LEILA HADDAD

Transcription

LEILA HADDAD
LEILA HADDAD
Two works on tour:
“Zikrayat, Homage to Oum Khalsoum”
Choreography for nine dancers
“In the trail of the Ghawazee”
Solo dance with Gypsy musicians from Upper
Egypt
Leila Haddad is her own woman. She has long fought for the recognition of “oriental
dance” as a major art form. She has sought a new way that has secured it acceptance as a
noble art, freed it of the degrading connotations of mere “belly dancing”, and taken it out of
the Arab Berber villages where it is misjudged and the cabarets where it has been losing its
soul.
She has pioneered a break with convention that has renewed oriental dance. Such revitalizing
change that has been the experience of all other dance forms. In the early twentieth century,
for example, Ruth Saint-Denis and Isadora Duncan liberated contemporary dance, while
Antonia Merce (known as “La Argentina”) transformed flamenco.
There is nothing ethnographic in Leila Haddad’s exploration of original folk dances, as she
builds bridges between past and present, and between oriental and modern, even
contemporary, dance.
Leila Haddad, heir to sacred dance forms from time immemorial, incarnates womanhood.
Oriental dance has restored pride of place to understanding the body, accepting it as it is,
whether young or old, never hurting it or forcing it to make movements it cannot.
What is at work is not the seduction of others, but self-seduction and solidarity between
women – all women.
ZAMZAMA PRODUCTIONS 9, cité Paradis – 75010 Paris
Tel + 33 1 44 63 00 34 – Fax + 33 1 42 46 22 94 - www.zamzama.net - [email protected]
1
ZIKRAYAT, HOMAGE TO OUM KHALSOUM
Choreography for nine dancers
Choreography : Leila Haddad
Dancers: Isabelle Alama, Anate Atlan, Clélia Bergerot, Laurence Dehaene, Amir Ed
Dine, Pascale Goubert, Leila Haddad, Fabienne Marastoni, Cécile Marron.
Lights: Patrick Riou
Traditionnal Music and pieces written for Oum Kalsoum
Sound track: Rainer Engel and J.P. Rykiel
Costumes: Madame Abla and Bella
Make Up : Ludovic Larthomas
Costumes dresser : Fabienne Gauthier
Nobody had ever dared dance to the voice of Oum Khalsoum, the legendary Egyptian singer.
Idolized to this day across the Arabic-speaking world, she remains one of its federating forces.
Leila Haddad has added her offering to the many tributes paid to this towering, legendary
figure. It is a dance inspired from a poem called Zikrayat. It is one of 200 written by Ahmed
Rami for the diva, with whom he was deeply, but platonically in love.
Zikrayat literally means “memory”
It is the memory of all Arabic and Berber peoples from all walks of life. They rediscover their
sense of identity in the great singer who brought together the scattered fragments of their
soul.Through Oum Khalsoum, whose voice resonates in street cafés throughout the Arab
world, Leila Haddad also glorifies the people. In her Zikrayat she juxtaposes and revitalizes
complex classical and popular music.
Born into a modest family, the diva began singing at the age of thirteen disguised as a boy.
Later whole orchestras were to accompany her.
Zikrayat follows that career evolution. The first part is rooted in the soul of the Egyptian
people, while the music in the second part is more complex. The uniting theme throughout is
the singing voice of Oum Khalsoum.
Through a subtle play of shadows, Leila Haddad seeks to restrict the individuality of the
dancers performing to the great voice. The pure, deeply learned dance movements
remain, however. They espouse the turns and depth of Oum Khalsoum’s voice in
songs like “Eastern Star”.
Leila Haddad expresses her style explosively. She pursues the ecstatic trance-like state known
as tarab. Induced by the music, it leads the audience into a dreamworld where sound
responds symbolically to colour.
"….memories invaded the horizon of my fantasy like lightning illuminates the
darkness…Zikrayat Zikrayat Zikrayat"
Ahmed Rami for Oum Khalsoum
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2
IN THE TRAILS OF THE GHAWAZEE
Solo dance with Gypsy musicians from Upper Egypt
Leila Haddad – Dance, choreography
Mohamed Mourad : rababa, sufara, vocals
Youssef Moubarak : vocals, rababa
Ramadan Atta : mizmar, arghul
EL KINAWY – mizmar
HANAFY – tabla
Mohamed El Hamy– dohola, doff, rababa, vocals
Ramadan Abbdellatif – tabla balady
Lights
Costumes
Costumes dresser
Make Up
Patrick RIOU
Madame ABLA
Fabienne GAUTHIER
Ludovic LARTHOMAS
To quote the Egyptian proverb: “Life is like the Ghawazee, the Gypsy dancers from Upper
Egypt, who dance but an instant for each and all.”
Leila Haddad, the high priestess of oriental dance, traces the steps of these little-known
dancers, so wise in the ways of life.
Accompanied by Gypsy musicians from the Nile, she treads in the paths they wandered,
which lead from India to Egypt, sweeping on into the legends of memory in Turkey, Greece,
Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Bulgaria, Spain, and North Africa.
Dance is a traveller, setting out from Rajasthan in Northern India some time in the 4th
century AD. The routes it took crossed in Upper Egypt, where it drew deeply on the mythical
Nile as a source, before moving on to nourish the roots of all the world’s profane dance
forms – including modern dance, which surged forth in the early twentieth century.
The Gypsies of Egypt go with the wind, driven by the original, travelling spirits of Dance and
Music. Yet today’s world seems to deny the large Gypsy presence in the Eastern Mediterranean
and its immemorial ties with music and dance.
In this new creation Leila Haddad stages a dialogue between two of dance’s staging posts on
its travels over time. They are the Ghawazee dances of Upper Egypt and those of the
Kalbeliyas in Rajasthan. The roving subconscious of the epic Rom voyagers has woven its farflung invisible fabric.
Accompanied by seven Egyptian Gypsy musicians, Leila Haddad has created a work
that takes the form of a challenge between dance and trance.
Improvisation only guides the music of the virtuoso masters from Upper Egypt, who hover on
the brink of the ecstatic trance state known as tarab, which suddenly breaks through when
least expected. Leila Haddad’s pure, deeply learned solo performance follows the
music’s twists and whims in a choreography that shifts like the spirit presiding over
each evening’s performance.
ZAMZAMA PRODUCTIONS 9, cité Paradis – 75010 Paris
Tel + 33 1 44 63 00 34 – Fax + 33 1 42 46 22 94 - www.zamzama.net - [email protected]
3
Leila Haddad
The High Priestess of Oriental Dance
The history of dance has always been marked by major figures who have broken with
convention to renew the form. They include early-twentieth century artists like Antonia
Merce (known as “La Argentina”), who put flamenco on theatre stages, and Isadora Duncan,
who liberated the body and developed natural movement that ushered in the freedom of
modern dance.
Born in Djerba in Tunisia, the beautiful, regal Leila Haddad is of that ilk. She has won her
fight to force recognition of oriental dance as a major art form. Since the early 1980s
she has incarnated womanhood at venues where her art was ignored or scorned as “belly
dancing”. She has legitimized the term "oriental dance" (raqs el sharqi in Arabic) and
brought the dance itself out of the Arab Berber villages where it was misjudged and the
cabarets where it was losing its soul.
Leila Haddad is adamant about dancing on stage only. She has upset the rules, making
oriental dance a “noble art” and earning it its place in theatres.
Even contemporary dance has, since Isadora Duncan, developed an infrastructure, put in place
classes, and gained a following, so creating a chain-effect. Leila Haddad has set the ball rolling
for oriental dance. The first step was to teach the dance and produce dancers, which she did
through her classes. The next step was directing and choreography. It was important to
change perceptions of oriental dance, to lecture on it and speak about at conferences, both in
France and in those European countries where it did not really exist. Her approach was
comprehensive and pioneering: teach, talk, perform on stage.
Teaching oriental dance
For a school of thought on raqs el sharqi
Leila Haddad opened her first Paris oriental dance class in the mid-1980s. It was a bold
move at a time when the dance form was unknown or ill-understood, and even disdained by
right-thinkers and men in search of exotic cheap thrills. Leila Haddad decided to fight for
recognition of the millenarian depth of her Arab Berber culture and to teach oriental
dance.
The European women who attended her classes did not experience their bodies in the same
way as their Arabic counterparts. They now discovered a new continent: their own bodies.
The oriental dancer accepts her body as it is, whether young or old, does not hurt it, and does
not force it to move in ways it cannot. Her relationship to her body is one of self-seduction –
not the seduction of others – and of solidarity among women.
Oriental dancers wear brightly coloured costumes that are anything but kitsch. They have
important ritual and cultural significance. Colours, for example, have powerful symbolic,
spiritual meanings.
To further understanding of her culture and her art, Leila Haddad has adopted a
comprehensive approach that involves researching the history of dance, travelling widely in
Arab countries to seek out little-known dances, and speaking at conferences all over the world.
Milestones in Leila Haddad’s career
Internationally acknowledged as the world’s premier oriental dancer, Leila Haddad has
performed on stage in London and Los Angeles, Cologne and Oslo, Carthage and Paris. And,
like a born teacher, she imparts her knowledge in her dance classes.
In 1984 she danced in the Hans-Peter Cloos production of Othello. She has also
appeared in movies, like L"Homme voilé (Veiled Man) by Lebanese director Maroon Baghdadi
and La Goutte d'or by French film-maker Marcel Blüwal, in which she plays the role of the
dancer Zobeida.
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4
In 1988 she was the first oriental dancer to perform at the Paris festival, Salon de la
Danse. For its dance festival the French city of Lille commissioned an original work from her on
the theme of Salomé. Entitled the Dance of the Seven Veils, its music was composed and
arranged by Julien Jâlal Eddine Weiss and the Al-Kindî Ensemble.
In 1989 she again broke new ground when she delivered a triumphant lecture on the
history of oriental dance to a packed audience in the auditorium of the Institut du Monde
Arabe in Paris.
In 1992, as part of the festival Danses Contemporaines et Orientales, the Théâtre
Contemporain de la Danse and the Institut du Monde Arabe commissioned her to create two
new original works, Rouh and A la Recherche de Tanit.
In 1993 she performed the first version of Sur les Traces des Ghawazees at the
Tempodrum in Berlin and the Austria Theater in Vienna with the Musiciens du Nil.
In 1994 she created Aquarelles for the Théâtre du Rond Point in Paris.
In 1995, the Institut du Monde Arabe asked her to choreograph L'Orient d'une
Danseuse - Rêveries sur le Nil as part of its season devoted to Egypt. Performances were sold
out.
In 1996 she created Nomades, which was premiered at the Café de la Danse in Paris
as part of the Estivales festival.
In 1997 the Culturegest festival in Lisbon.
In 1998 the San Francisco International Belly Dance Festival
In 2000 her work Zikrayat premiered at the Théâtre Mogador in Paris, in homage to
Oum Khalsoum.
In 2003 her new version of Zikrayat is performed at Théâtre du Trianon in Paris.
In 2006, Leila Haddad created In the trail of the Ghawazee at Théâtre du Trianon in
Paris with the Gypsy musicians from Upper Egypt.
Leila Haddad continues to show Zikrayat and to dance solo at festivals and
performances in countries worldwide, like Sweden, Slovenia, Macedonia, France, Tunisia,
Singapore, and New York and San Francisco in the US.
In parallel Leila Haddad travels widely to teach oriental dance and train new teachers.
ZAMZAMA PRODUCTIONS 9, cité Paradis – 75010 Paris
Tel + 33 1 44 63 00 34 – Fax + 33 1 42 46 22 94 - www.zamzama.net - [email protected]
5
LEILA
HADDAD
«
Un
magnétisme
félin,
sensuel
et
un
regard
qui
embrasse
l’espace.
Harmonie
des
geste
et
volupté
des
mouvements.
L’anatomie
se
fait
poésie.
Le
message
éloquent.
»
LA
MONTAGNE
«
Contre
les
clichés,
cette
tunisienne
d’origine
revendique
la
beauté
et
l’harmonie
d’une
technique
dont
les
mouvements
enroulent
et
déroulent
des
huit
à
l’infini.
»
TELERAMA
«
Dès
qu’elle
apparaît
un
silence
médusé
se
fait
:
tout
semble
magique
et
irréel.
(..)
Il
n’y
a
rien
d’érotique
chez
Leïla
Haddad
mais
une
grâce
et
une
aura
mystérieuses
et
envoûtantes.
»
LE
PARISIEN
«
La
chaleur
et
la
sincérité,
le
plaisir
de
cette
danse
émane
avec
une
indicible
élégance
des
gestes.
Leïla
est
réellement
une
prêtresse.
»
DANSE,
DANSE,
DANSE
«
Leïla
Haddad
dévoile
son
jeu
avec
distance
et
humour.
Cette
façon
d’envoyer
le
rythme
d’un
endroit
à
l’autre
(…)
expose
le
corps
féminin
dans
toute
sa
mobilité
féconde.
»
LE
MONDE
«
Avec
Sur
les
traces
de
Ghawazee,
Leïla
Haddad
se
fait
l’héritière
des
danses
sacrées
immémoriales
(…)
elle
unit
dans
un
voyage
imaginaire
les
traditions
des
pays
du
bassin
méditerranéen.
»
LE
PARISIEN
«
Grande
prêtresse
de
la
danse
orientale
qu’elle
a
sorti
de
l’avilissement
de
la
forme
«
danse
du
ventre
»
des
cabarets.
»
DANSER
«
Leïla
Haddad
a
le
mérite
des
militants,
celui
d’aller
rechercher
les
origines
lointaines
de
ces
danses,
dévoilant
ainsi
toute
une
culture
presque
systématiquement
passé
sous
silence.
»
PARIS
OBS
«
Passée
des
temples
aux
bordels,
la
danse
orientale
est
aujourd’hui
réhabilitée
par
la
divine
Leïla
Haddad.
»
TELE
OBS
«
Leïla
Haddad
puts
her
own
spin
on
Egyptian
folklore
in
a
stirring
display
of
movement
»
LOS
ANGELES
TIMES
ZAMZAMA PRODUCTIONS – 9, cité Paradis - 75010 Paris
Tel + 33 1 44 63 00 34 – Fax + 33 1 42 46 22 94 - www.zamzama.net - [email protected]
LOS ANGEI,ESTIMES _ MARCH 24.2008
DANCE REVIEW
She'sgotthebeat
'lirnisian
dancerLeila
Haddadputsher own
spinon Egyptian
folklore in a stirring
displayof movement.
might end in a spùal down to
th€ noor and weighuess glid€s
acrcss the stage. And some
times shed shatter the senseof
flow that she'd worked so hard
to sustain Mth ân outburst of
shoulder shâIes, frârtic lsshings of her long aù€âdsor a sin,
gle g€sttù€ thât seNed as a
kjnd of excbnetion point.
Moving âcmss a darkened
siage in iqvers of gleâming fab
nc, she embodied all the glam
ow and fantâsr that traveling
peltomers hâve brcughl to rurar societies through the ages
th€ escapefrom ewryday life
that we stiù seekin neady every
kind of ent€rtâiment.
some people might carl
saddâd a bely dmcer, but thê
ten çertd noi only d€grade
whât she perfoms by linking it
to cheap câb&€t exhibitionism
but al"sofâil to âccount for the
emâzing expânsions and contmctions of the upper torso
and chest thât she displayed in
one sotoor those liquid alm in
her openiûg invocation ituâ]
or her ùtdcate articulations or
Th€ ti'lklore ofUpper Eglpt
embracesând sometimestuses
a nùmber or ùraditions: anci€nt
Pharàonic, thos€ belonging to
villàge cultures of the ar€a, others dating from the Ottomân
conqu€sl âno more recen[ pânMuslim influences. To these.
Tunisiân dancer Leila Haddâd
added soùrce mat€rial (inctud,
ing costming)
iiom Raja
sthân, Iûdiâ, for b€r vaned 90minute pro$m tiU€d "In the
Trà'l of the chawazee" ai
UCLA'S Royce Hall on SaturIn all ber dânc$, gÂddad
relied on rhe bedmck âuthority
of seven men billed as the
Gypsy Musicians of Uppe.
Egypl. mast€rs of such ârcân€
instruments âs the two,string
spike fiddle, the drone double
clarinet. the open-ended r€€d
flut€ ad drums of âll siz€s.
And her dancing proled most
exciting when specificâ[y re
flectjng the pulse of their accompùiment, whether in rip
pling ârm movements or shârp
At one point in her dânce
with a silver câne the most
farniliar Eglptim
iblldoic
piece on the pmgrm
she
brieilv d.aped herseralong the
lârge cùtular drum held by El
Kina\ly.
At other rimes, she interact
ed at length with singer-drummer El Hân\y Mohmcd and
lâter with singer YoussefMoub
ârà-k. !,rho moved behind h€f
ând rcached for$ârd to lrow his
fidd1eac.oss her chest.
The easy câmârâderie and
cham
of these passages
eclipsedHaddad's more insu
lâr solos.in which she u.iortu-
Caling he. an Ori€ntâl
dancer wodd be equaly mis,
leading - you might expect to
lind her in a kimono or nowercmm headdr€ss instead ofthe
long, ven rik€ h€ad cloths over
eith€r dr€ssesor pantâloon en
sembl€s that she wor€ Sâtu.clây,âppæl acc€nt€d in metallic gold bnt dominat€d by vari
ous reds and spldhes of or-
WOMAN
OF THE WORLD: I,eilo.Fo.lddd dancet ùhile
Maurad ptaas the sulldld dùrin tl the peûorman.e dt UoLA.
natel,v adopted a forced smile
ihât undercut the spontareitl
of her penbmance - e!€n the
complex but tiæ spjrited musculâr isolâtlonsthat linked ihe
skills of the Ghawazee (ctpsy
eDtertainers) with modem
NIârV ol the pieces begân
wLth siow, atmospheic musiciânship(â hoa6e flute, for in
stæce. or ihose lnsisleût fid
dles ) lhat soon âccelerated md
becâmestructurcd with the âcldition ot rhlthmic drummjng
md peùàps vocals. Haddad s
conlribuiion reuected the bear
through light, quicir footwork
ùd torso accenls thât rdged
iiom generalized shimers to
conlulslve pelvic undulâtions.
Her technicâl âxsenal also
included sensuous laierâ1
swaling. smoolh spiming that
CâI her instead a woman of
the world, one who moved to
FEnce in her teens but even
tually delined herself as an art
ist who belongs to I]@y cultur€s ând âges, assimjlating
th€ir b€autles dd
shâring
rhem with us âs our oM woild
dârk€ns ând needs aI the es
Besides the musicims pr€
viousv mentioned,ihe ensemble included Abdâllâh !ùah,
Mohâmed Moumd, Râmâdân
Aila and GMal Gomââ.
teu is.æs a\.! lati mes..om
LOS ANGELESTIMES - MARCH 24.2008
oLD TR'ADITIoNS
I MohamedMotrad_left. andyoussefMoubarakpld! rabdbas,dnd.Ranûdan Atta pt.Lltsthe archul.
R|VT'I DI PRbSSI LLILA H \DDAD
Lry3
F R A N CM
EÉ T R O P O L I T A I N E
tu
J E U D6I M A R S2 O O 3
FONDATEUR
: HUBERTBEUVE-MÉR.
CULTTJRE
DÀmroRrErrarË
d Avec< Zikrayato, la chorégrapherend homrnageà la chanteuseOum Kalsoum
Lespositions
dialectiques
deLeilaHaddad
< IL FAUT que lesprogrammateursnousouvrentlesportes>>,
corÉtate Leila Haddad,qui vient six
jours d'affiléede remplir le Théâtre du Trianon, boulevard de
Rochechouart.
C'està sesfraisoue
cette < militante" de la danse
orientaledanstoutes sessubtiles
variationscorporellesseproduit à
Paris.Soit prèsde 3 000eurospar
soirée,sanscompterla locationde
rnatériel technique complémentaire.
DansZikrayat(la mémoire),elle
rend hommage à la chanteuse
Oum I(alsoum. Cette création,
déjàdonnéeau ThéâtreMogador,
tire son titre d'un poèmé homon1nne,écrit par AhmedRami :.<<Ce
poètea composé
plus de 200chansons pour celle qui I'inspirait
tant ! >>,rappelle la chorégraphe,
qui sur scèneest entouréede huit
danseuses
et d'un garçon.Ensemble,ils racontentunehistoirede la
danse orientale, à tort nommée
<<
par leslégion.
dansedu ventre>>
naires de Napoléon, de retour
d'Egypte,prenaat la partie pour le
tout, unç manièrebien masculine
d'envisagerIe coSpsféminin. On
ne leurjetterapasla pierre...
D'altant qu.eles coupsles plus
durs portés à cette dansecélèbre
viruentdel'intérieur.Pourmémoire : eù 1834,le patha MehemetAIi
exilei;400danseusesen HaùteEgyple; en 1955,Nasserexigeque
le nombrilsoit masqué.Peuà peu,
Ia dansene sort plus du aontexte
desfêtesfamiliales,s'enferme,de
peur,éternellement,
d'êtreassimilée à la prostitution:On saitqu'en
Egypte,actuellement,Ies danseusesdoivent obtenir un permisde
la police des mæurs,qui dépend
du ministèrede I'intérieur.L'AFP
que,tdansôe'
indiquaitrécemmp11t;
mêmepays,la réalisatrice
Jocelyne
Saabs'étaitvu interdirele toumage d'un film sur.lasexualitéfépinine avecDour nerolneune.Jeune
danseuse.
je voisdansla salle,com<<Quand
medimanche
enmatinée,
troisfemj'ai enviedepleurer,et
mesvoilées,
d'aller illico me'mettreen btkinià
>, dit LeilaHaddad,née
Couronnes
Leila Haddad sur scène,au Théâtredu Trianon, à Paris, entouréede huit danseuseset d'un danseur.
à Djerb4 en Tirnisie;qui elle aussi les ai .formées,
ellespartagentma
'a :dt' !érieusement argumenter' visiondela danse.Il y a aussiungarpour ,que,lsa farnille comprenne çon qui nous accompagne.
Il est
qu'endansantdanslesthéâtres,et homosexuel,
paron meIe reproche
non dansles cabarets.elle se:bat- fois. Je ne vaispourtantpas oppritait flèrementpour faire recopnal-1 merleshom:osexuels
comrneleifemtre sa culture.Elle est deitous le$,, mesle:sont.>>l,apremièrerpartie
de
colloques,invitée dansle:,,monde, Zikrayatemprunteà.la comédie
entierà danseren solo.
musicale;;avec
des'costumêstrès
vifs, desvoilesmulticolore,sl,et
des
VISIOiI PARTAGEE
corpsvêtusjusqu'aumenton.Leila
son jeu avecdisDansquelquesjours, elle seraà Haddad:'dévoile
BerkelÊy,en Californie. Dans tance et humour. Jusqir'au
Ztkrayat,c'est donc l'aventurede moment où,elle se lancedansun
Ia,danseorientalequ'elleesquisse solo,trèslong, ûès beau,où, avec
à grandstraits, influencéepar les un plaisirinfini, elle montre comTsiganesvenusd'Inde,tout com- menq des orteils à la pointe des
me le fut le flamenco,aveclequel cheveux,elle met en mouvement
elle.présente
desliensde parenté. chaquecentimètrede sonco1ps,y
Huit filles donc,de niveauinégal, compris chaque mini-musclede
défendentcespectacle,
toutesheu- sonventre.
reusesde montersurscène,certaiCettefaçond'envoyerle rythme
nespour la premièrefois.
d'un endroit à un autre,au point
<<
Je ne peuxpas lutter avecles qu'on en suit des yeux le trajet
tarifsoferts auxexcellentes
interprè- sans difficulté, expose le corps
prëjèrentle cabaret. féminin dans toute sa mobilité
tesqui souvent
qui sontavecmoi,je féconde.Observerle faufilement
Lesdanseuses
de la danse sur et sous Ia oeau
constitue en soi: <<une géoryihmique du monde,de I'Asieà l'Europe.
Il faudrait aller devant:]!qmbiassade
des Etats-Unis.danser,dirç que,
dans quelgues jp,urs, c-'est cette
culture iéculaire que lesAméricains
veulentefacer r>,dit avecforce Bernard Rémy, de la Cinémathèque
de la danse, venu avec son jeune
fi]s.
Leila Haddad ne dirait pas non.
EIe sait à quel point son désir de
faire viwe sa culture librement
n'est jamais gagné.< Je saiscombien pour imposerma danseje dois
I'envelopperdans un discoursintellectuel qui la légitime.Je ne dispose
pas toujoursde ce tempslà. >>Pourtant, en voyant la salle archi-cornble du Trianon, en grande majorité
des femmes, on se dit, depuis près
de vingt ans qu'op assiste au travail de la danseuse,que son engagement artistique n'est pas vain.
Dominique Frétardo

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