Chimborazo Fauna Production Reserve

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Chimborazo Fauna Production Reserve
One of the main objectives of
Chimborazo Reserve is to manage
populations of vicuñas, the most
graceful of the Andean camelid family.
Contents
This brochure offers a panoramic view of the
biological and cultural diversity of Chimborazo
Fauna Production Reserve (CFPR), as well
as practical information for the visitor: a
geographic and a tourist map, sites you
do not want to miss, outstanding tourist
activities, some useful recommendations for
your trip, and a directory of services.
b
2
Map of Ecuador’s Natural
Heritage Sites (PANE)
4
Chimborazo Fauna Production Reserve
Graceful vicuñas graze the mountain
closest to the sun
8
Geographic map of the Reserve
10
Faces and traces
Indigenous communities brave the rugged
surroundings of the ice giant
14
Tourist map
16
Not to be missed
22
Things to do
24
Getting there
26
Directory
28
List of outstanding wildlife species
GALÁPAGOS
1
GALÁPAGOS NATIONAL PARK
2
GALÁPAGOS MARINE RESERVE
16
PACIFIC COAST
3
GALERA SAN FRANCISCO MARINE RESERVE
4
MACHALILLA NATIONAL PARK
5
MANGLARES CHURUTE ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
6
MACHE CHINDUL ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
7
SANTA CLARA ISLAND WILDLIFE REFUGE
8
MUISNE RIVER ESTUARY MANGROVES WILDLIFE REFUGE
9
EL SALADO MANGROVES FAUNA PRODUCTION RESERVE
10
SANTA ELENA PENINSULA MARINE FAUNA WILDLIFE REFUGE
11
EL MORRO MANGROVES WILDLIFE REFUGE
12
PACOCHE WILDLIFE REFUGE
13
PARQUE LAGO NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
14
ARENILLAS ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
15
ISLAS CORAZÓN Y FRAGATAS WILDLIFE REFUGE
16
CAYAPAS MATAJE ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
17
ESMERALDAS RIVER ESTUARY MANGROVES WILDLIFE REFUGE
18
LA CHIQUITA WILDLIFE REFUGE
19
ISLA SANTAY AND ISLA DEL GALLO NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
20
PAMBILAR WILDLIFE RESERVE
21
LOS SAMANES NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
22
PLAYAS DE VILLAMIL NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
23
EL PELADO MARINE RESERVE
18
2
17
1
26
3
Pto. Baquerizo
Moreno
20
8
LOS ILINIZAS ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
25
COTACACHI CAYAPAS ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
6
EL ÁNGEL ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
27
PULULAHUA GEOBOTANICAL RESERVE
28
PASOCHOA WILDLIFE RESERVE
29
ANTISANA ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
30
EL BOLICHE NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
31
COTOPAXI NATIONAL PARK
32
CHIMBORAZO FAUNA PRODUCTION RESERVE
33
CAJAS NATIONAL PARK
34
YACURI NATIONAL PARK
35
QUIMSACOCHA NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
PODOCARPUS NATIONAL PARK
37
LLANGANATES NATIONAL PARK
38
SANGAY NATIONAL PARK
39
CAYAMBE COCA NATIONAL PARK
CUYABENO FAUNA PRODUCTION RESERVE
41
LIMONCOCHA BIOLOGICAL RESERVE
42
YASUNÍ NATIONAL PARK
43
EL ZARZA WILDLIFE REFUGE
44
COFÁN BERMEJO ECOLOGICAL RESERVE
45
SUMACO NAPO-GALERAS NATIONAL PARK
46
EL CÓNDOR BIOLOGICAL RESERVE
47
EL QUIMI BIOLOGICAL RESERVE
48
CERRO PLATEADO BIOLOGICAL RESERVE
39
Quito
O
28
Sto. Domingo
N
24
15
30
E
S
40
45
31
29
Latacunga
Portoviejo
12
41
Francisco
de Orellana
Tena
37
42
Ambato
32
4
Guaranda
23
13
9
Santa Elena
11
Riobamba
38
Babahoyo
21
10
Puyo
19
Guayaquil
5
Macas
Perú
22
33
Pacific Ocean
35
7
Azogues
Cuenca
Machala
47
14
43
AMAZON
40
Nueva Loja
27
0o
ANDES - AMAZON
36
44
Ibarra
ANDES
26
Tulcán
25
COAST - ANDES
24
Colombia
Esmeraldas
Zamora
Loja
36
100 km
34
46
MAP of
NATURAL HERITAGE SITES
Patrimonio de Áreas Naturales del Estado, PANE
48
3
Chimborazo, a colossus
20 kilometers in diameter.
Chimborazo
Fauna Production
Reserve
Graceful vicuñas
graze the mountain
closest to the sun
The immense volcano, revered
by locals since ancient times,
is visible from the Ecuadorean
coast, more than 400 kilometers
away. As it is the point farthest
from the center of the earth, its
icy peaks are closer to the sun
than any other place on earth.
T
he normal way of determining an
elevation is to calculate its distance
above sea level, but if we measure instead from the center of the Earth, Chimborazo
is the highest elevation in the world. This is
because our planet widens at the equator
and flattens at the poles. Our great mountain,
located very close to the equator, is in this way
higher than Mt. Everest. But Chimborazo is
more than a geographical oddity; its history,
culture, and natural environment make it an
awe-inspiring destination.
4
The huge snowcapped mountain stands at
6,310 meters in the middle of a relatively low
mountain range. To the north is another snowy
volcano called Carihuairazo (5,116 masl). On
a clear morning, the enormous white cap of
Chimborazo can be seen from Guayaquil on the
coast and from various points along the Andean
range. Its meltwaters nourish the páramos (high
mountain plains located between 3,000 meters
and the glacial limit) as well as the surrounding
Land of counterpoints: while
the plains below the volcano
are quite dry, the ice and
snow atop the mountain
provide water to adjacent
areas. Likewise, the brittle,
rocky slopes of Chimborazo
contrast with the smooth
plains in El Arenal.
Biodiversity and endemic species in CFPR
CFPR
% of
Ecuador / no.
% of
no. of species endemism of species national total
Flora
220
50%
15,306
1.5%
Mammals
17
n/d
380
4.5%
Birds
60
n/d
1,616
3.7%
Amphibians
11
n/d
464
2.4%
Source: Freile, 2009. * These figures are, of necessity, estimates and subject to change.
5
The Andean wolf, Ecuador’s
largest wild canid.
The ecosystems of
Chimborazo Reserve
High-mountain evergreen forest: actually
the lowest part of the páramo, populated
by low shrubs and trees native to these
altitudes; herbaceous páramo: the
typical tall-grass páramo, blended with
shrubs and small wetlands; dry páramo:
characteristic of Chimborazo, especially
on the western slope, with sandy soil,
tall grasses, and small bushes; and
gelidophyta: meaning “plants of the
ice” found in the highest zones close to
the glaciers; they include grasses and
sparse, resistant shrubs.
C H I M B O R A ZO IN BRIEF
L o c ati o n : Riobamba county (Chimborazo
province), Mocha and Ambato (Tungurahua)
and Guaranda (Bolívar)
A re a : 58,560 hectares
Altitude range: 3,200 to 6,310 masl
Te m p er a tu r e r a n g e: 0 to 10 ºC
Ne a r b y s ettl emen t s: Guano,
Guaranda, Riobamba and Ambato
Established in: 1987
communities, which use it for irrigation, energy,
and drinking water. The Guayas River, which
ends in Guayaquil, begins on Chimborazo. Both
the river and the mountain are represented in
the Ecuadorean national coat of arms.
Chimborazo Fauna Production Reserve
encompasses the area surrounding the volcano in the central Andean provinces of
Chimborazo, Tungurahua, and Bolívar. The
Reserve promotes the conservation and reproduction of wildlife, specifically vicuña and
other camelids, Andean relatives of the camel.
The plains surrounding the volcano –curiously
dry– are a habitat similar to the Peruvian and
Bolivian highlands that vicuñas prefer. Herds
of vicuña have adapted to the environment in
Chimborazo and are a major attraction there. In
the ring around the volcano, within and outside
of the Reserve, live indigenous communities
Vicuñas, like llamas and
alpacas, are relatives of the
camel. Unlike their cousins,
vicuñas only live in wild herds
and are difficult to domesticate.
that are heir to an ancient culture. Today, these
communities are linked to the Reserve through
their agriculture, work raising alpacas and
llamas for wool, and community tourism.
The climate in the Reserve is cold, from the
peak of the volcano through the páramos and to
the Andean forests (3,200 meters). The páramos
are semi-arid because they are far from the rain
source: the eastern clouds. Their dryness contrasts with the moistness characteristic of most
of Ecuador’s páramos. The western zone of the
Reserve, known as El Arenal, is particularly dry,
as Chimborazo’s own great mass creates a “rain
shadow,” preventing clouds from the Amazon
from advancing further west.
Getting to the Reserve is easy. The
highway that connects Ambato to Guaranda
passes by it. To enter the habitat of the vicuñas
and approach the volcano, take the road that
begins at kilometer 56 (from Ambato). From
Riobamba, the Reserve can be reached via
the road to San Juan. From this route, take
the road to the volcano; along the way, one
can visit communities, observe vicuñas, and
enjoy the landscapes.
7
Rayo Pamba
Salhuaycu
Cochapamba
Montalvo
Bla
n
Peñas Negras
co
PROVINCE OF
TUNGURAHUA
Tisaleo
Callanarumi
Pachancho
Rumicorral
Yuracsha
To
A m b at
Huañuna
Santa Lucía
o
bat
Am
Yanahurcu
o
Quinchicoto
Cununyacu
Natahuapamba
nas
Sali
Verde Pungu
C
Mechahuasca
am
N
ba
12 de Octubre
(5 060 m)
Carrel refuge
E
añ
os
O
Whymper refuge
Chimborazo
6 310 m
S
To
B
To Guara
nd
a
Huangaló Alto
Mo
ch
a
iob
Cap
ad
To R
ía
Mocha
o
rad
olo
Cruz de
El Arenal
PROVINCE OF
BOLIVAR
Carihuairazo
5 020 m
city
village
interest site
Panam. Highway
main road
(4 850 m)
access to
Reserve
Chorrera
Pulinguí San Pablo
San Juan
Siche Chico
Cuatro Esquinas
Chimborazo
Quindigua Alto
Campanaloma
secondary road
river
province limit
railway
Reserve limit
summit
San Rafael
Cochapamba
Pucará Pamba
Pical Chico
Elevation
El Tejar
Padre Rumi
o
an
Gu
Moya
Santa Isabel
Guabo
0
FAUNA PRODUCTION RESERVE MAP
a
b
PROVINCE OF
CHIMBORAZO
Nitilvisa
Queseras
CHIMBORAZO
am
San Antonio
Guaranda
8
Cachipamba
Ayaloma
iob
El Erazo
R
To
Illang
am
a
Murachaca
Sources: ETI, 2011; Jarvis, 2008; MAE, 2011
Credits: S. Crespo, P. Cabrera, X. Cordovez
Ecuador Terra Incognita
2.5
5
10 km
9
In the shadow of Chimborazo thrives
a culture that has learned to live on
the resources of the páramo.
Faces and
traces
Indigenous
communities
brave the rugged
surroundings of
the ice giant
From time immemorial,
Chimborazo has challenged
people from near and far;
travelers have tried to reach its
summit in centuries past, fighting
the cold and the snow, and, today,
the fragile páramos shape daily
life for the local populations.
C
himborazo Fauna Production Reserve
occupies part of the territory of the
Puruháes, ancient inhabitants who
tenaciously opposed the Incan invasion
five centuries ago. Subsequent rule by
the Spanish and mestizos weakened their
legacy, but this population, historically
marginalized, has undergone an important
process of cultural revitalization and selfdetermination. Many communities speak
Kichwa, which, even though it was the
language imposed upon them by the Incas
in the 15th century, is the tongue linked
to their identity. Characteristic names
10
of local sites like Puñalica, Tisaleo, and
Chibuleo bear witness to the Puruhá legacy.
The numerous indigenous communities
of Chimborazo are an example of people who
struggle but thrive in a vast, inclement environment. One peculiar local profession is that
of the icemen, who with a great deal of determination climb up to Chimborazo’s glaciers to
chip off chunks of ice to carry down and sell
in villages in the valleys.
Chimborazo dominates the landscape and is a
source of spirituality across the region. It figures
into the rites of the indigenous communities,
which emphasize that human beings are part of
and connected to their natural environment.
11
The roots of the name “Chimborazo”
are lost in history; it is said that its origin is
Puruhá or Kichwa, but it has also been linked
to the ancient cultures of Chimú, from the
area that is currently the north of Peru, as
well as Tsáchila, from the group of the same
name that today is settled in Pichincha. The
meanings attributed to “Chimborazo” range
from “snowy hill” to “protective shade.” In
Kichwa, chimpa means “the other side” and
rasu means “snow;” thus it has been suggested that the name means “snow from the
other side” (perhaps because of the mythical
relationship to Mama Tungurahua, the volcano on the other side of the mountain range),
or possibly “snowy crossing.”
It is possible to spend a workday with
someone who still practices the centuriesold profession of retrieving ice from the
glaciers of Chimborazo (see page 23).
Legend has it that Chimborazo
and Carihuairazo –both males of
great stature– fought for the love
of Tungurahua, the temperamental
female nearby. Chimborazo
won after a fierce battle, and
Carihuairizo, heartbroken,
collapsed into its current shape.
Endless curiosity about “the giant
of the earth”
Before the Himalayas were explored at the
beginning of the 20th century, Chimborazo was
considered the tallest mountain on earth and
one of the most difficult to climb. This turned the
volcano into a mecca for important expeditions.
Names of famous naturalists and travelers such
as Meyer, Humboldt, the Carrel brothers and
Whymper –who became the first ones to reach
the summit in 1880– are closely associated
with the colossal mountain. Even Simón Bolívar
was overcome by its presence and asked himself in his well-known work My Delirium on
Chimborazo: “And will I not be able to tread on
the grey hair of the giant of the earth?”
Much research has been conducted on the
area of the current Reserve since then. Recently, attention has been focused on a project
to reintroduce camelids for the use of nearby
communities. The alpacas, llamas, and vicuñas
seem to feel very comfortable in this landscape,
although the goal of generating alternatives for
the local people through the sustainable use of
these animals –mainly producing high-quality
fibers– has yet to come to fruition.
12
A Chimborazo Hillstar,
endemic to the central
13Andes.
Ecuadorean
N
Rayo Pamba
information
Cochapamba
lodging
Bla
n
Callanarumi
Huanuña
Amb
Yuracsha
lookout point
Rumicorral
as
lin
Sa
camping
PROVINCE OF
TUNGURAHUA
Cunuyacu (hot spring)
o
at
horseback riding
Tisaleo
comunitary
tourism
Pachancho
restaurant
E
S
co
Peñas Negras
archaeological
area
To
Am
ba
to
O
Natahuapamba
Cruz del Arenal
Whymper
refuge
refuge
hot spring
Quindigua Alto
To
G
handicraft
Hermanos
Carrel refuge
access to
Reserve
Chorrera
fauna
San Juan
Pucará Pamba
Campanaloma
Ice mine
Templo Machay
Panam. Highway
Pical Chico
iob
Riobamba-Guaranda: 61 km
Padre Rumi
To
R
Ambato-Guaranda: 99 km
Ambato-Reserve: 96 km
Guaranda
Riobamba-Reserve: 99 km
PROVINCE OF
CHIMBORAZO
TOURISTIC MAP OF
Guayaquil-Reserve: 282 km
Ayaloma
CHIMBORAZO
Cachipamba
a
Riobamba
railway
province limit
river
summit
Murachaca
mb
Quito-Reserve: 207 km
14
main road
secondary road
trail
protected area
ba
Rio
To
Guaranda-Reserve: 48 km
village
interest site
San Rafael
Gu
an
Inca Fortress
o
Ambato-Riobamba: 52 km
Solitary Tree
Chimbo
razo
Pulinguí San Pablo
Ambato
Chimborazo
6 310 m
s
Ca
pa
Moc
ha
ua
forest
día
ño
flora
climbing
ra
nd
a
panoramic view
Carihuairazo
5 020 m
Ba
excursion
Mocha
To
tourist cycling
Verde Pungu
PROVINCE
OF BOLÍVAR
am
ba
volcano
ado
lor
Co
bird
watching
Santa Isabel
FAUNA PRODUCTION RESERVE
Moya
Nitilvisa
Sources : ETI, 2011; Jarvis et al., 2008; MAE, 2011
Credits: Esteban Garcés y Ximena Cordovez
Ecuador Terra Incognita
Chimborazo (6,310 meters above sea level).
Not to be
missed
The Volcano Chimborazo
Excursions through clouds and snow
R
eaching the summit of Chimborazo
requires thorough preparation, as
the ascent is long and entails demanding
passages; moreover, the rarefied air can
cause altitude sickness. The lower refuge
or Carrel Brothers refuge (4,800 masl) is
accessible by automobile or by foot from
the Guaranda-Riobamba highway. From
there, a hike of about two hours brings
you to the Whymper refuge (5,000 masl).
In order to continue to the summit, the
Whymper route is the most advisable; in
eight hours you can reach the Veintimilla
summit (6,270 masl) or, in one more hour,
the Whymper summit (6,310 masl). The
best time to climb the volcano is between
December and February; during the dry
months (June-August) you will not find
much snowfall, but the strong winds can
be daunting.
16
17
El Arenal
Mountaineering animals and
plants
T
he rugged plains of Chimborazo are
ideal for observing plants and animals
adapted to the cold climate, intense isolation, and drastic temperature changes: dense
fur to trap heat, glossy leaves to reflect the
intense ultraviolet light, deep roots to search
for water, large lungs to compensate for the
lack of oxygen... On the western slopes of the
Reserve, extreme water scarcity is added to
all the other challenges. One inhabitant is the
“hibernating” hummingbird –the Chimborazo
hillstar– that lowers its metabolic rate almost
to nothing during the coldest hours; in the
páramo, it is as if it were summer every
morning and winter every evening. Certain insects appear only when the sun goes
down, but the extreme cold still has not set in.
Species that stand out among the abundant
plants are flowers with curled petals to keep
out the cold and retain moisture. Birds like
the carunculated caracara live together with
rabbits, wolves, and lizards, and the Andean
condor flies over the plains.
The cliffs of San Juan offer
numerous rock-climbing routes.
Pulunguí San Pablo and
Chorrera Mirador
Herds of vicuñas brought in
from the south
W
ith one of the finest and most
delicate coats in the world, vicuñas
are the most graceful members of the
18
Andean camelid family, which also
includes alpacas and llamas. Unlike
their docile relatives, vicuñas are very
difficult to domesticate. Their presence
in Chimborazo –they were brought in from
Perú– is an indisputable attraction for
the tourist. The communities of Pulunguí
San Pablo and Chorrera Mirador are ideal sites for enjoying the elusive vicuñas,
diverse crops, sheep, guinea pigs, and
Conjectures about Chimborazo’s name are multiple.
One of the most accepted, traces it to the Kichwa
words chimpa, which signifies “beyond”, and rasu,
for “snow”. The volcano’s name, therefore, would
mean something like “snow-covered crossing”.
19
for participating in community-based
tourism. Visitors can also take part in
ancient celebrations such as tarpuy, a
sowing ritual in September, or murut
anday, a harvesting ritual at the beginning of the year. Both communities
are along the route to the refuge of the
Carrel brothers.
IN THE SURROUNDING AREA
Salinas de Bolívar
Ancient mines and new endeavors
T
o the west of the Reserve, the people
of Salinas are well-known for their
community-based agroindustrial projects. The name comes from the salt
mines that have been active since the
times of the Puruhá (about 850 A.D.).
Before the dawn of the sea-salt industry, mines were salt’s only precious
source, but the dynamic salt market
declined just as the local inhabitants
gained ownership of the mines. These
days, the town thrives on the production
of other goods such as dairy products,
cured meats, and mushrooms.
One can travel to Salinas by bus from Guaranda.
Take a bus (US$ 1) or pickup truck (US$ 5) from the
Plaza Roja. Another point of access is El Empalme. In
Salinas, visitors can appreciate the ancient mines and
modern operations (US$ 3), as well as take fascinating
hikes through the surrounding páramos.
20
Rock climbing at the cliffs of San21
Juan.
Things to do
Hikes and thermal baths
in Cunuyacu
E
ven though Chimborazo is not considered
an active volcano, the persistent volcanic
forces in the region make it possible to enjoy thermal baths such as those in Cunuyacu
(3,600 meters above sea level). Near the
thermal baths, visitors can take hikes in a
landscape dominated by the great mass of
rock and ice. The vegetation is typical of the
páramos that cover much of the Reserve,
but there are also small forests, especially of
yahuales or “paper trees.” The tree has unusual bark that resembles crumpled sheets
of reddish paper as well as twisting branches
that evoke forests of fairy tales.
Coming from Riobamba along the road
to San Juan, take the old road to Ambato for
11 kilometers. There is a sign on the left that
points to the road to the baths. Other dry páramos
border this road and the Riobamba-Guaranda and
Ambato-Guaranda highways. From the RiobambaGuaranda road, one can access the refuge and
nearby communities. From the west side, visitors
can enter Urbina, just before arriving to Riobamba
from the north. Here, a signposted highway
goes to the old train station (currently Posada La
Estación) and the sloping páramos, with views of
the volcanoes Altar and Tungurahua.
www.cordtuch.org.ec / www.altamontana.net
22
View of Chimborazo from the slopes of Carihuairazo
(5,116 meters above sea level).
Excursions by foot, on horseback,
and by bicycle, and communitybased tourism
I
n the parish of San Juan, outside of
Riobamba, one can observe everyday
community life and enjoy lookout points with
spectacular views of Chimborazo and the
rest of the mountain range. The location offers hikes, horseback rides, spiritual activities,
biking, mountain climbing, and observation of
native wildlife. Some sites to visit include the
lonely tree (a large, isolated kishwar among
the grasslands), a polylepis forest, the thermal
baths of Cunuyacu, and the Machay temple (a
rock formation where rituals are performed).
The Casa Cóndor inn, managed by its host
community, offers crafts and traditional dishes.
This community is located on the 37th
kilometer on the highway from Riobamba to
Guaranda. Various bus companies depart every
hour from Riobamba’s terminal for Guaranda
(US$ 1). The trip takes about an hour. Travelers
must pay attention to be let off at the bus stop
in Pulunguí San Pablo.
More information: Casa Cóndor
(08) 795 4899 / www.cordtuch.org.ec
Meals, US$ 5 per person; lodging, US$ 12
a night per person. The price of tours depends
on the selected activities, length of stay, and the
number of visitors.
Visiting the ice mines
A
strange, moving story is that of
the people who used to climb to
Chimborazo’s glaciers to chip off chunks of
ice for the settlements of the valley and, for a
time, transported the ice to the coast. These
tough workers removed large blocks of ice
with pickaxes and shovels and covered them
with straw so they would arrive intact to their
destinations. In Riobamba, it is actually still
possible to find shaved ice and juice made
with ice brought down from Chimborazo on
the back of a donkey. These days, this ageold activity is carried out by only one person:
Don Baltasar Ushca. Tourists can directly
witness his work; the adventure to the mines
includes meals, lodging, and transportation
from and to Riobamba. It is essential to bring
warm clothing, snow goggles, and sunblock,
and to be in good physical condition since
the mines are at an altitude of almost 5,000
meters. The weather is highly variable, so
trekkers must be prepared for rain even
when the sun is shining.
These excursions are organized by the
community enterprise Puruhá Razurka, whose
office is located in Riobamba (Av. Conónigo
Ramos, ciudadela Los Álamos, block E, House
6; go after lunch). Transportation is provided
to a point close to the mines; from there,
tourists reach their destination after a hike of
approximately two hours.
Puruhá Razurku (03) 260 6774 / 098 179 0109
Up to four passengers, US$ 127 per
person; from five to nine passengers, US$ 92
per person; more than ten passengers,
US$ 63 per person.
23
Enjoying a warm respite in the Carrel
Brothers refuge (4,800 masl).
Getting there
Transportation
A good base of operations from which to
explore the Reserve is the city of Riobamba,
which can be reached via the Pan-American
Highway that connects various Andean cities. From Guayaquil, take the Pallatanga
road that joins the Pan-American Highway
south of Riobamba. In Quito, the Andina,
Chimborazo, Condorazo, Ecuador Ejecutivo,
Patria Riobamba, Riobamba Express, and
Transvencedores bus companies depart
from Quitumbe bus terminal from 3:00 a.m.
to 8:30 p.m. The trip takes about four fours
and costs approximately US$ 5.
Safety and health
• Take precautions against the cold and high
altitude, especially when doing climbing activities. Even the lowest parts of the Reserve
are at an altitude above 4,000 meters; as
such, it is important to acclimate oneself
before the trip.
• To hike to the glacier, it is essential to hire
professional guides who know how to find
their bearings along the glacier.
• Lemon balm tea can ease the effects of
altitude sickness.
• Hikers must be prepared with warm
clothing, including a hat and gloves, but
also be prepared to remove some items
during the day, when the heat can be
24
intense. They should use hiking boots
for traversing irregular surfaces as well
as snow goggles.
• Because of the intensity of ultraviolet
rays even on cloudy days, it is essential to
use sunblock.
• While there are not poisonous plants
or animals near Chimborazo, visitors
should always take care not to eat unfamilar wild fruits or hurt themselves on
sharp or spiky leaves.
• It is recommended that hikers carry
durable bottles or canteens with plenty of
water and avoid using disposable plastic
bottles.
• In general, the weather in the Reserve
is highly unpredictable, and visitors should
be prepared for sun, rain, fog, and even
snow every day.
When to visit
Even though the ecosystem of the Reserve
is considerably dry, there are occasionally
strong rains, occurring ever more unpredictably. Theoretically, the best time to
visit is the dry season (June to September)
and the dry period near the end of the
year. Additionally, the dry period coincides
with local harvests and the beginning
of the year with planting, which makes
these dates good times for participating in
community activities.
Sustainable tourism tips
• The páramo is a particularly fragile
ecosystem, even more so in the dry
conditions on Chimborazo. Thus, visitors must be very careful with trash and
fires. Regarding trash, we must not leave
any trace of our presence; it is essential
to collect all waste and carry it with us
out of the park. Regarding fires, they
should only be built in marked areas and
must be completely extinguished before
moving on.
• It is prohibited to take anything away
from the Reserve except for photographs,
memories, and of course purchases or
gifts from the communities.
• Walking should only be done on marked
trails, as highland vegetation can take
hundreds of years to regenerate.
Entrance to all PANE continental
protected areas is free for
residents and foreigners.
Money matters
In Riobamba, it is possible to use credit cards
at many establishments, and there are banks
and ATMs in the city center. Payments for various activities can be made via telephone or
online. Cash is needed for all transactions in
the smaller communities. Transportation must
almost always be paid for in cash.
Important contact information
- 1 800 TURISMO (1 800 887 476)
- Chimborazo Reserve:
(03) 261 0029 ext. 103
- Ministry of Tourism, Riobamba:
(03) 294 1213
- Bus terminal, Riobamba:
(03) 296 2005
- Hospital, Riobamba: (03) 296 1386
- Police, Riobamba: (03) 294 2811
25
Directory
Lodging
address
reference price
Riobamba
Activities
2. Horseback riding
3. Guided hikes
6. Cultural tourism
Riobamba
Altar Climbing
099 424 6504
[email protected]
www.altarclimbing.com
1 3 4 5 6
Ciclo Tours
(03) 295 1759
[email protected]
4
Expediciones Andinas
(03) 236 4279
099 973 3646
www.expediciones-andinas.com
1 3 5 6
Julio Verne
(03) 296 3436 / 099 416 7350
[email protected]
www.julioverne-travel.com
3 4 5
Puruhá Razurku
(03) 260 6774
www.puruharazurku.com
2 3 4 5 6 7
26
category
Prices are per guest and include breakfast and taxes unless otherwise indicated.
Tour Operators
1. Camping
contact
Hostería Cerro Blanco
4. Biking
5. Hiking and climbing
7. Community tourism
Soultrain Expeditions
(03) 296 2696
099 803 8958
www.facebook.com/pages/soultrain-expeditions/257048074313
3 4 6
Ecuadorean Alpine
Institute
(02) 256 5465
[email protected]
www.volcanoclimbing.com
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Veloz Expeditions
(03) 296 0916
[email protected]
www.velozexpeditions.com
1 3 5 6
Positiv Turismo
(02) 600 9401
[email protected]
www.positivturismo.com
3 4 5 6
Guaranda
Blue Bird
(03) 298 4910
3 5 6
Quito
Ecoandes Travel
Andesadventure
(02) 222 0892
[email protected]
www.ecoandestravel.com
1 2 3 4
Palmarvoyages
(02) 256 9809
[email protected]
3 4 6
Terranova Trek
(02) 225 3327
[email protected]
2 3 5 6
Kleintours
(02) 226 7000
[email protected]
www.kleintours.com.ec
3 5 6 7
Surtrek
(02) 250 0530
[email protected]
www.surtrek.com
2 3 4 5 6
Rumipamba km 19
16
(03) 293 3217
second
Hotel Montecarlo
10 de Agosto 25-41 and García Moreno
22
(03) 295 3204
[email protected]
www.hotelmontecarlo-riobamba.com
first
Albergue Estrella del Chimborazo
Comunidad Pulinguí San Pablo
26 for a double room
(03) 296 4915
first
Hostería Rosaspamba
Sector Rosaspamba, plot 3, Quisintol
30
(03) 296 8403
first
Hotel Chimborazo Internacional
Los Nogales and Argentinos
43
(03) 296 3474 / 296 3475
[email protected]
www.hotelchimborazo.net
first
Hotel El Molino
Duchicela 4213 and Unidad Nacional
61
(03) 294 1372 / 294 2232
[email protected]
www.hotelelmolino.com.ec
first
Hostal Mansión Santa Isabella
José Veloz 2848, between Carabobo
and Magdalena Dávalos
55
(03) 296 2947
[email protected]
www.mansionsantaisabella.com
first
Guano
Hostería Quinta Aidita
Marcos Montalvo 919, San Roque
54
(03) 290 1727
[email protected]
www.hosteriaquintaaidita.com.ec
first
Hostería Hacienda La Andaluza
Vía Riobamba – Ambato, km 16
54 - 71
(03) 294 9370
[email protected]
www.hosteriaandaluza.com
first
Guaranda
Hotel Los Espejos
García Moreno and 7 de Mayo
17 (does not include breakfast)
(03) 298 1968
first
Hostal de las Flores
Pichincha 402 and Rocafuerte
25
(03) 298 4396
second
Hostería El Refugio
Via thermal baths, Salinas
28
(02) 973 1975
second
Hotel Tambo Libertador
Av. Guayaquil, across from the
regional transit authority
30
(03) 298 5999
www.facebook.com/
pages/Hotel-Tambo-ElLibertador/156586227687380
first
Hotel La Colina
Guayaquil 117 and Bellavista
40
(03) 298 0666
[email protected]
www.complejolacolina.com
second
Hotel Márquez
10 de Agosto w/n and Eloy Alfaro
17 (does not include breakfast)
(03) 298 1306
second
27
Below is a short list of some outstanding wildlife found in
Chimborazo. Given the extraordinary diversity in this area, it is, of necessity, an
incomplete list. Enjoy filling it in!
Mammals
Andean White-eared Opossum
Didelphis pernigra
Great Horned Owl
Bubo virginianus
Whorltail Iguana or Huagsa
Stenocercus guentheri
Band-winged Nightjar
Caprimulgus longirostris
Mountain lizard •
Pholidobolus montium
Haggard’s Leaf-eared mouse*
Phyllotis haggardi
Sparkling Violet-ear
Colibri coruscans
Plants
Unexpected Cotton Rat*
Sigmodon inopinatus
Ecuadorean hillstar •
Oreotrochilus chimborazo
Rabbit •
Sylvilagus brasiliensis
Stout-billed Cinclodes
Cinclodes excelsior
Devil Fingers
Huperzia crassa
Ecuadorean Small-eared Shrew*
Cryptotis montivaga
Tawny Antpitta
Grallaria quitensis
Small Big-eared Brown Bat
Histiotus montanus
White-tailed Shrike-tyrant
Agriornis andicola
Puma
Puma concolor
Páramo Ground-tyrant
Muscisaxicola alpinus
Andean fox or wolf •
Lycalopex culpaeus
Chiguanco Thrush
Turdus chiguanco
Llama •
Lama glama
Black Flowerpiercer
Diglossa humeralis
Alpaca •
Vicugna pacos
Blue-and-yellow Tanager
Thraupis bonariensis
Vicuña •
Vicugna vicugna
Golden-bellied Grosbeak
Pheucticus chrysogaster
White-tailed Deer
Odocoileus virginianus
Aquatic birds
St. John’s Wort
Hypericum laricifolium
Birds
Slate-coloured Coot
Fulica ardesiaca
Sunfo
Satureja nubigena
Andean Condor •
Vultur gryphus
Andean Teal
Anas andium
Lupine or Chocho
Lupinus bogotensis
Variable Hawk
Buteo polyosoma
Andean Gull
Larus serranus
Polylepis or Paper Tree •
Polylepis reticulata
Carunculated Caracara •
Phalcoboenus carunculatus
Amphibians and reptiles
Valerian
Valeriana microphylla
Andean Marsupial Frog*
Gastrotheca riobambae
Puya or Achupalla
Puya hamata
Chuquiragua •
Chuquiraga jussieui
Snow Frailejon
Culcitum nivale
Coordination, Ministry of Tourism: Mónica Burbano Montalvo and Liliam Figueroa
Revision, Ministry of Tourism: Undersecretaryship for Tourism Management, Undersecretaryship
for Tourism Promotion and Undersecretaryship for Information and Communication
Revision, Ministry of the Environment: National Biodiversity Directorate and Area Chief
Cat’s Ear or Achicoria
Hypochaeris sessiliflora
Deer’s Antlers
Halenia weddeliana
• ECOLAP and MAE, 2007. Guía del Patrimonio de Áreas Naturales Protegidas del Ecuador. ECOFUND / FAN / DarwinNet / IGM, Quito
• Ecuador Terra Incognita, 2010. Ecuador: Turismo en Áreas Protegidas. Ministerio de Turismo, Quito
• Freile, Juan Fernando, 2009. Reserva de Producción Faunística Chimborazo: guía interpretativa. Manuscript
• García, Emilia and Stephan G. Beck, 2006. Puna. In: Mónica Moraes, Benjamin Øllgaard, Peter Kvist, Finn Borchsenius and
Henrik Balslev (eds). Botánica Económica de los Andes Centrales. Universidad Mayor de los Andes, La Paz
• Hofstede, Robert, Pool Segarra and Patricio Mena (eds), 2005. Los Páramos del Mundo. IUCN Holanda/Ecociencia, Quito
• Mena, Patricio, Galo Medina and Robert Hofstede (eds), 2001. Los Páramos del Ecuador: Particularidades, Problemas y
Perspectivas. Proyecto Páramo / Abya Yala, Quito
This document may be cited as:
Ecuador Terra Incognita, 2012. Informative brochure for sustainable tourism in
Chimborazo Fauna Production Reserve. Ministry of Tourism / Ministry of the Environment, Quito
© Ministry of Tourism of Ecuador, 2012
Produced by:
re
s
* species endemic to Ecuador
• species mentioned in the text
ejemplar
ste
,p
or compár
ta
fav
l
Páramo grass •
Stipa inconspicua
Calamagrostis intermedia
References
uiere guar
da
Kishwar •
Buddleja incana
or
Robber Frog
Pristimantis spp.
Golden Eye or Ñachag
Bidens humilis
oq
in
Andean Lapwing
Vanellus resplendens
Pincushion or Almohadilla •
Azorella aretioides
Photo credits:
Pete Oxford and Reneé Bish (contents, 12:ice harvester);
José Cobo / Afuera Producciones (5, 20:climber); Robert Gibson (6);
Pete Oxford / Archivo Criollo (11); Murray Cooper / Archivo Criollo (13:hummingbird);
David Oleas (17); Patricio Hidalgo (18:cliff);
Bernard Francou (23); Andrés León (25)
o
Ecuadorean Rail
Rallus aequatorialis
Andean Horsetail
Equisetum bogotense
Series director: Andrés Vallejo
Editorial design and edition: Nadesha Montalvo
Texts: Patricio Mena
Design: Esteban Garcés
Photographic research: Martina Avilés and Alegría Acosta
Maps: Susana Crespo and Pablo Cabrera
Map coordination: Ximena Cordovez
English translation: Amanda Blewitt
Text revision: David Padgham
d
utearge
b
i
tr h
Dise of c
fre
CONSCIOUS TOURISM
Is Love for life
Conscious tourism is a life-transforming experience that leads to personal growth, making
us better human beings.
This new concept is based on principles of sustainability and ethics, and promotes peace,
friendship, respect, and love for life as the essence of tourism.
It is a pact to live together in a responsible, mutually respectful fashion, in communion with
tour agents from sending and receiving communities, the tourist, and the natural and
cultural heritage.
Conscious tourism is a living, dynamic concept in constant development. It is an experience
in giving and receiving.
El Telégrafo E7-58 and Av. de los Shyris
Av. 6 de Diciembre N59-161 and Manuel Zambrano
Quito-Ecuador
Telephone: (02) 399 9333

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