Presidential Citation: Recognizing Club Outstanding Achievement

Transcription

Presidential Citation: Recognizing Club Outstanding Achievement
In Motion
ROTARY
Foundation Team
PDG Chuck Davidson
District Rotary Foundation Chair
PDG Travis White
Foundation Stewardship
PDG Donna Phillips
Annual Giving
DGN Scott Mills
Paul Harris Society & Newsletter Editor
PDG D.R. Butler
Major Gifts & Planned Giving
Stephen Gresham
Endowment Fund & Triple Crown
Colleen Bonadonna
PolioPlus
AFA Vance Zavela
Grants
Andrew Wade
Global Grants
AFA Henry Weinschenk
Global Grants Assistant
Jim Church
Global Grants Assistant
Joe Akkara
District Grants
Bill Holliman
District Grants Assistant
AG Joseph Luquire
Scholarships
PDG Andy Turner
Vocational Training Team Co-Chair
Michelle Peters
Vocational Training Team Co-Chair
Lester Schoene
World Peace Fellowships
TBD
Alumni
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Ron Burton
President, Rotary International
Juanita Cawley
District Governor
In this edition
2 Goal Setting at PETS
2 “This Close” to Triple Crown
3 Nominate a Peace Fellow
4 PHS 250 by June 20
4 New PHS Member: Fairfield
5 Your Last Happy Dollar
6 Wizards’ End Polio Night
7 Polio Ambassador: Kovacs
7 Points Still Available
8 Developing Sustainable Projects
8 Rotary Foundation Calendar
8 Celebrate Rotary’s Birthday
9 Theatre of the Oppressed
9 Israel Remains Polio-Free
9 Did You Forget Something?
10 AFA of the Month: Strohl
11 India Certified Polio-Free
11 Polio Webinar
12 Writing the Check
12 Top Ten All-Time Giving Clubs
13 Farewell to Sophie
13 RI & TRF Annual Reports
14 PHS Membership Form
15 Top Ten Clubs
16 Monthly Contribution Report
17 TRF Team
Copyright © 2014 Rotary District 7610 All Rights Reserved
IS HUMANITY IN MOTION
The Rotary Foundation Newsletter for District 7610
February 2014
Presidential Citation: Recognizing Club Outstanding Achievement
March 31 deadline nearing for certifying your club’s achievements in 2013-14.
The 2013-14 Presidential Citation recognizes Rotary clubs for an
array of achievements that promote our membership growth, enhance
humanitarian service through our Foundation, and strengthen our
network through the family of Rotary. By qualifying for the
Presidential Citation, clubs contribute to Rotary’s strategic goals and
multiply the impact of their good work through the collective focus of
more than 34,000 Rotary clubs worldwide.
To qualify for the Presidential Citation, clubs must complete all three
required activities, along with three additional activities in each
category. Clubs that complete four additional activities in each
category will qualify for the Presidential Citation with Distinction.
Unless otherwise specified, all activities must be undertaken and
completed between 1 July and 31 March of the 2013-14 Rotary year.
Clubs should complete the form and send it to the district governor no
later than 31 March. Forms sent to Rotary International will NOT be
processed.
Enhancing Humanitarian Service Through Our Foundation
In addition to completing all of the required elements for membership and family of Rotary
activities listed in the citation requirements, to qualify for the Presidential Citation a club also must
complete at least one community or international humanitarian service project related to at least
one of Rotary’s areas of focus in partnership with The Rotary Foundation and complete three
additional activities, listed below. Your club will receive the citation “with distinction,” if the club
completes four additional activities in each category and certifies the completion to the District
Governor before March 31. The additional activities for enhancing humanitarian service through
our Foundation are:
Submit 2013-14 Rotary Foundation giving goals using Rotary Club Central.
Support polio eradication through a community fundraising initiative OR implement a public
awareness campaign to inform the community about Rotary’s contributions to polio eradication.
Attain 100 percent participation in Rotary Foundation Annual Fund giving (every active member
contributes) (see the monthly giving report on page 16 for your club’s achievement towards this
goal as to current members who are EREY and Sustaining Members).
Attain a minimum Annual Fund contribution of US$100 per capita.
Help secure our Foundation’s future by making a contribution or a bequest to the Permanent
Fund.
Have at least 10 percent of club members enrolled in Rotary’s recurring giving program, Rotary
Direct.
Participate in a project funded by a global grant or packaged grant.
Sponsor a Rotary Peace Fellow OR assist another club in its support of a Rotary Peace Fellow.
A Suggestion for Setting Your Club’s Annual Giving Foundation Goal for 2014-15
Goal-setting is one key to a successful year.
BY PDG CHUCK DAVIDSON, DISTRICT ROTARY FOUNDATION CHAIR
A club’s goal for giving to the Annual Fund—SHARE is typically set by
the club’s incoming Board of Directors. This goal is then provided to
The Rotary Foundation through the district at PETS by the club
president-elect. Although such a goal can be changed during the
Rotary year, in most instances, it makes sense to set a challenging
but achievable goal, and then to stick with it.
A general suggestion for setting a challenging but achievable goal is
to base it on your club’s giving history to the Annual Fund. The “Club
Fundraising Analysis” document is a recommended way to do this.
Your Area Foundation Advisor has your club’s Fundraising Analysis
and can make it available to you.
The Club Fundraising Analysis is a one-page document that (among other things) shows your club’s giving history for the
last four complete years (2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13), plus your history to date for the current year (201314). Since the current year data are incomplete, ignore that year for goal-setting purposes.
Because giving amounts vary from year-to-year based on a number of factors, averaging the last four complete years
tends to even out such variations. The Club Fundraising Analysis for your club no longer does this calculation for you, but
you can do it easily. Simply average the four “Annual Fund Contributions” shown at the top center of your analysis report
for 2009-10 through 2012-13. Most would agree that a recent four-year average is achievable since it reflects what has
been achieved in the near past. Adding an extra amount to that average (such as 10%) provides the challenge, giving rise
to a challenging but achievable goal.
In summary, District 7610 suggests that your club establish its Rotary Foundation Annual Giving goal for 2014-15
by adding 10% to your club’s prior contributions averaged over the last four complete years.
Ashburn Rotary Club is Near its Goal of Being First 100% Triple Crown Club
If your club is interested in learning more about the Triple Crown recognition, or to
schedule a presentation of the Triple Crown pin to members of your club, please
contact Steve Gresham, District Endowment Fund Chair.
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February 2014
85% Benefactors
Many clubs find this recognition difficult to achieve because of the Benefactor
requirement. The Rotary Club of Ashburn, however, has experienced a quiet
revolution over the past three years, growing its membership in each of the Triple
Crown recognition categories to the point where it is “this close” to becoming
District 7610’s first 100% Triple Crown Club. The membership of the club was
100% Sustaining Member last year, and this year it is 85% Benefactor and 73%
Paul Harris Fellow. The club, which has 33 members, has the highest
percentage of Benefactors of any club in District 7610. The club has set a goal
this year to again be 100% Sustaining Member and to become 100% Benefactor,
while working to close the gap on the third category, Paul Harris Fellow.
73% Paul Harris Fellow
District 7610’s Triple Crown recognizes individuals who are a Paul Harris Fellow,
Sustaining Member, and Benefactor. Members who achieve this distinction
receive a unique Triple Crown pin in recognition for their generous commitment
for The Rotary Foundation. A Rotary Club can be recognized as a 100% Triple
Crown Club when all of its members are Paul Harris Fellows, Sustaining
Members, and Benefactors.
100% Sustaining Member (as of 6/30/13)
Club is “this close” to 100% Benefactor, 100% Paul Harris Fellow, and 100% Sustaining Member Club!
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
Nominate a Scholar to be a Rotary Peace Fellow
Club-endorsed Peace Fellow candidate nominations due to District Chair by May 18, 2014.
Applications are now being accepted for Rotary Peace Fellowships for classes beginning in 2015. If
you know a likely candidate, please support her or him in applying for this unique opportunity.
District 7610 has a history of nominating winning candidates. See the Application Process below
for deadlines.
The Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution is Rotary’s major
educational priority in achieving TRF’s mission for world understanding and peace. Rotary Peace
Centers provide Rotary an opportunity to shape future community and world leaders dedicated to
working for peace by allowing fellows to focus on hunger, poverty, human rights issues, conflict over resources, and other
obstacles to peace.
Up to 110 new Rotary Peace Fellows are selected annually on a world-competitive basis to study for one to two academic
years in graduate programs leading to a master’s-level degree in international relations, peace studies, conflict resolution,
and related subjects or for a three-month certificate program. A professional development certification program through
the Peace Center in Thailand is also available to applicants who are well-established in their chosen careers. All districts
are invited to submit any number of candidates.
Eligibility Criteria
● A strong commitment to international understanding and peace demonstrated through professional and academic
achievements and personal and community service activities
● A bachelor’s degree or commensurate experience as a minimum, with strong academic achievement
● A minimum of three years’ combined paid or unpaid full-time relevant work experience (master’s degree) or five years’
relevant work experience with current full-time employment in a mid- to upper-level position (certificate program)
● Proficiency in a second language (for admission to the master’s degree program) or in English (for admission to the
certificate program)
● Strong leadership skills
Application Process
The fellowship application and selection process consists of three levels: club, district, and world. There is no limit to the
number of qualified candidates a club and/or district may submit to the world competition.
Club level – Applications must be endorsed by the sponsoring club – Individual Rotary clubs initially screen and
select fellowship applications to forward club-endorsed nominations to the district level for competition.
District level – Club-endorsed applications are due by May 18, 2014 to District Chairman Lester Schoene.
World level - Each Rotary district submits candidates’ applications to the Foundation on or before 1 July. The Foundation
will inform candidates and districts about final selection decisions in November.
More information, links to applications, program guides and handbooks are available on-line at https://www.rotary.org/
en/peace-fellowships or from District Rotary Peace Fellow Chair Lester Schoene at [email protected]
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 3
Paul Harris Society Aims for 250 Members by June 30, 2014
Each Rotary Club challenged to induct one additional PHS member.
Will you make that commitment today by returning a completed membership form (see page 14 of
this newsletter), which will help District 7610 meet its goal of reaching 250 members by June 30, 2014?
District 7610 can exceed its goal of 250 PHS members by June 30, 2014 if each of our 54 Rotary
clubs has a net growth of one new PHS member between December 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014. That
is an average of fewer than 2 PHS members per week, or fewer than 8 new PHS members per month in
District 7610. Herndon, Rappahannock-Fredericksburg, and West Springfield already have recruited a
new PHS. Will your club?
Make this your New Year’s Resolution: Become a member of The Paul Harris Society and help
expand Rotary’s capacity to serve our community and the world.
A PHS brochure is available on the PHS webpage of the District 7610 website. Please complete a
membership form (see page 14 of this newsletter) and send it directly to The Rotary Foundation, 14280
Collections Center Drive, Chicago, IL 60693, and send a copy to PHS Chair Scott Mills. Thank you!
District 7610 Paul Harris Society Members
The Paul Harris Society recognizes donors who pledge to give $1,000 to the Annual Fund—SHARE and
other qualified TRF funds each year they are financially able. The generosity of PHS members helps to
fuel our Service Above Self when PHS members commit their annual PHS contributions to Annual
Fund—SHARE, ensuring that our clubs will have access to District Designated funds to finance Global
Grants, District Grants, and scholarships. That is why each club has been challenged with the goal of
inducting one new PHS member to help District 7610 meet its goal of reaching 250 PHS members
before June 30, 2014.
Help Us Reach the Goal!
250
BY SCOTT MILLS, DGN & PHS CHAIR
202
Herndon Rotarian Jeff Fairfield is a New Paul Harris Society Member
H e r n d o n
Rotarian Jeff
Fairfield
(center) was
inducted into
the
Paul
Harris Society
by PDG &
DRFC Chuck
Davidson
(left) and by
DGN & PHS
Coordinator
Scott
Mills
(right) at the
meeting of the
Rotary Club of
Herndon on
January 15.
Photo by Mary Drum.
Page 4
February 2014
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
Your Last Happy Dollar
You can continue making the world a better place—forever!
BY STEVE GRESHAM, DISTRICT ENDOWMENT FUND CHAIR
At our weekly meetings, many of us take advantage of "Happy Talk"
to share some good news about something happening in our lives . .
. the birth of a child, the marriage of a son or daughter, the arrival of
a grandchild. We contribute happily for the privilege of sharing the
good news.
As Rotarians, we strive to "make the world a better place." We
eradicate polio. We build wells to supply clean water. We offer
fellowships to promote peace, tolerance and cooperation. We are
proud of our efforts.
Your Endowment Fund gift makes smiles and changes
Would you like your efforts to live on after your lifetime? You can lives...forever.
continue making a difference in the world through The Rotary
Foundation's Endowment Fund. You can designate the spendable earnings from your endowed gift to SHARE, which
makes a portion available to support club, and district projects. Your club and District 7610 can benefit from your legacy
for years to come.
A portion of available earnings from our Endowment Fund supplements Foundation activities and helps strengthen our
future commitments. Your contributions are invested in perpetuity. A percentage of the total value of the Endowment Fund
is spent annually to benefit current and future Foundation grants and programs. The Foundation has set a goal of $1 billion
in Endowment Fund assets and gift commitments by 2025.
I can't think of a better legacy than to have the efforts and aspirations of my involvement in Rotary continue after I have
passed on. I'll never miss the money. When I explained my thoughts to my heirs, they were pleased and supportive of
this opportunity. Please join me by including a bequest to the Endowment Fund (previously known as the Permanent
Fund) in your estate plans.
Think of it as your last Happy Dollar . . . a Happy Dollar that keeps on giving for years and years.
The Rotary Foundation’s Endowment Fund
You are invited you to give a gift that will go beyond your lifetime: a donation to The Rotary Foundation’s Endowment
Fund. This fund enables individuals to combine their gifts into a significant force to address the world’s greatest needs for
generations to come. The initial target of US$200 million for the Endowment Fund was met in 2005, six years ahead of
schedule. The next target is $1 billion by 2025. In a Rotary year, about $8 million from the Endowment Fund is made
available to support Foundation programs.
The Rotary Foundation recognizes donors who make donations to the Endowment Fund in several different ways:
Benefactor
You may become a Benefactor by making the Endowment Fund a beneficiary in your estate plans or by donating $1,000
or more to the Endowment Fund outright.
Bequest Society
Couples or individuals who have made commitments of $10,000 or more in their estate plans, such as in a will, living trust,
or through whole or universal life insurance, can become Bequest Society members. All Bequest Society members
receive recognition from the Trustees of The Rotary Foundation. Donors may elect to receive an engraved crystal
recognition piece and a Bequest Society pin. You must ask to become a Bequest Society member by filling out a form.
For more information:
Read about planned giving, donate now, or make your Endowment Fund commitment now. Call The Rotary Foundation’s
Contact Center at 1-866-9ROTARY (1-866-976-8279), or e-mail at [email protected] A team of Foundation
specialists will answer calls Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time.
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 5
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February 2014
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February Polio Ambassador: Karen Kovacs
Post-Polio Syndrome: The effects of polio will be treated for decades after we eradicate the disease.
BY KAREN W. KOVACS, P.T., PRESIDENT, GLOUCESTER POINT ROTARY CLUB
We may be “this close” to eradicating the polio virus, but the effects of polio,
manifested through Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS), will be treated for many decades
after we eradicate the disease.
I have treated several people diagnosed with PPS. Their symptoms included pain,
fatigue and weakness. But these same symptoms are hallmarks of other diseases,
too, so the Post-Polio Health Education Network reminds us, "it's important to not get
hung up on a definition." Polio survivors, like anyone, need to work with their medical
team to find appropriate treatment for their unique symptoms.
People who have had polio, like many of my patients, typically come to physical
therapy because of pain and weakness. The patients I have worked with have been
as young as 40 years old. We still aren't exactly sure what causes the symptoms so
many years after the virus affects a person, typically more than 30 years later. And
no one really knows why some people experience PPS and others do not.
We think the symptoms are the result of damage at the point where the nerve
innervates a muscle to "tell it what to do." Then the muscles don't provide adequate
support at the joints. Aging bodies start to hurt and people notice more difficulty with normal activities like getting up out of
a chair. Sound familiar? A carefully prescribed program is really important. Just adding more exercise is definitely not
advised with the type of weakness that is associated with PPS.
Physical Therapists sometimes work with an orthotist to make low profile braces that integrate the latest technology (like
carbon) to give more stability at a polio survivor’s ankle or knee. This helps protect the patient's joints and makes it easier
to get around. These are not like the braces President Roosevelt wore.
Ironically, the profession of physical therapy went through a huge growth spurt after World War II because of the increased
number of citizens needing rehabilitation, including wounded soldiers and people with polio. We still use many of the
techniques that were developed in the 1950s to facilitate muscle recruitment for polio survivors with our patients who have
impaired neuromuscular function. This even includes athletes who have been injured or people who have developed
compensation habits because of pain.
It's ironic to me that despite advances in medicine and technology, PTs may still be treating patients with PPS (if those
people are fortunate enough to have access to health care) beyond 2050. We really are "this close" to eradicating the
virus; we can’t stop now.
Karen Kovacs is a Physical Therapist in Gloucester Point, Board Certified in Orthopedics, and a USA Triathlon Coach.
Points Still Available for New PHS Members and New PHFs
500 points available for each new PHS and new PHF contributing $500 or more.
New Paul Harris Fellows who donate $500 or more to Annual Fund-SHARE and new Paul Harris Society members can
take advantage of a special offer that is made available thanks to the generosity of fellow Rotarians here in District 7610,
who will transfer 500 TRF Recognition Points to the new PHF or new PHS who qualify. To qualify to receive the 500
points, New Paul Harris Fellows must mail/fax/email/telephone their contribution of $500 or more to the Annual Fund—
SHARE to The Rotary Foundation. New Paul Harris Society members must declare their intent to be a PHS member
and either (1) make an initial contribution of $500 or more to the Annual Fund-SHARE, or (2) enroll in Rotary Direct at a
level sufficient to meet their annual PHS contribution pledge of $1,000 to the Annual Fund—SHARE ($85 per month, $250
per quarter, or $1,000 annually). Both New PHF & PHS: Send a copy of the contribution or electronic confirmation to
DGN Scott Mills. Points may go to the donor or to a person the donor indicates when transmitting the information to DGN
Scott. The points will be available until they are all used. Only District 7610 Rotarians are eligible. Don’t delay!
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 7
Developing Sustainable Global Grants Projects
Do you know how to build sustainability into every project that your club undertakes?
Sustainability means different things to different organizations. For The Rotary Foundation, sustainability means providing
long-term solutions to community needs that the benefiting community can maintain after grant funding ends. Global grant
projects must be sustainable and display the following characteristics:
Community Needs/Strengths: Have local sponsors conduct a thorough assessment of the community’s needs to identify
a need that sponsors are able to support and that meets beneficiaries’ needs and fits their values and culture. Involve multiple community partners in the planning process.
Materials/Technology: Purchase equipment and new technology from local sources, when possible. Ensure spare parts
are readily available. Involve community members when selecting technology or equipment, and train them to operate,
maintain, and repair it on their own.
Funding: Confirm local funding source to provide long-term operation, maintenance, repair, and project longevity. Compensate project participants appropriately for their work to ensure continuity of services.
Knowledge: Provide training, education, and community outreach to strengthen beneficiaries’ capacity to meet project
objectives. Confirm that recipients have a plan to transfer knowledge to new beneficiaries. Collaborate with local agencies/organizations to supply expertise as needed.
Motivation: Provide incentives for beneficiaries and project participants to continue ongoing support. Identify personnel
willing to lead beneficiaries to sustain project outcomes. Prepare the community to assume ownership of the project once
global grant funds are fully expended.
Monitoring/Evaluation: Develop clear and measurable project objectives, and identify methods for collecting project data.
Establish baseline data for evaluation capable of demonstrating significant change for at least three years.
The Rotary Foundation Calendar for District 7610
Engage Rotary, Change Lives.
2014
February
1
Progress reports due for 2013-2014 District Grant
22
Washington Wizards End Polio Now Night
23
Rotary’s 109th Birthday!
April
12
Duke-UNC Peace Center Conference, Chapel Hill, NC
24-27 District 7610 Rotary Reunion, Virginia Crossings, Glen
Allen, VA
May
1
Final reports due for 2013-2014 District Grant
10
Club Leadership Training Seminar
15-17 Zone 33 Partnered Training (Foundation, Membership, &
Public Image), Raleigh, NC
18
Peace Fellow applications due to District Chair with club
endorsements
June
TBA Peace Fellow applicant interviews (district forwards
nominations to TRF by July 1)
1-4 RI Convention, Sydney, Australia
30
Deadline for 2013-2014 contributions to The Rotary
Foundation
Celebrate Rotary’s 109th Birthday by Raising Awareness and Funding for PolioPlus
Rotary’s Birthday on February 23rd is fast approaching. Why not take the opportunity to hold a community awareness
fundraising event for polio around this time, which qualifies for one of the additional elements for the Presidential
Citation? These events do not have to be major events, although they can be, but their purpose is to get the word out
about Rotary’s Number One humanitarian project and increase participation and knowledge about Rotary and it’s
programs. Over the years many clubs have had several kinds of activities such as:
• Posting Rotary Public Image bill boards along highly-traveled highways in the community
• Sending press releases about your club’s activities regarding polio eradication
• Participating in the Washington Wizards’ End Polio Night on February 22 and be part of a district-wide event
• Holding pancake suppers, fish fries, BBQ suppers and wine tastings to name just a few.
Page 8
February 2014
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
Rotary Peace Fellows at ICU Present “Theatre of the Oppressed” Workshop
District 7610’s Peace Fellow, Sana Saeed, and her class help communities face their challenges.
District 7610’s Peace Fellow, Sana Saeed, now studying
international studies in peace and conflict resolution at
International Christian University in Tokyo, Japan, joined
with her Rotary Peace Center classmates on January 26
to present a conflict resolution workshop entitled
Theater of the Oppressed (TO). The workshop is a
model of community-based theater developed by Nobel
Peace Prize nominee Augusto Boal.
First started in Brazil, Boal’s native country, it has been
practiced around the world for over 40 years. The goal
of Theater of the Oppressed is for participants to
dramatically analyze real-life oppressions/obstacles/
challenges they face and act out potential solutions to
overcome them. The theater process thus empowers Rotary Peace Fellow Sana Saeed (left) and DG Juanita Cawley shared a few
participants to go out into the world and take action moments with 2012-2013 RI President Sakuji Tanaka during the 2013 Dukeagainst the oppression, using the very solutions they UNC Peace Center Symposium, held last April.
tried out during scene work.
The goals of this workshop were to introduce participants to the TO process by fully immersing them in the exercises and
techniques, and to create a safe space for participants to explore social issues relevant to the group’s interests and
concerns.
Israel Remains Polio-Free, Averting Outbreak With Quick Response
Country remains polio-free seven months after virus discovered.
Seven months after the polio virus was discovered in Israeli sewage and four-and-a-half months after the introduction of a
national vaccination scheme, the Israeli Health Ministry has concluded that the crisis is over. Recent samples from sewage
treatment plants tested negative for the virus.
The finding, coupled with the fact that stool samples taken throughout this period from people in areas where the virus was
present in sewage all tested negative, means the episode ended without a single new case of the disease.
The disease, which had been eradicated in Israel for more than two decades, was identified in sewage systems in May
2013—first in the south and then in the north of the country—during routine testing. Despite legal challenges to the
administration of live polio virus, the nation quickly responded to the crisis and completed inoculation efforts, averting a
massive outbreak of new cases of wild polio virus.
Maybe with the New Year’s celebrations you forgot
something. February 1 is the deadline for completing
and filing your club’s report on the progress you have
made towards completion of your District Grant project.
All reports should be sent to District Grant Chair Joe
Akkara. Remember, District 7610 cannot issue funds for
2014-15 until all reports are in for this year.
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 9
Meet AFA of the Month: Roy Strohl
Advisor for the Fredericksburg area clubs, Roy exemplifies Service Above Self.
BY PDG DONNA PHILLIPS, DISTRICT ANNUAL GIVING CHAIR
Roy Strohl is known to almost everyone in our district. He has been an active supporter
and promoter of Rotary in District 7610 from the District's inception. His Rotary support
and involvement has been featured in numerous ways in the Fredericksburg area
whether it be the local newspaper or radio station or Rotary sponsored events over the
years. When Roy was hired by Mary Washington College (now University of Mary
Washington) in 1985 to be their new University Librarian, he came with a fourteen year
career as an academic librarian and a three year involvement in Rotary. Prior to coming
to Fredericksburg, Roy had for more than eleven years been the College Librarian at
Emory & Henry College, but it was his membership in the Abingdon (VA) Rotary Club
that had gotten him involved in so many service and community focused endeavors as
soon as he arrived in Fredericksburg. He already had three years of perfect attendance
and has continued that tradition so that he now has a total of thirty-two years of perfect
attendance. He actively promotes make-ups whenever he has a chance...particularly to
our club's new members. He personally has made up at clubs in Europe, Canada, and here in the United States.
Roy earned his Eagle Scout Award in 1956 and went on to earn both a bronze and silver palm. He served as an assistant
Scout Master in Fort Wayne, Indiana and was a regional scout leader for the 1957 International Scout Jamboree held at
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. He was the assigned Scouter to escort then Vice President Richard Nixon at the opening
ceremonies of the Jamboree. To this day Roy's legacy with the Boy Scouts continues with his involvement in the
International Fellowship of Scouting Rotarians, and he is now a lifetime member of the IFSR.
After serving as a Quartermaster 2nd in the U.S. Navy, Roy returned to begin his studies at Hanover College in Indiana
where he earned bachelors' degrees in English Literature and Theology. Upon completion of his studies at Hanover, Roy
and his wife Cathy, moved to Louisville, Kentucky where Roy worked as a production supervisor and assistant plant
manager of a division of Corning Glass. At the end of two years he went on to pursue his interest in continuation of his
academic studies. He holds two masters level degrees from the University of Kentucky - English and Library Science. His
training as an academic librarian led to working at higher education institutions in Kentucky, Rhode Island, and Virginia.
While working at the University of Mary Washington, Roy served two terms as the chairman for the State Council for
Higher Education. Among his many accomplishments at the University of Mary Washington were the successful
completions of accreditation reviews, and the design and construction of the University's Simpson Library. When Roy
retired in 2010 he was the first librarian to be named University Librarian Emeritus. Roy was a frequent speaker at library
conventions and programs about ways to influence young students to become interested in careers in information
technology and library service. He served for many years on the Association for College and Research Libraries division of
the American Library Association.
When Roy arrived in Fredericksburg, he was approached by members of the Fredericksburg Rotary Club to start a new
Rotary Club in the area. In the Spring of 1985 it was determined that there were already a number of former Rotarians and
interested individuals in the process of creating a new club. From the outset the Rappahannock-Fredericksburg’s Rotary
Club, as it was to become known, had demonstrated an interest in Rotary and community service and a commitment to the
Rotary Foundation. With a charter ceremony held at the Boy Scout Jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill, then RI president William
Cadman presented Roy with the club's charter.
Roy served as the Rappahannock-Fredericksburg Rotary Club's Charter President 1985-1986, and he went on to serve as
the Governor's Area Representative to the Northern Neck for several years. He enjoyed serving as one of the District
Governor's contacts during the transition period that saw the establishment of District 7610. Roy was involved in the
development of both the Stafford Rotary Club and the Caroline County Rotary Club. He and his friend David Pierce served
as District Conference Chairs in Jerry Evan's term as District Governor. Roy led the Rappahannock-Fredericksburg
Rotary Club to be the second 100% Paul Harris Fellow Club in District 7610 and the first to be a 100% Multiple Paul Harris
Fellow Club. Roy is a Paul Harris Fellow +7 and a Bequest Society Member. He has proposed more than two dozen new
members to the Rappahannock-Fredericksburg Rotary Club.
Page 10
February 2014
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
They Said It Couldn’t Be Done: India is Polio-Free!
Historic triumph is celebrated in Rotary’s quest to make the world polio-free.
BY DAN NIXON, ROTARY NEWS
(13 Jan.) Throughout India and around the world, Rotary
clubs are celebrating a major milestone: India has gone
three years without a new case of polio. The last reported
case was a two-year-old girl in West Bengal on 13 January
2011.
To mark this historic triumph -- reached after a decades-long
battle against polio -- Rotary clubs illuminated landmarks
and iconic structures throughout the country with four simple
but powerful words, "India is polio free."
"India is polio free" (written in Hindi) illuminates Jodhpur Sojati Gate in
The three-year achievement sets the stage for polio-free Rajasthan, India.
certification of the entire Southeast Asia region by the World
Health Organization. The Indian government also plans to convene a polio summit in February to commemorate this
victory in the global effort to eradicate polio.
The challenge now is to replicate India's success in neighboring Pakistan, one of three remaining polio-endemic countries,
along with Afghanistan and Nigeria.
Rotary leaders in India are working with their Pakistani counterparts to share best practices and lessons learned during
India's successful anti-polio campaign. Rotary was particularly effective in obtaining the support of influential religious
leaders in India's Islamic communities. Pakistani Rotary leaders are playing a similar role to counter rumors and
misinformation about polio vaccinations that keep some Muslim parents from immunizing their children.
Meanwhile, National Immunization Days continue in both countries. During these large-scale drives, Rotary volunteers join
health workers to vaccinate every child under age five against polio.
"We must now stop polio in Pakistan to both protect Pakistani children and to safeguard our success in India and other
countries where we have beaten this terrible disease," says India PolioPlus Committee Chair Deepak Kapur. "Until polio is
finally eradicated globally, all unvaccinated children will remain at risk of infection and paralysis, no matter where they live."
Rotary’s PolioPlus in the news
Newsweek: India's Polio Legacy
Wall Street Journal: India Manages to Free Itself of Polio
National Geographic: How India Beat Polio
Voice of America: India Reaches Polio-Free Milestone
Polio Eradication: 2013 Year in Review . . . and How You Can Help in 2014
Join The Rotary Foundation on February 18 at 11AM EST for a webinar update on polio eradication to
hear about progress made last year in polio-endemic countries, and the impact of recent polio outbreaks.
Hear how you can support polio eradication through fundraising (particularly how to maximize donations
through the latest agreement with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), advocacy, and awarenessbuilding.
Space is limited to 500 attendees, so register today by clicking on the link below:
English: Tuesday, 18 February, 10:00-11:00
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 11
Writing the Check
Making The Rotary Foundation my charity of choice helps change lives and change the world.
BY PATRICIA VELKOFF, PH.D., ROTARY CLUB OF VIENNA
Once again, I realized that I need to make a donation to The Rotary Foundation before our Club Foundation Chair has to
track me down. I just recognized, though, why this provokes an odd mixture of pride and humility that doesn’t happen
when paying bills. It’s because of some striking statistics about world poverty that I came across shortly after joining
Rotary in 2011. After re-researching what I found (it was a little hard to believe), here is what I learned.
If the world were a global village with only 100 people in it, then in our global village:
80 would live in poverty
24 would have no electricity
25 would have no source of safe water in their homes or within a short walking distance
40 would have no access to sanitary toilet facilities
25 would sleep in their own beds at night
When it comes to education and information access:
26 would be illiterate, 18 of them women
6 would have college degrees
Food disparities would be striking:
30 would always have enough to eat
12 would be chronically undernourished
50 would not have a reliable source of food and would be hungry some or all of the time
20 more would be severely malnourished at all times
And wealth disparities would seem nearly insurmountable:
1 would own nearly 40% of all the household wealth in our village
10 would own 85% of the wealth
30 would have bank accounts
If all the money in the village were divided equally, each person would have $6,200 a year. But in our global village,
money is not divided equally. Instead, 20 people in our village have more than $9,000 a year, and 20 of us have less than
a dollar a day.
That is why writing my check to The Rotary Foundation feels somehow reverent and somehow insufficient, all at the same
time. It reminds me of what matters about this organization, and of what we are trying to accomplish together. I like being
part of a community where we pool our resources to reduce the enormous disparities in access and opportunity that exist
around the world. I’m guessing that’s why you’re part of this community, too; why you make The Rotary Foundation your
charity of choice; and why you try to keep the Rotary Foundation Chair from having to track you down. Of all the checks
that I write, in fact, this one may matter the most.
Top Ten All-Time Giving Rotary Clubs in District 7610
These ten Rotary Clubs lead District 7610 in all-time giving to The Rotary Foundation’s programs
and funds:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
McLean ($737,671.20)
Annandale ($714,456.12)
Alexandria ($600,982.03)
Rappahannock-Fredericksburg ($515,031.09)
Reston ($501,642.44)
Page 12
February 2014
6. Bailey’s Crossroads ($472,662.63)
7. Springfield ($420,396.00)
8. Vienna ($335,297.41)
9. Charlottesville ($308,241.46)
10.Middlesex ($293,718.98)
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
Fairfax & District 7610 Bid Sophie Farewell
Rotary Scholar Sophie McManus will study in South Africa
Recently, Fairfax Rotary
Club bid farewell to
Rotary Global Scholar
Sophie
McManus.
Sophie left for South
Africa to study as a
recipient of The Rotary
Foundation’s
Global
Scholarship. The Rotary
Club of Fairfax sponsored
Sophie’s application.
Sophie (right center) was
presented her scholarship
check
by
District
Governor Juanita Cawley
(left), joined by Fairfax
Scholarship Chair Verne
Tuininga (left center) and
PDG & DRFC Chuck
Davidson. Photo: Irby Hollans
Rotary International and The Rotary Foundation Issue Annual Reports
Reports document the good work Rotarians are doing to change lives.
By John Hewko, RI General Secretary
This past year was one of exciting achievements and forward momentum for
Rotary, as highlighted in the 2012-13 Rotary International and The Rotary
Foundation Annual Report.
We launched a bold new chapter in our partnership with the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation that makes your contributions to the vital polio eradication
end game work three times as hard.
We also finished preparing for the global launch of our new grant model,
boosting our ability to help more communities secure and sustain a better
quality of life. And we carried out our first projects with Mercy Ships, while
building on our work with Aga Khan University, UNESCO-IHE, the Rotary
Peace Centers, and other partners.
In addition, The Rotary Foundation earned top marks from several
independent charity evaluators, including the American Institute of
Philanthropy, Charity Navigator, and the Wise Giving Alliance.
I encourage you to review our annual report carefully, and to share it with others who may be interested in joining,
partnering with, or donating to Rotary. You can order print copies of the report at shop.rotary.org. For those who want a
more detailed look at Rotary finances, the audited financial statements are available for download.
Thank you for the important role you play in Rotary's work to help meet critical human needs, strengthening the
groundwork for a more peaceful world.
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 13
Please email or fax a copy to District 7610 PHS Chair,
Scott Mills [email protected] or fax: 703-848-8333.
Page 14
February 2014
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
Top Ten Clubs’ Giving Helps Engage Rotary, Change Lives
Thank you, Rotarians for helping to fuel our Service Above Self!
These clubs are leading the way in Per Capita, Annual Fund-SHARE, Polio, and Total giving this Rotary
Year. Congratulations to the Rotarians in these clubs who are helping all Rotarians to “do good in the
world.”
Top Ten Per Capita Giving Clubs
Top Ten Polio Plus Clubs (as of 1/18/14)
1. Annandale ($4,304.71)
2. Crystal City-Pentagon ($283.65)
3. Dulles International Airport ($260.74)
4. Herndon ($256.62)
5. Burke ($249.36)
6. McLean ($239.80)
7. Dunn Loring-Merrifield ($230.48)
8. Springfield ($219.57)
9. Bailey’s Crossroads ($216.05)
10. Leesburg-Daybreak ($209.24)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
T7.
Top Ten Annual Fund Clubs
Top Ten Total Giving Clubs
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Annandale ($103,313.00)
Herndon ($18,220.00)
McLean ($14,627.82)
Rappahannock-Fredericksburg ($13,960.00)
Bailey’s Crossroads ($12,099.00)
Fairfax ($11,820.00)
Blue Ridge Mountains ($9,450.00)
Dulles International Airport ($9,126.00)
Vienna ($8,998.05)
Tappahannock ($8,700.00)
Leesburg ($4,317.27)
Fredericksburg ($2,800.00)
Lake Ridge ($2,340.00)
West Point ($2,170.50)
West Springfield ($2,100.00)
Caroline County ($2,020.00)
Annandale ($2,000.00)
Fairfax ($2,000.00)
Stafford ($2,000.00)
10. Crystal City-Pentagon ($1,308.00)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Annandale ($105,313.00)
Herndon ($18,320.00)
McLean ($17,627.82)
Rappahannock-Fredericksburg ($14,110.00)
Fairfax ($13,820.00)
Alexandria ($12,440.00)
Bailey’s Crossroads ($12,169.00)
Leesburg ($11,542.27)
Fredericksburg ($11,428.00)
Crystal City-Pentagon ($10,317.38)
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 15
District 7610 Rotary Foundation YTD Giving Report (as of 01/27/2014)
Club Name
Albemarle County
Alexandria
Alexandria South
Annandale
Arlington
Ashburn
Bailey's Crossroads
Blue Ridge Mountains
Burke
Caroline County
Centreville and Chantilly
Charlottesville
Crystal City-Pentagon
Culpeper
Dulles International Airport
Dunn Loring-Merrifield
Fairfax
Falls Church
Fredericksburg
Gainesville-Haymarket
Gloucester
Gloucester Point
Great Falls
Herndon
Kilmarnock-Irvington-White Stone
King George-Dahlgren
Lake Ridge
Leesburg
Leesburg-Daybreak
Louisa County
Manassas
Manassas-Bull Run
Mathews
McLean
Middlesex County
Mount Vernon
Northern Neck
North Stafford County-Garrisonville
Orange
Purcellville
Rappahannock-Fredericksburg
Reston
Rosslyn-Fort Myer
Springfield
Stafford
Sterling
Tappahannock
Tysons Corner
Vienna
Warrenton
Warsaw
West Point
West Springfield
Woodbridge
Other
District Totals
Goal
Annual Fund
Entered on
YTD
Members
Annual
Rotary Club
ZERO
on
Fund Goal
Central
GIVING
7/1/2013
NO GOAL
CLUBS
REPORTED
$10,000+
$4,200.00
60
$4,200.00
$1,000.00
$0.00
$26,000.00 129
$4,690.00
$0.00
$1,000.00
10
$400.00
$4,308.00
24
$4,308.00 $103,313.00
$3,400.00
26
$3,400.00
$2,425.00
$0.00
$9,600.00
40
$4,451.00
$16,000.00
56
$16,000.00 $12,099.00
$10,500.00
63
$10,500.00
$9,450.00
$5,500.00
14
$5,500.00
$3,491.00
$3,400.00
17
$3,400.00
$1,500.00
$0.00
$1,850.00
15
$1,060.00
$9,936.00
65
$9,936.00
$5,682.50
$13,000.00
30
$13,000.00
$8,509.38
$0.00
$2,000.00
21
$1,000.00
$10,000.00
35
$10,000.00
$9,126.00
$3,400.00
21
$3,400.00
$4,840.00
$11,000.00
96
$11,000.00 $11,820.00
$4,000.00
21
$11,000.00
$225.00
$14,000.00
86
$14,000.00
$8,628.00
$6,858.00
32
$6,858.00
$3,935.00
$5,600.00
34
$5,600.00
$0.00
$5,220.00
41
$5,220.00
$4,500.00
$11,600.00
91
$11,600.00
$25.00
$24,100.00
71
$24,100.00 $18,220.00
$0.00
$3,000.00
40
$1,425.00
$750.00
$5,400.00
$7,400.00
$15,250.00
$1,900.00
$14,750.00
$3,000.00
$3,800.00
$20,125.00
$8,025.00
$2,000.00
$1,600.00
$2,000.00
$3,900.00
$7,700.00
$29,500.00
$7,850.00
$3,750.00
$7,200.00
$13,800.00
$1,500.00
$13,770.00
$9,000.00
$28,590.00
$13,000.00
$4,000.00
$4,880.00
$5,000.00
$3,500.00
$452,682.00
20
27
56
41
20
62
26
31
61
39
17
17
17
18
41
96
27
13
23
30
22
53
37
69
61
43
25
39
31
$750.00
$5,400.00
$7,400.00
$15,250.00
$1,900.00
$0.00
$3,000.00
$3,800.00
$20,125.00
$8,025.00
$2,000.00
$0.00
$2,000.00
$3,900.00
$7,700.00
$29,500.00
$7,850.00
$3,750.00
$7,200.00
$13,800.00
$1,500.00
$13,770.00
$9,000.00
$28,590.00
$13,000.00
$4,000.00
$4,880.00
$5,000.00
$0.00
$175.00
$4,474.00
$6,475.00
$8,579.00
$3,797.91
$100.00
$1,000.00
$0.00
$14,627.82
$1,575.00
$3,550.00
$0.00
$2,067.00
$725.00
$1,700.00
$13,960.00
$4,700.00
$100.00
$5,050.00
$4,866.00
$712.00
$8,700.00
$2,425.00
$8,998.05
$5,010.90
$0.00
$4,029.50
$6,695.00
$1,400.00
$85.00
2,200 $379,112.00 $337,392.06
% AF Goal
Per Cap(Target:
ita
58%
$100+
by 1/31/14)
$200+
ON
$0
TARGET
$16.67
24%
$36.36
18%
$40.00
40%
$4,304.71
2,398%
$93.27
71%
$111.28
46%
$216.05
76%
$150.00
90%
$249.36
63%
$88.24
44%
$70.67
57%
$87.42
57%
$283.65
65%
$47.62
50%
$260.74
91%
$230.48
142%
$123.13
107%
$10.71
6%
$100.33
62%
$122.97
57%
$0.00
0%
$109.76
86%
$0.27
0%
$256.62
76%
$35.63
48%
$8.75
$165.70
$115.63
$209.24
$189.90
$1.61
$38.46
$0.00
$239.80
$40.38
$208.82
$0.00
$121.59
$40.28
$41.46
$145.42
$174.07
$7.69
$219.57
$162.20
$32.36
$164.15
$65.54
$130.41
$82.15
$0.00
$161.18
$171.67
$45.16
$153.36
5%
83%
88%
56%
200%
1%
33%
0%
73%
20%
178%
0%
103%
19%
22%
47%
60%
3%
70%
35%
47%
63%
27%
31%
39%
0%
83%
134%
40%
Polio Goal
Polio
YTD
$2,000+
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$100.00
$2,000.00
$500.00
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$1,500.00
$1,000.00
$1,000.00
$500.00
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$300.00
$1,000.00
$2,000.00
$34.00
$70.00
$200.00
$2,020.00
$200.00
$1,308.00
$2,000.00
$1,000.00
$4,000.00
$600.00
$250.00
$2,000.00
$1,200.00
$500.00
$1,000.00
$500.00
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$150.00
$1,000.00
$2,500.00
$2,000.00
$2,000.00
$1,200.00
$500.00
$500.00
$600.00
$2,000.00
$1,500.00
$300.00
$300.00
$2,000.00
$500.00
$2,000.00
$6,000.00
$500.00
$2,000.00
$2,800.00
$625.00
$500.00
$100.00
$2,340.00
$4,317.27
$205.00
$221.00
$350.00
$762.65
$250.00
$150.00
$600.00
$200.00
$300.00
$2,000.00
$100.00
$1,300.00
$1,000.00
$250.00
$2,170.50
$2,100.00
75% $64,100.00 $30,873.42
Number of
Current
Members
Number
and % of
EREY*
Members
100%(2)
Number
and % of
Sustaining
Members*
100%(0)
61
125
10
25
29
33
53
66
12
16
14
65
29
21
33
24
88
20
85
33
35
43
83
72
42
1=2%
8=6%
5=50%
17=68%
27=93%
6=18%
30=57%
63=95%
5=42%
11=69%
5=36%
64=98%
28=97%
2=10%
23=70%
10=42%
88=100%
2=10%
70=82%
20=61%
0
37=86%
1=1%
70=97%
30=71%
1=2%
6=5%
5=50%
17=68^
0
6=18%
29=55%
62=94%
5=42%
10=63%
5=36%
10=15%
14=48%
1=5%
17=52%
10=42%
18=20%
2=10%
70=82%
18=55%
0
37=86%
0
26=36%
0
21
25
52
40
23
61
23
31
60
34
17
17
20
17
41
98
28
14
23
27
21
58
43
72
62
48
24
37
31
2=10%
13=52%
50=96%
13=33%
20=87%
1=2%
2=9%
0
58=97%
31=91%
6=35%
0
14=70%
17=100%
38=93%
96=98%
11=39%
1=7%
15=65%
26=96%
3=14%
18=31%
3=7%
54=54%
43=69%
0
11=46%
29=78%
2=6%
1=5%
9=36%
44=85%
12=30%
14=61%
1=2%
2=9%
0
11=18%
0
6=35%
0
9=45%
1=6%
1=6%
93=95%
11=39%
1=7%
15=65%
10=37%
0
18=31%
3=7%
11=15%
6=10%
0
10=42%
29=78%
2=6%
2,185 1,200=55%
689=32%
* 100% Sustaining Member and EREY Club banners are awarded based on the contributions of all Active members as of June 30, 2014. Send to TRF a Sustaining Member contribution of $100.00
to Annual Fund-SHARE for each new member who is inducted on or before June 30, 2014! 100% contribution status as of March 31, 2014 is an element of the Presidential Citation (see p. 1)
Contact District 7610’s Rotary Foundation Team to Assist Your Club
Foundation team can help with grants, scholarships, exchange programs, polio, and annual and planned giving.
District Rotary Foundation Chair
PDG Chuck Davidson
[email protected]
Area Foundation Advisors:
Area 1: Piedmont: Albemarle
County, Blue Ridge Mountains,
Charlottesville & Louisa County
Henry Weinschenk
[email protected]
Ar ea 2: M iddle Peninsula:
G louc es ter, G louc es ter Point,
Mathews & West Point
Ron Saunders
[email protected]
Area 3: Northern Neck: KilmarnockIrvington-White Stone, Middlesex
County, Northern Neck,
Tappahannock & Warsaw
Greg White
[email protected]
Area 4: I-95 Corridor: Caroline
County, Fredericksburg, King GeorgeDahlgren, North Stafford CountyGarrisonville, Rappahannock Fredericksburg, & Stafford
Roy Strohl
[email protected]
Area 5: Wine Country: Culpeper,
Orange & Warrenton
Frank Ramey
[email protected]etlife.com
Area 6: Prince William County:
Gainesville-Haymarket, Lake Ridge,
Manassas, Manassas-Bull Run &
Woodbridge
Dennis Fargo
[email protected]
Area 7: Alexandria/Mount Vernon:
Alexandria, Alexandria South & Mount
Vernon
Mary Wharton
[email protected]
Area 8: West Central Fairfax
County: Annandale, Burke,
Centreville and Chantilly, Springfield
& West Springfield
Wayne Chiles
[email protected]
Area 9: East Central Fairfax
County/Fairfax City: Arlington,
Bailey’s Crossroads, Crystal CityPentagon, Fairfax & Rosslyn-Ft. Myer
Peter C. Anderson
[email protected]
Area 10: Northeast Fairfax County:
Dunn Loring-Merrifield, Falls Church,
Great Falls, McLean, & Tyson’s
Corner
Vance Zavela
[email protected]
Area 11: Northwest Fairfax County:
Dulles International Airport, Herndon,
Reston & Vienna
Woody Bentley
[email protected]
Area 12: Loudoun County: Ashburn,
Lees burg, Lees burg -Da ybreak ,
Purcellville & Sterling
Priscilla Godfrey
[email protected]
Global Grants Assistant
Henry Weinschenk
[email protected]
Global Grants Assistant
Jim Church
[email protected]
District Grants
Joe Akkara
[email protected]
District Grants Assistant
Bill Holliman
[email protected]
Scholarships
Joseph Luquire
[email protected]
World Peace Fellowships
Lester Schoene
[email protected]
Alumni
TBD
Vocational Training Teams
PDG Andy Turner
[email protected]
Foundation Stewardship
PDG Travis White
[email protected]
Vocational Training Teams
Michelle Peters
[email protected]
Annual Giving
PDG Donna Phillips
[email protected]
Rotary Contact Center
Paul Harris Society Coordinator
Foundation Newsletter Editor
Scott Mills
[email protected]
A team of Foundation specialists is
available to help you. Specialists
answer calls Monday through Friday
from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST.
Major Gifts and Planned Giving
PDG D.R. Butler
[email protected]
Call 866-9ROTARY (866-976-8279)
or E-mail at [email protected]
Endowment Fund & Triple Crown
Stephen Gresham
[email protected]
PolioPlus
Colleen Bonadonna
[email protected]
Grants
Vance Zavela
[email protected]
Global Grants
Andrew Wade
[email protected]
In Motion: The Rotary Foundation Newsletter of District 7610
February 2014
Page 17

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