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PDF - Carnegie Hall
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Synneve Carlino & Matt Carlson ! Phone: 212-903-9750 ! E-mail: [email protected]
***UPDATED INFORMATION AS OF MARCH 2, 2009***
CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS
HONOR! A CELEBRATION OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL LEGACY
A FESTIVAL CURATED BY JESSYE NORMAN, MARCH 4–23, 2009
Citywide Festival Features More Than 20 Events Celebrating African American Culture with
Wide Array of Performances and Panel Discussions at
Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, and Venues throughout New York City
Concerts Honor Pioneers Marian Anderson, Duke Ellington, and Others;
Additional Highlights Include a Weekend Devoted to the Spiritual and Gospel Music and the
World Premiere of Ask Your Mama! Based on Langston Hughes’ Poem
Programs Feature Jessye Norman, Maya Angelou, Geri Allen, Ashford & Simpson,
Terence Blanchard, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Shirley Caesar, James Carter, Ron Carter, Ray Chew,
Michael Eric Dyson, Doug E. Fresh, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harlem Quartet, Gwen Ifill,
Imani Winds, MC Lyte, Arthur Mitchell, Toni Morrison, Eric Owens, Toshi Reagon, The Roots,
Daniel Bernard Roumain, George Shirley, Richard Smallwood, Sweet Honey In The Rock,
Anna Deavere Smith, Esperanza Spalding, James “Blood” Ulmer, Cornel West, and Many More
Six Free Neighborhood Concerts, Carnegie Hall’s National High School Choral Festival, and a
Curriculum on African American Song for New York City Middle School Students Comprise
Festival’s Education and Community Programs, All Presented by The Weill Music Institute
(Tuesday, January 13, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)—Carnegie Hall will present Honor! A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy, a festival saluting the enduring vitality, influence, and creativity of
African American culture, curated by internationally renowned soprano Jessye Norman, from
Wednesday, March 4 through Monday, March 23, 2009.
With a diverse array of more than 20 events—including concerts, panel discussions, and educational
events at venues throughout New York City, including Carnegie Hall, the Apollo Theater, The Cathedral
Church of St. John the Divine, Harlem Stage, the Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural Center,
the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, and the Schomburg Center—Honor! celebrates
African American music and its influence worldwide, with programs paying tribute to pioneering artists.
The festival will provide a citywide showcase for African American music in its many genres: classical,
gospel, the Spiritual, contemporary popular music, blues, and jazz.
The festival is bookended by two special programs at Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage
featuring contemporary musicians honoring the great African American artists of the past. Honor!
launches on Wednesday, March 4 with Honor: Blues, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Soul and Beyond, an
event at which some of today’s musical innovators will gather in tribute to the great African American
popular music artists of the past. Under the musical direction of Ray Chew and hosted by Emmy Awardwinning WABC news anchor Sade Baderinwa and actor Wendell Pierce from HBO’s The Wire, featured
artists for this program include: pianist Geri Allen, trumpeter Terence Blanchard, bassist Ron Carter,
and saxophonist James Carter from the world of jazz; blues vocalists/guitarists James “Blood” Ulmer
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Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 2 of 8
and Toshi Reagon; R&B and soul vocalists Ashford & Simpson, Anthony Hamilton, Freddie
Jackson, Leela James, Kem, and Ryan Shaw; rock guitarist Vernon Reid and vocalist Corey Glover;
and hip-hop artists Doug E. Fresh and MC Lyte. The festival concludes with Honor: The Voice on
Monday, March 23, a program that brings together acclaimed African American classical singers to pay
tribute to icons who paved the way for succeeding generations. Featured singers include sopranos
Harolyn Blackwell, Angela M. Brown, and Nicole Cabell; baritone Gregg Baker; bass-baritone Eric
Owens; and bass Kevin Maynor.
As part of Honor!, festival curator Jessye Norman will perform the U.S. premiere of Sacred Ellington at
The Cathedral of St. John the Divine on Saturday, March 7—a program that features excerpts from Duke
Ellington’s magnificent Three Sacred Concerts. Miss Norman will also perform the world premiere of
composer Laura Karpman’s Ask Your Mama! on Monday, March 16 at Carnegie Hall along with hip-hop
group The Roots, vocalists de’Adre Aziza and Tracie Luck , and conductor George Manahan leading
the Orchestra of St. Luke’s in a multimedia concert presentation based on the epic poem cycle by
Langston Hughes and directed by Annie Dorsen (Passing Strange).
Festival partner the Apollo Theater hosts a weekend devoted to the Spiritual and gospel music beginning
on Saturday, March 21 with a panel discussion exploring the historical, political, and musical issues
associated with these musical genres. Participants include Derrick Bell, Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Portia
Maultsby, Sweet Honey In The Rock, Chapman Roberts, and Olly Wilson. On Sunday, March 22, a
concert at the Apollo Theater traces the development of the Spiritual from its African roots in a joyous
program that brings together vocalists Shari Addison, Shirley Caesar, Donnie McClurkin, Smokie
Norful, and Richard Smallwood with the Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir, Hezekiah
Walker and the Love Fellowship Choir, Sweet Honey In The Rock, and Vy Higginsen's Gospel for
Teens with other artists to be announced. Celebrating its 75th Anniversary season in 2009, the iconic
Apollo Theater has been a driving force shaping America’s cultural and musical landscape, launching the
careers of gospel greats like Clara Ward, the Staple Sisters, and Sam Cooke’s Soul Stirrers. As legends
like these graced its stage, the Harlem Theater became a catalyst for broadening the audience of
Spiritual music, and sparked the development of the many genres that grew out of the gospel tradition.
A trio of panel discussions on Sunday, March 8 at Zankel Hall—all featuring performances—focus on
various aspects of the African American cultural experience, including insights from such luminaries as
Maya Angelou, Michael Eric Dyson, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Gwen Ifill, Judith Jamison, Arthur
Mitchell, Toni Morrison, George Shirley, Anna Deavere Smith, and Cornel West; performances at
these panels will be given by baritone Robert Sims, the Dance Theatre of Harlem School and
Ensemble, and Imani Winds, which will perform a new work from African American composer Daniel
Bernard Roumain, Five Chairs and One Table, commissioned by Carnegie Hall and featuring brief
musical portraits of Jessye Norman, Odetta, Miriam Makeba, and the daughters of President Barack
Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, Malia and Sasha.
Other festival highlights include an interview with Arthur Mitchell, founding Artistic Director of the Dance
Theatre of Harlem, as well as a panel discussion on this iconic institution (Thursday, March 12) and a
concert of Spirituals (Saturday, March 21), all at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts; a
Carnegie Hall concert by The Philadelphia Orchestra and Chief Conductor Charles Dutoit featuring
bass-baritone Eric Owens performing Mahler in tribute to the great soprano Marian Anderson as well as
a performance of African American composer George Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning work Lilacs with
tenor Russell Thomas (Tuesday, March 17); and an evening with jazz vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater in
Zankel Hall (Wednesday, March 18).
Education and community programs presented by The Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall are an
integral part of Honor!. A series of free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts will bring exciting music
to venues throughout the city with performances offered at CUNY Graduate Center, the Schomburg
Center for Research in Black Culture, Harlem Stage, and Apollo Theater’s Soundstage, all in Manhattan;
Brooklyn’s Kingsborough Community College; and the Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural
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Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 3 of 8
Center of the Queens Library. A free interactive Carnegie Hall Community Sing at the Apollo Theater
Soundstage on Friday, March 13 invites vocalists of all ages and levels to make music together with host
Vy Higginsen and the Gospel for Teens Choir.
Carnegie Hall’s National High School Choral Festival is presented this season as part of Honor! with
four select high school choirs from around the country performing Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our
Time on Friday, March 20. Soloists at this concert include soprano Angela M. Brown, contralto Meredith
Arwady, tenor Russell Thomas, and bass Morris Robinson. Tippett’s thought-provoking oratorio,
written during World War II, uses the Spiritual in much the same way that Bach employed the chorale in
his choral masterworks. Also in support of Honor!, The Weill Music Institute’s Perelman American
Roots program for middle school students offers a specially created curriculum drawing connections
between African American music and US history.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor! festival with
a special exhibit entitled The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall. Through items on display
from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for
Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and Howard University, visitors will have the chance to
explore the fascinating history of African American artists and political and social figures who have
appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout its 118-year history.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, on January 16, Carnegie Hall launches a revised website,
carnegiehall.org/honor, to serve as the online companion to the festival. The site will offer the most upto-date information about Honor! events; pay tribute to the hundreds of legendary African American
performers who have appeared on Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its history; and provide historical
context to the festival’s programming via an interactive timeline curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of
Indiana University.
Released in conjunction with the festival is LIFT EVERY VOICE!, a two-CD, 21-track musical
retrospective, part of the Carnegie Hall/Sony Masterworks series of recordings. The set features historic
live performance and studio recordings from an array of great African American artists, all of whom have
performed at Carnegie Hall and contributed to the rich cultural legacy in the history of music, including
Marian Anderson, Kathleen Battle, Harry Belafonte, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Aretha Franklin, Ella
Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Mahalia Jackson, Wynton Marsalis, Jessye Norman, Bill Withers, Luther
Vandross, and more. The audio project, which will be available on February 17, offers a diverse crosssection of musical genres, spanning gospel to swing, classical to contemporary, Spiritual to jazz—
complementing the Honor! festival’s programming.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its stages,
from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining an open-door
policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one year after the hall
opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by numerous African American
musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s 1928 debut—more than ten years
before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer
John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African
American styles and performers, and the Kool Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions”
debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced
through Carnegie Hall programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C.
Handy and Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of the
Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music stars
continue to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef Jean, Mary J.
Blige, and Mos Def, among many others.
****
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Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 4 of 8
PERFORMANCES
Honor: Blues, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Soul, and Beyond
Wednesday, March 4 at 8:00 p.m. (Carnegie Hall; Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Honor! opens with a concert that pays tribute to the great African American popular music artists of the
past. Each presentation will parallel an event in the bountiful history of performances by African
American artists at Carnegie Hall. Ray Chew—Musical Director for NBC’s The Singing Bee, Showtime At
the Apollo, and BET’s Sunday Best—is Music Director for the program. Featured artists for this program
include pianist Geri Allen, trumpeter Terence Blanchard, bassist Ron Carter, and saxophonist James
Carter (jazz); vocalist/guitarist James “Blood” Ulmer and vocalist/guitarist Toshi Reagon (blues); vocalists
Ashford & Simpson, Anthony Hamilton, Freddie Jackson, Leela James, Kem, and Ryan Shaw (R&B,
soul); guitarist Vernon Reid and vocalist Corey Glover (rock); rappers Doug E. Fresh and MC Lyte (hiphop) and actor Avery Brooks. Emmy Award winning WABC news anchor Sade Baderinwa will host the
program alongside actor Wendell Pierce from the acclaimed HBO’s series The Wire.
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert: Imani Winds
Thursday, March 5 at 1:00 p.m. (CUNY Graduate Center’s Music in Midtown)
In the first of six free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts presented by The Weill Music Institute during
Honor!, the Grammy-nominated wind quintet Imani Winds will perform a sneak preview of a new Carnegie
Hall commission by Daniel Bernard Roumain at Manhattan’s CUNY Graduate Center (to be premiered on
March 8; see Panel Discussions below). Since 1997, Imani Winds has sought to diversify and expand the
wind quintet repertoire by incorporating diverse musical genres into their performances, including
compositions by classical composers Elliott Carter, Luciano Berio, and György Ligeti and jazz artists
Wayne Shorter and Paquito D’Rivera.
Sacred Ellington
Saturday, March 7 at 8:00 p.m. (The Cathedral of St. John the Divine)
Comprised of excerpts from Duke Ellington’s large-scale, three-part work known as the Sacred Concerts,
Sacred Ellington features Jessye Norman in a program that pays homage to this legendary figure and his
music. The concert, which features Miss Norman performing with Music Director/pianist Mark Markham,
tap dancer Maurice Chestnut, dancer Margie Gillis, the Flux Quartet, the choir Sacred Voices, plus a jazz
ensemble, takes place at The Cathedral of St. John the Divine, a special sanctuary of central importance
in Ellington’s life and where he gave the premiere of his Second Sacred Concert in January 1968. Less
than four months later, on April 4, 1968, Ellington performed excerpts from the Second Sacred Concert at
Carnegie Hall, where it was announced from the stage prior to the start that Martin Luther King, Jr., had
just been assassinated. The concert was subsequently performed in memory of Dr. King.
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert: Esperanza Spalding
Thursday, March 12 at 7:00 p.m. (Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture)
Twenty-three-year-old bassist/vocalist/composer Esperanza Spalding performs a free Neighborhood
Concert at Manhattan’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Spalding’s fresh approach to
jazz—mixing pop, soul, and Latin music bolstered by classical music training—made her the youngest
professor in the history of the prestigious Berklee College of Music where she had studied since age 16.
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert: Community Sing with Gospel for Teens
Friday, March 13 at 6:30 p.m. (Apollo Theater’s Soundstage)
The Gospel for Teens Choir will join host Vy Higginsen at the Apollo Theater’s Soundstage for a free
Community Sing where audience members are invited to come together and sing along with the choir.
Higginsen, writer/producer/director of the 1984 musical Mama, I Want to Sing, founded Mama Foundation
for the Arts and its Gospel for Teens Program, which teaches aspiring teenagers about the importance of
gospel music as an art form.
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert: Harlem Quartet, A Sphinx Ensemble
Saturday, March 14 at 2:00 p.m. (Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural Center)
The Harlem Quartet, comprised of First Place Laureates of the Sphinx Competition, will engage the
audience in this free Neighborhood Concert highlighting works by minority composers at the Langston
Hughes Community Library & Cultural Center of the Queens Library. The Harlem Quartet made their
acclaimed debut in the fall of 2006 at the Sphinx Organization’s Gala Concert at Carnegie Hall.
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 5 of 8
Ask Your Mama!
Monday, March 16 at 8:00 p.m. (Carnegie Hall; Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Soprano Jessye Norman, hip-hop group The Roots, and vocalists de’Adre Aziza and Tracie Luck are the
featured artists in the world premiere performance of Ask Your Mama!, an extraordinary multimedia
concert production from composer Laura Karpman commissioned by Carnegie Hall. Based on Ask Your
Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz, Langston Hughes’ 1961 poem cycle about African-American life, music, and
culture, this collaboration between the four-time Emmy Award-winning composer Karpman and the fivetime Grammy Award-winning soprano Norman will be directed by Annie Dorsen (Passing Strange) with
conductor George Manahan leading the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. Artist Rico Gatson will provide visuals.
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Tuesday, March 17 at 8:00 p.m. (Carnegie Hall; Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Chief Conductor Charles Dutoit and The Philadelphia Orchestra return to Carnegie Hall for a program
dedicated to the great soprano Marian Anderson, featuring bass-baritone Eric Owens singing Mahler’s
Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen. Anderson, a native of Philadelphia, performed at Carnegie Hall 56
times throughout her life, the third-most performances by an African American musician behind
trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Jon Faddis. The program also features African American composer
George Walker’s 1996 Pulitzer Prize-winning work Lilacs with tenor Russell Thomas and European
classical works inspired by African American music including Milhaud’s La création du monde and
Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9 in E Minor, “From the New World.”
Dee Dee Bridgewater
Wednesday, March 18 at 8:30 p.m. (Carnegie Hall; Zankel Hall)
Grammy- and Tony Award-winning vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater presents an evening of original music
and jazz standards. Noted by The New York Times as “a woman of a thousand voices [with the] stage
personalities to match,” Ms. Bridgewater has performed on Broadway and with jazz legends such as
Sonny Rollins, Dizzy Gillespie, Dexter Gordon, and Max Roach, earning her the reputation of a
consummate entertainer. Ms. Bridgewater also hosts the syndicated weekly NPR radio show, JazzSet
with Dee Dee Bridgewater.
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert: McCollough Sons of Thunder & Hypnotic Brass Ensemble
Thursday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. (Harlem Stage/Aaron Davis Hall, Inc.)
The McCollough Sons of Thunder, a “shout” gospel brass band ensemble, and Hypnotic Brass Ensemble,
made up of seven sons of the jazz trumpeter Phil Cohran, will perform two free Neighborhood Concerts,
first at Harlem Stage/Aaron Davis Hall, Inc., and then Brooklyn’s Kingsborough Community College
Performing Arts Complex. The “shout” band, a tradition deeply rooted in the African-American church, is
quickly gaining recognition in larger circles, and the McCollough Sons of Thunder provide a unique fusion
of these traditions with brass band instruments.
Carnegie Hall National High School Choral Festival
Friday, March 20 at 8:00 p.m. (Carnegie Hall; Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute, the National High School Choral Festival features
choirs from Georgia, New York, New Jersey, and Washington, chosen by audition, performing Sir Michael
Tippett’s A Child of Our Time, a work that utilizes the African American Spiritual in much the same way
that Bach employed chorales in his choral masterworks. Craig Jessop, former Music Director of the
Mormon Tabernacle Choir conducts the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. Soloists include soprano Angela M.
Brown, contralto Meredith Arwady, tenor Russell Thomas, and bass Morris Robinson. Throughout the
year, the four chosen choirs have rehearsed the work and will have intensive rehearsals in New York the
week prior to the performance. At the performance, each choir will also perform its own set led by their
own choir directors.
Emancipation's Jubilations: Spirituals and Songs that Led a Nation
Saturday, March 21 at 3:00 p.m. (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts)
Presented by the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts as part of its series Mystic Chords of
Memory: Abraham Lincoln and the Performing Arts, baritone James Martin performs a recital based on
songs Lincoln heard at a contraband camp (a refuge for escaped slaves), including "Nobody Knows the
Trouble I've Seen," "Every Time I Feel the Spirit," "I Thank God that I Am Free at Last," "John Brown's
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Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 6 of 8
Body," "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," "Didn't My God Deliver Daniel," "Go Down, Moses," "I Ain't Got
Weary Yet," "I've Been in the Storm So Long," "Steal Away," and "Praise God from Whom Blessings
Flow."
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concert: McCollough Sons of Thunder & Hypnotic Brass Ensemble
Sunday, March 22 at 3:00 p.m. (Kingsborough Community College Performing Arts Complex)
See Thursday, March 19.
A Celebration of the Spiritual and Gospel Music
Sunday, March 22 at 5:00 p.m. (Apollo Theater)
A weekend devoted to the Spiritual and gospel music at the Apollo Theater begins with a panel
discussion on Saturday, March 21 (see below). Then, on Sunday, a concert traces the development of
the Spiritual from its African roots through solo vocal performances and choral arrangements. Following
intermission, choirs from around New York City join forces for a joyous celebration of gospel music. Music
Director Ray Chew is joined by gospel singers Shari Addison, Shirley Caesar, Donnie McClurkin, Smokie
Norful, and Richard Smallwood, the Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir, Hezekiah Walker and the
Love Fellowship Choir, Sweet Honey In The Rock, and Vy Higginsen’s Gospel for Teens Choir.
Honor: The Voice
Monday, March 23 at 8:00 p.m. (Carnegie Hall; Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
In the Honor! closing program, acclaimed African American singers from the classical world come
together to pay tribute to icons who opened the doors for succeeding generations. Featured performers
are sopranos Harolyn Blackwell, Angela M. Brown, and Nicole Cabell; baritone Gregg Baker; bassbaritone Eric Owens; and bass Kevin Maynor.
****
PANEL DISCUSSIONS
Panel Discussions
Sunday, March 8 (Carnegie Hall; Zankel Hall)
12:00 p.m.—Exploration: A Panel Discussion
Attorney Gordon J. Davis; author Michael Eric Dyson; Dr. Luvenia A. George, author and developer
of the Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong curriculum for the Smithsonian Institute; composer Laura
Karpman; conductor Rachael Worby; and scholar Cornel West offer a wide ranging discussion on
music today ranging from hip-hop and jazz to contemporary orchestral music. Following the
discussion, Imani Winds will perform Five Chairs and One Table, a new work by Daniel Bernard
Roumain, commissioned by Carnegie Hall. The piece portrays a history of African and AfricanAmerican song and struggle and includes brief musical portraits dedicated to Jessye Norman, South
African singer and civil rights activist Miriam Makeba (1932-2008), the folk singer Odetta (1930-2008),
and the daughters of Barack and Michelle Obama, Malia and Sasha. Imani Winds will also perform
the New York premiere of Cane by jazz pianist and composer Jason Moran.
3:30 p.m.—Impression: A Panel Discussion
Composer/conductor Tania León, author Toni Morrison, tenor and professor George Shirley, and
actress and playwright Anna Deavere Smith take part in an afternoon of reminiscences and
anecdotes of a life in the arts. Leading figures discuss their individual performance experiences on
the international stages. Baritone Robert Sims and pianist Paul Hamilton will conclude the event with
a 20-minute performance.
7:00 p.m.—Expression: A Panel Discussion
Poet and award-winning writer Maya Angelou, scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., journalist Gwen Ifill,
artistic director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Judith Jamison, musicologist Portia Maultsby,
and dancer and choreographer Arthur Mitchell of Dance Theatre of Harlem participate in a discussion
of the history of African American performing arts and its role in social and political change. The
event will conclude with a performance by Dance Theatre of Harlem School and Ensemble.
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Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 7 of 8
Dance Theatre of Harlem: Classically American
Thursday, March 12 at 3:00 p.m. (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts)
As part of its multimedia exhibition, Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts, running from February
11 to May 9, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts presents this panel discussion with
moderator Alastair Macauley and panelists Suzanne Farrell, Frederic Franklin, and Lorraine Graves
exploring the lasting legacy of this important cultural institution. Additional panelists are to be announced.
THE STORIES I COULD TELL: Arthur Mitchell at 75
Thursday, March 12 at 5:30 p.m. (New York Public Library for the Performing Arts)
As part of its multimedia exhibition, Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts, running from February
11 to May 9, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts presents an interview with Arthur
Mitchell, the Founding Artistic Director of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, moderated by Robert Greskovic.
Panel Discussion: The Spiritual and Gospel Music
Saturday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. (Apollo Theater)
Distinguished figures discuss the historical, political, and musical issues associated with this music.
Participants include Derrick Bell, Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Portia Maultsby, Chapman Roberts, Sweet Honey
in the Rock, and Olly Wilson.
****
EDUCATION PROGRAMS, EXHIBIT, AND WEBSITE
In addition to the six Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts and the Carnegie Hall National High School
Choral Festival presented during Honor!, The Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall has also incorporated
African American music into this year’s curriculum for its Perelman American Roots program for New York
City middle school students. Designed for middle school social studies and choral students, the
curriculum has been specifically designed to focus on the meaningful connections between the traditions
of African American song forms and U.S. history. This year, the program has expanded to include two
concerts for the participating classrooms. The first, held during the Honor! festival on Friday, March 20,
features a performance by the participants in the National High School Choral Festival at the Apollo
Theater; the second, on May 22, will feature the Fisk Jubilee Singers from Fisk University in Nashville,
Tennessee, performing in Zankel Hall.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor! festival with
a special exhibit, The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall. Through items from the
Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for
Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and Howard University, visitors will have the opportunity
to explore the fascinating history of African American artists and political and social figures who have
appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout its 118-year history. From the brightest classical music artists
through the greatest names in jazz to today’s trailblazing R&B and hip-hop artists, the African American
cultural legacy can, in one way, be traced through a look at Carnegie Hall’s past.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, on January 16 Carnegie Hall launches a revised website,
carnegiehall.org/honor, as the online companion to the festival. The site will offer the most up-to-date
information about Honor! events; pay tribute to the many African American performers who have
appeared on Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its history; and provide historical context to the festival’s
programming through an exploration of the evolution of African American music via an interactive timeline
curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
****
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Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Page 8 of 8
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The Andrew
W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation’s New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luiria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Neighborhood Concert Series Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
For ticket information about the Honor! festival, please visit carnegiehall.org/honor.
For high resolution images of Honor! artists, please contact the Carnegie Hall Public Affairs office at
212-903-9750 or [email protected]
Ticket Information
Tickets for all events taking place at Carnegie Hall are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th
Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212 247-7800 or by visiting the
Carnegie Hall website carnegiehall.org.
Tickets for all events taking place at the Apollo Theater are available at the Apollo Theater Box Office, TicketMaster
at 212-307-7171, or apollotheater.org. For further information call 212-531-5305.
Tickets for programs at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts are free and available on the day of the
event on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information: 212-870-1630 or nypl.org/lpaprograms.
Tickets for Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are free; check with each venue to see if advance reservations are
required.
In addition, for all Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited
number of partial-view seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through
Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall
Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served
basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.
A limited number of student discount tickets and senior citizen rush tickets, priced at $10, may also be available at the
Box Office for some Carnegie Hall events. Please call CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or, for students, visit
www.carnegiehall.org/students for availability. For information on Club 57th & 7th, Carnegie Hall’s discount ticket
program for those 40 and under, please visit www.carnegiehall.org/club.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Matt Carlson | Phone: 212-903-9751| E-mail: [email protected]
Contact: Tonya Bell-Green| Phone: 212-903-9752 | E-mail: [email protected]
HONOR! FESTIVAL OPENS MARCH 4 AT CARNEGIE HALL WITH A
SALUTE TO JAZZ, BLUES, R&B, ROCK, AND HIP-HOP GREATS AND
MARCH 7 AT CATHEDRAL OF ST. JOHN THE DIVINE WITH “SACRED ELLINGTON”
FEATURING EXCERPTS FROM DUKE ELLINGTON’S THREE SACRED CONCERTS
Closing Performance on March 23 Honors the Contributions
of Trailblazing African American Classical Vocalists
Special Exhibit At Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum Pays Tribute to the Extraordinary
Artistic Contributions of African Americans Throughout Hall’s 118-Year History
(January 29, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)—This March, Carnegie Hall presents Honor! A
Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy—a festival dedicated to saluting the
enduring vitality, influence, and creativity of African American culture—curated by internationally
renowned soprano Jessye Norman. The festival, which runs from March 4 through March 23,
includes a diverse array of more than 20 events at venues throughout New York City including
concerts, panel discussions, and educational events that celebrate African American music and
its influence worldwide as well as several events that honor past African American artists.
The festival launches on Wednesday, March 4 at 8:00 p.m. at Carnegie Hall’s Stern
Auditorium/Perelman Stage with a concert that showcases several genres of African American
music. The opening night program, entitled Honor: Blues, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Soul and
Beyond, will feature contemporary artists from the worlds of blues, jazz, R&B, rock and roll, and
hip-hop in performances that pay tribute to trailblazing African American figures of the past. In
addition to musical performances, the concert will include projected images and spoken
segments examining the bountiful past performances by African American artists at Carnegie Hall
and reflecting on African American contributions to each musical genre. Featured artists for this
program include: pianist Geri Allen, trumpeter Terence Blanchard, bassist Ron Carter, and
saxophonist James Carter from the world of jazz; blues vocalists/guitarists James “Blood”
Ulmer and Toshi Reagon; rock guitarist Vernon Reid and vocalist Corey Glover; R&B and soul
vocalists Ashford & Simpson, Anthony Hamilton, Freddie Jackson, Leela James, Kem, and
Ryan Shaw; hip-hop artists Doug E. Fresh and MC Lyte; and actor Avery Brooks. Ray
Chew—musical director for NBC’s The Singing Bee, Showtime at the Apollo, and BET’s Sunday
Best—is Music Director for the program, and Emmy Award winning WABC news anchor Sade
Baderinwa will host the program alongside actor Wendell Pierce from the acclaimed HBO’s
series The Wire.
Also during the festival’s opening week, Honor! curator Jessye Norman will perform Sacred
Ellington at The Cathedral of St. John the Divine on Saturday, March 7 at 8:00 p.m. The program
will feature excerpts from Duke Ellington’s magnificent three-part work known as Three Sacred
Concerts which, when it debuted, aimed to fuse Christian liturgy with jazz music. It eventually
came to encompass elements of classical and choral music, Spirituals, gospel, blues, and dance.
Ellington noted that this was the most important music he had ever written, and though rarely
performed today due to its scale and the large number of artists needed to execute each work,
Ellington performed it in churches and cathedrals around the world.
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 2 of 6
Organized by Miss Norman as a means of paying homage to Ellington and his outstanding
musical legacy, this large-scale work will feature Miss Norman performing vocals originally made
famous by gospel legend Mahalia Jackson. The program will also feature Music Director/pianist
Mark Markham, tap dancer Maurice Chestnut, dancer Margie Gillis, the Flux Quartet, a jazz
ensemble with trumpeter Mike Lovatt, saxophonist Bill Easley, double bassist Ira Coleman,
and drummer Steve Johns, plus the gospel choir Sacred Voices directed by Lawrence
Hamilton. Suzanne Ishee will serve as the coordinating producer, lighting will be designed by
Stan Pressner, sound design will be by Randy Hansen, ADI and wardrobe design will be by Sue
Anne Johnson. The performance will take place at The Cathedral Church of St. John the
Divine—a sanctuary of central importance in Ellington’s life—where the Second Sacred Concert
premiered in January 1968. Less than four months later, on April 4, 1968, Ellington performed
excerpts from the Second Sacred Concert at Carnegie Hall, where it was announced from the
stage prior to the start that Martin Luther King, Jr., had just been assassinated. The concert was
subsequently performed in memory of Dr. King.
The Honor! festival concludes on Monday, March 23 at 8:00 p.m. in Carnegie Hall’s Stern
Auditorium/Perelman Stage with another program paying tribute to the great African American
artists of the past. Honor: The Voice brings together acclaimed African American classical
singers of today to pay tribute to such icons such as Sissieretta Jones, Marion Anderson, Roland
Hayes, Paul Robeson, among others. Featured performers include sopranos Harolyn Blackwell,
Angela M. Brown, and Nicole Cabell; baritone Gregg Baker; bass-baritone Eric Owens; and
bass Kevin Maynor.
Additionally, throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall is supplementing its Honor! festival
programming with a special exhibit in the Rose Museum entitled The African American
Experience at Carnegie Hall. This exhibit helps to capture the rich diversity of African American
appearances at Carnegie Hall throughout its 118-year history through displays of historic items
from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the Performing Arts, the Schomburg
Center for Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and Howard University. Visitors will
be able to essentially trace the fascinating history of African American culture through the
pioneering political and social figures, innovative classical and jazz musicians, and trailblazing
R&B and hip-hop artists that have graced Carnegie Hall’s stage.
The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall includes rare musical sketches from Duke
Ellington's Sacred Concerts, an original manuscript from the only staged performance of the allblack production of Lawrence Freeman's opera The Martyr, and—on display for the first time
ever—an extraordinarily rare medal presented by the Sons of New York to soprano Sissieretta
Jones on the occasion of her Carnegie Hall debut in 1892. Jones was the first African American
performer to appear at Carnegie Hall, and her debut performance was held just one year after the
Hall opened its doors. Also on display are performance images of Josephine Baker and Nina
Simone, autographed artifacts from W.C. Handy; Langston Hughes; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.;
Ike and Tina Turner; and Marian Anderson as well as concert programs from famous Carnegie
Hall performances including the 1938 Spirituals to Swing concert; the Hall’s first rock & roll
concert in 1955 featuring Etta James and the Peaches and Big Joe Turner; and the 1955 Charlie
Parker Memorial Concert which featured over 40 of the top jazz musicians of the day.
Carnegie Hall has also launched the online companion to the Honor! festival,
carnegiehall.org/honor. The site offers the most up-to-date information about Honor! events,
pays tribute to the many African American performers who have appeared on Carnegie Hall’s
stages throughout its history, and will provide historical context for festival’s programming through
an exploration of the evolution of African American music via an interactive timeline, curated by
Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 3 of 6
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality,
influence, and creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special
events that have been curated by internationally-renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This
Carnegie Hall festival, presented in March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African
American music and its influence worldwide, and pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the
path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships with New York cultural institutions,
including the legendary Apollo Theater and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts,
Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a showcase for African American music in
its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals, contemporary popular music, blues, and jazz,
offering close to 20 events, including concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions, exhibitions,
and educational programs at Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the Divine,
and other venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its
stages, from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining
an open-door policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one
year after the hall opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by
numerous African American musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s
1928 debut—more than ten years before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington
D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to
Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African American styles and performers, and the Kool
Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions” debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby
McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced through Carnegie Hall
programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C. Handy and
Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of
the Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music
stars continue to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef
Jean, Mary J. Blige, and Mos Def, among many others.
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 4 of 6
Program Information
Wednesday, March 4 at 8:00 p.m.
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage
HONOR: BLUES, JAZZ, RHYTHM AND BLUES, SOUL, AND BEYOND
Ray Chew, Musical Director
Hosted by Sade Baderinwa and Wendell Pierce
Poetry reading by Avery Brooks
Geri Allen, Piano
Ashford & Simpson
Terence Blanchard
James Carter
Ron Carter
Doug E. Fresh
Corey Glover
Anthony Hamilton
Freddie Jackson
Leela James
Kem
MC Lyte
Toshi Reagon
Vernon Reid
Ryan Shaw
James "Blood" Ulmer
Paying tribute to the great African American popular music artists of the past, the brightest lights in blues,
rhythm and blues, soul, and jazz, as well as today’s daring innovators, gather for a magical evening of
music.
This performance is sponsored by Bank of America, Carnegie Hall's Proud Season Sponsor.
Tickets: $28, $34, $44, $60, $78, $86
______________________________
Saturday, March 7 at 8:00 p.m.
The Cathedral of St. John the Divine
1047 Amsterdam Avenue; New York, NY 10025
SACRED ELLINGTON
Jessye Norman, Soprano
Mark Markham, Music Director and Piano
Maurice Chestnut, Tap Dancer
Margie Gillis, Dancer
Flux Quartet
Tom Chiu, Violin
Conrad Harris, Violin
Max Mandel, Viola
Felix Fan, Cello
Sacred Ellington Band
Mike Lovatt, Trumpet
Bill Easley, Saxophone
Ira Coleman, Double Bass
Steve Johns, Drums
Sacred Voices
Lawrence Hamilton, Director
Suzanne Ishee, Coordinating Producer
Stan Pressner, Lighting Designer
Sound Design by Randy Hansen, ADI
Sue Anne Johnson, Wardrobe Designer
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 5 of 6
Sacred Ellington—comprising excerpts from Ellington’s magnificent Three Sacred Concerts—is Jessye
Norman’s homage to this legendary figure. The concert, which features Jessye Norman with a jazz
ensemble, string quartet, gospel choir, and a dancer, takes place at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, a
special sanctuary of central importance in Duke Ellington’s life.
This concert is supported, in part, by the A.L. and Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
Tickets: $40
______________________________
Monday, March 23 at 8:00 p.m.
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage
HONOR: THE VOICE
Harolyn Blackwell, Soprano
Angela M. Brown, Soprano
Nicole Cabell, Soprano
Gregg Baker, Baritone
Eric Owens, Bass-Baritone
Kevin Maynor, Bass
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL "Let the Bright Seraphim" from Samson
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL "Care selve" from Atalanta
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN "In questa tomba oscura"
FELIX MENDELSSOHN "Lord God of Abraham," Op. 70, No. 14 from Elijah
JOHANNES BRAHMS "Auf dem Kirchhofe," Op. 105, No. 4
HENRI DUPARC "L'invitation au voyage"
ROBERT SCHUMANN "Ich grolle nicht," Op. 48, No. 7 from Dichterliebe
FRANZ LISZT "Die Loreley"
RICHARD STRAUSS "Cäcilie," Op. 27, No. 2
GIUSEPPE VERDI "Il lacerato spirito" from Simon Boccanegra
GIUSEPPE VERDI "O patria mia" from Aida
GIUSEPPE VERDI "Ciel! mio padre!" from Aida
EARL ROBINSON/ANONYMOUS "Joe Hill" and "Water Boy"
LEONARD BERNSTEIN "Somewhere" from West Side Story
JEROME KERN "Ol' Man River" from Show Boat
GEORGE GERSHWIN "Bess You Is My Woman Now" from Porgy and Bess
GEORGE GERSHWIN "Summertime" from Porgy and Bess
TRADITIONAL "Deep River" (arr. Henry T. Burleigh)
TRADITIONAL "This Little Light of Mine"
TRADITIONAL "There Is a Balm in Gilead"
TRADITIONAL "Oh! What a Beautiful City"
African American singers from the classical music world come together to pay tribute to icons who opened
the doors for succeeding generations. Artists to be honored include Sissieretta Jones, Marian Anderson,
Paul Robeson, and Roland Hayes, among many others.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Tickets: $22, $26, $33, $45, $58, $64
______________________________
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 6 of 6
Exhibit Information
The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall
March 2009
Rose Museum at Carnegie Hall
Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. seven days a week (and open to Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage concert
patrons)
Admission: Free
For high resolution images of Honor! artists, please contact the Carnegie Hall Public Affairs office at 212903-9750 or [email protected]
****
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The
Rockefeller Foundation’s New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luiria
Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets for all events are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be
charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212 247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall
website carnegiehall.org.
In addition, for all Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman
Stage, a limited number of partial-view seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at
11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance.
The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the
general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket
limit per customer.
A limited number of student/senior citizen discount tickets, priced at $10, may also be available for some
Carnegie Hall events. They are on sale at the Box Office day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday
through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance. Student/senior
discount tickets for some Weill Recital Hall events are available at the Box Office one hour before the
performance. Please call CarnegieCharge for ticket availability.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Matt Carlson ! Phone: 212-903-9751 ! E-mail: [email protected]
Contact: Tonya Bell-Green ! Phone: 212-903-9752 ! E-mail: [email protected]
HONOR! FESTIVAL FEATURES SIX PANEL DISCUSSIONS, EACH EXPLORING
DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL EXPERIENCE
Panelists Include Leading Performers and Cultural Icons: Maya Angelou, Derrick Bell,
Calvin O. Butts III, Michael Eric Dyson, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Gwen Ifill, Judith Jamison,
Portia Maultsby, Arthur Mitchell, Toni Morrison, George Shirley, Anna Deavere Smith,
Sweet Honey In The Rock, Dr. Cornel West, and Many More
Zankel Hall Hosts Three Discussions on March 8 Regarding African American Music and the
Personal, Social, and Political Roles and Influence of African American Art, Featuring
Performances by Imani Winds, Baritone Robert Sims, and Dance Theatre of Harlem
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts Hosts Two Panels on March 12 Exploring the
Legacy of Arthur Mitchell and Dance Theatre of Harlem
Apollo Theater Program on March 21 Features Discussion About Spiritual and Gospel Music
(Tuesday, February 10, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)—From March 4 through March 23, Carnegie Hall
presents a citywide festival, Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, curated
by internationally renowned soprano Jessye Norman. As part of the festival’s programming, six panel
discussions explore the African American cultural experience, including three presented by Carnegie Hall
in Zankel Hall as well as two in partnership with the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and
one with The Apollo Theater. Honor! salutes the enduring vitality and creativity of African American
culture through a collection of concerts and events designed to celebrate African American music and its
influence worldwide. Festival events will also pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the path for
succeeding generations. For more information, visit carnegiehall.org/honor.
Honor! Panel Discussions in Zankel Hall
The series of panel discussions will kick off with three events on Sunday, March 8 in Zankel Hall. These
discussions will collectively examine the breadth of African American music, shed light upon what it
means to live and work as an African American artist, and examine the history of African Americans in the
arts and their impact on social and political discourse. Each of the three discussions will conclude with a
performance.
Exploration: A Panel Discussion, at 12:00 p.m., will feature a broad based conversation on
contemporary music, including the influence and significance of musical forms ranging from hip-hop and
R&B to jazz and contemporary orchestral music. Participants for this panel will include scholar, intellectual
and Princeton University professor, Dr. Cornel West, writer, radio host, and Georgetown professor
Michael Eric Dyson, Grammy award-winning composer Laura Karpman, acclaimed conductor Rachael
Worby, attorney Gordon J. Davis, and Dr. Luvenia A. George, author and developer of the Duke
Ellington and Louis Armstrong curriculum for the Smithsonian Institute. Following the discussion, the
celebrated African American wind quintet, Imani Winds, will perform the world premiere of Five Chairs
and One Table, a new work by Daniel Bernard Roumain, commissioned by Carnegie Hall. The piece
portrays a history of African and African-American song and struggle and includes brief musical portraits
dedicated to Jessye Norman, South African singer and civil rights activist Miriam Makeba (1932–2008),
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy March 4 – 23, 2009, Page 2 of 6
the folk singer Odetta (1930–2008), and the daughters of Barack and Michelle Obama, Malia and Sasha.
With this work, Mr. Roumain aims to nudge the boundaries of the traditional woodwind quintet and
“illuminate those obvious, yet elusive, opportunities for all of us to sit next to one another in communion.”
Imani Winds will also perform the New York premiere of Cane by jazz pianist and composer Jason
Moran.
Impression: A Panel Discussion, at 3:30 p.m., will feature leading cultural figures including Nobel Prizewinning author Toni Morrison, tenor and University of Michigan music professor George Shirley, Tony
Award- and Pulitzer Prize-nominated actress, playwright, and professor Anna Deavere Smith, and
acclaimed composer and conductor Tania León. The panelists will share their experiences—both on and
off stage—offer personal anecdotes, and provide insights about living a life in the arts. The event will
conclude with a 20-minute performance by baritone Robert Sims and pianist Paul Hamilton.
Expression: A Panel Discussion, at 7:00 p.m., will conclude the day’s activities with poet and awardwinning writer Maya Angelou; journalist and moderator of the PBS broadcast, Washington Week, Gwen
Ifill; scholar and Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; professor of Folklore and
Ethnomusicology at Indiana University Portia Maultsby; dancer, choreographer and founder of Dance
Theatre of Harlem Arthur Mitchell; and choreographer and artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American
Dance Theater Judith Jamison in a lively discussion about the history of African American performing
arts and artists and their influence on social and political change. The event will conclude with a
performance by Dance Theatre of Harlem School and Ensemble.
Honor! Panel Discussions at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
Two panel discussions at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts on Thursday, March 12 will
focus on the legacy of dancer and choreographer Arthur Mitchell and Dance Theatre of Harlem, in
conjunction with the library’s multimedia exhibition Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts. At 3:00
p.m., a panel discussion entitled Dance Theatre of Harlem: Classically American will focus on the first
African American classical ballet company, Dance Theatre of Harlem. Moderator and chief dance critic
for the New York Times, Alastair Macaulay, and panelists Suzanne Farrell, Frederic Franklin, and
Lorraine Graves will explore the lasting legacy of this important cultural institution. Additional panelists
are to be announced.
Then, at 5:30 p.m., the Library presents a conversation with the founder of Dance Theatre of Harlem,
Arthur Mitchell. Entitled The Stories I Could Tell: Arthur Mitchell at 75 this in-depth interview with
moderator Robert Greskovic will feature the prolific dancer and choreographer recounting experiences
from the beginnings of his dance career to his tenure with the New York City Ballet—where he soon
earned the distinction of becoming the first African American principal dancer in a major ballet company—
through his artistic journey with Dance Theatre of Harlem.
Considered a leading dance institution by dancers and choreographers alike, Dance Theatre of Harlem
was originally founded in 1969 by Arthur Mitchell and Karel Shook shortly after the assassination of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr., as a means of offering Harlem-based children an opportunity to learn about dance
and the allied arts. In the 40 years that followed, the award-winning company has traveled the world and
evolved into a multi-cultural dance institution that provides opportunities for creative expression and
artistic excellence that continues to set standards in the performing arts. Founder Arthur Mitchell’s artistry
has been universally recognized. In addition to being named a MacArthur Fellow and a Kennedy Center
honoree, he was also inducted into the Hall of Fame for the National Museum of Dance and has received
the United States National Medal of Arts, among other accolades.
Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts will be on display at the New York Public Library for the
Performing Arts from February 11 to May 9.
Honor! Panel Discussion at The Apollo Theater
The festival’s series of panel discussions concludes on Saturday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. with a program
hosted by the Apollo Theater entitled The Spiritual and Gospel Music. The program, which kicks off a
weekend of events at the Apollo, will feature a discussion on the history, musical influence,
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy March 4 – 23, 2009, Page 3 of 6
political and social significance of the Spiritual and gospel music.
The discussion will include reflections from Derrick Bell, Professor of Constitutional Law at the New York
University School of Law; Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III, Pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church; Portia
Maultsby, Professor of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana University; performer, arranger, and
musical director Chapman Roberts; composer, performer, and Professor of Music at University of
California at Berkley Olly Wilson; and members of the renowned a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey In
The Rock. The Apollo Theater Honor! weekend concludes on Sunday with a performance of Spirituals
and gospel music featuring vocalists Richard Smallwood and Shirley Caesar, Sweet Honey In The
Rock, the Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir, Hezekiah Walker and the Love Fellowship
Choir, and Vy Higginson’s Gospel for Teens among others.
***
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality, influence, and
creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special events that have been
curated by internationally-renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This Carnegie Hall festival, presented in
March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African American music and its influence worldwide, and
pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships
with New York cultural institutions, including the legendary Apollo Theater and the New York Public
Library for the Performing Arts, Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a showcase for
African American music in its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals, contemporary popular music,
blues, and jazz, offering close to 20 events, including concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions,
exhibitions, and educational programs at Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the
Divine, and other venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its stages,
from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining an open-door
policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one year after the hall
opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by numerous African American
musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s 1928 debut—more than ten years
before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer
John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African
American styles and performers, and the Kool Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions”
debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced
through Carnegie Hall programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C.
Handy and Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of the
Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music stars continue
to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef Jean, Mary J. Blige,
and Mos Def, among many others.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor! festival with
a special exhibit entitled The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall. Through items on display
from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for
Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and Howard University, visitors will have the chance to
explore the fascinating history of African American artists and political and social figures who have
appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout its 118-year history.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, Carnegie Hall has created a website, carnegiehall.org/honor, to serve as
the online companion to the festival. The site will offer the most up-to-date information about Honor!
events, pay tribute to the hundreds of legendary African American performers who have appeared on
Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its history, and provide historical context to the festival’s programming
via an interactive timeline curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy March 4 – 23, 2009, Page 4 of 6
Program Information
Sunday, March 8 at 12:00 p.m.
Zankel Hall
EXPLORATION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Panel Participants to Include:
Gordon J. Davis
Michael Eric Dyson
Luvenia A. George
Laura Karpman
Dr. Cornel West
Rachael Worby
Performance:
Imani Winds
JASON MORAN Cane (New York Premiere)
DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN Five Chairs and One Table (World Premiere, commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
A wide ranging discussion on music today ranging from hip-hop and jazz to contemporary orchestral music. This
event will conclude with a performance of Five Chairs and One Table, a newly commissioned work by Daniel Bernard
Roumain, and the New York premiere of Cane by Jason Moran, performed by Imani Winds.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Carnegie Hall commissions in the 2008-2009 season are made possible, in part, by a generous grant from the New
York State Music Fund, established by the New York State Attorney General at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.
Tickets: $15
______________________________
Sunday, March 8 at 3:30 p.m.
Zankel Hall
IMPRESSION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Panel Participants to Include:
Tania León
Toni Morrison
George Shirley
Anna Deavere Smith
Performance:
Robert Sims, Baritone
Paul Hamilton, Piano
An afternoon of reminiscences and anecdotes of a life in the arts. Leading figures discuss their individual
performance experiences on the international stages. The event will close with a performance by baritone Robert
Sims and pianist Paul Hamilton.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Tickets: $15
______________________________
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy March 4 – 23, 2009, Page 5 of 6
Sunday, March 8 at 7:00 p.m.
Zankel Hall
EXPRESSION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Participants to include:
Maya Angelou
Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Gwen Ifill
Judith Jamison
Portia Maultsby
Arthur Mitchell
Performance:
Dance Theatre of Harlem
A discussion of the history of African American performing arts and its role in social and political change. The event
will close with a performance by Dance Theatre of Harlem.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Tickets: $15
______________________________
Thursday, March 12 at 3:00 p.m.
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
Bruno Walter Auditorium
40 Lincoln Center Plaza; New York, NY 10023
PANEL DISCUSSION: DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM: CLASSICALLY AMERICAN
Alastair Macaulay, Moderator
Suzanne Farrell
Frederic Franklin
Lorraine Graves
Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in conjunction with the Library's exhibition Dance
Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts
Tickets are free and available on the day of the event on a first come, first served basis.
For more information, please call 212-870-1630 or visit www.nypl.org/lpaprograms
______________________________
Thursday, March 12 at 5:30 p.m.
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
Bruno Walter Auditorium
40 Lincoln Center Plaza; New York, NY 10023
THE STORIES I COULD TELL: ARTHUR MITCHELL AT 75
Arthur Mitchell, Speaker
Robert Greskovic, Moderator
An interview with the Founding Artistic Director of Dance Theatre of Harlem
Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in conjunction with the Library's exhibition Dance
Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of Firsts
Tickets are free and available on the day of the event on a first come, first served basis.
For more information, please call 212-870-1630 or visit www.nypl.org/lpaprograms
______________________________
(more)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy March 4 – 23, 2009, Page 6 of 6
Saturday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m.
Apollo Theater
253 West 125th Street; New York, NY 10027
PANEL DISCUSSION: THE SPIRITUAL AND GOSPEL MUSIC
Derrick Bell
Dr. Calvin O. Butts III
Portia Maultsby
Chapman Roberts
Sweet Honey In The Rock
Olly Wilson
A wide-ranging discussion, exploring the historical and political issues associated with Spirituals and gospel music.
Tickets: $10
For more information, please call 212-531-5305or visit www.apollotheater.org
______________________________
For high resolution images of Honor! artists, please contact the Carnegie Hall Public Affairs office at 212-903-9750 or
[email protected]
****
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The Andrew
W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation’s New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets for all events are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be charged to major
credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212 247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website carnegiehall.org.
Tickets for all events taking place at the Apollo Theater are available at the Apollo Theater Box Office, TicketMaster
at 212-307-7171, or apollotheater.org. For further information call 212-531-5305.
Tickets for programs at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts are free and available on the day of the
event on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information: 212-870-1630 or nypl.org/lpaprograms.
In addition, for all Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited
number of partial-view seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through
Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall
Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served
basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Matt Carlson ! Phone: 212-903-9751 ! E-mail: [email protected]
Contact: Tonya Bell-Green ! Phone: 212-903-9752 ! E-mail: [email protected]
**UPDATED ARTIST INFORMATION**
JESSYE NORMAN, THE ROOTS, DE’ADRE AZIZA, AND TRACIE LUCK PERFORM
ASK YOUR MAMA!
THE WORLD PREMIERE OF A MULTIMEDIA CONCERT WORK
BY COMPOSER LAURA KARPMAN ON MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2009
New Concert Production Based on Poem Cycle by Langston Hughes,
Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz,
Presented by Carnegie Hall During Three-Week Honor! Festival Curated by Jessye Norman
(February 19, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)— On Monday, March 16 at 8:00 p.m. in Stern
Auditorium/Perelman Stage, soprano Jessye Norman, hip-hop group The Roots, and vocalists
de’Adre Aziza (Passing Strange) and Tracie Luck (Margaret Garner) will be the featured artists
in the world premiere performance of Ask Your Mama!, an extraordinary multimedia concert
production by composer Laura Karpman based on Langston Hughes’ 1961 poem cycle about
African American life, music, and culture. This collaboration between the four-time Emmy Awardwinning composer, Ms. Karpman, and the five-time Grammy Award-winning soprano, Miss
Norman, will be directed by Annie Dorsen (Passing Strange) with conductor George Manahan
leading the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. Artist Rico Gatson will provide visuals; Kate Howard is the
Video Designer, David Korins the Scenic Consultant, and Leslie Ann Jones the Sound
Designer.
Carnegie Hall commissioned Ask Your Mama! as part of its three-week festival Honor! A
Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy curated by Miss Norman from March 4
to March 23. Honor! salutes the enduring vitality, influence, and creativity of African American
culture through a collection of concerts and events designed to celebrate African American music
and its influence worldwide. Festival events will also pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged
the path for succeeding generations. For more information, visit carnegiehall.org/honor. For a
complete Honor! press kit, please click here.
Carnegie Hall will hold a benefit event in conjunction with the performance of Ask Your Mama!
with all proceeds going towards Carnegie Hall’s artistic and education programming. Benefit
tickets priced at $1,000 include prime concert seating and a post-concert cast party dinner at
Carnegie Hall’s Rohatyn Room. Benefit tickets priced at $500 include a pre-concert reception and
concert seating. For benefit tickets and more information, contact the Carnegie Hall Special
Events office at 212-903-9679 or online at carnegiehall.org/specialevents. Remaining concert
tickets, priced at $23, $27, $35, $48, $62, and $68, are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office,
by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800, or by visiting carnegiehall.org.
Ask Your Mama!
Based on Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz, the cycle of twelve poems by Langston Hughes
(1902–1967), Laura Karpman’s Ask Your Mama! is a 90-minute tapestry of music, film, and
(more)
Ask Your Mama!, March 16, 2009 Page 2 of 6
spoken word that bursts the boundaries of time, place, and verbal expression to trace the
currents and tributaries of cultural diasporas. The Hughes/Karpman work travels from Africa to
the Americas, from the South to the North, from cities to suburbs, from opera to jazz, from gospel
to be-bop—and in Hughes’s own words, "from shadows to fire."
From the start, Hughes conceived Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz as an interdisciplinary
creation. He began work on it while attending the Newport Jazz Festival and, taking his
inspiration a step further, penned an imaginary “soundtrack” in the margin of each page as an
accompaniment to his words and as part of the poem itself (“beat as if marching forward against
great odds, climbing a high hill—to again fade into the dry swish of maracas in cha-cha time”).
Though he subtitled the book 12 Moods for Jazz, Hughes’s imagination conjured a kaleidoscope
of styles—including hot jazz, German lieder, cha-chas, patriotic songs, post-bop, Middle Eastern
music, and Afro-Caribbean drumming—evoking the turbulent flux and flow of American cultural
life. In the work, Hughes refers to specific songs—chief among them “The Hesitation Blues,”
which asks the question, “How long will I have to wait?” Hughes weaves the tune into his cycle as
an emblem of the American dream deferred: of justice and equality held just out of reach.
Ms. Karpman’s music—the first major vocal setting of this poem—complements Hughes’s work
with a vivid mix of jazz, gospel, hip-hop, and orchestral music, bringing together live musicians,
video projections, and sampled quotations as well as African American and European vocal
traditions past and present. The many components of the work stem from Hughes’ encompassing
vision. His voice—in a rarely heard archival recording reciting his own work—will be interspersed
throughout the music.
Technology has evolved so that the boundary-crossing score that Hughes “composed” to
accompany his text can finally be brought to life, jumping from Harlem to Rio, from hot jazz to hiphop, with the click of a mouse or the beat of a baton. Much the way that Hughes’ work is also an
ode to the greats—references are made to Leontyne Price, Marian Anderson, Ray Charles, Dinah
Washington, Blind Lemon Jefferson, and many others—Ms. Karpman has created a sonic
panorama that includes quotations from Louis Armstrong, Big Maybelle, Pigmeat Markham, Bill
Bojangles, and many other cultural icons. These will be seamlessly integrated with the video clips
and archival images that constitute the production’s visual component.
For more information about the work, please visit www.askyourmama.com.
Artist Information
The multi-faceted Laura Karpman is no stranger to multi-media projects, having worked in
virtually every musical milieu, including film, theatre, concert, television, and video games. She is
a graduate of the University of Michigan and holds masters and doctoral degrees from The
Juilliard School, where she studied with Milton Babbitt. Among the first composers selected as a
Sundance Institute Film Scoring Fellow, Ms. Karpman is a four-time Emmy Award-winner and
twelve time nominee. Her concert works have been hailed in performances by the Los Angeles
Philharmonic, Cabrillo Festival Orchestra conducted by Marin Alsop, Juilliard Chorus, and the
Detroit, Richmond, Seattle, and Prague symphonies. She has worked with film directors Steven
Spielberg, Robert Greenwald, Barbara Koppel, Ken Olin, Rodrigo Garcia, Kathy Bates, and
JoBeth Williams. Ms. Karpman looks forward to new works for Evelyn Glennie, Tonya Pinkins,
and the 110 Project, a work newly commissioned by the L.A. Opera that is a paean to the city's
first freeway, the redoubtable I-110, which turns 70 in 2009.
Jessye Norman is “one of those once-in-a-generation singers who is not simply following in the
footsteps of others, but is staking out her own niche in the history of singing” (The New York
Times). This rich history continues as she performs around the world, bringing her joy of singing
(more)
Ask Your Mama!, March 16, 2009 Page 3 of 6
and passion to recital performances, operatic portrayals, and appearances with symphony
orchestras and chamber music ensembles. The sheer size, power, and luster of her voice share
equal acclaim with that of her thoughtful music making, innovative programming of the classics,
and advocacy of contemporary music. Miss Norman is the recipient of many awards and honors
including the Kennedy Center Honor awarded in December 1997 when she made history by
becoming the youngest recipient of this, the highest award in the U.S. for performing artists, in its
then 20 year history. She is an honorary ambassador to the United Nations and was awarded the
French Legion of Honor by President François Mitterand. Her many other prestigious distinctions
include honorary doctorates at 35 colleges, universities, and conservatories around the world, the
most recent being the Doctor of Fine Arts from the University of North Carolina in May 2008. Miss
Norman, a five-time Grammy winner, is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
The Roots is an influential, Grammy Award-winning Philadelphia-based hip-hop group, famed for
a heavily jazzy sound, live instrumentation, social consciousness, and innovative approach to
spoken word and groove. Inspired by the “hip-hop band” concept pioneered by Stetsasonic, The
Roots has gained wide critical acclaim and influenced later hip-hop and R&B acts. The band tours
extensively, and their live sets are frequently hailed as the best in the hip-hop genre.
de’Adre Aziza’s Broadway debut, Passing Strange, not only garnered her critical acclaim, but
also earned her a 2008 Tony nomination for Best Featured Actress in a Musical. In the show, Ms.
Aziza portrayed three incredibly diverse characters: a 14-year-old sassy school girl, a Dutch
sexual revolutionary, and a fanatical German filmmaker. In 2008, The New York Times called her
work in Passing Strange and the off-Broadway musical Doris To Darlene “radiant,” and that her,
“megawatt smile, silky singing voice and dazzling beauty make it entirely plausible that she would
be singled out for potential stardom.” Her journey began at 15 when she was accepted into a
summer acting program for high school students at the prestigious Tisch School of the Arts. She
applied and was accepted into New York University at the age of 16, and while there, studied at
both the Lee Strasberg Institute and the Playwrights Horizon Theatre School with a focus on
Classical Works. Ms. Aziza’s involvement with Passing Strange began with a workshop at
Stanford University in early 2006, and she has been involved in all incarnations of the piece
since. The film version, directed by Spike Lee, made its debut recently at the 2009 Sundance
Film Festival. Ms. Aziza was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and raised in Teaneck, New Jersey.
Tracie Luck made her New York City Opera debut in 2007 in the title role of Margaret Garner by
composer Richard Danielpour with a libretto by Toni Morrison. She has subsequently performed
the role in 2008 at Michigan Opera Theatre and in January 2009 in Chicago. Ms. Luck also
recently made her Utah Opera debut in Marc Blitzstein's Regina, as Addie, a role for which she
also made her Canadian debut in 2008. She has appeared as Maddalena in Rigoletto with
Cincinnati Opera and Michigan Opera Theatre; Flora in La Traviata, Virginelle in La Périchole,
and both Annie and Lily in Porgy and Bess with the Opera Company of Philadelphia; Fricka and
Grimgerde in Die Walküre and a number of roles in Rigoletto with Virginia Opera. Ms. Luck holds
a Bachelor of Music degree from Peabody Conservatory of Johns Hopkins University and earned
an Artist Diploma from The Academy of Vocal Arts (AVA) in Philadelphia.
In his 11th season as Music Director for New York City Opera, the wide-ranging and versatile
George Manahan has had an esteemed career embracing everything from opera to the concert
stage. He has appeared as guest conductor with the Opera Companies of Seattle, Santa Fe,
Chicago, Opera Theatre of St. Louis, Opera National du Paris, and Teatro de Communale de
Bologna. From 1987–98, he served as music director of the Richmond Symphony (VA) where he
was honored four times by the American Society of Composers and Publishers (ASCAP) for his
commitment to 20th-century music. The Live From Lincoln Center broadcast of New York City
Opera’s production of Madame Butterfly with George Manahan conducting won a 2007 Emmy
Award. Guest appearances include the symphonies of New Jersey, Atlanta, San Francisco,
Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Charlotte, the National Symphony, and Music Academy of the West as
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Ask Your Mama!, March 16, 2009 Page 4 of 6
well as at the Aspen Music Festival. Mr. Manahan's discography includes the Grammy Award
nominated recording of Edward Thomas' Desire Under The Elms with the London Symphony and
Steve Reich's Tehillim on the EMI-Warner Brothers label.
Annie Dorsen is a director, writer, and dramaturg. She is director and co-creator of the Broadway
hit Passing Strange, a piece she developed with musicians Stew and Heidi Rodewald, which
opened at the Belasco Theater in February 2008 to rave reviews. She also currently developed
Truckstop with the string quartet Ethel for BAM’s Next Wave Festival. Ms. Dorsen is the recipient
of several awards and fellowships, notably the Audelco Award for her direction of Passing
Strange, the Sir John Gielgud Fellowship for Classical Directors from SSDC, and both the Boris
Sagal and Bill Foeller Fellowships from the Williamstown Theater Festival. She is a founding
member of PAF (PerformingArtsForum), an artist-run research and residency space in St. Erme,
France.
Rico Gatson’s paintings, sculpture, and videos investigate complex issues relating to identity and
race. He takes a narrative approach to 20th century American and African American history,
interweaving a series of sources and events into a shifting landscape of ideas that knowingly
uses iconic figures, symbols, shapes, and images. Integrated with activist figures are references
to fractal geometry, African textiles, drumming and chanting, edgy 1960’s film culture,
psychedelia, Hurricane Katrina, and President Bush. Mr. Gatson’s work has been exhibited at
“Greater New York 2005” at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center; “African Queen” at The Studio
Museum in Harlem; and “Fight or Flight” at the Whitney Museum of American Art. His videos
have recently been shown at the New York Center for Art and Media Studies, the Museo
Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid, and the Bronx River Arts Center, among others.
Mr. Gatson is represented by Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York.
The Orchestra of St. Luke’s has earned a reputation as America’s foremost and most versatile
chamber orchestra since its inception in 1979 at the Caramoor International Music Festival. In
addition to its yearly collaborations with renowned artists on special projects and recordings, the
Orchestra is presented by Carnegie Hall in an annual subscription series. The Caramoor
International Music Festival is the summer home of the Orchestra of St. Luke’s where they
perform as orchestra-in-residence. The Orchestra averages 55 musicians, with members of the
St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble serving as its principal players.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality,
influence, and creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special
events that have been curated by internationally renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This
Carnegie Hall festival, presented in March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African
American music and its influence worldwide, and pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the
path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships with New York cultural institutions,
including the legendary Apollo Theater and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts,
Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a showcase for African American music in
its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals, contemporary popular music, blues, and jazz,
offering close to 20 events, including concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions, exhibitions,
and educational programs at Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the Divine,
and other venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its
stages, from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining
an open-door policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one
year after the hall opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by
numerous African American musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s
1928 debut—more than ten years before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington
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Ask Your Mama!, March 16, 2009 Page 5 of 6
D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to
Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African American styles and performers, and the Kool
Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions” debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby
McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced through Carnegie Hall
programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C. Handy and
Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of
the Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music
stars continue to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef
Jean, Mary J. Blige, and Mos Def, among many others.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor!
festival with a special exhibit entitled The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall.
Through items on display from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the
Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and
Howard University, visitors will have the chance to explore the fascinating history of African
American artists and political and social figures who have appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout
its 118-year history.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, Carnegie Hall has created a website, carnegiehall.org/honor, to
serve as the online companion to the festival. The site will offer the most up-to-date information
about Honor! events, pay tribute to the hundreds of legendary African American performers who
have appeared on Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its history, and provide historical context to
the festival’s programming via an interactive timeline curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of
Indiana University.
Program Information
Monday, March 16, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage
ASK YOUR MAMA!
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Jessye Norman, Soprano
The Roots
de’Adre Aziza, Vocalist
Tracie Luck, Vocalist
Orchestra of St. Luke's
George Manahan, Conductor
Annie Dorsen, Director
Rico Gatson, Artist
Kate Howard
David Korins
Leslie Ann Jones, Sound Designer
LAURA KARPMAN Ask Your Mama! (World Premiere, commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
Ask Your Mama!, a collaboration between four-time Emmy Award–winning composer Laura Karpman and
five-time Grammy winner Jessye Norman, is a multimedia presentation on a text by Langston Hughes, Ask
Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The
Rockefeller Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria
Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
(more)
Ask Your Mama!, March 16, 2009 Page 6 of 6
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets, priced at $23, $27, $35, $48, $62, and $68, are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154
West 57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or
by visiting the Carnegie Hall website, www.carnegiehall.org.
In addition, for all Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern Auditorium/Perelman
Stage, a limited number of partial-view seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at
11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance.
The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the
general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket
limit per customer.
A limited number of student discount tickets and senior citizen rush tickets, priced at $10, may also be
available at the Box Office for some Carnegie Hall events. Please call CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800
or, for students, visit www.carnegiehall.org/students for availability. For information on Club 57th &7th,
Carnegie Hall’s discount ticket program for those 40 and under, please visit www.carnegiehall.org/club.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Carnegie Hall Contact: Matt Carlson!Phone: 212-903-9751!E-mail: [email protected]
Carnegie Hall Contact: Tonya Bell-Green! Phone: 212-903-9752!E-mail: [email protected]
Apollo Theater Contact: Nina Flowers!Phone: 212-531-5334!E-mail: [email protected]
CARNEGIE HALL PARTNERS WITH THE APOLLO THEATER TO PRESENT
A WEEKEND DEVOTED TO THE SPIRITUAL AND GOSPEL MUSIC ON
MARCH 21 AND 22 DURING CITYWIDE FESTIVAL
HONOR! A CELEBRATION OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL LEGACY
Events To Take Place at the Apollo Theater Include:
Panel Discussion on Saturday, March 21 with Derrick Bell, Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Portia Maultsby,
Chapman Roberts, Sweet Honey In The Rock, and Olly Wilson
Explores Historical, Political, and Musical Dimensions of Spirituals and Gospel Music
Performance on Sunday, March 22 Features Musical Director Ray Chew, Gospel Vocalists
Shari Addison, Shirley Caesar, Donnie McClurkin, Smokie Norful, and Richard Smallwood,
Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir, Hezekiah Walker and the Love Fellowship Choir,
Sweet Honey In The Rock, and Vy Higginsen’s Gospel for Teens
For Immediate Release, February 18, 2009—This March, Carnegie Hall presents Honor! A Celebration
of the African American Cultural Legacy—a three-week festival dedicated to saluting the enduring
vitality, influence, and creativity of African American culture—curated by internationally renowned soprano
Jessye Norman. A highlight of the festival will be a special weekend at the Apollo Theater on March 21
and 22, immersing audiences in the traditions of the Spiritual and gospel music through discussion and
performance.
On Saturday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. a panel discussion explores the historical, political, and musical
issues associated with these musical genres. Participants include Derrick Bell, Professor of
Constitutional Law at the New York University School of Law; Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Pastor of The
Abyssinian Baptist Church; Portia Maultsby, Professor of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana
University; performer, arranger, and musical director Chapman Roberts; composer, performer, and
Professor of Music at University of California at Berkley Olly Wilson; and members of the renowned a
cappella ensemble Sweet Honey In The Rock.
On Sunday, March 22 at 5:00 p.m., the weekend’s programming will continue with a concert tracing the
development of the Spiritual from its African roots in a joyous program that brings together gospel
vocalists Shari Addison, Shirley Caesar, Donnie McClurkin, Smokie Norful, and Richard Smallwood
with The Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir, Hezekiah Walker and the Love Fellowship
Choir, Sweet Honey In The Rock, and Vy Higginsen's Gospel for Teens, with other artists to be
announced. Ray Chew, musical director of NBC’s The Singing Bee, Showtime At the Apollo, and BET’s
Sunday Best, serves as the concert’s musical director.
Prior to this special weekend, Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute also presents a free, interactive
Carnegie Hall Community Sing at the Apollo Theater Soundstage on Friday, March 13 at 6:30 p.m.,
(more)
Honor! Carnegie Hall and the Apollo Theater, Page 2 of 5
which invites vocalists of all ages and levels to make music together with host Vy Higginsen and the
Gospel for Teens Choir.
The Honor! festival runs from March 4 through March 23, celebrating African American music and its
influence worldwide with more than 20 concerts and events throughout New York City. Festival events will
also pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the path for succeeding generations. For more
information, visit carnegiehall.org/honor.
Now in its 118th season, Carnegie Hall has long presented performances of Spirituals and gospel music,
having had an open-door policy for performers and audience alike since its opening. Paul Robeson is
believed to have presented the first full program of Spirituals in a solo recital at Carnegie Hall in 1929,
although a duo vocal recital by J. Rosamond Johnson and Taylor Gordon preceded it by more than two
years. Even before that, a concert entitled "Hampton Negro and Indian Folk Lore Concert" took place in
1902. More recently, sopranos Jessye Norman and Kathleen Battle, appearing together for the first time,
performed a historic program of Spirituals, recorded for PBS telecast, in 1990. Some of gospel music’s
great stars have also performed at Carnegie Hall throughout the years, from Mahalia Jackson who made
the first of her eight Carnegie Hall appearances in 1950 as part of a “Negro Gospel Music Festival”
presented by Joe Bostic, noted radio announcer and producer of “The Gospel Train” on WLIB Radio; to
The Winans, which recorded its Grammy-winning Live at Carnegie Hall album over two concerts in 1987.
Celebrating its 75th Anniversary season in 2009, the iconic Apollo Theater has been a driving force
shaping America’s cultural and musical landscape, launching the careers of gospel greats like Clara
Ward, the Staple Sisters, and Sam Cooke’s Soul Stirrers. As legends like these graced its stage, the
Harlem theater became a catalyst for broadening the audience of spiritual music, and sparked the
development of the many genres that grew out of the gospel tradition.
Musical Director of the March 22 concert, composer and producer Ray Chew is also Musical Director of
the Honor! opening night concert on March 4, Honor: Blues, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Soul, And Beyond,
and has served as Musical Director for three network television series: NBC’s The Singing Bee,
Showtime At the Apollo, and BET’s Sunday Best in addition to the Apollo Theater’s long-running Amateur
Night. He most recently served as musical director for the historical “Neighborhood Inaugural Ball,” at the
Washington Convention Center, as President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama danced to a
soul-stirring rendition of “At Last” by Beyoncé. Chew also served as musical director for the 2008
Democratic National Convention in Denver, CO (Ricky Kirshner Productions). Chew and his nationwide
orchestra provided the music for all four days of the convention, including the historic, culminating events
at Invesco Field where he performed “America the Beautiful” with Michael McDonald. Chew also
arranged and produced the National Anthem performance for Academy Award winning powerhouse
Jennifer Hudson. He was also musical director for The BET Honors—and was featured in a piano duet
with Stevie Wonder, in addition to signature performances by Gladys Knight, Brian McKnight and Jill
Scott, and John Legend.
Apollo Theater
Celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2009, the Apollo Theater is one of Harlem’s, New York City’s, and
America’s most iconic and enduring cultural institutions. The Apollo was one of the first theaters in New
York, and the country, to fully integrate, welcoming traditionally African-American, Hispanic, and local
immigrant populations in the audience, as well as headlining uniquely talented entertainers who found it
difficult to gain entrance to other venues of similar size and resources. Since introducing the first
Amateur Night contests in 1934, the Apollo Theater has played a major role in cultivating artists and in the
emergence of innovative musical genres including jazz, swing, bebop, R&B, gospel, blues, soul and hiphop. Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday, Sammy Davis, Jr., James Brown, Bill Cosby, Gladys
Knight, Luther Vandross, D’Angelo, Lauryn Hill, and countless others began their road to stardom on the
Apollo’s stage. Based on its cultural significance and architecture, the Apollo Theater received state and
city landmark designation in 1983 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
(more)
Honor! Carnegie Hall and the Apollo Theater, Page 3 of 5
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality, influence, and
creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special events that have been
curated by internationally renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This Carnegie Hall festival, presented in
March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African American music and its influence worldwide, and
pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships
with New York cultural institutions, including the legendary Apollo Theater and the New York Public
Library for the Performing Arts, Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a showcase for
African American music in its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals, contemporary popular music,
blues, and jazz, offering close to 20 events, including concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions,
exhibitions, and educational programs at Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the
Divine, and other venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its stages,
from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining an open-door
policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one year after the hall
opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by numerous African American
musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s 1928 debut—more than ten years
before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer
John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African
American styles and performers, and the Kool Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions”
debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced
through Carnegie Hall programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C.
Handy and Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of the
Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music stars continue
to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef Jean, Mary J. Blige,
and Mos Def, among many others.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor! festival with
a special exhibit entitled The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall. Through items on display
from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for
Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and Howard University, visitors will have the chance to
explore the fascinating history of African American artists and political and social figures who have
appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout its 118-year history.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, Carnegie Hall has created a website, carnegiehall.org/honor, to serve
as the online companion to the festival. The site will offer the most up-to-date information about Honor!
events, pay tribute to the hundreds of legendary African American performers who have appeared on
Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its history, and provide historical context to the festival’s programming
via an interactive timeline curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
(more)
Honor! Carnegie Hall and the Apollo Theater, Page 4 of 5
Program Information
Friday, March 13 at 6:30 p.m.
Apollo Theater, Soundstage
253 West 125th Street
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: COMMUNITY SING WITH GOSPEL FOR TEENS
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Gospel for Teens
Vy Higginsen, Host
Gospel for Teens is a program of the Mama Foundation for the Arts and Vy Higginsen’s School of Gospel, Jazz, and
R&B Arts for teens ages 13–19. Under the direction of the foundation’s seasoned music masters, the Gospel for
Teens Choir has performed throughout New York City, including the Apollo Theater, the American Museum of Natural
History, and St. Paul Community Baptist Church.
Sponsored by Target
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free, RSVP Required – limit 4 tickets per person (Call: 212-531-5363)
______________________________
Saturday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m.
Apollo Theater
253 West 125th Street
PANEL DISCUSSION: THE SPIRITUAL AND GOSPEL MUSIC
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Derrick Bell
Dr. Calvin O. Butts III
Portia Maultsby
Chapman Roberts
Sweet Honey In The Rock
Olly Wilson
A wide-ranging discussion, exploring the historical and political issues associated with Spirituals and gospel music.
Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with the Apollo Theater.
Tickets: $10
______________________________
(more)
Honor! Carnegie Hall and the Apollo Theater, Page 5 of 5
Sunday, March 22 at 5:00 p.m.
Apollo Theater
253 West 125th Street
A CELEBRATION OF THE SPIRITUAL AND GOSPEL MUSIC
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Ray Chew, Musical Director
Shari Addison, Vocalist
Shirley Caesar, Vocalist
Donnie McClurkin, Vocalist
Smokie Norful, Vocalist
Richard Smallwood, Vocalist
The Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir
Hezekiah Walker and the Love Fellowship Choir
Sweet Honey In The Rock
Vy Higginsen's Gospel for Teens
Additional artists to be announced
Carnegie Hall and the Apollo Theater team up to present a concert of Spirituals and gospel music. The program will
trace the development of the Spiritual, from its African roots, to solo vocal performances and choral arrangements.
Following intermission, choirs from around New York City will join forces for a joyous celebration of gospel music.
Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with the Apollo Theater.
Tickets: $45
______________________________
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The Andrew
W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets for the March 21 and 22 events are available at the Apollo Theater Box Office, TicketMaster at 212-307-7171,
or apollotheater.org. For further information call 212-531-5305.
Tickets for the March 13 Carnegie Hall Community Sing are free, but reservations are required. Call 212-531-5363.
Limit four tickets per person.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Matt Carlson | Phone: 212-903-9751 | E-mail: [email protected]
Contact: Maggie Ciadella | Phone: 212-903-9753 | E-mail: [email protected]
CITYWIDE HONOR! FESTIVAL OFFERS FREE AND AFFORDABLE CONCERTS
AND PROGRAMS FOR NEW YORK CITY COMMUNITIES AND STUDENTS
Six Free Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts Feature
Leading African American Artists at Venues Throughout New York City
“Community Sing” Event at Apollo Theater on March 13
Unites Vocalists of All Ages and Levels
Carnegie Hall’s National High School Choral Festival on March 20
Features Four Choirs Performing with Professional Singers, Conductor Craig Jessop,
and Orchestra of St. Luke’s in Choral Work Inspired by African American Spirituals
(February 2, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)—Free and affordable community programs will be an
integral part of Carnegie Hall’s citywide festival Honor! A Celebration of the African American
Cultural Legacy. These programs, presented by The Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall
(WMI), will include six Neighborhood Concerts and the Carnegie Hall National High School
Choral Festival. In addition, WMI has created a yearlong curriculum focusing on African
American song and US history for its Perelman American Roots program for middle school
social studies and music students. The Honor! festival, curated by internationally renowned
soprano Jessye Norman, salutes the enduring influence of African American culture and runs
from March 4 through March 23, 2009. The festival will provide a citywide showcase for African
American music in its many genres: classical, gospel, the Spiritual, contemporary popular music,
blues, and jazz.
Carnegie Hall’s Neighborhood Concert Series will bring exciting music to venues throughout the
city. Six free performances featuring leading artists include the Grammy-nominated wind quintet
Imani Winds performing at Manhattan’s CUNY Graduate Center on Thursday, March 5 at 1:00
p.m.; 23-year-old jazz bassist/vocalist/composer Esperanza Spalding performing at the
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem on Thursday, March 12 at 7:00 p.m.;
the Harlem Quartet, comprised of First Place Laureates of the Sphinx Competition, performing at
the Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural Center of the Queens Library on Saturday,
March 14 at 2:00 p.m.; and The McCollough Sons of Thunder with the Hypnotic Brass
Ensemble performing at both Harlem Stage/Aaron Davis Hall on Thursday, March 19 at 7:30
p.m., and Brooklyn’s Kingsborough Community College Performing Arts Complex on Sunday,
March 22 at 3:00 p.m.
In addition, vocalists of all ages and levels are invited to make music with the Gospel for Teens
Choir in a free Community Sing event presented by WMI at the Apollo Theater Soundstage on
Friday, March 13 at 6:30 p.m. Vy Higginsen, writer/producer/director of the popular 1984
musical Mama, I Want to Sing and founder of Mama Foundation for the Arts and its Gospel for
Teens Program, will host. Reservations are required with a limit of four tickets to each person.
More information is below.
(more)
Honor! Festival Offers Free and Affordable Concerts, Page 2 of 6
The Carnegie Hall National High School Choral Festival will be presented this season as part
of the Honor! festival with four high school choirs chosen by audition—from Georgia, New York,
New Jersey, and Washington state—performing Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time on
Friday, March 20 at 8:00 p.m. in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall. The program
provides young school choirs with the opportunity to perform with a professional conductor,
singers, and orchestra. Craig Jessop, former Music Director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir,
conducts the Orchestra of St. Luke’s in this performance featuring soprano Angela M. Brown,
contralto Meredith Arwady, tenor Russell Thomas, and bass Morris Robinson. Tippett’s
thought-provoking oratorio, written during World War II, uses the African American Spiritual in
much the same way that Bach employed the chorale in his choral masterworks. Throughout the
year, the four chosen choirs have rehearsed the work and will also have intensive rehearsals in
New York the week prior to the performance. At the performance, each choir will also perform its
own set led by its own choir director. Students will also contribute testimonials about their
experiences to the Honor! festival site.
Another education component presented by The Weill Music Institute in conjunction with Honor!
is its Perelman American Roots program for middle school social studies and choral students,
which this year offers a specially created curriculum drawing connections between African
American song and US history. The program includes two concerts for the participating
classrooms. The first, held during the Honor! festival on Friday, March 20, features a performance
by the participants in the National High School Choral Festival at the Apollo Theater; the second,
on Friday, May 22, will feature the Fisk Jubilee Singers from Fisk University in Nashville,
Tennessee, performing in Zankel Hall.
Carnegie Hall has launched carnegiehall.org/honor, to serve as the online companion to the
festival. The site will offer the most up-to-date information about Honor! events, pay tribute to the
hundreds of legendary African American performers who have appeared on Carnegie Hall’s
stages throughout its history, and provide historical context to the festival’s programming via an
interactive timeline curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality,
influence, and creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special
events that have been curated by internationally-renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This
Carnegie Hall festival, presented in March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African
American music and its influence worldwide, and pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the
path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships with New York cultural institutions,
including the legendary Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and the New York
Public Library for the Performing Arts, Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a
showcase for African American music in its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals,
contemporary popular music, blues, and jazz. The festival offers close to 20 events, including
concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions, exhibitions, and educational programs at Carnegie
Hall and venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its
stages, from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining
an open-door policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one
year after the hall opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by
numerous African American musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s
1928 debut—more than ten years before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington
D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to
Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African American styles and performers, and the Kool
Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions” debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby
McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced through Carnegie Hall
(more)
Honor! Festival Offers Free and Affordable Concerts, Page 3 of 6
programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C. Handy and
Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of
the Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music
stars continue to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef
Jean, Mary J. Blige, and Mos Def, among many others.
Program Information
Thursday, March 5 at 1:00 p.m.
CUNY Graduate Center’s Music in Midtown
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016
CARNEGIE HALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: IMANI WINDS
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Program to include a sneak preview of newly commissioned work by Carnegie Hall:
DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN Five Chairs and One Table
Since 1997, the Grammy-nominated ensemble Imani Winds has carved out a distinct presence in the
classical music world with its dynamic playing, culturally rich programming, genre-blurring collaborations,
and inspirational outreach programs. With a deep commitment to commissioning new work, the group
enriches the traditional wind quintet repertoire while bridging European, American, African, and Latin
traditions.
Sponsored by Target
Our thanks to The Honorable Christine Quinn for making today’s concert possible.
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free (RSVP Required: 212-817-8215)
_______________________________________
Thursday, March 12 at 7:00 p.m.
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street
New York, NY 10037
CARNEGIE HALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: ESPERANZA SPALDING
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Bassist-vocalist-composer Esperanza Spalding challenges and redefines the common perceptions of
modern music with her compelling vocals, unmatched instrumental technique, and brilliant compositions.
Sponsored by Target
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free (RSVP Required: 212-491-2040)
_______________________________________
(more)
Honor! Festival Offers Free and Affordable Concerts, Page 4 of 6
Friday, March 13 at 6:30 p.m.
Apollo Theater – Soundstage
253 West 125th Street
New York, NY 10027
CARNEGIE HALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: COMMUNITY SING WITH GOSPEL FOR TEENS
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Hosted by Vy Higginsen
Gospel for Teens is a program of the Mama Foundation for the Arts and Vy Higginsen’s School of Gospel,
Jazz, and R&B Arts for teens ages 13–19. Under the direction of the foundation’s seasoned music masters,
the Gospel for Teens Choir has performed throughout New York City, including the Apollo Theater, the
American Museum of Natural History, and St. Paul Community Baptist Church.
Sponsored by Target
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free (RSVP Required: 212-531-5363; limit four tickets per person.)
_______________________________________
Saturday, March 14 at 2:00 p.m.
Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural Center of the Queens Library
100-01 Northern Boulevard
Corona, NY 11368
CARNEGIE HALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: HARLEM QUARTET, A SPHINX ENSEMBLE
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
The Harlem Quartet, comprising First-Place Laureates of the Sphinx Competition presented by Chase, aims
to advance diversity in classical music while engaging young and new audiences through varied repertoire,
highlighting works by minority composers.
Sponsored by Target
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free (718-651-1100)
---------------------------------------------------------------Thursday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m.
Harlem Stage at Aaron Davis Hall/The City College of New York
Convent Avenue between West 133rd and 135th Street
New York, NY 10031
CARNEGIE HALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: THE MCCOLLOUGH SONS OF THUNDER AND
HYPNOTIC BRASS ENSEMBLE
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Based out of the United House of Prayer for All People in Harlem, The McCollough Sons of Thunder is a 13piece brass shout band that was assembled in 1962. For the past 44 years the band has given weekly
performances in the United House of Prayer in addition to captivating audiences and winning critical acclaim
around the world, including an appearance at the homecoming of South African leader Nelson Mandela.
The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble began as a family group on the south side of Chicago in 1986. The eight
horn-playing brothers were led by their father and teacher Kelan Phil Cohran, lead trumpeter of jazz group
Sun Ra and mentor to the Pharaohs (later called Earth Wind and Fire). In 1999 the brothers combined their
(more)
Honor! Festival Offers Free and Affordable Concerts, Page 5 of 6
efforts and began performing a new style of brass music they termed “hypnotic.” These ambassadors of
brass are now building an international following with their signature infusion of imaginative jazz
arrangements with a hip-hop sensibility.
Sponsored by Target
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free (RSVP Required: 212-281-9240; limit 2 tickets per person.)
_______________________________________
Friday, March 20 at 8:00 p.m.
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage
CARNEGIE HALL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHORAL FESTIVAL
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Orchestra of St. Luke's
Craig Jessop, Conductor
Angela M. Brown, Soprano
Meredith Arwady, Contralto
Russell Thomas, Tenor
Morris Robinson, Bass
North Jersey Homeschool Association Chorale (Hawthorne, New Jersey)
Beth Prins, Conductor
Pebblebrook High School Chamber Choir (Atlanta, Georgia)
George Case, Conductor
Shorewood High School Aeolian Choir (Shoreline, Washington)
John Hendrix, Conductor
Songs of Solomon: An Inspirational Ensemble (New York, New York)
Chantel Wright, Conductor
Program to include:
MICHAEL TIPPETT A Child of Our Time
This performance of Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time will feature select high school choirs chosen
by competition with peer groups nationwide. The featured work uses the Spiritual in much the same way that
J. S. Bach employed the chorale in his great choral compositions.
The Carnegie Hall National High School Choral Festival is made possible, in part, by an endowment fund for
choral music established by S. Donald Sussman in memory of Judith Arron and Robert Shaw.
Tickets: $10
_______________________________________
(more)
Honor! Festival Offers Free and Affordable Concerts, Page 6 of 6
Sunday, March 22 at 3:00 p.m.
Kingsborough Community College / Leon M. Goldstein Performing Arts Center
2001 Oriental Boulevard
Brooklyn, NY 11235
CARNEGIE HALL NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: THE MCCOLLOUGH SONS OF THUNDER AND
HYPNOTIC BRASS ENSEMBLE
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy Curated by Jessye Norman
Sponsored by Target
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Tickets: Free (718-368-5596)
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The
Rockefeller Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria
Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets for all events taking place at Carnegie Hall are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West
57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212 247-7800 or by
visiting the Carnegie Hall website, www.carnegiehall.org.
Tickets for Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are free; check with each venue to see if advance
reservations are required.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Matt Carlson | Phone: 212-903-9751| E-mail: [email protected]
Contact: Justin Holden | Phone: 212-903-9601 | E-mail: [email protected]
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, LED BY CHARLES DUTOIT, PERFORMS ON
TUESDAY, MARCH 17 AS PART OF CARNEGIE HALL’S CITYWIDE FESTIVAL
HONOR! A CELEBRATION OF THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL LEGACY
www.carnegiehall.org/honor
Eric Owens Performs Songs by Mahler in Tribute to
Philadelphia Native and Carnegie Hall Legend Marian Anderson
Russell Thomas Is Featured Soloist in George Walker’s 1996 Pulitzer Prize-Winning Lilacs
(Monday, February 9, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)—On Tuesday, March 17 at 8:00 p.m. in Stern
Auditorium/Perelman Stage, The Philadelphia Orchestra under the direction of Chief Conductor
and Artistic Adviser Charles Dutoit performs a program as part of Honor! A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy, a citywide festival presented by Carnegie Hall and curated by
renowned soprano Jessye Norman. The program features bass-baritone Eric Owens singing
Mahler’s Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen in dedication to the late, great soprano Marian
Anderson. Ms. Anderson, a native of Philadelphia, performed at Carnegie Hall 56 times
throughout her life, the third-most number of performances by an African American musician. The
program also features African American composer George Walker’s 1996 Pulitzer Prize-winning
work Lilacs with tenor Russell Thomas as well as European classical works inspired by African
American music including Milhaud’s La création du monde and Dvorák’s Symphony No. 9 in E
Minor, “From the New World.” A pre-concert talk begins at 7:00 p.m. in Stern
Auditorium/Perelman Stage.
Also during Honor!, Russell Thomas returns to Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage on Friday,
March 20 at 8:00 p.m. as soloist in the performance of Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time
for the Carnegie Hall National High School Choral Festival, which is presented by The Weill
Music Institute and features four select high school choirs chosen by competition. A Child of Our
Time uses the African American Spiritual in much the same way that J. S. Bach employed the
chorale in his great choral compositions. Also, as part of Honor!, Eric Owens returns to Carnegie
Hall on Monday, March 23 at 8:00 p.m. in Honor: The Voice. On this program renowned African
American singers from the classical music world come together to pay tribute to icons who
opened the doors for succeeding generations. Artists to be honored include Marian Anderson,
Paul Robeson, and Roland Hayes, among many others.
Artist Information
A Philadelphia native, American bass-baritone Eric Owens has carved a unique place in the
contemporary opera world as both a champion of new music and a powerful interpreter of classic
works. During the 2008–09 season, Mr. Owens made his Metropolitan Opera debut in John
Adams’ Doctor Atomic, and he makes his New York recital debut in Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie
Hall on April 24, which is one of three Carnegie Hall engagements throughout this season.
Additional season highlights include the September 2008 Nonesuch Records release of A
Flowering Tree, performances as Sarastro in The Metropolitan Opera’s production of The Magic
Flute in December and January, and scenes from Strauss’ Elektra and Die Frau ohne Schatten
with Christine Brewer and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra under Donald Runnicles in February
(more)
Philadelphia Orchestra Performs in Honor! Festival, March 17, Page 2 of 4
2009. Mr. Owens began his music training as a pianist at the age of six, followed by formal oboe
study at age eleven under Lloyd Shorter of the Delaware Symphony and Louis Rosenblatt of The
Philadelphia Orchestra. He later studied voice while an undergraduate at Temple University and
then as a graduate student at the Curtis Institute of Music, and currently studies with Armen
Boyajian.
Tenor Russell Thomas, a Miami native, is quickly establishing himself as one of the most
exciting vocal and dramatic talents on the international opera and concert scene, most recently as
the First-Prize winner of the “Competizione dell’Opera” in Dresden. In addition to his performance
with The Philadelphia Orchestra, Mr. Thomas returns to Carnegie Hall on March 20 as soloist in a
performance of Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time. Mr. Thomas’ current projects include
Tamino in The Magic Flute at the Metropolitan Opera, his debut as the Duke of Mantua in
Rigoletto with the Arizona Opera, and the Steuermann in Der Fliegende Holländer with Atlanta
Opera. Recently Mr. Thomas reprised his role of the Prince for John Adams’ A Flowering Tree in
Tokyo, and upcoming performances of this role will take place in New York, Los Angeles, and
Perth. An alumnus of the Lindemann Young Artist Development Program of the Metropolitan
Opera, he was also a member of Seattle Opera Young Artist Program, a Roger R. Hinkley artist
at the Florida Grand Opera, a Gerdine Young Artist with Opera Theatre of St. Louis, an
apprentice at the Sarasota Opera, and has participated in the Marlboro Music Festival. Mr.
Thomas holds a Bachelor’s Degree of Music in Performance from the New World School of the
Arts and his most recent performance at Carnegie Hall took place in January 2009 as part of The
Song Continues…2009.
Charles Dutoit became Chief Conductor and Artistic Adviser of The Philadelphia Orchestra in
September 2008. Since 1990, he has been Artistic Director and Principal Conductor of The
Philadelphia Orchestra’s summer festival at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. He has also
performed regularly with the great orchestras in Europe, including the Berliner Philharmoniker
and the Concertgebouw Orchestra as well as the Israel Philharmonic and major orchestras of
Japan, South America, and Australia. From 1991 to 2001, he was music director of the Orchestre
National de France and has served as both the Principal Conductor and Music Director of the
NHK Symphony in Tokyo. For 25 years (1977 to 2002), Mr. Dutoit was Artistic Director of the
Orchestre symphonique de Montréal. He has recorded extensively for Decca, Deutsche
Grammophon, EMI, Philips, CBS, Erato, and other labels with American, European, and
Japanese orchestras. His more than 170 recordings have garnered more than 40 awards and
distinctions.
Founded in 1900, The Philadelphia Orchestra has distinguished itself as one of the leading
orchestras in the world through a century of acclaimed performances, historic international tours,
bestselling recordings, and its unprecedented record of innovation in recording technologies and
outreach. The Orchestra has maintained unity in artistic leadership with only seven music
directors piloting its first century: Fritz Scheel (1900–1907), Carl Pohlig (1907–1912), Leopold
Stokowski (1912–1941), Eugene Ormandy (1936–1980), Riccardo Muti (1980–1992), Wolfgang
Sawallisch (1993–2003), and Christoph Eschenbach (2003–2008). The Philadelphia Orchestra
annually touches the lives of more than one million music lovers worldwide through its
performances, publications, recordings, and broadcasts. The Orchestra presents a subscription
season in Philadelphia each year from September to May, in addition to education and
community partnership programs, and appears annually at Carnegie Hall. The Orchestra also
reaches audiences around the world through its regular international tours. Its summer schedule
includes an outdoor series at Philadelphia’s Mann Center for the Performing Arts, free
Neighborhood Concerts, and residencies at the Bravo! Vail Valley Music Festival and the
Saratoga Performing Arts Center in upstate New York.
(more)
Philadelphia Orchestra Performs in Honor! Festival, March 17, Page 3 of 4
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality,
influence, and creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special
events that have been curated by internationally-renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This
Carnegie Hall festival, presented in March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African
American music and its influence worldwide, and pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the
path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships with New York cultural institutions,
including the legendary Apollo Theater and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts,
Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a showcase for African American music in
its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals, contemporary popular music, blues, and jazz,
offering close to 20 events, including concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions, exhibitions,
and educational programs at Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the Divine,
and other venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its
stages, from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining
an open-door policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one
year after the hall opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by
numerous African American musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s
1928 debut—more than ten years before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington
D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to
Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African American styles and performers, and the Kool
Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions” debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby
McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced through Carnegie Hall
programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C. Handy and
Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of
the Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music
stars continue to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef
Jean, Mary J. Blige, and Mos Def, among many others.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor!
festival with a special exhibit entitled The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall.
Through items on display from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the
Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and
Howard University, visitors will have the chance to explore the fascinating history of African
American artists and political and social figures who have appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout
its 118-year history.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, Carnegie Hall has created a website,
www.carnegiehall.org/honor, to serve as the online companion to the festival. The site will offer
the most up-to-date information about Honor! events, pay tribute to the hundreds of legendary
African American performers who have appeared on Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its
history, and provide historical context to the festival’s programming via an interactive timeline
curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
(more)
Philadelphia Orchestra Performs in Honor! Festival, March 17, Page 4 of 4
Program Information
Tuesday, March 17 at 8:00 p.m.
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
Charles Dutoit, Chief Conductor and Artistic Adviser
Russell Thomas, Tenor
Eric Owens, Bass-Baritone
DARIUS MILHAUD La création du monde, Op. 81
GEORGE WALKER Lilacs
GUSTAV MAHLER Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen
ANTONÍN DVORÁK Symphony No. 9 in E Minor, Op. 95, "From the New World"
Pre-concert talk starts at 7:00 p.m. in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been
provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice
Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the
A. L. and Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets, priced at $35, $42, $55, $76, $99, and $110, are available at the Carnegie Hall Box
Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be charged to major credit cards by calling
CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website,
www.carnegiehall.org.
In addition, for all Carnegie Hall Corporation presentations taking place in Stern
Auditorium/Perelman Stage, a limited number of partial-view seats, priced at $10, will be
available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on
Sunday until one hour before the performance. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family
Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come,
first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.
A limited number of student discount tickets and senior citizen rush tickets, priced at $10, may
also be available at the Box Office for some Carnegie Hall events. Please call CarnegieCharge
at 212-247-7800 or, for students, visit www.carnegiehall.org/students for availability. For
information on Club 57th &7th, Carnegie Hall’s discount ticket program for those 40 and under,
please visit www.carnegiehall.org/club.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Contact: Matt Carlson ! Phone: 212-903-9751 ! E-mail: [email protected]
Contact: Tonya Bell-Green ! Phone: 212-903-9752 ! E-mail: [email protected]
CARNEGIE HALL PRESENTS GRAMMY- AND TONY AWARD-WINNING JAZZ VOCALIST
DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER IN ZANKEL HALL ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
Performance Is Part of Citywide Honor! Festival Celebrating the African American Cultural Legacy
(Wednesday, February 11, 2009, NEW YORK, NY)—Celebrated jazz vocalist, Broadway performer, and
honorary United Nations Ambassador Dee Dee Bridgewater performs an exciting program of Africanand Latin-influenced jazz in Zankel Hall on Wednesday, March 18 at 8:30 p.m. The concert, presented
by Carnegie Hall in partnership with Absolutely Live Entertainment LLC, is part of the citywide festival,
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, curated by internationally renowned
soprano Jessye Norman. The Honor! festival is dedicated to saluting the enduring vitality, influence, and
creativity of African American culture and runs from March 4 through March 23 with a diverse array of
more than 20 events throughout New York City. For more information, visit carnegiehall.org/honor. For a
complete Honor! press kit, please click here.
Noted by the New York Times as “a woman of a thousand voices (with the) stage personalities to match,”
Bridgewater has led a multifaceted music career earning her the reputation of a consummate entertainer.
Her March 18 performance will include selections from the Latin-jazz tradition as well as material from her
most recent release, Red Earth—A Malian Journey (DDB Records/Emarcy). Red Earth is a reflection of
Bridgewater’s search for her African ancestry and includes a vibrant blending of Malian musicians and
traditional African instruments coupled with the vocal and musical traditions of American jazz. The lyrics
reflect on the original ‘griot’—or West African story teller—tales while providing updated nuances which
highlight the roles and influences women have in Malian society, politics, and culture. Accompanying
Bridgewater for this performance will be bassist Ira Coleman, pianist Edsel Gomez, drummer Vince
Cherico, and percussionist Luisito Quintero.
Dee Dee Bridgewater earned her first professional performing experience as a member of the legendary
Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra, and throughout the ‘70s she performed with such jazz notables as
Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, Dexter Gordon, and Dizzy Gillespie. After a foray into the pop world during
the 1980s, she relocated to Paris and began to turn her attention back to jazz. Signing with the Universal
label as both a performer and producer, Bridgewater released a series of acclaimed titles beginning with
Keeping Tradition in 1993. Almost all of them—including her wildly successful double Grammy Awardwinning tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, Dear Ella—have received Grammy nominations.
Bridgewater has also pursued a parallel career in musical theater and won a Tony Award for her role as
“Glinda, the Good Witch of the South” in The Wiz in 1975. Her other theatrical credits include
Sophisticated Ladies, Black Ballad, Carmen, and Lady Day, a Billie Holiday tribute for which Bridgewater
received the British Laurence Olivier Nomination for Best Actress in a Musical. She also became the first
African American actress to play the role of Sally Bowles in Cabaret, a production staged at the Mogador
Theatre in Paris. Bridgewater currently splits her time between the U.S. and France and was recently
made a member of the Haut Conseil de la Francophonie, an organization that recognizes individuals who
have made significant contributions to French culture and society on a global level. As an Honorary
Ambassador to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, Bridgewater continues to appeal
for international solidarity to finance global grass-roots projects in the fight against world hunger.
Bridgewater also hosts NPR’s award-winning weekly syndicated show, JazzSet, now in its second
decade on the air.
(more)
Dee Dee Bridgewater, March 18, 2009, Page 2 of 3
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy salutes the enduring vitality, influence, and
creativity of African American culture through a collection of concerts and special events that have been
curated by internationally renowned soprano Jessye Norman. This Carnegie Hall festival, presented in
March 2009, has been designed to celebrate African American music and its influence worldwide, and
pay tribute to pioneering artists who forged the path for succeeding generations. Through partnerships
with New York cultural institutions, including the legendary Apollo Theater and the New York Public
Library for the Performing Arts, Honor! engages with diverse audiences and provides a showcase for
African American music in its many genres: classical, gospel, Spirituals, contemporary popular music,
blues, and jazz, offering close to 20 events, including concerts, recitals, lectures, panel discussions,
exhibitions, and educational programs at Carnegie Hall, Apollo Theater, The Cathedral of St. John the
Divine, and other venues throughout New York City.
Carnegie Hall has a long, storied history of featuring the greatest African American artists on its stages,
from classical trailblazers to jazz pioneers to R&B and popular music icons. Maintaining an open-door
policy since its inception—soprano Sissieretta Jones performed in June 1892, one year after the hall
opened—Carnegie Hall has been the site for groundbreaking concerts by numerous African American
musicians. These history-making events include Marian Anderson’s 1928 debut—more than ten years
before being notoriously barred from singing at Washington D.C.’s Constitution Hall—as well as producer
John Hammond’s famous 1938 “From Spirituals to Swing” program, a veritable cornucopia of African
American styles and performers, and the Kool Jazz Festival’s (now JVC Jazz Festival) “Young Lions”
debuts of Wynton Marsalis and Bobby McFerrin in 1982. The very evolution of jazz itself can be traced
through Carnegie Hall programs—from James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra (1912) to W.C.
Handy and Fats Waller (‘28) to Benny Goodman’s integrated orchestra (‘38) on through Duke Ellington’s
Black, Brown & Beige premiere (‘43), Miles Davis’s Carnegie Hall debut in the year of the “Birth of the
Cool” (’49), and John Coltrane jamming with Thelonious Monk (’57). Today’s popular music stars
continue to build upon this historic legacy, with performances in the past decade by Wyclef Jean, Mary J.
Blige, and Mos Def, among many others.
Throughout the month of March, Carnegie Hall’s Rose Museum will participate in the Honor! festival with
a special exhibit entitled The African American Experience at Carnegie Hall. Through items on display
from the Carnegie Hall Archives, the New York Library for the Performing Arts, the Schomburg Center for
Research in Black Culture, Columbia University, and Howard University, visitors will have the chance to
explore the fascinating history of African American artists and political and social figures who have
appeared at Carnegie Hall throughout its 118-year history.
Also in conjunction with Honor!, Carnegie Hall has created a website, carnegiehall.org/honor, to serve
as the online companion to the festival. The site will offer the most up-to-date information about Honor!
events, pay tribute to the hundreds of legendary African American performers who have appeared on
Carnegie Hall’s stages throughout its history, and provide historical context to the festival’s programming
via an interactive timeline curated by Professor Portia Maultsby of Indiana University.
Program Information
Wednesday, March 18 at 8:30 p.m.
Zankel Hall
DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER. Vocalist
Ira Coleman, Bass
Edsel Gomez, Piano
Vince Cherico, Drums
Luisito Quintero, Percussion
Grammy- and Tony Award–winner Dee Dee Bridgewater presents a breathtaking evening of jazz and more.
Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with Absolutely Live Entertainment LLC.
(more)
Dee Dee Bridgewater, March 18, 2009, Page 3 of 3
For high resolution images of Honor! artists, please contact the Carnegie Hall Public Affairs office at 212-903-9750 or
[email protected]
****
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy has been provided by The Andrew
W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation’s New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.
Ticket Information
Tickets, priced at $34 and $44, are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, or can be
charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website,
www.carnegiehall.org.
A limited number of student discount tickets and senior citizen rush tickets, priced at $10, may also be available at the
Box Office for some Carnegie Hall events. Please call CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or, for students, visit
www.carnegiehall.org/students for availability. For information on Club 57th &7th, Carnegie Hall’s discount ticket
program for those 40 and under, please visit www.carnegiehall.org/club.
###
CARNEGIE HALL presents
the history of the world. It’s an acknowledgment of those who have perhaps been
in the background, whose names we might not know, whose names we might
never have heard before. We stand on their shoulders. Sissieretta Jones appeared
at Carnegie Hall one year after the doors opened in 1891. It’s important that we
know who these people were. It’s important that we know what they did.
It is also vital that the younger generation that is creating new music today knows
the origins of this culture. I want them to understand—and I hope that they will be
pleased to understand—that they’re not actually creating anything that’s completely
new. There were black ministers, for instance, in the southern US during the
late 1800s and early 1900s who were already delivering their sermons in rhythm
because it caught the attention of the congregation. And so rap music is actually
drawn out of this. I believe that if I were in hip-hop, it would really make me happy
to know that this is something that is in my DNA—something that had existed long
before the idea occurred to me.
WITH
REVERENCE
Carol Friedman
JESSYE NORMAN
AND THE GENESIS
OF HONOR!
In preparation for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, Jessye Norman
recently sat down for a one-on-one interview with conductor and longtime collaborator Rachael
Worby, expressing her deeply rooted passion for the history of American music and the influence
of African Americans on this rich heritage. In the following excerpts from that interview, Miss
Norman tells the story of Honor! from its inception to its realization at Carnegie Hall.
My very first encounter with Marian Anderson was as a student at Howard
University during the time that she was giving her final series of concerts around
the world. It was at Constitution Hall, and we were sitting up in heaven, because of
course those were the only seats that we could afford. As I waited for her to begin,
I sat there thinking about the fact that in 1939, Marian Anderson had been denied
the privilege of singing on that very stage. I was so moved by that story, especially
as we waited eagerly for this majestic presence to come out onto that stage; and
we listened, and we watched, and it was rather overpowering.
I was very lucky later in my own performing life to be with Marian Anderson in
Danbury, Connecticut—where she lived—and to sit and just talk. The thing that
struck me about those visits was that she always wanted to know what I was doing
and where I’d been, and that was the last thing I wanted to speak about. I wanted
her to just talk and for me to listen.
At this particular moment we’re celebrating the contribution of African Americans—
like Marian Anderson—to what I consider to be the cultural mosaic of the world. It
is happening at a very interesting time, certainly in the history of our country and in
I thought a great deal about what we should call the festival—a festival needs to
have a name. I came across the idea of “HONOR!”—all capital letters, exclamation
point at the end—and I debated whether or not we should use the English version
or the Swahili translation. But we decided to use a word that would be recognized
immediately, that would be understood immediately, because that is the whole
point of this festival—that things should be understood.
We’ve had in the course of Carnegie Hall’s existence nearly 900 different concerts
featuring African American performers. We celebrate the legacy, the contribution
of the African Americans to the history of this great hall, and to explore exactly
how that has been presented to the world. I’ve never been anywhere where there
weren’t people who would come up and say that in 19-whatever they heard Paul
Robeson or Marian Anderson. I know that the music, the ideas, the culture has
taken its place in the world. It’s wonderful that we’re celebrating this.
In working with the archivists here at Carnegie Hall we discovered the hundreds
and hundreds of names of people of African descent who have walked across this
magnificent stage. It was important for me to understand that we had had Roland
Hayes on the stage of Carnegie Hall; we’d also had Josephine Baker and Maya
Angelou. Just to go through the list of names was something that gave me such
strength and such courage—so many ideas as to how we might proceed with
this word, “honor.” There is so much to say, and there are so many names that
we need to recall, and so many
names that we need to learn,
and so much about what has
been accomplished that has been
perhaps lost in time. We need
to bring those things back to the
foreground. We must honor it all.
Additional excerpts from this interview
are available at carnegiehall.org/honor.
Marian Anderson with Franz Rupp, pianist,
at Carnegie Hall in 1955. Courtesy of Franz Rupp
CARNEGIE HALL presents
HONOR!
A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
An Overview of Carnegie Hall
First Appearances by African Americans
Ida Burrell
Melville Charlton
Ida E. Chestnut
W. E. B. DuBois
Hampton Quartette /
Institute Singers
Ernest Hogan
J. Rosamond Johnson
P. G. Lowery and
His Famous Band
Charles J. Mahoney
Mass Meeting of
Negro Democrats
Marie A. Wayne
Mattie Harris
Roland Hayes
E. Aldama Jackson
Leonard H. Jeter
John Turner Layton Jr.
Andrades Lindsay
David I. Martin
David I. Martin Jr.
F. Eugene Mikell
Abbie Mitchell
Robert R. Moten
Music School Settlement
Choral Society
Negro Symphony Orchestra
New Amsterdam Orchestra
Elizabeth Payne
Adam Clayton Powell Sr.
Ethel Richardson
Royal Poinciana Quartette
St. Philip’s Church Choir
Fred W. Simpson
Daisy Tapley
369th Regiment Band
(“Harlem Hellcats”)
Tuskegee Quintette
William H. Tyers
Versatile Entertainers
Quintette
Felix Weir
Leon Du La Platte
Tom Fletcher
Taylor Gordon
Josephine Hall
Katherine Handy Lewis
W. C. Handy
W. C. Handy Jr.
Joseph McDonald Hayes
George E. Jackson
Hall Johnson
Ella Francis Jones
William Lawrence
Edward Margetson
Alice May
Negro String Quartet
Nettie B. Olden
New Negro Art Theatre
Players
Packer Ramsay
William H. Richardson
Paul Robeson
Russell Smith
Carmen Sousa
United Colored Chorus
Fats Waller
Clarence Williams
H. C. Williams
Hemsley Winfield
1911–1920
1921–1930
Abyssinian Baptist
Church Choir
Henry “Red” Allen
Albert Ammons
1892–1900
Paul Bolen
Harry T. Burleigh
Will Marion Cook
Fisk Jubilee Singers
Lulu Hamer
Sissieretta Jones
Mount Olivet Baptist
Church Anniversary
Service
The Phonetic Quartet
Rev. Charles T. Walker
Booker T. Washington
1901–1910
Afro-American
Folk Song Singers
Marian Anderson
Sara Bird
Frederick M. Bryan
Clef Club Orchestra
Cora W. Alexander
American Church Institute
for Negroes Sextette
Mary McLeod Bethune
Arthur Boyd
Bernardin Brown
1931–1940
Reginald Bean
Sidney Bechet
Lee Blair
Eubie Blake
Jules Bledsoe
Big Bill Broonzy
Sterling Brown
Willie Bryant
Cab Calloway
Harry Carney
Sidney “Big Sid” Catlett
Minto Cato
Charlie Christian
Buck Clayton
Rupert Cole
Shad Collins
Colored Orphan Asylum
of Riverdale Chorus
Charles L. Cooke
Ralph Cooper
Ida Cox
Merrill R. Dames
William L. Dawson
Wilbur De Paris
Thomas Andrew Dorsey
Eddie Durham
Harry “Sweets” Edison
Roy Eldridge
Hershel Evans
George “Pops” Foster
Joe Garland
Mercedes Gilbert
Gala Glenn
J. C. Higginbotham
Johnny Hodges
Charlie Holmes
Claude Hopkins
Helen Humes
Jimmie Lunceford
and His Orchestra
James P. Johnson
Otis Johnson
Pete Johnson
Willie Johnson
Jo Jones
Joseph Jordan
Juanita Hall Choir
William L. King
Tommy Ladnier
William Langford
Ed Lewis
Meade “Lux” Lewis
Bingie Madison
Eddie Mallory
Dorothy Maynor
Viola McCoy
Mitchell’s Christian Singers
Dan Minor
Benny Morton
Henry Owens
Walter Page
Sister Rosetta Tharpe
Henry Troy
Joe Turner
Tuskegee Institute Choir
Earle Warren
George Washington
Jack Washington
Ethel Waters
Dickie Wells
Wilbert Griffiths and
His Harlem Swing
Club Orchestra
William Lawrence Negro
Art Singers
Cootie Williams
Orlandus Wilson
Teddy Wilson
Lester Young
Jessie Zachary
1941–1950
Mabel Alexander
American Negro Opera
Company
Cat Anderson
The Angel Lites
Dorothy Maynor
(November 25, 1939)
Louis Armstrong
(December 25, 1938)
Paul Robeson
(November 5, 1929)
Sissieretta Jones
(June 15, 1892)
Florence Cole-Talbert
Frank de Bronte
Fannie H. Douglass
Joseph H. Douglass
James Reese Europe
15th Regiment Band
Lloyd Gibbs
Booker T. Washington
(March 3, 1896)
Minnie Brown
Sidney Brown
Lillie M. Carr
Louetta Chatman
Marion Cumbo
R. Nathaniel Dett
Carl Diton
Marian Anderson
(December 30, 1920)
Thomas Anderson
Andrew Dorsey’s
Negro Choir
Louis Armstrong
Bertha Fitzhugh Baker
Clyde Barry
Count Basie
Golden Gate Quartet
Freddie Green
Wilbert Griffiths
Jester Hairston
Lionel Hampton
Robert Harvey
Shelton Hemphill
Fletcher Henderson
Luckey Roberts
Bill “Bojangles” Robinson
Jimmy Rushing
Ernest Shaw
Noble Sissle
Ruby Smith
The Southernaires
William Grant Still
Maxine Sullivan
Sonny Terry
Irving Ashby
Buster Bailey
Harold Baker
Danny Barker
Charles Bateman
Harry Belafonte
Lionel Belasco
Belleville Choir
Emmett Berry
Denzil Best
Barney Bigard
Earl Bostic
Wellman Braud
Carol Brice
1941–1950 (continued)
Jonathan Brice
Bridge Street A. M. E.
Church Choir
Jimmy Britton
Brother Bones
Anne Brown
Hillard Brown
John Brown
Lawrence Brown
Ray Brown
Milt Buckner
Dave Burns
Garvin Bushell
Thelma Carpenter
Joe Carroll
Al Casey
Henderson Chambers
The Charioteers
Arnett Cobb
Cozy Cole
Nat “King” Cole
Bill Coleman
Janet Collins
John Collins
Lee Collins
Joe Comfort
Willie Cook
Cornerstone Baptist Church
Gospel Choir
James Crawford
Sonny Criss
Ed Cuffee
Wendell Culley
Joe Darensbourg
Ellabelle Davis
Kay Davis
Miles Davis
Mary Cardwell Dawson
Dean Dixon
Todd Duncan
Katherine Dunham
Andy Duryea
Blanche Eckles
John Eckles
Billy Eckstine
Duke Ellington
Marie Ellington
Duke Ellington
(January 23, 1943)
Gus Evans
Stanley Facey
Kansas Fields
Ella Fitzgerald
Pat Flowers
Benny Fonville
Jimmy Forman
Charlie Fowlkes
William Franklin
Lorenzo Fuller
Edward “Montudi” Garland
Donald “Little
Reverend” Gay
Joe Gayles
Dizzy Gillespie
Tyree Glenn
Wardell Gray
Bennie Green
Theresa Green
Lisle Greenidge
Sonny Greer
Oscar Griffin
Fred Guy
Joe Guy
Kenny Hagwood
Al Hall
Edmond Hall
Minor “Ram” Hall
Jimmy Hamilton
Otto Hardwick
Wilson Hardy
Charlie Harris
Joe Harris
Wynonie Harris
Clyde Hart
Johnny Hartman
Chauncey Haughton
Coleman Hawkins
Erskine Hawkins
Roy Haynes
Al Hayse
J. C. Heard
Ernest Henry
Al Hibbler
Bertha “Chippie” Hill
Baby Hines
Earl “Fatha” Hines
Billie Holiday
Lena Horne
Bob Howard
Sam Hurt
Alberta Jackson
Bull Moose Jackson
Calvin Jackson
Mahalia Jackson
Milt Jackson
Quentin Jackson
Illinois Jacquet
Caterina Jarboro
Eva Jessye
Budd Johnson
Buddy Johnson
Bunk Johnson
Howard Johnson
J. C. Johnson
J. J. Johnson
Lonnie Johnson
Claude Jones
Hank Jones
Jonah Jones
Slick Jones
Wallace Jones
Taft Jordan
Katherine Dunham
Company
Billie Holiday
(April 2, 1944)
Kenneth Kersey
Al Killian
John Kirby
Don Kirkpatrick
Eartha Kitt
Billy Kyle
The Landfordaires
Ellis Larkins
Lead Belly
John Levy
Joseph Lipscomb
Joe Louis
Al Lucas
Billy Mackel
Kaiser Marshall
Wendell Marshall
Mary Bruce’s Starbuds
Brownie McGhee
Howard McGhee
Al McKibbon
June McMechen
Velma Middleton
Lucky Millinder
Donald Mills
Harry Mills
Herbert Mills
John Mills Sr.
The Mills Brothers
Little Brother Montgomery
James Moody
Freddie Moore
Joe Morris
John Morris
Mother McClease
Ray Nance
Joe “Tricky Sam” Nanton
National Negro Opera
Company
Fats Navarro
Frankie Newton
Sylvia Olden
Roy O’Loughlin
Kid Ory
Dave Page
Oran “Hot Lips” Page
Aubrey Pankey
Charlie Parker
Delores Parker
Massie Patterson
Cecil Payne
Andrew Penn
Jay Peters
Oscar Peterson
Oscar Pettiford
Tommy Potter
Adam Clayton Powell Jr.
Bud Powell
Josephine Premice
Sammy Price
Pearl Primus
Russell Procope
Fred Radcliffe
Alvin “Junior” Raglin
Muriel Rahn
Irving “Mouse” Randolph
Philip A. Randolph
The Ravens
Frances Kraft Reckling
Napoleon Reed
Theresa Richards
Rodney Richardson
Max Roach
Jackie Robinson
Rex Stewart
Ruth Stewart
Slam Stewart
Teddy Stewart
Sonny Stitt
Billy Strayhorn
Alma Sutton
Talley Beatty and His
Dance Company
Jesse Tarrant
Art Tatum
Tennessee State Collegians
Helen Thigpen
Joe Thomas
Bobby Tucker
Union Star Gospel Singers
Sarah Vaughan
Bettye Voorhees
“Jersey Joe” Walcott
George T. Walker
Clara Ward
Ward Singers
William Warfield
Dinah Washington
Ben Webster
Harold “Doc” West
Josh White
Camilla Williams
Francis Williams
Johnny Williams
Mary Lou Williams
Skippy Williams
Lawrence Winters
Wilson Woodbeck
Elman Wright
Lammar Wright Jr.
Jimmy “Papa” Yancey
Estelle “Mama” Yancey
Max Yergan
Trummy Young
Jackie Robinson
(January 21, 1949)
Mahalia Jackson
(October 1, 1950)
Langston Hughes
(September 18, 1952)
Betty Roche
Ernie Royal
Curley Russell
Arthur “Bud” Scott
Hazel Scott
Al Sears
Edith Sewell
Charlie Shavers
Arvell Shaw
Joya Sherrill
Teddy Sinclair
Willie Smith
Willie “The Lion” Smith
Soul Stirrers Evangelistic
Singers
Eddie South
Gerold Spearing
Kenneth Spencer
O’Neill Spencer
Alphonse Steele
Everett Barksdale
Paul Bascomb
Joe Benjamin
Art Blakey
James Berry
Alfred “Pepsi” Bethel
Leon Bibb
Walter Bishop Jr.
Ed Blackwell
Edward Boatner
McHenry Boatwright
Margaret Bonds
Ronnell Bright
Eugene Broadnax
Clifford Brown
Marion Bruce
John W. Bubbles
Lord Burgess
Kenny Burrell
Chico Hamilton
Slide Hampton
The Harmonizing Four
Karl Harrington
Starling Hatchett
Marvin Hayes
Eugene “Fats” Heard
Percy Heath
Jon Hendricks
Robert Henson
Eddie Heywood
J. Earle Hines
Milt Hinton
Lynn Hope
Lightnin’ Hopkins
Langston Hughes
Al Jackson Sr.
Baby Laurence Jackson
Rhea Jackson
Ahmad Jamal
1951–1960
Ahmed Abdul-Malik
Elma Adams
Faye Adams
Julian “Cannonball”
Adderley
Adele Addison
Betty Allen
Martina Arroyo
Dave Bailey
Pearl Bailey
Eddie Barefield
Camp Minisink “Show
of Shows”
The Caravans
Benny Carter
Paul Chambers
Ray Charles
Kenny Clarke
James Cleveland
The Clovers
Henry Coker
Helen Colbert
John Coltrane
Ray Copeland
Israel Crosby
Daniels Singers
Larry Darnell
Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis
Richard Davis
Sammy Davis Jr.
Gloria Davy
Kenny Dennis
Vic Dickenson
Bo Diddley
Mattawilda Dobbs
Bill Doggett
Eric Dolphy
Dorothy Donegan
Carl Drinkard
Frankie Dunlop
George Duvivier
Mildred Falls
Addison Farmer
Art Farmer
Ethel Fields
Five Blind Boys
The Five Keys
Tommy Flanagan
Frank Foster
Hope Foye
Panama Francis
Andrew Frierson
Fran Gaddison
Earl Gaines
Erroll Garner
Leonard Gaskin
Amelia Goodman
George Goodman
Evelyn Greene
Al Grey
Johnny Griffin
Reri Grist
Gigi Gryce
Etta James
Herb Jeffries
Gus Johnson
Osie Johnson
Jimmy Jones
Philly Joe Jones
Reunald Jones Jr.
Reunald Jones Sr.
Louis Jordan
Connie Kay
Wynton Kelly
Matthew Kennedy
Juanita King
Kings of Harmony
Harold Land
Arthur Lawson
John Lewis
Melba Liston
Gildo Mahones
William Marshall
Inez Matthews
Seth McCoy
James McFerrin
Robert McFerrin
Norsalus McKissic
Butterfly McQueen
Carmen McRae
Clarence “Big” Miller
Charles Mingus
Modern Jazz Quartet
Thelonious Monk
George Morrow
Phineas Newborn Jr.
Joe Newman
The Nightingales
Odetta
The Original
Gospel Harmonettes
Georgia Peach
Charlie Persip
Brock Peters
Benny Powell
Richie Powell
Seldon Powell
Specs Powell
Leontyne Price
Paul Quinichette
Gene Ramey
Zizi Richards
Jerome Richardson
Leontyne Price
(December 8, 1954)
Sugar Ray Robinson
Timmie Rogers
Sonny Rollins
Charlie Rouse
Jimmy Rowser
Wyatt Ruther
Philippa Duke Schuyler
Shirley Scott
Selah Jubilee Singers
Shep Sheppard
Sahib Shihab
Don Shirley
Horace Silver
John Simmons
Zutty Singleton
Memphis Slim
Otis Spann
Rawn Spearman
Idrees Sulieman
The Swanee Quintet
Buddy Tate
Arthur Taylor
Billy Taylor
Francena Taylor
Lucky Thompson
Joseph “Big Joe” Turner
Shirley Verrett
Frances Walker
Mal Waldron
Charles Ward
Isaac Washington
Muddy Waters
Julius Watkins
Laurence Watson
Noble “Thin Man” Watts
Frank Wess
Lucretia West
Randy Weston
Josh White Jr.
Joe Williams
Paul Williams
Willie Webb Gospel Choir
James Wilson
Shadow Wilson
1961–1970
Nat Adderley
Rashied Ali
Lisle Atkinson
Josephine Baker
James Baldwin
Kenny Barron
George Benson
Obie Benson
Chuck Berry
Keter Betts
Rhoda Boggs
Garnett Brown
Roscoe Lee Brown
Ray Bryant
George “Mojo” Buford
Grace Bumbry
Jerry Butler
Jaki Byard
Donald Byrd
Godfrey Cambridge
Wilbur Campbell
Diahann Carroll
Betty Carter
Alpha Floyd
Carlos Garnett
Jimmy Garrison
Paul Gonsalves
Grant Green
Dick Gregory
Herbie Hancock
John Handy
Hilda Harris
Richie Havens
Louis Hayes
Albert “Tootie” Heath
Joe Henderson
John Hicks
Richard “Groove” Holmes
Isaac “Redd” Holt
Nora Holt
Son House
Freddie Hubbard
Roger Humphries
“Mississippi” John Hurt
Isaiah Jackson
Luther “Georgia Boy”
Johnson
Elayne Jones
Elvin Jones
James Earl Jones
Thad Jones
Clifford Jordan
Gwendolyn Killebrew
Albert King
B. B. King
Martin Luther King Jr.
Rahsaan Roland Kirk
John Lamb
Everett Lee
Henry Lewis
Ramsey Lewis
Harold Mabern
Moms Mabley
Julian Clifford Mance
Martha Reeves and
the Vandellas
Big Maybelle
Marlena Shaw
Woody Shaw
Archie Shepp
George Shirley
Bobby Short
Fred Shuttlesworth
Nina Simone
Jimmy Smith
James Spaulding
The Staple Singers
Levi Stubbs
Grady Tate
Clark Terry
Big Mama Thornton
Bobby Timmons
Stanley Turrentine
Veronica Tyler
McCoy Tyner
Freddie Waits
T-Bone Walker
Cedar Walton
Dionne Warwick
André Watts
Big Joe Williams
Buster Williams
Marion Williams
Flip Wilson
Nancy Wilson
Jimmy Witherspoon
Britt Woodman
Sam Woodyard
Leo Wright
Eldee Young
1971–1980
Muhal Richard Abrams
George Adams
Don Alias
Andrae Crouch and
The Disciples
Dwight Andrews
Dance Theatre of Harlem
Sarah Dash
Angela Davis
Anthony Davis
Alan Dawson
Carmen De Lavallade
Fats Domino
Cornell Dupree
Christiane Eda-Pierre
Maria Ewing
Jon Faddis
Roberta Flack
Ricky Ford
James Mtume Foreman
Sonny Fortune
Al Foster
Redd Foxx
Aretha Franklin
Chico Freeman
Curtis Fuller
Eric Gale
Nikki Giovanni
Dexter Gordon
Sir Roland Hanna
Billy Harper
Barry Harris
Jimmy Hayes
Jimmy Heath
Barbara Hendricks
Nona Hendryx
Billy Higgins
Natalie Hinderas
Major Holley
Ben Holt
John Lee Hooker
Melba Moore
Ralph Moore
Morgan State University
Chorus
Sunny Murray
Amina Claudine Myers
David “Fathead” Newman
Jessye Norman
Sy Oliver
Jimmy Owens
Gail Palmore-Archer
The Persuasions
Noel Pointer
Don Pullen
Bernard Purdie
Florence Quivar
Dewey Redman
Rufus Reid
Herbert “Toubo” Rhoad
Dannie Richmond
Sam Rivers
Paul Robeson Jr.
Faye Robinson
Smokey Robinson
Marshall Royal
George Russell
Gil Scott-Heron
Norman Simmons
Aretha Franklin
(December 10, 1975)
Jessye Norman
(February 23, 1974)
Martin Luther King Jr.
(February 23, 1968)
André Watts
(November 20, 1966)
Sidney Poitier
(June 9, 1964)
Martina Arroyo
(January 19, 1957)
Jimmy Cobb
Billy Cobham
George Coleman
Johnny Coles
Alice Coltrane
Barbara Conrad
Junior Cook
Bob Cranshaw
Ted Curson
Osceola Davis
Ossie Davis
Spanky De Brest
Ruby Dee
Jack DeJohnette
James DePreist
Wayne Dockery
Lou Donaldson
Kenny Dorham
Mercer Ellington
Simon Estes
Abdul “Duke” Fakir
Otis “Candy” Finch
The Four Tops
Arthur Mitchell
Billy Mitchell
Blue Mitchell
Dwike Mitchell
Hank Mobley
Lee Morgan
Oliver Nelson
Patterson Singers
Lawrence Payton
Duke Pearson
Coleridge Perkinson
Sidney Poitier
Julian Priester
Arthur Prysock
Sun Ra
Lou Rawls
Martha Reeves
Beah Richards
Larry Ridley
Ben Riley
Mickey Roker
Willie Ruff
Nipsey Russell
Pharoah Sanders
Harolyn Blackwell
John Blake
Terence Blanchard
Arthur Blythe
Walter Booker
Lester Bowie
Horace Boyer
Bobby Bradford
Bunny Briggs
William Brown
Ronnie Burrage
Red Callender
Terri Lyne Carrington
Baikida Carroll
John Carter
Nell Carter
Vincent Chancy
Tracy Chapman
Alvin Chea
Ira Coleman
Ashford and Simpson
Nick Ashford
Carmen Balthrop
Leon Bates
Kathleen Battle
Hamiet Bluiett
Joseph Bowie
Boys Choir of Harlem
Gwendolyn Bradley
Cecil Bridgewater
Dee Dee Bridgewater
Hiram Bullock
George Cables
Valerie Capers
Roland Carter
Ron Carter
Doc Cheatham
Don Cherry
Stanley Clarke
Natalie Cole
Ornette Coleman
Bill Cosby
Stanley Cowell
Philip Creech
Andrae Crouch
Andrew Cyrille
Albert Dailey
Clamma Dale
Fred Hopkins
Linda Hopkins
Cissy Houston
Thelma Houston
Alberta Hunter
Jesse Jackson
Oliver Jackson
Paul Jeffrey
Leroy Jenkins
Howard Johnson
Eddie Jones
Isola Jones
Robin Kenyatta
Coretta Scott King
Earl Klugh
Labelle
Patti LaBelle
Oliver Lake
Yusef Lateef
Hubert Laws
Jerry Lawson
Joe Lawson
George Lewis
Jimmy Lions
Jon Lucien
Nellie Lutcher
Benjamin Matthews
Roy McCurdy
Charles McPherson
Jay McShann
Leona Mitchell
Danny Mixon
Marietta Simpson
Valerie Simpson
Carrie Smith
Lonnie Liston Smith
Jamaaladeen Tacuma
Taj Mahal
Cecil Taylor
Charles Tolliver
Ike Turner
Tina Turner
Norris Turney
Cicely Tyson
Ben Vereen
Jayotis Washington
Kenny Washington
Johnny “Guitar” Watson
Tony Williams
Paul Winfield
Bill Withers
Stevie Wonder
Reggie Workman
1981–1990
Paul Spencer Adkins
Geri Allen
William Duncan Allen
Alvin Ailey Repertory
Ensemble
Clifton Anderson
Vanessa Bell Armstrong
Harold Ashby
The Badgett Sisters
Benny Bailey
Thurman Barker
Patricia Baskerville
Alvin Batiste
Aaron Bell
Steve Coleman
Albert Collins
Jerome Cooper
Anthony Cox
Marilyn Crispell
Roger DaCosta
Kenwood Dennard
Cedric Dent
David Dinkins
Dirty Dozen Brass Band
Akua Dixon-Turre
Ralph Dorsey
Mark Doss
Ray Drummond
George Duke
Arthur Duncan
Charles Dutton
Charles Earland
Kevin Eubanks
Alex Foster
Rodney Franklin
Von Freeman
Life Gee
Savion Glover
Milford Graves
Omar Hakim
Adelaide Hall
Eugene Hancock
Bill Hardman
Roy Hargrove
Craig Harris
Jerome Harris
Donald Harrison
Billy Hart
Edwin Hawkins
Gordon Hawkins
John Heard
Julius Hemphill
Eddie Henderson
Gregory Hines
Jay Hoggard
Bertha Hope
1981–1990 (continued)
Whitney Houston
Rhetta Hughes
Bobby Hutcherson
Freddie Jackson
Herman Jackson
Joseph Jarman
Al Jarreau
Duke Jordan
Stanley Jordan
Joe Kennedy
Chaka Khan
Mark Kibble
Billy Kilson
Cleavon Little
Longar Ebony Ensemble
Branford Marsalis
Ellis Marsalis
Wynton Marsalis
Marvis Martin
Kevin Maynor
Cecil McBee
Bobby McFerrin
James McKissic
Claude V. McKnight III
Jackie McLean
Jymie Merritt
Mulgrew Miller
Harold Minerve
Roscoe Mitchell
Charnett Moffett
Buddy Montgomery
Rose Murphy
David Murray
Lewis Nash
James Newton
Fayard Nicholas
Harold Nicholas
Jefferey Osborne
Eugene Perry
Herbert Perry
Ralph Peterson Jr.
Abdul Wadud
Mervyn Warren
Jeff “Tain” Watts
Felicia Weathers
Joe Wilder
Julius Williams
The Williams Brothers
The Winans
1991–2000
Yolanda Adams
Gerald Albright
Roberta Alexander
Muhammad Ali
Kenneth Amis
Wes Anderson
Maya Angelou
Tyler “T. D.” Bell
Charlie Binson
Brian Blade
Charlotte Blake Alston
Avery Brooks
Angela M. Brown
Elder Brown
Ruth Brown
Erbie Browser
Samuel Bryant
Peabo Bryson
Willa Mae Buckner
Jonathan Butler
Don Byron
Ernest Carrington
James Carter
Ravi Coltrane
Diamond Teeth Mary
Dillard University Choir
Howard Dodson
Rita Dove
Will Downing
William Dunn
Ebony Ecumenical Ensemble
Jordan B. Evans Jr.
Rachelle Ferrell
Herbert Field
Lynn Foddrell
Turner Foddrell
Charlie Forbes
Nnenna Freelon
Guitar Gabriel
Gregory Hutchinson
The Impressions
James Ingram
Jackson State University
Choir
Blind Willie James
Anita Johnson
Otto Johnson
William Johnson
Allen Jones
Carmella Jones
Willie Jones III
Gladys Knight
Charles Lloyd
Clyde Long
Margaret Love
Russell Malone
Johnny Mathis
Howard Matthews
Christian McBride
Audra McDonald
Anthony McGill
John Mealing
Brian Stokes Mitchell
Sam Moore
Morehouse College
Glee Club
Robert L. Morris
Toni Morrison
Gary Powell Nash
Aaron Neville
New World Ensemble
Eric Owens
Nicholas Payton
Charles Rangel
Toshi Reagon
Joshua Redman
Eric Reed
Rev. Essie Reed
Frankie Reed
Rev. Willie Reed
Willie Reed Jr.
Sheila Reed Loud
Jackie Reed Mackie
Merenda Reed Miller
Brenda Reed Smith
Ric-Charles Choral
Ensemble
Herlin Riley
Nile Rodgers
Diana Ross
Richard Sample
Sonia Sanchez
Jeff Scott
Diane Reed Tootle
Johnny Tootle
Louise Toppin
Luther Vandross
Voice of Freedom Ensemble
Tahirah Whittington
Vanessa Williams
Cassandra Wilson
Olly Wilson
Alfre Woodard
Cornelius Wright Jr.
Cleveland Young
Nina Young
2001–Present
Mariam Adam
India.Arie
Gregg Baker
Mary J. Blige
Bobby Broom
Terri Lynne Brown
Nicole Cabell
The Campbell Brothers
Dave Chappelle
Maurice Chestnut
Destiny’s Child
Valerie Coleman
Derrick Cummings
Aaron P. Dworkin
Monica Ellis
Harlem Gospel Choir
Joe Herndon
Vincent Herring
Lauryn Hill
Imani Winds
Leela James
Wyclef Jean
Gareth Johnson
Kem
Beyoncé Knowles
Lenny Kravitz
Spike Lee
James Martin
Ronnie McNeir
Marcus Miller
Mos Def
Tai Murray
Steve Nelson
Desmond Neysmith
Nokuthula Ngwenyama
Greg Osby
Rokie Payton
Clayton Penrose-Whitmore
Theo Peoples
Phylicia Rashad
Morris Robinson
Chris Rock
Angie Stone
Darryl Taylor
The Temptations
Russell Thomas
Ron Tyson
James “Blood” Ulmer
Terry Weeks
Melissa White
Katt Williams
Michelle Williams
Otis Williams
Bruce Williamson
Roy “FutureMan” Wooten
Victor Wooten
Lizz Wright
Thomas Young
Since complete biographical
information is not available for
every performer who has appeared
at Carnegie Hall, this overview of
African American artists is not
intended to be complete.
Major funding for Honor! A
Celebration of the African American
Cultural Legacy has been provided
by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith
Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller Foundation’s
New York City Cultural Innovation
Fund, and the A. L. and Jennie L.
Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor!
is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part,
by public funds from the National
Endowment for the Arts.
Bobby McFerrin
(June 30, 1982)
John Purcell
Bruce Purse
Derek Lee Ragin
Dianne Reeves
Vernon Reid
Marcus Roberts
Wallace Roney
Avery Sharpe
Sister Sledge
Jimmy Slyde
Hale Smith
Marvin “Smitty” Smith
Lorice Stevens
Delcina Stevenson
Bob Stewart
John Stubblefield
Sweet Honey In The Rock
Take 6
David Thomas
“Sir” Charles Thompson
Malachi Thompson
Henry Threadgill
Maya Angelou
(February 2, 1993)
Gandy Dancers
Danny Glover
Whoopi Goldberg
Wycliffe Gordon
The Gospel Christian
Singers
The Gospel Soul Seekers
Denyce Graves
Macy Gray
Lawrence Hamilton
Harlem School of the Arts
Choir
Stefon Harris
Cynthia Haymon
The Heavenly Tones
Eddie Herring
Moses Hogan
Shirley Horn
Audra McDonald
(September 23, 1998)
Muhammad Ali
(November 30, 1998)
Jimmy Scott
Wayne Shorter
Percy Sledge
Southern University Choir
Randolph Swain
Andre Thomas
Antina S. Thomas
Antoinette R. Thomas
Iesha Thomas
Indra Thomas
The Thomas Sisters
Robert Todd
Beyoncé Knowles
The Roots
Daniel Bernard Roumain
Kelly Rowland
Mark Rucker
Jill Scott
Ann Sears
Ryan Shaw
Anna Deavere Smith
Nate Smith
Toyin Spellman-Diaz
January 19, 2001
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
50 Notable African American Cultural Events at
Carnegie Hall
“It is probable that this hall will intertwine itself with the history of our country,” said Andrew Carnegie in 1890, when he
laid the cornerstone of the building that would become Carnegie Hall. In keeping with Carnegie’s belief in
egalitarianism, the hall that bore his name maintained an open-door policy from the beginning, providing a venue for
myriad African American musicians, social figures, and causes. From the brightest classical music artists through the
greatest names in jazz to today’s trailblazing R&B and hip-hop artists, the African American cultural legacy can, in one
way, be traced through a look at Carnegie Hall’s past. Following are some highlights.
June 15, 1892
Soprano Sissieretta Jones becomes the first African American artist to perform at Carnegie
Hall towards the end of its first full season. The concert, presented by the black social
organization The Society of the Sons of New York in Carnegie Hall’s lower level recital hall
(today’s Zankel Hall) also features noted African American baritone and composer Harry T.
Burleigh.
February 13, 1893
Sissieretta Jones returns eight months later to sing in the main auditorium at a benefit for the
World’s Fair Colored Opera Company. African American composer, conductor, and violinist
Will Marion Cook leads a program that also features the Jubilee Singers of Fisk
University.
January 22, 1906
Booker T. Washington and Mark Twain speak at a Benefit for the Tuskegee Institute.
May 2, 1912
James Reese Europe and his Clef Club Orchestra, comprised of members of the first black
musicians’ union, perform a “Concert of Negro Music” in the first Carnegie Hall program of a
musical style forming the roots of what was to become jazz.
April 12, 1915
Tenor Roland Hayes makes his Carnegie Hall debut, performing Spirituals and classical
arias, alongside fellow African American singers Sara Bird and Mattie Harris. In 1924,
Hayes becomes the first African American to give a full-length solo recital at Carnegie Hall.
April 27, 1928
W.C. Handy, the cornetist and composer often referred to as the “Father of the Blues,” leads
his orchestra along with the Jubilee Singers and pianist Fats Waller, one of the first jazz
superstars.
December 30, 1928
Contralto Marian Anderson makes her Carnegie Hall recital debut, more than ten years
before she was notoriously barred from performing at Washington’s Constitution Hall.
November 5, 1929
Baritone Paul Robeson makes his Carnegie Hall recital debut.
January 16, 1938
In the first formal concert program of swing jazz, this legendary concert by Benny Goodman &
His Orchestra featured Lionel Hampton and Teddy Wilson performing in Goodman’s racially
mixed ensemble. Count Basie, Harry Carney, Freddie Green, Buck Clayton, Johnny
Hodges, Walter Page, Cootie Williams, and Lester Young performed as well, in a special
“jam session” with Goodman. The still-in-print live recording of this concert remains the
number one selling jazz record to this day.
(more)
50 Notable African American Cultural Events at Carnegie Hall, Page 2 of 4
December 23, 1938
Jazz record producer John Hammond presents “From Spirituals to Swing,” a remarkable
concert that covered every facet of the black musical experience. Following an introductory
segment featuring field recordings of West African tribal music and a quick tune from Count
Basie and His Orchestra, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Mitchell’s Christian Singers
presented gospel music; harmonica player Sonny Terry and singer Big Bill Broonzy
represented the blues; pianists Albert Ammons, Meade “Lux” Lewis, and Pete Johnson
pounded out boogie-woogie; James P. Johnson and Joe Turner covered stride piano;
clarinetist/soprano saxophonist Sidney Bechet led a set of New Orleans jazz; and finally
Count Basie returned with his Kansas City Six and full big band to close the concert with the
newest jazz sounds.
October 2, 1939
Ten months after his Carnegie Hall debut with Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra, trumpeter
Louis Armstrong performs at this ASCAP American Music Festival event, celebrating
ASCAP’s 25th anniversary. Also on the bill: Red Allen, Cab Calloway, Pops Foster, J.C.
Higginbotham, Big Sid Catlett, Noble Sissle, Wilbur De Paris, Bill “Bojangles”
Robinson, the Abyssinian Baptist Church Choir, and the Negro Symphony Orchestra
under the direction of conductors James P. Johnson and William Grant Still.
January 23, 1943
Duke Ellington makes his Carnegie Hall debut, premiering his great concert work Black,
Brown & Beige.
April 2, 1944
In a Tribute to Fats Waller, performers include vocalists Billie Holiday, Thelma Carpenter,
Jimmy Rushing, and Josh White; pianists Earl Hines, J.C. Johnson, Hazel Scott, Willie
“The Lion” Smith, Mary Lou Williams, and Teddy Wilson; drummer William “Cozy” Cole;
trumpeters Erskine Hawkins and Frankie Newton; saxophonist Ben Webster, bassist Oscar
Pettiford; and trombonist Trummy Young.
April 20, 1946
Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter performs in “American Folk Music Concert.”
May 27, 1946
A “Jazz at the Philharmonic” program features the Carnegie Hall debuts of vocalist Sarah
Vaughan and saxophonists Coleman Hawkins and Illinois Jacquet.
May 12, 1947
A “Jazz at the Philharmonic” program features the Carnegie Hall debut of legendary jazz
saxophonist Charlie Parker.
September 21, 1947
The all-African American cast of the Negro Grand Opera Company performs African
American composer H.L. Freeman’s 1893 opera The Martyr.
September 29, 1947
Ella Fitzgerald makes her Carnegie Hall debut performing with Dizzy Gillespie and His
Orchestra.
February 20, 1949
Nat “King” Cole and Harry Belafonte make their Carnegie Hall debuts performing on a
program that also featured Woody Herman and His Orchestra.
December 25, 1949
In the year of the “Birth of the Cool,” Miles Davis makes his Carnegie Hall debut—along with
debuts by Roy Haynes, Max Roach, and Bud Powell—in a Christmas jazz concert
presented by critic Leonard Feather, DJ “Symphony Sid” Torin, and entrepreneur Monte Kay.
October 1, 1950
Gospel star Mahalia Jackson performs with The Angel Lites, the Cornerstone Baptist
Church Gospel Choir, and the Soul Stirrers Evangelistic Singers.
December 8, 1954
Soprano Leontyne Price makes her Carnegie Hall debut performing in the New York
premiere of Samuel Barber’s Prayers of Kierkegaard with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
(more)
50 Notable African American Cultural Events at Carnegie Hall, Page 3 of 4
April 2, 1955
Thelonious Monk and Charles Mingus make their Carnegie Hall debuts performing at the
Charlie Parker Memorial Concert.
October 29, 1955
The “Top Ten Revue” tour hits Carnegie Hall, with performances by Bo Diddley, Etta James,
and Big Joe Turner.
November 10, 1956
Billie Holiday performs in a concert entitled Lady Sings the Blues, named after her song and
album released earlier that year.
November 29, 1957
Ray Charles, John Coltrane, and Sonny Rollins make their Carnegie Hall debuts
performing in a “Thanksgiving Jazz” concert. Coltrane’s performance with Thelonious Monk
at this concert—released on CD in 2005—came during a very important and short-lived
collaboration between the two jazz giants.
January 24, 1958
Folk singer Odetta makes her Carnegie Hall debut on this “Folk Festival at Midnight” program.
April 3, 1959
Musicologist Alan Lomax presents “Folk Song ‘59” at Carnegie Hall, which features blues
legends Muddy Waters, Brownie McGhee, and Memphis Slim.
April 19-20, 1959
Harry Belafonte records the acclaimed album “Harry Belafonte at Carnegie Hall” for the RCA
Victor Living Stereo series.
May 21, 1961
Vocalist Nina Simone makes her Carnegie Hall debut performing on a double bill with South
African singer Miriam Makeba.
June 17, 1965
A New York Folk Festival program entitled “The Evolution of Funk” features Chuck Berry,
Son House, Muddy Waters, and Mance Lipscomb.
November 20, 1966
Pianist André Watts makes his Carnegie Hall debut performing Edward MacDowell’s Piano
Concerto No. 2 with the American Symphony Orchestra and conductor Leopold Stokowski.
February 23, 1968
Martin Luther King, Jr. makes one of his final public appearances, speaking with author
James Baldwin at a W.E.B. Du Bois Centennial Year event.
April 4, 1968
The assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., is announced from the stage of Carnegie Hall
prior to a benefit concert for Tougaloo College featuring Duke Ellington performing excerpts
from his Second Sacred Concert. TV networks, present for the event, go live to carry the
news.
April 12-14, 1968
Free jazz hits Carnegie Hall. On April 12 and 13, Sun Ra and His Space Arkestra perform a
program entitled “The Space Music of Sun Ra: a free form excursion into the far reaches of
sound and light”. The next night, April 14, Alice Coltrane performs “Cosmic Music” with her
group including Pharoah Sanders, Joe Henderson, Jimmy Garrison, Rashied Ali, and
Jack DeJohnette.
April 1, 1971
Ike and Tina Turner perform. Also on the bill: Fats Domino.
February 7, 1973
During the year of his number one hit singles “Superstition” and “You Are the Sunshine of My
Life,” Stevie Wonder makes his Carnegie Hall debut.
May 19, 1973
Boasting the one-two punch of front-woman Patti LaBelle and songwriter Nona Hendryx, the
female vocal group LaBelle performs at Carnegie Hall the year before it releases its protodisco funk classic “Lady Marmalade”.
(more)
50 Notable African American Cultural Events at Carnegie Hall, Page 4 of 4
September 14, 1973
Ornette Coleman makes his Carnegie Hall debut, performing with his New Septet.
February 23, 1974
Soprano Jessye Norman makes her Carnegie Hall debut performing Mozart with the Boston
Symphony Orchestra and pianist Robert Levin.
October 9, 1976
Soprano Kathleen Battle makes her Carnegie Hall debut performing in Mahler’s Symphony
No. 8 with the New York Philharmonic.
June 30, 1982
The Kool Jazz Festival (today known as the JVC Jazz Festival) presents a program entitled
“Young Lions,” featuring the Carnegie Hall debuts of future stars Wynton Marsalis and
Bobby McFerrin.
October 28, 1985
Riding the success of her chart-topping self-titled debut album with its four Top Ten hits,
Whitney Houston makes her Carnegie Hall debut.
November 17, 1985
Sweet Honey in the Rock makes its Carnegie Hall debut, recording “Live at Carnegie Hall”
two years later.
October 10-11, 1987
Contemporary gospel group The Winans record their Grammy Award-winning album “Live at
Carnegie Hall”.
April 28, 1991
The inaugural concert—part of the Carnegie Hall Centennial Festival—of the Carnegie Hall
Jazz Band led by Music Director Jon Faddis and featuring on its roster many notable African
American contemporary jazz artists.
September 23, 1998
Audra McDonald and Brian Stokes Mitchell make their Carnegie Hall debuts on the 108th
Opening Night Gala, performing in an all-Gershwin celebration, George Gershwin at 100, with
Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony.
January 19, 2001
Wyclef Jean headlines a benefit for his foundation, also featuring performances by Mary J.
Blige, Destiny’s Child, and Whitney Houston.
June 20, 2003
Film director Spike Lee hosts the JVC Jazz Festival concert The Movie Music of Spike Lee
and Terence Blanchard, featuring Terence Blanchard, Angie Stone, and Cassandra
Wilson, among others.
February 21, 2008
Vocal innovator Bobby McFerrin begins a seven-event Carnegie Hall Perspectives series,
culminating in an improvised, a cappella opera, Instant Opera!, as performed by young
vocalists in a Professional Training Workshop, presented by The Weill Music Institute at
Carnegie Hall.
CARNEGIE HALL presents
honor!
A Celebration of the
African American Cultural Legacy
Curated by Jessye Norman
Chronological Listing of Events
As of March 4, 2009
(For updated information, visit carnegiehall.org/honor)
HONOR: BLUES, JAZZ, RHYTHM AND BLUES,
SOUL, AND BEYOND
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall
Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
Ray Chew, Musical Director
Hosted by Sade Baderinwa, Wendell Pierce, and Ben Vereen
Poetry reading by Avery Brooks
Geri Allen
Ashford & Simpson
Terence Blanchard
James Carter
Ron Carter
Doug E. Fresh
Corey Glover
Anthony Hamilton
Freddie Jackson
Leela James
Kem
MC Lyte
Toshi Reagon
Vernon Reid
Ryan Shaw
James "Blood" Ulmer
Paying tribute to the great African American popular music artists of the past,
the brightest lights in blues, rhythm and blues, soul, and jazz, as well as
today’s daring innovators, gather for a magical evening of music. Each
presentation will parallel an event in the bountiful history of performances by
African American artists at Carnegie Hall.
This performance is sponsored by Bank of America, Carnegie Hall's Proud
Season Sponsor.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $28, $34, $44, $60, $78, $86
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 2 of 18
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: IMANI WINDS
CUNY Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue
Thursday, March 5, 2009 at 1:00 PM
Imani Winds
Valerie Coleman, Flute
Toyin Spellman-Diaz, Oboe
Mariam Adam, Clarinet
Jeff Scott, French Horn
Monica Ellis, Bassoon
DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN Five Chairs and One Table
(Sneak preview and discussion. World premiere in Zankel Hall at Carnegie
Hall, on March 8, commissioned by Carnegie Hall.)
“Imani Winds has proven itself to be more than a wind quintet—more like a
force of nature.”—This Week in Philly
Since 1997, the Grammy-nominated ensemble Imani Winds has carved out a
distinct presence in the classical music world with its dynamic playing,
culturally rich programming, genre-blurring collaborations, and inspirational
outreach programs. With a deep commitment to commissioning new work, the
group enriches the traditional wind quintet repertoire while bridging European,
American, African, and Latin traditions.
Our thanks to The Honorable Christine Quinn for making today’s concert
possible.
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and
Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Sponsored by Target
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: Free (RSVP Required: register online at
http://www.gc.cuny.edu/events/details_landing.asp?EventId=20664 or call
212-817-8215)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 3 of 18
SACRED ELLINGTON
The Cathedral of St. John the Divine
1047 Amsterdam Avenue
Saturday, March 7, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
Jessye Norman, Soprano
Mark Markham, Music Director and Piano
Maurice Chestnut, Tap Dancer
Margie Gillis, Dancer
Flux Quartet
Tom Chiu, Violin
Conrad Harris, Violin
Peter Bucknell, Viola
Felix Fan, Cello
Sacred Ellington Band
Mike Lovatt, Trumpet
Bill Easley, Saxophone
Ira Coleman, Double Bass
Steve Johns, Drums
Sacred Voices
Lawrence Hamilton, Sacred Voices Director
Suzanne Ishee, Coordinating Producer
Stan Pressner, Lighting Designer
Sound Design by Randy Hansen, ADI
Sue Anne Johnson, Wardrobe Designer
Sacred Ellington—comprising excerpts from Ellington’s magnificent Three
Sacred Concerts—is Jessye Norman’s homage to this legendary figure. The
concert, which features Jessye Norman with a jazz ensemble, string quartet,
gospel choir, and a dancer, takes place at The Cathedral of St. John the
Divine, a special sanctuary of central importance in Duke Ellington’s life.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
This concert is also supported, in part, by the A. L. and Jennie L. Luria
Foundation.
Tickets: $40
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 4 of 18
EXPLORATION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall
Sunday, March 8, 2009 at 12:00 p.m.
Participants:
Gordon J. Davis
Michael Eric Dyson
Luvenia A. George
Laura Karpman
Cornel West
Rachael Worby
Performance:
Imani Winds
JASON MORAN Cane (New York Premiere)
DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN Five Chairs and One Table (World Premiere,
commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
A wide ranging discussion on music today ranging from hip-hop and jazz to
contemporary orchestral music. The event will close with a performance by
Imani Winds.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Carnegie Hall commissions in the 2008-2009 season are made possible, in
part, by a generous grant from the New York State Music Fund, established by
the New York State Attorney General at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors.
Tickets: $15
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 5 of 18
IMPRESSION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall
Sunday, March 8, 2009 at 3:30 p.m.
Participants to include:
Tania León
Toni Morrison
George Shirley
Anna Deavere Smith
Performance:
Robert Sims, Baritone
Paul Hamilton, Piano
AARON COPLAND "Simple Gifts"
AARON COPLAND "At the River"
AARON COPLAND "Ching-A-Ring Chaw"
TRADITIONAL "I'm Goin' Home On Mornin' Train" (arr. Robert Sims)
TRADITIONAL "Lit'l Boy" (arr. Roland Hayes)
TRADITIONAL "Is There Anybody Here Who Loves My Jesus?"
(arr. Roland Carter)
An afternoon of reminiscences and anecdotes of a life in the arts. Leading
figures discuss their individual performance experiences on the international
stages. Baritone Robert Sims and pianist Paul Hamilton will conclude the
event with a 20-minute performance.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $15
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 6 of 18
EXPRESSION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall
Sunday, March 8, 2009 at 7:00 p.m.
Participants:
Maya Angelou
Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Gwen Ifill
Judith Jamison
Portia Maultsby
Arthur Mitchell
Performance:
Dance Theatre of Harlem School and Ensemble
Balm in Gilead
Choreography: Arthur Mitchell
Music: Traditional Spiritual (performed by Jessye Norman)
Inspired by a Dream (Port de Bras Rap)
Choreography: Robert Garland
Music: Soweto String Quartet, Scott Joplin, Arthur Mitchell
Port de Bras Rap: Developed by Endalyn Taylor
Firebird (solo)
Choreography: John Taras
Music: Igor Stravinsky
The Greatest
Choreography: Arthur Mitchell
Music: Michael Masser and Linda Creed
A discussion of the history of African American performing arts and its role in
social and political change. The event will also include a performance by the
Dance Theatre of Harlem School and Ensemble.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $15
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 7 of 18
PANEL DISCUSSION: DANCE THEATRE OF
HARLEM
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
40 Lincoln Center Plaza
Thursday, March 12, 2009 at 3:00 p.m.
Alastair Macaulay, Moderator
Suzanne Farrell
Frederic Franklin
Lorraine Graves
CLASSICALLY AMERICAN
Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in
conjunction with the Library's exhibition Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of
Firsts
Tickets: Free and available on the day of the event on a first come, first served
basis.
For more information visit nypl.org/lpaprograms or call 212-870-1630.
THE STORIES I COULD TELL: ARTHUR
Thursday, March 12, 2009 at 5:30 p.m.
MITCHELL AT 75
Arthur Mitchell, Speaker
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts Robert Greskovic, Moderator
40 Lincoln Center Plaza
An interview with the Founding Artistic Director of the Dance Theatre of
Harlem
Presented by The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in
conjunction with the Library's exhibition Dance Theatre of Harlem: 40 Years of
Firsts
Tickets: Free and available on the day of the event on a first come, first served
basis.
For more information visit nypl.org/lpaprograms or call 212-870-1630.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 8 of 18
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: ESPERANZA
SPALDING
The Schomburg Center for Research in Black
Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard at 135th Street
Thursday, March 12, 2009 at 7:00 p.m.
Esperanza Spalding
Esperanza Spalding, Double Bass and Lead Vocal
Otis Brown III, Drums
Leonardo Genovese, Piano
Ricardo Vogt, Guitar
“Whether exploding into vocalese or making her bass solo sound like a horn,
she’s a spark plug who dances as she grooves through a funked-up and
rocked-out repertoire.”—Billboard
Bassist-vocalist-composer Esperanza Spalding challenges and redefines the
common perceptions of modern music with her compelling vocals, unmatched
instrumental technique, and brilliant compositions.
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and
Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Sponsored by Target
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: Free (RSVP required, limit two tickets per person; call 212-491-2040)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 9 of 18
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: COMMUNITY
SING WITH GOSPEL FOR TEENS
Apollo Theater
253 West 125th Street
Btwn. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd. & Frederick
Douglass Blvd. (also known as 7th Ave. & 8th Ave.)
Friday, March 13, 2009 at 6:30 p.m.
Gospel for Teens
Vy Higginsen, Host
Bring your families, friends and most importantly your voice. Come celebrate
the music in you at Carnegie Hall's Community Sings!
This interactive event is your opportunity to sing, exchange stories, and share
food together with the exhilarating Gospel for Teens, hosted by Harlem icon,
Vy Higginsen. (No singing experience necessary!)
Based in Harlem, the Gospel for Teens choir was born out of Vy Higginsen's
Mama Foundation for the Arts—dedicated to teaching aspiring teenagers
about the importance of gospel music as an art form. Aged 13-19, these teens
stand as a shining example of musical possibility, bringing the power of
traditional and contemporary gospel to audiences all around New York through
performances at the Apollo Theater, the American Museum of Natural History,
and St. Paul Community Baptist Church.
"We mean to lift up the youth through history and gospel music!" —Vy
Higginsen, Mama Foundation for the Arts CEO and Executive Director
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and
Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Sponsored by Target
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: Free (RSVP required; limit 4 tickets per person; call 212-531-5363)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 10 of 18
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: HARLEM
QUARTET, A SPHINX ENSEMBLE
Langston Hughes Community Library & Cultural
Center
100-01 Northern Boulevard
Corona, New York
Saturday, March 14, 2009 at 2:00 p.m.
Harlem Quartet
Ilmar Gavilan, Violin
Melissa White, Violin
Juan-Miguel Hernandez, Viola
Desmond Neysmith, Cello
“The Harlem Quartet played with panache.”—New York Times
The Harlem Quartet, comprising First-Place Laureates of the Sphinx
Competition presented by Chase, aims to advance diversity in classical music
while engaging young and new audiences through varied repertoire,
highlighting works by minority composers.
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and
Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Sponsored by Target
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
For more information call 718-651-1100.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 11 of 18
ASK YOUR MAMA!
Music by Laura Karpman, on a text by Langston
Hughes
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall
Monday, March 16, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
Jessye Norman, Soprano
The Roots
de'Adre Aziza, Vocalist
Tracie Luck, Vocalist
Orchestra of St. Luke's
George Manahan, Conductor
Annie Dorsen, Director
Rico Gatson, Visual Artist
Kate Howard, Video Designer
David Korins, Scenic Consultant
Leslie Ann Jones, Sound Designer
LAURA KARPMAN Ask Your Mama! (World Premiere, commissioned by
Carnegie Hall)
Ask Your Mama!, a collaboration between four-time Emmy Award–winning
composer Laura Karpman and five-time Grammy winner Jessye Norman, is a
multimedia presentation on a text by Langston Hughes, Ask Your Mama: 12
Moods for Jazz.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $23, $27, $35, $48, $62, $68
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall
Tuesday, March 17, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
The Philadelphia Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, Chief Conductor and Artistic Adviser
Russell Thomas, Tenor
Eric Owens, Bass-Baritone
DARIUS MILHAUD La création du monde, Op. 81
GEORGE WALKER Lilacs
GUSTAV MAHLER Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen
ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 9 in E Minor, Op. 95, "From the
New World"
Pre-concert talk starts at 7:00 p.m. in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at
Carnegie Hall with Dr. Aaron A. Flagg, Executive Director of the Music
Conservatory of Westchester.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $35, $42, $55, $76, $99, $110
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 12 of 18
DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER
Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall
Wednesday, March 18, 2009 at 8:30 p.m.
Dee Dee Bridgewater, Vocalist
Ira Coleman, Bass
Edsel Gomez, Piano
Vince Cherico, Drums
Luisito Quintero, Percussion
Grammy- and Tony Award–winner Dee Dee Bridgewater presents a
breathtaking evening of jazz and more.
Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with Absolutely Live Entertainment
LLC.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $34, $44
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 13 of 18
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: THE
MCCOLLOUGH SONS OF THUNDER AND
HYPNOTIC BRASS ENSEMBLE
Harlem Stage / Aaron Davis Hall Inc.
Convent Avenue between West 133rd and 135th
Street
Thursday, March 19, 2009 at 7:30 p.m.
The McCollough Sons of Thunder
Hypnotic Brass Ensemble
Based out of the United House of Prayer for All People in Harlem, The
McCollough Sons of Thunder is a 13-piece brass shout band that was
assembled in 1962. For the past 44 years the band has given weekly
performances in the United House of Prayer in addition to captivating
audiences and winning critical acclaim around the world, including an
appearance at the homecoming of South African leader Nelson Mandela.
The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble began as a family group on the south side of
Chicago in 1986. The eight horn-playing brothers were led by their father and
teacher Kelan Phil Cohran, lead trumpeter of jazz group Sun Ra and mentor to
the Pharaohs (later called Earth Wind and Fire). In 1999 the brothers
combined their efforts and began performing a new style of brass music they
termed “hypnotic.” These ambassadors of brass are now building an
international following with their signature infusion of imaginative jazz
arrangements with a hip-hop sensibility.
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and
Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Sponsored by Target
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: Free (RSVP required; limit 2 tickets per person; call: 212-281-9240)
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 14 of 18
CARNEGIE HALL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
CHORAL FESTIVAL
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall
Friday, March 20, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
Orchestra of St. Luke's
Craig Jessop, Conductor
Angela M. Brown, Soprano
Meredith Arwady, Contralto
Russell Thomas, Tenor
Morris Robinson, Bass
North Jersey Homeschool Association Chorale
Hawthorne, New Jersey
Beth Prins, Conductor
Pebblebrook High School Chamber Choir
Atlanta, Georgia
George Case, Conductor
Shorewood High School Aeolian Choir
Shoreline, Washington
John Hendrix, Conductor
Songs of Solomon: An Inspirational Ensemble
New York, New York
Chantel Wright, Conductor
Program to include:
MICHAEL TIPPETT A Child of Our Time
This performance of Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time will feature
select high school choirs chosen by competition with peer groups nationwide.
The featured work uses the Spiritual in much the same way that J. S. Bach
employed the chorale in his great choral compositions.
The Carnegie Hall National High School Choral Festival is made possible, in
part, by an endowment fund for choral music established by S. Donald
Sussman in memory of Judith Arron and Robert Shaw.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $10
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 15 of 18
EMANCIPATION'S JUBILATIONS: SPIRITUALS Saturday, March 21, 2009 at 3:00 p.m.
AND SONGS THAT LED A NATION
James Martin, Baritone
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
40 Lincoln Center Plaza
A recital based on songs Lincoln heard at a contraband camp (a refuge for
escaped slaves), including "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen," "Every
Time I Feel the Spirit," "I Thank God that I Am Free at Last," "John Brown's
Body," "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," "Didn't My God Deliver Daniel," "Go
Down, Moses," "I Ain't Got Weary Yet," "I've Been in the Storm So Long,"
"Steal Away," and "Praise God from Whom Blessings Flow."
Presented by the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts as part of
Mystic Chords of Memory: Abraham Lincoln and the Performing Arts
Tickets: Free and available on the day of the event on a first come, first served
basis.
For more information please visit nypl.org/lpaprograms or call 212-870-1630.
PANEL DISCUSSION: THE SPIRITUAL AND
GOSPEL MUSIC
Apollo Theater
253 West 125th Street
Saturday, March 21, 2009 at 7:00 p.m.
Derrick Bell
Dr. Calvin O. Butts III
Portia Maultsby
Chapman Roberts
Sweet Honey In The Rock
Olly Wilson
A wide-ranging discussion, exploring the historical and political issues
associated with Spirituals and gospel music.
Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with the Apollo Theater.
Tickets: $10
For more information visit apollotheater.org or call 212-531-5305.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 16 of 18
NEIGHBORHOOD CONCERT: THE
MCCOLLOUGH SONS OF THUNDER AND
HYPNOTIC BRASS ENSEMBLE
Kingsborough Community College Performing Arts
Complex
2001 Oriental Blvd
Brooklyn, NY
Sunday, March 22, 2009 at 3:00 p.m.
The McCollough Sons of Thunder
Hypnotic Brass Ensemble
Based out of the United House of Prayer for All People in Harlem, The
McCollough Sons of Thunder is a 13-piece brass shout band that was
assembled in 1962. For the past 44 years the band has given weekly
performances in the United House of Prayer in addition to captivating
audiences and winning critical acclaim around the world, including an
appearance at the homecoming of South African leader Nelson Mandela.
The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble began as a family group on the south side of
Chicago in 1986. The eight horn-playing brothers were led by their father and
teacher Kelan Phil Cohran, lead trumpeter of jazz group Sun Ra and mentor to
the Pharaohs (later called Earth Wind and Fire). In 1999 the brothers
combined their efforts and began performing a new style of brass music they
termed “hypnotic.” These ambassadors of brass are now building an
international following with their signature infusion of imaginative jazz
arrangements with a hip-hop sensibility.
Media Sponsor: Time Warner Cable
Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts are supported, in part, by The Max and
Victoria Dreyfus Foundation.
Sponsored by Target
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
For more information call 718-368-5596.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 17 of 18
A CELEBRATION OF THE SPIRITUAL AND
GOSPEL MUSIC
Apollo Theater
253 West 125th Street
Sunday, March 22, 2009 at 5:00 p.m.
Ray Chew, Musical Director
Shari Addison, Vocalist
Shirley Caesar, Vocalist
Donnie McClurkin, Vocalist
Smokie Norful, Vocalist
Richard Smallwood, Vocalist
The Abyssinian Baptist Church Cathedral Choir
Hezekiah Walker and the Love Fellowship Choir
Sweet Honey In The Rock
Vy Higginsen's Gospel for Teens
Additional artists to be announced
Carnegie Hall and the Apollo Theater team up to present a concert of
Spirituals and gospel music. The program will trace the development of the
Spiritual, from its African roots, to solo vocal performances and choral
arrangements. Following intermission, choirs from around New York City will
join forces for a joyous celebration of gospel music.
Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with the Apollo Theater.
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $45
For more information visit apollotheater.org or call 212-531-5305.
Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural Legacy, March 4–23, 2009, Page 18 of 18
HONOR: THE VOICE
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall
Monday, March 23, 2009 at 8:00 p.m.
Harolyn Blackwell, Soprano
Angela M. Brown, Soprano
Nicole Cabell, Soprano
Gregg Baker, Baritone
Eric Owens, Bass-Baritone
Kevin Maynor, Bass
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL "Let the Bright Seraphim" from Samson
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL "Care selve" from Atalanta
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN "In questa tomba oscura"
FELIX MENDELSSOHN "Lord God of Abraham," Op. 70, No. 14 from Elijah
JOHANNES BRAHMS "Auf dem Kirchhofe," Op. 105, No. 4
HENRI DUPARC "L'invitation au voyage"
ROBERT SCHUMANN "Ich grolle nicht," Op. 48, No. 7 from Dichterliebe
FRANZ LISZT "Die Loreley"
RICHARD STRAUSS "Cäcilie," Op. 27, No. 2
GIUSEPPE VERDI "Il lacerato spirito" from Simon Boccanegra
GIUSEPPE VERDI "O patria mia" from Aida
GIUSEPPE VERDI "Ciel! mio padre!" from Aida
EARL ROBINSON/ANONYMOUS "Joe Hill" and "Water Boy"
LEONARD BERNSTEIN "Somewhere" from West Side Story
JEROME KERN "Ol' Man River" from Show Boat
GEORGE GERSHWIN "Bess You Is My Woman Now" from Porgy and Bess
GEORGE GERSHWIN "Summertime" from Porgy and Bess
TRADITIONAL "Deep River" (arr. Henry T. Burleigh)
TRADITIONAL "This Little Light of Mine"
TRADITIONAL "There Is a Balm in Gilead"
TRADITIONAL "Oh! What a Beautiful City"
African American singers from the classical music world come together to pay
tribute to icons who opened the doors for succeeding generations. Artists to be
honored include Sissieretta Jones, Marian Anderson, Paul Robeson, and
Roland Hayes, among many others.
Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP
Major funding for Honor! A Celebration of the African American Cultural
Legacy has been provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Horace
W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Alice Tully Foundation, The Rockefeller
Foundation's New York City Cultural Innovation Fund, and the A. L. and
Jennie L. Luria Foundation.
The opening performance of Honor! is sponsored by Bank of America.
Honor! is made possible, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment
for the Arts.
Tickets: $22, $26, $33, $45, $58, $64