Newsletter Issue No.10 September 2007

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Newsletter Issue No.10 September 2007
CARMARTHENSHIRE MOTH & BUTTERFLY GROUP
NEWSLETTER ISSUE No.10
September 2007
Editor: Jon Baker (County Moth Recorder for VC44 Carms)
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the 10th Newsletter. Another disappointing month of weather, and yet some great
moths continue to be found in the county. Towards the end of the month there were minimal
signs of a bit of migration from Europe, though the winds were north easterly. A fall of Great
Brocades Eurois occulta to parts of England, reached us, with a worn individual deciding to
come to light in Llanelli. Just shows that even in the worst of years, there is always hope.
In this issue, in addition to the regular highlights of the month there are two major articles – the
3rd part of my look at Pyralid moths in the county, and the write-up of all our combined efforts
on National Moth Night 2007. I hope these are of interest to someone.
To look out for in the coming month: if you are feeling adventurous and can trap up a
mountain somewhere we could still do with photographed records of Grey Chi Antitype chi,
Small Autumnal Moth Epirrita filigrammaria or even a Golden-rod Brindle Lithomoia
solidaginis. I will continue my long and seemingly pointless quest for scoring Portland Moth
Actebia praecox at Pembrey. A far more likely addition to the county list which could turn up
anywhere would be Brown-spot Pinion Agrochola litura – though please get a photo for proof.
I’m sure September will turn something of note up, so good luck to all.
Northern Rustic Standfussiana lucernea
HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MONTH
All records are mine (JSB) if not noted otherwise.
GREAT BROCADE Eurois occulta
Photo: Chris Manley
285 Caloptilia azaleella
The third county record was of two attracted to MV light on 11th August in my Carmarthen
garden (SN3919). The previous county records were also in my garden, during 2006.
1425 WAX MOTH Galleria mellonella
The third county record, on 11th August at Pwll (SN4601, Ian Morgan). The previous records
were also in the Llanelli area, once in 2005 and once in 2006. Has a habit of only appearing on
National Moth Night.
1647 BARRED HOOK-TIP Watsonalla cultraria
The first record in the county since 1971 – and the first record to be fully documented and
accepted through the county recorder. Came to actinic light on NMN, 11th August at Byrgwm
(SN5532, David Groom et al.). Photo appears in the NMN write up, below. Lives on beech
Fagus sylvatica.
1753 STRIPED TWIN-SPOT CARPET Nebula salicata
Six to light at Palycwrt on Mynydd Du on 2nd August (SN6718, Ian Morgan). An upland
species that is rarely recorded in the county simply due to lack of trapping at the correct
altitude. Lives on bedstraws Galium sp.
1964 ANNULET Charissa obscurata
Four to light at Palycwrt on Mynydd Du on 2nd August (SN6718, Ian Morgan). A very local
species of coast, heath and upland, there have been just six previous records. Various
foodplants.
2
2051 FOUR-SPOTTED FOOTMAN Lithosia quadra
Four records of singles, showing an increasing spread of this species to new parts of the county.
Singles at Gellywen (SN2723) on 10th and 11th August (Lee Walker), and further singles on
11th August at Pembrey Forest (SN3803, JSB and Lee Walker) and Troserch (SN5503, Colin
Jones). The last with an undeveloped wing proving it unlikely to be a migrant. Lives on lichens.
2104 NORTHERN RUSTIC Standfussiana lucernea
With just one previous record from 1985, this species was recorded twice this month. The first
was a single netted at dusk on the coast at Telpyn Point (SN1807) on 1st August (JSB,
photographed). This only just pipped Ian Morgan to it, as the very next night he got nine to
light at Palycwrt, Mynydd Du (SN6718). Also photographed by JSB. Lives on various grasses
on rocky coasts and mountains.
2137 GREAT BROCADE Eurois occulta
The first county record, caught at Llanelli North Dock (SS4999) on 25th August by Chris
Manley and photographed. Occurred at a time when many were being seen in England,
presumably migrants from northern Europe. Photo above.
2300 OLD LADY Mormo maura
There had been just 9 previous county record of this lumbering beast that is notorious for not
being readily attracted to light. So, four in a month is a very good show. The first was at
Gellywen(SN2723) on 9th August (Lee Walker), then in my Carmarthen garden (SN3919) on
11th and a third was caught at Gwernogle (SN5234) by David Groom and Faye Sharpley on
25th. A fourth individual was found dead in a car at Gwernogle on 26th, but as with all corpses
in cars, the record is sadly not worth recording, as origin cannot be proven.
2329 CONFUSED Apamea furva britannica
A very tricky little beast to identify, so records need to be properly backed up with photographs.
There had been one previous record from 1984 (Rhandirmwyn, SN74, Bernard Skinner). Ian
Morgan scored a mint individual at Palycwrt, Mynydd Du (SN6718) on 2nd August, which I
was more than happy to photograph and confirm.
CONFUSED Apamea furva britannica
3
2372 WEBB’S WAINSCOT Archanara sparganii
Ian Morgan caught one on 11th August at Bynea (SS5998). He then caught another, on 22nd at
Erw-las, Llwynhendy (SS5399). These are the 10th and 11th county records, all from the
southeast corner of the county.
2437 GOLDEN PLUSIA Polychrysia moneta
This moth has not been seen in the county since 1995. There were just five records, mostly in
the early nineties, and with the decline of this species nationally it was feared that it might not
be seen again here. But Ian Morgan got rewarded for planting delphiniums in his garden at
Pwll (SN4601) with one turning up in his trap on 22nd August. Photographed by JSB next day.
GOLDEN PLUSIA Polychrysia moneta
NOTE: re Anania funebris, which I reported about in the 8th Bulletin (June 2007). Ian Morgan
has pointed out that the two sites at which this species has been found are not actually on what
I referred to as “the limestone ridge”, but actually on the Millstone grit ridge that runs parallel
to it. He comments that goldenrod Solidago virgaurea is most commonly found on both the
grit ridge and dry coalfield sites in the county, so it is there that potential colonies of the moth
are likely to be discovered.
4
NATIONAL MOTH NIGHT 2007 – RESULTS
National Moth Night for 2007 was held on 11th August. This was the exact same date that it
was held back in 2001, which would have made for some interesting comparisons had it not be
the case that in 2001 absolutely no recording was made in Carmarthenshire due to driving rain
and high winds! Ah well. This year however was a different story, and quite amazingly, given
the appalling summer weather, we managed a night with only occasional rain and moderate
temperatures. Thanks to a little chivvying and publicity, we managed to get by far the best
level of involvement this year, with around 20 people trapping and submitting results.
ANALYSIS:
Results came from 21 sites, from 20 different 1km squares and from 13 different 10km squares.
This is an excellent and wide-ranging set of records. The following people participated in the
event:
10km sq
SN12
SN22
SN30
SN31
SN32
SN40
SN50
SN51
SN53
SN63
SN73
SS49
SS59
#
Traps
1
1
1
1
1
1
3*
3
10
1
1
2
3
Micro
sp
7
2
25
21
22
11
5
13
15
1
0
24
7
Macro
sp
34
47
46
29
46
30
41
47
90
13
15
42
42
Total
sp
41
49
71
50
68
41
46
60
105
14
15
66
49
# of
Macro
147
116
105
78
248
104
181
252
609
41
36
159
109
Observers
Mel Collier
Lee Walker
Jon Baker, Lee Walker
Jon Baker
Jon Baker
Ian Morgan
Ian Morgan, Colin Jones
Russel Hobson & Butterfly Con., Mat Ridley
Julian Wormald, D&J Bannister, M Lovell & CMG**
Elizabeth Goodyear
Elizabeth Goodyear
Jon Baker, Lee Walker, Chris Manley
Ian Morgan
* Colin Jones also tried sugaring in SN50, attracting a good number of Copper Underwings.
** CMG (Carmarthenshire Moth Group) on this night was:
Martin Lovell
Faye Sharpley
David Groom
Arnold Johnson
Clare Williams
TOTAL NUMBER OF MICRO SPECIES
89
TOTAL NUMBER OF MACRO SPECIES
164
5
TOTAL NUMBER OF ALL SPECIES
253
The Most Numerous Macros:
This table shows the highest totals when all site counts are added together. The exceptional
count of Buff Footman in Brechfa Forest helped place them in 2nd position.
1
2
3
4
5
6=
6=
8
9
10
11
12
13
14=
14=
14=
#
2107
2049
2102
1759
2343.5
1906
2033
2111
1777
2198
1738
2297
2044
1890
2008
2118
SPECIES:
Large Yellow Underwing
Buff Footman
Flame Shoulder
Small Phoenix
Common Rustic. agg
Brimstone Moth
Black Arches
Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow U’wing
July Highflyer
Smoky Wainscot
Common Carpet
Copper Underwing
Dingy Footman
Sharp-angled Peacock
Coxcomb Prominent
True Lover's Knot
TOTAL:
258
235
139
112
84
57
57
56
46
39
38
36
35
33
33
33
The Most Widespread Macros:
This table shows the most widely reported species, and the number of 10km squares from
which records were received.
1
2
3=
3=
3=
6=
6=
6=
6=
10=
10=
10=
10=
10=
10=
16=
16=
16=
16=
16=
16=
#
2107
2111
2102
2343.5
1906
1759
2198
2008
1405
1738
2044
2321
2003
1702
2289
2049
2297
1648
2064
1722
2361
Species
Large Yellow Underwing
Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow U’wing
Flame Shoulder
Common Rustic. agg
Brimstone Moth
Small Phoenix
Smoky Wainscot
Coxcomb Prominent
Mother of Pearl
Common Carpet
Dingy Footman
Dark Arches
Pebble Prominent
Small Fan-footed Wave
Knot Grass
Buff Footman
Copper Underwing
Pebble Hook-tip
Ruby Tiger
Flame Carpet
Rosy Rustic
10km sqs
13
12
11
11
11
9
9
9
9
8
8
8
8
8
8
7
7
7
7
7
7
6
HIGHLIGHTS:
Photo: Martin Lovell
Star moth of the night has to be the Barred Hook-tip Watsonalla cultraria that came to David
Groom’s actinic trap at Byrgwm in Brechfa Forest (SN5532). The only previous records I can
find on file are Rothamsted records from 1971 in SN74, so this is the first record of the species
to be properly verified and accepted through the county recorder process. This is yet another
great find in the under-explored Brechfa area, and I can only hope that such other mythical
county rarities as Oak Lutestring Cymatophorima diluta, Sprawler Asteroscopus sphinx and
Small Brindled Beauty Apocheima hispidaria will be found by the pioneering recording done
by Martin Lovell and the group. Amongst the great list of species the group scored on National
Moth Night were many quality moths, including Bleached Pugs Eupithecia expallidata and
Welsh Wave Venusia cambrica.
Other highlights included three records of the NMN target species Four-spotted Footman
Lithosia quadra, with single males seen at Pembrey Forest (SN3803, JSB and Lee Walker), at
Gellywen (SN2723, Lee Walker) and Troserch (SN5503, Colin Jones). Twenty-five Grass
Eggars Lasiocampa trifolii came to MV at Pembrey Burrows (SS4199, JSB and Lee Walker).
At the same site we also netted three Oblique Striped Phibalapteryx virgata at dusk, and
caught scarce species such as Southern Wainscot Mythimna straminea, Archer’s Dart
Agrotis vestigialis and the micros Bryotropha desertella, Agonopterix nanatella and
Agonopterix yeatiana. A Small Argent & Sable Epirrhoe tristata at Brechfa (SN5030, Dave
and Jan Bannister) is a good record of a scarce species. Melanie Collier had some great moths
out at Penrhiw (SN1924) including Sharp-angled Carpets Euphyia unangulata and
September Thorn Ennomos erosaria. My Carmarthen garden (SN3919) had an atypically
good night, even though the trap was only run for a few hours, with Old Lady Mormo maura,
7
Marbled Green Cryphia muralis and Caloptilia azaleella the highlights. Ian Morgan went to
incredible lengths to record as many squares as he could, with an array of traps in the Llanelli
area. This paid dividends with many species recorded that no one else got, including both
Bulrush Wainscots Nonagria typhae and Webb’s Wainscot Archanara sparganii in SS59 at
Bynea (SS5598).
Four-spotted Footman Lithosia quadra
Photo: Colin Jones
Many thanks to all of you for your sterling efforts and for making this the best National Moth
Night so far, in terms of participation and organization (if not actually in number of species).
The full table of results appears at the end of this bulletin.
8
PYRALID MOTHS OF CARMARTHENSHIRE
PART 3 (of 4)
A Review – by Jon Baker
Continuing my review of the Pyralidae of Carmarthenshire, in this section I will be looking at the
Pyraustids. Many of these are commonly encountered and are very easily identified, if you know what
to look for. Many rest in the typical triangular shape.
PYRAUSTINAE
Britain: 57 species. Carmarthenshire: 25 species.
A large family with many distinctive species. Many of the species in this group are easily identifiable,
and common.
1361 Pyrausta aurata
National Status: Moderately widespread across Britain, except for the far north.
Foodplant: Labiates, especially mint Mentha spp., marjoram Origanum vulgare, calamint Calamintha spp. and clary Salvia
spp.
Habitat: Calcareous grasslands, or anywhere mint or marjoram grows.
Main Flight Period: May to August in two broods.
County Status: Scarce, it would seem.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 11
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN61, SN74, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 15-18mm. All the “purple” Pyrausta sp. can be very variable, and upper-wing characteristics are not
always enough to identify them. The hind-wing of P. aurata is dark with an orangey-yellow, broadening bar centrally but with
no further paler marks basally. This is the more likely species to turn up in gardens, if mint is being grown.
Pyrausta aurata
Pyrausta purpuralis
1362 Pyrausta purpuralis
National Status: Throughout Britain and locally common.
Foodplant: Corn mint Mentha arvensis and thyme Thymus spp.
Habitat: Prefers grassland on chalk or limestone, but also in other habitats.
Main Flight Period: May to August in two broods.
County Status: Moderately widespread and common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 45
10km squares prior to 2007: SN20, SN21, SN30, SN32, SN40, SN41, SN51, SN52, SN53, SN61, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 15-22mm. Very difficult to separate from P. ostrinalis, which flies at the same time in the same
habitats. The patterning of the undersides of both wings is diagnostic, especially the hind-wing. In P. purpuralis this has a
single pale bar subterminally, with paler markings basally, whereas in P. ostrinalis there is a second paler bar, narrower and
running along the fringe of the underside of the hind-wing. See Text figure 6 (p.67) in British Pyralid Moths (B. Goater) q.v.
9
1363 Pyrausta ostrinalis
National Status: Throughout Britain and locally common.
Foodplant: Corn mint Mentha arvensis and thyme Thymus spp.
Habitat: Prefers grassland on chalk or limestone, but also in other habitats.
Main Flight Period: May to August in two broods.
County Status: Due to similarities with P.purpuralis, perhaps an unclear picture. Few records.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 10
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN51, SN54, SS49
Identification: Wingspan 15-21mm. See P. purpuralis above for differences from that species.
Pyrausta ostrinalis
Pyrauta despicata
1365 Pyrausta despicata
National Status: Moderately widespread throughout Britain.
Foodplant: Plantains Plantago spp.
Habitat: Heaths, sandhills, cliffs and downland.
Main Flight Period: May to August in two broods.
County Status: Local, but can be very common where it occurs.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 53 (but virtually all from Pembrey)
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN32, SN40, SN41, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 14-19mm. A small, rather non-descript, triangular moth, with a brown hind-wing transversed by two
paler bands. The pale marks sub-apically on the otherwise mottled forewing, which are often a complete subterminal line are
what should catch your eye. Once seen a few times this is a very memorable little moth, though it is quite local in the county.
1367 Pyrausta cingulata
National Status: Local across much of Britain.
Foodplant: Wild thyme Thymus polytrichus.
Habitat: Chalk and limestone hills, sandhills and other coastal habitats where thyme grows.
Main Flight Period: May to August in two broods.
County Status: Rare and very local.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 5
10km squares prior to 2007: SN33, SS49
Identification: Wingspan 14-17mm. Very dark brown with sharp thin lines through all 4 wings. Only the as yet unrecorded P.
nigrata (whose bands are more sinuous) could be confused with it. Very local to extensive areas of wild thyme.
10
Pyrausta cingulata
Sitochroa palealis
1370 Sitochroa palealis
National Status: Very local in southern England. Rarely elsewhere.
Foodplant: Wild carrot Daucus carota.
Habitat: Rough fields and light soils where the foodplant grows.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Rare.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 1 (28th July 2004, SS4199, Pembrey Burrows, JSB)
10km squares prior to 2007: SS49
Identification: Wingspan 29-34mm. A large pale, powdery yellow colouration to the forewing, with dusky veins and pure
white hindwings make this a distinctive moth. Even so, a photo (preferred) or specimen will be required for acceptance of the
record.
1371 Sitochroa verticalis
National Status: Local in southern England, rare in Wales.
Foodplant: Various.
Habitat: Fields and pastures.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Rare.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 1 (1st September 1990, SN5399, Techon Marsh, Llwynhendy, IK Morgan)
10km squares prior to 2007: SS59
Identification: Wingspan 30-34mm. One of several very similar species. Due to its rarity in the county, any claim would have
to be supported by a good quality photograph or specimen. Refer to text figure 7 in Goater to see the distinctive underside
markings.
Sitochroa verticalis
Photo courtesy of Neil Sherman
11
1373 BORDERED PEARL Paratalanta pandalis
National Status: Southern England and Wales. Locally common.
Foodplant: Wood sage Teucrium scorodonia, goldenrod Solidago virgaurea and marjoram Origanum vulgare.
Habitat: Open woodland.
Main Flight Period: June.
County Status: Rare.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 1 (22nd May 1990, SN6016, Carmel Woods, IK Morgan)
10km squares prior to 2007:SN61
Identification: Wingspan 25-29mm. One of the species that is very similar to S. verticalis, along with Ostrinia nubialis (yet to
be recorded in Carms) and to a lesser degree with several other “straw coloured” pyralids. Wasn’t able to get a photo of this
one. Well, not yet. Any claim would obviously need to be fully supported, as with the previous species or O. nubialis.
1376 SMALL MAGPIE Eurrhypara hortulata
National Status: Common in southern England and Wales. Less common further north.
Foodplant: Common nettle Urtica dioica and occasionally other labiates.
Habitat: All.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Very common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 180
10km squares prior to 2007: SN22, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN33, SN40, SN41, SN44, SN50, SN51, SN52, SN53, SN54, SN61,
SN62, SN63, SN64, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 33-35mm. Unmistakeable.
SMALL MAGPIE Eurrhypara hortulata
1377 Perinephela lancealis
National Status: Southern England and Wales. Locally common.
Foodplant: Hemp agrimony Eupatorium cannabinum and other plants.
Habitat: Damp woodland and rough ground.
Main Flight Period: June and July.
County Status: Moderately widespread and frequent.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 65
10km squares prior to 2007: SN10, SN20, SN22, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN41, SN51, SN53, SN61, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 30-34mm. Long abdomen, with jagged cross-lines on pale grey and patchy long wings. Once seen
this species is readily identifiable and memorable.
12
Perinephela lancealis
Photo courtesy of Chris Manley
1378 Phlyctaenia coronata
National Status: Southern England and Wales. Locally common.
Foodplant: Elder Sambucus nigra.
Habitat: Scrubland, hedgerows and woodland edge.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Local and not common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 20
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN53, SN74, SN49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 23-26mm. Together with P. stachydalis forms a species pair, which is quite tricky for beginners to
separate. The differences are very subtle. P. coronata is proportionately longer winged, P. stachydalis is more compact. The
patterning along the edge of the hind-wing is a good place to start, but personally I always find the best place to look is the
innermost paler windows of the forewing – or rather that dark area that separates the small white dot from the more square
patch. In coronata it makes for quite a broad dark splodge, but in stachydalis it’s but a dot.
Phlyctaenia coronata
Phlyctaenia stachydalis
1384 Phlyctaenia stachydalis
National Status: Southern England and Wales. Probably not as scarce as was once thought.
Foodplant: Woundwort Stachys spp.
Habitat: Woodland edges, lanes and ditches.
Main Flight Period: June to August.
County Status: Local in central Carms.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 26
10km squares prior to 2007: SN31, SN32, SN33 (recorded in SN53 during 2007)
Identification: Wingspan 23-25mm. See above for differences from P. coronata.
13
1381 Anania funebris
National Status: Local, with scattered records from across Britain.
Foodplant: Goldenrod Solidago virgaurea.
Habitat: Rough hillsides and cliffs, especially on limestone, also woodland margins. The millstone grit ridge here in Carms.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Very local. Only recently discovered at two sites in the county.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 1 (also several seen at a new site in 2007, see Bulletin No.8)
10km squares prior to 2007: SN61 (Betws, SN6412, June 2005, Barry Stewart).
Identification: Wingspan 20-23mm. Totally unmistakeable. Though if recorded from a new area, a photo for the files would
be preferred.
Anania funebris
1385 Ebulia crocealis
National Status: Locally common in southern England and Wales. Very local further north.
Foodplant: Common fleabane Pulicaria dysenterica and ploughman’s-spikenard Inula conyza.
Habitat: Marshes and damp woodland.
Main Flight Period: June to August.
County Status: Local.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 35
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN53, SN61, SN74, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 22-25mm. The strong wiggly cross-lines and dark fringe line are distinctive.
Ebulia crocealis
14
1386 Opsibotys fuscalis
National Status: Fairly widespread throughout Britain, though local.
Foodplant: Yellow rattle Rhinanthus minor and common cow-wheat Melampyrum pratense.
Habitat: Meadows and woodland rides, and on northern moors.
Main Flight Period: June.
County Status: Very local, but common where it occurs.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 54
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN40, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 20-26mm. Memorable, funnily enough, by its lack of any great character. A soft chestnut
colouration with indistinct dentate cross-lines. Unlikely to be found anywhere but where the foodplant is common, but in
places like Pembrey Forest it is abundant along rides, and readily disturbed by day.
Opsibotys fuscalis
Udea lutealis
1388 Udea lutealis
National Status: Throughout Britain and common.
Foodplant: Various.
Habitat: Wasteground.
Main Flight Period: July and August.
County Status: Moderately common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 66
10km squares prior to 2007: SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN43, SN51, SN52, SN54, SN61, SN64, SN74, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 23-26mm. A rather pretty pale straw colouration with golden cross-lines and an elliptical stigma
mark.
1390 Udea prunalis
National Status: Common to Abundant throughout Britain.
Foodplant: Various.
Habitat: Woodland edge and hedgerows.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 118
10km squares prior to 2007: SN12, SN20, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN51, SN52, SN53, SN61, SN62, SN64, SN74, SS49,
SS59
Identification: Wingspan 23-26mm. A rather indistinct Udea sp. but with the darker stigma marks and a subterminal line.
Very common in most parts of the county.
15
Udea prunalis (photo:N. Sherman)
Udea olivalis
1392 Udea olivalis
National Status: Common throughout Britain.
Foodplant: Various.
Habitat: Woodland edge and hedgerows.
Main Flight Period: June and July
County Status: Common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 120
10km squares prior to 2007: SN22, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN33, SN40, SN41, SN43, SN51, SN52, SN53, SN61, SN62, SN64,
SN72, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 24-27mm. The typical Udea size and shape, with a square white window and other scattered white
markings. Fairly unmistakeable.
1395 RUSTY-DOT PEARL Udea ferrugalis
National Status: Migrant. Arrives in varying numbers from scarce to very abundant.
Foodplant: Various.
Habitat: Anywhere as a migrant.
Main Flight Period: Early summer to late Autumn.
County Status: Migrant, common in some years, scarce in others.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 170
10km squares prior to 2007: SN10, SN20, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN51, SN53, SN61, SN62, SN64, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 20-24mm. By comparison to the other Udea species, this is smaller and slimmer winged. Once seen
a few times it becomes fairly straightforward to identify. Colour ranges from rich ginger to a paler yellow-brown.
RUSTY-DOT PEARL Udea ferrugalis
16
1397 Mecyna asinalis
National Status: Local along south-western coasts of England and Wales..
Foodplant: Wild madder Rubia peregrina.
Habitat: Coastal grassland and cliffs.
Main Flight Period: May to October in two broods.
County Status: Scarce and very local.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 4
10km squares prior to 2007: SN10, SN20, SN40
Identification: Wingspan 27-34mm. Large, longish wings and a grey-brown colouration. The patterning can be much bolder
than the example shown in the specimen below. Unlikely to be found away from the coast. Photo or specimen required for
acceptance.
Mecyna asinalis
1398 RUSH VENEER Nomophila noctuella
National Status: Migrant. Often common to abundant.
Foodplant: Clover Trifolium spp., knotgrass Polygonum aviculare and grasses.
Habitat: Anywhere as a migrant. Breeds in grasslands and open habitats.
Main Flight Period: Can occur anytime between March and November.
County Status: Common migrant, though scarce in some years. Early arrivals have bred here.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 267
10km squares prior to 2007: SN20, SN21, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN40, SN42, SN43, SN50, SN51, SN52, SN53, SN54, SN61,
SN62, SN64, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 25-34mm. A very distinctive moth. Though the markings come in a wide range of intensity and
colouration, the distinctive shape of the moth means it cannot readily be confused.
RUSH VENEER Nomophila noctuella
17
1402 Diasemia reticularis
National Status: A scarce migrant.
Foodplant: Oxtongue Picris spp.
Habitat: Anywhere as a migrant.
Main Flight Period: May to September.
County Status: Very rare migrant.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 1
10km squares prior to 2007: The only county record is “Laugharne 1870”. Possibly SN31, but as Laugharne is at the
confluence of 4 different 10km squares, it is impossible to say.
Identification: Wingspan 18-22mm. I have no photo to show. It is generally very similar to D. ramburialis (below) and given
the rarity of both, a clear photo or specimen is definitely required for acceptance of records.
1403 Diasemiopsis ramburialis
National Status: A scarce migrant.
Foodplant: Unknown.
Habitat: Anywhere as a migrant.
Main Flight Period: June to October.
County Status: Very rare migrant.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 2
10km squares prior to 2007: Both records were in Pembrey Forest (SN30) in 2003, on 17th June (A. Graham) and on 18th
August (JSB, photoed).
Identification: Wingspan 17-22mm. A quite striking little moth. Apologies for the poor quality of the picture, but back in
2003 when I caught it, I didn’t have a very good camera….
MOTHER OF PEARL Pleuroptya ruralis
Diasemiopsis ramburialis
1405 MOTHER OF PEARL Pleuroptya ruralis
National Status: Abundant throughout Britain.
Foodplant: Common nettle Urtica dioica.
Habitat: Widespread.
Main Flight Period: July and August.
County Status: Common.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 259
10km squares prior to 2007: SN10, SN21, SN30, SN31, SN32, SN33, SN40, SN41, SN50, SN51, SN52, SN53, SN54, SN61,
SN62, SN63, SN64, SN74, SS49, SS59
Identification: Wingspan 33-37mm. Once known, it is a very obvious moth, even in flight.
1408 Palpita vitrealis
National Status: Scarce migrant, chiefly to coastal southern Britain.
Foodplant: Jasmine Jasminum officinale, and olives Olea europaea
Habitat: Anywhere as a migrant.
Main Flight Period: Can occur in any of the summer months, though more likely in Autumn.
County Status: Very rare migrant.
VC44 Records prior to 2007: 3 (all in 2006)
10km squares prior to 2007: SN31, SN53
Identification: Wingspan 27-31mm. Straightforward. Though all records should ideally be supported by a photo.
18
Palpita vitrealis
So that’s Pyraustinae. I’ll try to finish the Pyralids in the next bulletin, but I’ll have to see if I
have the required photos to hand. Otherwise I’ll do a different group and come back to the last
lot of Pyralids next year.
The main reference for this article has been the excellent and invaluable:
B. Goater. BRITISH PYRALID MOTHS. A GUIDE TO THEIR IDENTIFICATION. Harley
Books (1986). ISBN 0 946589 08 9
Thank you:
Thanks to all contributors to this bulletin – Lee Walker, Martin Lovell, Chris Manley, Julian
Wormald, Mat Ridley, Elizabeth Goodyear, Melanie Collier, Sam Bosanquet, Dave and Jan
Bannister, Clare Williams, David Groom, Faye Sharpley, Mike Harrington, Stuart Blackmore,
Simeon Jones, Russel Hobson, Martin White, Deborah Sazer, Tony Lewis, Colin Jones, Martin
Warren, Keith Williams and Ian Morgan.
JON BAKER
Moth Recorder for VC44 Carms
14 Job’s Well Rd
CARMARTHEN
SA31 3HG
01267 221681
[email protected]
19
No.
15
18
68
200
228
240
263
285
294
304
341
410
411
412
438
453
455
460
464
595
607
631
647
658
672
694
697
714
786
787
789
792
English Name
Orange Swift
Map-winged Swift
Stigmella salicis
Psychoides filicivora
Monopis weaverella
Tinea pellionella
Lyonetia clerkella
Caloptilia azaleella
Aspilapteryx tringipennella
Parornix devoniella
Phyllonorycter maestingella
Argyresthia brockeella
Argyresthia goedartella
Argyresthia pygmaeella
Swammerdamia pyrella
Ypsolopha dentella
Ypsolopha scabrella
Ypsolopha parenthesella
SN12
1
SN22
SN30
SN31
SN32
SN40
SN50
SN51
SN53
SS49
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
Brown House-moth
Carcina quercana
Depressaria pastinacella
Agonopterix nanatella
Agonopterix arenella
Agonopterix yeatiana
Bryotropha desertella
Bryotropha terrella
Bryotropha domestica
Mirificarma mulinella
SN73
2
Diamond-backed Moth
Elachista biatomella
Elachista canapennella
Cosmiotes freyerella
SN63
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
20
SS59
#SQ
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
SUM
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
No.
812
819
843
873
937
938
964
966
969
972
998
1010
1031
1038
1062
1089
1092
1093
1111
1126
1134
1138
1151
1155
1165
1175
1178
1179
1205
1233
1260
1261
English Name
Scrobipalpa instabilella
Scrobipalpa costella
Aproaerema anthylidella
Blastobasis lignea
Agapeta hamana
Agapeta zoegana
Cochylis dubitana
Cochylis atricapitana
Pandemis corylana
Pandemis heparana
Epiphyas postvittana
Ditula angustiorana
Eana penziana
Acleris laterana
Acleris emargana
Apotomis semifasciana
Apotomis turbidana
Apotomis betuletana
Bactra lancealana
Ancylis badiana
Epinotia ramella
Epinotia nisella
Epinotia trigonella
Epinotia brunnichana
Zeiraphera isertana
Epiblema uddmanniana
Epiblema roborana
Epiblema incarnatana
Spilonota ocellana
Pammene aurita
Cydia splendana
Cydia pomonella
SN12
SN22
SN30
SN31
SN32
SN40
5
20
1
2
SN50
SN51
SN53
SN63
SN73
SS49
10
1
1
10
1
1
2
3
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
10
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
21
2
SS59
#SQ
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
3
4
4
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
SUM
10
1
1
38
1
1
2
3
3
5
14
1
1
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
3
12
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
6
1
No.
1288
1302
1303
1304
1305
1313
1331
1334
1338
1340
1344
1345
1348
1365
1388
1405
1413
1425
1428
1439
1481
1497
1509
1523
1524
1634
1636
1637
1640
1645
1646
1647
English Name
Twenty-plume Moth
Crambus perlella
Agriphila selasella
Agriphila straminella
Agriphila tristella
Catoptria pinella
SN12
SN22
SN30
SN31
SN32
SN40
SN50
1
10
5
2
2
Lackey
Grass Eggar
Oak Eggar
Drinker
Scalloped Hook-tip
Oak Hook-tip
Barred Hook-tip
SN73
SS49
1
1
3
2
3
2
2
5
4
1
4
30
7
10
4
1
1
1
1
5
3
10
300
SS59
7
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
10
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
22
2
2
2
10
7
8
3
1
1
5
1
1
2
4
1
1
3
Brown China-mark
Ringed China-mark
Trachycera advenella
Homoeosoma sinuella
Amblyptilia acanthydactyla
Stenoptilia pterodactyla
Oidaematophorus lithodactyla
Emmelina monodactyla
SN63
1
Scoparia ambigualis
Dipleurina lacustrata
Eudonia truncicolella
Eudonia mercurella
Mother of Pearl
Gold Triangle
Wax Moth
Bee Moth
SN53
1
1
Water Veneer
Pyrausta despicata
Udea lutealis
SN51
25
5
3
#SQ
2
1
2
6
4
3
1
2
2
2
6
3
1
1
1
9
4
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
6
2
2
1
SUM
2
1
5
59
13
3
1
6
6
13
314
10
1
1
2
21
5
1
4
13
1
1
1
1
3
1
25
7
25
10
4
1
No.
1648
1651
1652
1665
1666
1682
1702
1708
1713
1718
1722
1724
1725
1728
1732
1737
1738
1742
1751
1752
1754
1755
1756
1759
1762
1764
1765
1769
1777
1789
1794
1802
English Name
Pebble Hook-tip
Chinese Character
Peach Blossom
Grass Emerald
Large Emerald
Blood-vein
Small Fan-footed Wave
Single-dotted Wave
Riband Wave
Oblique Striped
Flame Carpet
Red Twin-spot Carpet
Dark-barred Twin-spot Carpet
Garden Carpet
Shaded Broad-bar
Small Argent and Sable
Common Carpet
Yellow Shell
Devon Carpet
Purple Bar
Phoenix
Chevron
Northern Spinach
Small Phoenix
Dark Marbled Carpet
Common Marbled Carpet
Barred Yellow
Spruce Carpet
July Highflyer
Scallop Shell
Sharp-angled Carpet
Rivulet
SN12
SN22
2
SN30
3
1
1
SN31
SN32
SN40
2
SN50
4
7
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
1
4
1
4
5
SN51
1
3
1
SN53
6
3
1
SN63
SN73
1
SS49
SS59
1
4
1
1
6
2
3
1
2
2
3
2
2
1
6
1
1
3
9
1
2
1
1
7
2
9
1
3
3
2
1
3
5
1
1
1
8
5
5
1
4
6
1
1
40
2
1
1
4
2
3
16
2
1
3
2
2
3
1
23
1
2
2
1
1
44
6
1
3
1
33
1
2
7
10
3
2
1
2
1
1
4
1
#SQ
7
2
6
1
1
4
8
1
6
1
7
5
4
2
2
1
8
2
1
4
4
3
1
9
3
3
1
1
6
1
1
2
SUM
19
4
14
1
4
6
16
1
20
3
18
18
14
6
3
1
38
11
3
6
11
4
3
112
9
3
1
1
46
2
2
2
No.
1803
1809
1817
1825
1830
1833
1835
1837
1838
1851
1862
1867
1873
1874
1875
1876
1882
1883
1884
1887
1890
1893
1894
1906
1907
1913
1915
1917
1919
1921
1931
1937
English Name
Small Rivulet
Twin-spot Carpet
Foxglove Pug
Lime-speck Pug
Wormwood Pug
Bleached Pug
White-spotted Pug
Grey Pug
Tawny Speckled Pug
Golden-rod Pug
Double-striped Pug
Treble-bar
Welsh Wave
Dingy Shell
Small White Wave
Small Yellow Wave
Small Seraphim
Yellow-barred Brindle
Magpie
Clouded Border
Sharp-angled Peacock
Tawny-barred Angle
Latticed Heath
Brimstone Moth
Bordered Beauty
Canary-shouldered Thorn
September Thorn
Early Thorn
Purple Thorn
Scalloped Oak
Peppered Moth
Willow Beauty
SN12
SN22
1
SN30
SN31
1
SN32
SN40
SN50
SN51
1
4
SN53
2
SN63
SN73
SS49
SS59
1
2
2
1
1
3
16
2
1
1
2
1
7
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
5
3
9
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
3
18
1
8
4
1
1
2
3
5
5
2
6
2
1
1
3
1
2
3
2
4
1
6
3
1
2
1
1
1
24
8
8
2
1
2
2
1
4
5
2
6
#SQ
5
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
4
3
6
1
1
11
2
4
1
6
2
2
4
6
SUM
6
4
1
4
1
3
17
2
1
2
1
7
1
1
3
1
2
4
8
6
33
2
1
57
3
7
1
17
4
2
6
20
No.
1940
1947
1955
1956
1968
1981
1984
1991
1994
1997
2000
2003
2006
2007
2008
2011
2030
2033
2037
2044
2047
2049
2050
2051
2061
2064
2081
2085
2089
2092
2102
2107
English Name
Satin Beauty
Engrailed
Common White Wave
Common Wave
Yellow Belle
Poplar Hawk-moth
Humming-bird Hawk-moth
Elephant Hawk-moth
Buff-tip
Sallow Kitten
Iron Prominent
Pebble Prominent
Lesser Swallow Prominent
Swallow Prominent
Coxcomb Prominent
Pale Prominent
Yellow-tail
Black Arches
Rosy Footman
Dingy Footman
Scarce Footman
Buff Footman
Common Footman
Four-spotted Footman
Buff Ermine
Ruby Tiger
White-line Dart
Archer's Dart
Heart & Dart
Shuttle-shaped Dart
Flame Shoulder
Large Yellow Underwing
SN12
SN22
SN30
SN31
SN32
SN40
1
1
SN50
SN51
SN53
6
SN63
SN73
SS49
SS59
1
1
4
4
3
13
1
1
3
1
5
5
1
3
10
3
6
2
1
1
5
1
2
5
5
3
11
9
1
5
21
2
9
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
8
3
3
1
5
6
6
3
1
4
2
8
1
4
10
2
14
2
2
15
3
5
1
4
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
20
1
1
54
35
8
12
1
208
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
8
12
4
2
2
1
3
4
20
10
50
4
15
25
38
1
32
21
9
12
2
25
7
14
7
5
1
2
8
#SQ
1
2
1
4
1
4
1
3
3
6
6
8
4
3
9
6
3
6
5
8
2
7
3
3
1
7
1
1
3
2
11
13
SUM
6
2
4
9
13
5
1
3
16
8
18
20
10
6
33
20
25
57
14
35
2
235
5
3
2
19
12
4
3
2
139
258
No.
2109
2111
2112
2118
2122
2123
2126
2127
2130
2133
2134
2159
2160
2173
2176
2177
2192
2193
2197
2198
2225
2289
2291
2293
2295
2297
2298
2300
2305
2306
2311
2318
English Name
Lesser Yellow Underwing
Lsr Bd-bd Yellow Uwing
Least Yellow Underwing
True Lover's Knot
Purple Clay
Small Square-spot
Setaceous Hebrew Character
Triple-spotted Clay
Dotted Clay
Six-striped Rustic
Square-spot Rustic
Dog's Tooth
Bright-line Brown-eye
Lychnis
Antler Moth
Hedge Rustic
Brown-line Bright-eye
Clay
Southern Wainscot
Smoky Wainscot
Minor Shoulder-knot
Knot Grass
Coronet
Marbled Beauty
Marbled Green
Copper Underwing
Svensson's C. Underwing
Old Lady
Small Angle Shades
Angle Shades
Double Kidney
Dun-bar
SN12
SN22
6
1
6
SN30
1
4
SN31
1
3
SN32
1
10
SN40
SN50
1
9
1
1
SN51
4
7
3
30
1
1
1
1
1
SN53
SN63
SN73
4
1
1
SS49
3
2
1
SS59
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
2
2
20
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
26
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
3
6
3
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
8
2
26
5
6
1
5
1
#SQ
6
12
3
3
1
3
3
1
3
2
3
1
3
1
5
1
1
4
1
9
1
8
1
1
1
7
1
1
2
2
3
6
SUM
11
56
5
33
1
3
3
1
4
3
3
1
4
1
11
2
1
6
3
39
1
11
1
5
1
36
1
1
3
2
7
23
No.
2321
2335
2341
2342
2343.5
2345
2350
2353
2360
2361
2368
2369
2373
2379
2382
2421
2425
2434
2439
2441
2443
2449
2450
2469
2474
2477
2484
2485
2489
English Name
Dark Arches
Slender Brindle
Cloaked Minor
Rosy Minor
Common Rustic. agg
Small Dotted Buff
Small Wainscot
Flounced Rustic
Ear Moth
Rosy Rustic
Crescent
Bulrush Wainscot
Webb's Wainscot
Small Rufous
Rustic
Scarce Silver Lines
Nut-tree Tussock
Burnished Brass
Gold Spot
Silver Y
Plain Golden Y
Dark Spectacle
Spectacle
Herald
Straw Dot
Snout
Pinion-streaked Snout
Marsh Oblique-barred
Fan-foot
SN12
2
SN22
SN30
SN31
SN32
2
2
SN40
1
SN50
1
SN51
9
SN53
10
1
SN63
2
SN73
2
1
7
1
6
5
10
10
15
6
1
1
2
SS59
2
3
4
13
1
1
2
1
6
SS49
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
27
1
#SQ
8
2
2
2
11
1
2
2
1
7
1
1
1
5
3
1
3
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
5
2
3
1
4
SUM
29
3
3
4
84
1
2
3
2
10
2
8
1
5
3
2
7
2
1
6
1
1
3
1
6
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