
wonder through the house with clay on my
boots much to everyone's annoyance. As most
potters would understand it is a bug that is very
hard to shake.
was typical - I thought she was dreaming!
Since I opened the studio, IT (including the
internet), the digital camera (and camera tent)
and my customers have continued to influence
my artistic career.
The customer has been the most interesting
influence on my work making me more
discerning and aware of the market. Customers
keep in contact online, they use mobile phones
to photograph and share images of your work
while trying to make a decision on which piece
to buy. As potters we have no choice but to
embrace new technology if we are to survive
and develop in today’s IT savvy world. Another
growing phenomena is social networking
mediums to promote work for free. After all
even some of the wood firers amongst us are
on Facebook.
25 years ago the documentation of my work
consisted of taking photos with a camera
using wind-on film that had to processed at the
local camera shop and we celebrated when
one hour processing came in.
When presenting my work I needed to provide
slides with information stickers stuck on the front.
I brought my first digital camera with a massive
1.3 mega pixels for close to $1000.00. Though
expensive, the camera was the start of a
change, giving me the ability to keep an
ongoing record of my work and opened up the
world of IT. When we first opened the studio
computers were something banks had and the
greatest piece of tech we had was the manual
bankcard swipe machine. Marketing meant
the expensive printing process and snail mail. As
struggling artists, we had to think of ingenious
ways to advertise without spending too much
money. So stunts like parking your car with the
gallery logo in prime spots in and around
Fremantle on the weekends to attract attention
were not uncommon.
IT and the internet is now integral to my business
as an artist, providing me the ability to
communicate and send images across the
globe as I have done with these images sent
through for PYRE.
A lot of my new customers are already familiar
with my work via the web before they come
into the gallery.
Now for the next 25 years, what next, potters on
the moon???
I have a clear memory of getting a hint of the
way IT was going to change business, when
working with an Interior Designer from Hong
Kong who said that in Hong Kong emails had
become the main way businesses were
communicating and of course my response
16
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
GALLERY EAST
Opening 6pm on Friday 24th of August
Jörg Schmeisser: prints
Keiko Amenomori Schmeisser: textiles
Stewart Scambler: ceramics
Exhibition continues until Sunday 16th of September
This exhibition of prints by Jörg Schmeisser is a tribute to his superb craftsmanship a nd to a very wonderful man who, sadly passed a way in June this year. Jörg’s print making covers 45 years a nd the works on show represent the extraordinary breadth of his vision a s well a s his technical virtuosity. Many of the works have the feel of a visual diary, recording with enormous warmth a nd sensitivity the places, cultures a nd traditions that he experienced. Keiko Amenomori Schmeisser is a master of the Shibori technique of dyeing. Represented in the National Gallery of Australia a nd Parliament House, Canberra, a mong others, her rich textile works with their shimmering surfaces, a re a unique fusion of a n Australian experience with Japanese craftsmanship a nd aesthetic sensibilities. Stewart Scambler is a master ceramicist; a leading a uthority a nd teacher in ceramics a nd one of Western Australia's most prominent wood-­‐firers. His ceramic forms a re a n exploration of his response to the land, the underlying presence rather than the landscape itself. They are a bout the emotional a nd spiritual effect that the land has on the people a nd the stillness that it g enerates within.
17
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Potter’s Tips:
“When setting out to make large bowls or
platters, first attach a dampened circle of
canvas to your bat with a good smear of
slurry, and throw on that. When you have
finished, slide the cutting wire between the
canvas and the bat, not under the bowl
itself. When the bowl is firm enough to turn
upside down the canvas can be peeled
off, and none of the clay gets wasted.”
Ginny Conrow, US potter
~Submitted for PYRE by Janet Kovesi-Watt
What is a pot?
A pot is not
Just any grey
Little bowl of clay
A pot is a pot
For daffodils
Or a porridge pot
Or a pot for pills
Cruets and goblets
Jars and jugs
Platters and plates
And trays and mugs
Shallow pots
Or dark and deep
Pots to give
And pots to keep
Touch them hold them
Pick them up
Batter bowl
Or sake cup
And feel the curve
Of earth and sky
Kitchen warm
Or springtime shy
A pot is a mood
Of many hues
But most of all
A pot is to use
Poem by US potter Cynthia Bringle
~Submitted for PYRE by Janet Kovesi-Watt
Competitions & Prizes:
York Art Award
In October or November of each year the
York Society holds the annual Art and Craft
Awards which originated with the Craft
Awards in the York Fair of 1973.
The Awards hold an important place in the
Western Australian Art & Craft scene and
now attract around 500 entries each year
from some 180 artists and craftspersons.
Entrants must be residents of Western
Australia.
Prize money, donated by the community,
totals $8850. A new Award of $1000, was
first included in 2001. In 2012 two such
Awards, one in the Art section and one in
the Craft section, will be made for the best
entries in any category depicting
"Farming". (2012 has been designated as
"The Year of the Farmer".) Entries close 10th
of September 2012.
For more information:
www.yorksoc.org.au
Ph: 9641 1276
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Noticeboard:
*Message from the treasurer: When making a direct deposit can you put in your name a s reference please. A recent deposit a t a Floreat Forum bank remains anonymous. If you have made a payment recently could you contact me. Ph: 9447 9179 Thank you, Di Sigel
POTTERY CLASSES
With
Cher Shackleton
Pottery Studio Gar age Sale!
Wendy Binks is having a studio closing
down sale at her studio 13 Walker St,
South Fremantle (rear) on Sunday 23
September, from 1pm to 4pm.
Goods include:
• 11 cu ft electric kiln plus furniture
and kiln controller
• 2 Venco wheels
• Pug mill
• Large slab roller
• Extruder
• Various tools, materials,
wooden batts, plaster moulds, tile
cutters, kiln furniture
• Wedging table
2/16 Peel Road, O’Connor
Term dates:
Enquiries: Wendy 0407 942 757
20th October – 24th November
6 Weeks
Saturdays 10am – 12:30pm
23rd October - 11th December
8 Weeks
Tuesdays 10am-12:30pm or
2pm – 4:30pm or
6pm – 8:30pm
Call Cher: 0408 904 271
www.shackletongallery.com
Wanted to buy:
Giffin grip - in
good nick - at
reasonable price.
Call Elaine
Ph: 0411 160 233
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
CAAWA CALENDAR
2nd
August
9th
September
6th
20th
October
4th
5th,
6th,7th
October
October
November
1st
December
2013
April
15th
AGM: Community Room, Peppermint Grove Library
Dr. Stefano Carboni talks on the subject of Islamic
Ceramics
Annual Selective Exhibition Closes
No August Study Group
Committee Meeting 6 pm
Study Group: Subject: Ikebana Artist talk and
demonstration.
Committee Meeting 6 pm
POTober 2012 Ceramic Workshops
No Study Group
Committee Meeting 6 pm
Study Group: TBA
CAAWA Christmas dinner. Rosie O’Gradys’
Selective Exhibition Heathcote Gallery, Melville
For PYRE submissions and enquiries email
[email protected]
WEB ADDRESS
www.ceramicartswa.asn.au
POSTAL ADDRESS
C/- 9 Hartington Way
Carine 6020 WA
AUGUST 2012
CERAMIC ARTS ASSOCIATION OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL
1st July 2012 – 30th June 2013
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RENEWAL
TWO YEARS
FULL
$ 50.-
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GROUP
$ 75.-
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FULL TIME STUDENT
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ASSOCIATE
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Monies to: Dianne Sigel, 9 Hartington Way, Carine WA 6020. email: [email protected]
Payments may be made by cheque, money order, credit card or direct debit to Westpac Karrinyup
BSB: 036027. A/c: 257310. Account name: Ceramic Arts Assocn. of WA Inc. When paying by direct debit,
please reference your name on the direct debit and please advise Dianne Sigel via email that you have made
the direct debit. Cheques made out to Ceramic Arts Assn of WA (Inc).